TACTICAL OPTIONS FOR DEALING WITH ALCOHOL-RELATED VIOLENCE IDENTIFIED THROUGH THE TACKLING VIOLENT CRIME PROGRAMME

Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Contents
Introduction Chapter 1 – Key generic issues for agencies to consider in preparation for the attendance of night-time economy users in an area Chapter 2 – Getting there: Arriving in the area Chapter 3 – The main event: Making the evening safe and enjoyable Chapter 4 – Leaving: Planning to ensure that night-time economy users arrive home safely Acknowledgements 3 6 13 16 20 23

Visit the Tackling Violent Crime Programme website at: www.crimereduction.gov.uk/tvcp/tvcp01.htm
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Introduction
The Tackling Violent Crime Programme (TVCP) was launched in November 2004. Through this programme the Home Office is working intensively with practitioners in a small number of local areas with high levels of more serious violent crime. The aim is to support local efforts to reduce alcohol-related crime and domestic violence in particular; to improve police and other agencies’ performance and partnership working; to improve local strategies; and to develop good practice, which can then be disseminated nationally. The TVCP currently works with 56 of the 373 Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs) in England and Wales through the Government Offices who have responsibility for regional delivery of the programme. The TVCP has funded a large number of initiatives since it began. Whilst some represent ‘core’ activities that are common to the majority of CDRPs involved in the programme, others are increasingly innovative. This guide aims to highlight the effective practice that has led to a reduction in more serious night-time economy violence in the TVCP CDRPs. It will take the reader through a typical night out and the different interventions that can be utilised at different stages and times of the evening. The guide is broken down into a series of sections, which aim to reflect each stage of an evening in the night-time economy. By April 2008 all local areas will have in place an alcohol strategy to reduce anti-social and violent behaviour along with alcohol-related health harms as well as providing information to tackle under-age drinking. This document will assist those responsible for delivering reductions in anti-social and violent behaviour related to alcohol. The guide signposts readers to those TVCP areas that have introduced different interventions which have had an impact on violent crime.

Getting Started: Violent Crime Strategic Group
It is advisable to start by forming a dedicated multi-agency violent crime strategic group. This group would meet regularly to develop and implement a localised action plan and would report progress to the CDRP which leads on developing the local alcohol strategy. The group would focus actions in accordance with local priorities and would assist in holding agencies to account for those actions. The following agencies’ representation and input are essential to such a group: Police – It is essential to include a senior officer ‘champion’ who can assist in implementing projects to reduce violent crime. Local Authority – This is a leading agency responsible for a wide range of services which complement core activity, such as providing additional enforcement services, highways, planning, street lighting and waste management, and implementing by-laws. Representatives from the local authority will also include: • a night-time economy manager – Many CDRPs have appointed night-time economy managers, who liaise with other stakeholder agencies such as licensing units, the alcohol industry, police and local authorities, providing an essential link between those responsible for the reduction of violent crime;

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

• the licensing unit – Local authorities have been responsible for licensing since the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003. Best practice has seen police and local authority licensing units combining and working from a co-located office; and • those providing or using the services of the night-time economy. Trading Standards – Trading Standards officers who can also conduct under-age sales test purchase operations. Alcohol industry – It is advisable that a manager from this sector is included in the strategic group so that they can represent licence holders’ interests through a forum such as Pubwatch. Data analysts – It is advisable that data analysts attend so that they can present relevant joint information from all partners relating to violent crime hotspots and the mapping of incidents. The group can plan activity based on this collective information. (Guidance will be provided to local areas on what information is available and how it might be used.) Media/marketing – Media officers can publicise good news stories, thereby reducing the public’s fear of crime and leading to reassurance. Fire and Rescue Service – Fire officers are able to bring additional data to the meeting and can be involved fully in both the enforcement, visibility and education sides of the plan. Health services – Representatives are able to bring important additional data to the meeting. Full engagement means not only that information can help to identify and understand the full extent of the problem with depersonalised information from A&E admissions, but also that reductions in violence and alcohol-related injuries will lead to significant savings for health and paramedic services. Education – Engagement of education authorities is seen as important, to balance the enforcement side of the action plan. All the above agencies can contribute to reducing violent crime. Meetings should take place at least quarterly with minutes taken and action points arising being agreed and assigned.

