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“To reduce crime and the fear of crime, tackle youth

c ri m e and violent, sexual and d ru g- re l ated crime, anti-


social behaviour and disorder, increasing safety in the
home and public spaces.”
Home Office Aim 1

This statement confirms our joint commitment to reduce crime and disorder. The Digest
is published quart e r ly and aims to support crime re d u c t i o n /c o m mu n i t y s a fe t y p r a c t i t i o n e r s
in police and local authorities working in stat u t o ry partnerships by fa c i l i t ating info rm at i o n
e x ch a n g e. The Digest is a fo rum for your initiat i ves and experi e n c e s. Its success depends on
yo u , the practitioners, c o n t ri buting your art i c l e s. Deadline for copy is given below. A rt i c l e s
MUST be submitted by this date.
So that eve ryone can benefit from your work and experi e n c e, we ask contri butors to
consider both what worked and what didn’t work within their projects. Projects may be well
c o n c e i ved and still not ach i eve all their aims; this does not mean they have fa i l e d . Please be
b r ave enough to discuss what aspects did not ach i eve the expected outcomes. Include as
mu ch info rm ation as you can, c ove ring the analysis of the pro blem and how it wa s
i d e n t i fi e d , the response devised and how it was implemented and an assessment of the final
outcomes.

Note:
The inclusion of mat e rial in the Digest or re fe rence to any pro d u c t s / s e rvices does not
signify that they have been tested or eva l u at e d . Nor should inclusion be thought to confer
‘official’ approval.
You can reproduce material from this Digest, but we ask that, you reference CRC and the
originating organisation as the source, you do not use the information out of context and
that there are no charges connected with the reproduction of the material.
October 2003
The next Digest will be
Centre Staff with you in January ‘04.

Director Training Team Training Resource Solutions


All contributions
Steve Trimmins David Fernley Simon Jones
be submitted by
November 19th 2003.
Support Services Gill Archibald Michael Hawtin
Liz Walton June Armstrong
Janet Caton Administration Unit Contributions to:
Richard Cox Dee Cooley Mark Ledder Jane Jones
Adrienne Jowitt-Thrall Anne Curran Ruth Whitaker Information Services Team
Ann Keen Martin Fenlon Tel: 01347 825095
Amanda Form Editor or 01765 602580
Information Services Christine Morrison Jane Jones Fax: 01347 825097
Jane Carpenter Jason Roach Design/Production
Kim Sutton Michael Hawtin Home Office
Stuart Charman Crime Reduction Centre
John Goldsbrough The Hawkhills, Easingwold,
For Training or General Enquiries:
Abby Hickman York YO61 3EG
Jane Jones Tel: 01347 825060 Tel: 01347 825060
Kathleen Noble Fax: 01347 825099
Richard Wales E-mail: crc@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

October 2003 1
Centre News 4
Crime Reduction Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Crime Reduction Centre Diary 2004 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Staff News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Crime Reduction Centre Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Passport to Crime Reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Five Minute Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Crime Prevention Initiatives (CPI) Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Active Communities 9
Women Influencing Safer Environments (WISE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Participation into Practice Award 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Community Safety Accreditation Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Anti-Social Behaviour 10
Operation Safer Travel (OST) - Mark of Excellence Certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
"Acceptable-behaviour contracts and anti-social behaviour orders" Booklet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Beggars given the 'Yellow Card' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Exploring solutions to 'g ra f f i t i' in Newcastle upon Tyne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Not Reinventing The Wheel: A Directory of Current Practice in
Tackling Anti-Social Behaviour by Scottish Local Authorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Tackling Anti-social Behaviour:
An Audit of Scottish Local Authority Practice 2001 - 2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Arson 14
The Role of the Fire Service in Crime Reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Home Fire Safety Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
School Arson: Education Under T h re a t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Funding for Arson Prevention Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Burglary 16
Experiences of older b u rg l a r y victims . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Distraction B u rg l a r y amongst older adults and minority ethnic communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Distraction B u rg l a r y Good Practice Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Older victims of b u rg l a r y and distraction b u rg l a r y
- recommendations for practitioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
‘Bogus Caller Watch’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Repeat Victimisation, Domestic B u rg l a r y Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Sponsorship to help reduce b u rg l a r y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
The Reducing Burglary Initiative: investigating burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Reducing Burglary Initiative: early findings on b u rg l a r y reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
The Reducing Burglary Initiative: planning for p a rt n e r s h i p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Open i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Pushing back the boundaries: new techniques for
assessing the impact of b u rg l a r y scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Business Crime 24
Security for Small Retailers scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Small Retailers in Deprived Areas - Guidelines for Practitioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
"Retail Crime: What are the Solutions?" - Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
St ra t e g y to Tackle Business-Related Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
D e r by s h i re Business Against Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
CCTV 26
LeedsWatch Local CCTV System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
ATM Robbery - Designing out the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Designing Out Crime 26
ATM Robbery - Designing out the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
No Particular Place to Go? Children, Young People and Public Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Designing Out Crime Association (DOCA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
ACPO CPI & Secured by Design News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Safe in the City - Planting the Seeds of Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000: Crime Prevention Measures for Rights of Way . . . . . .29
Planning out Crime Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Domestic Violence 30
Safety and Justice: the Government's Proposals on Domestic Violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Making it count: A practical guide to collecting and managing domestic violence data . . . . . . .31
Drugs & Alcohol 31
"Rat on a Rat" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Hidden Harm: Responding to the needs of children of problem drug users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Seizures of drugs in the UK 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

2 Contents October 2003


Proof of Age Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Brent Against Drugs (BAD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Fraud 34
Identity Theft: Do You Know the Signs? A Guide for businesses and individuals . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
G e n e ra l 34
Problem-Oriented Guides for Police . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Primary Care Trusts as responsible authorities:
A guide for Crime and D i s o rd e r Reduction Pa rt n e r s h i p s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
VICTOR - Crime and D i s o rd e r Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Superhighway Robbery: Preventing e-commerce crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
The New Politics of Crime and Punishment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Crime in England and Wales 2002/2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Keeping Section 17 on the agenda: Good process and practice for
local authorities implementing Section 17 of the 1998 Crime and Disorder Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
"Launching Crime Science" Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Leeds Community Safety - New Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead
Community Safety Pa rt n e r s h i p's Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
A New Director for Crimestoppers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
New Crime Prevention Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Hate/Race Crime 40
Racist harassment and support projects: Their role, impact and potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Multi-Agency Panel on Racial H a ra s s m e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
A Resource Directory and Guide for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual or Transgendered
victims of crime and h a ra s s m e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Neighbourhood Wa rd e n s & Neighbourhood Watch 42
The Effectiveness of Neighbourhood Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
National Neighbourhood Watch Association - 21st Anniversary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Flintshire Victim Support & Neighbourhood Watch Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Neighbourhood Watch Community Support Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
‘Wa rd e n’ - The Neighbourhood Warden Team Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Property Crime 44
A Different Tack on Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
National Churchwatch Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Ru ra l Crime 45
Ru ra l Safety Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Each article in the Digest
Sexual Offences 46 is highlighted with an
Sexual Offences Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 icon which will define
Town/Shopping Centre crime 46 the product described in
Shoplifting Leaflet for Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 that article. They are:
Vehicle Crime 47
Theft from Motor Vehicles - Advice Leaflet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Campaign/
Vehicle Crime Reduction Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Touring Caravans: Crime Reduction Officer's Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Initiative
Park Safe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Fo re c o u rt Crime Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Car Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Publication
The ‘Vulture’ Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Victims and Witnesses 50
Older people and fear of crime - the next steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Community Safety and Disabled People: The Way Forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Video
Victims Virtual Walkthrough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Streets Ahead: A joint inspection of the Street Crime Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Violent Crime/ Street crime 51
Streets Ahead: A joint inspection of the Street Crime Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Website/
Electronic
Youth Crime 52
Information
Positive Activities for Young People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Virtual Crucial Crew Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
‘Watch Over Me’ - A personal safety teaching programme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 G e n e ra l /
Clubs and Activities for Young People Leaflet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Communicating Citizenship to Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Exchange
Good2bsecure back for the new term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 of Ideas/
Reducing Crime against Students - Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Conferences
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56

October 2003 Contents 3


Crime Reduction Website
Following a series of national seminars hosted by the Crime Reduction Centre (CRC), a new
Good Pra c t i c e Seminars Mini-Site has been added to the Crime Reduction Web s i t e.
Conference papers and reports can be viewed and downloaded from the website at:
www.crimereduction.gov.uk/gpseminars
Details of award-winning initiat i ves that have been tried both around the UK and
overseas are now ava i l able on the Ideas eXch a n g e. O ver a hundred schemes are held in the
e X c hange and indexed either by location or crime type. We are keen to hear about any
schemes that you have tried.Visit the Exchange at: www.crimereduction.gov.uk/iex
The Learning Zone has also been updated and now features learning modules on the 'Ten
Principles of Crime Prevention’
www.crimereduction.gov.uk/learningzone/tenprinciples.htm
and the 'Onion-Peeling Principle' which is used when carrying out home security surveys.
www.crimereduction.gov.uk/learningzone/onionpeeling.htm

For more information contact Stuart Charman, Crime Reduction WebsiteManager, Home Office Crime
Reduction Centre, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG
Tel: 01347 825064 Fax: 01347 825097 E-mail: stuart.charman@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Crime Reduction Centre Diary 2004


The Crime Reduction Centre (CRC) has • Crime reduction tools,
p roduced a pocket diary for 2004, w h i ch including the Ten Principles.
aims to increase commu n i c ation and • Contact details for Crime and Disorder
i n fo rm ation sharing amongst cri m e Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs) and
reduction practitioners. Home Office Regional Directors.
Contact Simon Jones, Home The diary contains useful cri m e
Office Crime Reduction Centre, reduction info rm ation together with key If you are invo l ved in an initiat i ve or
The Hawkhills, contact details and it will be distri buted to p roject and feel that your partners wo u l d
Easingwold, York YO61 3EG practitioners in November. benefit from a CRC Diary, please contact us,
Tel: 01347 825081 The diary includes info rm ation on: outlining details of the initiat i ve, its aims
Fax: 01347 825096 • CRC’s products and services and how and objective s , those invo l ved and the
E-mail: to get hold of them. number of diaries you re q u i re. N u m b e r s
simon.jones@homeoffice. • Effective p a rt n e r s h ip working. are limited but we will do our best to meet
gsi.gov.uk • How to engage the community. all requests.

Staff News
C o n g r at u l ations to R i c h a rd Wa l e s, fo rm e r ly a member of the Training Resource Solutions
Team, who was promoted to Deputy Webmaster earlier this year, assisting Stuart Charman in
the Info rm ation Services Team.
John Goldsbro u g h joined CRC in August on a 12-month student placement. He will be
working in the Info rm ation Services Team on the Crime Reduction Web s i t e. John is two -
thirds of the way through a degree in Info rm ation Systems Management at Live rpool Jo h n
Moores University. His placement will enable him to put what he has learned into a practical
context as well as benefiting the centre with his recently acquired expertise.
Liz Wa l t o n joined Support Services on the 1st of September as team leader. S h e
p rev i o u s ly wo r ked for the Department of Work and Pensions in Leeds. P rior to this Liz
worked for many years in local offices and was responsible for ensuring accurate payments of
a wide range of benefits. She also managed a team investigating allegations of fraud.

4 Centre News October 2003


Crime Reduction Centre Publications
A survey has been carried out to determine how practitioners are using the various publica-
tions produced by the Crime Reduction Centre (CRC).

Home Security an introduction to domestic surveying


This computer-based training pack ag e, l a u n ched in 2001, aims to provide users with the
skills to be able to survey a domestic pro p e rt y, identifying any potential security risks and
providing practical solutions to reducing those risks.
Insurance companies have used the pack age to train their assessors, to enable them to
advise householders more effectively on security. A number of police forces have installed the
p a ck age onto their Intranets and Centrex use it as part of their foundation training course.

South Norfolk Home Wat ch , working with the support of the County District Crime and For more information contact
D i s o r d e r Reduction Pa rt n e r s h i p and the police, has used the pack age in an initiat i ve to John Broughton, Administrator,
e n c o u r age householders to increase the security of their pro p e rt y. In June 2003, the gro u p South Norfolk Home Watch,
a rranged a training session for over 60 co-ordinat o r s. Fe e d b a ck has suggested that future Police station, Stanley Road,
sessions should include contri butions from speakers such as lock s m i t h s , police offi c e r s , Diss IP22 4BP
victims of bu rg l a ry and Home Wat ch A d m i n i s t r at o r s. T h ey also identified the need to Tel: 01379 650773
i n t roduce the pack age gradually and to tailor the training session to the needs of the Fax: 01379 650824
attendees. E-mail: southwatch.norpol
@gtnet.gov.uk
A c o m mu n i t y g ro u p in Goole is using the pack age to make homes in their area more
s e c u re. The training fo rms part of the police-led initiat i ve, ' O p e r ation Cascade', w h e re
members of the c o m mu n i t y a re being empowe red with the skills to survey homes. T h e
group's crime reduction experience was varied but, by the beginning of the second session,
they said they had already made changes to the security in their own homes. The next phase
of this initiative will be to target high crime areas and advertise the use of home security and
s a fe t y surveys to the public.

For more information contact PC Linda Duncan, Humberside Police, Beverley Police Station, Sessions
House, New Walk, Beverley, East Riding HU17 7AF Tel: 01482 396419

Following on from this experience and other enquiries, a short training session is being
developed by CRC, to introduce community groups and those new to crime reduction to the
Home Security Pa ck ag e. The session will be in two parts, with each part running for two and
a half-hours and including ap p rox i m at e ly 2 hours of self-study and a home survey. T h e
course is designed to guide discussion on home security and s a fe t y and to help the audience
identify security and s a fe t y i s s u e s. Details of the course will be ava i l able on the Cri m e
Reduction Website later this year.

For more information contact Simon Jones, Home Office Crime Reduction Centre, The Hawkhills,
Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825081 Fax: 01347 825096
E-mail: simon.jones@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Crime Reduction Basics


This two and a half-hour print-based training session is designed to introduce individuals
and c o m mu n i t y g roups to the basic principles of crime and d i s o r d e r reduction and
encourages them to get involved in reducing crime, especially anti-social behaviour. It can be
v i ewed and downloaded via the Crime Reduction Web s i t e (w w w. c r i m e re d u c t i o n .
g ov. u k / l e a r n i n g zo n e / c r i m e re d u c t i o n b a s i c s . h t m) or ordered in hard copy from the
Crime Reduction Centre on 01347 825079.
Neighbourhood Wat ch C o - o r d i n ators have found this pack age a useful source of cri m e
reduction info rm at i o n . Each section is approx i m at e ly 40 minutes long to enable flexibility in
l e a rn i n g. Crime Reduction Basics was used at the Staffordshire Police County Neighbourhood
Watch Conference in September this year.

October 2003 Centre News 5


Passport to Evaluation
This print-based distance-learning pack age is designed to assist people who are invo l ved in
planning or managing projects and who are required to carry out eva l u at i o n s. Each passport
contains an eva l u ation sheet and fe e d b a ck suggests that the majority of users are left fe e l i n g
‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ about carrying out an evaluation.
Sue Lambert from Norwich City Council initially ordered the book for personal interest
and discovered it could be used effectively within her own organisation.
The passport has been distri buted to the Gove rnment Office for the Northeast (GO-NE)
Partnerships, to assist them in planning and evaluating crime reduction initiatives. The Crime
Reduction Team Leader, M i ke Bradley, found the book ve ry easy to use. He commented that
people can re t u rn to it again and again as a reminder and that it was a useful tool fo r
assessing activity plans and helping to explain the language of evaluation.
South Gloucester Community Safety Partnership ran a project evaluation workshop based
on the Passport to Evaluation in April this year. The workshop was funded by the Gove rn m e n t
Office for the Southwest(GO-SW) and was designed and led by Crime Concern. It was aimed
at a broad range of officers from across the p a rt n e r s h i p involved in various projects running
in South Gloucestershire. Attendees can use their newly found skills to monitor and eva l u at e
existing and future projects. Following their training, practitioners have been able to evaluate
p rojects in a more cre d i ble way, w h i ch has led to dramatic improvements in the quality and
type of project applications received by the partnership.

Passport to Crime Reduction


This new distance-learning pack age is the Crime Reduction Website at:
second in the passport series and is www.crimereduction.gov.uk/
essential reading for anyone new to the passporttocrimereduction
field of crime re d u c t i o n . The pack ag e The Pa s s p o rt to Crime Reduction will
examines what is meant by ‘ c ri m e fo rm part of the new modular training
re d u c t i o n ’ and looks at the pro bl e m - course programme to be run by CRC and as
solving tools and pro c e s s e s , w h i ch fo rm p re-course learning mat e rial for the new
the basis of the pro fe s s i o n . It also fo u n d ation course. It can also be used as a
contains a case study allowing the user stand-alone training package.
to put their new skills into practice. On
completion of the pack ag e, the user For more information contact Simon Jones,
will have a fo u n d ation of know l e d g e Home Office Crime Reduction Centre, The
based upon years of pro fessional and Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG
practical experience. The Passport can Tel: 01347 825081 Fax: 01347 825096
be viewed and downloaded via the E-mail: simon.jones@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Five Minute Guides


The Crime Reduction Centre is producing a series of short interactive guides, w h i ch will
form a suite of basic guides available on the Crime Reduction Website and also as a CD ROM
in the future. The info rm ation contained in the guides will be aimed at the public and as a
reminder for practitioners.
The first guide, which will concentrate on mobile phone security, will soon be available
on the website. Some of the other suggested topics include:
• Vehicle s e c u ri t y. • Personal s a fe t y.
• PC/Laptop security. • Credit card/wallet/purse security.

If you have any suggestions for information or topics that you think should be included in the new Five
Minute Guides contact Michael Hawtin, Home Office Crime Reduction Centre, The Hawkhills, Easingwold,
York YO61 3EG. Tel: 01347 825082 Fax: 01347 825096 E-mail: michael.hawtin@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

6 Centre News October 2003


Crime Prevention Initiatives (CPI) Form
CRC maintains a database of crime prevention initiatives, which is used as an information-sharing tool for practitioners with
enquiries for the Information Services Team. Details of initiatives or projects that are planned/ongoing/completed or have been
abandoned, are submitted using the CPI form. This information is then considered for inclusion in a future copy of the Digest and/or
the Ideas Exchange on the Crime Reduction Website.
If you know of an initiative in your area, please send details in using this form to: Jane Jones, Home Office Crime Reduction
Centre, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825095 E-mail: jane.jones@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Alternatively
complete the form on-line via the Crime Reduction Websiteat: www.crimereduction.gov.uk/cpiform.htm

Project Name:

Description Summary:
(the aims and objectives of the project and how it works)

Geographic Location:
National: Project Area:

County: Coverage:
e.g. specific estate, town centre

Lead Organisation:

Partners:

Contact Details:
Name(s):

Organisation:

Address:

Post Code:

Tel: Fax:

E-mail: Website:

Project Status: Planned/Ongoing/Completed/Abandoned (delete as appropriate)

Start Date: End Date:

October 2003 CPI Form 7


Materials: Is there any material to support this initiative?
(e.g. Leaflets, video, report, handbook etc.)
Please detail and attach if possible.

Evaluation: If there is to be a later evaluation, please note here so that we can


(Is there anything follow up at a later date.
documented which gives an
indication of the success or
otherwise of the project ?
Please detail key findings and
where they came from.)

Funding:
(Funding Sources if applicable e.g. Home office, Local Authority, Business, Panel - Cash or Kind e.g. secondment/office space)

Total Cost: £
(if known)

Thank You
I agree to this information being stored on the Home Office database/website Yes No

Office Use Only:


Source: Sub:

Cat: Keyw:

D Ref:

8 CPI Form October 2003


Women Influencing Safer Environments
(WISE)
WISE

Women Influencing Safer Enviro n m e n t s • Supporting the multi-agency approach


( Wise) was established in 1997 and to ensure that the promotion of the
members include the Po l i c e, P ro b ation and women's perspective on community
Social Serv i c e s , H e a l t h , L a n c a s h i re County safety is at the fo re f ront of the public,
C o u n c i l , Vi c t i m S u p p o r t and pri vat e p ri vate and voluntary sectors' agendas.
businesses. The group meets each month to • Encouraging inter-agency working and
discuss va rious issues re l ating to p e r s o n a l pooling resources and experience to
s a fe t y. Its many initiat i ves include improve community safety.
p u blishing s a fe t y a dvice leaflets and • Encouraging agencies, particularly
o rganising a national c o n fe re n c e o n housing associations and local
women's safety issues. authority planners, to assist in the
The group's aim is to influence safe r development of community s a fe t y.
e nv i ronments for the communities of • Examining ways of
Lancashire by: promoting safety
• Promoting and encouraging a safer on public transport
environment both at home and and in public car
at work. parks.
• Adopting responsibility for promoting
positive action on community s a fe t y For more information visit the website:
at every available opportunity. www.wise-lancs.info

Participation into Practice Award 2003


Tenants Participation Advisory Service

Four c o m mu n i t y g roups have re c e i ved national recognition fo l l owing their invo l vement in
tackling crime and anti-social behaviour in their neighbourhoods. The groups from London,
B i rm i n g h a m , M i d d l e s b rough and Luton are winners of the Home Office funded
' Pa rt i c i p ation into Practice' competition organised by the Tenants Pa rt i c i p ation A dv i s o ry
Service (TPAS).
The competition was introduced in Ja nu a ry 2003 with the aim of recognising g o o d
p r a c t i c e in involving communities in crime re d u c t i o n . This year's cat e g o ries included a n t i -
social behav i o u r, bu rg l a ry and ve h i c l e c ri m e (theft of and theft fro m ) . Details of initiat i ve s
a re encouraged from vo l u n t a ry c o m mu n i t y-based groups invo l ved in helping to re d u c e
c rime in their are a . Winners re c e i ve £1,000 plus 2 free places for the annual T PA S
conference, where they are presented with a certificate.
This year's winners we re :
• Sidmouth Mews and Regent Square Tenants and Residents Association,
London - anti-social behaviour.
• Small Health Practical Care Project, Birmingham - burglary.
• Southfield Community Council, Middlesbrough - theft from vehicles.
• Wauluds Association of Tenants and Residents, Luton - theft of vehicles.

