HM Government

National Community Safety Plan
2006-2009

A Government plan for community safety led by the Home Office. Published by the Community Safety and Local Government Unit, Home Office. Crown copyright 2005. The Community Safety and Local Government Unit is part of the Home Office’s Crime Reduction and Community Safety Group. The Government Departments contributing to the National Community Safety Plan are: Department for Constitutional Affairs Department for Culture, Media and Sport Department for Education and Skills Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Department of Health Department of Trade and Industry Department for Transport Department for Work and Pensions HM Treasury Home Office Office of the Deputy Prime Minister The National Community Safety Plan complements the Government’s Together We Can Action Plan for civil renewal.

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Contents
Foreword
Rt Hon Hazel Blears MP, Minister of State 2

Introduction

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Priorities

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Developing the delivery framework

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The role of key partners: The Police Local authorities Local Strategic Partnerships Crime & Disorder Reduction Partnerships Drug Action Teams Primary Care Trusts Children’s trusts Jobcentre Plus Local Criminal Justice Boards The Fire and Rescue Service 16 17 18 18 19 20 21 22 22 23

How we will take this plan forward

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Annex A: The National Policing Plan 2006-2009

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NCSP contacts

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Foreword by Hazel Blears

Britain is a more prosperous, better educated and healthier country than ever before. But this progress has also been accompanied by a loosening of traditional ties and less respect within and between communities. Like other countries in the developed world, we face new threats and are confronted by the challenges of tackling crime, anti-social behaviour, drug addiction and terrorism. The Government has already done much to tackle these issues, as we set out in the pages which follow. We are making a difference to how people feel about the areas in which they live. But we have to do more. Crime has fallen by 35% since 1997 and the fear of crime is falling too. But they both remain too high. Too many of our neighbourhoods and the lives of too many of our citizens and their businesses are blighted by the anti-social behaviour of a minority, while the events of July 2005 have demonstrated all too clearly that the threat of terrorism has not abated. If we are to make our communities still safer, everyone – from the heart of national government, through regional and local partners, right through to neighbourhoods and the people who live in them – must play their part. We need to create a new relationship between public services and the communities they serve which will encourage accountability, trust and cooperation – a mutual respect. And we need to work together to tackle extremism and racism in all its forms.

This Plan will help us do that. It sets out central government’s community safety priorities for the next three years as an aid to better local delivery. It defines our minimum expectations of each of the key partners involved and draws together the contributions that each can make, emphasising the very broadly-based nature of successful community safety work. We will support it by an action plan to take forward the cross-Government ‘Respect’ agenda, and a new Strategy to Reduce Re-offending, and will publish both shortly. The National Community Safety Plan is not limited to the work of the police. Crucial as their role is, they alone cannot provide for all our safety and security. That is why, shortly after taking office, we legislated to introduce Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships across England and Wales. We brought together, for the first time ever, all the chief players at local level – the police, police authorities, local government, primary care trusts, children’s trusts, fire services and other public sector bodies – to prevent and reduce crime and anti-social behaviour. Section 17 of the Crime and Disorder Act laid a responsibility on local government to do everything it reasonably could to prevent crime and disorder as it exercised all its functions. We are committed to delivering similar outcomes at central government level. That is why Government departments are committing themselves here for the first time to the concept of a National Community Safety Plan.

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We recognise that strong local government and active voluntary and community groups make a vital contribution to our quality of life, providing a reinvigorated civic purpose and addressing deep-rooted social needs, disadvantage, discrimination and exclusion. They too have a crucial role to play in keeping the community safe. But it is communities themselves which lie at the heart of the Plan. We need them to identify the community safety priorities for their neighbourhoods, work with the key agencies at local level to make sure they are tackled responsibly and effectively and then hold them to account for what they have promised to do. We must remember that the public will only feel safe if they have confidence that the agencies on whom they rely are responsive to their concerns and are providing high quality services to them. This Plan is the first of its kind and we welcome views on what it contains. We shall examine and refine it over the next 12 months, discuss it with our partners and adjust its content in the light of the comments we receive. We shall then produce a revised version next year. It represents a new way of working on community safety which is nothing short of major cultural change. It will require a deeper and more mature relationship than we have ever enjoyed before, but only by working together can we make life better for us all. We have already achieved much in partnership to improve the quality and safety of people’s lives. This Plan gives all of us the opportunity to do more.

Rt Hon Hazel Blears MP Minister of State Home Office November 2005

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Introduction
1. We have made significant progress since this Government came to office:

Crime1 has fallen by 35% since 1997 and is at its lowest in a generation. Drug-related crime is going down. Class A drug use by young people is stable and the use of other illegal drugs has fallen. Cannabis use is down by 16% among 16-24 year olds in 2004-05 compared to 1998. Since 1998 we have created 80,000 more drug treatment places meaning that most drug users can get into treatment in less than three weeks. The number of police officers in England and Wales has reached a record 141,230, and the police are employing an additional 6,300 community support officers. There are over 12,000 special constables and a large body of nonuniformed volunteers. We have established the Security Industry Authority which has issued over 48,000 licences to people working in the private security industry. Partnerships have targeted over 10,000 prolific offenders, to ensure their efforts are focussed on those most responsible for crime in their own locality, as well as youngsters on the point of offending. We have reformed the licensing of alcohol, entertainment and late night refreshment to give local people a more effective voice in licensing decisions, and the police and others stronger powers to control problem premises. The TOGETHER campaign has ensured that anti-social behaviour is dealt with swiftly and effectively by local services, leading to: ➤ over 5,500 Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs); ➤ over 150 crack house closure orders; and ➤ over 400 dispersal orders.

1

Household crime against adults, as measured by the British Crime Survey

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We have created over 500 neighbourhood warden schemes, with over 3,000 wardens. Crime in warden areas fell by 28% in an 18 month period during 2003 and 2004. Offenders under supervision in the community deliver five million hours of unpaid work to improve the environment. The Living Spaces scheme has given people the opportunity to transform open spaces in their neighbourhood with over 600 projects finished. Satisfaction with parks and open spaces has risen from 62% in 2000-01 to 71% in 2003-04. We have empowered practitioners at the sharp end to take action against anti-social behaviour, and against litter, graffiti, fly posting, fly tipping and abandoned vehicles. The Decent Homes Programme supports good estate and housing management. Many schemes have included security improvements, such as re-modelling estates to reduce crime. Deaths and serious injuries in road accidents are 28% below the 1994-98 level, and child deaths and serious injuries in road accidents are 43% lower. We are introducing Sure Start Children’s Centres to bring together care and education, health services, family support, and affordable childcare. We are committed to ensuring that by 2010, all schools will provide access to a range of extended services for children, young people and families. We have brought in new powers to achieve the biggest overhaul of domestic violence legislation in 30 years and published a National Delivery Plan. We have created 42 Local Criminal Justice Boards across the country, bringing together the core Criminal Justice System agencies. 15% more offences were

brought to justice in 2004-05 compared with 2001-02 as a result. We have also opened the flagship Community Justice Centre in Liverpool, bringing together agencies to tackle quality of life, crime and anti-social behaviour issues that the community have identified as priorities. Underpinning all this is the Government’s ongoing commitment, reflected in the Together We Can Action Plan, to enable people to be more active and to empower them to work together to improve where they live. 2. But encouraging as this is, we need a further step change. Crime remains too high and too many people’s lives continue to be blighted by anti-social behaviour. A reduction in crime is also the key to attracting the business and investment necessary for economic development. Through the reforms in Every Child Matters: Change for Children, we will provide more effective help for vulnerable children and young people and so tackle future offending and anti-social behaviour at their root. By reducing the harm caused by drug and alcohol misuse, violence and fear, and fostering safe communities, we improve health. 3. This Plan sets out the Government’s key priorities over the next three years for creating the safe and secure environment in which individuals, families and communities can realise their potential. It also sets out our expectations of the key public partners involved in improving community safety. The Plan includes the Home Secretary’s priorities for the police and thus also forms the National Policing Plan for 2006 -09. 4. The Plan mainly applies to England. It applies to Wales where it relates to non-devolved policing issues. The Plan does not extend to Scotland, since both policing and community safety have been devolved to the Scottish Executive. Nor does it apply to Northern Ireland where the Criminal Justice Directorate of the Northern Ireland Office is responsible for the implementation of Northern Ireland's Community Safety Strategy launched in 2003.

