Before the

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION
APPLICATION FOR LICENSE
for the
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
F.E.R.C. PROJECT NO. 2911
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
KETCHIKAN, ALASKA
FEBRUARY 1979
APJ.!S .
" ,ut(()S UbroN 8: Inrormation
ihl1lry l3ullJiog. 111
t?" Prn\/icl('floC'L' Drn"'C
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p. o.
January 29, 1979
Mr. Kenneth F. Plumb, Secretary
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
825 North Capitol Street, N. E.
Washington, D. C. 20426
Subject: Swan Lake Project
Dear Sir:
Application for Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission License
;El£PHo,.n 9C7 225-3111
Transmitted herewith are one original and nine (9) conformed
copies of our Application for License for the Swan Lake Project.
This Application has been prepared in accordance with the Federal
Power Act and Title 18 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
As discussed in the text of this Application, we have an urgent
need for power from this Project. Our goal is to avoid having to
add another diesel generating unit to our system if at all possible.
Load projections show that in order to do this we must begin Project
construction no later than December of 1980, so that it will be on
line to meet expected loads by the end of 1983.
We will be appreciative of any effort the Commission makes toward
expediting review of the Application and issuance of the License
for the Project.
Enclosures
cc: U. S. Department of Agriculture
Forest Service
U. S. Department of Interior
of Land Management
Very truly yours,

Utilities Manager
BEFORE THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISS lOt,)
APPLICATION FOR LICENSE
1. Ketchikan Public Utilities, hereinafter referred to as the
"Applicant", organized under the Charter of the City of Ketchikan
and the Laws of the State of Alaska, and having its office and
principal place of business at Ketchikan, in the State of Alaska,
hereby makes Application to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
for a License to authorize the construction, operation and mainte-
nance of certain project works fully described herein.
2. The name, title and post office address of the person to whom
correspondence in regard to this Application shall be addressed is
as follows:
copy to:
Mr. Donald D. Bowey
Utilities Manager
Ketchikan Public Utilities
334 Front Street
Post Office Box 7300
Ketchikan, Alaska 99901
Donald E. Bowes
Executive Engineer
R. W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
TO\ver Building
7th Ave. & Olive Way
Seattle, Washington 98101
1
3. The Applicant is a Public Utility organized under the Charter
of the City of Ketchikan and the Laws of the State of Alaska.
4. The measure of control or ownership exercised by the Applicant
in any other organization or over the Applicant by any other
organization is as follows:
The Applicant has full control and ownership of the electrical
generation and distribution system serving the area in and
around the City of Ketchikan, Alaska.
5. The Applicant operates and/or proposes to operate in the
following States:
The Applicant operates and proposes to continue operating only
within the State of Alaska.
6. A concise general description of the Swan Lake Hydroelectric
Project and principal works is as follows:
6.1 General
The Swan Lake Project (Project) is located in Southeast
Alaska on the central portion of Revillagigedo Island. The site is
approximately 22 air miles northeast of Ketchikan near the northern
end of Carroll Inlet. The Project will consist of a dam, a power
tunnel and a powerhouse situated at tidewater on Carroll Inlet, plus
approximately 30 miles of transmission line from the site to
Ketchikan.
6.2 Dam and Reservoir
The dam will be a double-curvature, thin-arch concrete
structure located about 3/4 mile downstream from the outlet of the
2
existing Slvan Lake" The dam I'lill ha'7
P
'::: la:Cllnum height of 190 Frcp::
above the estimatecl base of the foundation excavation. The dam
crest at El 344.0 above mean lower low w ~ ~ e r (MLLW) will have a
length of d50 feet. The dam will have a crest thickness of 6 feet,
base thickness of 13 feet, and a centerline radius at the crest of
250 feet.
A 100-foot wide ungated ogee service spillway section with
the crest at El 330 will be located in the central portion of the
dam. On each side of the service spillway will be 50-foot wide
auxiliary spillway sections, crest at El 338.5. Spillway discharges
will be flipped downstream from the toe of the dam to a plunge pool
excavated in rock in the existing stream channel. The spillway will
be designed to discharge 9,400 cfs at a reservoir elevation of 338.4
for the adopted spillway design flood, which has a peak inflow of
18,600 cfs and a volume of 19,350 acre-feet. Under probable maximum
flood conditions, flows in excess of those passing over the service
spillway section would pass over the two auxiliary spillway sections.
A power intake will be located on the upstream face of the
dam between the end of the auxiliary spillway section and the right
abutment. The intake invert will be at EI 240. Semi-circular steel
trashracks will protect the power conduit and generating facilities
from debris. A fixed wheel gate will be provided at the intake for
emergency closure and will permit closure for draining of the tunnel
for inspection and maintenance purposes. A 16-foot wide single lane
roadway with curbs and parapet walls, extending along the dam crest
from the right abutment, will provide vehicle access to the power
intake for operation and maintenance of these facilities.
The reservoir formed by the dam will provide 86,000
acre-feet of active storage above the minimum operational pool El
271.5. At the normal maximum reservoir elevation of 330, the
surface area will be 1,500 acres. The existing lake, at El 236 has
3
a surface area of 1,050 acres. The shoreline area surrounding the
existing lake is fairly steep and densely forested so that it will
be necessary to clear all trees and brush within the area of
expected normal reservoir operation between the existing lake at El.
236 and El. 345. A survey of the reservoir rim area revealed no
potentially unstable slopes which might present a hazard to project
operation from landslide action.
6.3 Power Conduit
A concrete-lined power tunnel at an approximate 11% grade
will extend from the power intake to the powerhouse. The circular
tunnel will be excavated to a nominal diameter of 13 feet, with an
internal diameter of 10 feet after concreting.
In the 130-foot
section of tunnel upstream of the powerhouse, a steel lining will be
provided, the tunnel diameter will gradually be reduced, and the
tunnel will bifurcate into two 6-foot diameter branches leading to
the generating units in the powerhouse.
Construction of the power tunnel is planned by driving up
from a heading in the vicinity of the proposed powerhouse. Excavated
tunnel rock will be used for site development in the vicinity of the
powerhouse and construction staging areas.
6.4 Powerhouse
The powerhouse will be an indoor-type structure partially
excavated into the hillside immediately north of the mouth of Falls
Creek. The structure will be reinforced concrete, 56 feet wide, 88
feet long and about 90 feet high. It will contain two unit bays
which will house vertical shaft Francis turbines. Each unit will
deliver 15,200 horsepower at 450 rpm at average head and best gate
and will drive a vertical-shaft generator, rated at 12,250 kVA, 0.9
p.f., 13.8 kV. The total plant installed capacity will be 22,000 kW.
4
l\ 72-inch butterfly inlet va.lve ':iill be provi(jfcri.
L
, _ ',:1.
each turbine to serve as a guard gate for each unit. cn i'::,C)l),
bypass line \,lill be provided for each pf'nstock branch vii' 11;-),·"
Bunger type pressure relief valves which will operate Hl the e·"
of emergency shutdown of the plant. A tailrace channel will ~ (
excavated in rock to convey the plant discharges into the F 3 1 1 ~
Creek Channel at tidewater. The tailwater level will be maintainen
at or above El 0.0 to protect the turbines against cavi;:2t:iun.
The switchyard will be located adjacent to the north w ~ l l
of the powerhouse. Three single-phase transformers will transform
the voltage from 13.8-kV to the 115-kV transmission voltage, also a
spare transformer will be provided. The plant will be remotely
controlled from the S.W. Bailey diesel plant in Ketchikan.
6.5 Site Access
Due to the remoteness of the site from Ketchikan, access
for construction and operation will be limited to air and water
transportation routes. Port facilities, consisting primarily of a
high-tide barge landing grid and a dock for small boats and float
planes will be located about 1,000 feet north of the mouth of Falls
Creek. A bulkhead will be required along the shoreline and a harge
grid on piles about 260 feet long by 60 feet wide will be provided
alongside the bulkhead. The grid will be set at approximately El
3. A pile-supported float alongside the grid will provide access
for small boats and float planes.
An access road 0.8 miles in length will extend from the
port facilities to the dam, switchyard, and powerhouse. For
economic and environmental reasons, the road will be of single lane
I construction with turnouts and will be constructed to minimum
I standards, adequate only for construction and for maintenance of the
Project.
5
6.6 Transmission Line
The transmission line will extend from the S.W. Bailey
Substation in Ketchikan to the switchyard at the powerhouse. The
new single circuit IIS-kV transmission line will be 30.5 miles in
length. The line will follow the route of the existing 34.5-kV line'
north from the S.W. Bailey diesel plant to Ward Cove, and from there
extend east along the north side of Connell Lake and turn to follow
the White River Valley to the upper end of George Inlet. From there
it will extend along the north side of George Inlet heading east to
the South Saddle lake area, near Carroll Inlet, where it will turn
to the north and follow the western edge of Carroll Inlet to a
location opposite the powerhouse. The line will then cross the
inlet via an overhead span to the Project site, terminating at the
switchyard adjacent to the powerhouse.
From the Bailey plant north to Ward Cove the ll5-kV line
will be built on single pole structures within the existing State
highway right-of-way. The existing 34.5-kV line will be reconstruct-
ed as an underbuild on the new poles. From Ward Cove, approximately
25.5 miles of wood pole H-frame transmission line will be constructed
along the route described above to a point on the west bank of
Carroll Inlet opposite the powerhouse. The overhead crossing of
Carroll Inlet will utilize lattice steel dead end tower structures
at each end. The overhead span will be approximately 3,000 feet
long and will provide adequate clearance above the water surface to
preclude interference with water craft. Hazard warning markers will
be provided as required by FAA Regulations. From the dead end tower
on the east bank of Carroll Inlet, the line will utilize wood pole
H-frame structures and will extend north, crossing Falls Creek,
terminating at the switchyard immediately north of the powerhouse.
6
7. The location of the Project is as follows:
a. In the State of Alaska
b. In the Ketchikan Gateway Borough
c. On the following stream: Falls Creek, carrying no
commerce.
d. In the region of the following-named City: Ketchikan
8. Lands of the United States
The majority of the lands required for construction of the
Project are presently owned by the United States and administered by
the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Tongass National Forest.
This includes all lands within the project site at Swan Lake,
including the area encompassed by the reservoir, and the area within
the bounds of the power generating facilities.
Lands required for construction of the transmission line
from the site to Ketchikan are predominantly National Forest lands.
However, a portion of land which will be crossed by the transmission
line near the northern tip of George Inlet has been nominated for
selection by the State of Alaska in accordance with provisions of
the Alaska Statehood Act, and will eventually become State lands.
An additional portion of land which will be crossed by the line in
the vicinity of the White River has been nominated for selection by
a local native village corporation, Cape Fox, under provisions of
the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971. Transfer of
ownership of these lands is currently in process, and these lands
are now, or soon will become, privately-owned lands of the Cape Fox
Corporation. An easement reservation has been held in the name of
the United States to allow future construction of the Swan Lake
7
h th 1 d
Notl
'ce of this reservation
Transmission line throug ese an s.
has been published in the Federal Register and the Ketchikan Daily
News. The other major portion of land required for construction of
the transmission line which is not owned by the United States and
administered by the U.S. Forest Service is a segment extending from
the Ward Cove area into Ketchikan. This portion of line will be
constructed within the right-of-way for the existing State Highway
from Ward Cove to the S.W. Bailey Substation, where it will connect
to the Ketchikan Public utilities generation and distribution system.
9. The proposed initial and ultimate scheme of development for the
Project is as follows:
The Swan Lake Project, a conventional hydroelectric
development with a total installed capacity of 22,000 kilowatts, is
expected to produce an average annual energy output of approximately
85,400,000 KWh delivered to the load center. This is considered to
be the ultimate economic development of the water resources in the
Swan Lake - Falls Creek drainage and no additional future power
installation is contemplated.
10. The proposed use or market for the power to be developed is as
follows:
The power produced by the proposed Swan Lake Project will
be used to augment the output of the Applicant's existing electrical
generation system presently serving the commercial, industrial and
residential users of Ketchikan, Alaska and its surrounding service
area. As the Swan Lake Project contributes to the Applicant's
overall electrical generation system, the market available to the
Project is that of the Applicant's entire system.
11. The location, a brief description and capacity of all power
plants or other· electric facilities owned or operated b ~ the
8
Applicant, the market supplied thereby and the .••
the Project applied for, are briefly described as follows:
11.1 Facilities
The Applicant owns and operates the Ketchikan Lakes
Project (FERC Project No. 420) and the Beaver Falls Project (FERC
Project No. 1922). The Ketchikan Lakes Project is situated
the southern end of Ketchikan Lakes and the corporate limit of the
City of Ketchikan. This project consists of the Ketchikan Lakes Dam
and Spillway, two power tunnels and two penstocks leading from
Ketchikan Lakes to Fawn Lake. A diversion dam and two tunnels and a
flume from Granite Creek Basin to Fawn Lake. Two dams and a
spillway at Fawn Lake. A power tunnel and three penstocks from Fawn
Lake to the Ketchikan powerhouse. The three generating units in the
powerhouse became operational in 1923, 1938, and 1957. At the
present time the total installed capacity is 4,200 kW, but the
dependable capacity from the plant is considered to be only 1,800 kW
delivered to the load center in Ketchikan as a result of hydraulic
limitations during low water periods. Ketchikan Lakes also serves
as a potable water supply for the City.
The Beaver Falls Project is located on George Inlet about
11.5 air miles northeast of the City of Ketchikan. This project
consists of two darns with reservoirs for regulation of flows and two
powerhouses. The Beaver Falls powerhouse has three operating
generators which became operational in 1946, and 1954. Upper Lake
Silvis is formed behind a concrete-faced rockfill dam which has a
separate spillway weir and channel. A tunnel and penstock connects
Upper Lake Silvis reservoir to the powerhouse located on Lower Lake
Silvis. The Lake Silvis Project became operational in 1968, has a
total installed capacity of 2,100 kW and a load center dependable
capacity of 2,000 kW.
9
Lower Lake Silvis is formed by a second concrete-faced
rockfill dam with an adjacent spillway. Water is conveyed from
Lower Lake Silvis to the Beaver Falls powerhouse through a tunnel
and penstock. In addition, a smaller penstock runs from an intake
located in Beaver Falls C r e e ~ about 3,000 feet downstream from the
dam to the Beaver Falls powerhouse. The powerhouse is located on
George Inlet at tidewater; its three operating generators became
operational in 1923, 1938 and 1957. The total plant installed
capacity is 5,000 kW and the load center dependable capacity is
considered to be 4,750 kW.
The Applicant presently operates all hydroelectric plants
as base load generation facilities and is expected to continue as
such when the Swan Lake Project becomes operational.
11.2 Diesel Generating Facilities
About one third of KPU's existing generating capacity is
hydroelectric; the balance is provided by diesel-fired internal
combustion units. The three diesel plants presently serving
Ketchikan have load center dependable capacities as follows:
Ketchikan (870 kW); Totem Bight (2,000 kW); and S.W. Bailey
(14,450 kW). The S.W. Bailey Plant is located within the Ketchikan
City Limits and contains three units. Units number one and two each
have a nameplate rating of 4,000 kW; unit number three has a
nameplate rating of 6,450 kW. Operation of the diesel units has
historically been to meet peak loads and provide system capacity
reserves. However, at the present time they are supplying about 30
percent of KPU's electrical generation requirements. By late 1983
it is expected that this percentage will increase to about 45
percent.
When the Swan Lake Project comes on line in late 1983, the
more costly to operate diesel capacity will be retired to a system
reserve status.
10
12. The following exhibits are filed herewith and are hereby made a
part of this Application:
Exhibit A
, Exhibit B
Exhibit C
Exhibit D
Exhibit E
Exhibit F
Exhibit G
Exhibit H
Exhibit I
Organization Papers
Resolution Authorizing the Filing o ~ Application
for License
Statement as to Special Hydroelectric, Water Power
or Irrigation Laws of the State of Alaska Pertaining
to the Construction of the Project.
Statement that the Applicant has Complied with the
Laws of the State of Alaska with Respect to Bed and
Banks, its Use of the Water and its Right to Engage
in the Business of Developing, Transmitting and
Distributing Electric Power
Statement of the Nature, Extent and Ownership of
the Water Rights for the project
Summary of the Nature and Extent of the Applicant's
Title to or Rights to Occupy or Use the Private
Lands Necessary to Develop, Operate and Maintain
the Project
Statement of the Financial Ability of Applicant to
Develop and Operate the Project
Statement of the Proposed Operation of the Project
During Periods of Low, Normal and Flood Streamflow
Statement of the Estimated Dependable Capacity and
the Average Annual Energy Produced by the Project
11
Exhibit J
Exhibit K
Exhibit L
Exh ibit M
Exhibit N
Exhibit 0
Exhibit P
Exhibit Q
Exhibit R
Exhibit S
Exhibit T
Exhibit U
Exh ibit V
Exhibit W
General Project Map
Detailed Project Maps
General Design Drawings
General Description of Mechanical, Electrical, and
Transmission Equipment
Estimated Cost of Project Development
Statement of the Estimated Time Required to
Complete Project Works
Not Required
Not Required
Project Recreation Plan
Statement on the Effect of the Project on Fish and
Wildlife Resources
Statement Justifying the Development of the Project
by the Applicant Rather than by the Federal
Government
Not Required
Statement of the Protection, Enhancement of
Natural, Historic and Scenic Features in the
Design, Location, Construction and Operation of the
Project Features
Environmental Report
12
Exhibit u
Exhibit V
Exhibit H
Not Required
Stcternent of the Protection, Enhancement at
Natural, Historic and Scenic Features in the
Design, Location, and Operntion of the
Project Features
Environmental Report
13
IN WITNESS WHEREOF Applicant
signed by Donald D. Bowey
its seal toGe hereto a£Tl-;-Zed by
Clerl: thereunto duly 2.uthorir:ed,
of February 1979.
has its narne to
its UtIlitIes
!';cKin1£Y. __ -,-_
th 1S 1st day
Attest:
r·lanaCjer L''lej
lts
VERIFICATION
State of Alaska
City of Ketchikan, ss:
ss:
Donald D. Bowey being first duly sworn deposes and
says that he 1S the Ut11it1es Manager of the City of Ketchikan, the
Applicant for a License, that he has read the foregoing Application
and knows the contents thereof; that the same are true to the best
of his knowledge and belief.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this
1979.
(SEAL)
5th day of Februar;
My commission expires ! ~ l 7 / ?!
EXHIBIT A
CERTIFICATION OF CITY CHARTER
I, the undersigned, the duly qualihei and cit) cl'O,k
of the Cit} of Ketchikan, and keeper the rsc,'::ds C
C
+::11(' it,;
of Ketchikan, including the Journal of the c,:' the CO::,:.-J:,
Council, do hereby certify:
1. That the City of Ketchikan, Alaska, is a municipality
organized and chartered under the lo.l'ls of the State of
Alaska.
2. That a copy of the Charter of the City of Ketchikan,
Alaska, duly certified by the Secretary of State of the
State of Alaska, was filed with the Federal POI'ler
Commission (F.E.R.C.) in July of 1962 and is included
herein by reference.
3. That I am authorized to execute this certificate, and
that the seal affixed hereto, is the official seal of the
City of Ketchikan and this certificate is hereby executed
under such official seal.
IN ItIiTNESS I/IHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 10th day of
February, 1978.
SEAL
71 )''1 (.
t1ary t,lcK:lnley, City Clerk1
City of Ketchikan, ]l,laska
EXHIBIT B
CITY OF KETCHIKAN
RESOLUTION NO. 1124
A resolution of the City of i\lask2 2uthor ;_zinc;
the Utilities l1anager to proceed immediately I-.'ith filing the -
necessary documents and exhibits with the FERC in order to obtain
the license to authorize the construction and operation of the Swan
Lake Hydroelectric project.
the power requirements of the City of Ketchikan
have demonstrated a rapid and substantial growth, and
WHEREAS, the City of ICetchikan has foreseen this require-
ment and has accomplished an extensive series of studies to
determine the most economical and beneficial means to improve the
reliability of its power supply, and
WHEREAS, the final recommendations of the consultants
retained by the City of Ketchikan are contained in the recently
completed report entitled Evaluation Report for the Swan Lake
Project, and
WHEREAS, upon thorough review of the report by the Council
of the City of Ketchikan, it is concluded that the best alternative
plan to satisfy the latest forecast of developing power requirements
is that plan identified in the report entitled Evaluation Report for
the Swan Lake Project as the Swan Lake Project.
WHEREAS, the City of Ketchikan will require a license from
the FERC in order to authorize the construction of the Project.
NOvi, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT, the City of I:etchikan
hereby authorizes its Utilities Manager to proceed immediately with
filing the necessary documents and exhibits with the FERC in order
to obtain the license to authorize the construction and operation of
, the Swan Lake Hydroelectric Project.
PASSED, APPROVED ADOPTED by the Council of the City of
Ketchikan, Alaska on this 1st day of February, 1979.
I-li11iam G. Horan, Mayor
ATTEST:
, Clerk l
CERTIFICATION
I, ___ • do hereby certify that I
nm Clerk of die CltyUof !(etchlkan,Oa municipality organized and
existing under the laws of the State of Alaska; that the foregoing
is a complete and correct copy of the Resolution adopted at a
meeting of the Council of this City, duly and properly called and
held on -3=J.-.I2...,",-,<,-'-cV''-:';1 I ,1 79.. ; that a quorum \Yas present at
the meeting; that the forth in the minutes of the
meeting and has not been rescinded or modified.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto subscribed my name and
affixed the seal of the City of Ketchikan this ? 7-lV- i..lLA/' /'
EXHIBIT C
STATEMENT AS TO SPECIAL LAWS OF THE STATE OF ALASKA
PERTAINING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE PROJECT
There are no special hydroelectric, water power, or
irrigation laws in the State of Alaska which pertain to t h ~ PrujecL
for which a license is applied for herein.
1
EXHIBIT 0
STATEMENT THAT THE APPLICANT HAS COMPLIED
WITH THE LAlvS OF THE ST1\TE OF ! ~ L A S K ! I
WITH RESPECT TO BED AND BANKS, ITS USE
OF THE WATER AND ITS RIGHT TO ENGAGE IN
THE BUSINESS OF DEVELOPING, TRANSMITTING
AND DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER
The Applicant has complied with the requirements of the
laws of the State of Alaska with respect to the right to engage in
the business of developing, transmitting and distributing electrical
power, and in any other business, necessary to effect the purpose
applied for in the License Application. The Applicant is currently
acquiring the necessary State franchises with respect to bed and
banks and will submit a full disclosure of these items to the
Commission as they become available.
1
EXHIBIT E
STATEMENT OF THE NATURE, EXTENT AND
OWNERSHIP OF THE WATER RIGHTS FOR THE PROJECT
The Alaska Division of Lands issued a permit to the
Applicant on November 17, 1978, authorizing the Applicant to develop
the water resources of the Swan Lake drainage basin and Falls
for power generation purposes as discussed in this Application. "
copy of this permit is contained in Exhibit E-l. After
and installation of the necessary structures and equipment
to effect taking of water, and after determining the daily usage to
a reasonable extent, the Applicant will notify the Alaska Division
of Lands of the quantity being used, at which time the State will
issue a Certificate of Appropriation which will supercede the
current permit. Upon receipt of the Certificate of Appropriation,
the Applicant will submit the necessary copies, with certification
as required, to the Commission.
1
EXHIBI'=' E-l
HATER RIGH':'S ?SmiJ'
IV. OF LA
PERM IT 1«).
2022
STATE OF ALASKA
DEPARTMENT or NATURAL RESOURCES
OF LANDS
323 E. fourth Avenue
Anchorage, Al aska 99501
AOL NO.
100113
PERMIT TO DEVELOP WATER SOURCE OR EFFECT CHANGES IN WATER FLOW
Pursuant to A.S . 46.15, IS amended and rul es end regulat ions pror.ulglted
thereunder. pennission 1$ hereby granted the' Ci v of Ketchl":IO, p.O.
x 1110,
334 Fr gn t •• Ketchi kan. 99901, for the of 462
water for powe r a of for thc City of
l<e tchik:tn. The wa ter will be trt klm fr om Falls Creek about onc n lIe
of the Swan Lake o utlet, Tn"'llsh i p 72 South , Rang!" 92 [ast , CoopC'r Rivcr ldi •
wit h i n 11-15, 20-23 and 27 ,mel wi 11 be u<;eo at t he- prnpo,>co power lou l
loca t ed in the SE1/4NE1/4 Section 19, Townsh ip 72 Sou t h , Rnnge 92 East,
River M Tidian.
Structures which w111 be effected are a 1'15 conS!..!.:,.l
house , a 2, 250 f oot l ong t unn e l, nnel a mi l c t rnns -
mis s i on line.
Cha nge s In t he n3tu-
ral state of water to be made as stated herein lnd for the purposes Indicat ed.
Ourl ng the tf f t ctl v, pe riod of thi s permIt. t he sh.ll :
I . Follow aceep tabl . t n9lnt. rln9 sta nd. rds In , x. relsl n. t he rlyhtl 9re nt,d f rt ln.
2. Compl y with all appllc. bl, lawS. and I ny rvl,s . nd/ or regul lt lons I ss ued t
3. Indrmnl fy th, Stlt ' 1911nst Ind hold It hlrmless Iny and 111
lults. l oss. lIabilIty Ind Ilptns . fo r Inj ury to or del t h of p.rl ons I nd to
10l' of prope r ty I ri slng out of or wIt h the "ertls. of t - ,
covered by thl . p, nalt.
4. kotlfy the Wl t tr R. sourc.s Sect Ion, Al , ska DivIsion of llnds upon chl nge of addre l s
or transftr of any rell proparty
The Div i si on of Lands may suspend effect ed under t hi s whenc er
such suspensi on sh511 in its judg::1ent be neces sary to protect t he pub lc lnteres
or tha t of a prinr appropriator.
This permi t shall expire
nC'c('mher 31 ,
APPROVED' _!/;r,f. 4w-
;tl.. T".:"crtor
DivIsion of Land ,.11 'rr , 1 r n
___ .;,..1.;,..0 _-J"",I_ .
Oepart.Ji>Cnt of Natural Resources
10- 108 (263)
:"' . ' , ... r.
"11 AD IHENT TO USE PE 11.."11 T Nil) CE RTl F 1(/\ TE
With respect to those existing small dams which have been constructed
to lmpound water for beneficial usc, the StHe of Al;lc,l:a, T)ivision of LOlr,us
docs not !It this tilne inspect, Jppraise flor certify the
liS to their soundness.
In order to 0110h' issuance of a Hater Use I'nr:lit for W:lter ir.poundeJ by
such structure which you have described in your <lr]115c;]tioll, the 1':1ter
Resources Section of the Division of LlTlas requires that YOll sil;Tl the
statement below for the purpose of re 1 c;]sing the State fror:l any 1 i :Jt>i 1 it)'
pertaining to this structure. The stater:lent becofPes a p:lft of the \I';1ter
Use Permit and/or Certificate.
The Use Application, ADL 11100113 is for the use of water
an artificial ir.1poundr.1ellt as hereinbefore described. I (He) City of
-----
RetchikBn
the oWTler(s) of the stnlcturr:
hereby release the State of Alaska from any <Ina all advcrse cl<1ir.:s th:1t r::;:r
arise as a result of the existing structure and/or its if:1]1oundcd
Date

