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The Maat Tarot Workbook

The Maat Tarot Workbook


A Simplified Guide to the Deck by Julie Cuccia-Watts
Corrine Kenner
The Ma'at Tarot Workbook is 2007 by Corrine Kenner. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be
used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever, including Internet usage, without written permission from
New Moon Trading Company, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles and
reviews.
The Ma'at Tarot deck is 2006 by Julie Cuccia-Watts. All rights reserved. Maat Tarot images may not be
used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever, including Internet usage, without written permission from
New Moon Trading Company.
First Edition
First Printing, 2007
ISBN 978-0-9755510-3-5
New Moon Trading Company
P.O. Box 555
Watertown WI 53094-0555
www.newmoontradingco.com
Printed in the United States of America
Buyers who download the electronic version of this guide may print one hard copy for their personal use.
All other reproduction prohibited.
Also by Corrine Kenner
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TheAncestralPathTarot
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Introduction
This guide will help you master the Maat Tarot, the groundbreaking new deck by artist Julie Cuccia-
Watts.
The Maat Tarot is a beautiful deck, and you can read the cards just as you would read any traditional
tarot deck. Once you understand the unique astrological foundation of the Maat Tarot, however, youll
add new layers of depth and dimension to your readings. Youll also experience a dramatic shift in the
way you think about the cards especially if youre familiar with traditional tarot and astrology.
The Maat Tarot is directly linked to one of the worlds most popular astrological tarot decks, the Thoth
Tarot by Aleister Crowley. Thoth was the ancient Egyptian god of wisdom. His wife Maat was the
goddess of justice.
Crowley designed the Thoth Tarot based on the principles of solar astrology. Fascinated by his system,
Cuccia-Watts designed the Maat Tarot as a feminine counterpart to the Thoth, but she based her work
on lunar astrology.
The switch is ingenious and its fitting. In myth and legend, the sun is usually assigned to male gods,
while female goddesses are linked with the moon.
The following pages will guide you, card by card, through the Maat Tarot. As you progress, youll learn
the basic structure and symbolism of the deck. Youll also discover how simple and satisfying Maat
Tarot readings can be.
Once youre comfortable with the fundamentals of the deck, youll probably want to refer to the official
guide to the cards the Maat Tarot book by Julie Cuccia-Watts. Its a comprehensive work that details
the full story behind the creation of the Maat Tarot. It also explains all of the symbols on the cards, and
retells the myths and legends associated with each image.
For now, if youre ready to begin, just turn the page.

The Central Focus: The World Card
The World is the consummate big picture card, and its the starting point for our study of the Maat Tarot.
In a typical astrological chart, the Earth is in the center, and the rest of the planets circle around it. In the
Maat Tarot, the World card is in the center. The other cards circle around it in rings, moving from general
concepts to specific details.
The World card depicts Gaia, the Great Mother, dancing through the universe.

The First Round: The Seasons
The earth revolves through four seasons a year. In the Maat Tarot, the four Ace cards correspond to the
four seasons, and they surround the World card.
The watery Cups correspond to spring, the season of love and procreation.
The earthy Coins correspond to summer, the season of growth and investment.
The fiery Swords correspond to autumn, the season of harvest.
The airy Wands correspond to winter, the season of introspection and healing.

The Second Round: The Cross-Quarter Days
The four seasons are marked by eight cross-quarter days the turning points on the Wheel of the Year.
A Major Arcana card is assigned to each one.

The Cross-Quarter Cards
The Major Arcana cards assigned to the cross-quarter holidays are some of the most celebratory cards in
the deck.
The Spring Equinox and the Fool
The Fool, the card of new beginnings, is assigned to the vernal equinox the
first day of spring, and a holiday of rebirth.
In the Maat Tarot, the Fool is Orion, dressed like a shaman but still wearing his
belt of seven stars. His companion is the faithful Dog Star, Sirius. Orion is a
prominent constellation, but its not part of the zodiac just as the Fool is a
prominent card, but it doesnt have a set place in the Major Arcana.
May Day and the Lovers
Historically, May 1 known as Beltaine was the day when love and sex were
free for the taking, and fertility was celebrated. During the festivities, lovers
reenacted the sacred union of the god and goddess.
In the Maat Tarot, two lovers embrace, surrounded by ribbons from a May Pole.
Its a card of love, attraction, and the union of opposites.
The Summer Solstice and the Sun
The summer solstice is the longest day of the year, when the sun is at its peak.
Traditional tarot decks typically depict the sun as a child. In the Maat Tarot, the
sun is an egg in the process of fertilization possibly as a direct result of the
Lovers May Day interaction.
Lammas, the First Harvest, and the Hanged One
By August 1, the cross-quarter date of Lammas, the first crops are ready for
harvest.
In the Maat Tarot, the Hanged One is an unborn child. Shes the seed that was
fertilized in the Sun card. Soon, shell be the fruit of her mothers labor.