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Priorities
5. The Government’s priorities for community safety over the next three years are built around five themes: I. MAKING COMMUNITIES STRONGER AND MORE EFFECTIVE by enabling individuals and the wider community to take greater responsibility for their own, and their communities’, safety. As we tackle disadvantage and inequalities and create sustainable, cohesive communities, reassurance and confidence will increase. We want to encourage and empower citizens to play their part in building active, cohesive and sustainable communities and to be able to exert pressure for improved performance and greater accountability in local services. Businesses and service providers form the back bone of any successful community and allowing them to trade, and their employees to work, free from the fear of crime is essential to making communities stronger and more effective. We want to foster a vibrant voluntary and community sector. We want local people to connect to organisations and groups which can act as their advocate and exert pressure for improved performance and greater accountability in public services. We aim to build a culture of respect between citizens which embraces diversity, spans generations, races and faiths and supports the vulnerable. II. FURTHER REDUCING CRIME AND ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR so there are fewer victims of both and people have greater confidence not only in their own safety but in that of the communities in which they live and work. Reducing crime will by definition make communities safer places to live in, and reducing the fear of crime will make people feel safer, more confident, and able to play a full part. But it is not only crimes like burglary, robbery, domestic violence and assault that we need to tackle. As Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs) have discovered when they consult their local residents, the public feel threatened by joyriders, alcohol-fuelled disorder and noisy neighbours too. So it is as important to us to deal with anti-social behaviour as with the traditional forms of neighbourhood crime. We must provide high quality and responsive services to the public, resting on the bedrock of effective neighbourhood policing. III. CREATING SAFER ENVIRONMENTS in which people can live, work and relax. We want to create places where people like to be because they feel safe and secure and where the neighbourhood and those who live in it are shown respect. So we will improve living, working and community spaces and provide public transport networks and streets which give people the confidence to travel for both work and pleasure. IV. PROTECTING THE PUBLIC AND BUILDING CONFIDENCE by countering crime wherever it occurs from the neighbourhood right up to international level, bringing more offences to justice, and providing high quality and responsive services. People need both to be safe and to feel safe. We must not only offer them protection against organised crime, domestic extremism and terrorism but also the assurance that we are tackling the alcohol-fuelled violence that blights too many of our city centres at night, and the risk of being robbed on our streets. We need to act on the ‘hidden’ crimes of domestic violence and rape, and the hate crime to which too many of our citizens are still subject. The public must also have the confidence that where crimes are committed, the perpetrators will be brought to justice, that effective sentences and penalties will be imposed and rigorously enforced, and that the needs of victims and witnesses will be a priority.

V. IMPROVING PEOPLE’S LIVES SO THEY ARE LESS LIKELY TO COMMIT OFFENCES OR RE-OFFEND. This Plan is about improving the lives of all our citizens. But unless we can deal with the drug and alcohol misuse which so often leads to criminal activity, and improve housing outcomes and employment opportunities for exoffenders, we will not be able to break the vicious circle of re-offending. We must work together to educate people against the danger of drug and alcohol misuse, enforce the law to protect the vulnerable, and treat those who do misuse drugs through intervention programmes. We must also intervene early to deter youngsters from starting to engage in anti-social behaviour or criminal activity, and

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we must regenerate those neighbourhoods associated with the social exclusion which so frequently poses a threat to community safety. Bad behaviour and absence from school also contribute to educational underachievement and poor outcomes for individuals. We have introduced a comprehensive national strategy to improve behaviour and attendance at school which includes: national truancy sweeps; support and sanctions for parents; more training for staff; more learning mentors; and improved alternative provision. Higher Standards, Better Schools For All published on 25 October 2005 heralded further developments in this area, such as a renewed focus on persistent truancy, widening the use of parenting contracts and orders, reinforcing teachers’ right to discipline, and streamlining the exclusions process. Low crime levels will attract more businesses, create more jobs and improve the lives of the people who live nearby, by increasing their employment and recreational opportunities, making them less likely to commit offences or re-offend. Underpinning all this, we need to deliver high quality services which are responsive to the needs of all our communities.

development frameworks and parish plans;

strengthen voluntary and community sector organisations to act as a focus for collaborative action, and improve the long term capacity and infrastructure of voluntary and community sector groups through programmes such as ChangeUp and Futurebuilders; increase the level of volunteering and community engagement by 5%, particularly amongst groups at risk of social exclusion, including implementing the Russell Commission’s recommendations on youth action and engagement; reduce race inequalities and build community cohesion by working with local partners to deliver the objectives of the Government’s strategy, Improving Opportunity, Strengthening Society, including work with local communities on tackling extremism and maintaining interfaith dialogue; and implement a range of actions in the cross-Government Together We Can Action Plan for community empowerment under the themes of safety and justice, regeneration and cohesion, citizens and democracy, and health and sustainability.

Making communities stronger and more effective
6.

The Government’s key priorities for 2006-09 are to: enable local people to ensure action from key service providers to tackle acute or persistent problems of crime and anti-social behaviour and other risks to community safety; give communities more of a say and influence by offering a range of new options from which they can choose. These could include neighbourhood charters, delegated budgets, community ownership, parish arrangements and neighbourhood management; provide more opportunities for communities to help shape their future through sustainable community strategies, local

7.

Specifically in 2006-07, the Government will: propose a new power to enable local people to secure a response from the police and their partners to a community safety issue that they believe has not been adequately addressed; support the further development of the Neighbourhood Watch movement together with the police and other partners; support residents in community-led estate regeneration through the Guide Neighbourhoods programme; and provide a Together We Can support package for citizens

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strengthening their communities to help them acquire skills and confidence, and to expand their capacity to organise, to secure change and develop sustainable resources beyond grant aid.

crime and harm through the Prolific and Other Priority Offenders Strategy; establish neighbourhood policing teams in every community by 2008; deal with violent crime through new measures to ensure that the police and local authorities have the powers they need to tackle violence related to guns and knives;

Further reducing crime and anti-social behaviour
8.

The Government’s key priorities for 2006-09 are to:

reduce crime by 15%, and further in high crime areas, by 2007-08. To achieve this we continue to support improvements in local delivery by CDRPs, and we will need to focus on individual crime types such as criminal damage and domestic burglary. We will target the offending behaviour of individuals who cause the most

continue to treat domestic violence as a serious crime and encourage local partnerships to develop strategies to combat it. Continue to encourage victims, families, friends and neighbours to report incidents of domestic violence and sexual assault to the police and other agencies; combat alcohol-related violence and disorder through the

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introduction of Alcohol Disorder Zones, Drinking Banning Orders, Fixed Penalty Notices, conditional cautions and tougher enforcement of licensing requirements;

of all crime, and ensure there is inter-departmental co-operation at all levels of the delivery chain. Expand the specialist domestic violence court programme to many more areas across the country;

continue the drive to tackle anti-social behaviour by working more closely with communities to build on the success already achieved across England and Wales; direct around 1,000 drug-misusing offenders into treatment each week via the Criminal Justice System by 2008; and continue to work in partnership with business to tackle business-related crime problems faced by small businesses and retailers.

ensure that everyone in Britain has access to an effective racist incident helpline; support the police in implementing the joint Roads Policing Strategy to help deny criminals the use of the roads; continue to develop, evaluate and disseminate good practice on reducing crime and the fear of crime wherever it occurs in the transport system through such initiatives as the Secure Stations Scheme and the Safer Travel on Buses and Coaches Panel; encourage police forces to adopt a model for improving the quality and accuracy of statistics around business crime and ensure businesses have access to key crime prevention advice in order to better protect themselves and their staff from crime; continue to seize more assets from those engaged in criminal conduct. Assets can be recovered from those involved in benefit fraud, counterfeiting, sales of illicit items (such as cigarettes, alcohol etc) as well as mainstream and organised criminality; and develop the Community Justice model to encourage the adoption of problem-solving approaches and stronger community engagement within the Criminal Justice System to tackle anti-social behaviour and other crime affecting quality of life.