NOV 1 7 1978
EXHIBIT F
SUMMARY OF THE NATURE AND EXTENT OF THE
APPLICANT'S TITLE TO OR RIGHTS TO
OCCUpy OR USE THE PRIVATE LANDS NECESSARY
TO DEVELOP, OPERATE AND HAINTAIN THE
PROJECT
Presently the Applicant does not own any of the lands
required for Project development, with the exception of those lands
occupied by the existing Ketchikan Public Utilities substation
facilities located adjacent to the S. W. Bailey diesel plant in
Ketchikan. This site will serve as the terminal location for the
Swan Lake Project transmission line.
All other lands within the project boundaries, as outlined
on the Exhibit K drawings, are in private, State, and Federal
ownership. The Applicant is currently in the process of acquiring
the necessary rights to occupy said lands by easement, permit or
other agreement. The Applicant intends to submit, by amendment, a
description of all land use rights acquired within one year after
acquisition of said rights.
ALASKA !"-'"-'
" . ""\1
:;. 1
1
EXHIBIT G
STATEMENT OF THE FINANCIAL ABILITY
OF THE APPLICANT TO DEVELOP
AND OPERATE THE PROJECT
The Applicant represents that it is financially able to
construct, operate and maintain the Project and submits the following
in support of this statement:
1. Evaluation of the economic and financial feasibility of
Project development has shown that it is the most desirable long-
range generation alternative available to the Applicant.
2. The Applicant anticipates that electrical loads in the
project area will continue to increase at a steady rate and that the
project's power output will be fully utilized within about six years
of the initial date of operation, based on the assumption that
commercial operation of the Project will begin in late 1983.
3. The Applicant anticipates establishing a rate structure
consistent with the need to meet its cost of providing electric
service to its customers, which will include charges sufficient to
cover the cost of Project debt service including both principal and
interest, financing costs, and the cost of operation and maintenance
of the Project facilities.
4. The Applicant has annually submitted financial statements
to the Commission on FPC Form 1 demonstrating its financial ability
to construct, operate and maintain its existing power system.
Presently the Applicant is exploring the various avenues
available for financing Project design and construction, including
the following:
1
SESE ............................................ ------------.... ; ~
1. A loan from the Alaska Power Authority Power Project
Revolving Fund, established under Alaska Statutes 44.56.170, which
provides loans for feasibility studies, preconstruct ion engineering,
and design of power projects.
2. Special appropriation from the State of Alaska general fund
to the Department of Revenue for a loan to the City of Ketchikan.
3. Issuance of electric revenue bonds by the City of Ketchikan,
4. Financial support from the Department of Energy made avail-
able through interim financial assistance programs to be implemented
through future Program Research and Development Announcements (PRDA)
and Program Opportunity Notices (PON).
Upon final selection of the method of financing, full
details including the cost of financing will be submitted to the
Commission in accordance with Commission regulations.
2
EXHIBIT H
STATEMENT OF THE PROPOSED OPERATION
OF THE PROJECT DURING PERIODS OF LOI'l,
NORMAL, AND FLOOD STREAMFLOI'l
1. PROJECT SETTING
The Swan Lake Project will be located in the Swan Lake -
Falls Creek drainage basin near the northern end of Carroll Inlet,
approximately 22 air miles northeast of Ketchikan, Alaska. The
basin is located within the heavily-forested mountainous area
between Carroll Inlet and Behm Canal. Elevations range from sea
level on Carroll Inlet to 4,000 feet at the drainage area divide,
resulting in an average basin elevation of about 1,800 feet. The
drainage area is elongated in shape being approximately 9 miles long
by 4 miles wide above Swan Lake. The main stream gradient is 14% in
the upper 2 miles, flattening to 1% in the lower 5.4 miles as the
stream approaches Swan Lake. The lake has a surface area of about
1,050 acres at El 236 and is nearly surrounded by steeply walled
mountains. Falls Creek outlets from the lake flowing in a westerly
direction through a narrow canyon, at a gentle grade for about 6,500
feet where it then drops through a series of falls to Carroll Inlet,
about 7,500 feet downstream. The stream channel elevation at the
dam site, about 4,700 feet downstream of the lake outlet, is
approximately 200 feet.
The concrete dam with a spillway crest at El 330 (MLLW),
which is to be located 3/4 of a mile downstream from the outlet of
Swan Lake, will raise the lake level by about 90 feet and will
increase the surface area of the lake from its current estimaten
size of 1,050 acres to about 1,500 acres. The active storage
provided will be about 86,000 acre-feet which will allow regulation
of approximately 91% of the annual basin runoff.
1
~ ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - .
2. STREA!1FLOWS
Despite the high elevations of the surrounding peaks there
are no areas within the Swan Lake basin which are permanently glaci-:
ated or snow covered. Because the basin is largely underlain by
bedrock with relatively little soil cover and the climate does not
induce large amounts of evaporation, nearly all of the precipitation
that falls within the basin ultimately produces runoff. High runoff
periods usually occur during the rainy fall months, while low flow
periods occur during winter and early spring.
Streamflow records are available for Falls Creek from the
United States Geological Survey (USGS) Gage No. 700 for the periods
of September 1916 through January 1926 and October 1946 through
September 1959, for a total of 28 years. (1) The drainage area
upstream of the gage location (gage is located just below the dam
site) is 36.5 square miles and the recorded average annual runoff
for the period of record is 460 cfs, or 330,000 acre-feet.
I
In order to estimate streamflows for the ungaged periods of ,!
February 1926 through August 1927 and January 1933 through September
1946, the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) in its Re-
Evaluation Study developed a set of monthly correlation curves. (1)
The USBR correlated gaged flows for Falls Creek to those of nearby
Fish Creek and Ketchikan Creek. The correlations were verified for
the above years and further developed to include a similar set of
monthly correlations relating Fish Creek and Falls Creek flows for
the period of overlapping records extending from October 1946
through September 1959. From these correlations, monthly and annual
streamflows were estimated for Falls Creek for the ungaged period
October 1959 through September 1974. Using the verified results of
earlier USBR studies and the flows developed during the Project
evaluation studies, a total of 58 years of flow data covering the
period from October 1916 through September 1974 has been established
2
lei·
It
:io;
loff
I ~ I
ds
for Falls Creek. The flow data indicate a long-term average annual
flow for Falls Creek at the gage location of 462 cfs, or 334,500
acre-feet. This compares favorably with the 28 year recorded
average flow of 460 cfs.
The flood of record on Falls Creek occurred on November I,
1917, when the average daily discharge was 4,600 cfs; the momentary
peak discharge during this flood Ivas estimated to be 5,500 cfs. The
greatest spring runoff was recorded on April 16, 1952 when a momen-
tary peak discharge of 3,700 cfs was reached. Conversely, a record
minimum daily discharge of 19 cfs occurred from February 21 through
February 25, 1925. (2)
For power study purposes, it was determined that a 40-year
period of flow data would be adequate to represent the long-term
hydrologic cycle at the Project. Flow data for the years 1921
through 1960 were selected as being representative of the long-term
average flows expected, as this period encompasses nearly all of the
recorded flow data and additionally, includes the two extreme low
of runoff periods which occurred in 1925 and 1956. This flow data is
~ r presented in Table H-l.
II
al
ed
3. PROJECT OPERATION
electric
existing
The Project will be operated as a conventional hydro-
plant and will be operated in conjunction with Ketchikan's
hydroelectric and diesel generation plants. The reservoir
will be
storage
operated on a rule curve whereby water is withdrawn from
to generate required system firm energy each month and
secondary energy will be generated only when the reservoir is full
and there is excess inflow available. The total amount of monthly
generation is then the sum of the firm and secondary energy.
3
.................
With the addition of the Project, the system load in the
foreseeable future will be met completely with hydroelectric units
while Ketchikan's diesel units will be used as standby reserves and
to firm up the hydroelectric secondary energy during low runoff
periods. Ketchikan's existing hydroelectric plants at Ketchikan
Lakes, Beaver Falls and Lake Silvis will probably continue to be
operated as base load plants in the future. The Project will be
fulfilling the remainder of the system needs, accepting the load
swings, and providing system reserves during the initial years of
operation.
During years when inflows are high, the reservoir will be
maintained full or nearly full. During low flow years, the reservoir
will be drawn down to the level necessary to meet firm generation
requirements each month. Dependable capacity is that capacity
available when the reservoir is at minimum level which will only be
reached during the most adverse hydrologic period encountered
during the life of the Project.
Reservoir operation studies conducted, show that the firm
annual energy available from the Project, based on operation to
deliver a minimum dependable
capacity of 18,000 kW to the load
center, will be 68,800,000 kWh. Table H-2 summarizes the amount
firm energy which will be available from the Project on a monthly
basis, based on the above method of operation.
of
Normally, the reservoir will be operated in the upper third
of the drawdown range so that the capacity available in an average
year will be higher than the dependable capacity. During most
years, the reservoir will be drafted an average of only 11 feet, or
to an average reservoir elevation of 319. The maximum drawdown
level for this method of operation will be approximately El 271.5,
however, it will be possible to draw the reservoir down to the level
of the existing lake, if it is necessary to do so, and the Project
can operate under these conditions as well.
4
T
The resulting pattern of reservoir fluctuation is
illustrated graphically in Exhibit 8-1, which shows envelopes of
extremes of reservoir operating levels, plus the average monthly
reservoir levels.
'4. FLOOD CONTROL
The Swan Lake Project will be operated as a hydroelectric
facility and not for the purpose of flood control. There is no need
for flood control protection downstream of the Project as there is
no development between the Project and tidewater. Thus, none of the
active storage volume has been reserved for flood storage but the
)i project has been designed to pass all floods, up to and including
the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF). The PMF is the flood resulting
from the occurrence of the probable maximum precipitation (PMP) in
addition to snowmelt.
To determine the PMP, a review was first made of available
precipitation data for the two existing weather stations in the
Project vicinity, at Ketchikan and Beaver Falls. It seemed
reasonable to assume that the spillway design storm would occur in
the fall or early winter. This would produce a flood with a higher
peak inflow than a flood which would occur during the spring snowmelt
season, although a spring flood would be much longer in duration and
greater in volume. Therefore the PMP storm was assumed to occur in
the fall and a 24-hour duration was selected.
Generalized isohyets have been developed by the National
Weather Service which aid in determining the characteristics of
large storms for an area. For the Project, the basis for deter-
mining the Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) was the U. S.
,Weather Bureau (now the National Weather Service) Technical Paper
5
...................... ------.•
No. 47 (TP-47). (3) For the Project area, TP-47 shows the probable
maximum 24 hour point precipitation to be 22 inches. Since this
22-inch rainfall value applies to a small drainage area (less than
10 square miles), an adjustment factor of 0.97 was applied to
reflect the larger drainage basin of Swan Lake and a 24-hour PMP of
21.3 inches was determined. This precipitation volume compares
favorably with results of a 1976 study done for the Alaska District
Corps of Engineers by the Hydrometerological Branch of the National
Weather Service entitled of the Probable Maximum Preci-
pitation and Snowmelt Criteria for the Lake Grace and Swan Lake
Drainages of Southeast This study indicated that the
estimated 24-hour area PMP for Swan Lake drainage is in the range of
18 to 23 inches.
Considering the range of temperatures that can be expected
in the fall, it is possible to have a snowpack condition antecedent
to the PMP, especially in the upper reaches of the basin. The
combination of the fall PMP and some snowmelt runoff was considered
acceptable in formulating the spillway design flood.
In calculating snowmelt, a maximum October sea level
temperature of 50
0
F was assumed to accompany the PMP storm. This
temperature was then adjusted for elevation by assuming a - 3
0
F
change in temperature per 1,000 feet of elevation change above sea
level. Based on the resulting saturated air temperatures it was
estimated that about 3 inches of snowmelt runoff could be expected
during the PMP storm. The basis for this determination was the
Corps of Engineers' snowmelt formula for rain on a snowpack. (5)
This snowmelt was then distributed in the same proportion as the PMP.
For calculating the net excess precipitation about 10% of
the PMP, 2.5 inches, was assumed to be lost by infiltration during
the first 5 hours of the storm and 0.1 inches per hour thereafter
6
for a total loss of 4.34 inches. The net excess runoff considering
precipitation, snowmelt and infiltration totalled 19.98 inches in 24
hours.
The Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) is the flood resulting
from the occurrence of the PMP in combination with snowmelt as
described above. The PMF, based on 21.3 inches of rain and 3 inches
of snowmelt has a peak inflow of 37,150 cfs and a volume of 38,700
acre-feet.
The ogee-shaped service spillway which is located centrally
in the dam is designed to pass a standard project flood which was
selected to be half the magnitude of the PMF peak of 18,600 cfs with
zero freeboard, on the abutment portions of the dam.
Flood routing studies were performed to simulate spillway
operation under large and rare magnitude flood occurrences including
both standard project and probable maximum floods. Using a spillway
crest length of 100 feet, the spillway design flood of 18,600 cfs
was routed through the reservoir starting with the reservoir at its
normal maximum elevation of 330 at the beginning of the assumed
24-hour storm. Routing of the spillway design flood resulted in a
maximum reservoir elevation of 338.4 and a peak discharge of 9,400
cfs.
In order to permit possible discharges of flood flows in
I excess of the spillway design flood, an auxiliary spillway will be
provided slightly above and at both ends of the centrally located
service spillway. This auxiliary spillway will not extend to the
extreme of the dam so the upper portions of the abutments will not
be discharged upon even during a rare flood event such as a PMF. In
order to restrict spillway design flood flows to the service
spillway, the crest of the auxiliary spillway was set at El 338.5.
A PMF routing was made using an auxiliary spillway length of 200
7
------..
feet, including the 100-foot long service spillway. The maximum
reservoir elevation for this configuration was 343.3 and as a
result, the crest of the non-overflow portion of the dam was set at
El 344. For the PMF event, the time of overtopping of the auxiliary
spillway was about 18 hours, and the peak discharge was 22,800.
5. IRRIGATION, MUNICIPAL AND DOHESTIC l'lATER SUPPLY
No use of the Project waters is anticipated for irrigation
or water supply.
6. NAVIGATION
Presently Swan Lake and Falls Creek do not support commer-
cial navigation and the Project is not being constructed nor will it
be operated for the purpose of aiding or enhancing commercial
navigation.
7. FISH AND WILDLIFE
The effects of Project construction and operation on the
fish and wildlife resources in the area are described in Exhibit w.
In a related matter, the Fisheries Rehabilitation, Enhance-
ment and Development Division of the Alaska Department of Fish and
Game (ADF&G) has expressed an interest in developing a major fish
hatchery on Falls Creek, utilizing water diverted from the hydro-
electric facility.
As now envisioned, this would involve providing a tap from
the power conduit just upstream from the powerhouse to supply a
continuous flow of up to 25 cfs for egg incubation and an outlet
works facility in the dam capable of providing a dependable water
supply for fish rearing when the power conduit is dewatered for
8
inspection, maintenance or when the plant is not generatIng. In
addition, low head pumps would be utilized to reuse tailrace waters
for fish rearing. The ADF&G does not propose to build the hatchery
[v simultaneously with the power plant, but rather it is planned for
construction at some subsequent, unscheduled date.
It
An agreement covering the costs of designing and construct-
ing the necessary items into the hydroelectric facility to allow
future development of the fish hatchery and a mutually acceptable
commitment concerning lost project energy output has not been
consumated. The Applicant and the ADF&G are continuing to pursue
the possibility of joint use of the basin resources.
8. RECREATION
The effects of Project operation on recreation in the area
are described in Exhibits Rand W.
9. WATER QUALITY
9.1 Introduction
Swan Lake Project operation effects on the water quality of
Swan Lake and Carroll Inlet are discussed herein. Construction
related impacts on water quality are specifically discussed in
Exhibit W, Sections 3 and 4.
Although specific effects on water quality as a result of
impoundment are difficult to predict, some conclusions concerning
potential and probable effects can be drawn based on available
data. While the Applicant has not performed specific studies
relating to the effect of the proposed impoundment on water quality,
Swan Lake has been the subject of several investigations due to its
potential as a hydroelectric development.
9
9.2 Data
The hydroelectric potential of Swan Lake was the subject of
a u.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation report
dated January, 1951 and updated in 1962. (1) Rather thorough
rnconnaissances of Swan Lake were also conducted by the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service July 26 through 29, 1975 and the Alaska Depart-
ment of Fish and Game August 30 through September 2, 1977. The
purpose of the latter studies was to collect baseline biological
data for evaluating the proposed hydroelectric development. While
results of both studies remain unpublished to date, the agencies
graciously made preliminary field data available to the Applicant's
Environmental Consultant, Dr. David T. Hoopes for inspection and use
in the project environmental investigations. (6)
This data includes morphometric characteristics, temperature
profiles, chemical analysis as well as biological sampling. Bathy-
metric and temperature profile data are shown and chemical parameters
are discussed in Dr. Hoopes report which is included as Appendix W-9
of Exhibit W.
One method available for predicting the effects of a
proposed reservoir and its operation on water quality is to use a
similar existing reservoir as a model. The Blue Lake Project (FERC
No. 2230), located about 5 miles east of Sitka, Alaska, offers such
an example. Similar to Swan Lake, Blue Lake was a natural lake that
was raised in 1961 approximately 130 feet by a dam, and regulated
for power generation. The slopes around the lake are steep and
forrested, with the exception of the delta at the main tributary
creek. Table H-3 illustrates the physical similarity between Blue
Lake and Swan Lake. Both lakes are at about the same elevation and
experience similar climatological conditions.
10
I 1
9.3 Effects of Impoundment
~ The following effects are considered probable either by
reason of simple physical effects or by use of the Blue Lake Model.
The degree of thermal stratification in the Swan Lake
t· Reservoir can be expected to increase with an attendant drop in
atmospheric reaeration as a result of increased depth and reduced
velocities in the reservoir. A limnological study of Blue Lake(7)
indicates marked thermal stratification was apparent by late August
after being isothermal in May.
le Reservoir operation, alternately flooding and dewatering
riparian areas, will result in increased nutrient levels and
therefore a probable increase in plankton production for an initial
Ir period of time. The overall effect of impoundment over the long
term will probably be a productive potential that will stabilize at
,[, some level below that existing in the lake ecosystem at the present
time. As a comparison, Blue Lake showed an increased productivity
for a period of about 10 years before stabilizing at a comparatively
low nutrient level. (8)
9.4 Conclusion
No significant adverse effect on the water quality of Swan
Lake or Carroll Inlet is expected to result from operation of the
Swan Lake Project. The continued operation of the Blue Lake Project
with no deterioration of water quality is considered to provide
adequate evidence of that conclusion and no further water quality
monitoring is considered necessary or justified.
11
10. CONSULTATION ~ l r H FEDERAL, STATE A I ~ D LOCAL AGENCIES HAVING
RESPONSIBILITY FOR WATER QUALITY CONTROL
The Applicant consulted with the following Federal, State
and local agencies having responsibility for water quality control.
U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA)
DATE: October 20, 1978
TYPE: Letter from R. W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
SUBJECT: Transmitting the Swan Lake Evaluation Report and
requesting comments relating to aspects of the
development of particular concern or warranting
special design considerations. Also, requesting any
additional pertinent data.
DATE: January 30, 1979
TYPE: Meeting in Seattle, Washington
SUBJECT: National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)
U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE (USFWS)
DATE: October 20, 1978
TYPE: Letter from R. W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
SUBJECT: Transmitting the Swan Lake Evaluation Report and
DATE:
TYPE:
SUBJECT:
requesting comments relating to aspects of the
development of particular concern or warranting
special design considerations. Also requesting any
additional pertinent data.
December 7, 1978
Meeting in Juneau, Alaska
Review of proposed project development.
12
DATE:
TYPE:
SUBJECT:
DATE:
TYPE:
SUBJECT:
December 15, 1978
Letter to R. W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
USFWS comments relating to proposed development.
ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION (DEC).
October 20, 1978
Letter from R. W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
Transmitting the Swan Lake Evaluation Report and
requesting comments relating to aspects of the
development of particular concern or warranting
special design considerations. Also requesting any
additional pertinent data.
DATE: December 7, 1978
TYPE: Meeting in Juneau, Alaska
SUBJECT: Review of the proposed project development.
ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME (ADF&G)
DATE: October 20, 1978
TYPE: Letter from R. W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
SUBJECT: Transmitting the Swan Lake Evaluation Report and
requesting comments relating to aspects of the
development of particular concern or warranting
special design considerations. Also requesting any
additional pertinent data.
DATE: December 7, 1978
TYPE: Meeting in Juneau, Alaska
SUBJECT: Review of the proposed project development.
13
-
11. UTILIZATION OF THE RESOURCE
The Project as described herein, will fully develop and
utilize the water resource in the best public interest for power,
fish, wildlife, and recreational purposes. Exhibit I describes the
power development; Exhibit R discusses plans for recreation, while
Exhibit S deals with fish and wildlife aspects associated with the
Proj ect.
12. REFERENCES
(1) United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation,
Swan Lake Project - Re-evaluation Study, July 1962.
(2) United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey
Division, Geological Survey Water Supply Papers: 1372: Com-
pilation of Records of Quantity and Quality of Surface Waters of
Alaska through September 1950; 1740: Compilation of Records of
Surface Waters of Alaska, October 1950 to September 1960; 1936:
Surface Water Supply of the United States 1961-65, Part 15,
Alaska; 2136: Surface Water Supply of the United States 1966-70,
Part 15, Alaska.
(3) United States Department of Commerce, Technical Paper No. 47,
"Probable Maximum Precipitation and Rainfall - Frequency Data
for Alaska, for Areas to 400 Square Miles, Durations to 24
Hours, and Return Periods from 1 to 100 years," 1963.
(4) United States Department of Commerce, National Weather Service,
of Probable Maximum Precipitation and Snowmelt Criteria
for Drainages of Lake Grace and Swan Lake, Revillagegedo Island,
March 3, 1976.
14
I,
la
(5) United States Army Corps of Engineers, Division of Engineering
and Design, Manual No. EM 1110-2-1406, "Runoff from Snowmelt,"
January 5, 1960.
(6) David T. Hoopes, An Investigation of Biotic Communities in
the Hydroelec.tr
Rivillagegedo Island, Alaska, January, 1978.
(7) U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey in Cooperation
with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Water Resources in
Alaska, "Limnological Investigation of Six Lakes in Southeast
Alaska," WRI 76-122.
(8) David T. Hoopes, An Investi2ation of the Biotic Communities in
the Vicinity of Green Lake, Baranoff Island, Alaska, July, 1977.
15
.................................
TABLE H-2
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
FIRM ENERGY DELIVERED BY MONTH
Firm Energy
Month Delivered, k ~ v H
July 5,224,000
August 5,430,000
September 5,430,000
October 5,636,000
November
5,911,000
December
6,461,000
January
6,667,000 1
-
February
5,774,000
March
6,117,000
April
5,567,000
1
May
5,430,000
June
5,086,000
Maximum Depth, ft.
Average Depth, ft.
Surface Area, acres
Drainage Area, sq.
Volume, acre-ft.
Altitude, ft. (MSL)
COMPARISON OF RESERVOIR
MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS
Raised
Swan Lak el/
Swan Lake.!/
502 596
285 379
1,050 1,500
miles 36 36
285,000 410,000
228 322
TABLE H-3
Raised
Blue Lake'?/
463
171
1,330
37
228,000
350
!/ Based in part on unpublished preliminary field data collected
by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, August 30 through
September 2, 1977.
~ / Based on information contained in "Limnological Investigations
of Six Lakes in Southeast Alaska," WRF 76-122, prepared by u.S.
Department of Interior, Geological Survey in Cooperation with
the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.
,"" >40 NOTES
I
I
I
I I I
I
I I . Cur.... how rllulll of nllnolr operol1on
[ ElIYelOpe of mGl imum monthly r ... rvoir 'I,votion .'udl .. baud 01'1 historical lood dolo for
Normal r ... ryolr EI. 330 Ketchi kan and ncO«fed and .ynl hnilld
» 0

