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COWARD TO
THE
END
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THE world’s most wanted terrorist Osama
Bin Laden died as a coward after using one
of his wives as a human shield.
The Al Qaeda mastermind was shot dead by US
special forces in a raid monitored from the White
House. President Barack Obama watched on spy
cameras as Bin Laden died alongside his wife, son
and two aides.
US intelligence had traced the terror chief to a high-
walled mansion in Pakistan and an elite unit was sent in
KLIEKFG8><)
9pAf_e@e^_XdXe[GX[iX`Z=cXeX^Xe
TEN YEAR MANHUNT: SPECIAL REPORT AND PICTURES PAGES 2-12. NO HIDING PLACE PAGES 20-21
The evil terrorist
was shot dead in
a daring mission
by crack US troops
***
Victory123
2 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
FG@E@FE();@8IP(-KM*0JK8IJ++:IFJJNFI;J+,C<KK<IJ+.:@KP+0JGFIK,(
9i`kX`ep\jk\i[Xp
Amsterdam Sunny 15C/59F
Brussels Sunny 15C/59F
Dublin Sunny 13C/55F
Frankfurt Sunny 15C/59F
Geneva Showers 18C/64F
Lisbon Sunny 21C/70F
Madrid Sunny 23C/73F
Paris Sunny 18C/64F
Rome Fair 21C/70F
Amsterdam Sunny 14C/57F
Brussels Sunny 16C/61F
Dublin Fair 14C/57F
Frankfurt Sunny 17C/63F
Geneva Sunny 19C/66F
Lisbon Fair 21C/70F
Madrid Sunny 23C/73F
Paris Sunny 19C/66F
Rome Sunny 22C/72F
9i`kX`e
<oki\d\j1
(24 hours
to 2pm yesterday)
Warmest: Porthmadog 18C (64F)
Coldest: Kinbrace -5C (23F)
Wettest: Camborne 0.32in.
Sunniest: Tiree 15.0hr.
C`^_k`e^$lgk`d\j Glasgow 8.57pm-5.29am
London 8.26pm-5.28am
Manchester 8.41pm-5.30am
Newcastle 8.42pm-5.21am
Belfast 8.58pm-5.39am
Birmingham 8.35pm-5.31am
Bristol 8.35pm-5.37am
New Moon
3 May
MOON rises: 5.09am, sets: 9.09pm
SUN rises London: 5.30am, sets: 8.26pm
Manchester rises: 5.31am, sets: 8.41pm
Dffe#jleXe[k`[\j
HIGH TIDE
London B’ge (2.42am), (2.57pm)
Liverpool (–), (12.04pm)
Greenock (1.15am), (1.34pm)
Dover (–), (12.05pm)
Jlggc`\[Yp Meteo0roup
Kf[Xp Kfdfiifn
100
80
60
40
20
0
-20
40
30
20
10
0
-10
-20
-30
ºC ºF
d`e dXo d`e dXo d`e dXo d`e dXo d`e dXo d`e dXo
J@O$;8P=FI<:8JKTemperatures in Centigrade
8ifle[k_\nfic[p\jk\i[Xp
Temperatures in Centigrade
North West: A dry and fine day with
plenty of sunshine and just a little patchy
cloud. Gentle winds. High 16C (61F).
East Anglia: A dry day with good spells
of sunshine, but some cloud in the north.
Breezy. High 14C (57F).
Northern Ireland: Dry and fine with
lengthy spells of sunshine. Moderate to
fresh southeast winds. High 15C (59F).
London/South East: Dry and fine with
plenty of sunshine and just a little patchy
cloud. Breezy. High 15C (59F).
Wales: It will be a dry and fine day with
lengthy spells of sunshine. Breezy with
brisk winds. High 16C (61F).
South: It will be a dry and fine day with
long spells of sunshine. Breezy with brisk
winds. High 16C (61F).
Midlands: Fine and dry with long periods
of sunshine. Breezy with moderate
easterly winds. High 16C (61F).
South West: Once early showers have
cleared it will be dry and increasingly
sunny. Breezy. High 16C (61F).
Channel Isles: A dry day with sunny
spells, but also some cloud. Breezy with
fresh to strong winds. High 15C (59F).
Sea: North Sea: Slight. Irish Sea:
Moderate. Channel: Moderate.
Joday's summary: DX`ecp[ipn`k_jlej_`e\
Scotland: Any low cloud in the east will
break to leave it dry with lots of sunshine.
Gentle winds. High 16C (61F).
UK OUTLOOK TOMORROW: Dry with long spells of sunshine, but cloud is expected to
thicken across Northern Ireland, Wales and southwest England during the afternoon.
North East/Yorks: Dry with lengthy periods
of sunshine, but also some cloud around.
Gentle to moderate winds. High 14C (57F).
Aberdeen 8.5 0.00 3 12
Aberporth 9.2 0.00 9 18
Alnwick 13.0 0.01 7 11
Belfast 14.0 0.00 6 16
Birmingham 12.6 0.00 6 15
B’mouth 2.2 0.08 10 17
Bristol 9.5 0.00 8 18
Cardiff 8.9 0.00 9 18
Durham 11.6 0.00 4 13
Edinburgh 11.4 0.00 3 16
Glasgow 14.6 0.00 2 16
Hull 13.9 0.00 3 12
Ipswich 11.5 0.00 8 13
Leeds 13.8 0.00 2 15
Lincoln 14.1 0.00 6 13
London 10.5 0.00 9 17
Manchester 13.8 0.00 7 15
Oxford 9.8 0.00 6 17
S’hampton 6.8 0.00 11 17
St Andrews 9.0 0.00 0 12
24 hours SUN RAIN TEMP
to 5pm (hrs) (ins) (min) (max)
: = : = : =
Amsterdam . Sunny 14 57
Athens . . . . . Sunny 22 72
Barcelona. . . Rain 16 61
Berlin . . . . . . Cloudy 9 48
Budapest . . . Fair 17 63
Cairo. . . . . . . Sunny 33 91
Cape Town. . Cloudy 20 68
Casablanca . Shwrs 15 59
Corfu . . . . . . Sunny 22 72
Dublin. . . . . . Sunny 12 54
Dubrovnik. . . Fair 17 63
Faro . . . . . . . Rain 18 64
Florence. . . . Sunny 23 73
Gibraltar . . . . Cloudy 19 66
Guernsey . . . Rain 11 52
Hong Kong. . Cloudy 29 84
Istanbul. . . . . Fair 18 64
Jersey. . . . . . Sunny 13 55
Larnaca . . . . Sunny 22 72
Las Palmas . Cloudy 20 68
Los Angeles. Sunny 27 81
Luxor . . . . . . Sunny 33 91
Malaga . . . . . Cloudy 21 70
Mallorca . . . . Cloudy 18 64
Malta . . . . . . Sunny 21 70
Melbourne . . Cloudy 16 61
Miami . . . . . . Cloudy 31 88
Moscow . . . . Cloudy 12 54
Nairobi . . . . . Cloudy 24 75
New Delhi. . . Fair 38 100
New York . . . Cloudy 17 63
Nice . . . . . . . Sunny 19 66
Nicosia . . . . . Sunny 24 75
Perth. . . . . . . Sunny 24 75
Prague . . . . . Cloudy 14 57
Singapore. . . Rain 26 79
Stockholm . . Shwrs 6 43
Sydney. . . . . Cloudy 18 64
Tel Aviv. . . . . Sunny 33 91
Tenerife . . . . Fair 21 70
Toronto. . . . . Shwrs 11 52
Tunis. . . . . . . Sunny 22 72
Venice . . . . . Sunny 20 68
Vienna . . . . . Sunny 15 59
Warsaw . . . . Cloudy 10 50
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Body buried at sea to ward off fanatics
FBI’s Most Wanted website yesterday marks Bin Laden’s death
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on Sunday night with orders
to kill. Four Black Hawk heli-
copters flew a team of 24 US
Navy Seals to carry out the
daring attack on Bin Laden’s
compound in Abbottabad.