9.

Specifically in 2006 -07, the Government will:

take the Violent Crime Reduction Bill through its remaining Parliamentary stages and introduce the powers relating to guns, knives and alcohol related violence; work with our stakeholders to continue to design out crime by making products more difficult to steal and reducing the markets for dealing in stolen goods; as part of our new ‘Respect’ agenda, ensure that communities are supported and encouraged to stand up for acceptable standards of behaviour, challenge bad behaviour and know what they can expect from local services; launch a new service to deal with non-emergency police and anti-social behaviour issues in a ‘first wave’ of areas in 2006. The service will be accessed by the public via a triple digit number, subject to consultation, and delivered by police forces and local authorities working in partnership. National coverage will be achieved by 2008; further develop and implement the National Delivery Plan for domestic violence, which currently accounts for 25%

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Creating safer environments
10. The Government’s key priorities for 2006 -09 are to:

improve public spaces and the quality of people’s homes and communities through the Cleaner, Safer, Greener Communities initiative and then to support and sustain good practice and innovation in keeping them clean, safe and attractive; reduce the supply of illegal drugs, particularly Class A drugs, in local communities in order to protect them against drug dealing and its consequences in their neighbourhoods; and by 2010 reduce deaths and serious injuries on Britain's roads by 40% (50% for children) compared with the average for 1994-98, tackling the significantly higher incidence in disadvantaged communities.

11. Specifically in 2006 -07, the Government will:

ensure that appropriate policy and guidance is in place to help local authorities to make places safer by designing out crime in all new residential, industrial, retail and commercial development as well as in parks, open spaces and car parks; work together in promoting Cleaner Safer Greener Communities, demonstrating, documenting and disseminating learning from good practice in town centre management, residential areas, parks and open spaces; promote the take up of new enforcement powers to create safer environments, such as gating off alleyways affected by crime and anti-social behaviour, and review the enforcement of environmental regulations; give local authorities improved powers to clean up graffiti and fly posting, tackle litter and enforce environmental

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crime reduction through the Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003 and the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005;

carry out their functions having regard to the need to safeguard and promote children’s welfare;

spread the learning from the 19 areas participating in the Tackling Violent Crime Programme to other parts of the country with particular alcohol-fuelled or domestic violence problems; and apply an intelligence-led model of action to take out entire drug supply networks and seize the assets that are the lifeblood of drug dealers.

legislate to bring in an offence of incitement to religious hatred. The new offence will close the unacceptable loophole as a result of which faith groups associated with a single race are protected from incited hatred whereas multi-ethnic faith groups are not; and improve the enforcement of sentences and penalties of the court.

Protecting the public and building confidence
12. The Government’s key priorities for 2006 -09 are to:

13. Specifically in 2006 -07, the Government will:

implement new measures to improve protective security arrangements for: ➤ crowded places and soft targets; ➤ the transport system;

bring 1.25 million offences to justice by 2007-08; increase victims’ and witnesses’ satisfaction with the Criminal Justice System; deliver the Government’s strategies to counter terrorism and illegal intimidation by animal rights and other extremists; reduce the harm caused by organised crime; as a contributory step to achieving the overall priority of reducing the total number of rapes committed, increase the number of rapes that are reported to the police and the proportion of those that result in a conviction; make children and vulnerable adults safer through improved information sharing, employment vetting, protection strategies and responses to abuse; ensure the effective implementation of section 11 of the Children Act 2004 which requires a wide range of agencies including the police, local authorities, health services, and prison and offender management services to

➤ border security; and ➤ UK interests overseas;

introduce legislation to Parliament in the spring of 2006. The Terrorism Bill is designed to ensure that the police, intelligence agencies and courts have all the tools they require to tackle terrorism and bring perpetrators to justice; relentlessly target animal rights extremists using every lawful means, both nationally and internationally, to bring them to justice and to protect their intended victims; formally establish the Serious Organised Crime Agency, and increase the effort directed against organised immigration crime. Powerful new tools for them to do their job will be provided by powers in the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005, providing new Financial Reporting Orders, extending Serious Fraud Office–style questioning powers in organised crime cases, and putting Queen’s Evidence on a statutory footing;

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drive up performance on the enforcement of sentences and penalties by meeting Local Criminal Justice Board targets to improve the enforcement of fines, community penalties, defendant attendance and asset recovery; as an interim step to bringing more sexual offenders to justice, increase the number of rapes and other sexual offences (but excluding exposure) reported to the police so that fewer victims suffer in silence; from 1 April 2006, give victims and witnesses a statutory right to high standards of treatment from criminal justice agencies, spelt out in a code of practice. Criminal justice agencies will be held to account for delivering these; improve the confidence of people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds that they will be treated fairly by the Criminal Justice System, in particular by identifying and tackling inequalities of treatment; implement a national framework setting out guaranteed levels of service the public can expect from police forces and police authorities; establish Local Safeguarding Children Boards to coordinate and monitor the effectiveness of the work of their member agencies to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, including the implementation by agencies of their duties under section 11 of the Children Act 2004; increase sanction detection rates to at least 25% by 2007-08; improve public understanding of the work of community safety and criminal justice agencies; and increase confidence in the Criminal Justice System by ensuring that local agencies work effectively together in engaging with communities and responding to their concerns and priorities.

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14. We will also continue to work to improve protective security arrangements in the transport system taking particular account of the lessons learned following the London bombings on 7 July.

people’s life chances – the equivalent of 36,000 pupils back in school every day.

Improving people’s lives so they are less likely to commit offences or re-offend.

scale up and strengthen the support (in the form of information, advice and signposting) available to all parents so they can access good quality, integrated services when they need them; provide safe, healthy, stimulating and enriching environments for children and families at the heart of their communities by increasing the number of Sure Start Children’s Centres to 3,500 by 2010 and ensuring that all pupils have access to a range of well organised, out of hours extended services (before and after school) by that date; enhance the resources available to staff in all early years providers to help resolve conflicts and challenging behaviour and promote the social and emotional development of young children; and halve the number of people living in insecure temporary accommodation by 2010.

