These materials represent the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the

groups to which they were presented or any client or partner of vFluence Interactive Public Relations Inc. They may only be reproduced with the written permission of v-Fluence Interactive Public Relations. Footnotes and additional references are available upon request. All inquiries are welcomed at info@v-Fluence.com (877) 835-8362 ◊ Corporate Headquarters: general mail and deliveries to 4579 Laclede Ave #275, St. Louis, Missouri 63108 ◊ Visiting our headquarters offices – 356 North Boyle, 2nd Floor, St. Louis, Missouri 63108 ◊ Administrative, contracts and billing address: 7770 Regents Road, #113-576, San Diego, CA 92122 © v-Fluence Interactive Public Relations, Inc. 2013

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61% of mobile use spent on “mobile web” with 34% using apps. 172 million Americans using social media

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http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/1999/12/06/269931/ (Michael Dell goes social 1999) http://blog.sfgate.com/bronstein/2010/04/19/bill-gates-on-journalism-and-social-mediaand-the-ipad-too/ (Bill Gates goes social 2010) http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/6eed4810-b372-11e2-95b300144feabdc0.html#axzz2TTVRcu00/ (Warren Buffet goes social 2013) Video: Colbert Report: The Word - Great News Episode #03011

The free market has shown you no longer need a staff of credible, experienced journalists. Now, all you need is a camera phone and a live journal. (5:00) Tags: The Word, media, Wikipedia, John Edwards, Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Stone Phillips Aired: 01/24/2007

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Video: The Office, NBC “Creed Thoughts Blog” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQJGmjnc8LU

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800 to 500 BC – Abacus/ Counting Boards in use in Asia and Babylon 1500 – first watch (Germany) 1642 – France adding machine 1804 – First automate loom operated by punch cards 1888 – Burroughs adding machine with printer 1936 – Z1 Mechanical calculator 1943 – MIT Whirlwind computer 1974 – IBM 5100 series “personal computer” 2008 – Smart phone

800 to 500 BC – Abacus/ Counting Boards in use in Asia and Babylon 1500 – first watch (Germany) 1642 – France adding machine 1804 – First automate loom operated by punch cards 1888 – Burroughs adding machine with printer 1936 – Z1 Mechanical calculator 1943 – MIT Whirlwind computer 1974 – IBM 5100 series “personal computer” 2008 – Smart phone

800 to 500 BC – Abacus/ Counting Boards in use in Asia and Babylon 1500 – first watch (Germany) 1642 – France adding machine 1804 – First automate loom operated by punch cards 1888 – Burroughs adding machine with printer 1936 – Z1 Mechanical calculator 1943 – MIT Whirlwind computer 1974 – IBM 5100 series “personal computer” 2008 – Smart phone

800 to 500 BC – Abacus/ Counting Boards in use in Asia and Babylon 1500 – first watch (Germany) 1642 – France adding machine 1804 – First automate loom operated by punch cards 1888 – Burroughs adding machine with printer 1936 – Z1 Mechanical calculator 1943 – MIT Whirlwind computer 1974 – IBM 5100 series “personal computer” 2008 – Smart phone

800 to 500 BC – Abacus/ Counting Boards in use in Asia and Babylon 1500 – first watch (Germany) 1642 – France adding machine 1804 – First automate loom operated by punch cards 1888 – Burroughs adding machine with printer 1936 – Z1 Mechanical calculator 1943 – MIT Whirlwind computer 1974 – IBM 5100 series “personal computer” 2008 – Smart phone

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Wide_Web http://nymag.com/news/media/15971/ 1994- Linksnet Technology existence does not equal adoption – just because it exists doesn’t mean you need it.

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While many today focus on the latest whiz-bang application, it’s critical to acknowledge that people use the Internet with well researched and defined behaviors. Behaviors define the distinctions between Web 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0. These behaviors, which can significantly influence opinion and belief formation linked to actions, do not take place in the isolation of a single channel or tactic. An understanding of how traditional Web 1.0 behaviors such as search and e-mail are being extended to emerging Web 2.0 activities such as blogging, social networking, multi-media sharing and taking shape with ubiquity with Web 3.0 is the foundation for appropriate technology adoption and investments. Web 1.0: Web sites, news portals, search engines, email listservs (distribution lists), interactive online survey and calculator tools, etc… Web 2.0: Blogs, social networks, micro-blogs (twitter), Multi-media indexes (YouTube), Widgets, etc… Web 1.0 and 2.0 distinctions are primarily behavioral. Web 1.0 behavior is about proactively seeking and collecting, while 2.0 is about establishing your interests through profiles and behavior which then allows content to find you.