The Autumn Equinox and the Tower
By September 22, the second harvest holiday of Mabon, most crops are cut
down and fields are burned. Days become noticeably shorter, and longer nights
lend themselves to introspection.
In the Maat Tarot, the Tower is an old, dead tree, struck by lightning. It will fall,
return to the earth, and make way for new life to rise up from its ashes.
Halloween and the Judgment Card
On Halloween traditionally called Samhain the veil between the worlds is
at is thinnest, and the spirits of the dead are free to walk among the living.
In the Maat Tarot, the Judgment card depicts a spirit rising up from the body of
Mother Earth. Other spirits hover near an ancient stone cairn, a monument to
the work and faith of previous generations. The card symbolizes the eternal life
of the spirit, as well as intervention from the spirit world.
The Winter Solstice and the Devil Card
December 21, the winter solstice, marks the shortest day of the year. The Maat
Tarot depicts the goddess of Yule giving birth to the sun, single-handedly
transforming darkness into light and spirit into matter.
The title of the card alludes to the fact that women have been both venerated
and demonized for their powers of creation.
Candlemas and the Wheel of Fortune
February 2, the cross-quarter holiday of Candlemas, is a celebration of light. In
some farming communities, the date also heralded the birth of lambs, so it was
known as Ewes Milk.
In the Maat Tarot, the Wheel of Fortune depicts the goddess Hera, who was
tricked into nursing her unfaithful husbands child, Hercules. She pushed the
baby away, but her milk had already started to flow. It sprayed across the
heavens, creating the lights of the Milky Way. In the background, a birth chart
symbolizes destiny and fortune.

The Third Round: The Lunar Months
The remaining 13 Major Arcana are organized by moon sign not sun sign, as you might expect. Each
one refers to a full moon in one of the zodiacs 12 signs.
Because there are 13 full moons in a calendar year, the Moon card itself serves as the Blue Moon. It slips
into the lineup whenever theres a calendar month with two full moons.

The Full Moons
In the Maat Tarot, the cards astrological assignments illustrate the qualities we can associate with the
moon moving through the signs.If youre used to sun sign astrology, this system will be new to you at first
but soon youll see the relevance of giving the month back to the moon.
A Note about the Lunar Calendar
In the Maat Tarot, the cards lunar assignments are calendar-based. While the moon does move through
all 12 signs in the course of a 28-day lunar month, its only full in each sign once a year.
Oddly enough, those full moons in each sign are directly opposed to the sun sign for the month. When the
sun is in Aries, for example, the new moon is in Aries, too. The full moon, however, takes place in Libra
six signs over, on the other side of the zodiac wheel.
Sun in New Moon in First Quarter in Full Moon in Last Quarter in
Aries Aries Cancer Libra Capricorn
Taurus Taurus Leo Scorpio Aquarius
Gemini Gemini Virgo Sagittarius Pisces
Cancer Cancer Libra Capricorn Aries
Leo Leo Scorpio Aquarius Taurus
Virgo Virgo Sagittarius Pisces Gemini
Libra Libra Capricorn Aries Cancer
Scorpio Scorpio Aquarius Taurus Leo
Sagittarius Sagittarius Pisces Gemini Virgo
Capricorn Capricorn Aries Cancer Libra
Aquarius Aquarius Taurus Leo Scorpio
Pisces Pisces Gemini Virgo Sagittarius

