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National Ethics Advisory Committee

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Resources
Publications
NEAC has produced a number of publications and documents, which are listed under the following categories:        Intervention studies Observational studies Elective services Pandemic planning and response Goals, Objectives and Desired Outcomes of an Ethical Review System (GODO) Health and disability research - review of processes for ethical review Annual reports

Intervention Studies
Ethical Guidelines for Intervention Studies (Nov 2009) NEAC has developed guidelines on conducting intervention studies that aim to contribute to better health outcomes for New Zealanders by further developing best practice in intervention studies. Information and advice on the ethical review of research, including application forms, can be found on the New Zealand Health and Disability Ethics Committees website. Information and advice on the ethical review of studies, including application forms, can be found on the New Zealand Health and Disability Ethics Committees website

Observational Studies
Ethical Guidelines for Review of Observational Studies: Observational Research, Audits and Related Activities (Dec 2006) NEAC has developed guidelines on conducting observational studies in an ethical manner that are intended to facilitate high quality studies, protect the interests of participants, and underpin public assurance of good study conduct. The guidelines are available in combination with a two-page summary guidance sheet for easy reference. Information and advice on the ethical review of observational studies, including application forms, can be found on the New Zealand Health and Disability Ethics Committees website

Elective Services
Ethical Issues in Elective Services: NEAC Report to the Minister of Health (Feb 2007) NEAC completed work on ethical issues in elective services and provided advice to the Minister of Health in September 2006. See also: NEAC advice on elective services. Booking Systems for Elective Services: Literature Scan to Identify Ethical Issues of National Significance (Feb 2005) This report to NEAC is based on a scan of literature reporting research and developments related to New Zealand’s booking system. The purpose is to assist NEAC identify any ethical issues of national significance addressed, or raised, about booking systems for elective services. The focus is on publications reporting research and/or discussing the New Zealand booking system and accompanying policy.

Goals. Annual Reports NEAC Annual Report 2009 NEAC Annual Report 2008 NEAC Annual Report 2007 NEAC Annual Report 2006 NEAC Annual Report 2005 NEAC Annual Report 2004 NEAC Annual Report 2003 NEAC Annual Report 2002 Page last updated: 15 October 2010 . Objectives. peer review. Health and Disability Research . ethics committee review. Ethical Values for Planning for and Responding to a Pandemic in New Zealand: A Statement for Discussion (Jul 2006) NEAC prepared a statement of ethical values for planning for and responding to a pandemic.a report to the Minister of Health. objectives and desired outcomes that are to be applied to the ethical review system itself. It applies established ethical standards to research and related activity. NEAC sought feedback to make the statement as reflective of shared values. and using shared values to make decisions in situation s of overwhelming demand. and Desired Outcomes of an Ethical Review System (GODO) in accordance with its statutory function to determine nationally consistent ethical standards across the health sector. Getting Through Together also gives guidance on some key issues in pandemic ethics. Getting Through Together emphasises using shared values to help people to care for themselves. their whānau and their neighbours.Pandemic Planning and Response Getting Through Together: Ethical values for a pandemic (July 2007) NEAC has completed its work on ethical values for a pandemic. Objectives and Desired Outcomes of an Ethical Review System (GODO) GODO statement The National Ethics Advisory Committee – Kāhui Matatika o te Motu (NEAC) has issued a statement of Goals. The ethical review system includes ethical aspects of self-review. and specialist review of health and disability research and related activity. GODO states established goals. as possible.Review of Processes for Ethical Review Review of the Current Processes for ethical Review of Health and Disability Research in New Zealand (May 2004) Review of the Current Processes for ethical Review of Health and Disability Research in New Zealand . and as useful. It identifies widely shared ethical values for our pandemic planning and response. The Minister issued a media release on 2 July 2007 in response to NEAC’s pandemic work.

this same level of care can mean the difficult choice of purchasing the necessary and expensive drugs instead of paying this month's rent or buying food. Perhaps nowhere can we see this more than in access to HIV/AIDS services. God is able from these stones to raise up children to Abraham. Each year. However. are contributing significantly to the common good. —The Reverend Tyrone Fowlkes National Episcopal AIDS Coalition © 2010 . less than half of those who need them. this impact is more visible in low and middle income countries. Encouraging universal access and human rights is life giving — for ourselves as well as the communities of which we are a part. for John. It is true that these groups were among the most educated and elite groups in Judea. if only in part. they too could embrace a much deeper humanity. Barriers to access are commonplace in many societies. Should we come down with an illness that requires a visit to the doctor and a round of antibiotics. Not only do these groups often face discrimination but they are at higher risk for HIV infections as a result." —Matthew 3:9 Access is not something we equally share. This year's World AIDS Day theme is: Universal Access and Human Rights. Some of us receive special invitations to black-tie affairs while others would be happy just to be invited to lunch by a group of co-workers. While antiretroviral therapies are effective in treating HIV infection. Often we feel that granting equal access will negatively impact the privileges that we. And it is precisely this sentiment that John the Baptist challenges in his discourse with the Pharisees and Sadducees when they presented themselves for baptism. By doing so. Thus the promotion of individual human rights can be instrumental in preventing the spread of HIV. sex workers and other marginalized groups. their 'privilege' of being descendants of Abraham in no way relieved them of the responsibility to 'bear good fruit'. have access to them. But. for I tell you. Increasingly. Advocating for equal access to HIV information. ourselves enjoy. When we support such humanitarian efforts we are sharing in a much larger drama where we. 'We have Abraham as our ancestor'. education and treatment as well as human rights protections will not only increase our own well-being. much of our attitude toward universal and equal access is often blurred by larger assumptions of class and privilege. Yet for others. obtaining medical treatment may be as simple as presenting our insurance card. The relationship that universal access has to human rights becomes even more acute when viewed through the experiences of injection drug-users. But it will foster a collective ability to make healthy choices.World AIDS Day Resources World AIDS Day Prayers Worship Service for World AIDS Day Presiding Bishop World AIDS Day Letter Universal Access and Human Rights: A Meditation on World AIDS Day "Do not presume to say to yourselves. millions of people continue to be infected with HIV.