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Introduction

Violent crime strategic group
Alcohol industry Local Authority Licensing unit

Police

Media/ marketing

VIOLENT CRIME STRATEGIC GROUP

Night-time economy manager

Data analysts

Education

Trading Standards

Fire and Rescue Service

Health services

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Chapter 1 Key Generic Issues for Agencies to Consider in Preparation for the Attendance of Night-time Economy Users in an Area

Option Licensing champion Contact: Jonathon Toy, Southwark CDRP London, , jonathon.toy@ southwark.gov.uk

Description To have an identified lead for licensing issues within each agency who provides strong leadership, guidance and direction

Lead agency Senior manager in the local authority

Purpose

The champion liaises with the different agency leads for licensing so that issues are identified and dealt with efficiently. This individual is part of the violent Licensing unit crime strategic group and is on the panel to deal Police basic with licensed premises in need of attention and command unit (BCU) assistance. Local fire and rescue service Health services Education

Identify ‘top 10’ licensed premises in need of attention and assistance Contact: Jan Hart, Islington CDRP , London, jan.hart@islington. gov.uk Sergeant Chris Gibson, Merseyside Police, christopher. m.gibson@ merseyside.pnn. police.uk

To have a joined-up approach to identifying and dealing with the ‘top 10’ premises identified as being in need of attention and assistance

Local authority licensing unit

The licensing unit draws down intelligence from a variety of sources in order to accurately identify licensed premises in need of improving. (Sources Police include: reported crimes, information from custody Local authority offices, arrest data, intelligence reports, complaints, enforcement unit accident and emergency (A&E) department data and information from other enforcement units within the Local fire and rescue local authority.) service Use should be made of the Practitioners’ guide for dealing with problem licensed providers on the TVCP website.

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Key generic issues for agencies to consider in preparation for the attendance of night-time economy users in an area

Option Licensing panel

Description To have a panel of senior staff from key agencies to deal effectively with licence holders who feature in the ‘top 10’

Lead agency Police Local authority Local fire and rescue service Trading Standards

Purpose Where issues are not serious enough to warrant prosecution or review, on occasions just sending a letter advising an irresponsible licence holder of the problems can bring little response. As a consequence, a licensing panel can be formed to which licence holders are called. The panel should comprise the Assistant Director, Chief Inspector – Police and Senior Fire Officer holding responsibility for licensing in their respective organisations. The panel discusses findings with regard to licence holders and agrees an action plan. All three organisations give support to licence holders. This works best when time is invested to solve problems jointly. Compliance is then monitored, and cases are passed for review or prosecution if repeat offences occur. The panel can also see licence holders who have made sales during test-purchasing exercises; for these cases, the Chief Trading Standards Officer joins the panel. Examples of how the powers of the Licensing Act can be utilised can be found in the guidance notes via the TVCP website. See: www.crime reduction.gov.uk/tvcp/tvcp01.htm

Contact: Jan Hart, Islington CDRP , London, jan.hart@ islington.gov.uk

Use of Licensing Act 2003 powers This is complemented by a range of additional measures in the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006, e.g. ADZs, Directions to Leave, Expedited Reviews and increased fines for persistently selling to children Alcohol task force Contact: Jan Hart, Islington CDRP , London, jan.hart@ islington.gov.uk

To have a structured way in which to use Licensing Act powers effectively, to review and revoke licences and to impose conditions as appropriate

Licensing panel, in conjunction with multi-agency licensing officers

To have a mobile police unit able to be intelligence led in their deployment for alcohol-related incidents

Police Local authority licensing unit

This group is able to be tasked as a direct response to the identification of the ‘top 10’ premises in need of attention and assistance. Having a specially trained and dedicated unit to deal with the people and premises enhances efficiency in providing a quality service.