For more information contact TPAS, 5th Floor, Trafford House, Chester Road, Manchester M32 0RS
Tel: 0161 868 3500 Fax: 0161 877 6256 E-mail: info@tpas.org.uk
or visit their website: www.tpas.org.uk/crimecompetition.html

October 2003 Active Communities 9


Community Safety Accreditation Scheme
Home Office

The Home Office has announced the results e n g aged in c o m mu n i t y s a fe t y wo r k .


of a funding round for C o m mu n i t y S a fe t y A c c redited persons will wear a nat i o n a l ly
Accreditation Schemes. recognised badge and also have the option
The round provides funding to police to wear the badge of the force that has
forces to help them set up an accre d i t at i o n a c c redited them (subject to the ag re e m e n t
s cheme under the Police Refo rm Act 2002. of their employers and the re l evant police
The total grant will be shared between 8 fo r c e ) . The badge shows members of the
For more information contact forces around the country. The money will p u blic that the accredited person is
Joe Pugh, Home Office help them to set up schemes with the aim t ru s t wo rt hy and that the org a n i s ation fo r
Reassurance Team, of accrediting 300 people by the end of w h i ch they work is re l i abl e. T h o s e
Crime Reduction Delivery Team, M a r ch 2004. Forces to re c e i ve money a c c redited are also eligible for some minor
2nd Floor, Allington Towers, include Cleve l a n d , D u r h a m , G we n t , powers, though these are not compulsory.
19, Allington Street, L H a m p s h i re, L a n c a s h i re, M e t ro p o l i t a n , This is an important first step in the
ondon SW1E 5EB North Wales and West Yorkshire. g ove rn m e n t ’s effo rts to strengthen the
Tel: 020 7035 5095 C o m mu n i t y S a fe t y A c c re d i t at i o n extended police fa m i ly, p rov i d i n g
E-mail: S c hemes will help to improve the co- reassurance to the public and helping to
joseph.pugh@homeoffice. o r d i n at i o n , visibility and standards of large i m p rove police re l ations within the
gsi.gov.uk numbers of staff from va rious sectors community.

Operation Safer Travel (OST) - Mark of


Excellence Certificate
West Midlands Police and Travel West Midlands

O p e ration Safer Tra ve l (OST) is a unique p a rt n e r s h i p, w h i ch was fo rmed over 4 years ag o


between Travel West Midlands and West Midlands Police. The p a rt n e r s h i p aims to reduce and
detect anti-social behaviour and crime on buses and the Metro system in the area.
Tr avel West Midlands is the re g i o n ’s largest bus operator and carries over 1 million
passengers each day. T h i rty million journ eys are made by s ch o o l ch i l d ren and in July this
ye a r, the p a rt n e r s h i p released a new OST Mark of Excellence Cert i fi c ate for s ch o o l s, yo u t h
o rg a n i s ations and individuals. The cert i fi c ate is awarded by the p a rt n e r s h i p to s ch o o l s t h at
a c t i ve ly part i c i p ate in bus s a fe t y and good citizenship initiat i ve s. It provides recognition to
these groups of their positive and pro - a c t i ve work with the p a rt n e r s h i p and also helps to
improve relationships between the s ch o o l s and pupils.
The first s ch o o l to re c e i ve the awa r d , St Thomas Aquinas S ch o o l in Kings Nort o n ,
B i rm i n g h a m , c o n t ri buted to an improvement in behaviour on the bu s e s , as well as show i n g
an increased respect for drivers and staff.
In 2002, Operation Safer Travel saw 160 joint operations carried out by the p a rt n e r s h i p,
with over 60,000 buses stopped and ch e cked by Tr avel West Midlands' Reve nue Inspectors.
O ver 1 million passengers had their travel cards and tickets scrutinised on both buses and
trams and 152 arrests we re made for a va riety of offe n c e s. P hysical dri ver assaults we re
reduced by 42% and passenger assaults by 61%.

For more information contact Stuart Henry, Operation


Safer Travel Co-ordinator, Travel West Midlands,
121, Miller Street, Aston, Birmingham
Tel: 0121 254 6967
or visit their website: w w w. t ra ve l w m . c o. u k / o s t

10 Active Communities/Anti-Social Behaviour October 2003


"Acceptable-behaviour contracts and
anti-social behaviour orders" Booklet
North Yorkshire Police

North Yorkshire Police, in association with Selby District Community Safety Partnership, S a fe r
York and the Youth Offending Te a m s , h ave published a booklet that looks at the pro bl e m s
associated with anti-social behaviour. The idea came from a similar initiative run by the New
Forest Community S a fe t y Partnership as fe at u red in the April 2002 Digest.
The booklet highlights the need for housing, e d u c at i o n , the police and other re l eva n t
agencies to share info rm at i o n . It recognises the initial success of using Acceptable Behaviour
Contracts (ABCs) in identifying underlying reasons for anti-social behav i o u r s u ch as
bu l ly i n g, substance misuse or fa m i ly diffi c u l t i e s. The pro c e d u re enables the re l evant ag e n c y
to tackle the pro blem or proceed with a contract or 'pro m i s e ' , w h i ch young people
understand more easily than a 'contract'. The ABC gives the person the chance to face up to
their behaviour and act positively to correct it with the help of other agencies.
An example used in the booklet is 2 youngsters playing football in a communal are a ,
resulting in smashed windows on their estat e. D u ring the initial interve n t i o n , t h ey
‘promised’ not to play football and after 6 months of good behaviour, they received a reward
of two leather footballs and local football training.
The booklet is ava i l able from va rious outlets and there are plans to link it with new
tenancy contracts both for the local authority and Registered Social Landlords.

For more information and copies of the booklet, published in March 2003, contact PC Andy Patchett,
Youth Action Officer/Anti-social BehaviourCo-ordinator, Selby CommunitySafety Partnership,
Portholme Road, Selby, North Yorkshire YO8 4QQ
Tel: 01904 669671 E-mail: andrew.patchett@northyorkshire.pnn.police.uk

Beggars given the 'Yellow Card'


Gloucestershire Constabulary

Police in Gloucestershire have launched an being implemented within the county. A n


i n i t i at i ve in a bid to crack down on the ' A l t e rn at i ves to B e g g i n g C o - o r d i n ator' wa s
numbers of people begging on the streets. re c r uited earlier this year who is
The 'Ye l l ow Card' system has been re s p o n s i ble for co-ordinating the work of
i n t roduced in Cheltenham and was set up the nu m e rous support agencies as well as
fo l l owing consultation with the Boro u g h i n t roducing a 'Dive rted Giving Sch e m e ' .
C o u n c i l , Cheltenham C o m mu n i t y P ro j e c t s This invo l ves the installation of dedicat e d
and va rious other agencies who prov i d e b oxes situated in va rious locations to
support for the homeless. e n c o u r age the public to donate via the
The first time a person is caught
b e g g i n g t h ey re c e i ve a ye l l ow card, a l s o
known as a 'beg caution'. If they are caught
again within the next 6 months they are
o f ficial container rather than give money
d i re c t ly to beggars. This is similar to the
c a m p a i g n o rganised by the Safe r
Middlesbrough Pa rt n e r s h i p, which fe at u re d
“ The first
time a person
a rre s t e d . The card explains why the in the July 2003 edition of the Digest. is caught
wa rning has been issued and where the
person can find help with issues such as For more information contact Insp Rachel Jones, begging they
h o u s i n g, d ru g s , d ebts and jobs. It is hoped Gloucestershire Constabulary, Cheltenham and
t h at the initiat i ve will assist in securi n g Tewkesbury Divisional Police HQ, receive a
help for those people who genu i n e ly need Talbot House, Lansdown Road, Cheltenham,
i t , while helping to reduce a n t i - s o c i a l Gloucestershire GL51 6QT yellow
behaviour and disorder. Tel: 01242 276140
The ye l l ow card scheme is only one
element of a much wider begging i n i t i at i ve
E-mail: rachel.jones
@gloucestershire.pnn.police.uk
card...

October 2003 Anti-Social Behaviour 11
Exploring solutions to 'graffiti' in
Newcastle upon Tyne
Northumbria University

Exploring solutions to graffiti in Newcastle • Local artists stressed that the need to be
upon Tyne examines whether legal g r a f fi t i seen is key. Tagging was there fo re
sites can reduce the amount of graffi t i considered to be an unavoidable
ap p e a ring in the city. The study used development stage in any artist's career.
i n t e rv i ews with members of the publ i c, • As many people like graffiti as dislike

“ ...whether
legal graffiti
members of the local G r a f fi t i Fo rum
and those invo l ved in the local graffi t i
s c e n e, to establish the most effe c t i ve
i n t e rve n t i o n , or mix of interve n t i o n s , t h at •
it. However, most people felt that tags
have a bad effect on local areas and on
them as individuals.
Graffiti p ro blems vary from place to
sites can could reduce the negat i ve impact of place.
graffiti. • A range of solutions is essential - local
reduce the w ri t e r s , Graffiti Forum members, and
Six key questions we re considered in the general public (including Metro
amount of compiling this report: users) identified a wide range of
• What is graffiti? What does the term potential solutions to the emerging
graffiti mean to those who are involved in ‘graffiti problem’. Many of these
apparently doing graffiti? solutions represent one of 4
appearing in • What are the causes (reasons) for potentially complementary types of
doing graffiti? intervention: diversion, enforcement,
the city.
” • What are the perceived impacts of
doing graffiti for the individual
concerned and the wider society?
• Where is graffiti undertaken? What

situational crime prevention
and education.
Legal sites and sustained projects can
work but will never completely
types of places/locations/sites are eradicate illegal graffiti.
graffiti hotspots and why? Where do • Enforcement and crime prevention
local writers prefer to do their work? interventions will not work in isolation
• Would legal sites work in reducing and should be implemented alongside
graffiti within the city? What other approaches to solving graffiti.
characteristics would an ideal/legal
site, or sites for graffiti have? Where The full report, published in April 2003 and
should such sites be? priced £15.00 is available from PEANuT
• What other solutions to the 'graffiti (Participatory Evaluation and Appraisal in
p ro blem' in Newcastle upon Tyne can Newcastle upon Tyne), Division of Geography,
be identified? Lipman Building, Northumbria University,
Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST Tel: 0191 227 3848
Some of the key findings include: E-mail:ge.peanut@northumbria.ac.uk It can also
• Many local graffiti artists pre fe rred to be viewed and downloaded via their website:
use terms such as aerosol art to http://northumbria.ac.uk/business/pa
distinguish themselves from the more /consultres/graffiti/?trail=139,3076,59
mindless and indiscriminate 'tagging' 482,66497,66497,66503
(name signing) that others engage in.
• The term graffiti is often misused The executive summary can also be viewed and
and does not encompass the variety of downloaded via the IdeA Website(registration
forms that graffiti and 'g r a f fi t i art' required): w w w. i d e a - k n ow l e d g e .
can take. gov.uk/80256d350027cd0f/
• Reasons for engaging in graffiti and httppublicpages/FD480B0ED2CAAEC58
the impacts it has on individuals 0256D630056EEB7/$file/graffiti.pdf
va ri e d .

12 Anti-Social Behaviour October 2003


Not Reinventing The Wheel: A Directory of
Current Practice in Tackling Anti-Social
Behaviour by Scottish Local Authorities
Scottish Executive

This directory has been published for practitioners whose work involves combating anti-
social behaviour. It will also be useful for those planning new projects or initiatives as it
enables them to see whether a similar idea has been tried and tested elsewhere.
P rojects are cat e g o rised into topics, with some ap p e a ring in more than one
c at e g o ry. For example, working with young people is cro s s - re fe renced to
A c c e p t able Behaviour Contracts (ABCs) and details of specialist teams are
included in each section.
The dire c t o ry only bri e f ly outlines the nat u re of initiat i ve s , but full
contact details are provided for those practitioners who have been involved in
projects to be able to obtain further info rm at i o n .
Because projects are those identified through the audit of local authori t y
p ro c e d u res and practices, t h e re is little info rm ation on initiat i ves intro d u c e d
by Housing A s s o c i ations and Registered Social Landlords (RSLs). F u rt h e r
i n fo rm ation is required from this group for future updates of the directory.

Copies of the directory, published in July 2003 are available free from The Stationery Office Bookshop,
71, Lothian Road, Edinburgh EH3 9AZ Tel: 0870 606 5566. Copies can also be viewed and downloaded
via their website: www.scotland.gov. u k / l i b ra ry 5 / s o c i a l / n rt w - 0 0 . a s p

Tackling Anti-social Behaviour:


An Audit of Scottish Local Authority
Practice 2001 - 2002
Scottish Executive

The info rm ation in this re p o rt is take n • providing intensive supervision of the


f rom audits of the 32 Scottish Local most anti-social families and
Au t h o rities between March and Nove m b e r p e rp e t r ators of anti-social behaviour
2 0 0 1 . The info rm ation obtained at the • promoting the use of mediation,
audit has been updated to take account of supporting victims, witnesses
ongoing development and amendment of and complainants
policies and procedures since the audit, as a • making use of techniques such as
result of internal rev i ew or legislat i ve Acceptable Behaviour Contracts (ABCs).
change.
The aim of this p u bl i c at i o n is to The re p o rt was written befo re the
p rovide an ove rv i ew of how a n t i - s o c i a l i n t roduction of the Anti-Social Behav i o u r
b e h av i o u r is being dealt with by Scottish Bill and there fo re many of the issues raised
Local Au t h o ri t i e s. A major theme emerg i n g will be addressed by the provisions within
f rom these examples is that co-ordinat e d the Bill.
responses from all re l evant agencies
s i g n i fi c a n t ly reduces incidences of Copies of this report, published in July 2003 are
anti-social behav i o u r and neighbour available free from The Stationery Office
nu i s a n c e. Funding has been made ava i l abl e Bookshop, 71, Lothian Road, Edinburgh EH3 9AZ
for local authorities to support new Tel: 0870 606 5566.
initiatives in the areas of: Copies can also be viewed and downloaded via
• extending Community their website:
Warden s ch e m e s www.scotland.gov. u k / l i b ra ry 5 /
• establishing specialist anti-social social/tasb-00.asp
behaviour teams at community level
October 2003 Anti-Social Behaviour 13
The Role of the Fire Service in Crime
Reduction
NACRO CommunitySafetyBriefing Paper

Community s a fe t y has always formed an integral part of the Fire Service's role, with many of
its aims and objectives shared with Crime and D i s o r d e r Reduction Pa rtnerships (CDRPs).
Section 97 of the Police Refo rm A c t , w h i ch names Fire Au t h o rities as re s p o n s i ble bodies
alongside the police, police authorities and local authori t i e s , will necessitate the Fire
S e rv i c e ’s closer involvement in formulating and implementing crime and disorder reduction
strategies.
This b ri e fing pap e r has been produced as an introduction for CDRPs to the stru c t u re of
the Fire Service and ways in which they can work in partnership more effectively. Publication
of the report was timed to coincide with the introduction of the Fire Service's new responsi-
b i l i t i e s. It provides examples of existing good practice i n i t i at i ves aimed at reducing ve h i c l e
c ri m e, youth crime and anti-social behaviour.
The work of the brigades and CDRPs overlap in a number of key subjects including:
• Arson prevention - arson now accounts for up to 70% of fires in some areas of
the country.
• Vehicle c ri m e - there are strong links between a number of vehicle thefts and vehicle
ignitions. It is estimated that up to 45% of vehicles deliberately set on fire have been
used in some form of crime.
• Anti-social behaviour and youth disorder - it has been estimated that approximately 37%
of all deliberate fires are as a result of youth disorder.

Copies of this report, published in May 2003 and priced £5.00 can be obtained from NACRO
Publications, 169, Clapham Road, London SW9 0PU Tel: 020 7840 6427. Copies can also be viewed and
downloaded via their website: www.nacro. o rg . u k / d a t a / b r i e f i n g s / n a c ro - 2 0 03 0 5 28 0 1 - c s p s
.pdf
For details of the fees and to NAC RO are also hosting a c o n fe re n c e entitled ‘Playing with Fire: The role of the Fire &
book a place contact Laura Rescue Se rvice in crime reduction and social inclusion’ on 12th November 2003 at the
Halley, NACRO, L i ve rpool Marriott Hotel South. The c o n fe re n c e will bring together re p re s e n t at i ves from the
237, Queenstown Road, Fire Service, Arson Control Forum and the Home Office with the aim of:
London SW8 3NP • Helping Community Safety Managers and other members of CDRPs with the process of
Tel: 020 7501 0551 integrating the Fire Authorities as responsible authorities.
Fax: 020 7501 0556 • Helping Fire Authorities take on the responsible authority status.
E-mail: laura.halley • Providing practical guidance on effective partnership working between the Fire and
@nacrocsp.org.uk Rescue Service and other agencies to reduce crime.

“ This briefing paper has been produced as


an introduction for CDRPs to the structure of
the Fire Service and ways in which they can
work in partnership more effectively.

14 Arson October 2003
School Arson: Education Under Threat
Arson Prevention Bureau/Association of British Insurers

A r s o n at t a cks on s ch o o l s amount to huge • Virtually all (97%) of s ch o o l-time


costs in terms of the damage and s ch o o l arson fires are started within a
d i s r uption they cause. In 2001, i n s u re r s building compared to about
e s t i m ated that over £65 million wo rth of three-quarters (77%) of those
i n s u red damage was caused to s ch o o l s by occurring outside of s ch o o l- t i m e.
fi res started deliberat e ly. H oweve r, the tru e During s ch o o l-time arsonists have
cost of a r s o n at t a cks on s ch o o l s is mu ch better access to internal areas, which
h i g h e r. E a ch fi re results in the use of may also be more secluded than
resources by the fi re brigade and the external areas.
police, while staff, pupils and parents suffer • Of deliberately started s ch o o l-time
considerable inconvenience and disruption. s ch o o l fires that occur internally, the
The general perception is that most delib- majority (59%) started in a cloakroom.
e r at e ly started s ch o o l fi res occur outside of In contrast, cloakrooms are one of the
s ch o o l t i m e, d u ring holiday s , evenings and least common places for accidental
at we e ke n d s. H oweve r, n e a r ly a third of all fires to start, accounting for just 5% of
s ch o o l a r s o n fi res happen when pupils are all such fi re s. While arson attacks rarely
in s ch o o l. occur in the kitchen or canteen area,
This is the first comprehensive study of this is one of the most common
s ch o o l-time s ch o o l a r s o n fi res in England locations for accidental fi re s. The next
and Wa l e s. It covers the period 1990 to most popular location for s ch o o l-time
2000 and includes fi res at pri m a ry, s ch o o l arson fires were classrooms
s e c o n d a ry and special s ch o o l s. The study (12%) and storage rooms (11%).
examines the characteristics of s ch o o l- t i m e • D e l i b e r at e ly started s ch o o l fi re s , which
a r s o n at t a ck s , s u ch as where they start , t h e began during s ch o o l- t i m e, are more
timing of fi re s , w h e re in the country they l i ke ly to occur between 1pm and
a re more like ly to occur and who start e d 1.59 pm. There is also a suggestion that
t h e m . F i g u res for accidental fi res are also they are more likely to occur
given so that comparisons can be made. mid-week.
• According to fire brigade records,
A summary of the main findings are: individuals under the age of 18 were
• Since 1994, the number of arson responsible for 93% of all intentionally
attacks on s ch o o l s has been in decline started s ch o o l-time
- driven pri m a ri ly by a fall in the s ch o o l fi re s. Just over a
number of deliberately started fires quarter were started by
occurring outside of s ch o o l- t i m e. A children younger than
corresponding fall has not been seen in 7 years old.
the number of s ch o o l arson attacks that
occur when pupils are present, and in Copies of this report, published in
fact, the last two years (1999 and June 2003 and priced £10.00 are
2000) have witnessed an increase in available from the Arson Prevention
this type of fire. This has caused the Bureau, 51, Gresham Street,
proportion of all s ch o o l arson fires London EC2V 7HQ
represented by s ch o o l-time attacks to Tel: 020 7216 7474
increase from 13% to nearly one third. Fax: 020 7216 7525.
• Half of all s ch o o l-time s ch o o l fires in The report can also be viewed and
England and Wales are arson at t a ck s. downloaded via their website:
www.arsonpreventionbureau.org.uk/
Publications/Files/
EducationUnderThreat.pdf

October 2003 Arson 15


Funding for Arson Prevention Projects
ArsonControl Forum

The Fire Service Minister re c e n t ly announced £4 million to fund a r s o n reduction pro j e c t s.