Identify and evaluate the channels stakeholders use with target audiences’ awareness, first inquiry, choice work and belief forming actions – our research shows the measurable audience behaviors through these phases and the stakeholder tactics used to influence those behaviors. This model uses well researched foundations of risk communication and is adapted from the Daniel Yankelovich model of opinion to belief to action process (cite: http://www.annenberg.northwestern.edu/pubs/violence/viol5.htm) By overlaying the psychological tenets of converting awareness to commitment with wellresearched online information gathering and engagement behaviors you can evaluate and model online environments and associated technologies from the perspective of how related issues will influence target audiences. Emerging new media technologies are enhancing, not replacing, these foundational behaviors – in some cases shortening processes but rarely eliminating core components. We superimpose these with organizational goals, industry and target audience behaviors to generate appropriate and measurable tactical options within the context of a clear, research driven strategic framework.

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Definitions, descriptions and examples of the various social and consumer media platforms and tools, along with best-practice white papers and case studies available to all v-Fluence clients. Included in our review and ongoing support are various elements including: Content Sharing Web Applications Social Networks Recommendation and Topic Filters In addition to evaluating and monitoring social media profiles (e.g., Facebook, LinkedIn, Care2, Sermo…) and branded content sharing channels (YouTube, FlickR, Twitter…), ongoing v-Fluence tracks and supports “behind the scenes” content placements and tactics to support SEO include social bookmarking, cataloguing, directory submissions, etc… We have an existing database of thousands of bloggers coded by stakeholder type, publishing topics, tactics and influence. We assess and monitor social and dialogue channels. Our assessments and monitoring include permission or subscription-required professional networks.

Social media (Web 2.0) does not replace search (Web 1.0) they build on one another. While substantially more time is spent on social media (Web 2.0) activities daily search and websites (Web 1.0) still matter: • Three (3) billion searches conducted daily on Google alone • 300-400 million visitors (user sessions) on Facebook • 20-30 million visitors (user sessions) on Twitter • 8-10 million visitors (user sessions) on LinkedIn www.v-Fluence.com http://royal.pingdom.com/2011/03/25/social-networks-one-million-visitors-per-day/ http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-google-search-is-still-growing-2012-7 http://www.zdnet.com/blog/facebook/facebook-is-destroying-google-in-time-spentonline-chart/4183

The hallmarks of an effective online campaign include effective (usable, accessible and visible) content validated by relevant influencers and shared via compelling audiencespecific tactics.

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Focus and clear scope associated with interest within a topic can yield the most useful information. What terminology and associations exist (and don’t exist) helps determine the right keywords to use and tactics needed. The Web remains literal and is not yet semantic – so language matters. Consumer language often differs from industry or professional terminology. First inquiry and choice work search interests need to be identified and addressed to appropriately develop and position content for influence against specific goals.

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Using well documented behavioral analysis, reported search engine market share and weighting based on eye tracking visibility data we can use search volumes by topic category (brand, product or related issue) to generate a weighted influencer list showing influential pages and combine page website weighted influence/visibility.

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* Wikis have their own category w/in social media platforms.

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Example Twitter key tactics: 1. 2. 3. 4. Embedded mini-URL hyperlink #Hash tags @name targeting “RT” re-tweeting

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What a sample “well anchored” and owned/influenced online brand looks like.

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Some technologies to consider and watch linked to your organization’s goals and interests. www.v-Fluence.com http://www.nmc.org/horizon

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Early semantic application examples: Pandora (March 2010) had 48 million users who listened to an average 11.8 hours per month Netflix (Jan 2010) has 14 million subscribers now downloading more content than consuming via mailed disks. Semantic aware applications allow meaning to be inferred from content and context. The promise of these semanticaware applications is to help us see connections that already exist, but that are invisible to current search algorithms because they are embedded in the context of the information on the web. http://horizon.nmc.org/wiki/Semantic-Aware_Apps http://www.trueknowledge.com/ Smart objects are the link between the virtual world and the real – facilitating the concept of “the Internet of things.” A smart object “knows” about itself — where and how it was made, what it is for, who owns it and how they use it, what other objects in the world are like it — and about its environment. Smart objects can report on their exact location and current state (full or empty, new or depleted, recently used or not). Whatever the technology that embeds the capacity for attaching information to an object — and there are many — the result is a connection between a physical object and a rich store of contextual information. Think of doing a web search that reveals not pages of content, but the location, description, and context of actual things in the real world. http://wp.nmc.org/horizon2009/chapters/smart-objects/ http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080408120106.htm http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/4326/2/1/ The vision for the future of smart object technology is a world of interconnected items in which the line between physical object and digital information is blurred. Applications that tap into “the Internet of things,” as this vision is called, would assist users in finding articles in the physical world in the same way that Internet search engines help locate content on the web. Reference materials, household goods, sports equipment: an actual instance of anything a person might need would be discoverable using search tools on computers or mobile devices. Further, while looking at an object, a prospective buyer could call up reviews, suggestions for alternate or related purchases, videos of the item being used, and more, as well as finding out whether something similar lay forgotten in the garage back home

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These materials represent the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the groups to which they were presented or any client or partner of v-Fluence Interactive Public Relations Inc. They may only be reproduced with the written permission of v-Fluence Interactive Public Relations.

www.v-Fluence.com

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