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Option Custody office intelligence gathering

Description Custody staff to collect details of where arrested people have been drinking that night, and particularly where they have had their last drink, to enable a clear intelligence picture to be created to assist with the targeting of the top 10 licensed premises in need of attention and assistance To make use of a database similar to the MPS database on music promoters, artists and eventholding licensed premises. The index contains data on identified problematic events, promotions and artists and is available 24 hours a day. Intelligence is held on crimint (criminal intelligence system)

Lead agency Police

Purpose Intelligence is fed into the violent crime strategic group and into the multi-agency group that deals with the ‘top 10’ licensed premises in need of attention and assistance.

Contact: Chief Inspector John Dale, Westminster BCU, London, john.dale2@met. pnn.police.uk Promoters index, CO14 Clubs and Vice Unit, Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Police – CO14 Clubs and Vice Unit, MPS Contact can be made with the CO14 Clubs focus desk from non-MPS forces for searches and advice

Can be used to collate details on problematic promoters, artists and venues and in conjunction with a requirement for identified licensed premises to inform the police when they have details of a proposed event. This allows the police to identify and assess potential risks and implement/monitor any necessary additional risk management measures required.

Contact: ClubsFocusDeskCO14@met. police.uk or telephone 020 7321 8203

Counter terrorism For all bars, pubs protective and nightclubs to be security advice conversant with the guide Contact: www. nactso.gov.uk Accurate flagging on crime reports Contact: Keith Lawrance, Leeds CDRP , keith.lawrance@ leeds.gov.uk

Designated premises supervisors Local authority licensing unit Police

Bars, pubs and nightclubs need to reduce the risk of a terrorist attack and limit the damage such an attack may cause.

To ensure that the Police correct alcohol flags are attached to crime reports and incident logs, to create clear and accurate intelligence

Flagging is used to gain a clear idea as to the particular problems in an area with respect to alcohol-related incidents and offences. This assists in developing problem profiles and subsequent problem-solving initiatives.

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Key generic issues for agencies to consider in preparation for the attendance of night-time economy users in an area

Option Best Bar None

Description To set up a scheme whereby licensed premises are encouraged to achieve common minimum standards and can compete at a local level for an annual award.

Lead agency Designated premises supervisors Local authority licensing unit Police British Institute of Innkeeping (BII) CDRP Police

Purpose This scheme is either used in a designated area/ ward or implemented across a CDRP/BCU from the outset. It can grow each year in response to demand, promotes safety, and recognises high standards and responsible management of licensed premises.

Contact: John McNamara British Institute of Innkeeping johnmc@bii.org Alcochol Referral Scheme Contact: www.homeoffice. gov.uk/ documents/ Alcohol-strategy. pdf?view=Binary james.blamey@ homeoffice.gsi. gov.uk Polycarbonate drinking vessels or other alternatives to glass Contact: Chief Inspector Adrian Studd, Clubs and Vice Unit, MPS, adrian.studd@ met.police.uk Jan Hart, Islington CDRP , London, jan.hart@ islington.gov.uk

Scheme to refer adults who have been arrested for alcohol-related offences only

This scheme can be used to target alcohol-related offenders using a combination of penalties and health and education interventions to drive home messages about alcohol and risks and to promote changed behaviour.

To reduce glassrelated injuries in licensed premises and surrounding areas Encourage adoption of plastic instead of glass for certain premises, particular problems or events, or during certain periods

Designated premises supervisors Local authority licensing unit Police

Glasses and glass bottles are exchanged for polycarbonate to reduce the potential for them to be used as weapons or cause accidental injury. They also prevent floor coverings from needing treatment as a result of glass being trodden into them. In high-risk premises a condition can be placed on the licence by the licensing committee.