After being identified by a
woman – believed to be his
youngest wife Amal al-Sadah
– the terror chief was shot in
the eye and chest while
firing an automatic weapon
at the US commandos.
John Brennan, US counter
terrorism adviser, told a
White House press confer-
ence: “The woman killed was
Bin Laden’s wife. She served
as a shield.
“Here is Osama Bin Laden
who has been calling for
these attacks living in a
million dollar house in an
area far from the front line
hiding behind women put in
front of him as a shield.”
But hiding behind women
could not save Bin Laden,
the inspiration behind the
9/11 attacks on the US and
7/7 terror outrage in London.
His body was retrieved by
the Seals and buried at sea
after a 99.9 per cent DNA
match was gained. Photos
were also taken which are
expected to be shown to the
world today.
Last night US President
Barack Obama said: “The
world is safer. It is a better
place because of the death of
Osama Bin Laden.”
And former Republican
presidential candidate Mike
Huckabee spoke for many
when he said: “Welcome to
hell, Bin Laden.”
Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton refused to confirm
whether the $25million
bounty put on Bin Laden’s
head after the 9/11 attacks
would be paid out.
Last night it emerged the
hunt for the Al Qaeda leader
was given a huge boost after
one of the 9/11 plotters
revealed information under
torture in Guantanamo Bay.
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed
gave CIA interrogators the
name of Bin Laden’s personal
courier after repeated “water-
boarding”, according to the
Wikileaks website.
US intelligence followed
the courier to Abbottabad
last August, an hour’s drive
from the capital Islamabad,
and the suspicious £600,000
compound was located a
short walk from Pakistan’s
equivalent of Sandhurst mili-
tary academy.
A full-scale spy plane and
satellite surveillance opera-
tion was launched, while CIA
agents of Pakistani descent
were holed up in farm build-
ings close to the house. They
even managed to smuggle a
camera into the compound.
The first evidence that Bin
Laden was there came after
he was picked up on a CIA
microphone. A photo was
also taken of him inside the
compound prompting Mr
Obama to hold secret meet-
ings with his security team.
The green light for the
operation was given last Fri-
day, as the world’s attention
was on the Royal Wedding.
It is thought the President
chose not to bomb the com-
pound because he wanted to
have Bin Laden’s body as
firm proof he was dead and
did not want to kill another
family living in the house.
Mr Obama revealed the
news of Bin Laden’s demise
in a late-night address to the
nation, triggering wild cele-
brations on the streets of
New York and Washington.
He said: “On nights like
this one, we can say to fami-
lies who have lost loved ones
to Al Qaeda’s terror: Justice
has been done.”
But America and Britain
immediately issued a height-
ened terror alert amid fears
that Al Qaeda will stage a
revenge “spectacular”.
Within hours of the raid
being announced, radical
British Muslim cleric Anjem
Choudary said: “Britain is
more likely to face a 7/7 today
than ever.”
And CIA director Leon
Panetta said: “Though Bin
Laden is dead, Al Qaeda is
not. The terrorists almost
certainly will attempt to
avenge him, and we must –
and will – remain vigilant and
resolute.” But across Wash-
ington there was a wide-
spread belief that Bin Lad-
en’s death was a devastating
blow to Al Qaeda.
David Cameron, who was
woken in the early hours of
yesterday to be told the news
by President Obama, said
Bin Laden’s elimination
would “bring great relief to
people across the world”.
Pakistan was only informed
about the raid after it was
over, underlying fears that
rogue elements in Pakistan’s
intelligence service have
been too close to Bin Laden.
The fact that he was able
to live so close to the Paki-
stan capital will further
undermine trust between the
US and Pakistan.
0PINI0N & 00MM£NJ: Pk0£ !2
IN a move designed to thwart fierce
reaction, Osama Bin Laden’s body was
swiftly buried at sea yesterday.
But the rapid disposal and absence
of published photographic evidence of
his death sparked conspiracy theories
that he had not been killed.
The US military said the decision to
dispose of the Al Qaeda leader’s
remains at sea was taken to avoid
international problems over a burial
site, after Saudi Arabia was said to
have refused to take the corpse.
The move was also ordered to
prevent construction of any physical
shrine to Bin Laden that could become
a future focal point for fanatics. Bin
Laden, shot in the eye by American
forces in Abbottabad, Pakistan, was
buried at sea from the deck of a US
aircraft carrier in the north Arabian
Sea after being washed according to
Islamic custom and receiving a
religious funeral, a US official said.
But Muslim clerics interpreted the
burial at sea as a humiliating disregard
for the Muslim practice of placing the
body in a grave with the head pointed
toward Mecca. Sea burials could be
allowed, they said, but only where the
death occurred on a ship.
Scholars said the sea burial might
further provoke calls for revenge
attacks on American targets. “The
Americans want to humiliate Muslims
through this burial, and I don’t think
this is in the interest of the US
administration,” said Omar Bakri
Mohammed, the radical cleric who fled
Britain for exile in Lebanon.
According to US sources, the death
of a sister of the terror leader in a
Boston hospital several years ago
allowed DNA confirmation of his death.
The Kremlin welcomed the US’s
“serious success” in slaying him. But as
the internet erupted with messages
from sceptics doubting the death,
Major-General Vladimir Ovchinskiy,
former head of Russia’s Interpol
bureau, said: “Perhaps he was killed
ages ago, or probably he is still alive.”