»0 _Inomllo'll' data for Fall. Cr .. lI . SII/dy
....---------
period from 1921 - 1960 .
....
.............

'"
--
. ...---
'"
2. Recorded dreomflow dllio from U. S. G, S.
LL
I
Wallr Supply Paper Valum.. 1372 ond 1140,
320
I I
320 QO\lI 700 - Foil, Cr.," near K'lchlkan · ,
Z
'----
,.. .. rvoir ,ltYG11on
Sept,mba, 1916 - Januory 1926. S,ptamblt
-
/1------"'J
1927- a.clmb.r 1934 ond Octob.r 1946-
I
/
t Bo.. d on 40-ylor period of operotlolll
S.pttmb.r 1959.
Z
""
+
0
L ....
>1 0 - +
.
"'------
f- /
>10
••
Synlllnlted . 'reom'low, denlop.d from:
<l
[nvl lope of minimum monti'll),
V
( 01 Streamflow dolo on FI," Crllk from >
.. '"
I-
'"
t ... rvol r .llvotlon._ u.s.G.s. Water Supply Poper Volum .. 1312
..J /-.--..,.. . and 1740 , gQtjle 720 ,"FI,1'I C,,,k near
'"
. .'---.../ Kelchlkan February 1926 - Augu,1 1927 and
a:: .",,--
vi +- -1. -
.January 1933 - Seplember 19S9 and
-
'00 ; --
'00 (b) Sireamllow dolo on Ketctllkan Creek fr om
0
'"
-1
US.G.5. Water Supply Poplr Volllml 1372 ,
>
IIOlIe 2S, - Kelel'llkan Creek nlor
a::
'" \
Flbruary 1926 - Alltjlull 1927 and ,JaooQI"}
en

Slptlmber 19"'6.
'" a:: 290 -
\
-
t-
- 290
••
Ellvali anl bQlld an Meon Lowe, Low Wall'
'"
/
( MLLW1 dotllm.
"
<l
..J
\
'" i
280 I- - - - 280
Z

en
ocl iv. ,Io,otjle EI. 271.46
270 270
260
I
260
....... ' ....... "u I.,. ..... , • • It ou, n. •
Novemb.r Olc.mber Jonllor)' Februory March April .0, ,Junl July AIItjIU,I Sepllmber October . ...........n. '0' "<K'" ....
., oCl"OllUJl ....... un ......

".1;G; "iJ?"2.!lft
MONTHS OF THE YEAR
.. _*4. .:...

SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
I(ETCHIKAN, ALASKA
EXHIBIT H-I
SWAN LAKE RESERVOI R
OPERATION STUDY RESULTS
291,.,


ZI<,J:;) 0
: Jf'j"[" loot
I I ITI
TIME, HOURS
0 4

12 I. 20 24 2.
"
36 40
4500
w
,j. .r·· 1 1 1

---r-R;!,; lone.
NOTES
0%
--- 4000 Peak In' low 3740th
!;ii
3500 ":-
,
1 IT I
I
(,,,. m.1I i
-
.'

_0
u I. Probable Modmum Flood WOI dlriv. d usinO
·
3000
f,\
30· mlnule unit u'
probable moximum precipitation 'rum U. S.

2'00 - hwdrooroph
I
WeollMr Bur.ou Technical Pop.r 41 and th,
S ·Ii Co.rp. of En\llneer. ,no.m.11 formulo from

2000 %
Manual No. EM 1110-2-1406.
-j
-
"00
"-
1000
"
2. O"illll Flood Inltow lIon. half 40
'00
Plok Inflow
l
37 1!50 eft I
probable moalmum flood.
0
0
• •
12
,.
20
"
/

TIME, HOURS 3. Elevotiont bond on M,on Lower Low iN(Iler
Inflow h),drOllroph
(MLLW J datum.
ONE -HALF HOUR UNIT HYDROGRAPH
30 f-
2S
"
f-- .
1\
."","L , •. .loo,.

u Peok Dulfla. 22 800 d,
0
II
0
4-
20 r - - 2 20 -

/ I'\.
"
101l1ffo. h,drOllroph

1
u 0
"

"
0
Inflow h)'drO<;lroph I • 0
v /
2
" J 0111110. 9 400 eft 10 f- lO
I- 0
/
[/
--........ hydrO\lropll


,
V
,
1/
r ./
J
00
0
4

12 I. 20 24 2. 32 3. 40 0 4

12
,.
20 2' 2. 32 3. 40
TIME, HOURS TIME, HOURS
• • w w
w w
300

300
+

'"'!"Iolr EI. 343.3
.
.... Oom er.. ' EI. 344.0 · _rOom ""' El 344.0
>' 340
t- ;- .
f-- >' 3.,
r-s;ru.or ed- - V
w w

340 340
w
st."o,!" ".t ......-v

,
w T
....... " . .... o· ,.,
_ ......... , .. < ..
330 330 E1.330.0 ../ .........." •• ••• u . . ....... . n o. . ' .. oe'.'u.",e
<; 0
t
' 1 . ......... . . uuc UTI... " "
...... c. __ .. ....
EI. 33O.0
1-
.1 .1
o. ''''. DO' 0, m' ._ ... .. > 330 > 330 -

1 I

1 1
..
w w
325
0
I 325
0
• •
12
,.
20 2. 2. 32 3. 40

4

12 I. 20 24 2. 32 ,. 40 w w

TIME, HOURS TIME, HOURS
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
SPILLWAY DESIGN FLOOD PROBABLE MAXIMUM FLOOD KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
KETCHIKAN. ALASKA
EXHIBIT H-2
fLOOO HYOROGRAPHS
2911 - 2
EXHIBI'r I
STATEMENT OF THE ESTIMATED DEPENDABLE CAPACITY
AND THE AVERAGE ANNUAL ENERGY PRODUCED BY THE PROJECT
1. DEPENDABLE CAPACITY AND AVERAGE ANNUAL ENERGY
The dependable capacity delivered to the load center is
estimated to be 18,000 kW and the average annual energy delivered to
the load center is estimated to be 85,400,000 kWh. Power studies
for project operation were conducted using historic and synthesized
streamflows shown in Table H-l and reservoir area capacity data
shown in Figure 1-1. Based on the power studies presented in the
Swan Lake Project Evaluation Report, June 1978, the lowest reservoir
level reached was El 271.5 feet. This minimum reservoir level was
reached twice during the 40-year study period or about once every 20
years. The firm annual energy available from the Project is
estimated to be 68,800,000 kWh a year. This firm generation would
be available to meet system loads even during a repeat of the most
adverse historical hydrologic cycle, based on the assumed method of
operation.
2. SYSTEM LOADS
Based on the reservoir operation studies conducted, the
annual energy expected to be generated by the Project exclusive of
transmission losses will range from a minimum of 68,800,000 kWh to a
maximum of 109,800,000 kWh and is expected to average about
88,012,000 kWh. Results of these studies are shown in Table VI-I,
Sheet 4 of 6, of the Swan Lake Project Evaluation Report. (1)
1
Currently, Ketchikan's electric power is supplied by
hydroelectric and diesel generation facilities, with about one-third
(8,550 kW) of the Public Utility System (KPU) dependable capacity
supplied by hydroelectric sources and two-thirds (17,320 kW) by
diesel. KPU also has an inter tie and an exchange agreement with the
Louisiana Pacific-Ketchikan Division (LPK) which is limited by the
2,000-kW intertie capacity. LPK delivers power to KPU at 34.5 kV
and KPU delivers power to the Ketchikan Spruce Mill at 4.16 kV. The
intent of the exchange agreement is to break even on the energy
transfer, however, dependable capacity from the LPK plant is not
always available to meet KPU's peak load requirements.
It is estimated that Ketchikan's electrical energy
requirements will increase at an annual rate of 5% for the fore-
seeable future. This estimate is based largely on consideration of
the long-term electrical load growth that has been experienced by
the Applicant since it began generating power in 1935, plus a look
at the most recent trends in energy consumption. Since 1935,
Ketchikan's electrical loads have increased at an overall rate of
nearly 6% although the magnitude of increases in individual years
have varied greatly. In the last ten years, the average has been
around 4.6%. While it is expected that there will be short-term
fluctuations in annual load requirements, it is not expected that
the overall continued long-term rate will ever drop much below 5%.
Historic peak and energy loads along with projected loads
through 1994 are shown graphically in Fig. 1-2. System capacity
reserves have been set to be equal to the largest single generating .
unit in the system.
Figure 1-2 also shows KPU's existing generating resources!
with the Project coming on-line in late 1983 replacing system base
load diesel generation. As indicated by the projected load curves,
KPU is expected to have enough existing hydroelectric and diesel
2
:y
It:
:he
:'1
of
Y
ok
generating capacity to meet peak load plus reserve requirements until
the beginning of 1982. The earliest practical date the Swan Lake
Project power could be available to meet loads, assuming a 2-3/4
year construction period, is late 1983. This leaves 1-1/2 to 2
years when system reserves will be marginal and it is likely that if
the Project on-line date is delayed beyond 1983 a new diesel unit
will be a serious consideration to meet increasing capacity and
energy requirements.
When the Project comes into service, KPU's existing
diesel units will be used as standby reserves and to firm up the
secondary hydroelectric energy. During the first few years of
operation the project will exceed KPU's power requirements.
Presently, no firm agreements have been made to market any excess
power that might be available from the Project during these early
years, although potential customers exist in the Ketchikan area.
Based on projected loads and average runoff conditions it
is expected that the Project, in conjunction with the existing hydro-
electric resources, will satisfy system load requirements, with
little diesel generation, until about 1989 or 1990.
3. FLOW DURATION CURVES
The flow duration curves for Swan Lake monthly inflows
)ac are shown in Exh ibi t 1-1. These curves were developed using the
historic and synthesized streamflows that were used for the power
~ ; studies, which are shown in Table H-l.
4. TAILWATER RATING
ce'
The power plant will discharge directly into Carroll
5,1 Inlet where normal tidal fluctuation ranges from below El 0.0 (mean
lower low water) to about El 21.0, with mean sea level being around
3
B.O feet above mean lower low water. The configuration of the
tailrace channel will assure that the tailwater at the power plant
will be maintained at or above El 0.0 (MLLW) to protect the turbines
against cavitation. When the tidewater elevation is greater than El
0.0 (MLLW), the tailwater elevation will be controlled by the
tidewater elevation. Under this condition the tailwater elevation
will equal tidewater elevation for the entire range of power plant
discharges and will fluctuate approximately 21 feet.
5. REFERENCES
(1) R. W. Beck and Associates, Inc., Swan Lake Project Evaluation
Report, June 1978.
4
NOTES
---
I. Recorded renrvolr Inflow doto from U5.G.s. Water
Supply Poper \tIItU"" 1372 ond 1740,IIolie 700,
"Foil' Cr.. neor K.tchlkon"S.pt.mb.r 1916-
Jonuary 1926, September 1927 -December 1934
1600
I
ond Octob.r 1946 -Septemb'r 1959.
2. Synthetlled rennolr Inflow developed from:
(01 Stnamflow dolo on FI,h Cr.. k from
1400 -+-- t
U.5.G.S. Water Supply Pop.r\!olum .. 1372
-
-
ond 1740,11011' 720,"FI,h Cr .. k n.ar
Ketchikan' Februol')' 1926 - AUllu,t 1927 ond
Jonuary 1933 - Sept.mber 1959 ond
(bl Stnamflow dolo on Ketchikan Cre.k from
-t
U.S.G.S. Woter Supply Poper Volume 1372,
r-
t
• Ketchikon Creek neor Ketchlkon' Febl'\lClry 1926
1200
---r-
-AUllu,t 1927 ond Jonuory 1933 - September 1946.
1'1
••
Yeo" of recorded and Iynttlulud re"rvolr

Inflow dolo 1921-1960.
+ t- -
1000
-
4. The lIow doto Indicate 0 lonll term o'lerolle
<n annuol flow for Foil, Creek 01 lIolie locotlon
"- of 462 ch .
'-'
Z
800 + -
t
-
;:
1
infloJ
0
..J Rllervolr
"-
1

600 I t I
400
I
-
,." ......... " ..... G' 'H. ...... IUI .. , ... ' ....
......... no. ... uc<_ ... . . 0<<10 •• UI><I&'tU, .. L
T
I
I

•• • •••• " ... \ft1<.fO.. ... n.l, " .... ....,0 •
200 "" .... ':"f 0 ... ...., ....... ._ ....

"TO « _ ... 1 II lUI.-
t u ...... ) "", ........ tU-E'1
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
1
KETCHIKAN PUBUC UT1LinES
KETCHIKAN, ALASKA
EXHIBIT I - I
0 10 20 .0 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
FALLS CREDC
PERCENT OF TIME
FLOW DURATION CURVE
-
~
..J
~
4 00
360
_ 320
....
UJ
UJ
"-
z
°
E 280
"'
..J
"'
240
200
o
2400
./'
/'
,,/
30
SURFACE AREA, ACRES
2100 1800 1500 1200 900 6 0 0
w
//
V

-
-
"- u ,
c(
u
c(
f- g
Normal rese rv oir Ei. 3 3 0 ~
KCOPOCIIY
0.
Y
/' 1\
/
V
Area
Minimum reservoir EI. 271.5 ........
\
\
Exj sli ng 10k. EI . 236"
""
60 90 120 150 180 210
CAPACITY , IOOO ACRE-FEET
300
24 0
o
4 00
360
~
..J
320 ~
t.:i
"' "-
z
280 52
~
240
200
2 70
>
"'
..J
"'
Figure I-I
NOTES
I. Area -capa ci ty curves based on
U.S.G.S. topographi c mopping shown
on Ketchikan (C-4),Alosko I
I: 63, 360 series quadrangl e, 19 55.
2. Eleva ti ons shown ore based on
Meon Lower Low Woter (MLLW)
datum.
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
RESERVOIR
AREA-CAPACITY CURVES
FEBRUARY 1979

"
0
0
0
>-
to
0
..
0-
..
0
" ..
"'
0-
70
60
50
40
diesel 17,320 kW.,/<I
""

30
",,'
Peak lood plus reserves <::::
1\
""
/
.,.../

V
....--

peak
20
....-
.....-
"""'f'" load
Hi storic
V
I
peak .
p -----
Swon Lake
18,000 kW
"" Existing diesels

17320 kW
10
I
Existi ng hydroelec tri c 8 ,550 kW
o

tO W(O """" """"""I"-
I I , , I I I , I
"""",,,,,""COCX)(X)Q)CDOO
I I I I I I I I I ,
IOWr---<OO'IO-Nrtl'l:t
,...,...,....r-r--COalCDCOCO
a) CD coco 0l(T)
I I I , I I
1()<Dr-coc;nO
IX)CDCOCOa)(tI
0>0>
, ,
0>0>
, ,
c.Dr--COcnO -N rtl.;r
U)c.D<DW,...,....,... ...... ,...
0>
POWER YEAR
PEAK LOADS
NOTES AT LOAD CENTER
I. Hydroelectric plont energy Is overage onnual
delivered at load center.
2. Plont copacities ore dependable delivered at lood cent er .
3, ' Power yeors extend from July I through June 30.
4. (1) indicates actual historic dotu .
5. Growth rate 5 % f or proje cted peak loods and energy requirements.
-N
0>0>

0>0>
200
180
160
140
:I:

><
w 120
0
>-
'"
0:
100
"'
z
"'
...J
<[
80
::>
z
z
<[
60
40
20
o
Figure 1-2
/
)".1
/
/
'/
Pr ojected energy load
y
V Swan Lake
85,400,000 kWh
Historic energy load
/
/
.L J'f' Diesel
,,/1
I
Iv/
Exis ting hydroelectric 62,700,000 kWh

00 000000
, , ,
00 mmmm
, I I I
, ,
w ....
ww
0>
, , , , I I I I I I I , I 1 1 I I


POWER YEAR
ENERGY REQUIREMENTS
AT LOAD CENTER
>Ow ....
000000
, , ,
00000
000000

mcnO'lcn
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
SYSTEM LOADS AND RESOURCES
FEBRUARY 1979
EXHIBIT J
GENERAL PROJECT MAP
\
\
T 72 S
Halla 8",
(J
_J'''-''T 72
135
I
I
\Jl
I

I
/ 1roN'""" FORESTI
.,
1'--U.5.:""", Guard 51011011
F. H. No.
GRAVINA ISLAND
I
I

SWAN LAKE PROJECT SITE
REVILlAGIGEOO ISLANO
,EX.".rr K-' K-'

.. 01 reurvoir

S(JfI,., ...
TONGASS NATIDNAL FOREST
I I K-4
I
I
I
I
I TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST
I
I
I
173 5
T14S
Guord
,LORIn ·C·,itl
"120
LEGEND
____ Propand 115-kV lron,mi .. 1on lin,
___ lronlmlnlon lin.
Ed,tlnt;l pipeline or lunn,'
""soc US.G.S. 9O!lllIQ .talionl
BOUNDARIES
United Stotu ReMrvollon.
TonQon Notional Forul
L1n,un'red land lines
C:'=:J ell, 01 Kelehlkon
E.IIUnQ paved
EllSllng unclassif ied
.!:!Q.ill
I. MopplnQ Rel.r.nce - Us. G. S. Quadran;l ..
Kell:Nkon (B-:)),AIoOa minor rlvillonl 1970
K,Ietdkon I B-6} , Akllko 1954 minor , ... I,\on, 1967
1!Y.i5 minor r..nllonl 1974
Kltdtlkoo (C-5I,Alalko 1948 minor fMlSon. 1963
2. Lend Un.. r'prn,n' III1IJUrv,ytd QI'Id
loeotlonlJ lrom tomp!llollolll by lilt Slott 01 AIOf;ilo.
DI'fiIJolI of LondlJ,Collper River Meri dian.
, .................. ,0'_
.....,u, __ ....b ...... .
.. ,,"-- ........ , .... " ..
• ,.,.......
.. $)- c.' .. ....,.
I ....... '
-_ ..... ....... .
... _ ... _11 .... <
.... ....."._ , ...
_ ... 0. ucq..,..
.. " '1-"".2'" l'.!J!.'_
- .......
KETC HikAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
k£TCtlkAN. ALASICA
EXHIBIT J
GENERAL PROJECT MAP
2911-4
EXHIBIT I\
DETAILED PROJECT GAPS
TRUE
tmRTHJ I NORTH
11
"
T73 S
T 74 S

TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST
14
19 20
Cop. fO. lond
Selection boundCU}
TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST
o
3
'-p, ... " II!HtV ..
line 10 b, rOil I,d 0lon9
,on\lon HIII.!'!!O)' rl;lIl-o'-.o)'
frOlI'I Ketchikan City LImit. to
thl, point . S .. £.hlbll 1(-6 tor
(oul, '\I(VI, .
10
3.
T 745
T755
COURSE
NO.
I
2
3
4


1
8
9
10
-
II
_ 12
13
0
! , • ! ,
BEARING LENGTH
N 48- 30

110 0
.
NI6·35'W 800'
-
1\13''"45'£ 3650'
N 34'" 0'

,,00'
N 62· 45'
• "..,.
N 40' 0'

2100
N 7'" 30'

-
N 33'" I S'

3650'
11·45'

1100'
N 34· 40' E 2300'
ii 40' 30' E
t
1050'
N SS-55 ' E 51:50'
N E , 1350'
Mot ch LillI - Ellhl bil )(-2
TRUE
NORTH
,
\
" •
• ,


MAGNETIC
NORTH
/
2000' 4000' 5000' l1000' I0000'
, , , . .
COURSE
BEARING LENGTH
NO.
14 S :n-2:5' E 4450'
"
S 33'" 25' E 100'
I. S 46'" IS' E 1300'
11 S 83'" 50' E 1000'
18 N 47-'0' E 1350'
_!9
N 26'"20'£ 1150'
20
+ N 22'"35' E{
3950 '
21 N 34· 30'£ 2500'
22 N 54· 30' E 50!50 '
- 23 --+---N-19' 3!5' £ 31!50'
: !5' £ -+--,300 '
2!5 N 24· 50' E 2100'
2. N '5-45' E 1850 '
..... -..<1 .. _ ._. _ 06 ...... "", .. "'" ..... t
...c •.-_ .... ____ .. _.- ..........,. ..... ...
. ...... _ ..... ____ ,04; -' ....... t_ ..UIOU
.......... _ ...... _ .............. ---...... , .. -
..... .. .. " ... "",n. , ........... ,_, ..... .
....... """" , .................. <1' •• • ............. , ...
.... flO. 0' ....... E 'OIl 'OIl ,_"'
KEY MAP
lEGEND
2
C
, Mil..
Scale
COllrs. number
" TrOftlml.. 1on Une c.nter Unl
Projlcl boundar,
U. S. ,una, boundo,'"
Un,un'yed land Un..
S.ct lon number
Cope FOl Land Sel.ction boundary
Siole of Alalko Land S"action boundar,
I . Land Un.. repr ... n' uniurve,.d a nd unma,ked
lacalian, from compllllon. by till Stol. 01 Alo.lla,
010.' 1.'011 01 Lond.,Coppe, Rivlr Meridian
I,om U,s'G.S.l ' 63,360 10POOrophic U!, i ...
Z. GrId bo.ed on Ala.ko coordInate 'YSllm,IOM I.
3, Tolol PfOj.cl orlO shown on El!hlbll 1(-'-200 oc,. • .
--...... .. -
_ .......... " .. _ ..-
........... _l" "tier ....
.. ' ......... --., ....
.. .J._Jw s.....,.-
1 - -1
.. _ ...
.. .'_.'"
.. ........ . _ ...-
_ • •• #l-t.tCa......
.... ,-"""'n
_ .... a ••
SWAN LAKe PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
KETCHIKA N. ALASkA
EXHIBIT 1(-'
PROJECT BOUNOARY
TRUE
NORTH
/
COURSE
NO.
'7
28
29
'0
"
'! -
" Gi


>7
,.
MAGNETIC
NORTH
BEARING
N HP45'E
5
S
S 88-20' E
-
N
52- 0 'E
r- N 8O.25,f-
S 76" 20' E
S 77·
N48-0'E
S 77-45'E
N 85- O'E
LENGTH
BB50'
2600'
2450'
1850'
r- 1450'

1000'
550'
2900 ' -
2450'
4750 '
600'
TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST
,.
3
,
40
41
4'
4'
8EARING

N 61· 1:5'
H 49" 30' E
LENGTH
33:50'
2900'
44 N
45 N
46 N32' O'W
N O· 3O'W
N 73· 5'
N __
••
49
'4
Tns
T74S
17
19
TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST
"
I. 17
Oom ond pOW'thou" (Pow" lunllli
boundo,,-", Elnlbit 1(-'3 \ Oom
24 "':-w
. , SW(HI LflAe
48 )l
, \ f
\
2530 \ 29
\
,.