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Option To gain information to create a holistic picture of intelligence around alcoholrelated violence Contact: Zara Anderson, Liverpool John Moores University, z.a.anderson@ ljmu.ac.uk Planning town centre usage Contact: www. communities. gov.uk

Description Gather A&E depersonalised information relating to patients who have consumed alcohol

Lead agency A&E department Local authority Police

Purpose This is linked to the violent crime strategic group, which looks at the data compiled by A&E departments relating to violent crime. The data sheets include where the injured person consumed their last drink and the type of violent crime they experienced. The information is made anonymous and then complements that of the police and the local authority.

To manage the Local authority development of town Police centres effectively Local fire and rescue service Health services Police Local authority

When planning applications are received, issues around commercial use, transport implications for services to all areas, access and facilities for all age ranges, crime prevention and designing out crime are all taken into account. Copies of the How to manage town centres guide can be obtained from 0870 122 6236. Sniffer dogs are utilised at transport interlinks early in the evening so that customers attending the night-time economy area can be scanned for illegal substances.

Use of sniffer dogs To place sniffer dogs in key Contact: locations to detect Jonathan Roy, drugs Merseyside Police, Jonathan.R.Roy@ merseyside.pnn. police.uk Use of Penalty Notices for Disorder (PNDs) Contact: Jonathan Roy, Merseyside Police, Jonathan.R.Roy@ merseyside.pnn. police.uk Night-time economy manager Contact: Martin Greenhalgh, Bolton CDRP , martin. greenhalgh@ gmp.pnn. police.uk 10

To issue PNDs Police in respect of individuals who attend the night-time economy area and commit low-level disorder

PNDs are used to ‘set the tone’ of the area. The aim is to prevent low-level disorder from escalating. Although there may be a short-term increase in recorded lower level offences with this tactic, this should plateau once the deterrent effect of the use of PNDs is realised and, correspondingly, more serious violence should fall.

To have a specific post to co-ordinate night-time economy activities, in the same way that the town centre manager focuses on the day-time economy

Local authority Police

This post co-ordinates and supports all of the activities that form part of the night-time economy and is available at the key hours in order to manage any issues that arise.

Key generic issues for agencies to consider in preparation for the attendance of night-time economy users in an area

Option Dispersal Orders to tackle antisocial behaviour Contact: Chief Inspector John Dale, Westminster BCU, MPS, john.dale2@met. pnn.police.uk Sue Bryant, sue.bryant@ goem.gsi.gov.uk Sec 27(2) of the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 Contact: http://police. homeoffice.gov. uk/news-andpublications/ publication/ operationalpolicing/ directions-toleave-locality Crime prevention advice for students Contact: Kate Griffiths, Southwark CDRP London, , kate.griffiths@ southwark.gov.uk

Description To designate a ward/specified area that is subject to the Dispersal Order, to increase powers to deal with antisocial behaviour in the area

Lead agency Local authority Police

Purpose These should be utilised in intelligence-led hotspot areas where there is then the capacity to enforce breaches.

Direction to leave a locality related to alcohol incidents

Police

Whereby over 16 year olds’ presence is likely to cause or contribute to the occurrence, repetition or continuation of alcohol-related crime and disorder in a locality and it is necessary to remove them from the locality.

To provide crime prevention information in areas where there are large numbers of new students who are unfamiliar with the area

Local authority Local education authority

Providing new students with crime prevention advice makes them aware of the safety issues and helps them to remain safe in pubs and bars while out late at night.

Anti-Social To serve an ASBO Behaviour Orders on violent crime (ASBOs) offenders in city centres whose Contact: behaviour is Jonathan Roy, anti-social Merseyside Police, Jonathan.R.Roy@ merseyside.pnn. police.uk

Police Local authority

Good practice example – Liverpool: One of Liverpool’s most prolific violent crime offenders has been served an ASBO, banning him from the city centre between 6pm and 6am for the next 10 years.

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Option Conditional Cautions

Description

Lead agency

Purpose Conditional Cautions are aimed at rehabilitation and/ or reparation and may include restorative justice processes.