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DNA means US is 99.9% certain it is him
***slip
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 3
The bloody scenes inside
the devil's Iortress lair...
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Bin Laden’s fortress home, top
right. Images from inside show,
above, a bloodstained bed and
other furnishings strewn about
in the ransacking during the
American raid. Right, smashed
windows in the living room.
***slip
Victory123
4 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
I’ve waited 10 years for
The 7/7 Tavistock Square bus bomb in London in 2005
A tense Obama watches the operation. Left, a sign in New York
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OSAMA Bin Laden’s final
moments were watched live by
Barack Obama in the White
House, it emerged last night.
The US president saw the Al
Qaeda leader shot dead on a
giant TV screen while huddled
in a room with Vice President
Joe Biden and members of the
national security team.
In scenes that could have
been taken straight from the
hit US television series 24,
Obama exclaimed “we got him”
when Bin Laden’s body was
recovered.
Images released by the White
House show 20 US officials
watching anxiously as the
action is streamed via satellite
link from the helmet-mounted
camera of a US commando.
Obama, wearing a casual
jacket, shirt and khaki trousers,
is seen leaning forward in his
chair looking intently at the
screen.
He is also seen in a close-up
image with his mouth covered
by his knuckles and in
another picture pointing
while talking to National
Security Adviser Tom
Donilon. Secretary of
State Hillary Clinton is
captured with her hand
over her mouth as she
struggles to contain her
emotions during the
dramatic episode.
Obama’s top counter-
terrorism adviser John
Brennan told a press
conference yesterday
that the President moni-
tored the progress of the
operation from begin-
ning to end in a “very
tense” atmosphere.
He revealed “the minutes
passed like days” as Obama
and officials tracked the mis-
sion and that the most nail-
biting moment came when a
malfunctioning helicopter was
forced to land and they had to
move on to “plan B”.
Speaking at the White House
Mr Brennan said: “It was prob-
ably one of the most anxiety-
filled periods of time in the lives
of the people who were assem-
bled here yesterday.
“The minutes passed like
days and the President was
very concerned about the secu-
rity of our personnel – that was
what his mind was on through-
out. It was clearly very tense
with a lot of people holding
their breath.”
He added there was a “tre-
mendous sigh of relief” as news
came in of Bin Laden’s death.
Details of how Bin Laden was
finally tracked down to a
compound in Pakistan emerged
last night after it was revealed
US forces used information
gleaned from tortured Guan-
tanamo Bay detainees to pin-
point his whereabouts.
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed,
who helped to plot the 9/11
atrocity, gave CIA interroga-
tors the name of Bin Laden’s
personal courier after repeat-
edly being subjected to contro-
versial “waterboarding” and
stress position techniques.
According to secret documents
obtained by whistleblowing
website WikiLeaks, another Al
Qaeda “leader” held at the
Cuban prison confirmed the
courier’s identity – leading to
the massive manhunt which
tracked Bin Laden – the world’s
most wanted man and ending a
10-year hunt.
The US yesterday hailed the
use of the torture methods as
being directly responsible for
helping security forces hunt
down and kill the Al Qaeda
leader. But it has reignited the
debate over whether water-
IT was the moment devastated
families who lost loved ones in two of
the world’s most devastating terror
attacks had been waiting for.
A decade after 9/11 in America and
six years since 7/7 in London, the
relatives whose lives were ripped
apart on the command of Osama Bin
Laden finally got justice.
He personally ordered the attacks
on September 11 2001 on New York
and Washington which killed 2,995
people, including 67 Britons.
His poisonous extremism then
inspired four British Islamic
extremists to blow themselves up in
London on July 7, 2005 and kill 52
innocent commuters.
Yesterday, Maggy Owen, 63, from
Portsmouth, whose daughter Melanie
de Vere, 30, was killed when the Twin
Towers collapsed, said: “I’ve been
waiting for this for 10 years.
“We should not rejoice in the death
of others, but this man murdered
thousands of people, including my
daughter. Nothing will replace her
but this has closed a door.”
Melanie was waiting for a breakfast
meeting to start on the 106th floor of
the north tower when the first of the
hijacked planes hit.
It was her second day in New York
and the start of a glamorous new job
as an events manager for financial
magazine publishers Risk Waters.
Mrs Owen said: “I’m glad he didn’t
go out in a blaze of glory, I feared he
Aljk`Z\
JOY AT GROUND ZERO
AMERICANS took to the
streets yesterday to celebrate
Osama Bin Laden’s death.
In New York, where his
hijackers flew passenger jets
into the twin towers of the
World Trade Center in 2001,
killing 3,000 people, the party
went on all night.
Chants of “USA! USA!”
broke out in Times Square.
Watching work on the new
towers, Nicole Alexander, 22,
from New Jersey, said: “We
are part of an epic moment in
American history. This is
victory at last.”
Thousands broke into The
Star Spangled Banner as
they rushed into the streets
on Sunday night and crowds
gathered at the White House
in Washington as President
Barack Obama announced
Bin Laden had been shot.
Ashley Hollett, 22, from
Kirkby, Merseyside, came out
of her New York hotel to see
the crowds in Times Square.
“This is amazing news,” said
***
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 5
this...he killed my girl
Hillary Clinton puts her hand to her mouth as she watches
9/11 victim Melanie de Vere with her mother, Maggy Owen
Bin Laden-inspired attack on Twin Towers is vivid in American memory
c`m\m`[\fXj9`eCX[\e[`\[
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Blair-Bush:
‘Thanks for
finishing job
we started’
TONY Blair expressed his “heartfelt
gratitude” to Barack Obama yesterday on
news of the death of Osama Bin Laden.
The former Prime Minister joined former
US President George W Bush in praising the
operation that saw the world’s most wanted
man shot dead.
The two leaders spearheaded international
military action that saw troops enter
Afghanistan in 2001 in order to hunt down
the Al Qaeda leader after the September 11
terror attacks in the US. At the time,
President Bush called Bin Laden the world’s
most-wanted terrorist, “dead or alive”.
His killing is likely to be the defining
moment of Barack Obama’s presidency with
his approval ratings expected to rise.
Mr Blair thanked President Obama and the
military personnel involved in the operation.
He also paid tribute to those who lost their
lives in September 11 attacks. He said: “9/11
was an attack not just on the United States,
but on all those who shared the best values
of civilisation.” And
he warned that,
despite Bin Laden’s
death, the fight
against the terrorism
he inspired and the
ideology he
represented remains
“as urgent as ever”.
In a statement, Mr
Bush said that the
news was a
“momentous
achievement”.
He said: “The fight
against terror goes
on, but tonight
America has sent an
unmistakable
message: No matter
how long it takes,
justice will be done.”