The Full Moon Cards
While were used to thinking of Aries as a sign of spring, the Aries full moon occurs in the fall, when the
sun is in Libra so thats where well begin our study of the full moon cards in the Maat Tarot.
Aries and the Emperor (September 22-October 22)
The Emperor is assigned to Aries, a sign of leadership and authority. In the
Maat Tarot, the Emperor is the ram-headed Egyptian god, Amun-Ra. Hes also
the Green Man, born every spring and sacrificed with the harvest each fall. He
leads his people into prosperity, and he forces them to plan and prepare for the
lean months of winter. Because the Green Man knows death, he loves life, and
the card symbolizes vitality. Whats more, the Green Mans experience has
given him the confidence to show his true colors. Like the autumn leaves that
surround him, those colors can only come to light when the green of youth
wears off.
Taurus and Death (October 23-November 22)
Traditionally, the Death card is a card of transition. In the Maat Tarot, the Death
card depicts a tomb where the spirits of the dead await their transition from
death to rebirth, and the goddess Cybele maintains the beat of life on her drum.
The setting is an actual tomb in Turkey, where archeologists found bull heads
a Taurus symbol mounted on the walls. At first, they assumed the heads
were symbols of male fertility. Later, they realized that the heads could also
symbolize female fertility, because each one is the shape and size of a full-term
uterus. The premise makes sense, considering that ancient people believed that
tombs would return the dead to the womb of Mother Earth.
Gemini and Strength (November 23-December 20)
Most Strength cards feature a human being and a wild animal. In the Maat
Tarot, the card features the Gemini-like Tufnut and Shu, the twin lions of
Egyptian mythology. Tufnut consumed the sun at the end of each day, and her
brother Shu who often assumed human form took it from her mouth and
replaced it in the sky each morning.
The card symbolizes courage, self-control, and the strength it takes to persevere
through the darkness of night.
Cancer and the Magician (December 21-January 19)
December 21 is the shortest day of the year, but this card celebrates the arrival
of the sun king the herald of spring. His mother is the Magician, who created
new life where none existed before.
Cancer is the sign of the transforming power of motherhood, and the Magician
card symbolizes our power to transform reality through conscious thought and
will.

Leo and the Chariot (January 20-February 18)
Leo is the sign of freedom and will two principles clearly expressed by the
movements of the sun and the moon. From our vantage point on earth, both
luminaries seem to spin along celestial wheels. While they travel in different
directions, their movements are balanced; neither forces its will upon the other.
Below, the image of the Sphinx and the Nile River mirror their heavenly
counterparts in the constellation Leo and the Milky Way.
The card represents the importance of balancing movement and power, to
ensure that everyone is free to follow his or her own path.
Virgo and the High Priestess (February 19-March 20)
Virgo is the sign of the virgin and in ancient Greece, all priestesses were
virgins, no matter how experienced they were in the ways of the world. They
were self-contained, self-possessed, and beholden to no one. In this version of
the card, a priestess has succumbed to the intoxicating fumes of a sacred fire.
She drifts, unconscious, through an alternate reality.
The card symbolizes our power to cast off the shroud of time and space, cross
the boundary between worlds, and embrace the mysteries of life.
Libra and Justice (March 21-April 19)
Justice is the goddess Maat, the inspiration for this deck. She was the patron of
truth, law, and universal order. She helped ensure predictability and regularity in
the cosmos. In the illustration, she weighs a mans heart against a feather, to
determine if he deserves everlasting life. She balances the scales that may
have inspired the classic imagery associated with Libra.
The card symbolizes balance and equanimity, both in a cosmic sense and in the
world of our everyday lives.
Scorpio and the Empress (April 20-May 20)
The Empress reminds us that love and sex lead to life not the sting of death
normally assigned to the Scorpions tail. She is the embodiment of fertility and
creativity: she is Mother Earth. The white dove is a symbol of spirit, ready to
descend into matter. The moon and stars that surround the Empress like a
lemniscate represent infinity.
The Empress card symbolizes the power of creation, as well as the beauty and
bounty of nature.

Sagittarius and the High Priest (May 21-June 20)
In the Maat Tarot, the High Priest is the Green Man, newly returned to life in the
season of spring. He is the Holy Father and the consort of the Great Mother.
Hes closely tied to nature and wildlife; he synthesizes the wisdom of spirit, and
he passes it along to his children.
Sagittarius is the sign of philosophy, long-distance travel, and higher education;
the card represents a great teacher who loves to broaden his students horizons
and stretch their world view.
Capricorn and the Hermit (June 21-July 22)
In the Maat Tarot, the Hermit is Ra, the ancient Egyptian god of the afternoon
sun. Like a Capricorn goat, he has climbed to the top of a mountain. From his
vantage point high above the earth, he can shed light on the rest of civilization.
In the background, an ancient earth figure depicts a serpent swallowing the light
of the sun.
The card symbolizes wisdom and leadership, along with the sense of isolation
that accompanies any position of power.
Aquarius and the Star (July 23-August 22)
The full moon in Aquarius coincides with the annual flooding of the Nile River. In
the Maat version of the card, the Egyptian god Hapy is pouring out the waters
of the Nile. Like the mythic water-bearer of the zodiac, he is reinvigorating the
desert and renewing the dreams and desires of those who live in the
surrounding valley.
The Star is a card of wishes, hope, and inspiration.
Pisces and Temperance (August 23-September 21)
The figure of Temperance represents two dark goddesses who held the power
to create and to destroy: Isis, who knew the secret name of Ra, and Lilith, who
knew the secret name of Yahweh. She balances her power by maintaining the
flow of energy between two vessels, which magically assumes the shape of the
Tigris and Euphrates Rivers the legendary birthplace of the mythic Pisces
fish.
The card symbolizes that balance of power, as well as the ongoing dialectic of
thesis, antithesis, and synthesis.