Conditional Cautions Police can be issued to CPS over 18-year-old Contact: offenders for low www.cps.gov.uk/ level offences Publications/ (country wide from others/conditional April 2008) cautioning04.html They are an www.cps.gov.uk/ alternative to Publications/ prosecution whereby directors_ the caution has guidance/ conditions attached conditional_ cautioning.html Acceptable Behaviour Contracts Contact: Sergeant Paul Dunn, Metropolitan Police, paul.dunn2@ met.pnn.police.uk Pub Watch Banning Schemes Contact: Superintendent Stuart Ashton, Essex Police, stuart.ashton@ essex.pnn. police.uk Acceptable Behaviour Contracts/ agreements can be used (before ASBOs or parenting orders) in order to nip the problem in the bud Police

ABCs can be used as an intervention against constant problematic individuals in an attempt to Local authority address unacceptable behaviour in a given area or anti-social behaviour location. team

BOBB (Behave or Be Banned) enables the exclusion of problematic individuals from licensed premises linked by the Pub Watch scheme

Police Local authority licensing unit Designated premises supervisors

Enables licensed premises to demonstrate a united front towards problematic individuals who have caused problems in licensed premises by banning them from all licensed premises in any given Pub Watch area.

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Chapter 2 Getting There: Arriving in the Area

Option Media campaign

Description

Lead agency Local authority Police Voluntary sector

Purpose A media campaign ensures that publicity is used to maximum effect for all events.

To make effective use of the media in order that activities Contact: undertaken Joanne Davies, are highlighted Manchester CDRP comprehensively , j.davies6@ and co-ordinated manchester.gov.uk centrally in the CDRP ‘Lock ’Em In’ media campaign Contact: Ron Johnson, North Yorkshire Police, ron.johnson@ northyorkshire. pnn.police.uk Use of plasma screens/ dot-matrix boards Contact: Steve Breen, Ealing CDRP , London, steve.breen@ ealingbroadwaybid. co.uk Media campaign aimed at raising awareness about acceptable standards of behaviour

Police

Media campaign with information available at outlets in the night-time economy area to reinforce acceptable standards of behaviour in the night-time economy area.

To site screens and boards near to transport interlinks to advise incoming users of the nighttime economy of the acceptable standard of behaviour in the area they are entering

Local authority Transport for London Police

The screens and boards feature a mixture of information and warnings which are updated regularly. The rolling programme offers assistance and advice both to the night-time economy users and to anyone else passing through the area.

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Option Body-worn video systems Contact: Plymouth BCU via Martin Goodall, Home Office, martin.goodall5@ homeoffice.gsi. gov.uk See: http://police. homeoffice.gov. uk/operationalpolicing/ technologyequipment Mobile CCTV vans Contact: Chief Inspector Simon Prince, simon.prince@ met.police.uk Speakers attached to CCTV Contact: Roselyn Baker, Salford CDRP , Roselyn.Baker@ salford.gov.uk Intervention by CCTV operators Contact: Detective Chief Superintendent John Carnochan, Strathclyde Police, john.carnochan@ strathclyde.pnn. police.uk

Description To collect evidence through video cameras that are overtly worn on the body (primarily the head)

Lead agency Police Licensed premises door staff Local authority enforcement unit

Purpose These cameras are worn overtly in order to record actions and incidents. The cameras are capable of recording both audio and video. National guidance was published in July 2007.

To have a mobile CCTV van able to be deployed at will

CCTV staff Local authority Police

Strong links to be made to the Tasking and Coordination meeting for intelligence-led deployment. Presence will act as reassurance as well as a deterrent and for detecting offenders.

To use loudspeakers CCTV staff to inform congregating groups that they are being observed and filmed by the CCTV operators To distract individuals who look as if they are becoming volatile through the use of a light by CCTV operators as a distraction CCTV staff

This reduces anti-social behaviour and criminal offences in the area by reminding individuals they are being observed.