15. The Government’s key priorities for 2006-09 are to:

tackle re-offending by implementing end-to-end offender management in the National Offender Management Service and the Reducing Re-offending Strategy, with the aim of reducing re-offending by 5% by 2008 and 10% by the end of the decade; reduce the proportion of young people not in education, employment or training; implement actions arising from the Green Paper on youth to increase activities for young people and their take-up; reduce drug use by young people, particularly the most vulnerable, and reduce the harms caused by alcohol misuse; increase the participation of problem drug users in drug treatment by 100% by 2008 and increase the year-on-year proportion of users successfully sustaining or completing treatment programmes; implement all the recommendations of the Practitioner Group on Behaviour and Discipline published on 21 October 2005, legislating where necessary. The Government’s response was set out in Higher Standards, Better Schools For All published on 25 October 2005; reduce absence from school by 8% by 2008 compared to the 2003 level of 6.83% as part of the work to drive up attainment in schools and improve children’s and young

16. Specifically in 2006-07, the Government will:

continue to implement the drug treatment effectiveness strategy, launched in June 2005 by the Department of Health and the National Treatment Agency, to improve the quality and effectiveness of drug treatment programmes; continue the Department for Education and Skills, Home Office and Department of Health joint approach to the development of universal, targeted and specialist services to prevent drug harm and to ensure that all children and young people are able to reach their full potential; continue to increase the number of drug misusing offenders entering treatment in line with the 2008 drug treatment target;

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introduce the new measures contained within the Drugs Act 2005 to make it even more difficult for dealers to evade conviction and to: ➤ give police powers to test for drugs on arrest rather than charge, so that more people who commit crime to finance their drug habit can be directed into treatment earlier; and ➤ require those testing positive for specified Class A drugs to undergo an assessment followed up, as appropriate, with a sanction for those who fail to comply;

continue to support the Prolific and Other Priority Offenders Strategy throughout England and Wales by: ➤ evaluating the programme to assess the impact on offending rates; ➤ embedding the Performance Management Framework into key agencies’ performance management arrangements; and implement regional, cross-agency, plans to reduce reoffending.

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Developing the delivery framework
17. Section 17 of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 placed a statutory duty on local authorities, police authorities and fire and rescue authorities to take account of the need to prevent crime and disorder when exercising all of their functions. In formulating this National Community Safety Plan we are intending to achieve similar outcomes at central government level. This will mark a step change in our current ways of working. Many Government departments have already written community safety objectives into the Public Service Agreements (PSAs) which this plan is based upon, ranging from social exclusion and delivering neighbourhood renewal to balancing the need to travel with the need to improve quality of life, safety and respect for the environment. But we can and should go further. So in future Ministers will:

community safety dimension or adjust existing ones;

use the opportunity the Comprehensive Spending Review offers to consider the challenges facing the Government in delivering further improvements to community safety; consider how best to reflect this in their departmental PSAs; prioritise community safety policies clearly, taking account of the view of our partners, and reflect this in our expectations of what can be done by when.

consider collectively under the umbrella of the Plan, whether we need to develop new policies with a

18. The following diagram illustrates broadly how we see the relationship between local, regional and national priorities and how this Plan will help bring them all together 2.

PUBLIC SERVICE AGREEMENTS

S U S TA I N A B L E CO M M U N I T I E S
NATIONAL COMMUNITY SAFETY PLAN
Local priority setting and planning by Local Strategic Partnerships incorporating thematic partnerships and organisations working with communities

GOVERNMENT OFFICES FOR THE REGIONS

LOCAL AREA AGREEMENTS
(ENGLAND)

2

In considering the implications of the Plan for children and young people, it should be viewed alongside the Outcomes Framework given in Every Child Matters: Change for Children (DfES, December 2004).

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The role of key partners
19. Although this is a national plan, it is not confined to action by central government. Indeed, it signals the beginning of a new way of working on community safety, with much closer collaboration between central and local government and our other partners at local level in the setting of priorities and the development of new policies and initiatives. In particular, while the police and police authorities clearly have a key role to play in delivering community safety, this is a task they share with many others, as the earlier sections of the Plan have demonstrated. Partnership working between local authorities and other key agencies with responsibility for policing, offender management, health, education and other services is especially important. The Local Government Association’s Going Straight report stressed the need for local collaboration to reduce reoffending. We are developing a Civic Society Alliance to engage local agencies in this work. Local Area Agreements (LAAs), via Local Strategic Partnerships, strongly reinforce this approach by encouraging joined-up thinking around agreed priorities and how these might be delivered. LAAs and the Safer and Stronger Communities Fund bring related funding streams together for use on agreed priorities, and harness the energies of the voluntary and community sector and other local partners. Developing capable partnerships at the local level is also vital in ensuring the sustainability of neighbourhood policing. 22. The Government’s key priorities for the police for 2006-09 are to:

reduce overall crime by 15% by 2007-08 and more in high crime areas; bring more offences to justice in line with the Government’s PSA; provide every area in England and Wales with dedicated, visible, accessible and responsive neighbourhood policing teams, and reduce public perception of anti-social behaviour; tackle serious and organised crime including through improved intelligence and information sharing between partners; and protect the country from both terrorism and domestic extremism.

23. Specifically, in 2006-07 the Government will:

implement new measures in the Violent Crime Reduction Bill to tackle guns, knives and alcohol-related violence; implement substantial reform of police forces to strengthen the capability of the police service in tackling serious and organised crime; take forward the establishment of the National Policing Improvement Agency; create neighbourhood policing pathfinder Basic Command Units (BCUs) in every force area; step up the response to both terrorism and domestic extremism; bring more offences to justice; and begin implementation of the new guidance and Code of Practice for the police on information management.

20. The Government Offices for the Regions are the key brokers between central government policy and delivery on the ground. They help local partners to understand, implement and influence central government policies and initiatives, have a lead role in encouraging better performance by local partnerships, and help central government to understand local issues.

The Police

21. The Home Secretary has a statutory obligation to publish a National Policing Plan which sets out his strategic priorities and performance indicators for the police service for the next three years. The full National Policing Plan for 2006-09 is at Annex A to this Plan.

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Local authorities
24. Local authorities in England and Wales are responsible for many key local services which have a significant impact on community safety, including education, social services, planning, roads, fire and rescue, housing, trading standards, and environmental health. They work with primary care trusts to co-deliver health improvement and tackle the health inequalities that are at the heart of many of the social and economic regeneration programmes that reduce the incidence of criminal behaviour. The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 requires local authorities and the police, with other key agencies in the community, to work together at unitary and district council level to develop and implement strategies for reducing crime and disorder in their areas. Local authorities are also responsible for developing Children’s trust arrangements which bring together all services for children and young people in an area, underpinned by the Children Act 2004 duty to co-operate and focus on improving outcomes for all children and young people.

focus on those at risk of offending or re-offending by offering early intervention, prevention and diversionary activities; enforce action against those responsible for anti-social behaviour and assaults on staff; reduce the risk of crime through producing development plans that deliver safe places to live in accordance with Government policy and guidance; support neighbourhood policing, by further joining up with other public service providers at the neighbourhood level; ensure local people and the voluntary and community sector have a voice and are empowered to influence local services; build cohesion and tackle inequalities.

25. The Government’s key priorities for local authorities, for 2006-09, in respect of their community safety responsibilities, are for them to:

Local highway authorities (LHAs) are key partners in delivering the Government’s casualty reduction targets. Many authorities have integrated road safety work into CDRPs.

play an overall leadership role in their communities in line with the Government’s 10 year vision for local government, specifically: ➤ within Crime & Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs), Children’s Strategic Partnerships, Local Safeguarding Children Boards, Children’s trusts, Youth Offending Teams and Local Strategic Partnerships (LSPs), ensuring community safety; ➤ taking responsibility, within Local Strategic Partnerships, for ensuring community safety is reflected in the Local Area Agreements now being rolled out across England;

26. The Government’s specific priorities for local authorities for 2006-07, in respect of their community safety responsibilities, are to:

ensure community safety is reflected in the Local Area Agreements which will be negotiated throughout the remainder of England and oversee subsequent performance, particularly through CDRPs and LSPs; play their part in keeping their CDRPs’ crime reduction trajectories on track and supporting all elements of the Prolific and Other Priority Offenders Strategy; and manage the night time economy effectively in town and city centres to reduce alcohol-related violence.

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help the resettlement of offenders, particularly through the provision of housing advice in prisons and links with employment services;

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29. The Government’s specific priorities in community safety for LSPs for 2006-07 are to:

take the lead role in negotiating Local Area Agreements across England, ensuring that community safety is reflected across all four LAA blocks; and manage performance of the community safety element of the LAAs which have already been negotiated.

Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs)
30. Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships were created following the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. They are the key local vehicle for community safety strategic planning and delivery, bringing together all the main players at local level under the leadership of the police, local authority, police authority, fire & rescue authority and primary care trust as the responsible authorities under the Act. There are many lessons to be learnt from partnerships which have adopted a process of self-improvement and we are keen to look further at what capabilities need to be in place for CDRPs to act effectively on the issues which affect communities most.

Local Strategic Partnerships (LSPs)
27. Local Strategic Partnerships are multi-agency partnerships, led by local government and sited at local authority level, with the objective of working together to identify common objectives for their local communities. They bring together at local level different parts of the public, private, community and voluntary sectors and are responsible for producing the local area’s Sustainable Community Strategy. Alongside their other roles, LSPs contribute to reducing crime and anti-social behaviour. 28. The Government’s key priorities for LSPs for 2006-09 which relate to community safety are to:

31. The Government’s key priorities for CDRPs for 2006-09 are to:

deliver their agreed crime reduction targets by March 2008; play a leading role in the development of the Safer and Stronger Communities block of Local Area Agreements and manage subsequent delivery, ensuring targets set by the CDRP are reflected in the LAA; encourage collaboration between agencies, including joint planning, problem analysis and performance management. ensure that sufficient arrangements are in place to deliver

develop the local Sustainable Community Strategy and manage its delivery; and

take the lead role in negotiating and refreshing Local Area Agreements (LAA) across all top tier local authorities in England.

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a range of engagement opportunities for local communities, and to respond to their concerns; and

ensure arrangements are in place for a joint intelligenceled approach to solving local problems.

authorities. They are required to review the level and pattern of drug misuse in their area. These audits inform decisions on the partnership’s strategic priorities and commissioning of services, and enable progress to be tracked. Most DATs are expected to be a part of CDRPs. Many also take responsibility for local strategies on alcohol misuse.

32. The Government’s specific priorities for CDRPs for 2006-07 are to:

34. The Government’s key priorities for DATs for 2006-09 are to:

manage their performance against crime reduction targets, ensuring that delivery remains in line with trajectory; develop more effective ways of working with Local Criminal Justice Boards, building on guidance to be issued by the end of 2005 by the Home Office and the Office of Criminal Justice Reform; in unitary local authority areas, complete integration with local Drug Action Teams. In two tier areas, complete arrangements for closer working to ensure an appropriate input to delivery of the National Drugs Strategy; continue to lead the Prolific and Other Priority Offenders Strategy; and work in partnership with other key agencies nationally, regionally and locally to identify, generate and share good practice in tackling volume violent crime, in particular alcohol-related and domestic violence.

take strategic decisions on expenditure and service delivery, and develop local plans within the 4 strands of the Drug Strategy; commission effective services appropriate to local needs; monitor and report on performance to regional management; communicate plans, activities and performance to stakeholders; and engage local communities and ensure that delivery is linked to supporting strategies, such as the Alcohol Harm Reduction Programme, the Anti-Social Behaviour Strategy and the Neighbourhood Renewal Strategy.

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35. The Government’s specific priorities for DATs for 2006-07 are to:

Drug Action Teams (DATs)
33. Under the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, Drug Action Teams are responsible for identifying local needs and commissioning drug treatment and other interventions to meet them. There are 149 DATs in England (one for every upper tier or unitary local authority area). They are consortia of local partners involved in the delivery of the Government’s Drug Strategy, including responsible authorities under the Act – primary care trusts, police, probation, prisons and local

ensure that the objectives of the Drug Interventions Programme (DIP), which aims to direct drug misusing offenders out of crime and into treatment, are delivered as agreed in local compacts in the DIP intensive areas and in line with the expectations of both intensive and nonintensive areas which form part of the funding terms and conditions; implement the measures contained within the Young People and Drugs Delivery Plan which links the response to children, young people and drugs with the Every Child

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Matters: Change for Children programme locally. Ensure that provision is built around the needs of vulnerable children and young people, as set out in Every Child Matters: Change for Children, Young People and Drugs;

develop a local treatment plan to ensure that effective and prompt treatment is available and meets the needs of the local drug-misusing population including young people and offenders referred from the police, courts and prisons; in unitary local authority areas, complete DAT integration with CDRPs. In two-tier areas, agree arrangements for collaborative working; and ensure that provision is made for the drug treatment, harm reduction and support measures set out in the Prolific and Other Priority Offenders Strategy.

Primary Care Trusts (PCTs)
36. Following the Police Reform Act 2002, PCTs have had a statutory responsibility to work in partnership with other responsible authorities to tackle crime, disorder and the misuse of drugs. PCTs have a duty to:

participate in an audit of crime and disorder, anti-social behaviour and drug misuse for the CDRP area or areas in which they fall; and contribute to the development of local strategies that effectively deal with the issues which are identified.

37. PCTs’ contribution to the delivery of local strategies will be determined through local negotiation and will depend on the extent to which action on drugs, alcohol or crime and disorder makes a significant contribution to the PCT’s own national or local priorities. Local NHS organisations can play a role in developing Local Area Agreements as part of Local Strategic Partnerships.

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38. There are no national targets for NHS action to reduce crime and disorder but in line with the devolved planning and performance system for health and social care as set out in National Standards, Local Action: Health and Social Care Standards and Planning framework 2005-06 – 2007-08, PCTs can commit to the delivery of local targets and Local Area Agreements in consultation with local partnerships.

working to reduce the health inequalities that prevent people from developing economically independent and socially engaged lives.

39. Areas for joint delivery can include:

reducing pressures on emergency services as a result of violence or alcohol-related injury; reducing the demand on NHS services from crime, alcohol or drug-related ill health; improving the working lives and conditions for NHS staff by reducing the risks of violent or alcohol-related attacks and abuse; improving the health and life chances of children and young people; commissioning services for the identification, referral and treatment of individuals with drug problems; identifying individuals with alcohol misuse disorders and the provision of brief health interventions to encourage them to address their behaviour; developing integrated services to support victims of crime, particularly victims of domestic violence, young offenders or offenders with mental health problems and those experiencing drug and alcohol dependence; developing more effective prison health care and links with community provision for primary care and the treatment of mental health problems, drug and alcohol dependence, and other chronic ill health problems prevalent among prisoners; and

40. Effective partnership delivery also depends upon robust information exchange between all the agencies involved. Whilst there is no statutory requirement for PCTs to disclose data they do have the power to do so subject to the usual restrictions on patient confidentiality. Local information sharing protocols are the best way of ensuring that disclosure of data is properly handled and used to greatest effect in supporting partnership delivery.

Children’s trusts
41. Children’s trusts will bring together all services for children and young people in an area, underpinned by the Children Act 2004 duty to co-operate, to focus on improving outcomes for all children and young people. They will support those who work every day with children, young people and their families to deliver better outcomes – with children and young people experiencing more integrated and responsive services and specialist support embedded in, and accessed through, universal services.

42. Children’s trusts will focus on preventative work through multi-agency teams, whereby police, youth offending teams, youth services, drug action teams, health, social service and education professionals work together with young people and their families to intervene at an early stage, before the young people turn to crime and anti-social behaviour. Children’s trusts will also play a role in developing Local Area Agreements with Local Strategic Partnerships.

43. In areas where Children’s trust arrangements have been fully established, there is emerging anecdotal evidence that the preventative focus has led to:

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fewer young people engaging in criminal activity, reducing the need for ASBOs; fewer young people engaged in drug taking;

46. Specific priorities in each local area will be influenced by:

the ECM outcomes; outcomes negotiated with Government Offices for the Regions to support Local Area Agreements; local priorities agreed as part of the Children’s and Young People’s Plan, drawn up after rigorous needs assessment based on existing data from all partners, national priorities and the views of children, young people, their families and communities and front-line professionals. This is set out in the guidance issued jointly by the Department for Education and Skills, the Home Office and the Department of Health, Every Child Matters: Change for the Children, Young People and Drugs.