David Cameron
said: “News of Bin
Laden’s death will be welcomed right across
our country. Of course it does not mark the
end of the threat we face from extremist
terrorism. Indeed, we will have to be
particularly vigilant in the weeks ahead. But
it is, I believe, a massive step forward.”
Labour leader Ed Miliband said: “Osama
Bin Laden committed one of history’s most
appalling acts of terrorism and the world is a
safer place because he will no longer be able
to command or encourage acts of terror.
“For the victims of 9/11 and their families,
nothing can take away the pain of what
happened but this will provide an important
sense of justice.
“Despite the death of Osama Bin Laden,
our vigilance against the perpetrators of
terrorism must and will continue.”
Meanwhile, the Foreign Office last night
advised British nationals overseas to
monitor local media and remain alert to any
signs of unrest as the news of Bin Laden’s
death spreads.
9pDXikpe9ifneGfc`k`ZXc:fii\jgfe[\ek
Momentous, says Blair
boarding – which Britain has
long regarded as torture –
should be used as a legitimate
interrogation technique.
The method sees prisoners
strapped to a board with their
mouths and noses covered by
cling film before water is poured
over their faces. The sensation
mimics drowning. Mike Blake-
more, of human rights group
Amnesty International, said:
“It’s never justifiable and no
-one should be trying to use
tracking down Osama Bin
Laden or anything else to try
and say torture is acceptable.
Whatever is claimed, it is of
course also hopelessly unrelia-
ble as a source of information –
someone being tortured will say
anything to try and make their
suffering stop.”
Former US President George
Bush has claimed that water-
boarding has saved British lives
and “helped break up plots” to
attack Heathrow and Canary
Wharf.
But the Government has long
regarded it as a form of torture
and Prime Minister David Cam-
eron has warned that if “you’re
getting information from tor-
ture, it’s very likely to be unreli-
able information”.
would have been made into a martyr.
In fact, it’s embarrassing for him to
have gone with such a whimper.
“I grew up being told that good
always triumphs over evil and today
has proved that to me.”
Patricia Bingley’s only child Kevin
Dennis, 43, also died in the north
tower. Mrs Bingley, 77, from Clacton-
on-Sea, Essex, said: “I am very, very
relieved. I’ve waited 10 years for this
news, for justice for my son.”
Mr Dennis was a trading manager
for financial firm Cantor Fitzgerald
on the 101st floor. Mrs Bingley said: “I
miss him in every way – his phone
calls, his laughter.”
John Taylor, 62, from Billericay in
Essex, whose daughter Carrie, 24,
was killed in the 7/7 bombings said he
would be celebrating with a glass of
champagne.
He said: “This is a little piece of
justice for Carrie and the thousands
around the world who have been
killed as a result of his actions.”
However, the news brought no real
sense of justice for David Hartley,
whose wife Marie, 34, of
Oswaldtwistle, Lancs, died in the
Tavistock Square bus bomb on 7/7.
He said: “They have got one but
there are more behind. I can’t see
this meaning terrorism is likely to
stop.”
Norman Thompson, from Sheffield,
who lost his stockbroker son Nigel,
33, on 9/11 said: “I’m pleased. It
doesn’t bring our son back. It’s an
every day trial for us.”
AS U.S. HAILS VICTORY
Ashley, who has lost friends in
the Army in Afghanistan.
“It feels less like they were
fighting for nothing now.”
Many feared reprisals while
others wished Bin Laden had
been caught and put on trial.
Frankie Sturiano, 35, who is
working on the new towers,
said: “They should have
hanged him from that crane
like a common criminal.”
His fellow workers raised
their hard hats in a cheer.
Diana Massaroli, 45, who lost
her husband David, stood at
Ground Zero with a US flag.
She said: “I feel calmer than
I’ve felt in 10 years. I am ready
to start a new chapter in life.”
New York firemen, who lost
343 comrades in the disaster,
stood arm-in-arm outside fire
houses, some openly in tears.
Michael Carroll, 27, whose
father, also a fireman, died in
the attack, said: “I never
figured I’d be excited about
someone’s death. It’s been a
long time coming.”
***
Victory123
6 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 7
Why do we give £650m
to haven for terrorists?
‘Secret shield’
for Bin Laden
from Pakistan
Demonstrators in Pakistan protest against killing of Bin Laden yesterday but Andrew Mitchell, right, is sending more aid
OSAMA Bin Laden was being secretly
protected by Pakistani security forces,
leaked US government files allegedly
revealed yesterday.
Wikileaks documents show American
diplomats were aware Bin Laden was
eluding capture because he was being
tipped off about potential US operations.
The claims will further undermine trust
in Pakistan’s willingness to join the
international fight against Al Qaeda.
Last year David Cameron told Pakistan it
could not “look both ways” on terrorism.
He warned: “It is not right to have any
relationship with groups that are
promoting terror.”
At the time, the Pakistani government
issued a strongly-worded rebuttal.
The US was warned in 2009 by the
government of Tajikistan of potential
security leaks. It claimed that “many”
inside Pakistan knew where Bin Laden was.
The Tajik file reportedly stated:
“Whenever security forces attempted a raid
on his hideouts, the enemy received warning
from sources in the security forces.”
The Pakistani authorities claim they did
not know Bin Laden was in the country and
were not told about the US operation.
ByJXiX;`ofe
ByDXikpe9ifne
PoliLical CorrespondenL
FRESH anger erupted yesterday
over Britain’s £650million aid gift
to Pakistan after it emerged that
Osama Bin Laden had been living
there.
David Cameron sparked
dismay last month when he
announced the massive handout
on the eve of tax rises and benefit
cuts in Britain.
The Prime Minister also prom-
ised the Pakistani security serv-
ices, which are widely blamed for
funding and arming the Taliban
highly sensitive military technol-
ogy to combat roadside bombs.
The gesture came after Mr
Cameron sparked a diplomatic
rift last year when he accused
Pakistan of “looking both ways”
on terrorism.
But the act of financial goodwill
was met with anger last night in
the wake of the Al Qaeda leader’s
assassination.
Tory MP Philip Davies, who
criticised the aid payment when
it was announced in April, said:
“It is extraordinary to give £650
million of taxpayers’ money to a
country that at best is facing both
ways and at worst harbouring the
world’s worst terrorist.”
The huge cash injection by the
Department for International
Development will make Pakistan
the UK’s biggest recipient of over-
seas aid.
The package is designed to get
four million of the 17 million
children who currently receive no
schooling into the classroom.
Pakistan spends just 1.5 per
cent of its national income on
schools but is placing billion-
pound orders for six Chinese sub-
marines and 36 fighter aircraft.