;;;
N

Tn.

T73S
,

I,
"
_" $D,"" La" ,
\
,
,
,
" .8
'"
\ ,
\i
"
Fo. Land S,ltcllon
boundo"
27
"
\
___ T 73 S
T 74S
2S


... --.a __ • " " .. _l .. 1 n' ..... ,."
_ ... __ , .............. ,_ ,_ ... u .............. . ..
..-•• _ .... 1 ___ (\'I ..... '-.'.' ....... ", ... .
,_ .... b_' __ ... __ """ __ ''''M' __
.... , ......"n .......... ........ >t.,., ... _ . .... .
__ .tlr! ....... n .. _ .......... " .... , ....., .. . . .
... ' ....... ..
KEY MAP
',- , Mil,.
LEGENO SCoie
v@ Coun, nvmber
", Tron.mlnlon 11111 cenler Un,
ProJecl boVndory
Ulllvrt.,.,d land 11M.
12 Slcllon nvmb,n
Cap, Faa Lane! Selection boundory
51011 of AIa.1l0 Lone! Selection boundar,
I . Lond lin.. reprellnl unllurvl,ed and unmarked
Iocollon. from computollon. b, tI" 51011 of Alo.ko,
OM.1on 01 Lond. ,Copp.r Rlylt Meridian tok.n Irom
U.S.G.S.1:63,360 lapo<grtlphlc IIrl ...
2. Grid bond on Alosko cGOrdlnol, 1,II.rn, lonl I.
3. Totol proJ.ct OrlO I hown on E.htbil 1(-2-356 ocr...
-_ ........... ....
-'- ..... "'"- ... . ...,oouo ,-" ......... u
.... "" o. "1"'-''' ••. "
...
t"·_,
-'-.. ..... . _- ... nu . • __
_ ...
.... '_'N'"
_," ..,.,"'1
EXHIBIT k-2
PROJECT BOUNDARY
29.U-'
NI ,392,OOO
N1,390,000
NI,38B,OOO
To Bolli,
Substatlon
In Ketchikan
0
0
"-
N

;;;
W
Pori III
0
0
o.


,.;
W
"
Tron,mis.ion 11M boundary
ue Eahlblts K- I,K-20nd K-6
30 29
360


I- 320


280 -
r
0 0
0 0
o.
"-
$

,.; ,.;
W PROJECT BOUNDARY
W
BEARING LENGTH
COURSE
NO.
I N 75 * 15

'90
,
N 24*'0' W 89$'
,
S 7'· 30' • 130'

N 10· 40'-W 860 '
5 N ".
30'£ 630'
6

••
10' E 600'
7 S
,..
O'E 670'
,
S
".
55' E 1905'
9 S 6- 25' W 245'
10 S 77· 0" 345'
"
N 52 * IO'W 500'
12 N '0· 0" 875' TONGASS
.
13 S oz* 45' W 590'
,.
N 75" tS'W 435'
17
20
Minimum
slorllQe ".",.>,
TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST
t
Capoclly
Area
NATIONAL FOREST
16
21
reservoir EI . 330
+---j360


320
Min mum rnervolr EJ. 271.5

OZ

240
W

d __ -ccc>--c __ __
CAPACITY ,1000 ACRE-FEET
AREA - CAPACITY CURVE
0
0


,.;
W

o
TRUE
NORTH
/
MAGNETIC
NORTH
0
&
N

,.;
W
• ,

••• "",,," __ •• .., ........ ... . ; ............. LIllo •• ,.. 0 .. ..
___ .... ""-" .... A.I I.t """' ...... ot .Nt .. _ ,-.n.
1OXt .. _._ ,._ "'" ... ,MIID ....... llJ., .......... ...
••"".. '" ....... ,(0,.., ..... -...-.s 'M' , ..... ... __
no ,0< .............,... or'" • ___ ... c(Jm' •• , ... If .. ....
_cu. "',. ""'" ... ("""............ , ... _ ..... O'UIU'U ..
' .....-' ... ,,_.... tLUI. , _ ............. u""__ , ... -....,

71
Tns
'j
D
- ,
Pori foeilll, / /,
/
r -"".;J,,' ,/'''\
\
I Dam I i
Lo' (40' ')
Iil '-;!' s.,"_/
. POWflrl!oul
__ ---1 J
I

WW
-N
Tron,mlulon lin.
•• T725
T13S

KEY MAP
o Mile
, ..
LEGEND
"'<0 Course number
""".... Projecl boundar,
Unlllrnyed land lilies
18 Seetloll number
Coune number
............ Tronlmlulon line tenler lint
NOTES
I. Topoqrophy prepar.d by Chari" Pool andAuoclot ..
Inc.ond Gtorq. Wolker and Auocitll .. ,lnc.,December
19770ncl O.cembar 1978. Horironlol control based on
the Aloiko Stott Grid Coordlnot.. I .
Vertical control boNd on U.S.e.G.S. B.nch Mork
(8. M. 2)9631 01 Nivelius Polnl,Corroll Inlet.
2. Ellyollon. based on Mean Lower Low Wol.r
(MLLW) dolum.
3. All londl Ihown on Il'Ils mop or. locol.d In Itte
TOnQoll Notional Forul.
4. Toto I pro/ecl area shown on Eanlblt K-3-207 oc,. • .
'''' ..... , .... A, • .., O. t.t
........., .. "-'"
...... 0:.0.... tOo u <;<...
"" ......... .... ". g"u"..
... ' ...... a .. ....,.. ... "
..
' .0«10, ..
..... " ....
__ • ••• d')...Ll('a.........
,
. ... n ........... "'.,."
.. _ .. ····f-'
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UnLlTlES
KETCHIKAN, ALASKA
,
,
EXHIBIT K-3
PRQ,JECT BOUNDARY
400' 800' t200'
, SC-.L[ 'to. 400' t
''''' I
2911-7
2000'
I
§
N 1,392.000 N
o
,;
TONGASS NATIONAL
f- N 1,390,000
I-N1,386,000
I-N 1,384,000
I-N 1,382,000
I.
FOREST
2. 27 2.
TRUE
NORTH
t7
9
' :
MAGNETIC
NORTH
/
,
KEY MAP
I 0 I Mile
, , , , , ,
$eole
LEGEND
---- Project boundar,
- - Un.ur"lyed land lin..
2> S Iclion number
NOTES
I. Topovroptly pre
Inc. and G pared byCNJrlel PDoI ond
19770nd Walker and Anociotu I Associates.
Ih ec.mber 1918 Hor I nt., December
• Alaska Stoll Grid C ' Izonlol control boud
.. d .,.tom I,"
. • 2,19631111 Nivellos Po . S. eerM:tI Mark
lllt,Corrolllnl.,
2. bated on .
(MLlW) dOlum. Mlon LO.lr Low Water
3. AU londl .hown on 'hi
The TOI'IQo" NatIonal ",' mOp 0,-. located withIn
rOfut .
4. Totol proJe<:t areo.no wn on E.hlblf K·4-e82 ocr ...
, ..... ...,... "' . ........ 00 ..... . ......... _ . : •••• , O. T"
0 .... , "', ••• "ao .. u"
... f'" ..... ;; ""."'"
aU..,. .. ....
... " .. . . ..... : ... e.
,
'Il... ....... !m
.. AIH.t.J 0 &.
........ , 'I'-
__ •• aln.W'-A-
.... .'1"",,""' 1I.1f1l
""._. 00 ...... .
SWAN LAK
KETCHIKAN puiu PROJECT
KETCHIKAN ,C UnLlTlES
• LASKA
,
, , '
EXHIBIT
PROJECT BOUNDARY

,
SCALE I " 400
'
'
,
2911-8
tooo'
0 g
8 o.
I!!
0


,;

N1,400,000
N I,J9a,OOO
'0
"
TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST
N I,J96,000
N 1,394,000
Swan Laktl RtlStlfl'(Jir
Match Unl-Exl!lbll K-4

0
0
"- N
• ,.
,.; ,;

13
0
0
"-


,;

TRUE
NORTH
/
MAGNETIC
NORTH
I
T72S
EXHIBIT
KEY MAP
L! ...,,-r,9_.J! Mile
Seal.
LEGEND
Proj.ct boundary
Un.ur .... ,.d land lin..
12 S.ellon number

I . Topography prepored by Chari.. Pool and Alloeloln,
Inc, ond George and Auocloln,lne" o.cemt!er
1977 and Oeeember 1978. Hofi:tontol eonlrol based on
lhe Alo.ko Slole Grid Coordlnol .. Syslem ,Ionl I.
Vertical control ba.ed on U,S,C.G.S. Blneh Mark
(a. M. 2,1963) 01 NI'i/eUus Polnl, Carroll Inl.t .
2. EI."otions baud on Mlon Lower Low Wol.r
(MLLW) dolum.
3. All lands 1ho ... n on Ihl, mop are located wilhln
Ihe Tonllo" Notional FOrl.l .
4. Tokll projlct ana .hown on Exhibit K-5-500 ocr ...
'''' ... .., .... . ... , •• 'ot _ .... , ....... lll
• ....,u""" "'" ««_ . . .. • ........... _uJ ...
.""U .••••"'no • ... • n ....... 1aUe Ul' .... ".
... , ..... ' . f jUg;::;:'
., .D.•. I A....
__ .. •• ll •••.l.I:I::.a.......
.. TI rn"Y'lll I',""
"'- ........ . , ...... 1
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBUC UTlLlTlES
KETCHIKAN, ALASKA
EXHIBIT 1(-5
BOUNDARY
4 00' a 400' ,00' 1200' IWO' tOOO'
, " J , , 1 '
SCALl I' , 400'
'- , .....

s. .. un.u o
r.. • ..
.... :!!,',
\1"" '.
'.· ... 01

.. ..
"m" . ......
:'
"
I ......
.. ·.tIII
1"0·" . - '.,

.. ..... -
..
I
',' \
¥
.( ;

of ... ' •
" _(11

"1'00'"
/
,-
-
(
" ....... _.'
",' .,'.0"",
.. ", "
• ,
!
.............
.. -........
, ...... , ....... , .• ...
aw. BAILEY SUBSTATION TO STATE HIGHWAY SURVEY STATIOM 129+ • . 1
Tf)NltASS NARROrs
.,,, ...
.... ,., ..
•• Y .... .......
;r- .• _ .......
,
., ....
... ".. ."
f


\' " --
"'..0:00
1 , ... .
.... '

.--.-...........
I
/
STATE HIGHWAY SURVEY STATIOH 129,.88.1 TO STATION
.. _ ........
'",
'.
rAIID cove
l
-",' S

/""--. i l
... , .. ,. _ ............ 01 ...
... -.,.", .. "'. ( 1iI'"ft, CRL;;---·7
• "'.",..!fllo;.... '- <1.1
I .............. :r1\1 tI'_; .. _ ... JE
. , ii"'-'" s'" ••• )"
... ""..... :t _,..1; /1 11
c
.. - .. ,
t ii
! !l
......r. ;;:;!" ...... ",.';. .: ... ,......... S; /" r 'f-- "
......... ':,.'.r.:'. •• -- 0._ .. ' ... , ....... -,
....... ,-J.
STATE HIGKWAY SURVEY STATION 22 .. +8 TO WARD COVE // '"0>0<' _ ... ,
//
TO IWIYCli'l"MO
I A1'f'1I0XIY"fltU' IS "'IL.U)
TRANSMISSION
1. LINc.

,
KEY MAP
2 0 2 Mil..
T735
T7-45
LEGEND
-'-c' :,-';---"
Seal.
NOTES
Co..... lIumblrhee E.hibll 1(-11
Trontmittion 1111. Clnllr lin.
U S. baundories
I. The pra,.cl troMmiulon Ii,. will b. conllrllClld from
1M S.W. BaiIly SubilDtion ta Fatnl High"), No. 39
along !hI rautl of 11M! I.I.ling :5-4.5-kV tran..mulon
lInt I1lno wtIoIt)' wit hi n Ihl TGnQau High",
2· SurYl), dolO tor thot IIctlon of IIHITongan Hlgh....o)'
r ight-of- '<101 within Ih. I(llchikon elll limit. 1. from
'Cit y 01 Kllchlkon, Subdlvl.lon Pial, t<lfohlkan
TIdllol'Idl Addition, Shill. :5 and 4
3. data lor thol lIetlon of lhl Tongo.. Hillhwol
right- of-woy from thl Ketchlkon IIml" to Word
C_ I. from ·5101, of AIoIko,Olporlmlnl of Public
Wf)fkt,OIvI.lon 01 Hl;hwoy. mop,AIo.lI.a
Pro2KI Roull Na,F-OS' ,cGIIlrol IIcllon 009512-02,
Notll! Tongan Hlghwoy."
-4. FOfc.ounu numblf.d 1,2 and:5 .... Edltbil I(-L
, ........ _" ........ TIll
__ .-u
-. •• .,. _ u"' ..... . • ...... .-Q ...,
.... ,,,,, ... "' .... .. LI,.II. .U"U_ ......... ..
....... " ..... .t'"!""-"""!<'.'.!! ........ u ••
.. ,..
1 ,
,.fj).-d a--,,-- 0... ...... " .... ,_
. ........ " ..... _._... I ........ '
• ,
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
KETCKKAN, ALASKA
EXHIBIT 1(-6
PROJECT BOUNDARY
, *rt RCf'
, ..
EXHIBIT L
GENERAL DESIGN DRAWHlGS
EXHIBIT L
GENERAL DESIGN DRAWINGS
1. GENERAL
Preliminary foundation investigations and design work
have been completed to the extent necessary to assure that the dam,
powerhouse, tunnel and appurtenant structures can be constructed
close to the layout and dimensions shown on the General Design
Drawings, Exhibits L-l through L-3. Final layout and dimensions
will be established upon completion of additional site exploration
and final design.
Initial foundation explorations for the structures shown
on the Exhibit drawings were conducted during the fall of 1977 and
additional field explorations are planned for the summer of 1979,
prior to initiation of final design of the major structures.
Investigations completed to date include core drilling at the dam
site and powerhouse site, geologic mapping, seismic refraction
surveys, and an analysis of alternative borrow sources. Results of
the initial investigations are summarized in a report entitled
Preliminary Geotechnical Investigation, Swan Lake Hydroelectric
Project, prepared by Converse Davis Dixon Associates, Inc. This
report is contained in its entirety, in Appendix A of the Swan Lake
Project Evaluation Report prepared by R. W. Beck and Associates,
Inc., dated June 1978. Results of the studies indicate that the
Project, as planned, is geotechnically feasible.
1
2. STRUCTURE FOUNDATIONS
2.1 Dam
Core drilling completed at the dam site confirmed that
the schist bedrock will provide an adequate dam foundation for a
thin arch concrete dam. Drilling revealed that talus and recent
alluvial deposits ranging between zero and approximately 12 feet
overlie portions of the bedrock at the site. Below the overburden
material the estimated depth to fresh rock ranges from five feet to
18 feet. Exploration indicated the possibility that an open joint
or narrow erosion channel may exist and may require additional
excavation near mid-channel. A single-line grout curtain
complemented with consolidation grouting will be utilized.
Foundation drainage will also be provided.
2.2 Power Tunnel
The power tunnel will be driven in bedrock, and most
likely a drill and blast method of construction will be used.
Results of refraction seismic traverses indicate that the terrace
deposits do not extend downward to the elevation of the proposed
power tunnel and there is sufficient rock cover for safe tunnel
construction. Based on the best information available to date, the
entire tunnel is expected to be constructed in schist, and will be
lined with concrete.
2.3 Powerhouse
Geological conditions at the powerhouse site were
determined initially by mapping of surface exposures of geological
units, which was augmented by seismic traverse and one core drill
h ~ l e . Results indicate that the site is covered with a thin mantle
of organic soil and/or muskeg ranging up to three feet in thickness,
which is underlain by sand and gravel. The maximum thickness of the
overburden at the site is on the order of 15 feet. The schist
bedrock is judged to be suitable for the powerhouse foundation.
?
TRUE
NORTH
MAGNETIC
"""'"
Po ... " ....
Invl rl EI ' .,' .0 .....
40'
! ,
Watt r lI;ili h""- _ _
Inlokl QoI. "",,, • ..---
Inlck. gots "" ••
Intak,
, '
0
, .
/ ,,,,,1111',,, .plnway

I
(
\
!) I
DAMSITE - PLAN
40' 80' 120' 160' 200'
, , , , ,
Sealt : I"· 40'
r Oom axil
25' ,
er .. 1 of cklm £1.338.5 , I
SECTION THROUGH ot INTAKE STRUCTURE
\ -
20' 0
I "" II
20' 40'
I '
60 '
,
Scol,: I"" 20'

, Ie'
Grout elKlaln ji-' ,
SECTION THROUGH ot SPILLWAY
eo ' 100'
, I

curtain
' >0'
foundoliQfl
DAM - DEVELOPED PROFILE LOOKING DOWNSTREAM
40' 0
10 ',1""
40' 80' 120' 160' 200'
! I I I t
of dt'
z· 342
o
S340
i:i 338

IIJ 336

g 334
t5 332
. • plliway

T r L
1:3 ,S" ...iat spillway El.330
a: 330
0
!-'===='::"':':==-:!
4 8 12 16 20 24
10 00 CFS
SPILLWAY RATING CURVE
I . Tapograph)' prlportd by Char". Pool and Aaaoeiatl',
Ine.ond Gtaf9t and Auoekrt",Ine.,Deelmbw
19n and o.e. mber 1978. Horizontal bOlld on
Ihl AIa.ka SIol1 Grid CoonUnal.. SY'.m ,l onl I
Virticol control boMd on llS.C.G.S. alndl Mon
(e. M. 2.19631 at NlQ4llIul F'oinl,Corrolt In'll .
2. boltd on Mlon Low" Low Woler
(MLLW) dolum.
3. Mlan SIO LlvII I. oppr01!mollly 8 fetl
abav. MLLW,
4. All dim. nllan. lhawn arl p,. UmllMlr)' and , ubje;cl
to ' .... I.lon , corrtetlan and chan;,.
......." ..... ".u. , .., 0".'" ., ... " .....
. .......... " "CU " .'.' • . .... . """'lI.'·"
"' . nc"! .......... .. LmU
"" t .. 09::/';;' .......

",
, ........ .
__
-' ..... '''->..:
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
KETCHIKAN . ALASKA
EXHIBIT L-I
DAM PLAN . ELEVATION AND
r r r f
, eolL( ol' NOftD
SECTIONS
"
,
2911-11
"
,
, G"",,' surllJCe

0'-6" Typical
"B· L1nl (typl
"A' LIne Il)' pl
Intake structure
9' mInimum
concrete Uninq ___
CONCRETE LINED
bedrock .urloee
100' 0 100' 200' 300' 400'
I , .. ,I , I I ! ,
Scale : 1"100'
Rock bolls
Stul liner
POWER TUNNEL SECTIONS
5' 0 10'
c, __ :;-",-,,-, __ "''--_--'',
Scali : I"' 5'
STEEL LINED
2'-0" minimum concrete lining
1. Topll4;lraphy prepared by Chari.. Pool and Associatll,
Inc. and Georqe Wolker and Auoclotu,lnc.,Decamber
1911and Declmberl918. HorIzontal control baled an
1h1 AIa.ka Sl1:Ile Grid Coordinatn Syliflm ,lonll.
Vlr1icol control based on Us.C,G. S. Bl nch Mark
I B.M. 2,19631 01 NiqeUu' Point ,Corrolllnll1.
2. Ellvot lon. baud on Mlon Law.,. Low Water
I MLlWI datum.
3 . Mean SIO Live' is opprOllmotely 8 f"l
above MLLW.
4 . All dimln.lon. Il'Iown orl prillminory and subjecl
10 revillon . correction and cl'lonll"
, ........... , ,. ....... or •...,
..... ,uno. , .... " ....... ..
.. . n ........... u. "ltU""
"" ,., ....... " ...... !LIII,
..
I .. • .... ·,
_ .......... ".u.
...... "' .. 00 ... 0,'"
"orTU .... ' ... 0-
... " .....
.0,. f J!!!t!!'l .. ,1.,_,_ _
..... ' •••• '41-'."
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
KETCHIKAN, ALASKA
EXHIBIT L-2
POWER TUNNEL PROF1LE AND SECTIONS
o I' z' ... ,. ff'
, • , ! ! I I
1.01. GO .o..
2911-12
I

Genu rood
MAGNETIC
"
Sw, itl'lyord EI 36,0-
""
'" "
NOfITH <b
29-1\. -
TRUE
NORTH \ ......
<t
'"
1--

SITE PLAN
",' 100' ,,,,'
, " " '
, , ,
Seolt: ,- .:)C'
.rEI , 6'-' al.ecllon
H:ftt),pl
Floor
••
1'-0"CI1".
,
Elr
a
n
.
f-,;.J
El22D ,
. .