This round of funding comes from the Arson Control Forum Implementation fund, which is
making £13 million available over the next 3 years for arson reduction schemes.
C rime and D i s o r d e r Reduction Pa rtnerships (CDRPs) and Fire Au t h o rity - led part n e r-
ships are being invited to submit bids by 31st October 2003. P rojects of particular intere s t
include schemes that clear abandoned vehicles from the streets before they are set on fire.
Successful existing schemes include:
• A car clearance scheme in Avon, which removes derelict and abandoned vehicles
promptly from streets across the county. In the 18 months to October 2001, the number
of deliberate fires across the whole of the Avon area fell in absolute terms by 3% - 17%.
This was less than predicted locally without the scheme.
• An Arson Task Force in Newcastle's West End initiated schemes that boarded up derelict
Further advice on how to apply p ro p e rt i e s , ensuring rubbish was stored correctly or cleared away, whilst also removing
for funding and what should be derelict and abandoned vehicles quickly. During the first 3 years of the scheme, the
included in potential bids can be West End saw deliberate property fires reduced by over 22%. Other 'less serious'
obtained from malicious fires were reduced by over 30% and hoax calls to the emergency services were
John Manning reduced by 62%.
Tel: 020 7944 8141
E-mail: To apply for funding, partnerships should compose a 2 - 3 page document and submit it
john.manning@odpm.gsi.gov.uk to Mr John Manning, O f fice of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM), Zone 17/C, Po rt l a n d
or Terry Pretious H o u s e, S t ag Place, London SW1E 5LP no later than 31st October 2003. Details can also be
Tel: 020 7944 6152 viewed and downloaded via the ODPM Website:
E-mail: terry.pretious www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/groups/odpm_fire/documents/sectionhomepage/
@odpm.gsi.gov.uk odpm_fire_page.hcsp

Experiences of older burglary victims


Home Office Findings 198

This re p o rt looks at a subject group living • Targeting appeared to relate more to


in sheltered accommodation in Nort h the location and physical security of
Wa l e s , i d e n t i fied in the course of a the (sheltered) accommodation than
Reducing B u rg l a ry I n i t i at i ve pro j e c t . I t the householder’s vulnerability.
suggests that being a victim of burglary has Improving location and design in
a significant effect on the health of the security would help reduce risks.
e l d e r ly, w h i ch differs from the findings of • Improved communication of the
the first re p o rt "Distraction bu rg l a ry outcome of investigation and
amongst older adults and m i n o rity ethnic prosecutions can reassure older victims
c o m mu n i t i e s " . H oweve r, this may be of burglary considerably and could be
explained because the ave r age age of the adopted as good practice.
g roup in the second re p o rt we re ap p rox i-
m at e ly 5 years older and living in Copies of this report, published in June 2003 are
residential care, w h i ch indicates a gre at e r available free from the Research Development
level of pre-existing decline. and Statistics Directorate (RDS),
The key findings we re : Communications Development Unit,
• When this group were victims, their Room 264, 50, Queen Anne’s Gate, London
health declined faster than non-burgled SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 E-mail:
fellow residents of a similar age. publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk and can
• Typically, the reported impact of also be viewed and downloaded from the Home
burglary on the health and emotional Office Website:
state of older victims is gre at . www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/
pdfs2/r198.pdf
16 Arson/Burglary October 2003
Distraction B u rg l a ry amongst older adults
and minority ethnic communities
Home Office Research Study 269 and Findings 197

The Distraction B u rg l a ry Ta s k force was set • Risk factors for potential older victims
up in A p ril 2000 with the aim of tack l i n g included problems with mobility and
distraction bu rg l a ry and improving the daily life, few regular visitors and few
quality of life of vulnerable commu n i t i e s. d o o r s t e p - ch e cking routines.
To gain a better understanding of the extent • Victimisation was lower among
of distraction bu rg l a ry and the effects of minority ethnic communities.
being a target of this type of cri m e, t h e Suggested reasons include higher
Ta s k force commissioned two re s e a r ch occupancy levels at high-risk times,
s t u d i e s. The first study concentrated on and a greater awareness of doorstep
people over the age of 60 who are checking procedures.
victimised most fre q u e n t ly. The second
l o o ked at m i n o r ity ethnic c o m mu n i t i e s R e c o m m e n d ations cover the fo l l ow i n g
who appear to be targeted less fre q u e n t ly issues:
by distraction burglars. This report presents • Raising awareness of self-protection,
the results of these 2 studies. such as through campaigns designed
The findings of this re p o rt will be of for specific community groups.
i n t e rest to all org a n i s ations working with • Reducing vulnerability risk factors, e.g.
older victims of distraction bu rg l a ry a n d minimising signs of neglect.
s p e c i fic vulnerable gro u p s. The practical • Reducing the impact of the crime,
re c o m m e n d ations cover advice on dealing which although was not great for most
with victims of distraction bu rg l a ry t o victims, did have a serious effect on a
e n s u re that the v i c t i m is given suffi c i e n t small number.
s u p p o rt to limit the impact of the cri m e
and also how to raise awa reness of the Copies of this report and associated findings,
crime without raising the fear of crime. both published in June 2003 are available free
The main points emerging from the from the Research Development and Statistics
study are: Directorate (RDS), Communications
• Two differing victim profiles: victims Development Unit, Room 264, 50, Queen Anne’s
who admitted the burglar, and those Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 E-
where the burglar entered uninvited. mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
• Risk factors leading to targeting and can also be viewed and downloaded from
included neglected gardens and the Home Office Website:
houses, surrounding houses neglected www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/
and front door not visible hors269.pdf (Research Study 269) and
to neighbours. www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/
r197.pdf (Findings 197)

Distraction B u rg l a ry Good Practice Guide


Home Office

Do you have a copy of the Distraction Burglary Taskforce's Good Practice Guide? If you have any queries, contact
Ruth Houston, Home Office
The Guide, which comes in a green box, fe at u res the "Stop, Chain, Check" logo, contains Crime Reduction Delivery Team,
a ring binder, two videos and various security gadgets. The Task Force would be interested to 1st Floor, Allington Towers,
hear how useful you have found the G u i d e in your wo r k , as well as how you have used the 19, Allington Street,
various items contained within it. London SW1E 5EB
Tel: 020 7035 5245
Please provide your fe e d b a ck by completing the questionnaire on the Crime Reduction E-mail: ruth.houston
Website at: www.crimereduction.gov. u k / b u rg l a ry 70 . h t m @homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

October 2003 Burglary 17


Older victims of b u rg l a ry and distraction
b u rg l a ry - recommendations for
practitioners
Home Office Development and Practice Report 11

This re p o rt p rovides g u i d e l i n e s and re c o m m e n d ations for practitioners working with older


people who are vulnerable to becoming victims of crime or who have been the victims of
bu rg l a ry, in particular distraction bu rg l a ry. Its re c o m m e n d ations may be of part i c u l a r
interest to the police, Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs), local authorities,
other housing prov i d e r s , P ri m a ry Care Trusts and org a n i s ations in the vo l u n t a ry and ch a ri t y
sectors.
The recommendations presented in this report are based on the findings of two research
studies including "D i s t raction b u rg l a ry amongst older adults and minority ethnic
communities" and "Experiences of burgled older people".
The recommendations from these studies cover 3 main topics:
• Raising awareness of the crime of distraction burglary and how it can be prevented
among older people and professionals working with them.
• Reducing vulnerability.
• Reducing the impact once a crime has occurred.

The fo l l owing provides re c o m m e n d ations for the content and dissemination of future
Copies of this report, published distraction burglary awareness-raising campaigns aimed at older people:
in June 2003 are available free • I n c o rp o r ate specific warning messages in awareness-raising campaigns rather than
from the Research general cautions and make the distraction burglary message more explicit.
Development and Statistics • Adding a ‘keep door locked’ message to the Distraction Burglary Taskforce’s ‘Stop, Chain,
Directorate (RDS), C h e ck ’ campaign could reduce the number of incidents of distraction burglary.
Communications Development • Adopt methods that encourage interaction rather than passivity on the part of the older
Unit, Room 264, audience.
50, Queen Anne’s Gate, • Promote self-confidence and feelings of personal control over victimisation among older
London SW1H 9AT people through reinforcing messages about doorstep behaviour, which can minimise
Tel: 020 7273 2084 future vulnerability.
E-mail: publications.rds • Tailor campaigns, wherever possible, to meet the needs of individuals including
@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk minority ethnic communities, through focused local campaigns using local
and can also be viewed and community resources.
downloaded from the Home • Encourage the homeowner to take action and the viewer to witness an actual (staged)
Office Website: victimisation and alert them to the repercussions of unsafe doorstep practices.
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/ • Encourage the reporting of attempted and successful distraction burglary incidents
rds/pdfs2/dpr11.pdf amongst all communities.

‘Bogus Caller Watch’


Safer Blaenau Gwent

Safer Blaenau Gwent, the County Borough’s used by the offe n d e r, the re g i s t r at i o n
For more information contact Co m mu n i t y Sa fe t y Pa rt n e r s h i p, h a s number or details of the offe n d e r
Stephen Carr, l a u n ched a new c a m p a i g n in a bid to cat ch t h e m s e l ve s. These details are immediat e ly
CommunitySafetyOfficer, bogus callers who prey on the elderly and re l ayed via radio to eve ry one of the
Blaenau Gwent County vulnerable. c o u n c i l ’s fleet of vans and lorri e s. D ri ve r s
Borough Council, Civic Centre, ‘Bogus Caller Wa t c h’ is an early a re requested to remain alert and look out
Ebbw Vale NP23 6XB wa rning scheme that immediat e ly passes for the ve h i c l e or individuals invo l ve d ,
Tel: 01495 355683 details of conmen operating in the are a re p o rting back to the central depot. S t a f f
Fax: 01495 301255 d i re c t ly to Blaenau Gwent Council’s central alert the police who are then able to follow
E-mail: community.safety fleet of 200 ve h i c l e s. This info rm at i o n up the info rm ation they receive.
@blaenau-gwent.gov.uk might include a description of the ve h i c l e

18 Burglary October 2003


Repeat Victimisation, Domestic
B u rg l a ry Project
Safe in Tees Valley

R e s e a r ch undert a ken by Safe in Tees Va l l ey Although a major emphasis was on


in 2001/2002 revealed that the ap p ro a ch understanding the systems and pro c e d u re s ,
to re p e at incidents of domestic bu rg l a ry a key part of the re s e a r ch was the contact
a c ross the 5 Tees Va l l ey Basic Command with and the collection of data from all
Units (BCUs) was inconsistent and often re p e at bu rg l a ry victims identified duri n g
i n e f fe c t i ve. Responses we re hindered by a the pro j e c t .T h ree factors we re considere d
l a ck of basic, t i m e ly info rm ation and few when assessing the vulnerability and risk of
resources to address the problem. victims: Copies of the report, published
This re s e a r ch is a development of the • P ro p e rty Type. in April 2003 are available free
initial work and aims to: • Location. from Safe in Tees Valley,
• Develop a way forward to prevent a • Victim Characteristics. Christine House,
first-time burglary victim becoming a Sorbonne Close,
repeat victim. This re p o rt p rovides statistical analy s i s Stockton-on-Tees,
• Reduce the number of domestic of data collected, with a view to identifying TS17 6DA
burglaries through highlighting the c h a r a c t e ristics that could predict the Tel: 01642 306699
circumstances of repeats. i n c reased likelihood of becoming a re p e at E-mail:
• Provide more timely and effective v i c t i m. The re p o rt also provides practical info@safeinteesvalley.org
intervention with repeat bu rg l a ri e s. options for addressing issues both at Copies can also be viewed and
• Improve the service to victims of strategic and practitioner levels. downloaded via their website:
repeat burglary. www.safeinteesvalley.org
• Improve partnership working. /mainframe.htm

Sponsorship to help reduce b u rg l a ry


Home Office

The Home Office is running a "targ e t e d " • Students.


p u blicity c a m p a i g n as part of its dri ve to • The elderly (who are at particular risk of
achieve a 25% reduction in burglary by 2005. distraction burglary).
By focusing crime prevention advice at • First time buyers and house movers.
s p e c i fic high-risk groups at the right time Pa rtners are being re c ruited from 3
and in the right way, it is hoped that it will sectors including:
have more of an impact in terms of changed • Home - such as utility and insurance.
b e h aviour or home security improve m e n t s. companies and estate agents.
The Home Office has appointed a • Contents - retailers.
sponsorship agency called 'Yellow Submarine' • Community - local services and retailers.
to re c ruit part n e r s. The aim is to establish a A number of companies have alre a dy
group of well-known brands to pass on anti- been signed up as partners and discussions
bu rg l a ry m e s s ages to their customers. a re ongoing with many more. For the lat e s t
Pa rtners are given back g round info rm at i o n details visit the Crime Reduction Web s i t e:
on bu rg l a ry and the measures that can be www.crimereduction.gov.uk/
taken to prevent it. Activity is developed with burglary69.htm
the partner agency, Yellow Submarine and the The police will play a key role in helping
Home Office. The overall tone of messages is to raise people's awa reness of bu rg l a ry a n d
re a s s u ring and empowe ri n g, taking care not some suggestions for future projects include: For more information or if you
to promote fear of crime but suggesting that • Burglary victim packs, which will are involved in running local
the use of low cost measures can significantly include advice and items such as schemes with partners like this,
reduce householders and local commu n i t i e s property marking pens and promotional contact: Jo Nowakowska
chances of being burgled. offers on security products. E-mail: jo.nowakowska
The first priority target audiences are: • Burglary alert packs for distribution in @homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk or
• Holiday makers. areas where a burglary has occurred. susan@yellowsubmarine.co.uk

October 2003 Burglary 19


The Reducing B u rg l a ry I n i t i a t i ve :
investigating burglary
Home Office Research Study 264 and Findings 181

This re p o rt looks at ways in which T h ree broad principles for effe c t i ve


bu rg l a ries can be inve s t i g ated more investigative work were also identified:
e f fe c t i ve ly. It examines the policing of • Routine - the often complex and
bu rg l a ry in 3 are a s : O x fo r d , C h i l t e rn Va l e dynamic nature of burglary
and Cove n t ry and was developed fro m investigation makes it essential that
Home Office eva l u ations of bu rg l a ry certain key elements of the process are
S t r ategic Development Projects (SDPs) in carried out in a systematic and
these 3 sites. routine fashion.
The re s e a r ch invo l ved a rev i ew of dat a • Simplicity - the investigation of
g at h e red as part of the local SDP eva l u at i o n bu rg l a ry tends to be a complex process
and the collection of further info rm at i o n but investigative work can be most
on police enforcement practices and re c e n t effective when police officers respond
bu rg l a ry i nve s t i g at i o n s. The latter phase of in re l at i ve ly simple ways to the
the research comprised the following: situations and chains of events on
• Examination of case studies of which their enquiries are focused. In

“ ...critical
importance
burglary investigations.
• Focus groups and semi-structured
i n t e rv i ews with police officers
involved in the investigation
particular, given the lack of
sophistication of most prolific
burglars, basic investigative actions
may often prove highly rewarding.
so that of burglary. • Flexibility - this is of critical
• Observation of investigative work. importance so that info rm ation is
i n fo rm ation is g at h e re d , recorded, c o m mu n i c ated and
The study has 2 main aims that seek to acted upon in a way that is responsive
g at h e re d , fill gaps in the existing literat u re on to investigative opportunities as and
burglary investigation: when these present themselves.
recorded, • To explore the nature of the
investigative process for burglary by Copies of this report and associated findings,
communicated identifying the main components of both published in June 2003 are available free
investigation and considering how the from the Research Development and Statistics
and acted upon process can best be conceptualised. Directorate (RDS), Communications
• To use these findings to develop Development Unit, Room 264,
in a way that is general principles for the effective 50, Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT
investigation of burglary. Tel: 020 7273 2084
responsive...
” The fi e l dwork conducted for this
report produced 2 major findings about the
n at u re of burglary investigations:
E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
and can also be viewed and downloaded from
the Home Office Website:
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/
• The investigation of burglary should hors264.pdf (Research Study 264)
not be characterised as a simple, and www.homeoffice.gov. u k /
step-by-step process. R at h e r, the rds/pdfs2/r181.pdf (Findings 181)
process of investigation should be
understood to be complex, dynamic
and multi-laye re d .
• Proactive policing methods can make
an important contribution to effective
investigative practice but should not do
so at the expense of reactive police
ap p ro a ch e s. Proactive and reactive
approaches to investigation are
interdependent and complementary.

20 Burglary October 2003


Reducing B u rg l a ry Initiative:
early findings on b u rg l a ry reduction
Home Office Findings 204

The first round of the Reducing B u rg l a ry I n i t i at i ve (RBI), l a u n ched in 1999, funded 63


Strategic Development Projects (SDPs). One of the key aims of the RBI was to find out which
bu rg l a ry reduction strategies work best where. The SDPs we re encouraged to deve l o p
i n n ovat i ve bu rg l a ry reduction strat e g i e s. As a re s u l t , a wide range of interventions wa s
implemented in a va riety of contexts. Some early findings on bu rg l a ry reduction in the SDP
a reas are discussed in this re p o rt. The decline in bu rg l a ry in 55 of these areas has been
compared with other 'reference'/comparison areas.

Some of the key points include:


• Burglary rates fell in 40 of the 55 SDP areas (re l at i ve to the comparison areas).
• In the 21 months after the launch of the Reducing Burglary Initiative, burglaries fell in
the 55 SDPs by 20% compared with a pre-project period. The net reduction in bu rg l a ri e s
was 7% in the SDP areas, when taking into account burglary reduction in
comparison areas.
• This analysis suggests that between April 1999 and December 2000 2,700 fewer
burglaries took place in these SDP areas than would have been expected.
• Of the 55 SDPs analysed, 15 achieved a 20% or more reduction in burglary re l at i ve to
the comparison area, a further 13 saw a re l at i ve reduction of between 10% and 20% and
15 of the projects saw a re l at i ve increase in burglary.

The report discusses the scale of the decrease in bu rg l a ry, whether these decreases were
due to the SDPs, and the lessons learned in the following areas:
• Anticipatory benefits.
• Amount spent per household and speed of implementation.
• Displacement of crime.
• Identifying the nature of the burglary p ro bl e m .
• Implementation problems.
• Monitoring progress and taking remedial action.
• Effective burglary reduction measures.

Four of the most successful projects are also described in summary in the report and are
supplied in full as supplements to the main findings.

Copies of this report and supplements, published in June 2003 are available free from the Research
Development and Statistics Directorate (RDS), Communications Development Unit, Room 264,
50, Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT
Tel: 020 7273 2084 E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
and can also be viewed and downloaded from the Home Office Website:
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/r204.pdf (findings)
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/r204sup1rochdale.pdf
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/r204sup2fordbridge.pdf
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/r204sup3yewtree.pdf
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/r204sup4stirchley.pdf

“ ...find out which burglary reduction


strategies work best where.

October 2003 Burglary 21
The Reducing B u rg l a ry I n i t i a t i ve :
planning for p a rt n e r s h i p
Home Office Development and Practice Report 4

Although working in p a rt n e r s h i p is now widely regarded as the most effe c t i ve way of


tackling crime, often it still proves to be difficult to get agencies working together effectively.
This report draws general lessons for partnerships from the experiences of multi agency
projects set up to tackle bu rg l a ry. It provides a framework which is intended to assist practi-
tioners to develop p a rt n e r s h i p-based projects more effe c t i ve ly. The lessons learnt from this
report can be applied effectively to any multi-agency project.
The bu rg l a ry p ro j e c t s , w h i ch are the main focus of the re p o rt, we re located in southern
E n g l a n d , the Midlands and South Wa l e s. T h ey we re 21 of the strategic Development Pro j e c t s
(SDPs) funded by the Home Office Reducing B u rg l a ry I n i t i at i ve (RBI). All the projects we re
subject to rigorous evaluation from South Bank University. The lessons for partnerships were
d r awn both from the findings of the eva l u ation and from further empirical work invo l v i n g
semi-structured interviews with project personnel at a number of sites.
Copies of the online report, The re p o rt includes a good practice m o d e l , w h i ch is designed to help practitioners in
also published in June 2003 are planning for partnership work. The model is based on 3 key elements:
available only via the Home • Knowledge - this refers to a partnership's understanding of what it is undertaking
Office Website: and why.
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/ • Commitment - describes the willingness of partners to undertake work proposed by
rds/pdfs2/rdsolr0403.pdf the p a rt n e r s h i p.
Application for reproduction of • Capacity - this relates to the individual partner's practical capacity to undertake the
this report should be made to work proposed.
Research, Development and
Statistics Directorate (RDS), Copies of the Development and Practice Report 4, published in June 2003 are available free from the
Communications Development Research Development and Statistics Directorate (RDS), Communications Development Unit, Room 264,
Unit, Room 264, 50, Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084
50, Queen Anne’s Gate, E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk and can also be viewed and downloaded from the
London SW1H 9AT Home Office Website: www.homeoffice.gov. u k / rd s / p d f s 2 / d p r 4 . p d f
Tel: 020 7273 2084
E-mail: publications.rds@ An online re p o rt entitled ‘ The Reducing Burg l a ry Initiative: planning for part n e r s h i p
homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk within a project setting’ is also available.