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a reduced need for parenting orders;

There is also an array of wider preventative work, for example alcohol patrols, life skills courses, sports initiatives, including urban sports activities, and work experience or student placements.

44. Children’s trust priorities are to improve across all 5 of the Every Child Matters (ECM) outcomes:
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Being healthy; Staying safe; Enjoying and achieving; Making a positive contribution; Achieving economic well-being.

Jobcentre Plus
47. Jobcentre Plus increases the number of those in employment by assisting those who can to find work, and by providing security through the benefit system for those who cannot. Through employment and benefit surgeries in prisons, and arranging Jobseeker’s Allowance interviews as soon as possible on release, Jobcentre Plus contributes to reducing reoffending. 48. As well as supporting offenders via a network of regional and district partnerships, Jobcentre Plus also offers enhanced support through programmes, such as progress2work and LinkUP, helping those with a range of disadvantages, including drug misusers, to find and keep employment. Jobcentre Plus also plays a key role in developing Local Area Agreements as part of Local Strategic Partnerships.

45. The five ECM outcomes are supported by 25 sub-outcomes for all children which include:

supporting the community and environment; choosing not to offend and engage in anti-social behaviour; choosing not to bully and discriminate; choosing not to take illegal drugs; attending and enjoying school; being safe from exposure to violence; being safe from crime and anti-social behaviour.

Local Criminal Justice Boards (LCJBs)
49. Local Criminal Justice Boards (LCJBs) exist in each of the 42 criminal justice areas in England and Wales. LCJBs are the principal vehicles for delivering the improvements in criminal

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justice services set out in this plan. They are responsible and accountable for:

52. The Government’s specific priorities for LCJBs for 2006-07 are to:

local delivery of Criminal Justice System (CJS) objectives; improvement in the delivery of justice;

meet their specific targets for the year, as set out in the CJS Business Plan 2006-07 (to be published in January 2006); roll out the Premium Service, as part of the “Catch and Convict” strand of the Prolific and Other Priority Offenders Strategy; implement the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime; implement the victim and witness delivery plan, embedding the 7 priorities for victims and witnesses; facilitate the expansion of specialist domestic violence courts; foster good working relations with CDRPs; and lead a range of activities designed to open up the CJS to the public during the annual Inside Justice week (October).

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the service provided to victims and witnesses; securing public confidence.

50. Delivery agreements formalise the local Boards’ direct responsibility to a National Criminal Justice Board for the achievement of local targets. Membership of LCJBs is deliberately kept narrow to focus attention on delivery and to promote joint working but, at a minimum, they include Chief Officers of Police, the Crown Prosecution Service, Her Majesty’s Court Service, Youth Offending Teams, Probation and the Prison Service. They secure the views of other Criminal Justice System stakeholders through consultation.

51. The Government’s key priorities for LCJBs for 2006-09 in tackling crime and anti-social behaviour are to deliver the vision for the CJS set out in the CJS Strategic Plan to:

The Fire and Rescue Service
53. Until recently, the Fire and Rescue Service in the UK has chiefly been concerned with firefighting, but it is now developing in other directions to fulfil its significant potential to promote community safety. The Police Reform Act 2002 made Fire and Rescue Authorities full partners of the CDRPs established under the Crime and Disorder Act 1998.

ensure that the public has confidence that the CJS is effective and that it serves all communities fairly; deliver a consistently high standard of service to victims and witnesses; bring more offences to justice through a more modern and efficient justice process; rigorously enforce sentences and orders of the court; and

54. Over the last several years, the Fire and Rescue Service has developed a much greater focus on prevention under the generic term Community Fire Safety. This:

ensure that criminal justice is a joined up, modern and well run service and an excellent place to work for people from all backgrounds.

embodies a wide range of activities including the Home Fire Risk Check initiative funded by ODPM; work in schools; work with those most at risk from fire; forming multi-agency partnerships to reduce fire risk, and a range of publicity and campaign efforts;

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has been particularly focused on dangers in the home where 75% of fire deaths take place – but also now encompasses efforts to prevent juvenile firesetting and hoax calls work with disaffected youths.

55. In the past 10 years, the Fire and Rescue Service, although traditionally a reactive service, has also become far more involved in proactive, community-based work, in two main strands:

57. The National Framework for the Fire and Rescue Service sets out the strategy for meeting these objectives and delivering an improved service that achieves better value for money for the communities it serves. In essence the Framework is a contract with the Fire and Rescue Service; a contract for a new relationship where we are clear on what we expect the Service to achieve, and Fire Authorities are clear what support we will give them.

first, programmes to reduce the incidence of accidental fires and casualties through education and publicity work in the community, for example in schools and old people’s homes; and second, wider community and youth work, specifically targeting youths at risk from social exclusion and those from deprived areas.

56. The Fire and Rescue Service has a major role to play in meeting the targets of reducing by 31 March 2010, the number of accidental fire-related deaths in the home by 20% and achieving a 10% reduction in deliberate fires. From 2010, no local fire and rescue authority should have a fatality rate, from accidental fires in the home, more than 1.25 times the national average by 2010.

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How we will take this plan forward
58. This Plan is not set in concrete. It is the first time the Government has sought to produce a document of this kind. It represents a considerable change in the way in which we will conduct our business in future. We are not only fully committed to much closer working on community safety issues across Government but to closer working with our local partners too in a shared and joint endeavour. So over the coming months, at both Ministerial and official level, we want to discuss the content of the Plan fully with all those who have a part to play in implementing it. We will reflect their views in a revised version which we intend to publish in a year’s time.

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Annex A: The National Policing Plan 2006-2009
1. This annex has been incorporated into the National Community Safety Plan 2006-09 to meet the statutory requirement for the Home Secretary to publish a National Policing Plan which sets out his strategic priorities and performance indicators for the police service for the next three years. 2. Following the publication of Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary’s report Closing the Gap, the Home Secretary wrote to chief constables and chairs of police authorities on 22 September launching a process of local discussion and analysis of the options for force restructuring. Restructuring is not an end itself. It is part of the process of reconfiguring the way in which the police service delivers protective services to safeguard the public from the threats posed by terrorism and domestic extremism, serious and organised crime, public disorder and civil emergencies.3 The process of restructuring will inevitably require significant engagement by police authorities and the senior management teams in forces over the period covered by this plan. During this period all forces and authorities need to ensure that the resources devoted to the work on structural change complement the delivery of the priorities set out below.

bring more offences to justice in line with the Government’s PSA; provide every area in England and Wales with dedicated, visible, accessible and responsive neighbourhood policing teams; and reduce public perception of anti-social behaviour; tackle serious and organised crime including through improved intelligence and information sharing between partners; and protect the country from both terrorism and domestic extremism.

Delivering the key priorities in 2006-07
Reduce overall crime by 15% by 2007-08 and more in high crime areas 5. Continuing to drive down burglary, vehicle crime, robbery and other forms of acquisitive crime is crucial to delivering the target. All of these volume crimes are linked to the supply and misuse of drugs, so dealing with the issues of drugs through education, enforcement and treatment will play an integral role in the reduction of volume crime overall. Tackling criminal damage, which makes up nearly a quarter of the British Crime Survey (BCS) crime and around a third of BCS comparator recorded crime, is essential to delivering the target. 6. The Violent Crime Reduction Bill will introduce new measures to ensure that the police and local authorities have stronger powers to tackle guns, knives and alcohol-related violence. The Tackling Violent Crime Programme will be developed to deal with violent crime in selected high-crime areas, particularly alcohol-related and domestic violence, but targeted on areas of local concern. The Government will build on the work and emerging success of the first tranches of areas through a second tier which will capture experience and spread good practice to all areas.