Mr Cameron defended the pay-
ments at the time, saying: “If
Pakistan is a success we’ll have a
good friend to deal with.
“If we fail we’ll have all the
problems of migration, of extrem-
ism – problems that we don’t
want to see, so it’s in our interest
that Pakistan succeeds.”
The cash will come on top of
the existing £140million annual
aid commitment to Pakistan and
means Britain will be sending
about £350million a year over the
next four years. Three months
ago, the Government announced
an extra £1billion for India over
the same period.
Britain’s overall foreign aid
budget is on course to rise
from £7billion this year to about
£11billion in 2015.
The Department for Interna-
tional Development is one of the
few Whitehall departments pro-
tected from spending cuts.
International Development
Secretary Andrew Mitchell said
earlier this year: “Britain will be
much tougher in the way it deliv-
ers aid, ensuring it reaches more
people in the poorest parts of the
world.”
However, he has slashed the
number of nations receiving aid
from 43 to just over 20.
Mr Mitchell has already
announced that aid programmes
for Russia, China, Vietnam, Cam-
bodia, Serbia and Moldova will be
scrapped.
But some countries, including
Ethiopia and Zimbabwe, will
receive much more cash.
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THE discovery that Osama
Bin Laden was living in a
wealthy suburb near the
equivalent of Sandhurst
could not have been more
embarrassing for the
Pakistan government.
It simply fuels
suspicions in the West
that at the very least rogue
elements of Pakistan’s
Inter-Services Intelligence
had been harbouring him.
For years US and Allied
troops scoured the caves
of Afghanistan and the
mountains on the Pakistan
border. Yet it now turns out
Bin Laden had been holed
up in Abbottabad, 50 miles
from the capital Islamabad.
The very fact that the US
only told Pakistan after the
raid underlines their lack
of trust in a supposed ally.
It stems from long-term
links between the ISI, the
Taliban and Al Qaeda.
During the Soviet
occupation of Afghanistan
the CIA used the ISI to
reach the mujahideen
resistance, whose leaders
included Bin Laden. But
when the Soviets left, the
ISI retained its links to the
mujahideen, including the
groups that became the
Taliban.
The suspicion that
rogue elements of the ISI
stood by their old friends,
including Bin Laden, has
been underlined by claims
that Dawood Ibrahim, the
alleged mastermind of the
1993 terror attack on the
Mumbai Stock Exchange,
enjoyed ISI protection.
Pakistan has always
insisted it did not know of
Bin Laden’s whereabouts
and pointed to its costly
war against pro-Taliban
tribesmen on the Afghan
border as proof of its
commitment to the war
against terror.
But these suspicions
will inevitably grow and
this in itself is a blow in
the war against terror.
Pakistan is a vital front
in this global war – and it
now appears that it cannot
be relied upon.
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Victory123
8 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
Evil No2 tipped
to win struggle
for power at top
Terrorist commanders Saif al-Adel, left, and Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, above Al Qaeda No 2 Ayman al-Zawahiri beside the terror mastermind Bin Laden
9pAf_e:_XgdXe
THE death of terror mastermind
Osama Bin Laden leaves a power
struggle at the heart of Al Qaeda.
Security experts fear extremists
will strike back in revenge attacks as
four leading extremists now fight to
be the new Bin Laden
Al Qaeda’s current No2 Egyptian-
born doctor Ayman al-Zawahiri is
expected by many experts to
succeed Bin Laden immediately.
He has worked in the Al Qaeda
organisation since its inception and
is often described as the “brains” of
the terror group and the September
11 attacks on the US.
The Islamist extremist has been
Al Qaeda’s most public face since
2001, repeatedly denouncing the US
and its allies in video messages.
He was born into an upper-class
family of scholars and doctors in
Cairo and he has devoted his life to
Islamic theology, history, and jihad.
He graduated from Cairo Univer-
sity’s medical school in 1974 and
obtained a masters degree in surgery
four years later. But he turned from
saving lives to taking lives.
He rose to prominence when he
was tried with other radical Islam-
ists for the 1981 assassination of
President Anwar Sadat during a
Cairo military parade.
Al-Zawahiri served three years for
illegal possession of arms. After his
release, he left for Saudi Arabia
before travelling to Pakistan and
Afghanistan, where he set up a
faction of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad
group. He met Bin Laden in the mid-
1980s when both were in Pakistan to
support guerrillas fighting the
Soviets in Afghanistan.
Saif al-Adel is a senior member of
Al Qaeda’s military committee. He
is an ex-colonel in the Egyptian
army special forces and is accused of
helping to mastermind the 1998 US
embassy bombings in Kenya and
Tanzania. He is also suspected of
teaching militants to use explosives
and training some of the September
11 hijackers, and is thought to have
set up a training facility in Somalia.
There has been speculation that
he has fled Afghanistan to live in
Iran. He has been on the FBI’s list of
most wanted terrorists since 2001.
Sulaiman Abu Ghaith was born in
Kuwait and regarded as a spokes-
man for Al Qaeda.
He has appeared on several video
and audio tapes, claiming responsi-
bility for terrorist attacks.
The former religious studies
teacher first came to prominence
during the 1991 Gulf war when he
denounced the invasion of Kuwait
by Saddam Hussein.
In 2000 he left Kuwait for Afghani-
stan, where he met Bin Laden and
joined Al Qaeda. He has been used
by Al Qaeda to widen its appeal from
ultra-conservative and mostly eld-
erly clerics to a younger audience.
American-born terror preacher
Anwar al-Awlaki is one of the most
wanted men in the world, high on
the CIA’s kill or capture list.
He is said to be hiding in Yemen
after being linked to a series of plots
against the US, three September 11
hijackers and to Fort Hood shooter,
Major Nidal Malik Hasan, who
emailed al-Awlaki before the attack.
;<8K?F=8DFEJK<I
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 9
Hate cleric threatens new 7/7
as world fears brutal backlash
Pampered son of billionaire builder
;<8K?F=8DFEJK<I
TERROR chief Osama Bin Laden has been the
inspiration for numerous plots to commit
atrocities on British soil.
The attacks on London’s Underground in July
2005 were the horrific result of his call for a
“holy war”, and shoe bomber Richard Reid was
also deeply involved with Al Qaeda.
US officials think the ex-convict, of Bromley,
Kent, was a trusted agent for Bin Laden. Reid,
28, is in a Boston jail after trying to set light to
his shoes packed with home-made explosives
on a flight from Paris to Miami. Bin Laden’s
attack on New York
in 2001 inspired a
series of race-hate
clerics in London,
including Abu
Hamza al-Masri,
jailed for inciting
murder and racial
hatred. Scotland
Yard questioned him
on suspicion of
bomb plots in Yemen
and he praised the
New York attack at
Finsbury Park
Mosque in 2002.