Open i
Central Office of Information (COI)

A dvice on how to protect ag a i n s t all gove rnment depart m e n t s. P rev i o u s


distraction bu rg l a ry will appear in the editions have cove red topics such as
October edition of Open i. The info rm at i o n pensions, mental health and Jobcentre Plus.
will include general advice on how to The COI works in p a rt n e r s h i p w i t h
reduce the chances of becoming a victim of other gove rnment departments and
this type of cri m e, an example of a agencies to provide effe c t i ve commu n i c a-
distraction bu rglar who was foiled by his tions solutions. The Radio Section produces
e l d e r ly intended v i c t i m and the "Stop, c o m m e r c i a l s , e d i t o rials and news re l e a s e s
Chain, Check" message. and launched Open i earlier this ye a r. T h e
Produced by the COI, the gove rn m e n t ' s feedback received so far has been extremely
c o m mu n i c ations expert , Open i consists of positive and there is a growing demand for
an audiocassette, which is aimed at visually copies of the cassette.
i m p a i red people and distri buted via
ch a ri t i e s , Citizen's Advice Bureaux, l i b r a ri e s Open i is available free via the Open i hotline Tel:
and health centre s. Fe at u res include adv i c e 020 7261 8938 or visit their website:
and case studies dealing with issues fro m www.open-i.gov.uk

22 Burglary October 2003


Pushing back the boundaries:
new techniques for assessing the impact
of b u rg l a ry scheme
Home Office Summary and Online Report 24/03

This report forms part of a series of studies crime prevention strategies aimed at
being published in 2003 that examine individual properties, it is necessary to
bu rg l a ry reduction practice. It would be of examine the pattern of victimisation of
p a rticular interest to those conducting in- these properties over time. Doing this
depth eva l u ations of crime re d u c t i o n for the Liverpool scheme revealed that
p ro j e c t s. The re p o rt p resents findings on 13 burglaries were prevented in a one-
the impact of a Reducing Burglary Initiative year period across 363 properties that
(RBI) Round 1 project in Live rp o o l .T h e had been target hardened. The risk to
L i ve rpool project employed four diffe re n t these properties was almost halved
interventions: following target hardening. This
• Target hardening. exercise was done for each
• Alley-gating. intervention type.
• Property marking. • Assessment should be made of the
• Offender supervision. degree to which other initiatives in a
scheme area are likely to cause
N ew analytical techniques discussed in burglary reduction. In the Liverpool
detail in this re p o rt we re developed in s ch e m e, it was concluded that such
order to answer the key eva l u at i o n initiatives were unlikely to have
questions. Some of the results include: c o n t ri buted to the reduction found.
• Identifying the precise geographical
areas in which crime prevention The implications of these results fo r
interventions are implemented is c r ime prevention are discussed in full in
important when assessing the the report.
effectiveness of schemes. For the
Liverpool scheme, the official Copies of both the Summary and Online Report,
boundary of the target area was published in June 2003 are available only via the
defined as 2 complete police beats, Home Office Website:
although the interventions were www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/
focused almost exclusively within three rdsolr2403summary.pdf (Summary) and
sub-areas. Analysis revealed that www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/
burglary reduction was dramatic in the rdsolr2403.pdf (Online Report).
sub-areas of intense implementation Application for reproduction of these reports
within the official boundary of should be made to Research, Development and
the scheme. Statistics Directorate (RDS), Communications
• Repeat burglary, as well as single Development Unit, Room 264,
incidents of burglary, significantly 50, Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT
reduced in the scheme area. Tel: 020 7273 2084
• There was some evidence that E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
following the implementation of the
s ch e m e, offenders may have switched
to committing other types of crime
within the scheme area. In particular,
theft from cars significantly increased
in the are a .T h e re was no significant
switch to theft from a person, taking a
vehicle without the owner's consent or
theft of car.
• In order to get the most accurate
assessment of the effectiveness of

October 2003 Burglary 23


Security for Small Retailers scheme
Home Office

O ver 5,400 shops across the country will will also pay for env i ronmental
re c e i ve money from the Security for Small i m p rovements to make shopping parades
Retailers scheme to pay for improve d look better and feel safer.
s e c u rity measures such as bu rglar alarm s ,
better locks and CCTV. For more information contact Mark Nicholas,
The money is the 2003/04 allocat i o n Home Office Business Team, 1st Floor,
of the £15 million 'Security for Small 85, Buckingham Gate, London SW1E
Retailers' sch e m e, w h i ch is funded by the Tel: 020 7411 5590
Treasury's Capital Modernisation Fund. This E-mail: mark.nicholas@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
is the final year of the scheme cove ri n g or visit the Small Retailers in Deprived Areas
England and Wales and this year's funding Mini-site on the Crime Reduction Website:
www.crimereduction.gov.uk/srda1.htm

Small Retailers in Deprived Areas -


Guidelines for Practitioners
Home Office

These g u i d e l i n e s h ave been produced for practitioners working on projects that aim to
i n c rease the security and viability of small re t a i l e r s , s p e c i fi c a l ly those projects that are
e l i g i ble for assistance under the small retailers in depri ved areas (SRDA) initiat i ve. T h e s e
re c o m m e n d ations may be of interest to the police, C rime and D i s o r d e r R e d u c t i o n
Partnerships (CDRPs), local authorities and other groups working in this field.
Details of the key learning points and suggestions that have emerged from year 1 and
2 SRDA projects are listed, together with relevant practical examples. They include:
• Project Design/Targeting.
• Building a Project Team - Getting businesses involved.
• Planning the work and installing the measures.
• Staffing and procurement issues.
• Thinking through implementation.
• A tool to map out how target hardening might work in practice.
• Sustainability.

For further information and to view the complete list of guidelinesand examples visit the Crime
Reduction Website: w w w. c r i m e re d u c t i o n . g ov. u k / s rd a 13 . h t m

For more information and to


"Retail Crime: What are the Solutions?" -
reserve a place contact C o n f e re n c e
Perpetuity Conferences Ltd, 50, Perpetuity Conferences Ltd
Queens Road, Leicester LE2 1TU
Tel: 0116 221 7775 The "Retail Crime: What are the c ri m e. I n d u s t ry experts will lead fo rm a l
Fax: 0116 221 7171 S o l u t i o n s ?" c o n fe re n c e will be held at the p re s e n t ations and discussion groups will
E-mail: conferences@ G i l b e rt Murr ay C o n fe re n c e Suite in o f fer attendees a choice of subjects. T h e
perpetuitygroup.com Leicester on We d n e s d ay 22nd October c o n fe re n c e aims to stimu l ate thinking and
Details are also available via 2003. g e n e r ate new ideas to develop best
their website: The c o n fe re n c e will provide insights practices in responding to retail crime.
www.perpetuitygroup. into new re s e a r ch , w h e re speakers will The cost of the c o n fe re n c e is
com/training/acatalog/ highlight the practical benefits of their £195.00 plus VAT and includes lunch and
Retail_Crime_Conference. findings as well as passing on the lat e s t refreshments.
html ideas and best practice on reducing re t a i l

24 Business Crime October 2003


S t ra t e g y to Tackle Business-Related Crime
Home Office

The gove rnment has announced the re c ruitment of regional Business Cri m e R e d u c t i o n
Advisers, who will be employed throughout England and Wales under the Home Office's new
business crime strategy.
Work will focus on encouraging business invo l vement in existing crime re d u c t i o n
p a rtnerships and initiat i ve s , p roviding support and advice to business on crime re d u c t i o n
and implementing measures to tackle retail crime and fraud. A new Business Crime Team has
been set up within the Home Office fo l l owing public consultation with small and medium-
sized businesses and re t a i l e r s , who we re highlighted as being the most concerned ab o u t For more information contact
c ri m e. They will implement the strategy, which builds upon existing work to tackle business Mark Nicholas, Home Office
c ri m e. Business Crime Team, 1st Floor,
"The Business Crime Consultation - your chance to air your views" was launched in 85, Buckingham Gate, London
December last ye a r. It sought the views of businesses on means of dealing with bu s i n e s s - SW1E Tel: 020 7411 5590 Fax:
re l ated cri m e. A re p o rt of the consultation responses has been published and is ava i l able via 020 7411 5596 E-mail:
the Home Office Web s i t e w w w. h o m e o f f i c e . g ov. u k / i n s i d e / c o n s u l t s / s u m m a r i e s / mark.nicholas@
index.html homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Derbyshire Business Against Crime


Derbyshire Constabulary

Local business leaders have joined fo r c e s (w w w. s a f e rd e r b y s h i re . g ov. u k) . A


with Derby s h i re Constabu l a ry and the East d at abase of companies wishing to re c e i ve
Midlands Development Agency in an effo rt i n fo rm ation via e-mail is curre n t ly under
to reduce business crime in Derbyshire. d eve l o p m e n t . The project will also
Fo l l owing the p u bl i c at i o n of the eve n t u a l ly provide local seminars, re g u l a r
B r itish Chambers of Commerce re p o rt - n ewsletters and direct help to local
‘Securing Enterprise’ , D e r by s h i re bu s i n e s s e s. A Business Cri m e Fo ru m , m a d e
Chambers of Commerce wo r ked in up of senior business people, has been set
p a rt n e r s h i p with the Po l i c e, D e r by s h i re up to steer the project.
County Council and Derby City Council to
l a u n c h an initiat i ve aimed at tack l i n g For further information contact Inspector
business cri m e. A local crime survey wa s Howard Frost, Crime Reduction Inspector,
carried out by the Chambers of Commerce, Derbyshire Constabulary, Butterley Hall, Ripley,
w h i ch showed that nearly 50% of Derbyshire DE5 3RS
businesses had experienced a crime in the Tel: 01773 572223
last 12 months. T h e re was also evidence of E-mail: howard.frost@derbyshire.pnn.police.uk
c o n s i d e r able under- re p o rting of incidents or Samantha Hancock,
and 29% of businesses said they had neve r Business CrimeCo-ordinator
received crime prevention advice. Tel: 07736 083895
In an attempt to combat this pro bl e m , E-mail: samantha.hancock@sdchamber.co.uk
D e r by s h i re Constabu l a ry has appointed a
Business Cri m e C o - o r d i n at o r. The post is
funded for the next 2 years by the va ri o u s
agencies invo l ved and the work includes
promoting crime prevention amongst small
and medium-sized companies. At the core
of the project are the compre h e n s i ve
business cri m e p revention web pag e s
p rovided on the Safer Derby s h i re Web s i t e

October 2003 Business Crime 25


LeedsWatch Local CCTV System
Leeds City Council

The LeedsWat c h C C T V s cheme was set up by Leeds City Council as part of the Leeds
C o m mu n i t y S a fe t y Pa rt n e r s h i p's S t r at e g y in 1996. Since that time, the scheme has expanded
both geograp h i c a l ly and in terms of camera nu m b e r s. The latest phase was the launch of
LeedsWatch Local in 2000, which aims to reduce crime and disorder. So far, the scheme has
helped the police with over 100 arrests including assault, c riminal damag e, bu rg l a ry a n d
anti-social behaviour.
There has been particular success with a new system set up in association with the Leeds
11 Business Pa rt n e r s h i p. This links an industrial estate to the scheme and two 24-hour
m o n i t o ring stations cove ring the North and South of Leeds, w h i ch have been in operat i o n
since December 2002. The new network of 44 cameras has been placed at va rious locat i o n s
across the city, with the capacity to add further cameras in future.

For more information contact Wayne Clamp, LeedsWatch, Leeds City Council, 1st Floor, Merrion House,
Merrion Centre, Leeds LS2 Tel: 0113 247 4485 E-mail: wayne.clamp@leeds.gov.uk

ATM Robbery - Designing out the Problem


West Midlands Police

West Midlands Police in p a rt n e r s h i p w i t h F u rther developments will invo l ve


L l oyds T S B , B ritish Telecom and seve r a l removal of a subway and improved parking
utility companies have been invo l ved in a facilities.
ro bb e ry reduction scheme at an ATM (cash E va l u ation of the initiat i ve is ongoing
point) fo l l owing nu m e rous incidents and fo l l owing the installation of the
around the machine. additional security earlier this ye a r, t h e re
The ATM is located in an area we re h ave been no further offences committed
t h e re are nu m e rous env i ronmental fe at u re s near this AT M . F u rther considerat i o n s
c o n t ri buting to the pro blem and making it include the use of simple technology to
easier for potential criminals to commit d e l i ver both audio and visual cri m e
this type of cri m e. Fo l l owing consultat i o n s p revention messages for users of the
with the org a n i s ations invo l ve d , a d d i t i o n a l m a ch i n e.
s e c u rity measures we re put in place
including: For more information contact
• Re-positioning external CCTV cameras. PC Keith Doyle, Crime Reduction/Design Adviser,
• Upgrading lighting. West Midlands Police, Queens Road, Aston,
• Repositioning a telephone kiosk to Birmingham B6 7ND
enable anyone inside to be seen by Tel: 0121 322 6248 Fax: 0121 322 6161
users of the ATM. E-mail: k.doyle@west-midlands.police.uk
• Installing warning signage, reflective
panels and mirrors.
• Removing street furniture located near
to the ATM.
• Installing a ‘user zone’ to define a
personal space for users of the ATM.

26 CCTV/Designing Out Crime October 2003


No Particular Place to Go? Children, Young
People and Public Space
Groundwork UK

This re p o rt was launched in June as part of B a r c l ays SiteSavers is a nat i o n a l


B a r c l ays SiteSave r s. It was funded by the p a rt n e r s h i p b e t ween Barclays PLC and
B a r c l ays C o m mu n i t y I nve s t m e n t G ro u n dwork UK. The partnership features a
P ro g r a m m e, a programme of env i ro n- re g e n e r ation sch e m e, n ow in its eighth
mental re g e n e r ation managed by ye a r, w h i ch helps local people to improve
Groundwork UK. d e relict land and invo l ves young people a s
The re p o rt found that a lack of c l o s e ly as possible in many of its pro j e c t s.
i m ag i n at i ve design and concerns ove r G ro u n dwork is a fe d e r ation of nearly 50
s a fe t y a re a major re s t riction to yo u n g local Trusts in England, Wales and Northern
p e o p l e, p rohibiting the adve n t u rous and I re l a n d . T h ey work together with local
ri s k - a s s o c i ated activities that are vital to p a rtners in depri ved areas to improve the
ch i l d re n ’s learning and deve l o p m e n t . quality of the local env i ro n m e n t . Last ye a r
Pa rents and local authorities are often G ro u n dwork:
fearful of adve n t u rous play because of the • worked with over 80,000 children and
risk of injury, while the perception of young people
young people as tro u bl e m a kers means that • involved more than 350,000 pupils in
t h e re is pre s s u re for gre ater control ove r environmental projects
their activities. C o n s e q u e n t ly, m a ny play • brought benefits to an estimated
a reas are dull and fail to interest or 2 million ch i l d re n
challenge young people’s imag i n at i o n s. • supported around 4,800 projects
This re p o rt suggests that if young people • encouraged volunteers to give more
are denied adventurous play areas, they may than 340,000 days of their time to
re l o c ate to more dangerous places and improve their neighbourhoods.
engage in anti-social behaviour.
The re p o rt looks at other Euro p e a n For more information on Groundwork and copies
c o u n t ries such as Denmark, w h i ch has a of the report ‘No Particular Place to Go? Children,
m o re positive attitude towards ch i l d ren in Young Peopleand Public Space’, published in
the design of public spaces. By invo l v i n g June 2003 contact Groundwork UK,
young people in the consultation and 85 - 87, Cornwall Street, Birmingham B3 3BY
design, the report advises that public spaces Tel: 0121 236 8565 Fax: 0121 236 7356
can be challenging as well as suitable fo r E-mail: info@groundwork.org.uk
children and adults of all ages. or visit their website:
www.groundwork.org.uk

Designing Out Crime Association (DOCA)


The Designing Out Crime A s s o c i a t i o n (DOCA) was fo rmed in 1999 and provides a
fo rum for Crime Pre vention T h rough Environmental Design (CPTED) pro fessionals
and practitioners.
Membership of DOCA is open to anyone with an interest in Designing out Cri m e a n d
c u r rent members include the police, a r ch i t e c t s , c o m mu n i t y s a fe t y o f ficers and cri m e
re s e a r ch e r s. The association holds 4 seminars each year and publishes a journal and
newsletters, as well as providing an interactive website and re fe rence library.

For more information contact Terry Cocks, General Secretary, DOCA (CPTED UK), 5, Stanley Lodge,
Cannonbury Park South, London N1 2JS E-mail: gensec@doca.org.uk or visit their website:
www.doca.org.uk

October 2003 Designing Out Crime 27


ACPO CPI & Secured by Design News
The new Chairman of the A s s o c i ation of Chief Police Officers C rime Prevention Initiat i ve s
Limited (AC P O CPI Ltd) is Mr Chris Fox , c u rre n t ly the President of AC P O. Stepping dow n
f rom the post is Richard Childs, who re t i red as Chief Constable of Lincolnshire Police in
September this ye a r. Mr Childs has been an active supporter and Director of AC P O CPI since
its launch and he will stay on as Managing Director to assist in developing the company
f u rt h e r. N ew Directors of AC P O CPI Ltd are Colin Cramphorn , Chief Constable of We s t
Yorkshire and Richard Brunstrom, Chief Constable of North Wales.
AC P O CPI published the latest edition of the Secured by Design (SbD) Focus N ew s l e t t e r
in Au g u s t . A new l e a f l e t explaining Secured by Design has also been developed for bu i l d e r s
and housing associations to give to purchasers and occupiers. This gives a brief outline of
SbD and contains some basic crime prevention advice as well as encouraging further reading
via the website (w w w. s e c u re d b yd e s i g n . c o m). The leaflet's header can be ove rp rinted with
details of the site, builder or contact point. If you have any news stories for the SbD Focus
newsletter contact ACPO CPI Ltd (details below).
The third in a series of leaflets explaining technical standards has been published jointly
by AC P O C P I , Loss Prevention Cert i fi c ation Board (LPCB) and the British Security Industry
A s s o c i ation (BSIA). The l e a f l e t c overs details of tests on staff protection screens
complementing earlier info rm ation on door, w i n d ow and computer securi t y. Copies can be
viewed and downloaded via the SbD Website (www.securedbydesign.com) and details also
appear in the SbD Focus newsletter.

Planning for the future


In 2002 the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM) published a Green Paper on
the new government s t r at e g y for planning. As part of this process a new guidance document
on Planning and Crime is curre n t ly in pre p a r at i o n . Chief Offi c e r s , AC P O C P I ,A r ch i t e c t u r a l
Liaison Offi c e r ’s (ALOs) and re p re s e n t at i ves from other agencies have been consulted in the
p re p a r ation of this guidance and all case studies used have had an element of police input.
The g u i d e will re i n force the gove rnment's commitment to place crime at the centre of the
planning process and the wide-ranging consultation will produce a practical and compre-
hensive document. Although the Crime & Disorder Act 1998 established the responsibility of
police and local authority departments to address local crime issues, the ODPM g u i d e w i l l
identify re s e a r ch and case studies that will stimu l ate thinking on planning out crime to
address the impact of development at a much earlier stage. P u bl i c at i o n of the guide is due in
autumn 2003. Visit the ODPM Web s i t e for further info rm ation and updates at :
www.odpm.gov.uk

Secured by Design Innovation Competition


AC P O CPI has announced details of a competition to reward the most innovat i ve and
effective ways of promoting and developing Secured by Design.
The competition is open to A L O s , C rime Prevention Design A dvisors (CPDAs) or any
s e rving member of a UK police force (including England, Wa l e s , N o rt h e rn Ireland and
S c o t l a n d ) . E n t ries must be supported by a Chief Officer or head of depart m e n t . A panel will
judge 4 winners who will re c e i ve prizes of £5,000 to be spent on SbD pro j e c t s. The closing
d ate for the submission of info rm ation is 31st Ja nu a ry 2004 and projects must have been
developed within the preceding two years. Winners will be announced in April 2004.

Details of the competition and how to enter can be found in the police section of the SbD Website:
www.securedbydesign.com
or direct from Liz Clarke, ACPOCPI Ltd, 7th Floor, 25, Victoria Street, London SW1H 0EX
Tel: 020 7227 3423 Fax 020 7227 3400 E-mail: acpocpi@acpo.pnn.police.uk

28 Designing Out Crime October 2003


Safe in the City -
Planting the Seeds of Security
Greater Manchester Police

G re ater Manchester Police re c e i ved a silve r For more information contact Chris MacKenzie,
medal at this year's Royal Hort i c u l t u r a l Force Crime Reduction Advisor, Greater
F l ower Show (RHS) held at Tatton Park in Manchester Police, 4th Floor, Chester House,
Knutsford. Boyer Street, Manchester M16 0RE
The award was presented for the 'Safe Tel: 0161 856 2247
in the City' garden, w h i ch was cre ated to E-mail: chris.mackenzie@gmp.police.uk
s h ow the nu m e rous s a fe t y p recautions that
people can implement to reduce the risk of
becoming a v i c t i m of cri m e. The garden
includes a secure shed for storing tools and
e q u i p m e n t , s l ate pat h ways that provide an
audible alert system, perimeter fencing and
a secured garden sculpture. Other fe at u re s
i nvo l ve strat e g i c a l ly placed spiky and
p ri ck ly plants, w h i ch are put in key
locations to keep out unwelcome intruders.

Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000:


Crime Prevention Measures for
Rights of Way
Department for the Environment, Food and RuralAffairs (Defra)

The Secre t a ry of State for the Env i ro n m e n t , These new powers are limited to rights
Food and R u r a l A f fairs re c e n t ly signed the of way where crime is a real pro bl e m . I n
first designation order under the p a rt i c u l a r, a l l ey way s , w h i ch encourag e
C o u n t ryside and Rights of Way Act 2000. crimes such as robbery, burglary, arson, car
This covers 52 areas in England and enables c ri m e and d ru g d e a l i n g. A n t i - s o c i a l
local highway authorities to dive rt or close b e h av i o u r, f ly tipping, dog fouling and
rights of way to prevent crime. g r a f fi t i alone will not usually justify
To ap p ly for an area to be designat e d , d e s i g n at i o n , although these may be
local highway authori t i e s , in p a rt n e r s h i p relevant.
with local Crime and D i s o r d e r R e d u c t i o n
Pa rtnerships (CDRPs), p o l i c e, l o c a l More information can be obtained from the
residents and user gro u p s , must make a Countryside (Recreation & Landscape) Division,
submission to the Secre t a ry of Stat e Rights of Way Branch (CYD5), Defra, Zone 1/02,
requesting a designation order. In county Temple Quay House, 2, The Square, Bristol BS1
a re a s , d i s t rict authorities or local CDRPs 6EB Tel: 0117 372 6274 Fax: 0117 372 8250 E-
can make a submission if the local highway mail: rights.ofway@defra.gsi.gov.uk or via their
a u t h o r ity does not wish to ap p ly. T h e website: www.defra.gov. u k /
S e c re t a ry of State has to be sat i s fied that wildlife-countryside/cl/publicrow.htm
t h e re is clear evidence of high levels of
crime associated with the affected rights of Defra also plans to hold seminars for
way and that realistic altern at i ve solutions interested authorities later this year. Details
h ave also been explore d . D e s i g n ation alone can be obtained by e-mailing:
does not close the right of way. S p e c i a l rightsof.way@defra.gsi.gov.uk
extinguishment and diversion orders will or Jane Elliot-Malpass Tel: 0117 372 8379
need to be made using existing public path or Karen Lee-Bapty Tel: 0117 372 8211
order pro c e d u res and may be subject to
objections from members of the public.

October 2003 Designing Out Crime 29


Planning out Crime Guidelines
Home Office and Office of the Deputy Prime Minister

Well-designed residential or other types of reducing crime do not sit altogether


developments can help to reduce crime and c o m fo rt ably with those of other key
d i s o r d e r p ro bl e m s , a major factor in re q u i rements of safe, s u s t a i n abl e
building safe and sustainable commu n i t i e s. communities. These guidelines are intended
The gove rnment is committed to putting to raise awa reness of the issues concern e d
planning out crime at the heart of its and to promote imag i n at i ve thinking to
planning objective s. As part of this, t h e tackle such problems.
O f fice of the Deputy Prime Minister
( O D P M ) , together with the Home Offi c e, For more information contact Ruth Houston,
will be publishing g u i d e l i n e s in the Home Office, Crime Reduction Delivery Team, 1st
autumn on how the planning process can Floor, Allington Towers, 19, Allington Street,
help in preventing crime and disorder. London SW1E 5EB Tel: 020 7035 5245
The issues are not straightfo r ward and E-mail: ruth.houston@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
t h e re are occasions where the needs fo r

Safety and Justice: the Government's


Proposals on Domestic Violence
Home Office

The Home Office has published a c o n s u l t ation pap e r on tackling domestic violence e n t i t l e d
'S a fe t y and Justice: the Government's Proposals on Domestic Vi o l e n c e' .
The paper sets out wide ranging
p roposals to tighten the law, s t re n g t h e n
p revention work and give more help to
victims of domestic violence, to encourag e
them to come fo r ward in the know l e d g e
t h at they will re c e i ve help, p rotection and
s u p p o rt . Proposals include:
• Work to prevent domestic violence through education, awareness raising and getting
i n fo rm ation to victims.
• Tackling risk factors such as alcohol and drugs misuse.
• Supporting police pro-arrest policies by making common assault an arrestable offence.
• Making it a criminal offence to breach a civil order such as a non-molestation order and
stronger legal protection for victims through extending the use of restraining orders.
• A register of civil orders to allow the police to check for outstanding orders against an
alleged offender so they can take immediate action to protect the victim.
• More refuge places as a result of £19 million of new investment in refuge provision this
year and moves to ensure that victims who are still subject to immigration control have
access to refuge support.

The full document and a brief summary, both published in June 2003 can be viewed and downloaded via
the Home Office Website: www.homeoffice.gov. u k / d o c s 2 / v i o l e n c e . h t m l.
Hard copies can be obtained priced £11.25 from the Stationery Office Ltd, The Publications Centre,
PO Box 276, London SW8 5DT Tel: 020 7873 0011 Fax: 020 7873 8200

30 Designing Out Crime/Domestic Violence October 2003


Making it count: A practical guide to
collecting and managing domestic
violence data
NACRO

Domestic violence accounts for the highest percentage of violent cri m e in the UK, w h i ch is
even more significant given the high levels of under- re p o rting and under- recording of
incidents by surv i vors and ag e n c i e s. The statistics that are ava i l able show the frequency and
n at u re of violence in the home and include:
• E ve ry year in England and Wales approximately 63,000 women and children spend at
least one night in a refuge.
• E ve ry week 2 women are killed in the UK by their current or ex partner.
• 30% of women experience an act of violence by a male partner at some point in Copies of this report, published
their lives. in July 2003 and priced £5.00
The collection, m a n agement and sharing of domestic violence d ata are crucial to the can be obtained from
development of effective strategies. This process enables partnerships to scope the extent and NACRO Publications,
n at u re of domestic violence and track surv i vors through the nu m e rous agencies often 169, Clapham Road,
contacted for guidance and support. London, SW9 0PU
This b ri e fing pap e r p rovides a practical g u i d e for local p a rt n e r s h i p agencies on the Tel: 020 7840 6427.
collection, s h a ri n g, management and use of domestic violence data. It examines the rationale Copies can also be viewed and
for data collection and outlines the processes re q u i red to deliver this work effe c t i ve ly. T h e downloaded via their website:
p aper also identifies key tips for overcoming barriers through a pro blem-solving tabl e. It is www.nacro.org.uk/data/
aimed at all agencies within the stat u t o ry, vo l u n t a ry and pri vate sectors engaged in the briefings/
process of monitoring domestic violence. nacro-2003080700-csps.pdf

"Rat on a Rat"
Thames Valley Crimestoppers

A major c a m p a i g n has been launched by For more information contact Neville Wade,
Thames Va l l ey Cri m e s t o p p e r s , w h i ch aims Thames Valley Crimestoppers, PO Box 544,
to tackle the area's growing drugs problem. Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire HP4 3WA
Working in p a rt n e r s h i p with the Tel: 01442 866656 Fax: 01442 870839
p o l i c e, local authority and Drugs A c t i o n E-mail: Neville.wade2@btinternet.com
Te a m , the c a m p a i g n s p e c i fi c a l ly targ e t s
dealers in Class A drugs. The theme, "Rat on
a Rat" draws attention to the fact that d ru g
dealers ruin lives and encourages people to
re p o rt w h at they know. In addition to
g at h e ring more intelligence about the
activities of d ru g dealers, the campaign will
raise awareness about the consequences and
costs of d ru g abuse.
The scheme uses maximum publ i c i t y
to get the message across in the area and
leaflets have been distri buted to ove r
18,000 households. Po s t e r s a re adve rt i s e d
on buses and bus shelters and have been
p roduced in altern at i ve languages to targ e t
various ethnic groups.

October 2003 Domestic Violence/Drugs and Alcohol 31


Hidden Harm: Responding to the needs of
children of problem drug users
Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs

The A dv i s o ry Council on the Misuse of Drugs has a stat u t o ry duty to advise the gove rn m e n t
on the misuse of drugs and the health and social pro blems it may cause. Its Preve n t i o n
Working Group carries out in-depth inquiries into aspects of d ru g misuse that are causing
p a rticular concern , with the aim of producing re p o rts that will be helpful to policy make r s ,
s e rvice providers and others. In 2000 the Council focused on the ch i l d ren of pro blem d ru g
users.
The inquiry looked at parental pro blem d ru g use and its effect on ch i l d re n . This re p o rt
aims to highlight aspects of the harm caused by d ru g misuse that have remained larg e ly
hidden until now.
The report's main findings are:
• Between 250,000 and 350,000 children have at least one parent with a serious
d ru g p ro bl e m .
• Having a parent with serious d ru g p ro blems causes huge harm to children of all ages.
• More needs to be done to help these children and their parents.
• Taking practical steps can make a real difference to the lives of these vulnerable children
- to protect and nu rt u re them and by helping their parents deal with their d ru g p ro bl e m .
• Effective, joined-up working between agencies is essential.
• The number of affected children is only likely to decrease when the numbers of problem
d ru g users decreases.

The report also makes 48 detailed recommendations of how this problem can be tackled
and its affects improved. The areas covered range from maternity and post-natal care through
to education and social work, to the police, court services and prisons.

Copies of this report, published in June 2003 are available free from Prolog UK
Tel: 0870 241 4680 Fax: 0870 241 4786 E-mail: homeoffice@prolog.uk.com
Copies can also be viewed and downloaded via the website:
www.drugs.gov.uk/ReportsandPublications/NationalStrategy/
10 5 4 73 3 8 0 1 ? b a t c h _ s t a rt = 1

Seizures of drugs in the UK 2001


Home Office Research Findings Paper 202

This re p o rt p resents the initial fi g u res fo r • In 2001, seizures involving Class A


d ru g s e i z u res made in the UK by law drugs increased by 10% to just
e n forcement agencies during 2001. S o m e under 38,000.
of the key points include: • Cannabis seizures accounted for 71%
• Nearly 56kg of crack was recove re d , of all seizures.
more than double the amount in 2000.
• Almost 4 tonnes of heroin was seized, Copies of this report, published in June 2003 are
which is a 16% increase on the available free from the Research Development
previous year. and Statistics Directorate (RDS),
• The number of dose/tablets of ecstasy- Communications Development Unit, Room 264,
type drugs seized rose in 2001 to 7.7 50, Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT
million, an increase of 17%. Tel: 020 7273 2084
• The overall number of d ru g seizures in E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
2001 rose by just under 5% to and can also be viewed and downloaded from
approximately 131,000. the Home Office Website:
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/
pdfs2/r202.pdf

32 Drugs and Alcohol October 2003


Proof of Age Card
The Portman Group

The Proof of Age Card Scheme wa s e n ables licensees and other retailers to
o ri g i n a l ly launched in 1990. In 2000, 2 3 8 know that it is a reliable and credible means
licensed retailers we re found guilty, o r of proof of ag e. N ew cards also fe at u re a
c a u t i o n e d , for selling alcohol to under 18 c o l o u r, r ather than a bl a ck and white,
year olds. This scheme helps l i c e n s ees to p h o t o g r aph of the holder and a new
uphold the law and there fo re safe g u a r d Portman Group 18+ logo.
their licenses.
The scheme allows 18 and 19 year olds The Proof of Age Card costs £5 and
to obtain a photo ID card, w h i ch enabl e s applications for cards can be made
them to buy alcohol without pro bl e m s. via the Portman Group's Website
Under 18s will be deterred from trying to (w w w. p o rt m a n - g ro u p. o rg . u k)
buy alcohol if they see the Proof of A g e or are available from local licensed
card scheme in use. outlets. Specimen cards can be
A pro fe s s i o n a l ly qualified adult mu s t obtained free from the Portman Group,
sponsor ap p l i c ations for cards and eve ry 7 - 10, Chandos Street, Cavendish Square,
ap p l i c ation is vetted to ch e ck that the London W1G 9DQ Tel: 020 7907 3700.
person is 18 or ove r. So far the scheme has Retailers can obtain a Proof of Age Kit
been a gre at success, with over 500,000 (containing 50 application forms,
cards issued. F rom June 2003 the card a dispenser, poster and specimen card) for
includes the PASS hologram logo, w h i ch £5 + VAT by telephoning 01782 741968.

Brent Against Drugs (BAD)


Brent Council

A controversial and hard-hitting drugs c a m p a i g n, funded by the gove rnment's C o m mu n i t y


Against Drugs sch e m e, was launched in Brent earlier this ye a r. B rent Against Drugs ( B A D )
is an interactive c a m p a i g n t a rgeted at young people, w h i ch raises awa reness of the harm f u l
and devastating effects of d ru g abuse.
The c a m p a i g n was developed by the council in consultat i o n
with local teenag e r s. It uses tongue-in-cheek tactics to highlight its
ve ry serious message through the use of eye - c at ching p o s t e r s a n d
case studies. These fe at u re people from a range of ethnic groups to
reflect the fact that drugs misuse is a pro blem affecting all
communities.
The c a m p a i g n not only raises the awa reness of d ru g abuse to
young people, but also directs them to re l evant agencies and
contacts for help and advice. The campaign includes a website called
'S t re e t p u l s e' (w w w. s t re e t p u l s e . c o. u k) , w h i ch enables yo u n g
p e o p l e to respond interactive ly to the c a m p a i g n. The web s i t e
fe at u res a 'Service Dire c t o ry ' , w h i ch allows visitors to the site to
l o c ate drugs services in their are a , as well as a list of events taking
place in the re g i o n . The web s i t e is also ava i l able in va rious diffe re n t
languages.

For more information contact Liz


Opalka, Communications Officer, Brent
Council, Mahatma Ghandi House, 34,
Wembley Hill Road, London HA8 8AD
Tel: 020 8937 4162

October 2003 Drugs and Alcohol 33


Identity Theft: Do You Know the Signs? A
Guide for businesses and individuals
FraudAdvisory Panel

This paper deals with the prevalence and scale of identity theft and the ways in which it
m a n i fests itself. It also illustrates how identity theft is committed. The re p o rt suggests that
the main victims of identity theft are:
• Government and the public sector • Business • Individuals.

In particular, the paper looks at the following methods:


• Application Fraud - where a fraudster applies for payment cards and financial products
in the name of their victim.
• Account take-over - where the fraudster collates sufficient info rm ation about the victim
to dupe the victim's bank.
• Wholesale assumption of the victim's identity - obtaining false passports and
identification documents or using the identity of a dead person, which may result in
Copies of this report, published fraudulent claims for social security benefits.
in August 2003 and priced • The fraudulent use of a business identity.
£5.00 are available from
The FraudAdvisory Panel, The F r a u d A dv i s o ry Panel has devised a number of methods by which the public sector,
Chartered Accountants' Hall, p ri vate sector and individuals can manage their affairs to assist in reducing the chance of
PO Box 433, Moorgate Place, becoming a victim of identity fraud. The panel has also produced a number of recommenda-
London EC2P2BJ tions as to how to deal with a fraud once it has happened. Some of these include:
Tel: 020 7920 8721 • Data-sharing and cross re fe rencing of info rm ation between governmental agencies and
Fax: 020 7920 8536 the business sector.
E-mail: info@ • Technological and organisational methods, which can be implemented to detect and
fraudadvisorypanel.org prevent identity fraud.
The report can also be viewed • Fraud reporting systems and the appointment of personnel with specific responsibility.
and downloaded via their • Protection of employees who 'blow the whistle' on fraud.
website: w w w. • Duties of directors to deal with fraud.
f ra u d a d v i s o ry p a n e l . o rg / • Asset recovery and how to reduce fraud losses via the civil courts.
publications1.html • Compliance.

Problem-Oriented Guides for Police


US CommunityOriented Policing Services (COPS)

The Pro bl e m - O riented Guides for Po l i c e causes of particular pro bl e m s. T h ey also


(POP) consist of a series of pro bl e m - identify known responses to each pro bl e m
o riented guidebooks and a companion and provide potential measures to assess
g u i d ebook that focuses on assessing and the effe c t i veness of pro bl e m - s o l v i n g
m e a s u ring response strat e g i e s. The guides e f fo rt s.
a re produced and funded by the US
C o m mu n i t y O riented Policing Serv i c e s
(COPS).
T h e re are curre n t ly 19 guides ava i l abl e The guidebooks are available to view and
ranging from 'assaults in and around bars' download via the COPS Website:
to 'bu l lying in s ch o o l s' , 'g r a f fi t i' and 'theft www.cops.usdoj.gov/
of and from cars in parking fa c i l i t i e s ' .T h ey default.asp?Item=248
p rovide those invo l ved in law enfo r c e m e n t
with pro bl e m - s p e c i fic questions to help
identify potential factors and underly i n g

34 Fraud/General October 2003


Primary Care Trusts as responsible
authorities: A guide for Crime and D i s o rd e r
Reduction Pa rt n e r s h i p s
NACRO CommunitySafety Practice Briefing

The Police Refo rm Act 2002 made p u blic health. This provides a natural set of
s i g n i ficant changes to the law affe c t i n g policy links and opportunities for action
h ow the National Health Service (NHS) at b e t ween public health and c o m mu n i t y
local level will need to work more closely s a fe t y. Reducing physical d i s o r d e r in an
with Crime and D i s o r d e r R e d u c t i o n a rea will have a health impact as well as a
Partnerships (CDRPs). Section 97 of the Act c rime and d i s o r d e r i m p a c t . S i m i l a r ly there
amended the Crime and D i s o r d e r Act 1998 a re a number of parallels between the
to state that responsible authorities include p rocess of determining local needs and
P ri m a ry Care Tru s t s. This g u i d e has been responding to them.
produced to help CDRPs consider how they There are a number of reasons why the
can integrate their local health ag e n c i e s health services should work more closely
into their partnerships and their work. with their local CDRP including:
The NHS has a responsibility with • Crime and health are linked both
other stat u t o ry agencies for public health. directly and indirectly as reducing
The term 'public health' re fers to the crime improves public health.
general state of the population's mental and • Reducing fear of crime among elderly
p hysical health. This is where there is a people can reduce isolation and
clear cro s s over with cri m e. The poore s t improve their mental health, as well as
c o m munities are like ly to have the wo r s t saving long-term care beds.
p u blic health as well as high crime rat e s. • Early intervention with victims of hate
Both crime and the fear of cri m e a re crime and domestic violence reduces
s i g n i ficant contri bu t o ry factors to poor long-term physical rehabilitation costs
and mental health costs, especially if it
targets and prevents repeat

“ ...changes to the victimisation.


• Crime costs health services hundreds
law affecting how the of millions of pounds every year and
takes resources away from patient care.
• Violent crime against health care staff
National Health costs upwards of £300 million a year
Service (NHS) at local and reduces the effectiveness of health
care services.
• Reducing alcohol-related crime
level will need to reduces injury and alcohol-related
work more closely h a rm .
• Violence-related injury is expensive to
Copies of this report, published
in May 2003 and priced £5.00

with Crime and t re at : an alcohol-related glass injury


can cost up to £180,000 to tre at ,
can be obtained from
NACRO Publications,

Disorder Reduction involving as many as 48 different


professionals.
169, Clapham Road,
London, SW9 0PU

Partnerships...... The b ri e fing paper provides a "Who's who"


Tel: 020 7840 6427.
Copies can also be viewed and

responsible of healthcare agencies and what they each


do together with details of the info rm at i o n
downloaded via their website:
www.nacro.org.uk/data/
briefings/nacro-
authorities include t h at va rious health agencies can bring to
the partnership and how this can be used. 2 0 03 0 5 28 0 0 - c s p s . p d f
P ri m a ry Care
Trusts.
October 2003
” General 35
VICTOR - Crime and D i s o rd e r Vehicle
Leicestershire Constabulary

VICTOR used to be a mobile police station, bourhood events and s ch o o l s in a highly


but now he has a new lease of life as a visible and easily accessible fo rm at .
purpose built promotional display vehicle. The character of V I C TOR is used on
The police, in p a rt n e r s h i p with the p o s t e r s and has also fe at u red in a short
local and borough councils, h ave c rime reduction animation to entert a i n
refurbished the 28ft tru ck , w h i ch now s ch o o l ch i l d ren aged 5 to 7 years both in
fe at u res an exhibition are a , f u l ly fi t t e d the vehicle and in s ch o o l s.
o f fice space with computer, TV and v i d e o,
mobile generator and an external aw n i n g For further information contact Insp Mark
t h at can be filled with crime re d u c t i o n Thomson, Beaumont Leys Police Station,
m at e ri a l . The vehicle takes crime prevention Beaumont Way, Leicester LE4 1DS
campaigns to all areas of the c o m mu n i t y Tel: 0116 248 3375 Fax: 0116 248 3327
including garden fe t e s , local neigh-

Superhighway Ro b b e ry :
Preventing e-commerce crime
Edited by Graeme R Newman and Ronald V. Clarke

This book developed out of papers pre p a red for the Fo resight Panel on Crime Preve n t i o n
(w w w. f o re s i g h t . g ov. u k /) , p a rt of the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). T h e
Fo resight Panel was established in 1993 as a result of the White Pap e r, "Realising Our
Potential" and was fo rmed to look at and address new opportunities for crime that will
e m e rge in the 21st century. It is made up of leading exe c u t i ves from bu s i n e s s , the Civil
Service and academia.
The Fo resight Panel requested an examination of the crime risks in the delive ry system
of products to e-commerce customers. This book there fo re provides an analysis of the
increasing crime opportunities associated with the Internet and e-commerce. It looks at ways
in which the concepts of crime prevention can be applied and suggests that
s i t u ational crime prevention works and is suited to developing measures to
combat the rapidly growing problem of e-commerce crime.
The authors of this book seek to identify the specific opportunities in
w h i ch crime can occur in the e-commerce env i ronment and the diffe re n t
kinds of info rm ation that are crime targets, such as intellectual pro p e rt y, intel-
l i g e n c e, i n fo rm ation systems and services of va rious kinds (banking,
p u r chasing etc). Consumer products are also examined with a view to
recognising the elements that make them particularly vulnerable to theft.
A va riety of techniques to counter e-commerce crime are identifi e d .T h e s e
are underpinned by seeking to:
• increase the effort criminals must make to carry out crime
• increase the perceived risk of crime
• reduce the anticipated rewards of crime
• remove excuses for the criminal.