The Moon
While the Moon card in traditional tarot decks symbolizes reflection in the dark
of night, the Moon card in the Maat Tarot is imbued with additional power. Its a
wild card, ready to slip into place whenever we need to rectify the difference
between the Julian calendar and the lunar months.
The Blue Moon is also a reminder that time and the cycles of life flow
seamlessly as well as the fact that we sometimes misunderstand and
misinterpret those movements.
Now that all the Major Arcana cards have been put in their place on the wheel of Maat, we can turn our
attention to the cards of the Minor Arcana.

The Fourth Round: The Minor Arcana
Our study of the Maat Tarot opened with a broad view of the World our home base in the universe.
Like the planet Earth itself, we moved through the four seasons embodied in the Ace cards. We divided
those seasons into equinoxes, cross-quarter dates, and lunar months, and found a place for the Major
Arcana cards.
Now its time to find a place for the 56 cards of the Minor Arcana.
The process is straightforward. Because there are 52 weeks in a year, almost every Minor Arcana card
can be assigned to a week of its own. The moon spends a week moving from one phase to another, so
we can use those transitions to determine the placement of each card.
As you look through the structure of the Minor Arcana, youll probably notice that the Court Cards weave
in and out of the series of numbered cards. Thats because numbered cards are assigned to new and
quarter moons, but the all-important full moons are assigned to the prominent personalities of the King,
Queen, and Princess cards.
That leaves the Princes. In the Maat Tarot, they stand guard over the four cardinal points on the Wheel of
the Year the summer and winter solstice, and the spring and autumn equinox. Theyre each assigned a
full week on the calendar, to help ensure a smooth transition from one season to another.

Autumn and the Suit of Swords
In the fall, the days grow shorter, moving still further from light into darkness. That increasing darkness is
reflected in the order of the Swords cards, which increase in number from 2 to 10.

The First Month of Autumn: The Full Moon Cycle of Aries
Each year, between September 22 and October 22, the moon is full in Aries. Its other three phases occur
in the cardinal signs of Libra, Capricorn, and Cancer.
Z The Two of Swords
is associated with the
new moon in Libra. The
scissors and the
predatory wolf both
symbolize the culling of
the herd, a drastic
measure that ultimately
strengthens the breed.
c The Three of Swords
is associated with the
first quarter moon in
Capricorn. The image of
a crucified white dove
symbolizes the violence
done in the name of
religion, and the spiritual
heartbreak and death
that occur as a result.
z The King of Swords
is associated with the
full moon in Aries. He is
the wounded king who
sacrifices his life for his
people. In the Maat
Tarot, he is the risen
Christ, living in the guise
of Joseph of Arimathea.
C The Four of Swords
is associated with the
last quarter moon in
Cancer. The image is
the 5,000-year-old
Iceman found in the
Alps. He symbolizes our
connection to history
and the family of man.
The Second Month of Autumn: The Full Moon Cycle of Taurus
Between October 23 and November 22, the moon is full in Taurus. Its other three phases occur in the
fixed signs of Scorpio, Aquarius, and Leo.
Z The Five of Swords
is associated with the
new moon in Scorpio.
The card, which depicts
a couple of card sharps,
symbolizes deception
and lessons learned the
hard way.
c The Six of Swords is
associated with the first
quarter moon in
Aquarius. It represents
rescue and long-
distance travel to new
worlds.
z The Princess of
Swords is associated
with the full moon in
Taurus. She is Diana,
goddess of the hunt,
who kills only for
survival and takes only
what is freely given.
C The Seven of
Swords is associated
with the last quarter
moon in Leo. The figure
in the card wears the
mask of age and death,
suggesting that time is
the ultimate thief.

The Third Month of Autumn: The Full Moon Cycle of Gemini
Between November 22 and December 20, the moon is full in Gemini. Its other three phases occur in the
mutable signs of Sagittarius, Pisces, and Virgo.
Z The Eight of Swords
is associated with the
new moon in
Sagittarius. The card
illustrates cultural
blindness. Wrapped in
her patriotism, the
woman in the card cant
see the Sombrero
Galaxy above her.
c The Nine of Swords
is associated with the
first quarter moon in
Pisces. It suggests
dreams as one path
however strange and
unfamiliar to connect
with the spirit world.
z The Queen of
Swords is associated
with the full moon in
Gemini. She is a mystic
and a widow who has
learned to communicate
with those on the Other
Side.
C The Ten of Swords is
associated with the last
quarter moon in Virgo.
Its a card of betrayal
and backstabbing,
clearly illustrated by the
murder of Julius
Caesar.