In 2007 the trial of
the London bombers
was told several had
heard Abu Hamza
preach at the
mosque. The US said Abu Hamza was a
“terrorist facilitator with a global reach” and he
was arrested for extradition. He was tried and
jailed in the UK in 2006.
Despite claiming to hate the West, Bin Laden
sought asylum in Britain in 1995. He visited
London in 1994 to set up an office called the
Advisory and Reformation Committee and had
been an Arsenal supporter since the 1970s.
Bin Laden’s brothers and other relatives also
owned properties in London by the mid-1990s.
His links sparked calls in the US to add Britain
to its black list of states sponsoring terrorism,
but the Home Office banned him from the UK.
Calls for holy
war inspired
UK bombers
9pAf_e:_XgdXe
9pAf_eKnfd\p
Xe[GX[iX`Z=cXeX^Xe
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Hate cleric Abu Hamza
Bin Laden’s former Afghan home yesterday
Armed police on patrol outside Heathrow airport yesterday amid fears of possible revenge attacks
BRITAIN is more likely to face
another 7/7 terrorist attack than
ever before, a radical Muslim
preacher warned yesterday.
Anjem Choudary, the former
UK leader of the banned al-
Muhajiroun organisation, said
the death of Osama Bin Laden
would inspire his followers to
step up their attacks against
the West.
Choudary, whose group
Muslims Against Crusades
threatened to disrupt the Royal
Wedding last week, said: “I think
Britain is more likely to face a
7/7 today than ever.
“Rather than dampening the
spirits of those who are today
engaged in jihad physically
around the world, Bin Laden’s
death will merely act as an
incentive to prove to the world
that the death of anyone will
not affect them.”
Describing Bin Laden as a
“hero” to jihadists, firebrand
Choudary predicted more
attacks in Iraq, Afghanistan and
elsewhere as a result of his
death.
He said: “Undoubtedly, I think
there will be an incentive now to
say to the world that the jihad is
not about one individual and
the jihad never stops.
“The message that people are
very eager to send out is that
there are many Muslims who
are a part of Al Qaeda and the
struggle will continue.”
Yesterday security experts
warned that fanatics would be
seeking revenge for Bin Laden’s
death and that the UK was high
on their list of targets.
Politicians, security chiefs and
Islamic leaders called on the
public to be extra vigilant in
their day-to-day life.
Foreign Secretary William
Hague said Al Qaeda was still
“in business” and warned the
country would need to be
vigilant for “some time to
come”.
He said: “There may be parts
of Al Qaeda that will try to show
that they are in business in the
coming weeks, as indeed some
of them are.
“So I have already asked our
embassies to review their secu-
rity to make sure that vigilance
is heightened.”
David Cameron and Labour
leader Ed Miliband also stressed
the need for vigilance against
the ongoing terrorist threat.
Mohammed Shafiq, chief
executive of UK Muslim think-
tank the Ramadhan Founda-
tion, said: “There will be a need
for calm and extra vigilance and
that time is now.”
Britain’s threat level is already
at severe – the second-highest
level – and will be raised to criti-
cal if the intelligence services
fear an attack is imminent.
Every police force in the coun-
try will be warned to be alert,
while airports and other trans-
port systems will be put on
heightened security.
British targets abroad will
also be urged to stay vigilant.
John Gearson, director of the
Centre for Defence Studies at
King’s College London, said: “I
would expect embassies and
military bases around the world
to be on high alert for some
time.
“There will be concerns that
there could be some sort of
retaliation, that Al Qaeda may
well want to demonstrate that
they are still strong and still in
the game.
“The danger is that the Amer-
icans may lose their focus, that
they will relax and that will pro-
vide an opportunity for the rem-
nants of Al Qaeda to reform and
grow stronger.”
Colonel Richard Kemp, com-
mander of British forces in
Afghanistan in 2003, suggested
the Taliban could now look to
Bin Laden’s deputy, Ayman al-
Zawahiri, for leadership.
He said: “I don’t suppose they
will manage a major attack but
they will undoubtedly try and
strike back in some form in the
short term.”
Security experts say the
threat comes not just from Al
Qaeda but also from its affiliate
groups and from “lone wolf” ter-
rorists whose attacks are virtu-
ally impossible to predict.
One security source said:
“Disrupting the terrorists before
they can get anywhere close to
carrying out attacks has proved
to be extremely effective in the
past.
“The police and intelligence
services will have to use all the
methods at their disposal to
combat this heightened
threat.”
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HE was a Saudi builder’s son who
used his family’s wealth to build
the world’s most feared terrorist
network.
But long before he became the
world’s most wanted man, few
could imagine that the pampered
Riyadh schoolboy would one day
be regarded by billions as the per-
sonification of evil.
He was born in the Saudi Ara-
bian capital in 1957, 17th of more
than 50 children born to his Yem-
eni father Mohamed, a self-made
billionaire building contractor.
Bin Laden’s father died when
the boy was 11 and he grew up
with his mother and stepfather.
He was schooled in the port city
of Jedda at the elite Al Thagher
Model School, where he fell under
the influence of teachers who
were members of the hardline
Muslim Brotherhood.
In the mid-1970s, Bin Laden
married his first cousin, a Syrian
from his mother’s family. He later
married three other women and
fathered up to 25 children.
He graduated from King Abdul
Aziz University in Jedda in 1979
with a degree in civil engineering.
A few months later he left Saudi
Arabia to join the Afghan resist-
ance – the mujahideen – to the
Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghan-
istan. By 1986 he had proved him-
self as a fighter and risen to the
rank of commander.
It was also the year he met
Egyptian militant Ayman al-
Zawahiri, whose teachings influ-
enced him deeply. Two years later,
Bin Laden formed Al Qaeda –
Arabic for “the base”.
It was a network for funding
the battle against the Soviets and
channelling fighters to Afghani-
stan until the war’s end in 1989.
Using his family’s wealth – his
personal fortune was estimated
at several hundred million pounds
– he developed Al Qaeda into a
militant international network.
In 1989, he returned to Saudi
Arabia a hero and began working
for the family construction firm.
But after he joined the move-
ment opposing the Saudi monar-
chy he was stripped of citizenship
and fled in 1991, first to Afghani-
stan, then to Sudan. In 1996 he
was expelled after financing ter-
rorist camps and threatened holy
war on the US if it did not remove
its troops from the Gulf.
In 1998 he issued a fatwa calling
on Muslims to kill Americans,
including civilians, anywhere in
the world. Al Qaeda bombed US
embassies in East Africa in 1998
and attacked the USS Cole in
2000. Then came the attacks on
New York on September 11, 2001.