Copies of this book, published in July 2003 and priced £30.00 (hardback) can be
obtained from Willan Publishing, Culmcott House, Mill Street, Uffculme,
Cullompton, Devon EX15 3AT
Tel: 01884 840337 Fax: 01884 840251 E-mail: info@willanpublishing.co.uk or
visit their website: w w w. w i l l a n p u b l i s h i n g . c o. u k

36 General October 2003


The New Politics of Crime and Punishment
Edited by Roger Matthews and Jock Young

This book, p u blished by Willan Publ i s h i n g, p rovides an analysis of the politics of crime and
punishment in modern Bri t a i n . It not only rev i ews the most recent initiat i ves in the field of
c rime contro l , but also considers the broader social and political context in which this is
taking place.
The underlying theme of the book is that a qualitat i ve change has taken place in the
politics of crime control in the UK since the early 1990s. Although crime has stab i l i s e d ,
i m p r isonment rates continue to rise and crime has become a central policy issue fo r
gove rn m e n t . It is no longer just a technical matter of law enforcement.
The aim has been to question some of the assumptions about the changing nat u re of
penal policy in society today. Evidence has been considered from both the United Kingdom
and the United States in an attempt to identify trends and recurring issues.

Copies of this book, published in July 2003 and priced £17.99 (paperback) can be obtained from Willan
Publishing, Culmcott House, Mill Street, Uffculme, Cullompton, Devon EX15 3AT
Tel: 01884 840337 Fax: 01884 840251
E-mail: info@willanpublishing.co.uk
or visit their website: www.willanpublishing.co.uk

Crime in England and Wales 2002/2003


Home Office Statistical Bulletin 07/03

This p u bl i c at i o n b rings together stat i s t i c s • Recorded robberies fell by 14% in


f rom the British Crime Survey (BCS) and 2002/03 (adjusted for the NCRS)
p rovides a compre h e n s i ve account of the following the introduction of the Street
l atest pat t e rns and trends in the main high Crime Initiative in 10 forces at the
volume crimes recorded by the police. T h e beginning of the year.
BCS questions a sample of the populat i o n .
The number of crimes recorded by the Copies of this report, published in July 2003 are
police for 2002/03 will be slightly inflated available free from the Research Development

“ There has
due to changes in the way that the police and Statistics Directorate (RDS),
record crime. Communications Development Unit, Room 264,
Some of the main points in this re p o rt
include:
50, Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT
Tel: 020 7273 2084
been a 25%
• Crimes recorded by the police
decreased by 3% in 2002/2003 after
E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
and can also be viewed and downloaded from
fall in crime
taking into account the impact of the
National Crime Recording Standard
the Home Office Website:
uk.sitestat.com/homeoffice/
measured
homeoffice/s?rds.rhosb703pdf&ns_
(NCRS) on recording practices.
• The risk of becoming a victim of crime type=pdf&ns_url=%5Bhttp:
by the BCS in
//www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs2/h
remains at an historic low (around
27%) according to the BCS, one-third osb703.pdf%5D
the 5 years
lower than the risk in 1995 (40%).
• There has been a 25% fall in crime Note: This file is 7MB large and may take some
between
measured by the BCS in the 5 years
between 1997 and 2002/03.
time to download.
1997 and


• Vehicle-related thefts fell by 5% this
year according to the BCS and by 9%
2002/03.
according to recorded crime (adjusted
for the NCRS).

October 2003 General 37


Keeping Section 17 on the agenda: Good
process and practice for local authorities
implementing Section 17 of the 1998 Crime
and D i s o rd e r Act
Crime Concern and London Borough of Havering

This b ri e fing pap e r has been pre p a red as a c o u n t ry in developing Section 17 wo r k ,


fo l l ow-up to the re p o rt ‘M a i n s t re a m i n g w h i ch are rev i ewed in the re p o rt, a re
c o m m u n i t y s a f e t y: A practical g u i d e t o mainly concerned with training and raising
implementing Section 17 of the 1998 awa re n e s s. The challenge in the future is to
Crime and D i s o rd e r A c t‘ published in t r a n s l ate this developmental work into
2000. action on the ground in local communities.
Four years on from the implementation
of the Crime and D i s o r d e r A c t , in which Copies of this briefing paper, published in July
Section 17 was made a legal re q u i re m e n t , 2003 can be obtained free from Crime Concern
this b ri e fing pap e r p rovides some re c e n t Beaver House, 147 - 150, Victoria Road,
examples of good mainstreaming practice Swindon SN1 3UY
by local authorities around the country. I n Tel: 01793 863500 Fax: 01793 514654
p a rt i c u l a r, it highlights the pro m i s i n g E-mail: info@crimeconcern.org.uk
ap p ro a ch taken by the London Borough of It can also be viewed and downloaded via their
H ave ri n g. The summaries of good practice website: www.crimeconcern.org.uk/
c a r ried out by authorities around the pubs/section17ontheagenda.pdf

"Launching Crime Science" C o n f e re n c e


Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science

C rime remains one of the biggest social T h e re will be opportunities thro u g h -


and political issues in the world today and out the 2 days for scientists to meet with
traditional methods of fighting crime are the police and those invo l ved in
still relied upon. This c o n fe re n c e, w h i ch c o m mu n i t y s a fe t y to hear first-hand ab o u t
t a kes place on 24th and 25th Nove m b e r the problems that crime science can help to
2003 at the Novotel London Euston Hotel, re s o l ve. P re s e n t ations will also be give n
will present a whole new ap p ro a ch to from leading UK scientists who will set out
crime control. the latest in re s e a r ch and technology in
C rime Science i nvo l ves the ap p l i c at i o n crime control.
of ri g o rous scientific thinking to fi n d This conference will be of interest to:
practical ways of reducing crime by • Police officers with an interest in new
focussing on prevention as well as cure. approaches to prevention and
This invo l ves disrupting the chains of detection.
events leading to crime as well as • Crime and Disorder Reduction
For more information contact identifying and arresting prolific offenders. Partnerships (CDRPs).
the organisers of the The c o n fe re n c e will explore the developing • Local authorities with an interest in
conference Yarrington Ltd, roles of science, t e chnology and design in front line scientific developments that
Blencathra C, Upton Magna c rime re d u c t i o n . The techniques used by can help to address their problems.
Business Park, the scientist, s u ch as using dat a , l o g i c, • Scientists and designers who would
Shrewsbury SY4 4TT r at i o n a l i t y, hy p o t h e s i s , testing and like to contribute to the debate on how
Tel: 01743 708201 knowledge acquisition can help to: science can reduce crime.
Fax: 01743 709596 • understand the crime problem
E-mail: info@yarrington.co.uk • improve the ability to prevent crimes The cost of the c o n fe re n c e i n c l u d i n g
Details are also available via from happening re f reshments and lunch on both days is
their website: • catch offenders more quickly. £ 2 7 5 . 0 0 . Single day attendance including
www.yarrington.co.uk/ re f reshments and lunches is £175.00.
crime_science/ O ve rnight accommodation is also ava i l abl e
at the hotel.
38 General October 2003
Leeds Community Safety - New Website
Leeds City Council

Leeds Community Safety’s new website (www.leeds-csp.org.uk) provides a useful source of


i n fo rm ation on reducing crime and the fear of crime in Leeds.
The new web s i t e outlines some of the work being
done to reduce anti-social behav i o u r, misuse of dru g s
and alcohol, bu rg l a ry and violent cri m e as well as
o f fe ring advice on crime preve n t i o n . The site also
p rovides a g u i d e to the Leeds Anti-Social Behav i o u r U n i t
and gives details on seeking help if you are a v i c t i m of anti-social behav i o u r and possibl e
s o l u t i o n s. The bu rg l a ry p age gives advice on rogue traders and a fact sheet, w h i ch can be
viewed and downloaded from the site. Other sections on the site include how to report a hate
crime and a ‘members area’ where visitors can register to receive more detailed info rm at i o n ,
including access to the Leeds C o m mu n i t y S a fe t y m o n t h ly n ew s l e t t e r ‘ U p d at e ’ and a
community s a fe t y library database of various publications.

For further information access the site: www.leeds-csp.org.uk or contact Cathy Carlill,
Communications Officer, Leeds CommunitySafety Team, Leeds City Council, Leeming House, Vicar Lane,
Leeds LS2 7JF Tel: 0113 395 0797 E-mail: cathy.carlill@leeds.gov.uk

The Royal Borough of Windsor and


Maidenhead Community Safety
Pa rt n e r s h i p's Website
Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead

The Royal Borough of Windsor and the main partner sites,


Maidenhead C o m mu n i t y S a fe t y Pa rt n e r s h i p including the Roya l
h ave developed a new web s i t e B o rough and T h a m e s
(w w w. r bw m s a f e t y 4 a l l . o rg . u k) fo l l ow i n g Va l l ey Po l i c e. A key
a local survey, w h i ch indicated that many element of the site is the Youth Offe n d i n g For further information contact
residents felt insuffi c i e n t ly info rmed ab o u t Team section, w h i ch provides the Helen Taylor, Communications
c ri m e. o p p o rtunity to ap p ly to be a re fe rral panel Officer, CommunitySafety
The Home Office funded site, which is member. Partnership, Royal Borough of
also linked to the development of a ro a d The web s i t e p rovides info rm ation on Windsor and Maidenhead Town
s h ow, joint p a rt n e r s h i p media s t r at e g y a n d n ew initiatives, a fe e d b a ck fo rm and useful Hall, St Ives Road,
p a rt n e r s h i p media gro u p, is a stand alone contact details. T h e re is also an interactive Maidenhead SL6 1RF
site owned and managed by the calendar providing details for all Tel: 01628 796305
C o m mu n i t y S a fe t y Pa rt n e r s h i p’s c o m mu n i t y s a fe t y and police events. Fax: 01628 796243 or Email:
C o m mu n i c ations Offi c e r. It is linked to all helen.taylor@rbwm.gov.uk

A New Director for Crimestoppers


Crimestoppers

R oy Clark, the Director of Crimestoppers Trust for the past two and a half years has been
appointed to a new position as the Director of inve s t i g ations for the Independent Po l i c e
Complaints Commission (IPCC).
Mr Clark's successor is Michael Lauri e, Major General (re t i red) who took up the post as
the new Director for Crimestoppers in August this year.

For more information on Crimestoppers contact Crimestoppers Trust, Apollo House, 66a, London Road,
Morden, Surrey SM4 5BE Tel: 020 8254 3200 Fax: 020 8254 3201 E-mail: cst@crimestoppers-uk.org

October 2003 General 39


New Crime Prevention Bus
Haltemprice Crime Prevention Panel

The Haltemprice Crime Prevention Panel in p rovision for a storage area for literat u re
East Yorkshire has recently taken delivery of and display mat e ri a l . The lower deck
a new crime prevention bus. re c e i ved similar tre atment with the
The doubl e - d e c ker bu s , w h i ch had i n s t a l l ation of a display console for the
For more information contact p rev i o u s ly been in operation as a s ch o o l l atest security devices and audio-visual
PC Paul Jackson, Kirk Ella Police bu s , is used by the panel as an exhibition u n i t . The bus has its own generator and is
Box, Redlands Drive, centre. Panel members, in p a rt n e r s h i p with protected by an intruder alarm and CCTV.
Kirk Ella HU10 7UE the Humberside Police and the East Riding For details on the full restoration of the
Tel: 01482 597721 S a fe C o m mu n i t y Te a m , we re fully invo l ve d bus and for other info rm ation about the
Fax: 01482 650833 in re-fitting the bus and the upper deck was panel and their wo r k , visit their new
or visit the website: t r a n s fo rmed into an info rm ation and website: www.hwcpp.com
www.hwcpp.com c o m mu n i c ations technology suite, w i t h

Racist h a ra s s m e n t and support projects:


Their role, impact and potential
Joseph Rowntree Foundation

A study conducted by the Joseph Row n t ree Fo u n d ation (JRF) in 1999 found that victims of
racial h a r a s s m e n t felt isolated and cut-off from the traditional support channels ava i l able to
victims of cri m e. This study surveys the pro g ress made in the field over the past 4 years and
i d e n t i fies the development and response of c o m mu n i t y-based racial h a r a s s m e n t s u p p o rt
p rojects across England and Wa l e s. It considers how casework-led interventions respond to
the needs of victims of racial harassment.
The report found that:
• Casework is the foundation of all the projects studied, but the degree to which casework
forms the basis of intervention va ri e s. The positive aspects of casework include
supporting the victim, rebuilding confidence and validating the experience of victims of
harassment.
• There is an uneven spread of support projects around the country.
• Projects have been initiated for a variety of reasons including the need for a more
co-ordinated response, awareness raising or a political response to racially
motivated at t a ck s.
• A wide range of activities are undertaken as part of these projects.
• The racial harassment support sector could be strengthened by adequate funding
streams, recognising the needs of caseworkers for structures of support and developing
community-based solutions to providing support and assistance.

Copies of this report, published in July 2003 are available priced £13.95 plus £2.50 p & p from York
Publishing Services Ltd. 64, Hallfield Road, Layerthorpe, York YO31 7ZQ
Tel: 01904 430033 Fax: 01904 430868.
It can also be viewed and downloaded via the JRF Website:
www.jrf.org.uk/bookshop/details.asp?pubID=541

40 General/Hate/Race Crime October 2003


Multi-Agency Panel on Racial Harassment
Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council

The Barnsley Multi-Agency Panel (MAP) is a group of agencies working with and responding
to victims suffe ring racial h a r a s s m e n t. The panel has been in operation since 1997 and
includes two fully operational sub-groups including a Casework C o n fe re n c e G roup and
Development Group.
In October 2002, the panel launched an initiative involving all secondary s ch o o l s in the
a re a . Pupils were encouraged to take part in designing an anti-racist slogan and the winning
s ch o o l was awarded £50.00. D u ring Nove m b e r, December and Ja nu a ry, the group also
arranged an anti-racist campaign to run on local buses, which saw a significant reduction in
this type of crime. S ch o o l s will again have the opportunity to design a new anti-racist slogan
as part of this year’s campaign in November.

For more information contact Max Senior, Racial Harassment StrategyCo-ordinator,


27/29, Western Street, Barnsley, South Yorkshire S70 2BT
Tel: 01226 774991 Fax: 01226 774969 E-mail: maxwellsenior@barnsley.gov.uk
or visit their website: www.barnsley.gov. u k

A Resource Directory and Guide for


Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual or Transgendered
victims of crime and h a ra s s m e n t
Berkshire Anti-Homophobia Group

A gro u n d b reaking p u bl i c at i o n t h at The extensive 60-page Resource


a d d resses the wide-ranging issues fo r D i re c t o ry and Practitioners G u i d e, i s
o rg a n i s ations working with victims of t a rgeted at people with human re s o u r c e
homophobic crime has been launched by responsibilities and those dealing with
the Berkshire Anti-Homophobia Gro u p customers, clients or staff who are potential
( B A H G ) . BAHG is a mu l t i - agency gro u p victims of homophobic hate cri m e. T h e
i nvolving the police, local authori t i e s , p u bl i c at i o n re c e i ved support and funding
P ro b ation Service, Victim Support, Citizen's f rom Berkshire ’s Crime and D i s o r d e r
A dvice Bureau and local Lesbian, G ay, Reduction Pa rtnerships and has been
Bisexual and Tr a n s g e n d e red (LGBT) c i r c u l ated to a range of agencies and
community g ro u p s. businesses in the area.

Copies of the Directory in printed form or


CD, published in July 2003 and priced
£5.00 including p & p are available from
BAHG,
PO Box 3699, Bracknell RG42 1HN or via
E-mail at: bahg@bahg.org
The Directory can also be viewed and
downloaded via the website:
www.bahg.org

October 2003 Hate/Race Crime 41


The Effectiveness of Neighbourhood Watch
The Campbell Crime & JusticeCo-ordinating Group

The Campbell Crime & J u s t i c e C o - rev i ew will be those that n e i g h b o u r h o o d


o r d i n ating Group is an intern at i o n a l wat c h might be able to re d u c e. T h e s e
n e t work of individuals who pre p a re, include:
u p d ate and disseminate systematic rev i ew s • crimes against residents
of high quality re s e a r ch conducted • crimes against dwellings
wo r l dwide on effe c t i ve methods to re d u c e • other (street) crimes occurring in
crime and delinquency. the watch area
The group has re c e n t ly published a • disorder in the area.
p rotocol on the ‘ E f fe c t i veness of
Neighbourhood Wat c h’ , w h i ch sets the The rev i ew will include the ‘ b e s t ’
standards for what will be included in the eva l u at i o n s. The minimum re q u i rement fo r
final review. inclusion of eva l u ations is that they are
The pri m a r y aim of the rev i ew is to based on both befo re and after surveys and
assess the effects of neighbourhood wat ch experimental and comparable control areas.
on crime. Objectives include: Both published and unpublished literat u re
• To operationalise the inputs (e.g. will be included in the rev i ew and there
neighbourhood watch) and the will be no re s t riction on the country of
outcomes (e.g. crime) for the purpose o rigin or source. Results of the rev i ew will
of conducting the review. include effect sizes or provide nu m b e r s
• To identify studies which have from which effect sizes can be calculated.
evaluated the effect of neighbourhood The principal reviewer in collab o r at i o n
watch on crime. with colleagues will update the rev i ew
• To identify a list of studies that meets every two years.
the minimum criteria of
scientific rigour. A full copy of the protocol can be viewed and
• To obtain a comparable measure of downloaded from the Internet:
effect size in the selected most www.aic.gov.au/campbellcj/reviews/
rigorous studies. NWProtocol.pdf
• To arrive at a conclusion about the
effectiveness of neighbourhood watch. Thanks to the European Crime Prevention
Network (EU CPN) for highlighting this
The rev i ew focuses mainly on the publication. For more information on EU CPN,
impact of neighbourhood wat ch s ch e m e s visit the website: e u ro p a . e u . i n t / c o m m /
on crime. The types of crime covered in the justice_home/eucpn

National Neighbourhood Watch Association


- 21st Anniversary
National Neighbourhood WatchAssociation

The National Neighbourhood Watch Association (NNWA) celebrates its 21st anniversary this
year and as a result a series of important and innovative events have been organised.
A series of seminars will be run across the country later in the ye a r, e n abling dissemi-
nation of info rm ation and easy access to the association.

Information packs, merchandise and further information can be obtained by contacting The National
Neighbourhood WatchAssociation, 18, Buckingham Gate, London SW1E 6LB
Tel: 020 7963 0160 Fax: 020 7963 0170 E-mail: info@neighbourhoodwatch.net
or visit their website: www.neighbourhoodwatch.net

42 Neighbourhood Wardens & Neighbourhood Watch October 2003


Flintshire Victim Support & Neighbourhood
Watch Seminar
Flintshire Local Voluntary Council

F l i n t s h i re Vi c t i m S u p p o rt , N e i g h b o u r h o o d
Watch and Local Voluntary Council hosted a • Involving the community, including
seminar earlier this year with the aim of young people, by working more
identifying the issues surrounding cri m e closely with s ch o o l s.
and d i s o r d e r and the fear of cri m e i n • Establishing c o m mu n i t y groups to
Flintshire. ensure the concerns and issues of the
Va rious groups and agencies fro m community are co-ordinated and
a c ross the region attended the seminar, raised with the authority.
w h i ch focused on establishing what is • Identifying projects that will secure
needed to improve the quality of life fo r early successes to inspire and raise For more information contact
the local c o m mu n i t y. The findings we re confidence in the community. John Watkin, Deputy Manager,
re p o rted back to the C o m mu n i t y S a fe t y • Increasing the use of CCTV and Flintshire Local Voluntary
Pa rt n e r s h i p to enable them to tailor their improving lighting in specific areas. Council (FLVC), The Manse,
action plan based on the issues raised. • Increasing control over the sale of Tyddyn Street, Mold, Flintshire
P re s e n t ations we re given by Nort h alcohol. CH7 1DX
Wales Po l i c e, Neighbourhood Wat c h, • Increasing police presence on Tel: 01352 755008
Vi c t i m S u p p o rt and the Local Vo l u n t a ry the streets. Fax: 01352 755490
Council and included workshops to discuss E-mail: info@flvc.demon.co.uk
s p e c i fic issues. Some of the issues raised Due to the success of the seminar, it is or visit their website:
include: hoped that it will run on an annual basis. www.flvc.demon.co.uk

Neighbourhood Watch Community


Support Unit
Valleys and Vale Neighbourhood WatchAssociation

In A p ril this ye a r, the Va l l eys and Vale Neighbourhood Wat ch A s s o c i ation introduced their
mobile Neighbourhood Wat ch U n i t , w h i ch travels throughout the are a , p ro m o t i n g
Neighbourhood Watch.
The A s s o c i ation decided to purchase the new unit, fo l l owing the temporary use of the
mobile police station to be able to eva l u ate the effe c t i veness of using a mobile service in
m o re remote are a s. Due to its success, a new unit was purchased with funding from Stro u d
D i s t rict Council and Gloucestershire Po l i c e. The unit consists of a twin-axle display trailer,
s p r ayed ye l l ow and fe at u ring the A s s o c i ation's details and logo. It is fitted with a v i d e o a n d
t e l ev i s i o n , together with a range of crime reduction and fi re prevention literat u re.
Co-ordinators who operate the unit are fully trained to provide crime reduction advice. Both
the Fire Service and Ambulance Service will provide further training in the future.
S everal agencies have expressed an interest in travelling with the unit, including the
D i s t rict Council Abandoned Vehicles Depart m e n t , C o m mu n i t y S a fe t y D e p a rtment and
Gloucestershire County Council Trading Standards, amongst others.
Some of the successes of using the mobile unit have included:
• Visits to 13 parishes and 17 events.
• Security marking of 400 items.
• Setting up of seven new watch schemes.
• Residents working together with the police and District Council to tackle drugs,
anti-social behaviour and abandoned vehicles.
• Co-ordinators working with the Youth Service to re-open the youth club.
• Anti-social behaviour orders obtained against three young people.