This has been trialled in Glasgow. CCTV staff proactively scan the streets for individuals whose non-verbal behaviour is such that it appears that they are about to engage in violent activity. A light, which is fully compliant with health and safety rules, is guided towards the individuals to act as a distracter, based on the fact that sight is the most concentrated sense when aggression is building.

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Getting there: Arriving in the area

Option Marshalling of school-aged children Contact: Detective Chief Inspector Nick Simpson, Haringey BCU, MPS, nicholas. simpson@met. pnn.police.uk

Description To have a co-ordinated multiagency response outside schools at the end of the day to deter gangs and to police the buses

Lead agency Local authority Local education authority Police Transport for London Bus company

Purpose A high concentration of adults in high-visibility jackets to identify them as marshals deters large groups and prevents disorder, robbery offences, bullying, etc.

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Chapter 3 The Main Event: Making the Evening Safe and Enjoyable

Option Environmental scanning

Description To ensure that plans are put in place in specific circumstances, for example to mitigate against temporary risks relating to specific events, at peak crime times in the calendar (Christmas, bonfire night, Halloween, etc). It can also be used in advance of known disruptions by roadworks, etc To have trained volunteers to interact with and help individuals on the streets

Lead agency Police Local authority Designated premises supervisors Voluntary sector

Purpose It is essential that the key agencies plan together well in advance and that they have a sufficient flow of information so that they can respond quickly to any issues that arise.

Street pastors Contact: Chief Inspector Simon Prince, Enfield BCU, MPS, simon.prince@ met.pnn.police.uk Radio links Contact: Russell HartleyJones, Hackney CDRP London, , russell.jones@ hackney.gov.uk Steve Breen, Ealing CDRP , London, steve.breen@ eclondon.co.uk

Religious groups Police Local authority

Street pastors are stationed in areas where young people may be vulnerable, to offer practical help and assistance as well as advice on a vast range of issues.

To have a dedicated radio channel to link the town centre manager/ night-time economy manager with CCTV operators, licensed premises and fastfood outlets and other night-time economy service providers

Local authority Town centre manager Police Private sector

By using the radios premises are able to advise other users of potential problems (which are not in need of police assistance at that stage). Door staff can be linked through a radio system, and CCTV staff can be provided with a police radio and/or a Pubwatch radio.

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The main event: Making the evening safe and enjoyable

Option Telephone in the CCTV control room

Description

Lead agency Designated premises supervisors Local authority Night-time economy manager Police Private sector Designated premises supervisors Local authority Police

Purpose This improves communication between the night-time economy service providers, and helps co-ordinate activity regarding individuals of concern.

To enable licensees and night-time economy service providers to alert Contact: the CCTV control Chief Inspector room (if no radio Simon Prince, link is in place) to Enfield BCU, MPS, low-level disorder, simon.prince@ so that it can be met.pnn.police.uk monitored Ensuring door staff are Security Industry Authority (SIA) accredited See: www.the-sia.org.uk Identification of door staff Contact: Police Sergeant Robert Dear, Camden BCU, MPS, robert.dear2@ met.pnn.police.uk Door supervisors initiative For premises to ensure that their door staff are easily identifiable by the wearing of fluorescent armbands or jackets For premises to ensure that their door staff are SIA accredited

This ensures that the minimum standards set out in legislation are maintained.

Designated premises supervisors Door staff Local authority Police

The wearing of fluorescent bands means that door staff are immediately visible and identifiable.

Each premises will be visited by the police, the SIA, the fire and rescue service and the local authority Contact: licensing unit, and Detective a ‘health check’ Inspector John will be conducted Anderson, Clubs around the door and Vice Unit, supervisors and any MPS, issues of concern john.anderson4@ around the premises met.police.uk

Police SIA Local authority Fire and rescue service

The health check will look at how many door staff are working at the club, whether they are complying with SIA regulations, and whether they are in possession of the appropriate badges. This is a way of setting the standard and tone of the premises by having a well managed door.