Priorities
3. The Home Secretary’s key priorities for the police service for 2006-09 have taken account of the Association of Chief Police Officers’ (ACPO) National Strategic Assessment and individual force assessments. They are also closely tied to the Government’s Public Service Agreements (PSAs). The Government expects that these national priorities will be reflected by police forces and authorities in developing their local policing plans. Local priorities based on community consultation and engagement should be identified within this national framework. 4. The Government’s five key priorities for the police service for 2006-09 are to:

reduce overall crime by 15% by 2007-08 and more in high crime areas;

3

The Closing the Gap report examined current capacity and capability to deliver seven protective services; Major Crime (homicide); Serious Organised and Cross Border Crime; Counter Terrorism and Extremism; Civil Contingencies; Critical Incidents; Public Order; and Strategic Roads Policing.

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Actions for the Police Service in 2006-07:

to work in conjunction with Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships to deliver the locally agreed crime reduction goals which will contribute to the national 15% crime reduction target by 2007-08;

all forces and Basic Command Units (BCUs) to reflect the principles of the Government’s Tackling Violent Crime Programme in their respective endeavours to drive down violent crime; and

to continue to apply and embed an intelligence-led and National Intelligence Model compliant approach to tackling crime and anti-social behaviour.

Bring more offences to justice in line with the Government’s PSA 7. Bringing more offences to justice is an important part of reducing crime through deterrence, removing offenders from the streets and treatment. The Public Service Agreement aims to increase the number of offences for which an offender is brought to justice to 1.25 million by 2008. The Government’s vision for the Criminal Justice System is set out in the Criminal Justice Strategic Plan 4. The police as members of Local Criminal Justice Boards are important contributors to the delivery of this goal. The Government estimates that to achieve the goal of

bringing 1.25 million offences to justice a national sanction detection rate of at least 25% will be required, with an interim national rate of 22.3% required to achieve the 2005-06 offences brought to justice target. Specific targets for 2006-07 will be confirmed in the Criminal Justice System Business Plan 2006-07. 8. Police forces, as key members of Local Criminal Justice Boards will need to be clear on the implications of Local Criminal Justice Board targets on bringing offences to justice for required sanction detection rates.

Actions for the Police Service in 2006-07:

to work in tandem with Local Criminal Justice Boards to deliver the locally agreed offences brought to justice targets for 2006-07 and the implied sanction detection rates which underpin them;

to make best use of the opportunities afforded by alternative sanction detection disposal means (such as Fixed Penalty Notices) whilst also, in conjunction with the Crown Prosecution Service, continuing to focus on increasing the proportion of offences which result in prosecution; and

to improve the frontline investigation skills of all officers and staff by the national roll out of the Professionalising the Investigative Programme at Level 1.

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Cutting Crime, Delivering Justice: A Strategic Plan for Criminal Justice 2004-08, Cm 6288, July 2004.

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Provide every area in England and Wales with dedicated, visible, accessible and responsive neighbourhood policing teams; and reduce public perception of anti-social behaviour 9. The Government has undertaken to ensure that there is a neighbourhood policing team in every area in England and Wales by 2008 and to provide funding to support an increase in the number of community support officers to 24,000 by the end of March 2008. As an initial step 43 pathfinder BCUs have been established, one for each force in England and Wales, with the aim of providing communities with:
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10. During 2006-07, the learning from the pathfinders will be shared to support the expansion of neighbourhood policing teams to other areas. Police forces and authorities should take the development of neighbourhood policing across their force area into account in drawing up their local policing plans. 11. Neighbourhood policing is one part of a broader programme to deliver more responsive, citizen focussed policing, aimed at improving public confidence in the wider police service and increasing satisfaction with the services it provides. The Public Service Agreement contains targets to improve confidence in the local police and to increase victim and witness satisfaction across the whole of the Criminal Justice System. The police service’s responsibility for improving confidence and satisfaction remains central to improving the responsiveness and citizen focus of the police service over the next three years.

access to policing services through a named point of contact; influence over policing priorities in their neighbourhood; interventions through joint action with partners and communities; and

answers through sustainable solutions and feedback.

Actions for the Police Service in 2006-07:
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to roll out and develop neighbourhood policing pathfinder BCUs in every force area; for all forces to be compliant with the national minimum standards set out in the Quality of Service Commitment (including achieving national call handling standards) by November 2006;

to implement (in partnership with local authorities) in designated ‘first wave’ areas a new single nonemergency number service to deal with non-emergency police and anti-social behaviour issues accessed via a three digit telephone number; and

to work alongside local agencies and local communities to tackle anti-social behaviour.

Tackle serious and organised crime including improved intelligence and information sharing between partners 12. Tackling organised crime is as much a priority for police forces as it is for the Serious Organised Crime Agency. Organised crime may often be national or international in dimension and origin but its impact extends into neighbourhoods of every kind and its harmful consequences

manifest themselves in local communities. Police forces will need to work closely with the new Serious Organised Crime Agency to identify threats and use those assessments to inform local actions. They also need to work closely with other national agencies such as the Serious Fraud Office, HM Revenue and Customs, HM Immigration Service and the Assets Recovery Agency.

Statutory Performance Indicators

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In particular, forces and authorities need to support the new powers on international corruption in Part 12 of the AntiTerrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 and are encouraged to take on any investigations not falling within the Serious Fraud Office’s remit. 13. Improving intelligence and information sharing between forces is crucial to the fight against crime. There is also a need to share information effectively between the police and the other delivery agencies with which they are increasingly acting in partnership. Serious deficiencies were highlighted by the Bichard Inquiry into the Soham murders and a substantial

programme of work is underway to address them. A new Code of Practice setting out a clear framework for police information management came into force on 14 November 2005. This will be supported by underpinning guidance which is currently being developed and is likely to be published by March 2006. Support will be provided to forces by the National Centre for Policing Excellence in ensuring effective implementation of the Code and guidance. Through the IMPACT programme, new systems and technical facilities to support information sharing across policing and between policing and other services will continue to become available throughout the period of this Plan.

Actions for the Police Service in 2006-07:
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through police force restructuring, to increase capacity and resilience in the provision of protective services; to establish and maintain effective partnership working with the newly created Serious Organised Crime Agency;

continue work towards an information and intelligence infrastructure across all forces via the IMPACT programme;

to support the use of Automatic Number Plate Recognition, integrated with the National Data Centre, to enhance intelligence sharing in the fight against serious and organised crime and terrorism;

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to begin implementing the new Code of Practice on information management; and to implement the Roads Policing Strategy.

Counter terrorism 14. The threat of terrorism is not new. The considerable expertise which the UK has developed in fighting terrorism over the past 30 years provides a strong basis on which to build. The events of July 2005 nevertheless require all forces and authorities to review and reinforce their current work in cooperation with the national agencies, including the Metropolitan Police Service. 15. Since 9/11, a cross-government counter-terrorism strategy has been put in place with the objectives of preventing young

people being drawn into extremism and violence; pursuing the existing generation of terrorists and disrupting their networks; protecting our citizens and national infrastructure from attack; and preparing to deal with the consequences of an attack should that occur. This strategy is based on an assessment of the threat, the risk and the UK’s vulnerabilities. The Home Office has specific responsibility for delivering key elements of the strategy through effective legislation, the national counter terrorism exercise programme, using science and technology effectively and the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Resilience Programme. Police forces and authorities are vital partners in the delivery of all elements of the strategy; in building community

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links and confidence which help develop intelligence and isolate extremism; in investigating and disrupting terrorist networks active in the UK; in prosecuting terrorists and protecting our citizens and infrastructure from attack; in responding to attacks by catching and prosecuting the perpetrators; and supporting a prompt return to business as usual. The role of the National Coordinator of Special Branch is also key. As terrorists can operate anywhere, all police forces must have specialised capabilities in place which will enable them to work with communities and national agencies to deliver this strategy. Domestic Extremism 16. The Government is determined to eradicate the illegal

activities of animal rights extremists, who threaten and intimidate law abiding citizens and businesses. They undermine democracy; they harass, attack and threaten law abiding individuals and businesses; and their activities threaten the development of new life saving drugs and investment in lawful business and research. A National Coordinator for Domestic Extremism now has a central team, to lead the regional and national police response to animal rights extremism. They will work within the framework of the National Intelligence Model and under the Association of Chief Police Officers’ arrangements. Police forces need to cooperate fully both with the National Co-ordinator and with each other in taking action that will disrupt illegal activity and bring an early end to this threat.