For more information contact Rick Pellatt, Neighbourhood WatchOffice, Police Station, Parliament
Street, Stroud GL5 1QQ Tel: 01452 335623 E-mail: rick.pellatt@gloucestershire.pnn.police.uk

October 2003 Neighbourhood Wardens & Neighbourhood Watch 43


‘Wa rd e n’ - The Neighbourhood Wa rd e n
Team Newsletter
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister

The Neighbourhood Warden Team N ew s l e t t e r, ‘Wa rd e n’ , is a quart e r ly re p o rt p u blished by


Copies of the newslettercan be the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM), w h i ch aims to disseminate good practice
obtained from the Office of the and ideas from schemes across the country. It provides readers with the opportunity to
Deputy Prime Minister, i n fo rm others of the events and activities that have wo r ked in their are a , as well as raising
PO Box 236, Wetherby, their profile and awareness of the work that they undertake.
West Yorkshire LS23 7NB The newsletter gives residents in the local c o m mu n i t y the chance to express their views
Tel: 0870 1226 236 on the work carried out by the wa r d e n s and to talk about issues that affect them. R e s i d e n t s
Fax: 0870 126 237 can also put fo r ward ideas about the improvements that could be made in their c o m mu n i t y
E-mail: odpm@twoten.press.net and the local environment.
or visit the website: The p u bl i c at i o n is designed for scheme managers and wa r d e n s, h owever copies are also
www.neighbourhood. c i r c u l ated to re s i d e n t s , c o m mu n i t y s a fe t y o f fi c e r s , the police and people with an interest in
gov.uk improving their community.

A Different Tack on Security


Staffordshire Police

Police in Staffo r d s h i re are adv i s i n g at point of manu fa c t u re. T h ey also carri e d


e q u e s t r ians to be extra vigilant and take out site-specific surveys to identify any
additional crime prevention pre c a u t i o n s weaknesses in security.
due to the increased numbers of horse tack An eva l u ation of the scheme wa s
theft in the area recently. carried out and crime figures were analysed
Ta ck theft is a pro blem in many part s 12 weeks befo re the start and for 4 we e k s
of the country, with stolen articles often d u ring and 4 weeks after the pro j e c t .T h e
sold on the intern ational marke t . results showed a 57.5% reduction in ru r a l
E l e c t ro n i c a l ly tagging equipment incre a s e s c ri m e. A d d i t i o n a l ly, the Society of Master
the chances of having it re t u rned to the Saddlers also now active ly encourages the
rightful owner if it is stolen because it i n s e rtion of tags at the point of
becomes more easily identifi abl e. Tags are manufacture. This initiative is being used as
often difficult to re m ove and equipment an example of good practice in several areas
t h at is tagged is mu ch harder to sell on, of the country and other forces are keen to
making items less at t r a c t i ve to wo u l d - b e p ro g ress the scheme.
thieves.
The aim of this initiative is to: For more information contact PC Gordon Scott,
• reduce incidents of equine-related Chase Division Crime Reduction Officer, Hilton
rural c ri m e, burglary other buildings, Hall, Hilton Stables, Hilton Lane, Essington,
theft of trailers/off-road vehicles and Staffordshire WV11 2BQ
theft of horse tack Tel: 01785 218828 Fax: 01785 232369
• reduce the fear of crime within the E-mail: gordon.scott@
rural community staffordshire.pnn.police.uk
• raise awareness of rural c ri m e issues.
The initiat i ve focused on over 200 Editors Note: Property marking schemes
e q u i n e - re l ated pro p e rties in the area and should adhere to the Association of Chief
was publicised via regional television and Police Officer (ACPO)/Home Office principles
radio bro a d c a s t s , as well as targ e t i n g on property marking. Details of these are
l o c ations that had prev i o u s ly been victims published on the Crime Reduction website:
of this type of cri m e. The police wo r ked in www.crimereduction.
p a rt n e r s h i p with local companies who gov. u k / p ro p e rt y 0 1 . h t m
fitted passive electronic tags to equipment

44 Neighbourhood Wardens & Neighbourhood Watch/Property Crime October 2003


National Churchwatch Seminar
City of London Police

The City of London C rime and D i s o r d e r w h i c h makes subsequent tracing of


Reduction Pa rt n e r s h i p (CDRP) has irreplaceable articles extremely difficult.
organised a National Churchwatch Seminar S p e a kers at the c o n fe re n c e will include
due to be held at the Corp o r ation of re p re s e n t at i ves from National Church -
L o n d o n ’s Guildhall between 5.30pm and wat ch , Trace and the City of London Police.
8.00pm on Thursday 23rd October 2003.
The aims of the seminar are to raise For more information contact PC Ray Sykes,
p e o p l e ’s awa reness to cri m e, s p e c i fi c a l ly Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership,
re l ated to places of worship and to adv i s e City of London Police, Suite 51, London Fruit &
C l e rgy and ch u r ch wo r kers on p e r s o n a l Wool Exchange,Brushfield Street, London E1 6EX
s a fe t y i s s u e s. In addition to suffe ri n g Tel: 020 7456 9814
incidents of violence and criminal damage, E-mail: ray.sykes@corpoflondon.gov.uk
s t atistics reveal that unfo rt u n at e ly when or visit the website:
va l u able ecclesiastical items are stolen they www.cityoflondon.police.uk/news/
a re rare ly re c ove re d . This is often due to latest_news_5/story5.htm
i n s u f ficient recording and documentat i o n ,

Ru ra l Safety Initiative
West Mercia Constabulary

West Mercia Constabulary has developed the g roup work through a pro bl e m - s o l v i n g
R u r a l S a fe t y I n i t i at i ve (RSI) in consultat i o n m o d e l , w h i ch fo rms the basis for the
with the ru r a l c o m mu n i t y, with the aim of initiative:
e n g aging them in reducing crime in their • Identify key stakeholders and establish
a re a . The initiat i ve utilises the c o m mu n i t y’s membership of the rural safety group.
help in problem solving their own issues at a • Convene rural safety group and agree
local parish level. It includes a comprehensive their purpose.
guide to risk management and was based on a • Collect appropriate data.
s t u dy carried out by Dr Richard Ya r wood of • Analyse data.
the University of Ply m o u t h . He conducted • Review progress.
re s e a r ch into the fear of cri m e a n d • Identify course of action.
perceptions of policing in rural districts. Four • Implement action.
ru r a l p a rishes we re selected to pilot the • Review impact.
i n i t i at i ve and in-depth surveys we re The groups ap p ly the pro blem solving
undertaken with the residents to determine: t e chniques to local issues, w h i ch enabl e s
• the extent to which crime is seen as a m atters to be addressed in a stru c t u red way.
problem in rural areas Where the group records their efforts, the RSI
• the types of crime and disorder and p rovides accre d i t ation in the fo rm of a
safety issues perceived to be problematic c e rt i fi c at e, w h i ch shows they have taken a
in these areas clear and logical ap p ro a ch to issues of s a fe t y
• public satisfaction with policing in rural and security in their community.
areas. The initiat i ve has been independently
Key stakeholders fo rmed ru r a l s a fe t y eva l u ated and the results are ve ry For more information contact
g roups who we re re s p o n s i ble for collecting e n c o u r ag i n g. The c o m mu n i t y h ave a gre at e r Sgt Mark Smith, Crime and
data to determine the real or perceived nature sense of working together to discuss problems Disorder Team, West Mercia
of the c o m mu n i t y’s concern s. These gro u p s and identify solutions with re d u c e d Constabulary HQ, Hindlip Hall,
attended a comprehensive three-hour training requirement for police involvement.The RSI is PO Box 55, Worcester WR3 8SP
course and re c e i ved info rm ation on cri m e also being used in other areas in the country Tel: 01905 331985
reduction theories, including how to cascade and it is hoped that it will eventually become E-mail: mark.smith@
this knowledge to other stake h o l d e r s. T h e recognised as good practice nationwide. westmercia.pnn.police.uk

October 2003 Property Crime/Rural Crime 45


Sexual Offences Bill
Home Office

The Sexual Offences Bill was introduced into the House of Lords on the 28th of Ja nu a ry this
ye a r. It has now passed to the Commons, w h e re it had its second reading on 15th July and
goes into committee on 9th September. The Bill is expected to re c e i ve Royal Assent in
November with implementation aimed for May 2004.
The Sexual Offences Bill represents a major re fo rm of the law on sexual offences. One of
the most important c hanges proposed is the overhaul of the law on consent. The Bill
introduces a test of reasonableness and a list of circumstances in which various presumptions
will be made as to the complainant's consent and the defendant's re a s o n able belief in
consent. This will provide juries with a very clear framework within which to make fair and
just decisions.
The Bill also proposes a pack age of measures to give ch i l d ren the gre atest possibl e
p rotection under the law from s e x u a l abu s e. It makes clear that s e x u a l activity with a ch i l d
under 13 years of age is never acceptabl e, and questions of consent will not be re l eva n t . I t
also proposes a new offence of 'meeting a child fo l l owing s e x u a l g rooming etc', w h i ch will
c at ch adults who undertake a course of conduct with a child leading to a meeting where the
adult intends to sexually abuse that child, either at that meeting or on a subsequent occasion.
The Bill brings gre ater coherence and higher penalties to the criminal law surro u n d i n g
p ro s t i t u t i o n , child porn o g r ap hy and traffi ck i n g, ensuring greater protection to children and
adults alike.
For more information contact Laura McIvor, Home Office SexualOffences Bill Team, Room 316, 50, Queen
Anne's Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 0207 273 2203 E-mail: laura.mcivor@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Shoplifting Leaflet for Schools


Hampshire Constabulary

H a m p s h i re Constabu l a ry, in p a rt n e r s h i p c riminal offence and those caught, ri s k


with Southern Co-operat i ves Limited, h a s gaining a criminal re c o r d , w h i ch could
set up an initiat i ve to raise awa re n e s s affect them later in life.
amongst teenagers of the serious conse- O ver 94,000 leaflets have been
quences of s h o p l i f t i n g. Their message is d i s t ri buted to eve ry secondary s ch o o l
simple - "S h o p l i f t i n g is not a word - IT'S s t u d e n t in the area and are also ava i l abl e
A SENTENCE!" f rom the va rious Co-operat i ve store s
The l e a f l e t was introduced fo l l ow i n g around the region.
c o n c e rns that s h o p l i f t i n g is seen by some
young people as acceptable behaviour, with For more information contact Malcolm Wilton,
little or no knowledge of the seve re conse- Force Crime Reduction Co-ordinator, Hampshire
quences of their actions. The message is Police HQ, West Hill, Romsey Road, Winchester,
aimed dire c t ly at teenagers and wa s Hampshire SO22 5DB
designed fo l l owing consultation betwe e n Tel: 01962 871082 E-mail:malcolm.wilton
both teachers and pupils at local s ch o o l s. It @hampshire.pnn.police.uk
highlights the fact that s h o p l i f t i n g is a

“ Shoplifting is not a word - IT’S A


SENTENCE!

46 Sexual offences/Town/Shopping Centre Crime October 2003
Theft from Motor Vehicles - Advice Leaflet
West Yorkshire Police

West Yo r k s h i re Police has set up an • Consider where you park your car. If it
i n i t i at i ve that deals with the incre a s i n g is parked in an isolated place, it is more
p ro blem of thefts from motor vehicles. at risk of being broken in to.
A n a lysis of police fi g u res in the are a Huddersfield has 7 car parks, which
has shown that between 1st June 2002 and have achieved Secured by Design status.
28 May 2003 there we re 3,518 thefts fro m These car parks have increased security
motor ve h i c l e s. Of these, 1,587 invo l ved a measures and are there fo re
window being smashed to gain entry to the more secure.
c a r. As a result the police have produced a • Consider having a car alarm fitted.
s p e c i a l ly designed l e a f l e t o f fe r ing cri m e Some alarm sensors can be adjusted to
p revention advice and useful contacts. penetrate the body of the car to detect
These have been issued to window movement as a thief approaches the
replacement companies who have agreed to vehicle.
place a copy of the l e a f l e t in a customer’s • Some burglaries are carried out solely
c a r when they replace a smashed window to steal car keys. Keys should always be
to prevent them becoming a re p e at v i c t i m kept in a safe and secure place, day and
of this type of crime. night.
O ver 2,000 leaflets have been
produced and advice includes: For more information contact PC Chris Green,
• 10% of vehicles are broken in to where Crime Reduction/Architectural Liaison Officer,
thieves see a CD player fitted and West Yorkshire Police, Huddersfield Police
assume that the glove compartment Station, Castlegate, Huddersfield HD1 2NJ
will be full of CDs. Always leave the Tel: 01484 436639
glove box compartment empty and E-mail: cg30@westyorkshire.pnn.police.uk
open. 21% of thefts from vehicles
include the theft of CD players.

Vehicle Crime Reduction Section


Home Office

Last year, the Home Office Vehicle C ri m e Reduction Section piloted a vehicle c ri m e project in
B ri s t o l , C ove n t ry and Middlesbro u g h . The project invo l ved the distri bution of c a r c ri m e
prevention advice to people who had left property on show in their cars.
Due to its success, the scheme was extended to the 24 Crime and D i s o r d e r R e d u c t i o n
Pa rtnerships (CDRPs) with the highest levels of cri m e. S u p p o rt was obtained from the Local For more information contact:
G ove rnment A s s o c i ation (LGA) and regional Home Office Directors we re asked to write to Steve Kirk, Home Office Vehicle
their CDRPs who had been identified as suffe ring the highest levels of cri m e. L o c a l Crime Reduction Section,
a u t h o rities employed the services of parking attendants and street wa r d e n s, who could note Allington Towers,
the re g i s t r ation numbers of vehicles parked with items left on show. R e g i s t r ation nu m b e r s 19, Allington Street,
were then forwarded to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), who sent a letter to London SW1E 5EB
the re g i s t e red keeper of the ve h i c l e a dvising them that their ve h i c l e had been identified as Tel: 020 7035 5269
h aving left items on show. A l e a f l e t p roviding advice on reducing ve h i c l e c ri m e was also E-mail: steve.kirk
included. @homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
Fo l l owing the p u bl i c at i o n of the latest crime fi g u re s , the remainder of the local For further advice on reducing
a u t h o ri t i e s , w h i ch appear in the ‘top 94’ p a rt n e r s h i p a reas with the highest levels of cri m e vehiclecrimevisit the Vehicle
will be invited to take part in the project. Crime Reduction Website:
This initiat i ve demonstrates how local communities can help in reducing crime in their www.secureyourmotor.
own neighbourhoods. gov.uk/

October 2003 Vehicle Crime 47


Touring Caravans: Crime Reduction
Officer's Guide
Lincolnshire Police

The National C a r ava n C o u n c i l , together with manu fa c-


t u rers and insure r s , a re working on a number of
For more information and i n i t i at i ves to raise the public's awareness on how to avoid
copies of the process map, becoming a v i c t i m of cri m e. As part of the c a m p a i g n, i t
contact PC Tim Booth, Crime was decided to produce a process map to assist Cri m e
Reduction Officer, Lincolnshire Reduction Officers who are ap p ro a ched for advice on
Police, Boston and Horncastle touring caravans.
Sector, Lincoln Lane, The map uses only recognised sources and includes a
Boston PE21 8QS number of websites offe ring va l u able info rm at i o n
Tel: 01205 312240 regarding legislation affecting new dri vers and re s t ri c-
Fax: 01205 312288 tions placed on them when towing vehicles.

Park Safe
Lancashire Constabulary

M i t re House c a r park in Lancaster has been "Park Safe" system. Park Safe is a compre-
a constant location for ve h i c l e c ri m e a n d h e n s i ve security ap p ro a ch to parking and
anti-social behav i o u r p ro blems over re c e n t fe at u res the use of extensive C C T V, ve h i c l e
ye a r s. The 1960's design encourag e d m ovement sensors in individual parking
g r a f fi t i, juvenile nuisance and d ru g misuse, b ays and the location of panic alarms on
making many people afraid to use it. each floor.
For more information contact S everal crime prevention techniques had Lancaster Police fa c i l i t ated a p a rt n -
Jan Brown or Phil Corris, been used prev i o u s ly to try to deter the e r s h i p b e t ween Park Safe and the city
Lancaster Police Station, p ro blems associated with the c a r park bu t council to install the system into Mitre
Thurnham Street, with limited success. R e s e a r ch undert a ke n H o u s e, w h i ch lead to a total re f u r b i s h m e n t
Lancaster LA1 1YB by the Crime Prevention Team at Lancaster of the c a r p a r k . Visitors to the new parking
Tel: 01524 596696 Police identified that a similar c a r park in facility have ag reed that it is light,
E-mail: jan.brown@ D e r by had re s o l ved all their cri m e welcoming and above all safe and secure.
lancashire.pnn.police.uk p ro blems through the installation of the

Fo re c o u rt Crime Seminar
West Yorkshire Police and British Oil Security Syndicate (BOSS)

The British Oil Security Syndicate (BOSS) The seminar will be of part i c u l a r
in conjunction with West Yo r k s h i re Po l i c e i n t e rest to crime reduction practitioners
a re hosting a one-day seminar on 15th and petrol re t a i l e r s. The cost of the event is
October 2003 at the South Leeds Stadium, £20.00, which includes a buffet lunch.
to discuss the pro blems associated with
petrol forecourt c ri m e. Further information is available from John Turtle,
Topics will include: BOSS Representative for the North West Tel. 0161
• Staff s a fe t y. 436 4714 or DI John Birkenshaw, Force Crime
• Reducing theft and fraud. Reduction Officer, West Yorkshire Police,
• D ri ve - o f f s. Police HQ, PO Box 9,
• CCTV (new advances in technology). Wakefield, WF1 3QP
• Forecourt Wat ch . Tel: 01924 292465 E-mail: jb152@westyork-
• Designing out Crime and ATM security. shire.pnn.police.uk
• Automatic Number Plate Recognition
(ANPR).

48 Vehicle Crime October 2003


Car Crime
Edited by Claire Corbett

This book surveys the extensive nat u re of c a r c ri m e. It starts by suggesting that the stere o-
typical representation of car c ri m e (theft of and theft from), whilst very important, provides
too narrow a definition and should be broadened to include offending involving drivers and
the wider society.
The book considers the historical roots of crime legislation involving cars and dri v i n g,
t h rough to current legislation and its effects and implicat i o n s. It also looks at crime contro l
and prevention and views c a r c ri m e in re l ation to masculinity, gender and c a r u s age issues.
Topics such as road rag e, mobile phone use and the perspectives of crash victims and
bereaved are also explored.
Other chapters cover:
• Theft of and theft from vehicles.
• Impaired driving (alcohol, drugs and fatigue).
• Speeding.
• Dangerous and careless driving.
• Past, present and future directions.