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Option

Description

Lead agency Designated premises supervisors Door staff Local authority Police Alcohol vendors/ designated premises supervisors Local authority licensing unit Police

Purpose If an area is wiped and drugs are identified, the matter can be referred to the police. They will then identify offenders and bring them to justice, and will suggest ways to design out crime in any given area to reduce the potential for such occurrences in the future.

Use of drug wipes For licensed premises to ‘wipe’ Contact: areas once a week Police Sergeant so that the use Robert Dear, of drugs can be Camden BCU, identified MPS, robert.dear2@ met.pnn.police.uk Reusable plastic lids for bottled drinks Contact: Shalina Balakrishnan, Hackney CDRP , London, shalina. balakrishnan@ hackney.gov.uk Chill-out hour Contact: Constable David Murphy, Enfield BCU, MPS, d.murphy@met. pnn.police.uk Lollipops Contact: Chief Inspector Simon Prince, Enfield BCU, MPS, simon.prince@ met.pnn.police.uk Detective Chief Inspector Chris Lovatt, Waltham Forest BCU, MPS, christopher. lovatt@met.pnn. police.uk To supply customers leaving licensed premises at the end of the evening with a lollipop To provide customers with reusable lids with the first bottled drink they buy so that they can prevent it from being spiked

Reusable plastic lids can be used in licensed premises where there is a predominance of vertical drinking to prevent the spiking of drinks. Items are now available in most supermarkets.

To reduce alcoholrelated violence

Local authority licensing unit Police

This is particularly effective if there are a number of premises that all have the same closing time, as it means that customers do not exit onto the streets at the same time in a heightened state immediately after drinking alcohol.

Alcohol vendors/ designated premises supervisors Licensed premises door staff Local authority licensing unit Police

Lollipops are made available to customers exiting licensed premises in order to preoccupy them and therefore reduce noise and violence.

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The main event: Making the evening safe and enjoyable

Option Ensuring problems are not ‘pushed out onto the pavement’

Description To take responsibility for problems occurring within licensed premises

Lead agency Designated premises supervisors

Purpose All licensed premises staff should deal with problems within their premises prior to the people involved leaving.

Chelsea clips Contact: Police Sergeant Mark Halton, MetPoliceLicensing Team@ westminster. gov.uk Use of Special Constabulary (SC) officers

To attach security clips to the underneath of a table or bar

Designated premises supervisors Local authority licensing unit Police

Clips will assist with crime reduction within licensed premises, thus making them a safer environment for customers to help reduce and prevent thefts.

To deploy SC staff in accordance with need through the Borough Tasking and Co-ordination meeting

Police Local authority

All available staff are deployed in the most effective way possible, and SC staff are included in the policing family, thus making maximum use of resources.

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Chapter 4 Leaving: Planning to Ensure that Night-time Economy Users Arrive Home Safely

Option CCTV in fastfood outlets, cab offices, etc Contact: Steve Breen, Ealing CDRP , London, steve.breen@ eclondon.co.uk Personalprotection/ conflict-resolution training

Description To encourage the fitting and use of CCTV in premises frequented by night-time economy users

Lead agency Private sector businesses Police Local authority

Purpose Advertised use of CCTV should deter anti-social behaviour; if anti-social behaviour does occur, CCTV increases the chances of detecting offenders.

Contact: Helen Simpson, Kirklees CDRP , helen.simpson@ kirklees.gov.uk Staff training in off-licences, fastfood outlets, cab offices, etc Contact: Helen Simpson, Kirklees CDRP , helen.simpson@ kirklees.gov.uk

For staff to be trained in both personal protection and conflict resolution in premises frequented by night-time economy users (for example licensed premises, fast-food outlets, cab offices, etc) To reduce the potential for conflict in outlets providing services to nighttime economy users (off licences, fastfood outlets, cab offices, etc)

Private sector businesses Police Local authority

This training can easily be linked to the use of CCTV (see above); if CCTV is part funded, training can be a condition of allocation. The training seeks to reduce and diffuse the escalation of violence and anti-social behaviour.