Actions for the Police Service in 2006-07:

to allocate appropriate resources to force Special Branches and Regional Intelligence Cells to support intelligence gathering requirements at a local, regional and national level;

to make the most effective use of counter-terrorism exercises, both real and ‘table-top’, to develop and maintain resilience; and

to target the illegal activities of extremists who intimidate those involved in legitimate animal research and testing.

Reform to deliver the priorities 17. The priorities listed in the Plan will help to reduce crime, bring more offences to justice and increase confidence at all levels:

at force level through restructuring into strategic forces, as recommended by HMIC, to deliver better protective services; and at national level through the establishment of the Serious Organised Crime Agency and the National Policing Improvement Agency and through greater international co-operation. The National Policing Improvement Agency will support police forces in delivering the three mission critical priorities – implementing the recommendations of the Bichard Inquiry especially the IMPACT programme; cross-border crime; and neighbourhood policing – and in working to deliver performance improvement at a time of structural change.

critically at the neighbourhood level, which is the foundation of modern policing, through the establishment of neighbourhood policing teams; at Basic Command Unit level, through working closely with local authorities and other CDRP agencies to ensure crime and anti-social behaviour are tackled at partnership level. To reinforce this partnership working there is a very strong expectation that the boundaries of CDRPs and BCUs should be co-terminous;

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18. The Government will continue to work with the police service to develop the police workforce so that it has the skills, flexibilities and incentives which are essential if this Plan is to be delivered successfully. It remains a key imperative to recruit, retain and support the progression of black and minority ethnic and female staff so that the composition of the police workforce is representative of the communities which it serves. Under the Association of Chief Police Officers’ and the Association of Police Authorities’ leadership, the Government is clear that the Service must be wholly committed to driving forward the implementation of the Race Equality Programme.

20. The new arrangements being considered would ensure that each police authority received the same level of funding from these grants in 2006-07 and 2007-08 that they receive currently.

19. The provisional funding settlement covering the two years of this Plan will be published in early December 2005. Funding beyond 2007-08 will be addressed through the Comprehensive Spending Review 2007. The Government will re-examine the funding system in the light of force restructuring. The Government is also considering making changes for 2006-07 to specific grant arrangements to mainstream some specific grants and relax ring-fencing. New arrangements are being considered for:
■ ■ ■ ■ ■

21. The Service is on track to meet its existing 3% efficiency target (including 1.5% which is cashable) in each of the three years up to 31 March 2008. HMIC’s final assessment of Force Efficiency Plans for 2004-05 reports that the service has exceeded the 2% efficiency target for that year by delivering efficiency gains of £315.9m (3.24%) of net revenue expenditure. The scope for longer term enhanced efficiency gains – particularly in the light of the National Policing Improvement’s Agency’s role and restructuring – will be addressed as part of the Comprehensive Spending Review 2007.

the Rural Policing Fund; the BCU Fund; DNA funding; Special Priority Payments; and London/South East allowances.

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Statutory Performance Indicators
Statutory Performance Indicators are set under ‘best value’ legislation and those intended for 2006-07 are listed below5. Technical guidance explaining the indicators in detail will be published in 2006. The guidance will also set out changes to statutory indicators compared to 2005-06.

SPI 4. a) b)

Crime level Using the British Crime Survey, the risk of personal crime. Using the British Crime Survey, the risk of household crime. Violent crime per 1,000 population.* Life threatening crime and gun crime per 1,000 population. Acquisitive crime per 1,000 population.

5.

b) e) f)

SPI 1.

User satisfaction Satisfaction of victims of domestic burglary, violent crime, vehicle crime and road traffic collisions with respect to: a) making contact with the police; b) action taken by the police; c) being kept informed of progress; d) their treatment by staff; e) the overall service provided. Confidence a) Using the British Crime Survey, the percentage of people who think their local police do a good job. Fairness, equality and diversity Fairness, equality and diversity a) b) Satisfaction of victims of racist incidents with respect to the overall service provided. Comparison of satisfaction for white users and users from minority ethnic groups with respect to the overall service provided. Percentage of PACE searches which lead to arrest by ethnicity of the person searched. Comparison of sanction detection rates for violence against the person offences by ethnicity of the victim. Proportion of police recruits from minority ethnic groups compared to the proportion of people from minority ethnic groups in the economically active population. Percentage of female police officers compared to the overall force strength.

*Also intended as a community safety indicator shared with local authorities.

SPI 6. b)

Offences brought to justice Percentage of offences brought to justice. Sanction detections Percentage of notifiable offences resulting in a sanction detection. Enforcement Percentage of domestic violence incidents with a power of arrest where an arrest was made related to the incident. Value of cash forfeiture orders and confiscation orders per 1,000 population. Traffic (i) Number of people killed in under 30 days or seriously injured in road traffic collisions* (ii) per 100 million vehicle km travelled.

SPI 7. a)

SPI 2. SPI SPI 3.

SPI 8. a)

c)

SPI 9. a)

c) d) e)

*Also intended as a community safety indicator shared with local authorities.

SPI 10. a) b) c)

Quality of life Using the British Crime Survey, fear of crime. Using the British Crime Survey, perceptions of antisocial behaviour. Using the British Crime Survey, perceptions of local drug use/drug dealing.

g)

5

Please note that the numbering of the Statutory Performance Indicators (SPIs) is not consecutive.

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SPI 11. a)

Frontline policing Percentage of police offer time spent on frontline duties. Resource use Delivery of cashable and non-cashable efficiency targets. Average number of working hours lost per annum due to sickness per police officer. Average number of working hours lost per annum due to sickness per police staff.

Local Policing Domain
Each police authority, following consultation with its force can set local performance indicators which reflect local priorities. The suite of local indicators is therefore, unique to each force and delivery against local priorities plus targets will be a critical component of performance assessments.

SPI 12. a)

13. a) b)

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NCSP Contacts
Departmental contact points for further information are:

Department for Constitutional Affairs Harjit Athwal harjit.athwal@hmcourts-service.gsi.gov.uk Department for Culture Media and Sport Anne Marie Andreoli annemarie.andreoli@culture.gsi.gov.uk Department for Education and Skills Nick Brooker nick.brooker@dfes.gsi.gov.uk Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Rory Wallace rory.wallace@defra.gsi.gov.uk Department of Health Sarah Donnelly sarah.donnelly@dh.gsi.gov.uk Department of Trade and Industry Small Business Service: Policy & Change Directorate regulation@sbs.gsi.gov.uk

Department for Transport Lesley Stark lesley.stark@dft.gsi.gov.uk Department for Work and Pensions Del Jenkins del.jenkins@dwp.gsi.gov.uk HM Treasury Ian Shepherd ian.shepherd@hm-treasury.x.gsi.gov.uk Home Office Steve Trimmins ncsp@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Office of the Deputy Prime Minister Kenneth Cameron kenneth.cameron@odpm.gsi.gov.uk

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Further printed copies of the National Community Safety Plan are available from: Home Office Community Safety and Local Government Unit 4th Floor, Peel Building 2, Marsham Street London SW1P 4DF Email: ncsp@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

The document can be downloaded from: www.crimereduction.gov.uk/ncsp

Alternative formats are available on request.

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HM Government