.
,
,
, _·'.-,I.[· l>owtrI'lOu..
{ . H 'I
-
(
0

200' • 3' .90
,

J
-
.
.
;;J

.
"
60
·1 1 i I5.2oo , " -:-
.. ifJ·::2c· 11- f-- '. . ,.
t Distributor flo 0 .0 _ .:!) , • ")
Sump
E1.-2!.O
El.-30,O
.'-,-
LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH <l OF UNIT
10' 0 10' 20' 30' 40' 50'
, .' , , , , , ,
Scale, I" · 10'
r
10'
,
88'-0·
Genetolor
@
12,250 kVA
i"'I
ILl
r ,< .• .
-: . 1 . EL -18.0 t-
46'-0· 26'-0· -+
SECTIONAL PLAN - EI. 22.0
o
,
10'
I
20'
,
Scolt . 1"0 to'
30' 40'
I !
",'
,
. -l- I .
__________________ lr----::=ipEI.69.0
j:1. 64.0 J


...
.
9
- Overheod I
crone
Gall hobl
[HSO
Toiln;lI:t cllonnll
SECTIONAL PLAN - EI. 0 .0
10' 0 10' 20' 30' 40' 50'
';:", ..::."---.:;.:....,.:;:;., --,;;:., ....:;,
Seal" I". 10'
Prnwr.
reli,t volve
I. T0l)0910pll1 pr.pored by Charles Poo!onclAuoclotu,
Inc.ond Gew;4I Walke, and Auo<:iot.. ,!nc.,OKemlMr
1977and DlelmlM, 1978. Horizontal CoMroJ boNd on
IhI AIaI.o Skltl Grid Coordinates I-
Vlr1loa1 conlrol boNd on US.C.G.5. B41nch
I 8.M. 2,1963) 01 Nlgllhl' Point,ClIffo.lnllt •
2 . Ellvation bONd on Mlan La... La. Wal.,.
( MLLW) datum.
3 . Mlan 51G Llnlll 8 rll'
abovi MLLW.
"' . All dlll'llniloni lhown or, prill minary and lubllet
10 rlvl-'an . cOI'reciian and ehonge .
Of"llfIGl
ground liM J ________ _
Droll IUtlt;at.
f--_p ' T.W. EI. eo
£1_·23.0
. __ ... _"',.
"OOUU". ' ... "tUIC .....
... • """' ......... ,
Q........ o .......... ,. Itt
.. Ih.d" ""--I
i ._..a"
_ ..... --I
. ... 00.4._ ..· .. · .
•.. "co .......... 0 •
.. o...-t.l (.a.......
':, .. : .
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
kETCHikAN. ALASKA
EXHIBIT L- 3
POWERHOUSE AND SWITCH'I'ARD PLANS AND SECTIONS
yrrrffr
St_l ... _
TRANSVERSE SECTION THROUGH <l OF UNIT
10' 0 10' 20' 30' ",0' :50'
I .." I
i ' t I I
2911-13
1. DAM
EXHIBIT M
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL
AND TRANSMISSION EQUIPMENT
The dam will be a double-curvature thin arch concrete
structure located about one mile downstream from the existing
Lake outlet. The dam will have a maximum height of
190 feet above the estimated base of the foundation excavation and a
crest length of about 450 feet at El 344. A 100 foot wide
uncontrolled service spillway with an ogee section and a crest at E1
330 will be located in the central portion of the dam. No gates or
appurtenant mechanical or electrical equipment will be provided for
spillway operation.
2. POWER CONDUIT
A power intake will be located on the upstream face of
the dam between the right abutment and the spillway section.
Semi-circular steel trashracks will protect the power conduit and
generating facilities from debris during operation. A fixed-wheel
gate will be installed to provide for emergency closure and to
permit closure for draining of the tunnel for inspection and
maintenance purposes. The gate will be operated by a hydraulic
cylinder. Hydraulic pressure for the gate operation will be
provided by an electric motor-driven hydraulic power unit located 1n
a control cabinet at the top of the dam. The controls for the gate
will be arranged for local operation and for remote operation from
the powerhouse. A single lane roadway, extending along the dam
crest from the right abutment, will provide vehicular access to the
power intake for operation and maintenance of these facilities.
1
A 10-foot diameter concrete-lined power tunnel with a
grade of approximately 11% will extend from the power intake to the ii
powerhouse. A steel lining will be provided in the 130-foot section
of tunnel upstream of the powerhouse, the tunnel diameter will
gradually be reduced, and the tunnel will bifurcate into two
penstocks leading to the generating units in the powerhouse.
3. POWERHOUSE
The powerhouse will be an indoor-type structure set into
the hillside immediately north of the mouth of Falls Creek. The
structure will be of reinforced concrete, approximately 56 feet wide
by 88 feet long and about 90 feet high. It will contain two
vertical shaft Francis turbines with standard hydraulically-operated
governors varying the position of the turbine wicket gates to
maintain turbine speed under varying load. Each unit will produce
approximately 15,200 horsepower at 450 rpm at average head and best
gate and will drive a vertical-shaft generator, rated at 12,250 kVA,
0.9 p.f., 13.8 kV. The generators will be equipped with all
necessary auxiliaries, controls and safety features for a reliable
power generating facility.
A butterfly valve will be provided upstream of each
turbine to serve as a guard gate for each unit. The butterfly
valves will be hydraulically operated. The hydraulic power unit
will be driven by an electric motor and the valves will be arranged
for local and remote operation from the powerhouse. A bypass
connection will be made to each penstock branch, with a
I
. ,
Howell-Bunger type pressure relief valve which will operate to limit'
the pressure rise in the power conduit upon loss of load.
Water will be discharged from each turbine through an
elbow-type draft tube into the tailrace leading to Carroll Inlet.
The draft tubes will be provided with bulkhead gates to permit
dewatering and maintenance of the turbines. The bulkhead gates will
be handled by gate hoists above the draft tubes.
2
The powerhouse will be equipped with a traveling crane
for installation and maintenance of the equipment in the powerhouse.
4. SWITCHYARD
The switchyard will contain a 3-phase bank of 13.8 to
,11S-kV transformers having a total rating of 25,000 kVA. In
addition, one spare transformer will be installed to ensure
reliability of the plant. A 11S-kV circuit breaker, disconnect
switches and related equipment will be provided in the switchyard.
S. TRANSMISSION SYSTEM
A 11S-kV single circuit transmission line will be
constructed to transmit the project power to Ketchikan. The
transmission line will extend from the switchyard at the powerhouse
to the S.W. Bailey Substation in Ketchikan. This existing
substation will be enlarged to accommodate interconnection of the
new transmission line, although this expansion is not a part of this
Application.
!
I
I
I
I
I
EXHIBIT N
ESTIMATED COST OF PROJECT DEVELOPMENT (1)
The estimated cost for the construction of the Swan Lake
Project, for a November 1983 on-line date is: (2)
Land and Land Rights .......................... .
'Powerplant Structures and Improvements .......•.
Reservoirs, Dams and Waterways ................ .
Water Wheels, Turbines and Generators ......... .
' Accessory Electric Equipment. ................. .
Miscellaneous Power Plant Equipment ........... .
Construction and Access Facilities(3) ....... .
, Transmission Facilities ..................•.....
Subtotal - Direct Construction Cost ...... .
Sales Tax .......................•...•.....
DIRECT CONSTRUCTION COST ...................... .
Contingencies, ................................ .
Subtotal ...............•..................
Engineering .........•..........•...............
TOTAL CONSTRUCTION COST •.....................•.
Interest During Construction (4) ............. .
i CAP ITAL INVESTMENT COST .................•......
$ 572,000
4,010,000
23,232,000
5,866,000
1,649,000
3,430,000
9,082,000
11,428,000
$59,269,000
-0-
$59,269,000
8,761,000
$ b ~ , 0 3 0 , O O O
8,396,000
$76,426,000
4,498,000
$80,924,000
(1)
Source: Swan Lake Project Evaluation Report, R.W. Beck and
Associates, Inc., June 1978.
(2)
(3)
(4 )
Estimated construction costs were based on January 1978 bid
price levels and were then escalated at 7% per year to their
respective bid dates.
Item includes all site preparatory work, contractor's
mobilization, site access roads and facilities, and
construction camp.
Interest during the construction period is based on an annual
rate of 5% and was determined from a cash flow developed for
the construction period.
1
EXHIBIT 0
STATEMENT OF THE ESTIMATED TIME
REQUIRED TO COMPLETE PROJECT WORKS
PHASE
I APPRAISAL REPORT
n EVALUATION REPORT
nr FERC LICENSE
A. APPLICATION PREPARATION
B. APPLICATION PROCESSING
lY DESIGN AND CONTRACT DOCUMENTS
A. FIELD INVESTIGATIONS
B. SITE ACCESS
C. MAJOR PROJECT FEATURES
~ CONSTRUCTION
A. SITE ACCESS
B. MAJOR PROJECT FEATURES
MOBILIZAT ION ANO DEMOBILIZ AT ION
RESERVOIR CLEARING
DIVERSION FACI LlTiES
POWERHOUSE ExCAVATION
POWER TUNNEL EXCAVATION
DAM EXCAVATION AND GROUTING
DAM CON':RETE
DAM JOINT GROUTING
POWER TUNNEL CONCRETE
POWERHOUSE CONCRETE
NECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
DIVERSION BULKHEAD ANO PLUG
RESERVOIR FILLING
TR ANSMISS[ON LI NE
(Completed -19J7 I
Submit application
.. f:; .
.. , ..c
1978 1979
Receive license
Bid
Bid
Award contract
Award contract
-
-
-
-
1980 1981 1982
-
Ofl- line
OeC.1983
-
-
,"
1983
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
EXHIBIT 0
SCHEDULE
FEBRUARY 1979
EXHIBIT R
PROJECT RECREATION PLAN
1. PROJECT SETTING
The Project is located at Swan Lake on the central portion
of Revillagigedo Island in Southeast Alaska. This is a remote area
approximately 22 air miles northeast of Ketchikan near the northern
end of Carroll Inlet. Swan Lake, a low-elevation lake surrounded by
mountains, drains westward through a narrow gorge into Carroll Inlet
via Falls Creek.
The Swan Lake Project development involves construction of
a 190-foot high thin arch concrete dam to be located approximately
3/4 mile downstream from the outlet of Swan Lake and a 2,150 foot
long concrete-lined power tunnel leading to a powerhouse located at
tidewater, just north of the mouth of Falls Creek. Approximately
0.8 miles of access road will connect the port facility, located
about 1,000 feet north of the powerhouse, with the powerhouse and
dam. Electric power w i l ~ be conveyed to Ketchikan via a 30.5 mile
115-kV wood pole transmission line.
The Swan Lake drainage basin is located within heavily-
forested mountainous area between Carroll Inlet and Behm Canal.
Elevations range from sea level on Carroll Inlet to 4,000 feet at
the drainage area divide, resulting in an average basin elevation of
about 1,800 feet. The drainage area is elongated in shape being
approximately 9 miles long by 4 miles wide above Swan Lake. The
lake has an existing surface area of about 1,050 acres which will be
increased to about 1,500 acres upon completion of the Project. The
lake is nearly surrounded by steeply walled mountains.
1
The topography of Swan Lake and :arroll Inlet is typical of
much of Southeast Alaska with precipitous side slopes rising from
the waterline. These slopes are heavily forested with muskeg
occurring in low areas, making access to the backcountry very
difficult and generally limited to light airc[3ft equipped with
floats c a p a b l ~ of landing on lakes or inlets. Saltwater shoreline
areas are accessible by boat or light aircraft.
The flora of the region is that associated with the forest
ecosystems of Southeast Alaska. The overstory is generally
comprised of Sitka spruce and western hemlock with some western red
cedar and Alaska yellow cedar. Red alder and Sitka alder occur on
disturbed mineral soils such as avalanche tracks, shorelines subject
to flooding, blowdown areas and abandoned logging areas. The forest
understory is dominated by blueberry, rusty menziesia and devils
club with moss ground cover. Vegetation associated with muskeg
areas is varied, but sedges and sphagnum mosses comprise the
dominant forms. Shrubs include bog rosemary, crowberry, common
juniper, swamp laurel, labrador tea and salal.
Big game animals indigenous to the area include Sitka
blacktailed deer, black bear, and gray wolves. Deer winter in the
lowland forest areas. Furbearers known to occur in the region
include beaver, mink, marten, and otter. Swan Lake serves as a
nesting and breeding area for migratory waterfowl, and numerous bird
species frequent the lake, its tributaries, and adjacent forests.
Fish occurring in the lake at this time are kokanee, Dolly Varden,
and a few small cottids. The falls on Falls Creek just upstream
from Carroll Inlet effectively blocks migration of anadromous fish
into Falls Creek and Swan Lake.
The general setting of the project site is typical of much
ot Southeast Alaska, and it does not exhibit any unusual features to
qualify it as having a unique environment or as having unique scenic
value.
2
2. REGIONAL RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES
2.1 Recreation in Southeast Alaska
The State of Alaska has a vast resource of scenic and wild
lands constituting among other things, prime potential recreational
,resources. To promote these resources and identify the needs and
goals necessary to make the recreational resources of Alaska
~ available to resident and non-resident alike, the Alaska Division of
Parks has developed an Alaska Outdoor Recreation Plan. (1) This
plan establishes a number of important policies with regard to
recreation in Alaska and presents a number of objectives that have
been adopted to which outdoor recreation-related actions should be
directed. Four of these objectives are primary goals of recreation
planners and agencies.
They are:
(1) To provide opportunities to Alaska's residents and
visitors for high quality outdoor recreation experiences.
(2) To preserve the beauty and integrity of the State's
natural environment.
(3) To preserve and enhance Alaska's cultural heritage.
(4) To provide recreation experiences which contribute to
good mental and physical health.
Four others are secondary goals:
(1) To fully explore the multiple-use potential of all
lands, in light of retaining their maximum recreational benefits.
3
(2) To provide outdoor educational opportunities.
I ri
(3) To achieve increased employment and income through the W
development of additional tourist attractions. iG
(4) To promote public safety through proper land use and
facility development in an outdoor recreation setting.
These objectives are those which any plan for recreational develop-
ment in Alaska should address. With respect to hydroelectric
facilities, these goals should be viewed with respect to their
relationship to " ... proper operation of the project for the
development of water power and other public purposes."
Based on a comparison between Alaska and other states of
resident participation rates, it is evident that the value Alaskan
residents place on participation in outdoor activities is very
high. This value creates a demand for outdoor recreation that has
cr
ca
II ;;
I
I ::
I";
11
been undergoing a steady increase in recent years. This increase Ii f:
1;
corresponds with the accelerated population growth of Alaska and the II tt
dramatic increase in annual tourist volumes since 1970. The growth
of recreational facilities has not kept pace with the increasing
:1
II n'.
CI
demand, resulting in a growing deficit of available facilities. V
O[
The State has determined that degree of resident participa- ! ~
tion relates to travel distance to the place of recreation. (1) Ii
The information developed indicates that" ... the greatest volume of .'.
participation in outdoor recreational activities occurs close to the I ~
participant's home." The need for more outdoor recreation within,
or within close walking distance of each community is a prime
concern of the Alaska Outdoor Recreation Plan. When considering the ~
various types of recreational activities, the State plan finds that [I
trail-related activities by far have the greatest participation
rate. Correspondingly, trail development is one of the greatest
4
recreational needs throughout t ~ e State.
rate for the number one activity, walking for pleasure, is e x p p c t n ~
to remain at least twice that of the next most popular activity
(driving for pleasure) through 1990.
For the Southeast Alaska region, the State plan has
identified 2,811,225 acres of available land already dedicated to
recreation and recreational facilities as of July 1973. However,
). some 2,810,640 acres (approximately 99.97%) of this land aro under
State and Federal jurisdiction and are categorized at "extended tri0
acreage", where the term "extended trip" relates to facilities \'Ihich
are further than one hour travel time from most users. This
categorizes most of the recreational activities as dispersed
recreation, which includes such activities as hunting, fishing,
hiking, camping, boating, and beachcombing. Dispersed recreation
accounts for approximately 75% of all recreational use of Alaska's
national forests. (2) In general Southeast Alaska lends itself
well to dispersed recreational activities.
The land masses consist
primarily of mountains covered with a thick growth of timber, and
'.: these land masses are indented with many fiords and contain large
numbers of inland waterways and lakes. These elements combine to
create a wilderness setting, which, when combined with a very low
population density offers a multitude of dispersed recreational
opportunities. Most popular recreational use areas are accessible
by boat or light aircraft. Existing trails from tideland to inland
lakes and along streams are used for overland access. Roads are not
to be found except near population centers and in areas in which
:e logging activities are in progress or have occurred in the past.
Due to the large extent of bays and inlets in southeastern
Ei Alaska, a wide range of opportunities exists for water oriented
recreational activities.
Boating, fishing, sightseeing, and
beachcombing are very popular in Southeast Alaska. Hunting near the
shorelines and near the many inland lakes is also popular.
5
In 1967 over one third of the Southeast Alaska residents
reported campsite use. Over 88,000 visitor days were spent in
Tongass National Forest Campgrounds by 23,000 people. Of this use,
thirty percent is attributed to picnickers rather than campers.
State park picnic area use was about twice that of the National
Forest picnic area use. Approximately 75 percent of the State
picnic use was by residents. (3)
In 1975, use data compiled for the Tongass National Forest
shows that of the total estimated recreational use, 209,700 days
occurred on developed sites and 1.2 million days occurred in
dispersed areas. This shows that of the total use, only 15 percent
occurred at developed sites. (3) There are three possible
explanations for this relationship: (1) there are relatively few
developed areas in the National Forest; (2) users prefer to visit
the abundant dispersed areas throughout the forest; or (3) a
combination of these two factors.
In preparing its Outdoor Recreation Plan, the State of
Alaska has used supply and demand information to define the needs
for future recreational facilities in southeastern Alaska. The
State plan established that facilities and acreage available in 1975
will supply thirty-one percent (31%) of the total outdoor
recreational needs. For the southeast region, as for the rest of
Alaska, the largest deficit in available wilderness-type facilities
has been identified as the need for trail systems. The plan shows
that the 1975 trail facilities available will supply only 14% of the
1975 need, leaving an 86% deficit. This is followed by deficits of
78% for picnic units, 69% for outdoor game ares, 56% for swimming
areas and 35% for camp units. (1)
The importance of the recreational experiences available in
Southeast Alaska to local residents can be seen in the following
paragraph from the Southeast Alaska Area Guide:
6
[I
'nts
it
19;
eo
"The quality and variety of recreational
experiences presently available in the Tongass
Forest are particularly important to area
residents. Boating, beachcombing, fishing,
hunting, camping, hiking and photography account
for most leisure time activities. Virtually all
of these activities OCcur on lands or waters
within the National Forest. These experiences
and opportunities are, in some cases, the reason
why people have chosen to live in Southeast
Alaska.,,(2)
2.2 Recreation in the Ketchikan R e g i o ~
2.2.1 Urban Recreational Facilities
There are three major elements that affect the recreational
activities of Ketchikan residents. They are:
1. The isolation of the community demands that play and
recreation take place largely in the developed area of the Borough.
2. The climate requires that much recreation take place
indoors.
'S 3. The large percentage of young people in the community
ti. (more than fifty percent are under twenty-five) indicates the need
cl for youth-oriented recreational opportunities. (4)
The City of Ketchikan has six school facilities with
attendant playing fields. Recreational activities can take place at
i' the library/museum, Totem Her i tage Center, and the civic center.
Bar Point Harbor, City Float, and Thomas Basin offer water oriented
recreational opportunities and boat dock facilities. City Park and
Whale Park offer outdoor recreation and are supplemented by two
7
tennis courts and two ball fields. The Deer Mountain-Blue Lake
Trail begins near the downtown area and allows hiking access to the
higher elevations behind Ketchikan.
A more complete discussion of Ketchikan's existing and
planned recreational facilities can be found in the earlier noted
reference. (4)
2.2.2 Ketchikan Area Recreational Facilities
2.2.2.1 Campgrounds
There are four campgrounds in the National Forest within
driving distance of Ketchikan. The Signal Creek Campground is at
the south end of Ward Lake and has 25 units. Near the point where
Ward Creek enters Ward Lake, the 3 C's trailer camp has room for
four units. Last Chance Campground has 25 units and is located on
Ward Creek about a mile and a half north of Ward Lake. Settlers
Cove Campground is located at the most northerly end of the Tongass
Highway north of Ketchikan. This campground has room for 9 units.
All of these campgrounds are accessible by motor vehicle on the
Tongass Highway and Forest Highway No. 39 (F.H. 39).
The U.S. Forest Service maintains recreation cabins at
selected locations throughout the Tongass National Forest. Most
cabins are located on inland lakes and therefore are mostly
accessible by light aircraft with floats. Exhibit R-l shows the
location of existing U.S. Forest Service cabins in the Ketchikan
area. The Table on Exhibit R-l shows the use rate for each cabin.
In addition to the Forest Service cabins, a private Scout Camp is
situated at the mouth of the White River on George Inlet, as shown
on the Exhibit.
8
2.2.2.2 Trails
The Forest Service maintains a number of trails in the
National Forest near Ketchikan. An interpretive nature trail is
maintained at Ward Lake near the Tongass Visitor Center and Signal
Creek Campground. The Lake Perseverance Trail extends from F.H. 39
to Lake Perseverance. The Talbot Lake trail follows the shore of
Connell Lake and Talbot Lake, roughly parallel to F.H. 39. The
White River trail begins at Lake Harriet Hunt and is accessible by
Forest Development Road, F.D. 3415. This trail extends to the mouth
of the White River at the White River Scout Camp. Beginning in the
urban area of Ketchikan, the Deer Mountain-Blue Lake Trail extends
for over 5 miles to Deer Mountain and Blue Lake. Forest Service
cabins are located at both Deer Mountain and at Blue Lake. They are
accessible only by this trail.
A number of other trails are located further from
Ketchikan, at the Naha River recreational area and at Silvis Lakes.
The Southeast Alaska Mountaineers Association also maintains trails
in the area surrounding Ketchikan. These are located primarily to
the north of Ketchikan.
No trails exist in the vicinity of the Swan Lake project at
the present time (see Exhibit R-l).
2.2.2.3
Boat M o o r a ~
Recreational boat moorages are also shown in Exhibit R-l.
On Carroll Inlet there are three recognized boat moorages that have
been used in the past. These are at Falls Creek, Shoal Cove and
Gnat Cove.
More popular moorages are located at the head of George
Inlet, in particular at Bat Cove, the Salt Chuck at the Salt Lagoon,
9
and the mouth of the White River. Other boat moorages are located
in Revillagigedo Channel south of George and Carroll Inlets, and to ~
the north of Ketchikan at Naha Bay and Traitors Cove. 0'
W
~
~
Recreational boating and fishing areas abound in and around , ~
2.2.2.4 Boating and Fishing
Ketchikan due to the great number of inlets and coves. The more Cr
heavily used areas are located north of Ketchikan in the waters
around Betton Island and Naha Bay. Coves and inlets on Behm Canal, ~ i
north of Ketchikan, are popular for boating and also recreational a:
crabbing and shrimping. Some recreational crabbing and shrimping ~
also occurs at the northern end of Carroll Inlet. The Behm Canal
southeast of Ketchikan, the Revillagigedo Channel, George Inlet, and
the lower reaches of Carroll Inlet are also popular recreational of
boating areas though they do not receive the heavy use of the more re
northerly areas near Naha Bay. ~
2.2.2.5 Hunting
~
Hunting in the Ketchikan area is popular with residents. 9
Several trails in the region are unmarked and unimproved but are eg
kept open due to constant use by hunters. The most popular deer se
hunting areas are dispersed throughout Carroll and George Inlets and fa
Thorne Arm. The head of Carroll Inlet, near the Project site ~
attracts many deer, bear, and waterfowl hunters annually.
3. RECREATIONAL USES OF PROJECT LANDS
3.1 Potential Uses
The Swan Lake Project could help to supply some of the
needs for recreation that the State plan brings forth by direct and
indirect means.
10
di
The Project will greatly i m p r o ~ e access to Swan Lake and
upper Carroll Inlet. The dock facilities could be made available to
pleasure boats and the access road can be utilized as a hiking trail
to the dam and reservoir. Access thus improved, the Swan Lake
reservoir would be available for fishing and hiking activities.
Hunting in the upper reaches of the reservoir would also be greatly
improved due to access that could be afforded by portable boats.
Crabbing and other tidewater activities would be available at the
upper end of Carroll Inlet and could be combined with picnicking and
hiking along a trail to the dam. Hunting, fishing and boating
activities in and around Upper Carroll Inlet could all be increased
due to the availability of the docking facility at the Project site.
The State plan presents, in a section pertaining to items
of State significance, the idea of identifying potential
recreational camp and picnic sites near remote airports and landing
strips, and adjacent to boat moorages along the coast, for use as
waysides to be developed along the lines of existing highway rest
areas. The plan suggests that "some of the special features at
these airport and marine waysides might include the installation of
emergency communication facilities and the storage of emergency
equipment and supplies." The Project could offer such emergency
services to boaters in the upper reaches of Carroll Inlet and this
factor might tend to draw more boaters further from Ketchikan. The
Project itself will also be an attraction which will draw visitors.
3.2 Limitations on Use
The Project site is located approximately 33 miles from
Ketchikan by waterways. This places it anywhere from 2 to 3 hours
by pleasure boat from the residential center of Ketchikan. This
distance puts the upper reaches of Carroll Inlet and Swan Lake in a
11
potentially poor location with respect to getting heavy use by
recreation-seeking Ketchikan residents, as similar or more "ost
attractive recreation opportunities exist much closer to the City. fl[:
The shores of the inlet are quite steep, and the steepness of the the
r
terrain sharply reduces the accessibility away from the inlet in fls
t
most areas. This would generally reduce the value of the areas u ~
surrounding Swan Lake for hunters and hikers due to the difficulty ,per
of negotiating the timbered slopes. In addition, sport fishing and alse
hunting in Swan Lake and the surrounding areas has historically been
poor, according to available reports, thus reducing the desirability
of the area to fishermen as well as hunters. Due to the coolness of i:
the summers and temperature of the reservoir (average of 55
0
F. [eae
from readings taken in July 1975) swimming in the reservoir may not Depi
be practical under normal circumstances and is therefore not an lea!
attractive recreational opportunity. per
The foregoing reyreation potentials and limitations have
been taken into account in evaluation of the Swan Lake Proj ect area real
for recreational development and facilities have been planned with 88
regard to the magnitude of their expected use. ,eal
'bn
3.3 Existing Use
of
f O i
Due to the distance of the Project site from Ketchikan and ~
the presence of many similar recreational opportuni ties closer to Jig
Ketchikan, the Swan Lake area does not receive a great amount of ~
use. The U.S. Forest Service in Ketchikan reports that the
activities associated with the project site have included limited
amounts of trapping, sport fishing and deer hunting. A short Forest
Service trail along Falls Creek extending from tidewater up to the
first barrier falls was available for use in the past, however, m
presently it is overgrown and unmaintained. It extends mainly not
through an area which has been extensively logged in recent years, ~ i
south of the Falls Creek outlet on Carroll Inlet. ~
. :an
12
by
e Ci ty,
:Jf the
:t in
'eas
ieulty
The present recreation31 use at the project SiC0 I liT
mostly to sport fishing in the lake and along Falls Creek to
first falls. No creel census has been taken on Falls Creck
therefore no figures are available on the magnitude of thIS
fishery. However, the Forest Service has indicated that
use rate for Falls Creek is estimated not to exceed 20 visitor
per year. (5) No use data is available for the lake, but it: is
ing anj also estimated to be very slight.
lly beE:
:abilit, During the summer, recreational boating is popular in many
,ness 0: of the bays and coves along the shores of George Inlet and the 10vlror
p, reaches of Carroll Inlet. Based on information obtained from Alaska
ay not Department of Fish and Game and Forest Service crews in the area, at
an least six to eight boats can be observed on these inlets during
periods of good weather in the summer months. (5)
lave No recreational trails or cabins exist near the upper
reaches of Carroll Inlet, however this area and the mouth of Carroll
"ith Creek present opportuni ties for recreational crabbing, shr imp Lng an<4
beachcombing. Good opportunities for recreational sport fishing and
hunting also exist at the head of Carroll Inlet, however, the extent
of these activities is currently limited by the long travel distance
from Ketchikan and few boaters venture into this area. It is likely
that with facilities for boat mooring at the Project site, more use
might be made of the upper Carroll Inlet area by overnight boaters
in the future.
Irest
he
"
3.4
In view of the existing and planned recreational facilitIES
available in the greater Ketchikan area, the Swan Lake Project is
not considered to be a major recreational resource. There are no
unique scenic, archeologic, biologic, or geologic features within
the Project area and the topography of the site severely limits the
range of recreational uses which can feasibly be developed.
13
Wh ile the prev ious information substantiates expected low . o ~
recreational usage of the Project area, some enhancement of access W
to Swan Lake and surrounding areas will be provided. This increased ~ ~
accessibility will serve to increase the recreational use of the pre
area. The dock facility at tidewater will be available as a public ~
docking and mooring facility for use by recreational boaters in SCC
addition to maintenance personnel for the Project. This dock will ad
offer a haven and wayside for boaters in the upper reaches of jhe
Carroll Inlet and will permit improved access to Swan Lake and the ~
power facility. Also, beachcombing and other tidewater activities l ~
will no doubt increase due to the access provided by the docking ~ e
fa c i 1 i tie s . bee
com
Two picnic tables, bear-proof trash cans, and chemical vis
toilets will be provided near the dock facilities for the enjoyment to
visitors. Maintenance of these facilities will be performed by KPU oot
maintenance personnel as part of normal Project maintenance. at
ree
The access road to the powerhouse and dam will be available crt
to visitors as a hiking trail. An interpretive structure describing
the Project facilities and the power generating process, will be
provided at the powerhouse. The trail will continue beyond the ~
damsite to provide access to Swan Lake. Portable boats can be ilie
carried to the lake and launched from its shores. Initially, the f ~
Applicant does not propose to prov ide boats on the Lake for public vis
use. Should usage resulting from the enhanced access increase
beyond that expected, the Applicant will re-evaluate specific
recreational facility needs and modify its Project Recreation Plan
accordingly to accommodate the increased usage.
ree
Future recreational use of Swan Lake and the Project area ij[
is expected to be somewhat greater than that presently experienced.
However, due to the long travel distance from Ketchikan and the
nature of the recreational experiences available at the Project as
14
compared to those closer to the City, thIS increase is not expected
to be significant. The Alaska Power Administration of the
Department of Energy (APA) , in a letter dated January 23, 1979(6)
presented recreational use information for the Snettisham
Hydroelectric Project near Juneau, Alaska. This project, similar in
scope to Swan Lake, was completed in the early 1970's and is located
a distance of 30 miles by air, or 45 miles by boat, from Juneau.
The APA reports that the recreational use patterns experienced to
the present have been quite sporadic. Visitor numbers have been
less than 100 per year at the project site to date and most visits
are by people who come for tours of the power plant. Tours have
been given by engineering groups, school classes and, in one case, a
commercial tour operator who organized a $25.00 per person tour for
visitors. The APA further reported that it does not expect visits
to exceed a few hundred per year in the future and that "there does
not appear to be a need for extensive on-shore recreation facilities
at Snettisham." The main reason for this expected small
recreational use of the Snettisham site is its distance from the
City of Juneau.
Based on the above information, and the similarity of the
two sites, it is expected that the average recreational use rate for
the Swan Lake project will also remain below 100 visitors per year
for the foreseeable future. In any given year, the total number of
visitors is not likely to exceed 200.
3.5
Cost of Project Recreational Facilities
~ ~ ~ ~ ~
It is expected that the on-site (project-related)
recreational development costs for the Project will be about
$10,000. These costs are itemized as follows:
15
Estimated COEt
Item (Bid 1/78)
Picnic Site/Tables ......................... $ 3,500
Trash Receptacles .......................... $ 400
Chemical Toilets........................... $ 1,800
Interpretive Structure/Signs ............... $ 2,500
Dock Facility on Carroll Inlet.............. $ -0-
Access Trail to Swan Lake ................... $ -0-
Misc. Site Development ..................... $ 1,800
TOTAL $10,000
The boat dock and access road costs have not been allocated
to recreation even though they will enhance recreational boating,
fishing, hiking, hunting and sightseeing in the Project area.
In addition to the initial capital costs of these
facilities, there will also be an ongoing maintenance cost of
approximately $1,000 per year for maintenance of recreational
facilities at the Project.
4. AGENCIES, ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS CONSULTED
The following consultations with Federal, State and local
agencies were conducted with regard to recreation for the Project:
U.S. FOREST SERVICE-KETCHIKAN
DATE: October 20, 1977
TYPE: Meeting in Ketchikan
SUBJECT: Requested recreation use data for Swan Lake area and
Forest Service standards for facilities such as docks,
trails, cabins, etc.
16
DATE: November 4, 1977
TYPE: Letter to Forest Service
SUBJECT: Requested information on current and projected
recreational development and use of the Swan Lake
and the area along alternative transmission routes
being considered.
DATE: December 27, 1977
TYPE: Letter to R.W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
SUBJECT: Visual management guidelines for transmission line
siting and construction plus a description of all
recreation use in the Project vicinity.
DATE: November 17 & 21, 1978/December 11, 1978
TYPE: Telephone
d r e ~
SUBJECT: Amount of seasonal use the existing Forest Service
picnic areas, campgrounds, and cabins get. Request
for recreation use data for existing facilities.
DATE: January 15, 1979
TYPE: Meeting and Field Work in Ketchikan
SUBJECT: Coordination of ongoing environmental studies; discuss
contents and outline for Applicant's environmental
report; field visit to Ward Lake recreation area, Ward
Cove to Talbot Lake.
DATE: January 24, 1979
TYPE: Letter to R.W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
SUBJECT: Letter report summarizing recreation use in Ketchikan
area and in particular in the Project vicinity.
HERITAGE CONSERVATION AND RECREATION SERVICE
DATE: November 17, 1978
TYPE: Telephone Conference
SUBJECT: Potential Recreational Use of the Project.
17
ALASKA DIVISION OF PARKS, DNR
DATE: November 17, 1978
TYPE: Telephone Conference
SUBJECT: Discussion of Applicant's planning studies for
recreation facilities at the Project site and request
for input to the facilities planning.
KETCHIKAN PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT
DATE: November 22, 1978
TYPE: Telephone Conference
SUBJECT: Notification of plans for Project development and
request for input to facilities planning effort.
KETCHIKAN GATEWAY BOROUGH - PLANNING DEPARTMENT
DATE: January 12, 1979
TYPE: Telephone Conference
SUBJECT: Potential for recreational use Project and Ketchikan
Comprehensive Plan study.
18
5. REFERENCES
5.1 Cited References
(1) State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of
Parks, Alaska Outdoor Recreation Plan (1976-1980), ,Juneau,
September 1976.
(2) U.S. Forest Service, Southeast Guide, Juneau, 1977.
(3) U.S. Forest Service, Draft Tongass National Forest
Juneau, 1978.
(4) Ketchikan Gateway Borough, Ketchikan Comprehensive Plan
Policies, Ketchikan, September 1976.
(5) U.S. Forest Service, letter from John Ruopp to Don Melinick, R.
W. Beck & Associates. Dated January 24, 1979.
(6) U.S. Department of Energy, Alaska Power Administration, letter
1
, ,
from Robert Cross to Don Melnick, R. W. Beck & Associates dated
January 23, 1979.
5.2 General References
City and Borough of Sitka, AK. for License for the
Green Lake Project, Sept. 1977.
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Green Lake, Alaska
ProiE.£t, No. 2818 Draft Environmental Impact Statement,
Washington, D.C., October, 1978.
Federal Power Commission, Recreation at
!:!Xdroelectr ic Projects Licensed by the Federal Pm'ler
Commission, October, 1970.
19
11 ___________ _
Ketchikan Gateway Borough, Draft, Atlas of the
unpublished.
Pool, Charles and Associates, Draft Environmental Impact
Statement - Mining Access and Development Road in the Tongass
National Forest, Ketchikan, AK. March 1976.
Retherford, Robert Toi[. Associates, Environmental for
Solomon Gulch Hydroelectric Project, 1976.
R. W. Beck and Associates, Swan Lake Project, Evaluation
Seattle, June 1978.
u.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation,
Report on the Swan Lake project, Alaska, Juneau, February 1954.
u.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Swan
Lake Project, Alaska - Re-evaluation Study, July 1962, Juneau.
u.S. Department of the Interior, the Bureau of Outdoor
Recreation, proceedings of a Conference on Recreation Planning
for Federally Licensed Hydroelectric Projects, Portland, OR.
May, 1974.
u.S. Forest Service, Alternatives for the Tongass, Juneau, 1977.
u.S. Forest Service, Tongass Land Management Plan, "Recreation/
Wilderness Task Force Working Report," Juneau, April 1978.
u.S. Forest Service, Tongass Land Management Plan, "Draft
Environmental Statement," Juneau, June 1978.
u.S. Forest Service, "Recreation Facilities - Ketchikan Area,
Ketchikan, AK," January 1976.
20
U.S. Forest Service, "Recreation Areas l<lard Lake _ ' , ~ J ,:, n2[: ,C''-
Hunt," "}vard Lake," and "Deer Mountain - Blue Lake Tr;c,5.1"
Ketchikan, AK.
21
T 75 S
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F. H. "'39,
GRAVINA ISLAND
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EXHIBIT R-I
EXISTING RECflEAT10NAL FACILITIES
,
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EXHIBIT R-2