In 2002 he threatened Britain,
among other nations, for its sup-
port of the US, saying: “It is time
we get even. You will be killed just
as you kill, and will be bombed
just as you bomb.”
Through it all, he vowed: “Amer-
ica can’t get me alive. I can be
eliminated, but not my mission.”
Victory123
10 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
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Beatle George Harrison has
treatment for cancer less than
three years after doctors tell
him he was free of disease.
Tony Blair wears a sacred
Hindu bracelet to ward off
“evil spirits” during Prime
Minister’s Questions.
George Blake is sentenced to
42 years for spying for the
Soviet Union. He caused the
deaths of 42 British agents.
Julian Lennon’s first pop tour
of Europe is cancelled due
to a lack of interest. His
promoters lose £80,000.
A German Antarctic
expedition led by Wilhelm
Filchner gets trapped by
the ice for eight months.
Chancellor Hitler rejects all
theories of devaluation or
inflation after his economics
minister Dr Schacht resigns.
V|s|t the 0a||y £xpress krch|ve oa||ae at www.express.co.u|/arch|ve
Goslings take a gander
THIS gaggle of geese
chicks enjoyed a cool swim
yesterday – with a little
help from their mums.
The 30 down-covered
greylag babies teetered
near the water’s edge
before taking the plunge to
learn how it’s done from
mother geese. But the
supersize family were
careful to stay close
together in the water at
Cod Beck reservoir,
Osmotherley, North
Yorkshire. The greylag is
the largest of the wild
geese native to Britain.
Today’s
answers can
be found on
Page 45
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your own 30-second challenge: for the
very young or arithmetically rusty, you
have 30 seconds for the BEGINNER task.
For a greater challenge, try BEGINNER and
INTERMEDIATE in 30 seconds. True mental
gymnasts should try INTERMEDIATE
and ADVANCED in 30 seconds together.
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Chicks on lake’s edge at Cod Beck, North Yorks, yesterday
Mother geese and their super-size brood take to the water
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 11
countries after visiting them
twice in the past 16 months.
His marriage has sent
support for the monarchy
soaring in both nations,
where there had been
growing calls to cut the ties.
The Queen discussed the
Commonwealth summit with
Australia’s republican Prime
Minister Julia Gillard in an
audience after the wedding
reception on Friday.
At the reception, Kate told
New Zealand’s Prime
Minister John Key she was
looking forward to seeing his
country.
Mr Key said: “The first
thing Kate said was she
wants to visit New Zealand.
She’s keen to come down
Is swoop on Bin Laden the
reason why Wills and Kate
delayed their honeymoon?
Newlyweds to head Down Under
As William and Kate waved to the crowds after their wedding, the Bin Laden operation
was beginning. Next day, right, the couple announced a delay to their honeymoon
Picture: TIM MERRY
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ised the raid at about the very time that
Prince William and Kate Middleton were
getting married on Friday.
It was at 8.20am that morning that Mr
Obama met Thomas Donilon, his
national security adviser, and John O.
Brennan, his counterterrorism adviser,
in addition to other senior aides in the
Diplomatic Room at the White House.
The President was travelling to
Alabama later that morning to see the
damage from last week’s tornadoes.
But first he had to sign off on the final
plan to send special forces operatives
into the compound where intelligence
reports suggested Bin Laden was hid-
ing. Across the Atlantic, William and
Kate were at that very moment starting
their celebrations after marrying in
Westminster Abbey.
Personal security expert and former
undercover investigator Kenn Griffiths
said: “I was looking for the security rea-
sons behind the happy couple’s decision
not to leave the UK at this time and I’ve
no doubt that the Bin Laden operation
in Pakistan was part of that reason.”
Mr Griffiths, a former soldier and
author of The Essential Survival Man-
ual, added: “Bin Laden has had years to
plan for his death and I’m sure there
will be a terrorist backlash, planned by
him to terrorise the world on an unprec-
INTELLIGENCE experts yesterday
claimed the military operation that
killed Osama Bin Laden might have
been behind the decision by the Duke
and Duchess of Cambridge to delay
their honeymoon.
There was widespread surprise on
Saturday when, just 24 hours after the
Royal Wedding, the couple revealed they
were returning to Anglesey so William
could continue his duties as an RAF
helicopter pilot.
But following news of the US opera-
tion in Pakistan, military analysts yes-
terday said there might have been more
to the decision than simply the Prince’s
wish to adhere to his duty.
Professor Anthony Glees, director of
the Centre for Security and Intelligence
Studies at the University of Bucking-
ham, said the military action could have
been directly behind the couple’s deci-
sion to remain in the UK.
“I would not be surprised if the reason
the royal honeymoon was put off had to
do with forewarning that this might be
happening and that security for the
young couple could not be guaranteed
at this moment in time,” he said.
“The Government would probably
have been told that now would not be a
good time for the royal couple to travel
off to the other side of the world.
“Clearly, wherever they would be
going, they would be outside the ring of
steel that the authorities could provide
for them in the UK.”
Reports in the United States suggest
that President Barack Obama author-
edented scale.” A Palace spokesman
last night played down the speculation,
stressing that William and his bride had
made their “personal” decision to stay
in the country “weeks ago”.
The possible destination of the royal
couple’s honeymoon has been the sub-
ject of much speculation.
The Duke is known to have a deep
affection for Africa and would be on safe
romantic territory if he chose to take his
wife to Kenya, where he proposed to her
last year. Jordan, where Kate spent two
years with her family as a child, has also
been touted as a possibility, but its
proximity to hotspots such as Syria
could count against it. If they are keen
to escape the media, a secluded Carib-
bean island might be a safe choice.
Bequia and Necker Island both have the
benefit of being easily secured, as does
the ultra-exclusive Mustique, where
Kate’s parents are frequent visitors.
Lizard Island, off the coast of Queens-
land, Australia, has also emerged as a
contender.
The couple were understood to be
back at their home in Anglesey last
night after spending three days relaxing
at a hideaway in Britain.
William is expected back at work
today.
PRINCE William plans to
take his new wife on a tour of
New Zealand and Australia
in the next few months to
introduce her to the two
Commonwealth countries.
St James’s Palace is in
talks with the governments
of both nations about the
trip, expected to happen in
September or October.
Final details have not been
agreed but the new Duke
and Duchess of Cambridge
hope to be in New Zealand
for part of the Rugby World
Cup which runs from
September 9 to October 23.
They are also planning a
short visit to Australia
around the same time.
Buckingham Palace and
St James’s Palace have
discussed sending them to
Perth in Western Australia to
coincide with the Queen’s
visit there for the biennial
Commonwealth Heads of
Government Meeting from
October 28 to 30.