Winter and the Suit of Wands
In the winter, the days begin to grow longer, moving back from darkness into light. That decreasing
darkness is reflected in the order of the Wand cards, which decrease in number from 10 to 2.

The First Month of Winter: The Full Moon Cycle of Cancer
Between December 21 and January 19, the moon is full in Cancer. Its other three phases occur in the
cardinal signs of Capricorn, Aries, and Libra.
Z The Ten of Wands is
associated with the new
moon in Capricorn. The
image of a woman
gathering wood hints at
the burden of karmic
debt.
c The Nine of Wands
is associated with the
first quarter moon in
Aries. The card depicts
Moses hidden in the
bulrushes, so he can
grow to fulfill his destiny.
z The Queen of Wands
is associated with the
full moon in Cancer.
She is a homemaker, a
wife and mother who
uses her gifts to ensure
that her family is clothed
and fed.
C The Eight of Wands
is associated with the
last quarter moon in
Libra. Its a card of
heartfelt messages and
communication.
The Second Month of Winter: The Full Moon Cycle of Leo
Between January 20 and February 18, the moon is full in Leo. Its other three phases occur in the fixed
signs of Aquarius, Taurus, and Scorpio.
Z The Seven of Wands
is associated with the
new moon in Aquarius.
The image of a
European fur trader
dealing with natives
depicts the benefits
and the dangers of
interacting with others.
c The Six of Wands is
associated with the first
quarter moon in Taurus.
The owl, who can hear
mice moving under the
snow, is a symbol of
perception.
z The King of Wands is
associated with the full
moon in Leo. He is John
Hancock, whose brash
signature set the tone
for a new nation of
independent spirits.
C The Five of Wands is
associated with the last
quarter moon in
Scorpio. Both chess
players are honing their
skills, but one day, the
student will outsmart his
master.

The Third Month of Winter: The Full Moon Cycle of Virgo
Between February 20 and March 20, the moon is full in Virgo. Its other three phase occur in the mutable
signs of Pisces, Gemini, and Sagittarius.
Z The Four of Wands
is associated with the
new moon in Pisces.
The log cabin
symbolizes the need to
put down roots. The
melting snow in the
garden serves as a
harbinger of spring.
c The Three of Wands
is associated with the
first quarter moon in
Gemini. Its a card of
learning: a teacher is
using a model of the
universe to pass along
complex ideas.
z The Princess of
Wands is associated
with the full moon in
Virgo. She is a
prepubescent girl,
unabashedly naked and
blissfully unaware of the
changes life has in store
for her.
C The Two of Wands is
associated with the last
quarter moon in
Sagittarius. In the card,
spring has just arrived,
and its even melting the
snow that lies in
shadow.

Spring and the Suit of Cups
In the spring, the days grow longer as they approach the summer solstice. The increasing light is
reflected in the order of the Cup cards, which increase in number from 2 to 10.

The First Month of Spring: The Full Moon Cycle of Libra
Between March 21 and April 19, the moon is full in Libra. Its other three phases occur in the cardinal
signs of Aries, Cancer, and Capricorn.
Z The Two of Cups is
associated with the new
moon in Aries. The
traditional wedding
ceremony symbolizes
marriage and
partnerships.
c The Three of Cups is
associated with the first
quarter moon in Cancer.
The card symbolizes
female friendship, and it
depicts the three
goddesses who spin the
wheel of fate.
z The Princess of
Cups is associated with
the full moon in Libra.
She is a virgin bride,
already committed to
her husband-to-be.
C The Four of Cups is
associated with the last
quarter moon in
Capricorn. It depicts the
faithful Lancelot refusing
the advances of four
bewitching queens, and
it symbolizes
disappointment.
The Second Month of Spring: The Full Moon Cycle of Scorpio
Between April 20 and May 19, the moon is full in Scorpio. Its other three phases occur in the fixed signs
of Taurus, Leo, and Aquarius.
Z The Five of Cups is
associated with the new
moon in Taurus. A
young girl grieves for a
wild rabbit that was
savagely attacked in her
garden. Its one of the
harsh realities that mar
the beauty of nature.
c The Six of Cups is
associated with the first
quarter moon in Leo.
The card, which depicts
children at a
Renaissance Festival,
symbolizes nostalgia
and happy childhood
memories.
z The Queen of Cups
is associated with the
full moon in Scorpio.
She is a new wife who
also happens to be
newly pregnant, and
she doesnt quite know
what shes gotten
herself into.
C The Seven of Cups
is associated with the
last quarter moon in
Aquarius. The card
depicts Narcissus, so in
love with his reflection
that hes unable to
make decisions or relate
to others.