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NOTES



«-

I. Topooraphy pr.pored by Chort .. Pooiond A$l.OeIOI..
Inc. ortd Geor9' Wolker and Anoclaln ,1nI:.,Dee.mbet
1917 ond D.umiHlf 1978. HorlZontOI (Milo! baled on
1M AIa.ko Slol. Grid Coordlna' .. Sy,"m ,Ion. I
V.rtltol conlrol buHd on USc,a,s. 8.lIch Mork
IS. M 2,1963)01 Nlgllhl. Pofnl,Corrolllnl,l .
2. EI.vollon. bQ"d on M.on Lowt( Low
CMLLWI datum
3 Mto/l S.o Level II 8 , .. ,
obcw. MLLW.
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SWAN LAf(.E PAOJECT
KETCH1KAN PU8UC UTlLITtES
lCETCHII(AN, ALASKA
,
, I
EXHIBIT R-2.
PROJECT RECREATION PLAN
-tort .w IaOO' IlOO'
, , , ,
IIc.ou: 1' •• 00
1

,
....
.... --------------------------------------------------------------
3TATEMENT OF THE EFFECT OF THE PROJECT ON
FISH AND WILDLIFE RESOURCES
1. INTRODUCTION
Fish and wildlife studies \'iere conducted by Dr. David T.
Hoopes, who was retained by the Applicant to the project
area and assess the impacts that project construction and operation
would have on these resources. The work included a review of all
available data, and field reconnaissances of the entire project area
to determine existing conditions and gather data on plant and animal
species. The field work was completed in two steps, the major part
being done in the fall of 1977, with follow-up work extending through
1978. Results of the primary investigation are presented in a
January 1978 report entitled "An Investigation of the Biotic Communi-
ties in the Vlcinity of the Proposed Swan Lake Project, Revillagigedo
Island, Alaska." (1) The follow-up work is reported in "An Investi-
gation of proposed Aggregate Sampling Sites in the Vicinity of
Carroll Creek and "A Reconnaissance of the Ward Creek-White River
Transmission Line Corridor" prepared in October 1978. (2) These
reports are presented in their entirety in Appendix W-9 of this
Application.
These reports constitute the base-line data used in pre-
paration of Exhibits Sand W. Based on this data and on discussions
with concerned agencies and individuals during the course of ongoing
studies, possible effects on the fish and wildlife resources and
habitats were identified and protective and mitigative measures have
been proposed. The following is a summary of the major findings of
the above studies, along with a discussion of specific mitigation
measures which are proposed by the Applicant. More specific data,
1
including an inventory of plant and animal species found in the
project area is contained in Appendix W-9 .
. 2. SlJI1MARY OF HAJOR FINDINGS OF FISH AND WILDLIFE STUDIES
2.1 Rclre or Endangered Species
No rare or endangered plant or animal species are known to
exist within the project area. There are, however, several species
of whales, protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which
may on occasion swim into George and Carroll Inlets. No adverse
effects should result from these visits and therefore no special
precautions are believed necessary. Also, the bald eagle, which is
a "protected species" by the National Bald Eagle Act of June 8, 1940
(as amended), is indigenous to the area. Precautions will be taken
as necessary during Project construction and operation to avoid
endangering bald eagles and eagle nesting areas.
2.2 Critical Habitats
The only critical habitat area, which has been identified
by Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologists, is the area sur-
rounding Carroll Creek and its estuary. Biologists believe that
construction activity in this lower portion of the Carroll Creek
valley would have a harmful impact on the resident and transient
wildlife.
During the course of Dr. Hoopes' investigations, one other
area was identified which warrants special attention from a wildlife
standpoint. This is the transmission line crossing of the waterway
connecting George Inlet and Salt Lagoon which serves as a waterfowl
flyway.
2
... ----------------------------------------------------------------------
1'. complete discussion of the impacts of the Pr()J,-,-::l );,
fish and wildlife resources is contained in Section 3 ()f F):', i i':'
and in the reports by Dr. Hoopes which are inclucled as !\Pt)'_:IF'
3. MITIGATION AND PROTECTION MEASURES
Hithi.n the project c:rea at th", dam, reservoi r-, <il;, pm·:r r
bouse sites, no critical viiJdlife hahitats have been ir1cI,j-;rif'J.
However, Project dev'?lopnent necessitate raising trlP 10\;(': "
Swan Lake approximately 100 feet, to a normal elevation of abnut
feet MLLW, and this may result in adverse impacts to the fishcri
n
-
resources of Swan La.ke. One potential impact which ha:= 1
fied is the loss of existing fish spawning areas in the
tributary to Swan Lake resulting from raising the lake level.
Applicant is currently coordinating efforts with U. S. Fores'
bioJ.ogists to assess the degree of impact that the loss of
areas will have on existing Swan Lake fisheries values. '1'1,,:, p()\-"n-
tial may exist for creating new spawning areas on some feec1C'r sUr . . -,
above tbe level of the raised reservoir as a mitigative measure.
In addition, on Lost Creek, the main tributary
Swan Lake, a barrier falls located above El 330 may preclude
by fish to the upper reaches of the creek once the reservoir is
ra ised.
The Applicant, in company with fisheries from
the Forest Service and the Alaska Department of Fish and plare
to conduct field surveys this spring to evaluate the potential for a
fish passageway in this area to open up the upper portion of Lost
Creek to fish spawning.
An alternative mitisative measurG being considered by the
Applicant is to develop, in cooperation with the ADF&G, a stocking
program in Swan Lake to offset the decline in fish populations which
is expected to occur as a result of the loss of important spawning ~
areas on inlet streams. The Applicant, in concert with cooperating
agencies, will develop and implement reasonable measures to mitigate
adverse impacts on the existing Swan Lake fishery. Such measures !I
will be of the type suggested above, however, final plan formulation ~
will necessarily not be made until completion of the aforementioned
investigations.
A potential concrete aggregate borrow site near Carroll
Creek is currently being investigated to determine if suitable
quality sand and gravel can be economically mined for use in making
concrete. In September, 1978 the Applicant's Engineers and Environ-
mental Consultant, in conjunction with the U. S. Forest Service
interdisciplinary team reconnaissanced this area to determine exist-
ing conditions and to assess the probable environmental effects of
the aggregate sampling program. Measures taken to safeguard the
environment during the investigations primarily involved the careful I
disposal of brush cleared from the existing logging road which was
used to access the site. A more detailed discussion of the sampling
program and environmental impacts is included in Appendix W-9.
The primary impact of development of this source as a
quarry would be potential disturbance to the aquatic environment of
the Carroll Creek delta region. Coho salmon utilize the main creek
and surrounding feeder streams as spawning and rearing areas.
Future plans for rehabilitation of the old logging road and extrac-
tion and processing of aggregate would include measures to ensure
that salmon spawning areas would remain undisturbed.
4
, :
by thf
eking
J '>'ihk
ming
a tine
tiga:,
res
la tic'
ioned
king
iron-,
dst-
of
eful
ras
l i n ~
of !
:ek '
c- ,
The following general measures would be fOllowed:
(1) Existing damaged culverts would be carefully replaced
in conjunction with restoration of the road.
(2) Slash material would not be allowed to accumulate in
existing drainages and waterways and will be disposed of in accord-
ance with pertinent State and Federal regulations.
(3) Aggregate production areas would not be allowed to
drain into Carroll Creek or its tributaries, in order to prevent
siltation of these streams.
(4) The existing cut slope exposed at the site would be
left unaltered so as to prevent sloughing of sands and gravels into
the stream below.
(5) No mining or crushing operations would take place
immediately adjacent to Carroll Creek.
(6) Restoration and revegetation of the quarry site would
be completed at the end of the construction phase.
Should further testing, to be conducted during the Project final
design phase, prove this aggregate source to be economically attract-
ive, a more definitive plan for quarry development and site restora-
tion will be developed by the Applicant.
Helicopter construction techniques will be employed in
construction of the transmission line, precluding the need for
building construction access roads along the entire route. While
transmission line construction does necessitate a significant amount
of clearing along the right-of-way, it does not require large amounts
of construction equipment and excavation as does access road con-
struction. Because the average distance between transmission
5
structures will be 400-600 feet, local areas of biotic concern can
be spanned with minimal impact. The use of helicopter construction
techniques for construction of the transmission line, will minimize
potential adverse impacts to soil and vegetation along the transmis-
sion route, and through careful planning of the clearing operation,
impacts to wildlife habitat along the route can be kept to a practi-
cal minimum.
In selecting final field locations for the transmission
line structures, the Applicant will work closely with the U.S. Fish
and wildlife Service (USFWS), the Alaska Department of Fish and Game
(ADF&G), and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) in identifying bald
eagle nesting trees, wetlands, flyways, spawning streams, and other
areas of concern in order to minimize environmental impacts of
construction and operation of the facilities. (Specific reference
to consultation and coordination with various agencies is found in
the following section of Exhibit S, and in Appendix W-9 and Section
10 of Exhibit W.)
T-
~
:f
, , .
"
;[
1-
.e
In construction of the transmission line, all statutes concern- ~
ing construction in the vicinity of eagle trees and recommendations er
from the U. S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service el
will be observed. Insulators on power transmission poles will be
spaced so as to prevent electrocution of eagles and other large
birds that might use the poles as perching sites.
Along the route of the transmission line, several areas have
been noted, which might be affected as a result of line construction.
These areas are located primarily around Leask Cove and Salt Lagoon
at the northern end of George Inlet. The area near Leask Cove is
used by deer as a wintering range and some of this range will be
altered as a result of clearing of the transmission line right-of-way. '
in this location. Salt Lagoon is an area used by waterfowl and
salmon and is also a wintering range for game.
6