Copies of this book, published in August 2003 and priced £17.99 (paperback) or £40.00 (hardback) can
be obtained from Willan Publishing, Culmcott House, Mill Street, Uffculme, Cullompton, Devon EX15 3AT
Tel: 01884 840337 Fax: 01884 840251 E-mail: info@willanpublishing.co.uk
or visit their website: www.willanpublishing.co.uk

The ‘Vulture’ Campaign


Greater Manchester Police

G re ater Manchester Police in p a rt n e r s h i p i n i t i at i ves including Operation Haw k ,


with Manchester City Council launched a t a rgeting s t reet cri m e and Operat i o n
mobile poster c a m p a i g n in June to tack l e Magpie, which tackles burglary.
vehicle c ri m e in the area.
The campaign uses hard-hitting images For more information contact Steve Hobson,
of vultures preying on pro p e rty left in full Crime Reduction Advisor, Greater Manchester
view inside vehicles. It shows them circling Police, South Manchester Divisional HQ,
the skies ab ove a c a r waiting to swo o p. T h e Elizabeth Slinger Road, West Didsbury,
simple messag e s , w h i ch include: ‘Ke e p Manchester M20 2ES Tel: 0161 856 6174
b i rds of prey away - Lock It’ and ‘E a s y E-mail: stephen.hobson@gmp.pnn.police.uk
meat for birds of prey’ were used
to remind motorists that
o p p o rtunist criminals operate in
the city and like vulture s , t h ey are
quick to act. Motorists are urged to
keep their va l u ables out of sight.
O ver 1,000 council vehicles took
the message to the streets of
M a n c hester with the aim of
reducing the numbers of victims
of this type of crime.
The ornithological idea
behind the campaign is in keeping
with GMP’s other long ru n n i n g

October 2003 Vehicle Crime 49


Older people and fear of crime -
the next steps
Help the Aged SeniorSafety Campaign

The Help the Aged SeniorSafety C a m p a i g n done to tackle it. The second half of the
aims to find new ways to increase older re p o rt looks at a 10-point action plan fo r
people's sense of security at home. T h e practitioners aimed at reducing both cri m e
c a m p a i g n focused initially on pro t e c t i n g and the fear of crime.
older people against bogus callers by
extending services to the elderly at home Copies of this report, published in November
and raising awa reness of this type of cri m e 2002 and priced £20.00 including p&p are
amongst the general population. available from Help the Aged, 207 - 221,
Fear of cri m e is a major concern fo r Pentonville Road, London N1 9UZ
the elderly. As a re s u l t , Help the Aged has Tel: 020 7278 1114 Fax: 020 7278 1116
p u blished a two - volume re p o rt e n t i t l e d E-mail: info@helptheged.org.uk
'Older people and fear o f crime - the or visit their website:
next steps' , w h i ch examines the nat u re of www.helptheaged.org.uk
fear of cri m e and looks at what is being

Community Safety and Disabled People:


The Way Forward
NACRO

NACRO are organising a conference aimed at both disabled people and professionals working
in the vo l u n t a ry, s t at u t o ry and commercial sectors, w h i ch aims to highlight the dispro p o r-
tionate victimisation of disabled people.
The c o n fe re n c e will be held on 12th November 2003 at the ORT House C o n fe re n c e
Centre in London and will give delegates a chance to discuss the high levels of fear of crime
amongst the disabled populat i o n . It will also look at the under- re p o rting and under-
recording of crime against this particular group.
The day will provide an opportunity to:
• develop an understanding of the key issues
• share experiences and good practice
• build relationships and understanding
• understand potential solutions to better meet the needs of disabled people.

S p e a kers will include the Minister for Disabled Pe o p l e, D e p a rtment for Work and
Pensions and representatives from the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) and British
Council of Disabled People.
The cost of the c o n fe re n c e ranges from £115.00 plus VAT for individuals and small
vo l u n t a ry org a n i s ations to £195.00 plus VAT for public sector, ch a rity and independent
organisations, which includes lunch, refreshments and conference m at e ri a l .

For more information contact Pavilion Publishing, The Ironworks, Cheapside, Brighton BN1 4ZZ
Tel: 0870 161 3505 Fax: 0870 161 3506 E-mail: info@pavpub.com
Details can also be viewed and downloaded via their website: www.pavpub.com/
pavpub/conferences/showfull.asp?Section=2&SubSection=0&Conference=332

For more information about NACRO contact them at: 169, Clapham Road, London SW9 0PU
Tel 020 7582 6500 Fax 020 7735 4666 E-mail: communications@nacro.org.uk
or visit their website: www.nacro. o rg . u k

50 Victims and Witnesses October 2003


Victims Virtual Walkthrough
Criminal Justice System (CJS) Online

For many victims of crime, the process of reporting it can be seen as a complex and daunting
e x p e ri e n c e. This interactive tour has been developed by CJS Online in conjunction with the
Home Offi c e, A s s o c i ation of Chief Police Officers (AC P O) , The Crown Prosecution Serv i c e
(CPS), Court Service and Victim S u p p o rt .
The 'Victims Vi rtual Wa l k t h rough aims to g u i d e a ny v i c t i m of crime through pro c e s s e s
that they will encounter when reporting a crime including: CJS Online can be contacted at:
• Reporting a crime. • Police Procedures and Investigation. Criminal JusticeIT, Portland
• Prosecution and Decision Making. • Court Processes. House, Stag Place, London
• Sentencing. SW1E 5RS
Fax: 020 7271 3407 E-mail:
These sections g u i d e the users through the fo rmal pro c e d u res from why they should cjsonline@cjit.gov.uk
report a crime and the different methods of doing so, to compensation and how to claim it. or visit their website:
www.cjsonline.org/
Visit the Victims Virtual Walkthrough at: www.cjsonline.gov. u k / v i rt u a l / d e t e c t / n o F l a s h . h t m l home.html

Streets Ahead: A joint inspection of the


Street Crime Initiative
Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC)

The S t reet Cri m e I n i t i at i ve began in March • The lack of a strategy for capturing and
2002 with the aim of cutting s t reet cri m e recycling emerging good practice
( ro bb e ry and snat ch theft) in the 10 wo r s t resulted in isolated pockets of good
a f fected areas in England. These 10 are a s practice.
accounted for over 80% of all ro bb e ry in • The quality of communication both
England & Wa l e s. A joint inspection of the within and between organisations was
agencies invo l ved in the initiat i ve fo u n d often poor with evidence of
many examples of good practice and found 'silo' mentalities.
it to be effe c t i ve in reducing s t reet cri m e. • The short-term nature of some central
H oweve r, the inspection identified room funding streams created uncertainty
for improvement - part i c u l a r ly in the over the sustainability of some local
rehabilitation of offenders. projects.
Some of the main positive fi n d i n g s • Street crime was not seen as a high
include: p ri o rity by all of the 10 police force
• The Street Crime Initiative had areas or the local partner agencies, and
a ch i eved a significant reduction in conflicted with locally agreed pri o ri t i e s
street crime and street robbery after in some areas.
6 months. • There was insufficient focus on
• Victims and witnesses were better breaking the cycle of offending
supported with improved through effective post sentence
court facilities. supervision and rehabilitation
• The initiative was well resourced with of offenders.
an additional £67 million being
invested in reducing street crime in the Copies of this report, published in July 2003 can
10 areas. be obtained free from Her Majesty's Inspectorate
• Local partnership working was of Constabulary, 50, Queen Anne's Gate, London
revitalised and energised with a SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 4197
renewed emphasis on delivery. E-mail: neal.cooper@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk.
The report can also be viewed and downloaded
Some of the areas for improve m e n t in 4 parts via the Home Office Website:
include: www.homeoffice.gov.uk/hmic/pubs.htm

October 2003 Victims and Witnesses/violent Crime/Street Crime 51


Positive Activities for Young People
Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS)

Po s i t i ve Activities for Young Pe o p l e is a new programme launched earlier this year fo r


young people, w h i ch extends and builds upon the successful Summer Plus and S u m m e r
Splash initiatives.
A total of £25 million has been allocated for the first year of the three-year scheme from
a p a rt n e r s h i p including gove rnment depart m e n t s , the youth and ch a rity sectors. Po s i t i ve
Activities will provide a broad range of s ch o o l h o l i d ay time activities offe ring stru c t u re d
o c c u p ation and personal development opport u n i t i e s , d i ve rting young people f rom cri m i n a l
b e h aviour and giving those at risk of becoming socially excluded the chance to fulfil their
p o t e n t i a l . The programme will also seek to bring together young people f rom diffe re n t
neighbourhoods and communities across England, t h e re fo re helping to break dow n
p rejudices and improve c o m mu n i t y c o h e s i o n . Vo l u n t e e ring opportunities will be offe red to
help engage young people in activities that will benefit their local community.
Positive Activities has been designed to meet local needs, often in close consultation with
the young people t h e m s e l ve s. Key wo r kers will help to support those ch i l d ren with the
g re atest needs, both in identifying and gaining access to suitable pro g r a m m e s , as well as in
their subsequent transition back into education or training.

Further information can be obtained from the New Opportunities Fund (NOF), Head Office, 1, Plough
Place, London EC4A 1DE Tel: 020 7211 1800 Fax: 020 7211 1750 E-mail: general.enquiries@nof.org.uk
Details are also available via their website:
www.nof.org.uk/index.cfm?loc=news&inc=presstemp&prnumber=625&grantlink=no

Virtual Crucial Crew Website


Safer York Partnership

A new web s i t e (w w w. c r u c i a l - c re w. o rg) One of the scenarios on the virt u a l


was launched earlier this year by the Safe r s t reet includes a road traffic accident,
York Pa rt n e r s h i p in association with w h e re kids learn how to deal with an
va rious national s a fe t y o rg a n i s at i o n s. T h e injured cyclist, providing basic first aid and
site is designed to teach young people l i fe making essential 999 calls. Inside the
s aving s a fe t y m e s s ages in a fun, o n - l i n e h o u s e, e a ch room contains a disaster or
environment. danger of some kind. The ch i l d ren can
The web s i t e, designed by Yo r k m ove around the house, zooming in and
M u l t i m e d i a , i nvo l ved the construction of a out and clicking on hotspots such as doors,
v i rtual street and house that ch i l d ren can telephones and fire extinguishers.
n av i g ate aro u n d , e n c o u n t e ring va ri o u s The site also includes an interactive
s c e n a rios and having to react accordingly. quiz in the style of a computer game.
The virtual house was intended to re p l i c at e Participants are asked various questions and
York's Crucial Crew wo r k s h o p s , run by the must answer corre c t ly befo re being able to
p a rt n e r s h i p. Wo r k s h o p s move on.
a re run eve ry ye a r
and are aimed at For more information contact PC Jon Palmer,
young people ag e d Youth Action Officer, Safer York Partnership, York
10 to 11 years old. Centre for Safer Communities, Lower Friargate,
The ch i l d ren take part York YO1 9SL
in ro l e - p l ay s , l e a rn i n g Tel: 01904 733713
h ow to deal with E-mail: safercommunities@
eve ry d ay situations. northyorkshire.pnn.police.uk
or visit the website: www.crucial-crew.org

52 Youth Crime October 2003


‘Watch Over Me’ - A personal safety
teaching programme
Milly Dowler Fund/Home Office/Department for Education and Skills

A s a fe t y v i d e o for teenagers commissioned p rotection safe g u a r d s. It also has re l eva n c e


by Milly Dow l e r ’s parents and part ly to many other are a s , as the issues raised by
funded by the Home Office was launch e d the video will lead to discussions on sexual
earlier this year. o f fe n c e s , the use of we ap o n s , bu l lying and
Amanda ‘ M i l ly ’ D owler was ab d u c t e d robbery. Copies of the videocan be
and mu r d e red last ye a r. This v i d e o, w h i ch obtained priced £35.00, from
fe at u res guest appearances from a nu m b e r Milly's Fund Ltd, PO Box 470,
of celeb ri t i e s , is a 5 - part soap opera Walton-on-Thames, Surrey
s h owing ch i l d ren how they can plan their KT12 3XZ or can be ordered via
own personal s a fe t y. Together with the their website:
D e p a rtment for Education and Skills, t h e www.millysfund.org.uk
Home Office provided advice and support For further information contact
on the content of the video and the accom- Alex Lahood, Home Office
panying teaching pack. Crime Reduction Delivery Team,
The v i d e o fo rms part of the Home 1st Floor, Allington Towers,
Office’s work to reduce the victimisation of 19, Allington Street, London
ch i l d ren and to strengthen all round ch i l d SW1E 5EB

Clubs and Activities for Young People


Leaflet
Gloucestershire Constabulary

Gloucester South Police have introduced several successful


i n i t i at i ves to tackle anti-social behav i o u r and d i s o r d e r in
their are a . One of these invo l ves the distri bution of a l e a f l e t
s p e c i fi c a l ly for young people, w h i ch lists over 100 c l u b s
and activities of interest to them.
The l e a f l e t was first printed over 2 years ago and due
to its success, it has been updated and over 10,000 copies
h ave been re - p r inted and distri buted to secondary
s ch o o l s, youth gro u p s , o u t re a ch wo r kers and libraries in
the are a . Copies will also go to the parents of ch i l d re n
who have been invo l ved in anti-social behav i o u r in an
e f fo rt to dive rt the youngsters into more positive
activities.
In conjunction with targeted foot pat rols in
hotspot are a s , a rresting offenders and the implemen-
t ation of a c c e p t able behaviour contracts and
anti-social behav i o u r o r d e r s , this initiat i ve has seen
anti-social behaviour incidents reduced by a quarter
this spring compared to the same period last year.

For more information and copies of the leafletcontact


PC Dominic Everiss, CommunityLiaison Officer, Forest & Gloucester
Division, Gloucester South Police Station,
St James, Quedgeley, Gloucester GL2 4WD
Tel: 01452 729050 Fax: 01452 723350

October 2003 Youth Crime 53


Communicating Citizenship to Kids
Middlesbrough Council

C o m m u n i t y K i d s is a Childre n ’s Fund every week. At the end of the programme, a


s p o n s o red programme operating in special assembly is held in front of pare n t s
P ri m a ry S ch o o l s a c ross Middlesbro u g h , and teachers and includes perfo rmances of
with the support from Middlesbro u g h p l ays and poems written by the ch i l d re n .
Council Housing Department and They are presented with a certificate, which
Cleveland Police. i n c o rp o r ates an individual promise that
The programme runs for 10 weeks and e a ch child has made on how they will help
fo rms part of a citizenship project for key to improve the area in the future.
stage 2 pupils (age 9-11 years), which aims The project has re c e i ved excellent
to reduce both levels of youth offe n d i n g b a cking from the local s ch o o l s a n d
and fear of crime for young people, as well feedback from teachers and pupils indicates
as helping to build sustainabl e a major step fo r ward in changing at t i t u d e s
c o m mu n i t i e s. Subjects cove red in the and behaviour amongst the young people.
p rogramme include anti-social behav i o u r,
nuisance and h a r a s s m e n t, g r a f fi t i, For further information contact David Foster,
vandalism and racism and bu l ly i n g. CommunityKids Project Manager, 2, River Court,
Sessions are interactive and consist of Brighouse Road, Middlesbrough TS2 1RT
g roup wo r k , poster designing, videos and Tel: 01642 354024 E-mail: david_foster@
ro l e - p l ay s , with a diffe rent topic cove re d middlesbrough.gov.uk

Good2bsecure back for the new term


Home Office

The g o o d 2 b s e c u re c a m p a i g n will be The new c a m p a i g n will re m i n d


re-launched in November this year. students of the risks of becoming a v i c t i m
The c a m p a i g n, w h i c h fe at u res the of crime and info rms them of the simple
web s i t e, w w w. g o o d 2 b s e c u re . c o. u k wa s steps they can take to stay safe. It will direct
i n t roduced in Ja nu a ry. It is supported by a them to the web s i t e w w w. g o o d 2 b s e c u re .
viral game entitled 'Danny T i m p s o n ' s c o. u k. A l e a f l e t of top 10 crime re d u c t i o n
Keb ab at h o n ' , w h i ch was mailed out to tips and posters with advice for students on
a round 700,000 members of the Nat i o n a l p rotecting themselves and their pro p e rt y
Union of Students (NUS). To catch the new are also available.
i n t a ke of students and to remind re t u rn i n g
students about the c a m p a i g n, the NUS Copies of the leaflets can be obtained free from
plans to re-send the game in the new term. Prolog UK Tel: 0870 241 4680
The Home Office is planning some Fax: 0870 241 4786
additional awa reness-raising activity to E-mail: homeoffice@prolog.uk.com
coincide with this.
For more information about the campaign
contact Katie Weeks, Home Office Crime
Reduction Delivery Team, 1st Floor, Allington
Towers, 19, Allington Street, London SW1E 5EB
Tel: 020 7035 5258 Fax: 020 7035 5280
E-mail: katie.weeks@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

54 Youth Crime October 2003


Reducing Crime against Students -
C o n f e re n c e
Home Office

O ver 250 delegates attended 2 confe rences organised by the Home Office Crime Reduction
D e l i ve ry Team (CRDT) on 'Reducing Crime against Students' at Hull and Reading
U n i versities in July (details fe at u red in the July 2003 Digest). The confe rences bro u g h t
together re p re s e n t at i ves from universities, student unions, the police and local authorities to
discuss student victimisation and to share good practice.
The c o n fe re n c e p rogramme included keynote speeches from the A s s o c i ation of Chief
Police Officers (AC P O) , the National Union of Students (NUS) and (at Reading) the Home
Office Permanent Secretary, Mr Leigh Lewis. Workshops covered particular aspects of student
v i c t i m i s at i o n , including bu rg l a ry, s t reet cri m e, s a fe t y on transport , s t a rting a s t u d e n t c ri m e
awareness campaign, i n t e rn ational students, landlord accreditation and d ru g assisted rape.
Some of the main points raised at these events included:
• High-level meetings (between the BCU Commander, Vice Chancellor and local student
union president) can help to ensure all sides understand the importance of tackling the
p ro blem and the part that they can play.
• While action must be taken to reduce and keep
crime down in the medium to longer
t e rm , some immediate impact is needed and with
many areas reporting peaks in the first few weeks
of term, action is needed now.
• The involvement of student unions in any crime
awareness campaign is vital if the messages are to
have any credibility with students.
• Reducing student victimisation is not the
responsibility of any one agency but depends
on collaboration from the university, student
union, the police and any other relevant
organisation.

One of the most encouraging aspects re s u l t i n g


from the conferences was the enthusiasm of all sides to
work together. The fe e d b a ck was extre m e ly positive, with delegates valuing the opport u n i t y
to share pro blems and ideas with colleagues from other org a n i s at i o n s. D e l e g ates will be
contacted at the end of the year to check on the progress made in promoting student s a fe t y.
The confe rences have also helped to identify examples of good practice, w h i ch are now
being collated and will eventually fe at u re in a new mini-site on the Crime Reduction Website
(www.crimereduction.gov.uk).

For more information contact Katie Weeks, Home Office Crime Reduction Delivery Team, 1st Floor,
Allington Towers, 19, Allington Street, London SW1E 5EB
Tel: 020 7035 5258 Fax: 020 7035 5280 E-mail: katie.weeks@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

October 2003 Youth Crime 55


Index

A
H
Acceptable Behaviour Contract .................11, 53
Harassment .........................................40, 41, 54
ACPO ......................................28, 44, 50, 51, 55
J
Anti-social behaviour ..................5, 9, 10, 11, 12,
Justice..................................................30, 42, 51
...................13, 14, 26, 27, 29, 39, 43, 48, 53, 54
L
Arson .............................................14, 15, 16, 29
Leaflet .....................................28, 46, 47, 53, 54
ATM Robbery ..................................................26
License............................................................33
B
M
Begging ...........................................................11
Minority ethnic .....................................16, 17, 18
Bogus Caller ....................................................18
N
Briefing Paper ...............................14, 31, 35, 38
Neighbourhood Watch....................5, 42, 43, 44
Burglary ...............5, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22,
Newsletter ..........................................28, 39, 44
....................................23, 26, 29, 39, 44, 49, 55
P
Business Crime .........................................24, 25
Personal safety .................................6, 9, 45, 53
C
Posters ..........................................31, 33, 36, 54
Campaign................11, 18, 19, 31, 33, 41, 48, 49,
Property crime ..........................................44, 45
...........................................................50, 54, 55
Publication.........3, 14, 25, 28, 37, 41, 42, 44, 47
Car ................................9, 16, 23, 29, 47, 48, 49
R
Caravan ..........................................................48
Repeat Victimisation .......................................19
CCTV .......................................24, 26, 40, 43, 48
Rural Crime ...............................................44, 45
Clubs...............................................................53
S
Community Groups ...........................................5
Schools.............10, 15, 34, 36, 41, 43, 46, 53, 54
Community safety.............6, 9, 10, 11, 14, 18, 26,
Sexual crime .............................................46, 53
....................................27, 35, 38, 39, 43, 44, 50
Shoplifting......................................................46
Conference .......4, 5, 9, 14, 24, 38, 41, 45, 50, 55
Sponsorship....................................................19
Consultation Paper .........................................30
Strategy .............................25, 26, 28, 39, 41, 51
Crime and Disorder Reduction
Street crime .........................................49, 51, 55
Partnership (CDRP) ...............................5, 14, 45
Student .................................................4, 46, 55
Crime Prevention Initiatives........................7, 28
V
Crime Science .................................................38
Vehicle crime .............................9, 14, 47, 48, 49
Criminal damage.......................................26, 45
Victim ............................9, 16, 17, 19, 22, 29, 30,
D
...................34, 37, 39, 40, 41, 43, 47, 48, 51, 54
Designing Out Crime .........26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 48
Victims and witnesses ...............................50, 51
Disorder......................4, 5, 11, 14, 16, 18, 24, 26,
Video ..............................................8, 36, 43, 53
......28, 29, 30, 35, 36, 38, 41, 42, 43, 45, 47, 53
Violent crime..................................31, 35, 39, 51
Distraction Burglary 2, 16, 17, 18, 19, 22
W
Domestic Violence 2, 30, 31, 35
Wardens ..................................13, 42, 43, 44, 47
Drugs.................................29, 31, 32, 33, 48, 55
Y
Drugs & Alcohol ..............................................31
Young people ...11, 13, 27, 33, 43, 46, 52, 53, 54
F
Youth crime ...................................14, 52, 53, 55
Fear of crime ....17, 19, 35, 39, 43, 44, 45, 50, 54
Forecourt ........................................................48
Fraud...................................................25, 34, 48
G
Good practice ..................4, 9, 14, 16, 17, 22, 38,
................................................44, 45, 50, 51, 55
Graffiti .....................................12, 29, 34, 48, 54
Guidelines .......................................... 18, 24, 30

56 Index October 2003