The Third Month of Spring: The Full Moon Cycle of Sagittarius
Between May 20 and June 20, the moon is full in Sagittarius. Its other three phases occur in the mutable
signs of Gemini, Virgo, and Pisces.
Z The Eight of Cups is
associated with the new
moon in Gemini. It
illustrates spiritual
retreat, as well as the
need to move on when
relationships end.
c The Nine of Cups is
associated with the first
quarter moon in Virgo. A
young woman scatters
dandelion seeds to the
wind but she should
be careful what she
wishes for.
z The King of Cups is
associated with the full
moon in Sagittarius. He
is the bridegroom,
dressed like Bacchus,
the playful god of wine.
He toasts his bride with
his eyes and a goblet of
mead, a traditional
honeymoon gift.
C The Ten of Cups is
associated with the last
quarter moon in Pisces.
It depicts the happy
home of a couple that
has weathered storms
together.

Summer and the Suit of Coins
After the summer solstice, the days begin to grow shorter, moving gradually from light into darkness. The
decreasing light is reflected in the order of the Coin cards, which decrease in number from 10 to 2.

The First Month of Summer: The Full Moon Cycle of Capricorn
Between June 21 and July 22, the moon is full in Capricorn. Its other three phases occur in the cardinal
signs of Cancer, Libra, and Aries.
Z The Ten of Coins is
associated with the new
moon in Cancer. Its a
card of inheritance, both
physical and spiritual;
the man is thinking of
his family as he gazes
at the fountain of life.
c The Nine of Coins is
associated with the first
quarter moon in Libra. It
depicts the process of
gestation that precedes
any major achievement.
z The Queen of Coins
is associated with the
full moon in Capricorn.
She is a pregnant moon
goddess, fully capable
of attaining and using
her power.
C The Eight of Coins is
associated with the last
quarter moon in Aries.
The sculptor is
Michelangelo, a young
contemporary of
Leonardo da Vinci. He
represents artistic
tradition.
The Second Month of Summer: The Full Moon Cycle of Aquarius
Between July 23 and August 22, the moon is full in Aquarius. Its other three phases occur in the fixed
signs of Leo, Scorpio, and Taurus.
Z The Seven of Coins
is associated with the
new moon in Leo. The
card symbolizes group
effort, and the compass
pattern of the coins
represents direction.
c The Six of Coins is
associated with the first
quarter moon in
Scorpio. While the
young girl in the card
holds a present in her
lap, shes the real gift.
z The King of Coins is
associated with the full
moon in Aquarius. He is
the Egyptian god Osiris,
tricked by his brother
and trapped in a
jeweled coffin. The card
encourages us to think
outside the box.
C The Five of Coins is
associated with the last
quarter moon in Taurus.
Its a card of healing;
two petitioners at a
sacred site hope their
prayers and offerings
will result in miracles.

The Third Month of Summer: The Full Moon Cycle of Pisces
Between August 23 and September 21, the moon is full in Pisces. Its other three phases occur in the
mutable signs of Virgo, Sagittarius, and Gemini.
Z The Four of Coins is
associated with the new
moon in Virgo. It
represents thrift and
preservation: the
settlers in the card are
stocking their root cellar
with provisions for the
winter.
c The Three of Coins
is associated with the
first quarter moon in
Sagittarius. It depicts
Leonardo da Vinci, and
it symbolizes the
connection between
artists and the creator of
the universe.
z The Princess of
Coins is associated with
the full moon in Pisces.
While she feels young in
spirit, shes approaching
menopause. Like
Hecate at the
crossroads, she
anxiously awaits the
next phase of her life.
C The Two of Coins is
associated with the last
quarter moon in Gemini.
Its a card of balance. It
depicts an analemma
the figure 8 path of the
sun over Britains
Stonehenge. Ra, the
Egyptian god of the sun,
sails past the crossing
point in his sun boat.