.-------------------------------------------------------------------------
For the transmission line crossing south of tIle
Lagoon on George Inlet, the Applicant proposes to span tIl('
waterway using towers high enough on the ridges on ejther
keep the line at approximately crown height of the trees borjering
the area. Birds of the species most likely to use the lag0,n dr)
normally fly at any great elevation, especially soon after
off from the water or when preparing to land as most birds
this flyway would be doing. Thus, elevating the line at point
will serve to effectively reduce the potential hazard of the line to
birds entering or exiting from the lagoon.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service indicated by letter
dated December 15, 1978, that some species of birds that use the
area in question usually fly at or above tree top level and recom-
mended that the line be routed around the north end of Salt Lagoon.
This would require construction of an additional 2.3 miles of line,
at an estimated cost of over $700,000 at the Project bid date of
January 1981. The total number of birds which might be impacted
adversely by the proposed action is expected to be small, and the
Applicant does not feel the proposed route represents a significant
enough risk to waterfowl and other birds to warrant such an
expenditure solely for the purpose of reducing these risks.
The possibility of electrocution of large raptors has been
considered and the chosen tower configuration provides for spacings
between power lines (12 feet) that more than adequately meets stand-
ards recommended by Morlan Nelson, Bureau of Land Hanagement [dprOr
electrocution expert, in Bulletin 61-10. (3)
The possibility of birds striking the transmission line
has also been considered. For much of its length the transmission
line will cross forested land where the average tree height of
85-140 feet will be well above the average tower height of 70 feet,
7
minimizing above-canopy exposure of the line and thus reducing the
potential for bird collisions. It should also be noted that the
chosen configuration of the line allows all wires except for the
static wire to be in the same horizontal plane. As Thompson notes
in the proceedings of a workshop, I m ~ o f Transmission Lines on
Birds in Flight (FWS/OBS-78/48), this reduces the vertical dimension
of the potential strike zone from what would be experienced if a
stacked or delta type configuration was used.
4. OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) has been
conducting studies over the past year to determine the feasibility
of developing a major salmon hatchery at the Swan Lake project
site. Although ADF&G has indicated that hatchery development, if
proven feasible, would not take place until several years after the
hydroelectric project becomes operational, the Applicant has and
will continue to work closely with the ADF&G throughout the Project
design phase to ensure compatibility of the two projects. Although
a joint construction program is not envisioned, the Applicant has
proposed to ADF&G that certain modifications could be made to the
powerplant and appurtenant structures during the final design phase
of Project development, which, if adopted by ADF&G would facilitate
future hatchery development at the site. No final agreements have
been reached with ADF&G to date, pending their completion of the
final study plan for the hatchery expected early this year, however,
the Applicant will continue to work closely with ADF&G towards the
goal of joint development of the Swan Lake site for fisheries en-
hancement as well as hydroelectric power generation.
5. CONSULTATION WITH FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES
The following consultations with Federal, State and local
agencies were conducted with regard to the effect of the Project on
fish and wildlife resources.
8
...... ........ .a .........................................................
. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
DATE: April 25, 1977
TYPE: Let ter from R. VI. Beck and Assoc iates, Inc. (RvJB)
SUBJECT: Requested eagle nesting data.
DATE:
TYPE:
SUBJECT:
DATE:
TYPE:
SUBJECT:
October 27, 1977
Meeting in Juneau, Alaska (David T. Hoopes)
Acquired data relating to Project
October 20, 1978
Letter from RWB
Transmitted Project Evaluation Report and requested
agency review and comments.
DATE: December 7, 1978
TYPE: Meeting in Juneau, Alaska
SUBJECT: Reviewed proposed development and discussed possible
impacts on fish and wildlife and possible additional
investigations to be conducted by USFWS and USFS.
DATE: December 15, 1978
TYPE: Letter to RWB
SUBJECT: Commented on Project Evaluation Report. t-1ain concerns
were loss of wildlife habitat and impact of transmis-
sion line on birds near the head of George Inlet.
DATE: January 4, 1979
TYPE: Letter from RWB
SUBJECT: Reply to above USFWS letter requesting additional
information on fish and wildlife resources.
9
DATE: 2/12/79
TYPE: Letter flom USFWS
SUBJECT: Transmitted information on eagle nest locations and
suggested approximate line route which would mitigate
major concerns relating to fish and wildlife. Also
included copy of USFWS June 1978 draft report entitled
"Swan Lake Hydropower project."
DATE: October 20, 1977
TYPE: Meeting in Ketchikan, Alaska - RWB
SUBJECT: Discussed environmental and recreational aspects of
the Project.
DATE: October 26, 1977
TYPE: Meeting in Ketchikan (David T. Hoopes)
SUBJECT: Discussed alternative transmission line corridors and
USFS reservations concerning routing transmission line
near Lake Harriet Hunt.
DATE: November 4, 1977
TYPE: Letter from RWB
SUBJECT: Requested any information, USFS guidelines or
standards that might aid in preparation of License
Application.
DATE: September 26, 1978
TYPE: Meeting - Field (David T. Hoopes)
SUBJECT: Visited potential aggregate source near head of
Carroll Inlet with USFS Interdisciplinary Team (lOT).
10
DATE: October 20, 1978
TYPE: Letter from RWB
SUBJECT: Transmitted Evaluation Report and requested aqency
review and comment.
DATE:
TYPE:
SUBJECT:
DATE:
TYPE:
SUBJECT:
DATE:
TYPE:
SUBJECT:
October 25, 1978
Meeting in Ketchikan, RWB
Reviewed proposed development and past s t u d j ~ s with
USFS IDT.
October 26, 1978
Meeting - Field Reconnaissance - RWB
Reviewed Project layout in field with USFS IDT.
December 5 through 7, 1978
Meetings in Ketchikan and Juneau
Forest service participated in various meetings
Applicant held with various agencies. Discussions
included subject of impacts of proposed development on
fish and wildlife and possible mitigation measures.
DATE: February 12, 1979
TYPE: Let ter to RWB
SUBJECT: Transmitted preliminary IDT comments on the Project
Evaluation Report.
ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAt1E (ADF&G)
DATE: October 20, 1978
TYPE: Letter from RIVE
SUBJECT: Transmitted Project Evaluation Report and requested
agency review and comment.
11
Q
DATE: December 7, 1978
TYPE: Meeting in Juneau - Applicant, R"VvB
SUBJECT: Reviewed proposed development and discussed impacts of
construction and operation of the Project on fish and
wildlife. Also discussed the potential for future
hatchery construction by ADF&G.
6. REFERENCES
(1) David T. Hoopes, An Investigation of the Biotic Communities in
the the Proposed Svlan Lake Hydroelectr ic Project,
Revillagigedo Island, Alaska, January 1978.
(2) David T. Hoopes, Investigation of Proposed Aggregate Sampling
Sites in the Vicinity of Carroll Creek and a Reconnaissance of
the Ward Creek-White River Transmission Line Corridor, October
1978.
(3) United States Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management,
Rea Bulletin 61-10.
(4) United States Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service,
Workshop Proceedings: Impacts of Transmission Lines on Birds in
Flight, (FWS/OBS-78/48), September 1978.
12
- ..
T
!
EXHIBIT T
STATEMENT JUSTIFYING THE DEVELOPMENT
OF THE PROJECT BY THE APPLICANT
RATHER THAN THE FEDERAL GOVERNI1ENT
The Swan Lake Project site is located in a remote area of
Revillagigedo Island near the City of Ketchikan in Southeast
Alaska. The population to be served by the Project is concentrated
in a relatively small area within or adjacent to the City limits.
As such, the Project will not directly benefit interstate or foreign
commerce.
Ketchikan Public Utilities owns and operates its own
electric generation facilities, including three hydroelectric
plants, three diesel generating plants and all appurtenant trans-
mission and distribution lines necessary to serve its commercial,
residential and industrial power customers. As a public utility,
the Applicant has over the years demonstrated its ability to develop
and operate power generation facilities. Although Ketchikan has had
electric service since 1903, the Public Utility was not responsible
for supplying Ketchikan's power until 1935, when Ketchikan acquired
what was considered to be a very run down electrical utility
system. Since then the system has been built up and has adequately
served Ketchikan and the surrounding community for over 40 years.
Over the past 28 years, the Federal Government has made
several attempts to initiate and fund development of a hydroelectric
project in the Ketchikan area, but without success. The Swan Lake
project itself has been the subject of feasibility studies done by
the U.S. Department of Interior in 1951, 1959, and 1962 and by the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1976. Although the project has
1
proven itself to be technically, economically and environmentally
feasible many times, the Federal Government has been unable to
develop it.
Based on the most recent Evaluation Studies performed in
1977 for the Applicant by its Consultants, the Project has once
again proven to be feasible. It is in the Applicant's best interest
to pursue development of the Swan Lake project and to have the
Project operational at the earliest possible date. Based on
electrical load growth projections, as presented in other portions
of this Application, the Applicant is experiencing a sustained
growth of its electric system loads which will result in a critical
need for the Project capability by the middle of 1982. At best the
Project will be operational by the end of 1983, leaving a period of
about one and one-half years when the Applicant's ability to meet
peak electrical system loads will be marginal. Should project
operation be delayed much beyond its target on-line date, the
Applicant will have to take measures to purchase and install
additional diesel generating units to assure reliability of power to
its customers in the interim period, until the Project becomes
operational. The Applicant wishes to avoid any delays in the
development of the Project which would cause this situation to
occur, and for that reason is pursuing development of the Project on
its own as rapidly as possible. The Federal agencies charged with
the authority to develop water power resources of this type have not
in the past demonstrated their ability to develop projects such as
this within the tight time frame needed by the Applicant.
The Applicant's plans for developing the project have taken
into consideration all resources of the Project area as discussed in
Exhibits R, S, V and W of this Application. The Applicant feels
that the Project has excellent potential as a power generating
resource and has demonstrated a critical need for the power benefits
to be derived from this development. The Applicant has shown that
2
01
t!
~ ______________ .a ______________________________________________________ ... "
... ------------------------------------------------------....
the Project will be developed in such a manner so as not to
compromise the site's recreational potential and that the site will
continue to provide recreational benefits consistent with the needs
of the Ketchikan area.
For the above reasons it is believed that development of
the Project by the Applicant rather than the Federal Government is
best suited to implementing a comprehensive plan for developing the
project waterway for the improvement and utilization of water power
development, and for other beneficial public uses, including
recreational purposes.
3
~ - - - - - - - - - - - - .........
I
I
I
I
EXHIBIT V
STATEMENT OF THE PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF
NATURAL, HISTORIC AND SCENIC FEATURES IN THE
DESIGN, LOCATION, CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION
OF PROJECT FACILITIES
1. INTRODUCTION
The purpose of Exhibit V of this application is to describe
and assess the impact the project elements will have on the natural,
historic and scenic resources of the project area; explain what
measures have been taken during the project planning and design
stages and what measures will be taken during construction and
operation to prevent or minimize any negative impact on those re-
sources; and explain what measures can be taken, if any, to preserve
and enhance the Project's scenic value.
The Applicant retained Dr. Robert E. Ackerman, of the
Arctic Research Section, Laboratory of Anthropology, Washington
State University to conduct an archeological survey of the Project
area. Sites of archeological significance are identified and pos-
sible impacts and mitigation measures are fully discussed in Dr.
Ackerman's report entitled, "Archeological Survey, Swan Lake Hydro-
electric Project, Revillagigedo Island, Southeast Alaska." This
report is presented in its entirety as Appendix W-IO of this License
Application. The firm of Elaine Day LaTourelle and Associates,
Architects and Environmental Planners, was retained by the Applicant
to assess the impacts of Project construction and operation on the
visual resources of the area and to identify measures that could be
taken to mitigate any adverse visual impacts. The following sections
of Exhibit V, relating to visual resources, are based on the studies
conducted for the Project to date.
1
2. LANDSCAPE CHARACTER
Southeast Alaska is an intricate pattern of mountains,
islands and fiords carved from the coastal mountains by glaciers of
the Pleistocene Age. It is characterized by heavy forests, sinuous
waterways and rugged terrain. The thousands of streams and lakes
are fed by the heavy rainfall and glacial runoff from the higher
barrier mountains on the Canadian border.
The Ketchikan area is located in the southern-most region
of Southeast Alaska. In this rugged setting the landscape displays
a great diversity in the visual setting of the project. Several
distinct types of land forms have been identified; each with a
unique visual character. These landscape types, which are the
result of the interaction of climate, soil types, topography and
vegetation are listed below. Photographs taken in the project area
showing these typical landscape forms are included at the end of
this report (Photos #1 through #6).
(1) Estuaries
The estuarine landscape type in the Ketchikan area is the
fiord, a powerful visual form. Fiords are deep, winding reaches of
the sea that have been gouged out of the coastal mountains by gla-
ciers. Steep mountain walls descend directly to deep water. There
are small coves, often formed at the mouth of a mountain stream,
with spare rocky beaches and a narrow bench at the shoreline.
Forest vegetation reaches to the tideline. Fifteen foot diurnal
tides expose the rocky walls or steep littoral zone.
(2) Valleys and Lowlands
The valleys and lowlands in the project area extend from
sea level at the mouth of the streams to about five hundred feet in
2
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- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~
elevation. The lowlands are entirely [ores ted fool!1 "":
slopes. In the valley bottoms only the muskegs, lakes c:r.(J "'_:"C';I,
banks are not forested. The valley floors are narrow, mostl
1
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ns, walled gorges carved by mountain streams. The \vhite RivEc-r '/alle')'
iers 0:
bottom, which the proposed transmission line traverses,
one-half mile at the widest point.
S inuo;,
lakes
Iher
(3 )
Fresh Water Lakes and Streams
The project area is rich in freshwater lakes and streams.
egion Swan Lake, encompassing over 1000 acres, is the largest lake in the
Splay, project area. Small lakes are found throughout the project area at
:al all elevations. Streams run in almost every crevice and depression
in the land. Along the shoreline of the lakes and streams, the
nd
aw
forest vegetation reflects the exposure to the sunlight with a heavy
growth of brush and alder. The lakes and streams are an important
element in the visual landscape both as a visual object themselves
)f and as a break in the forest cover to open other views. The fresh
water landscape elements provide variety in an otherwise uniformly
forested landscape.
the
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(4) Steep Timbered
The steep, timbered slopes reach from the lowland foothills
to the alpine and glacial regions. The hillsides are uniformly
forested and in many areas form a solid green wall on the horizon.
In other areas the steep timbered slopes are the visual foreground
to the alpine and glaciated landscape types at higher elevations.
The monotonous forest cover is sometimes broken by harvested patches
of different hues and black rock outcroppings and peaks. Snow
highlights the visual variety of the steep timbered landscape.
3
(5 )
Alpine Tundra and Glacial Valley Walls
Alpine tundra and glaciated valley walls appear above the
2000 foot elevation. These areas provide an exciting visual element
on the skyline when not shrouded in clouds. There are no alpine or
glaciated landscapes in the immediate Project area. However, they
are an important part of many distant vistas.
(6) Muskeg
Muskeg is one of the more extensive landscape types in the
Project area. The organic peat overlying cemented till creates a
swamp environment that provides visual open space in the forest and
a habitat for a wide and colorful variety of plants. Muskeg land-
scapes are either entirely open with only low growing vegetation or
dotted with clusters of small groves of trees. Exposure to the
sunlight and nutritous soils results in colorful broadleaf plants in
contrast to the monotonous forest background. Muskeg areas are one
of the few landscape types that change their visual character through I
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the seasons, reds in the summer and stark white in the winter.
3. VISUAL IMPACTS OF CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE POWER
GENERATING FACILITIES AND MITIGATIVE MEASURES PROPOSED
3.1 Reservoir and Dam
Swan Lake is surrounded by steep mountains which reach as
high as 4000 feet with slopes over 100%. Rocky outcrops are visible
at higher, steeper elevations; lower slopes are heavily timbered
down to the shoreline. Swan Lake is currently at elevation 236 with
a surface area of 1050 acres. Construction of the dam will raise
the normal pool level 94 feet to elevation 330 and increase the
surface area to about 1500 acres. The lake is surrounded by steeply
walled mountains. Due to the steep valley walls, the lake will
4
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10
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expand laterally very little but will up to the first
one-half mile of the three streams feed it. h
- P otograph No. 7
illustrates the Project setting.
The visual impact resulting from increasing the size of
Swan Lake is significant as it will be larger by one-third. However,
this is not an adverse impact. The increased size will provide some
additional recreation opportunities and it is likely that the number
of visitors attracted to the area will increase slightly because the
port facilities and site access road to the dam will provide better
access. However, because it will be necessary to clear all trees
and brush within the area of expected reservoir operation, a verti-
cal, cleared band will be highly visible around the perimeter of the
lake which will create a strong contrast of color and texture against
the natural landscape of uniform timber cover to the lake edge.
Because the lake has potential for increased recreational use after
project completion, the impact of concern is that related to the
treatment of the shoreline. Care will be taken in the clearing
operation along the shore of the lake in order that the modification
remain subordinate to the natural appearance. An irregular pattern
rather than a straight line will be used, when feasible, in order to
create as natural an appearance as possible. Understory vegetation
will be left where possible in order to minimize erosion and reduce
the contrast of landscape color and form along the lake edges.
The dam will be a double curvature concrete arch structure
located about 3/4 mile downstream from the existing Swan Lake outlet.
Maximum height will be 190 feet above the foundation and crest length
will be about 450 feet. A spillway will be located at crest center
with auxiliary spillways at either side. A power intake will be
located on the upstream face of the dam beyond the end of the auxil-
iary spillway section. An underground power tunnel will extend from
the intake to the powerhouse at tidewater, a distance of about 2150
feet.
5
While the new darn will be of substantial height and length,
any adverse visual impact is negligible due to the difficult access
to any viewing position. A view of the darn will not be apparent
from Carroll Inlet and it will not be easily reached by the public
in general. Although the darn will be visible from the air, it is
unlikely that it will be visible from the service road or construc-
tion areas due to heavy timber. The darn will make a strong contrast
in color and texture against the surrounding countryside, however,
the visual impact of the darn should be very pleasing to those who
cl
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• II
achieve a viewing position. The form at the foundation follows the L
existing land form. The structure is curved and of a contemporary,
dramatic design. It is somewhat reflective of the steep rock wall
faces along portions of Swan Lake. No mitigative measures are
proposed to screen or hide the darn.
A definite impact to the visual resources of the area will
be the loss of flow in Falls Creek and loss of the tumbling waterfall
at Carroll Inlet. During periods when no water is released over the
spillway, the flow over the falls will be greatly reduced. The rock
formations will be exposed and visible from the beach and from the
inlet. Among the stream banks, dense thickets of salmon berry,
devil's club, red alder, evergreens and mosses grow. It is likely
that this plant material will begin to encroach upon the stream bed
and the presently visible rocky forms will ultimately give way to
the vegetation. Water that now dissipates its energy as it tumbles
down Falls Creek will be diverted through the powerhouse to generate
electrical power. White water activity will still be visible from
the powerhouse tailrace, but the dramatic visual effect of the falls
will be greatly reduced.
3.2 Powerhouse, Switchyard and Related Facilities
The powerhouse, switchyard, outside maintenance areas, port
structure and roads to the darn and powerhouse are located in a
6
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cluster on the east shore of Carroll Inlet near the mouth of Falls
Creek. The setting is the coming together of the estuarine landscape
and steeply-pitched mountainsides. Along the south bank of the
creek and south along the Carroll Inlet shore, the hillside rises
steeply to a ridge and bench. This area has been recently logged.
On the north side of Falls Creek, the hillside remains undisturbed.
It is through these two landscapes which contrast sharply in texture
and color that the creek finishes its undulated one and one-half
mile journey to the sea. A series of steeply pitched bOlllJers form
the last bend in the creek. The white water cascading over the
falls can be seen from the inlet and contrasts pleasantly with the
dark evergreen background as shown in Photograph No.8. Where the
creek mouth meets the sea arm it cuts through delta deposits of
sand, gravel and occasional cobbles and boulders. At low tide, the
delta is exposed for a distance of several hundred feet. Eel Grass
is growing in shallow water on the sloping face of the delta and in
U some tide pools. The upper beach is clean gravel and cobbles on
fa!, sand. Patches of beach grass grow above the high tide mark.
U:
~ Falls Creek has maintained a channel of moderate depth
through the delta. The delta is the foreground landscape for the
powerhouse and associated structures which will be situated on a low
terrace backing up to the moderately steep hillside which forms the
~ background setting. Figure V-8 is an artist's conception of the
proposed powerhouse, showing its setting against the hillside adja-
cent to Falls Creek.
te
The powerhouse is located at tide level on the north side
of Falls Creek at the last bend of the creek before it reaches the
delta. The structure will be about 67 feet high above mean lower
low water, 88 feet long on the west face and 56 feet wide. Immedi-
ately in front of the north half of the structure at approximately
elevation 22 will be a parking and outdoor work area about 70' x
70'. The 50-foot wide tailrace channel is located in front of the
south half of the west face and connects with Falls Creek.
7
The switchyard is located immediately north of the power- la
house at about elevation 36 and encompasses an area about 70' x to
90'. Bedrock in this area is overlain by up to 15 feet of sand and
gravel. A thin layer of organic material is on the surface. The
excavation slopes to accommodate the siting of these features are . ~
1-1/2H:1V in the overburden soils in the foreground and 1/2H:1V for . in
areas where the powerhouse cuts below bedrock. Transmission lines ~
will leave the switchyard, cross Falls Creek and by means of a steel a1
tower-supported aerial crossing, span Carroll Inlet before being th
routed southwest toward Ketchikan.
The port facility will be entirely visible from certain 5i
viewing positions on Carroll Inlet, while the powerhouse and switch- Tt
yard will be visible from only a limited area. The steel tower on cl
the eastern shore of Carroll Inlet will be located approximately 700 pc
feet east from the water line. Topography immediately south of the 5(
tower will obscure the view until boaters approach the northern end "i
of Carroll Inlet near the Project site. VI
One thousand feet north of the mouth of Falls Creek where
the sea floor slopes steeply westward, a pile-supported barge landing
grid and floating dock facility will be constructed. Piles will be
driven on the inlet bottom to support the barge grid. In this area,
immediately north of the delta, bedrock is exposed intermittently at
high tide level, at about elevation 18.
Construction of the project features to the north side of
Falls Creek will involve clearing approximately 2 acres of timber
and understory vegetation and extensive blasting, grading and reshap-
ing of the topography. Cut and fill banks will be exposed and
because of their steep slope will be difficult to revegetate without
using special planting techniques. The cleared areas, while not
directly visible from many places at ground level, will create a
break in the regular tree pattern which is seen from a distance and
may expose the tree trunks above the Project on the steep side slope.
8
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In order to subordinate the ProJect features to the existing
landscape, the following specific measures have b",en or will be taken
to mitigate any adverse visual consequences:
(1) The general location of the powerhouse and switchyard
was established after evaluating several alternatives as discussed
in Section 8 of Exhibit W. The site chosen is behind a heavily
wooded knoll 25 feet in elevation. Most of the area will be natur-
ally screened by the land form and by trees that will be left along
the water line where feasible.
(2) The setting of the powerhouse against the steep hill-
side which rises behind it tends to diminish its apparent volume.
This position is advantageous in that the viewer has to stand very
close to the structure to see it in its entirety. From most vantage
points, trees, understory vegetation and land forms will partially
screen the structure. The composite view will be of a structure set
"into" the landscape rather than "on to" the landscape. Natural
vegetation will be encouraged to grow around its perimeter further
softening the regular lines of the form.
(3) The structure will be designed so that it has some
architectural interest in and of itself. This can be accomplished
by using formwork which will add texture to the surface of the
concrete. Pigment can be added to the mix in order to warm the
concrete color. The profile and facade of the structure can have
some architectural relief to reduce the apparent scale.
(4) The setting of the switchyard is such that it cannot
be readily seen from Carroll Inlet and only portions of it will be
disclosed from any particular viewing angle. Fencing and natural
landscape screening materials will be used around its perimeter.
9
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(5) The extent of cut and fill slopes in the immmediate sU
powerhouse area Vlill be I ~ e p t to a practical minimum. The organic fo:
topsoil will be stockpiled for use to revegetate the banks and to be i ~
re-spread on disturbed areas. On excavated slopes too steep to hold trl<
water or plant mater ials dur ing revegetation, the technique of CUi
"benching" or serrated stepping can be used. Depending on the ~
foundation conditions, these benches can vary between 6 inches and 4 of
feet. The topsoil will be redistributed on the benches so that it of
will be able to retain moisture and seeds or new plantings until Prl
they can get a root-hold. f ~
In
(6) Because all of the specific locations of project im.
disturbance cannot be anticipated at this early date, it is proposed in
that after construction a revegetation program will be conducted ge
which will involve planting or relocating native trees and understory 501
vegetation into areas which will further screen and soften project di
features. 111
3.3 Construction Staging Area and Dam Access Road
The construction staging area is approximately 3.2 acres in
size. It is located above Falls Creek between elevations 250 and ar
275, about half way between the dam and powerhouse. A single lane Th
road about 0.8 miles in length connects the dam, construction staging El
area, powerhouse, switchyard and port facility. One-half to two- ~
thirds of the road will be in bedrock, the rest situated in glacial
overburden.
While the actual staging area cannot be seen directly
except from the air, the clearing will create a break in the uni-
formly timbered hillside which may be seen from some viewing posi-
tions on Carroll Inlet. Similarly, the clearing for the road, while
narrow, will create a visible break in the pattern of the forested
hillside. In order to achieve the visual objective of all project
10
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I
features being subordinate to the natural landscape, the form of t ~ ~
staging area and the alignment of the road will be designed to
follow the land forms of the area where possible, so that the open-
ings are not regular in shape. Efforts will be made to clear only
the area needed for the staging area and to accommodate necessary
cut and fill slopes. Revegetation of those slopes will be initiated
as Soon as possible to reduce erosion and visual scars. A portion
of the construction staging area will ultimately be used for storage
of equipment and materials used for operation and maintenance of the
Project facilities. Following construction, that portion not needed
for this purpose will be regraded and revegetated where feasible.
In order for the landscape to accept the road with the least possible
impact, it has been routed where there is a high degree of variety
in the land form; the road will follow a linear pattern which is
gently rolling and curving. The road will be designed utilizing
sound engineering practices which include minimizing the visual
disturbance. Excavation slopes will be as steep as practical to
limit the extent of the area disturbed.
3.4 £otential Aggregate Source
Alluvial deposits located in the lower Carroll Creek valley
area are a potential source of aggregate for concrete production.
The general location of this source is shown in Figure W-8 of
Exhibit Wand photographs of the specific aggregate deposit site are
shown at the end of this report (Photos No.9 and 10).
As shown in Photo #10, large clearcut patches dominate the
visible landscape at the site. The lower Carroll Creek valley area
was logged several years ago and a network of roads and bridges
still exists. The roads are restricted to the east side of Carroll
Creek and extend southward for a short distance along the east side
of Carroll Inlet. Should further geotechnical investigations prove
11
of
the suitability and economy of this source and result in a need for WW
its development, portions of these existing roads may need to be fee
rehabilitated or extended to the powerhouse site.
Should development of this aggregate source occur, the
activity will be planned so that a final landscape form will emerge
toward the limits of the borrow area which is compatible with exist- of
ing land forms, rather than a sharp and ragged incline meeting the B 0
base of the trees above the excavation. As soon as practical, the
entire area would be revegetated.
3.S Transmission Facilities
3.S.1 Description of Proposed Facilities
asS
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thE
The transmission line will extend approximately 30.S miles str
from the S.W. Bailey Substation in Ketchikan to the switchyard at
the powerhouse. The line will follow the route of the existing be
34.S-kV line north from the S.I'i. Bailey diesel plant to Ward Cove, efl
and from there extend east along the north side of Connell Lake and to
turn to follow the Wh i te River Valley to the upper end of George Th
Inlet. From there it will extend along the north side of George Fo
Inlet, where it will turn to the north and follow the western edge
of Carroll Inlet to a location opposite the powerhouse. The line
will then cross the inlet via an overhead span to the project site, la
terminating at the switchyard adjacent to the powerhouse.
From the Bailey Plant north to Ward Cove the 11S-kV line
will be built on single pole structures within the existing State
Highway right-of-way. The existing 34.S-kV line will be recon-
structed as an underbuild on the new poles. From Ward Cove, approxi-
mately 26.3 miles of wood pole H-frame transmission line will be
constructed along the route described above to a point on the west
bank of Carroll Inlet opposite the powerhouse. The overhead crossing
12
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I
of Carroll Inlet will utilize at each end lattice steel dead-end
tower structures. The overhead span will be approximately 3,000
feet long.
3.5.2 Mitigative Measures
The transmission route was selected based on an evaluation
of a broad range of available alternatives, as discussed in Section
8 of Exhibit W. During the course of this evaluation, consideration
was given to the visual impact that the transmission facilities
would create on the existing landscape, in conjunction with an
assessment of the overall technical, environmental, and economic
feasibility of the various alternatives considered. As a result of
this evaluation, the most feasible route was identified. The final
line survey and final siting of the transmission structures along
the selected route will be made during the final design and con-
struction phases of project development. It is expected that local
modifications and refinements of the proposed route will continue to
be made a result of closer on-the-ground surveys and reconnaissance
efforts. Some modifications will be warranted during this process
to help mitigate potential adverse visual impacts of the facilities.
This work will be accomplished in close coordination with the U.S.
Forest Service and other concerned agencies.
Because the selected route passes through a variety of
landform types, it has varying degrees of potential for creating
adverse visual impacts. In general, the route selected has been
kept below the SOO-foot elevation, avoiding the alpine or high
mountain areas.
It passes through a variety of other landscape
types previously identified as estuaries, valleys and lowlands,
muskeg, fresh water lakes and streams and steep timbered slopes. Of
necessity, the transmission facilities vlill be visible from many
vantage points along the selected route, although it will be possible
to minimize the contrast between the faclities and their surroundings
13
by taking advantage of screening provided by existing landscape
features in certain areas. The visual objectives associated with
the transmission line are to plan, design, and construct the facili-
ties in a manner so that they will be in harmony with and subordinate
in
si
to the landscape. It is possible for a transmission line to blend in
gracefully with the natural landscape if care is taken in the selec- ' ft
tion of the route and in making adjustments in the final alignment.
The Applicant is familiar with the guidelines established
by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Forest
Service for transmission line planning and construction (referenced
in Section 7 of this Exhibit) and has consulted these guidelines
extensively in establishing criteria for the Swan Lake Transmission
Line. Specific measures which are identified in these guidelines
will be taken by the Applicant to assure that the natural, historic,
scenic, and recreational values of the project area are protected.
Figures V-I through V-7 show areas along the transmission route
where specific mitiation measures, as outlined in the referenced
guidelines, would be applicable. Sketches showing typical measures
being considered by the Applicant for implementation along various
portions of the transmission route, are included at the back of this
report. These sketches are keyed in to the base maps which are
included as Figures V-I through V-7 to aid in identifying areas
where these measures might be applicable. Photographs of certain
areas along the route (also keyed in to Figures V-I through V-7) are
included at the end of this report for visual reference and Figure
la
, de
fi
si
V-9 shows a schematic of the proposed aerial span of Carroll Inlet st
near the powerhouse site. In addition, aerial photographs describing
the location of the transmission route and discussing additional
mitigation measures are included as Figure 6 of Exhibit w.
3.6 General Mitigative Measures
k!
Many of the affects that the proposed development will have ir
on visual resources will become more evident during the final design
14
phase of the Project. The following general measures to
adverse visual impdcts have been identified and will be
in final design and construction of the project works:
(1) To minimize land form disturbance and contrasts tne
size of cut and fill slopes can be reduced by "fine tuning" the
final location of the faciJities and by adjusting actual d e ~ 1 0 n 0'
the site.
(2) Contrasts in the landscape form due to earth·:crk
modification can be reduced by:
a. Rounding cut slopes to blend with natural forms.
b. Varying the pitch of cut and fill slopes to simu-
late more natural terrain where desirable.
c. Rounding the edges of ditches and swales.
d. Using road spoils to fill unnatural appearing
depressions to form earthmounds along the routes for variety or to
fill abandoned sections of roads.
e. Shaping borrow areas by warping and rounding to
simulate natural conditions rather than leaving the borrow area raw.
f. Leaving natural forms, such as rock outcrops or
stable boulders, in the cut slopes where possible.
(3) Contrast in landscape color can be reduced by observing
the following guidelines:
a. In sensitive locations where cut banks are in the
key viewing backdrop, freshly broken rock faces may be aged by apply-
ing liquid fertilizer to promote rapid growth of lichen and mosses.
15
b. Spreading darker topsoil over lighter cut slopes.
c. Mulching with materials which blend with the
colors of the undisturbed area.
(4 ) Contrasts in texture may be reduced by:
a. Striving for a varied broken-face effect where
rock blasting is required thus providing planting pockets.
b. Scarifying cut slopes in a random pattern so they
look more natural.
(5) Methods that can be used to blend the project works to
the existing vegetation are:
a. Retaining as much of the existing plant cover as
possible.
b. Reducing the earthwork to a minimum to reduce
clearing limits.
c. Clearing only to the edge of anticipated cuts and
fills rather than a larger area.
d. Making the edges of clearings undulating and
irregular in order to create the appearance of natural breaks in the
vegetation.
e. Saving good plant and tree specimens around project
elements by building tree wells, protecting them from damage during
construction and by trying to duplicate existing surface and sub-
surface drainage to root systems.
16
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31
(6) Conditions for re-vegetation along the roads and
around project elements can be optimized by methods appropriate to
each affected area such as:
a. Serrating or "benching" cut and fill banks to
retain moisture and seeds or new plantings, rather than leaving a
uniform cut slope.
b. Creating planting pockets in rock banks for seeds
or seedlings to take hold.
c. Stripping and stockpiling topsoil, if any, and
re-spreading it back on disturbed areas.
d. Fertilizing cut and fill banks where soil tests
indicate that it would be an appropriate procedure to speed
re-vegetation.
e. Mulching with natural materials such as chipped-up
branches and bushes which have been taken in the clearing.
f. Choosing the correct planting and seeding time and
methods and selecting plants appropriate to the area for
re-vegetation.
(7) Sites for construction roads, borrow areas and con-
struction staging areas can be selected where existing trees and
plants can screen them from distance views. It is also possible to
use planting screens in critical areas after project construction is
complete.
17
4. ARCHEOLOGICAL SURVEY
An archeological survey has been completed for the project
area by Dr. Robert E. Ackerman, of the Arctic Research Section,
Laboratory of Anthropology, Washington State University. The study
concludes that if mitigative measures recommended in the report are
followed, the impact of the Project on archeological sites will be
close to zero.
The proposed transmission line has been routed in order to
avoid impacting two sites identified in the State of Alaska Heritage
Resource Survey. The first, a petroglyph near Shelter Cove is
designated KET 015. The transmission route, which extends from the
project switchyard, spans Carroll Inlet and follows the west side of
the Inlet, turns toward the west in the area of Nigelius Point in
order to avoid this area. The second site, near Leask Cove contains
cabins, stone fish wiers and a petroglyph. It is designated KET
018. The Applicant proposes to avoid this area by routing the
transmission line above the 100-foot contour and at least 500 feet
away from the estimated site boundaries.
A complete discussion of the archeological survey, including
maps and photographs can be found in Appendix W-10, of Exhibit W.
5. ESTIMATED COSTS OF MEASURES FOR PRESERVATION AND ENHANCEMENT
Architectural treatment of the powerhouse exterior, as
discussed in item No.3 of Section 3.2, can be expected to cost
about $10,000. The cost of an additional 0.3 miles of transmission
line around Leask Cove in order to avoid the archeological sites in
that area will add approximately $93,000 to the cost of the line.
(Direct construction costs; bid price level January, 1981; assuming
a 7% rate of inflation in the interim.)
18
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Costs of other mitigation measures are highly dependent o , ~
final design and construction methods employed and no attelnpc has
been made to estimate them at this time.
6. AGENCIES, ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS CONSULTED
The following consultations with Federal, State and local
agencies were conducted with regard to natural, historic and scenic
resources:
6.1 Archeological Survel
U.S. FOREST SERVICE - KETCHIKAN
DATE:
September 28, 1977
TYPE: Correspondence
SUBJECT: Memorandum of Understanding between Washington State
University and the U.S.F.S. authorizing completion of
an archeological study in conjunction with the Swan
Lake Project.
DATE:
TYPE:
October 17, 1977
Meeting in Ketchikan
SUBJECT: Discussion of archeologial survey procedures.
KETCHIKAN GATEWAY BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT AND
TLINGIT-HAIDA COUNCIL
DATE: October 25, 1977
TYPE: Meeting in Ketchikan
SUBJECT: Discussion of archeological survey research.
19
LOCAL CITIZENS OF KETCHIKAN
DATE: October 27, 1977
TYPE: Telephone conferences and meetings.
SUBJECT: Discussion and identification of significant local
archeological sites.
6.2 Visual Resource Study
U.S. FOREST SERVICE - KETCHIKAN
DATE: October 20, 1977
TYPE: Meeting in Ketchikan
SUBJECT: Requested recreation use data for Swan Lake area and
Forest Service standards for facilities such as docks,
trails, cabins, etc.
DATE: November 4, 1977
TYPE: Letter to Forest Service
SUBJECT: Requested information on current and projected
recreational development and visual quality objectives
of the Swan Lake area and the area along alternative
transmission routes being considered.
DATE: December 27, 1977
TYPE: Letter to R. W. Beck and Associates, Inc.
SUBJECT: Visual management guidelines for transmission line
siting and construction plus a description of all
recreation use in the Project vicinity.
DATE: December 5, 1978
TYPE: Meeting
SUBJECT: Discussed U.S.F.S. visual quality objectives with
respect to alternate transmission routes.
20
.Is,
DATE:
I
Q70
'J
TYPE:
enc Field \'\c,:l; In Ketchil-:an
SUBJECT; CoordInation of ongoing envlronmer;tal studies; discuoc
contents and outline fo;: Applicant's
report; field visit to Ward Lake area,
Cove to Talbot Lake.
TONGASS CONSERVATION SOCIETY
- ..
DATE:
December 4, 1978d
TYPE: Meeting
SUBJECT: Reviewed proposed development and discussed the visual
impacts of the Project.
7. REFERENCES
Ackerman, Dr. Robert E., "Archeological Survey, Swan Lake
Hydroelectric Project, Revillagigedo Island, S.E. Alaska," June 1978.
Federal Power Commission, "Electric Power Transmission and
the Environment, Federal Power Commission Guidelines for the Protec-
es tion of Natural, Historic, Scenic and Recreational Values in the
Design and Location of Rights-of-Way and Transmission Facilities,"
1970.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service "National
Forest Landscape Management, Volume 2, Chapter 1 - The Visual
Management System" Agriculture Handbook Number 462, 1974.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service "National
Forest Landscape Management, Volume 2, Chapter 2 - Utilities"
Agriculture Handbook Number 478, 1975.
U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Department of
Agrlcu ure, Envlronmen a
. 'It "" t 1 Crl"teL-I'a for ElecLLric Transmission
Systems," 1970.
21
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LEGEND
Figure no. and location
- • - Proposed 115 - kV
transmission line
,
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...
_I
2 o
I
Scale
2 miles
,
... SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES

., ' VISUAL ASPECTS OF THE
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT
.. KEY MAP
" -.J
• I .'-.
-' "'
FEBRUARY 1979
LEGEND

.:\(00'.., H;,hwo,
\
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Proposed 115-kV
Sketch no. ond location
Figure V-2

Photograph no. and location
NOTE
Project 115-kV transmission line to be
routed along existing Tongass Highway
right- of-way from Bailey Substation
to Word Cove.
2000' 0
I" "I"" 11111 I '" rl
Scale
2000'
I
'\....,--Bailey Substation (existing)
< .
SWAN LAI<E PROJECT
J<ETCHIKAN PUBLIC
VISUAL ASPECTS OF THE
PROPOSED
FEBRUARY 1979
------------------.............. .
Route behind ridge
of recreati on area
Ward
Cove
Edges of cleared area
cut in irregular pattern
a long ent i re route
r'"
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Figure v- 3
Connell
Lake
Limit clearing along
sides of road.
LEGEND
~ ~ Proposed IIS-kV
transmission line
Sketch no. and location
Photograph no. and locatiol
Possible miti gative
measure
~ - - - / "
( ,
Description
Point of
application
2000' o 2000'
I" ' "It' ", II,!' II rI
Scale
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
VISUAL ASPECTS OF THE
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT
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UlIlize trees
from George
Limit clearing 01
trail crossing
05 SCreen
Inlet
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Edges of cleared ore a cut
in irregul ar po tt er n along
en tire route .
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Figure V-4
LEGEND
• • Proposed 11 5-kV
transmission line
,® Sketch no. and location
Description
Point of
a pplication
Photograph no.
ond locotion
Possible mit igative
measur e
2000
1
0 2000
1
L'w' ,",,,", ,Ju.!!U' .J.!u .. ____ ...J'
Scole
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTI LITI ES
VISUAL ASPECTS OF THE
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT
FEBRUARY 1979
traverses 1imbered '
limited downhill cleorlng
over
to avoid clearing below
over sf ream valley
to avoid clearing below
Minimize clearing
ot
Mlnimiu
at crossing
Cleared area to
irregular edges for
entire route
~ O )
LEGEND
• tJf •
Description
Point of
application
Figure V-5
Proposed 115 - kV
transmission line
Sketch no. and
locotion
Photograph no.
ond location
Possi ble mitigative
mealure
2000' 0 2000'
I I. t!.I" "lit II II! II'
Scale
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
VISUAL ASPECTS OF THE
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT
FEBRUARY 1979
Cleared area to have
irregular edges along
ent ire route
j
V-6
LEGEND
A Proposed 115-k\
transmission line
Description
Point of
application
2000' 0
1" I II III! I,,," 1 II t!
Scale
Sketch no. and
location
Photograph no
and localion
Possible
mitigative
measure
2000'
I
SWAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
VISUAL ASPECTS OF THE
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT
Cleared area to have
irregular edges for
entire route
V(l) 1'.(2.)
(7), (4)1...
Route line along bench
in slope with trees as
screen from inlet
Route traverses timbered
hillside with limited
downhill clearing
Figure V-7
LEGEND
.....c-I/(>J::- Proposed 115 - kV
transmission line
Span stream valley to
Sketch no. and
location
\ ~ d ""do. b,lo.
\y
Description
Point of
appl ication
Photograph no
and location
Possible
m iti gative
measure
2000' 0
1""I"I/I,,,tI,,,,1
Scale
2000'
I
S WAN LAKE PROJECT
KETCHIKAN PUBLIC UTILITIES
VISUAL ASPECTS OF TH E
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT
FEBRU.l-RY 1979
"
NOTE
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POWERHOUSE AND
SWlTCHYARD SETTING
Figure v-a
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Figure V-9
NOTE
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CARROLL INLET
AERIAL CROSSING
LOOKING NORTHWEST
------------------.............
EXHIBIT V
PHOTOGRAPHS
Refer to location maps
figures V-I thru V-7
1 . View looking north at head of Carroll Inlet showing
estuarine environment of Carroll Creek Delta .
2. View looking south along Carroll Inlet. Typical
fiord exhibiting steep. timbered slopes and exposed
rocky intertidal zone.
3. View looking south along shoreline of Carroll Inlet
north of project site. Forest extending to a rocky
intertidal zone at low tide.
4. Photo taken near project site along Carroll Inlet.
Dense lowland forest environment typical of Ketchikan
region.

S. View looking west at Swan Lake outlet. Typical
fresh water lake environment exhibiting steep, timbered
slopes from alpine mountain tops to an abrupt shoreline .
6. Lake Harriet Hunt and surrounding shoreline showing
typical muskeg landscape type.
7. Aerial view of Carroll Inlet
and Falls Creek with Swan Lake in
background. Falls Creek delta and
location of powerhouse and port
facility in foreground.
8. View of Falls Creek delta and powerhouse site
from Carroll Inlet.
9. View of terrace deposites which are being investigated
for suitability as concrete aggregates.
g r
egate deposit in
10. Prev10usLY Loggeo area where a g
lower Carroll Creek Valley is located.
11. View of homes in the urban area of Ketchikan.
12. The City of Ketchikan is perched between steep,
timbered mountain slopes and the sea.
13. The S. W. Bailey Switchyard and diesel gene rating
plant vielved from Tongass Narrows.
14. View looking south at existing 34.S-Kv transmission
line along Tongass Highway right-of-way north of Ketchikan.
15. Aerial view looking northeast
f:om Peninsula Point along Tongass
H1ghway to Wa rd Cove. Project trans-
mission line will follow Tongass
Hi ghway right-of-way . See figure V-2.
16. Picnic area at \,ard Lake Recreation Area. Transmission
line r oute is located out-of -sight behind ridge in center of
photo. See figures V-3 and 1-'-6 (aerial photo 7) for routing.
17. Leask Cove at the head of George Inlet. Transmission
line route is above the 100 foot contour in this area. See
figures V-5 and W-6 (aerial photo 7) for routing.
18. Bat Cove at
corner of photo)
for transmission
the head of George Inlet (lower right
See figures V-5 and W-6 (aerial photo 7)
line routing.
19. Northeasterly view of the head of George Inlet. Bat
Cove in left foreground, and Salt Lagoon in center. See
figures V-S and W-6 (aerial photos 7 and 8) for trans-
mission line routing through this area.
20. Southwesterly view of Salt Lagoon at the head of George
Inle t. See figu res V-Sand 1 ~ - 6 (ae rial photos 7 and 8) for
transmission line routing.
21. Southwesterly view of Carroll Inlet across from the
project site. Transmission line routing begins south of
clear cut area. See figures V-7 and 1.}-6 (aerial photo 13).
22. View of Falls Creek and the project site. East tower
of aerial crossin g of Carroll Inlet will be located on
the knoll in the clear cut area (center of photo) . See
figures V-7 and W-6 (aerial photo 13).
EXHIBIT V
SKETCHES
Refer to location maps
figures V-I thru V-7
2
----------------.... .......-
1.
i"lEt.SUPJ.:S ':'0 seE;;"! c l:E5

1,lhen the transmi3sior: 1 fn'2 crusses a d' _ •
1'02 , a reatnereu plur:ti;,c, . _.
can be maintained at the l02d's edge to block v:l.ews do"" th", tt,. __ ,
sion line ri.ght-of-h'ay.
2. ,-lhere terrain permits, specially-designed spans can be used to elevate
the line above a travelled Haten-my or road.
3. Opportunities will be sought to locate transmission structures on high
points to reduce the required tree clearing from the right-of-way. If
necessary, long spans and tall structures may be considered for such
areas in order to retain as much of the existing vegetation as possible.
4. In areas where the transmission line is to be constructed in a heavily-
timbered area parallel to an existing road, it should be removed far
enough from the road so that existing vegetation can be used as a
natural screen.
Clearing Angle
Rood
1 high
" If
:uch
SSibl
e
,
/-
5.
For long, straight sections of tra;;s:;lissio:. Jince, the cl"cc[i If
can be irregular to simulate natural in thE
Along the boundaries of the right-of-way, existing trees and other
vegetation can be feathered back at an angle by selective clearing,
tree topping where feasible and by removing danger trees Ilhich stand
on the edges of the cleared area.
Clearing /,ngle
6.
It is important to avoid constructing the transmission line along beach
areas. Topography and vegetation should be used to screen the facilities
as much as possible from views from open waterways.
View ~
-7
Beach/ Estuary Zone
7. In areas where the transmission line traverses open muskeg or cleared
areas, it should be located along edges of the clearings if possible
to take advantage of existing timber as background. The scrub timber
should be left whenever possible for variety and the transmission
structures should be selected so their color blends with the natural
landscape.
Muslteg with Scattered Vogotation
I
,,--
8.
r-' ..... The transmission line should be located on or"
slopes ,.;henever feasible, to ut.ilize exist;n
o
t'mb' er as a -' .. f
-'- b .J,.. oC1.een c,(d
Ih; ITLdth sbould be limited, 1y '. (_.
downhiL. s de tbe l.LllCC so tbat tree trunks on the uphill side no!.
crp...ate a 1 ne across the slope.
to Stoop Forest Siopo
Inlet
' .
.".
9. In areas where topography is irregular, every effort will be made [0 avoid
silhouetting the transmission line and structures against tbe by
ing the line below hills or ridge crests. Natural features, such as
outcroppings, can be used as a background to reduce visibility of the
structures. Trees should be retained on top of knobs and ridges, and at
breaks in slope.
10. Bench or terrace areas on forested hillsides can be utilized ~ h e r e
feasible to a l l o ~ existing trees to provide natural screening for the
transmission line.
Bench Topography