Private sector Local authority

Workers need to be aware of the vulnerabilities associated with their occupation. Training on issues such as a lone-worker policy, age limits on sales of alcohol and cigarettes and actions to minimise conflict will reduce these vulnerabilities as far as possible. A co-ordinated approach to training will yield the best results.

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Leaving: Planning to ensure that night-time economy users arrive home safely

Option Planning ‘safe corridors’ Contact: Joanne Davies, Manchester CDRP , j.davies6@ manchester. gov.uk Information leaflets Contact: Paul Foster, Croydon CDRP , London, paul.foster@ croydon.gov.uk Temporarily increasing pedestrian areas Contact: Chris Thompson, Wakefield Police, Ct76@ westyorkshire. pnn.police.uk Taxi marshalling Contact: Cheryll JonesWright, Croydon CDRP London, , Cheryll.JonesWright@croydon. gov.uk Chief Inspector Iestyn Prosser, The Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames BCU, MPS, iestyn.prosser2@ met.pnn.police.uk

Description For the local authority to advertise routes into and out of the night-time economy area which are perceived to be the safest

Lead agency Local authority Designated premises supervisors Police

Purpose The local authority makes information on routes available to partner agencies, which can then disseminate the information to customers. This means that customers are given intelligence-led information to make their visit as safe as possible.

Leaflets on personal safety with cab numbers, etc to be handed out to customers as they leave licensed premises

Alcohol vendors/ designated premises supervisors Licensed premises door staff Local authority licensing unit Police

Important messages are distributed to exiting customers to assist with their welfare once outside the licensed premises.

To define areas to be closed to traffic at peak times of the night-time economy

Local authority Police Transport associates

A temporary increase in the size of the pavement reduces overcrowding on pavements and the potential for violence that accidental jostling may cause. Reduce road traffic collisions and risk of altercation between pedestrians and drivers.

To guide the public to safe areas where there is a steady flow of cabs available, so that they can leave the area quickly and safely

Alcohol vendors/ designated premises supervisors Licensed premises door staff Local authority enforcement unit Local authority licensing unit Police Local authority

Club door staff, street wardens, etc manage queues at taxi-marshalling points. (This initiative can be linked to the information leaflets mentioned above.)

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Tactical options for dealing with alcohol-related violence identified through the Tackling Violent Crime Programme

Option Paramedics and PCs Contact: John Stevenson, Humberside Police, john.stevenson@ humberside.pnn. police.uk Triage tents Contact: Richard Geen, Cardiff Council, rgeen@cardiff. gov.uk Evaluation available at: www.cardiff communitysafety. co.uk

Description To have a police officer and paramedic working together in the city centre

Lead agency Police Ambulance service

Purpose A police officer and a paramedic work together, touring the city centre and acting as the first point of contact for people with minor injuries. This results in fewer admissions to A&E departments and fewer 999 calls for a dedicated ambulance.

To provide medical care in city centres to support the nighttime economy

Ambulance service Police Local authority

Joint ambulance and police mobile and static facilities should be positioned in the city centre. These act as the first point of medical provision, thus taking pressure off A&E departments and the ambulance service. Fewer people attend A&E, leading to reductions in violent crime and anti-social behaviour at A&E.

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Acknowledgements
The Police and Partnership Standards Unit is grateful to the authors of this document: Chief Inspector Amanda Dellar – TVCP fieldworker Andy Pownall – TVCP fieldworker Thanks are also owed to the following for their efforts: All of the CDRP contributors DCS Richard Mann – PPSU – TVCP Clare Beamish – Violent Crime Unit – TVCP Chief Inspector Martin Goodall – PPSU – TVCP Christine Graham – TVCP fieldworker Scott Weetch – TVCP fieldworker Chief Inspector Duncan Slade – PPSU – TVCP

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Produced by COI on behalf of the Home Office. October 2007. Ref: 281118