The Prince Cards
In the Maat Tarot, the Prince cards stand guard over four cardinal points on the Wheel of the Year the
summer and winter solstices, and the spring and autumn equinoxes. They help ensure a smooth
transition between seasons.
The Prince of Swords
guards the week of the
autumnal equinox. He is
impulsive and
rebellious. He frequently
lashes out to protect
what he loves.
The Prince of Wands
guards the week of the
winter solstice. He is the
newborn sun of Yule,
who grows stronger with
every passing day.
The Prince of Cups
guards the week of the
vernal equinox. He is
the archetypal knight in
shining armor that
reflects only what others
want to see.
The Prince of Coins
guards the week of the
summer solstice. He is
the energetic builder of
an Egyptian temple.

The 78 Cards of the Maat Tarot
At last, we come to the conclusion of our journey through the Maat Tarot deck. All 78 cards are in place.
The cosmology is complete.
For more information about the Maat Tarot, visit www.newmoontradingco.com.

Frequently Asked Questions about the Maat Tarot
An interview with Julie Cuccia-Watts, creator of the Maat Tarot
Why is your deck called the Maat Tarot?
My deck is named after Maat, the ancient Egyptian goddess of
truth. The Egyptians believed that she was responsible for
ensuring that the cycles of the universe were regular, constant,
and predictable.
When I was working on the cards, the Maat name came to me
in a dream. I liked it instantly. I knew that Maat was the wife of
Thoth, the Egyptian god of magic and karma. I had always
admired the Thoth Tarot deck for its use of astrology and
planetary symbology, and I thought Maat would be a good way
to develop a similar deck from a female point of view.
As I learned more about Maat, I discovered that the name had
more meaning than I first realized. I learned that Maat may
have been the original model for the Justice card, and I learned
that she was the embodiment of cosmic balance and order.
I have to say she worked out great for changing the traditional
order of tarot
How long did it take you to develop the Maat Tarot?
I studied mythology, prehistoric cultures, and ancient calendar systems for years before I began my work
with tarot. In fact, I actually developed my first tarot deck, the Ancestral Path Tarot, simply to learn tarot.
As I painted that deck, starting in 1988, I had my first glimpses of a calendar-based tarot. I even
developed an Ancestral Path Wheel of the Year that assigned the Minor Arcana cards to the 52 weeks
of the year. I didnt know how to structure the Major Arcana, though, until I was commissioned to paint the
artwork for a lunar calendar. Then I started dreaming about the moon, and I started to make connections
between the wheel of the year, lunar astrology, and tarot.
In 1997, I used full moons and cross-quarter days as the basis for a Majors-only deck, the Blue Moon
Tarot. For me, that was the closure I needed for the Ancestral Path wheel of the year. Before long,
however, people who loved Blue Moon wanted to know when I would paint the Minor Arcana cards.
Eventually, I decided to go forward with an expanded version of the Blue Moon that would ultimately
become the Maat Tarot. For this new work, I assigned the Minors to moon phases, instead of calendar
weeks. After all, the quarterly moon phases had been the origin of our seven-day weeks in the first place.
All told, I suppose it took almost 20 years for the Maat Tarot to come to fruition as a completed deck. Im
still learning new ways to use the information, and Im still developing new ways to teach it to others.
In many of your classes and workshops, you note the importance of the number 13. Why is that?
When I was working on the lunar calendar, I started having dreams of the number 13. Thats when I
began to see a connection between the 13 full moons and 13 of the Major Arcana cards. It was a short
leap to assign the remaining nine cards to the eight cross-quarter days, with the World card in the center
of the calendar wheel.
Thats when I discovered that the entire deck could be broken down into six sets of 13 cards: 13 cards
based on the solar year, 13 cards based on the lunar cycle, and 13 weeks for each of the four seasons.
Coincidentally, the discovery of this system came to me on a Friday the 13th June 13, 1997.
So much for 13 being an unlucky number. In fact, Ive come to believe that 13 is a sacred number, hidden
in plain sight.

Why did you structure your deck around a Native American calendar?
The Maat Tarots calendar is not just Native American. Its a global calendar, and it was particularly
common among nature-based societies that kept track of time by watching the sky. Many cultures used
the calendar to dramatize the power of their leaders. They aligned their temples and staged ceremonies
to make it seem as though their pharaohs and priests could harness the power of the sun.
This calendar is still used today by Wiccans and neo-pagans, not to demonstrate their power but to align
their energy and activities with natural cycles.
To me, a nature-based calendar is a great way to keep my creative energy at a manageable level. I like to
structure my time based on the cycles of the moon. I schedule new beginnings for the new moon. As the
moon waxes toward full, those projects grow larger. I try to use the waning moon for completion and
healing.
Whether most people realize it or not, the cycles of the moon are still important to our society. We still
mark the cross-quarter days with holidays, and meteorologists still keep track of lunar movements and
seasonal patterns.
How did you know what to paint for each card?
I like to base my paintings on traditional tarot imagery, but I also like to use symbols that people
recognize on a subconscious level, and pictures that stir my emotions. Ive found that when Im moved,
other people will be moved, too.
The people who see my paintings experience a sudden impact, but for me, the images manifest
themselves in a controlled, gradual process. Observers dont get that buffer. Ultimately, I know what to
paint by how I feel when Im doing the work.
Do you ever worry about turning tarot tradition on its head?
At first I didn't want to tamper with something as special as tarot, but the more research I did, the more I
saw that I had just as much right to change the cards as anyone else did.
Historically speaking, there has never been a definitive version of the cards. In fact, tarot started out as a
fifteenth-century Italian card game. The earliest cards didn't have numbers or titles, and the only source
we have for the order of the cards comes from an old sermon that condemned gambling. For all we know,
the cleric who wrote that sermon could have been listing the cards at random.
Today, most tarot readers use astrological correspondences that the Golden Dawn developed a century
ago. They were the basis for the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, which was first published in 1909. Considering
the tarots 600-year history, though, that work is a relative newcomer, too.
Though I agree with some of the Golden Dawns astrological correspondences, many of them seemed
forced or just plain wrong. How could they have decided that Geminis twin brothers were lovers? For me,
thats a stretch. I was also bothered by Cancer as the Chariot. That never seemed to work for me at all. I
cant picture a vehicle of war as a symbol of the relationship between mother and child.
Maybe its arrogant for me to change those correspondences, but I think we should question authority
even spiritual authority if it doesnt feel like it aligns properly.
When I was designing the Maat Tarot, I decided it was time to give the months back to the moon. After
all, the moon originally determined the length of each month. I gave the cross-quarter days to the sun,
because theyre based solely on a solar cycle. Its a much better fit.
Its interesting to note that I didnt need to distort any of the cards symbolism to accommodate this
system. The lunar and solar correspondences all seemed to fall comfortably into place.
Why do you think tarot cards work?
I think tarot cards work because theyre subject to the same universal laws as everything else. Theyre
part of the whole system, which in my opinion is always working as one. Theres no belief required. In
fact, I never expect tarot cards to work. They just always do.

About the Artist
Julie Cuccia-Watts is the creator of three multicultural tarot decks: The Ancestral
Path Tarot (1996), the Blue Moon Tarot (1998), and the Maat Tarot (2006).
Julie is also the sole proprietor of New Moon Trading Co., which specializes in her
artwork, cards, and original paintings and posters. Julie has painted well over 250
original oil paintings over the past 20 years.
Julie's interests include all things paranormal and metaphysical, which she blends
with her interests in history, astrology, mythology, and experimental archeology.
Julie and her husband Peter live in Watertown, Wisconsin. They are the parents of
three grown children.
For more information about Julie Cuccia-Watts, visit www.newmoontradingco.com.
About the Author
Corrine Kenner is a certified tarot master and the award-winning author of eight
books and four anthologies, including the Epicurean Tarot, Simple Fortunetelling
with Tarot Cards, Tarot Journaling, Tall Dark Stranger: Tarot for Love and
Romance, Crystals for Beginners, and Strange But True. She has been an admirer
and student of Julie Cuccia-Watts work since 1999.
Corrine has lived in Brazil and Los Angeles, where she earned a bachelors degree
in philosophy from California State University. She now lives in Minneapolis,
Minnesota, where she teaches tarot classes and workshops on a regular basis. She
also offers tarot readings by appointment in her office near the Mall of America.
For more information about Corrine Kenner, visit www.corrinekenner.com.

The Mini Maat
You can cut these sample cards apart and use them for practice readings. To order a professionally
printed copy of the deck, made up of oversized, laminated cards, visit www.newmoontradingco.com.

The Mini Maat
You can cut these sample cards apart and use them for practice readings. To order a professionally
printed copy of the deck, made up of oversized, laminated cards, visit www.newmoontradingco.com.

The Mini Maat
You can cut these sample cards apart and use them for practice readings. To order a professionally
printed copy of the deck, made up of oversized, laminated cards, visit www.newmoontradingco.com.

The Mini Maat
You can cut these sample cards apart and use them for practice readings. To order a professionally
printed copy of the deck, made up of oversized, laminated cards, visit www.newmoontradingco.com.

The Mini Maat
You can cut these sample cards apart and use them for practice readings. To order a professionally
printed copy of the deck, made up of oversized, laminated cards, visit www.newmoontradingco.com.