A senior royal source said:
“The question is, will that
enhance the Queen’s visit
and enhance the image of
the Commonwealth, or will it
become a circus that takes
attention away from
CHOGM?”
The Queen usually spends
two or three days in the host
nation before the summit
starts. So it is possible the
couple could visit Australia
immediately after the rugby
world cup final, just before
the summit. William, 28, has
built an affinity with the two
and we’ll hopefully
encourage her to come and
visit us sometime very soon,
so that was great.”
One potential problem is
that a general election is due
in New Zealand on
November 26 and, by
convention, royal visits do
not take place in
Commonwealth nations in
the run-up to elections.
Opposition leaders fear Mr
Key will use William and
Kate’s visit to boost his
popularity. He has said the
couple can skirt convention
by making their trip private
rather than official.
An autumn tour would
make it unlikely that William
would be posted to the
Falklands in September for
10 weeks’ military service, as
was claimed yesterday.
P
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Victory123
12 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
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A
UST how jubilant
should we be about the
death of Osama Bin
Laden? Well, there’s no
doubt that a murdering
monster has been
destroyed, that the forces who
are fighting the War on Terror
will get a boost to their morale
and that President Obama and
others will trumpet it as hard
as possible – but what are the
longer-term implications?
Five or six years ago you
could buy nodding dolls of Bin
Laden, comedian Frank Skin-
ner mocked him in song and no
self-respecting dissident would
be without a T-shirt adorned
with his face. But there had
been no live broadcast from
him for years and while he was
mentioned on Islamist web-
sites it was with distant respect
rather than fervour.
In fact he’s always been more
icon than executive (remember
the stories about how delighted
but surprised he was over the
success of 9/11?) and his assas-
sination was always going to
make him a martyr.
So what will Al Qaeda and its
affiliates do now? A few weeks
ago I was researching the pos-
sible use of nuclear weapons by
terrorists and was left in no
doubt that Al Qaeda had every
intention of using such mate-
rial if they could get it.
Whether they do possess
such things is a moot point but
the websites shrieked that they
would certainly be used in the
event of the assassination of
“The Sheikh”. I wonder, but it
does point to a real desire for
high-profile revenge – and that
couldn’t come at a more deli-
cate time.
K



HE recent turmoil in the
Arab world has been
largely free of Islamist
extremist involvement. Indeed,
you could say that the inability
of Al Qaeda to influence events
in Egypt marks a signal failure
for them as this was where their
twisted ideology was born.
Egyptian president Hosni
Mubarak, the “Near Enemy”,
was to be toppled for his truce
with Israel but in the event Al
Qaeda had neither involvement
in his removal nor any place in
what replaced him – at least
not yet.
But we’re only glimpsing
what these countries might
look like in years to come. What
we don’t need is an Al Qaeda
that has been stung into fur-
ther action, nor do we need its
internal factions scrambling to
attain power via “spectacular”
attacks.
Take Yemen, for example.
That country is in chaos and
the parasite within it – “Al
Qaeda in the Arabian Penin-
sula” – will mount further
assaults such as the ink car-
tridge bombs at East Midlands
Airport last October to rein-
force their position, I have no
doubt.
The biggest problem though
is Pakistan. It is important to
remember that the regional
war that stretches from the
borders of nuclear-armed Rus-
sia through Afghanistan and on
to Iran has Pakistan at its
centre. The alliance between
Islamabad and the West has
always been wobbly with as
much suspicion focusing upon
its internal intelligence agency,
the ISI, as it does upon Al
Qaeda and the Taliban.
The fact that Osama was
killed in a substantial villa that
was apparently built specially
for him only 35 miles north of
the capital and on the edge of a
military town will not have
helped to cement confidence.
Wasn’t he meant to be trot-
ting about on a donkey, shuf-
fling from cave to cave on the
lawless Afghani border watched
by satellites and harried by
drones instead of living in luxury
and, until yesterday, safety?
Yet every day Pakistan is
rocked by Islamist attacks that
kill dozens of people and its
troops take the worst casual-
ties of the War on Terror while
Al Qaeda tries to foment con-
flict between Pakistan and
India.
Certainly Islamabad’s posi-
tion is ambivalent but recently
it has allowed a four-fold
increase of US drone attacks
from Pakistani airspace that
have accounted for many key
Al Qaeda and Taliban deaths.
The added turmoil that Bin
Laden’s destruction (carried
out by US forces within Paki-
stan’s borders) is bound to
cause will only put increased
and unwelcome pressure on
President Zardari to reassert
his independence.
8



ND of course events in
Pakistan will be
reflected in Britain.
The most recent successful ter-
rorist attacks in this country
were mounted by men who had
schemed amid and leeched
upon our own Pakistani com-
munity.
The fact that we have not
suffered any casualties on our
streets since 2005 does not
mean, however, that the plot-
ters have gone away, rather it is
a mark of the competence of
our security forces.
It’s a fact, for instance, that
40 per cent of America’s exter-
nal intelligence effort is directed
towards Islamist extremist
activity in Britain. Remember
how home-grown terrorists
plotted to seize American air-
liners flying out of Heathrow in
August 2006 and blow them up
in US airspace? That was
designed not only to kill but
also to fracture the relationship
between the “Great” and the
“Little Satan”, the US and UK in
the language of the radicalised.
Now British terrorists will be
looking to mark their icon’s
death with something similar.
This attack has been a great
success but only a fool cannot
see how difficult the backlash
is likely to be. That’s why our
leaders must be careful with
their words and not use such
incendiary phrases as “cru-
sade” as President Bush did,
nor crow about it as Obama is
in danger of doing.
The past few years have seen
real strides taken against our
enemies and many will hope
that the death of Bin Laden
will have decapitated the snake.
It hasn’t: it has inflicted
another grievous wound but
wounded animals are at their
most dangerous.
DEAD MAN:
Bin Laden
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T IS usually thought unbecoming to
celebrate the death of another
human being but when the person in
question was the most murderous
terrorist mastermind in history those
rules of restraint should be suspended.
Let it be said openly: Osama Bin
Laden was an evil man responsible for
killing thousands of innocent people
and it is a thoroughly good thing that
he is dead.
While his assassination may provoke
further attacks by his followers, it is
hardly as if they were not planning more
terrorist assaults in any case – that is
their very purpose just as it was his.
The ability of Bin Laden to repeatedly
evade the West undoubtedly elevated
him to the status of an unbeatable
superhero in the eyes of some in the
Muslim world.
So for those who believe in freedom it
is a major morale boost that the leader
and instigator of Al Qaeda is no more,
indicating that the free world has the
capacity to hunt down its enemies, no
matter how long it may take.
New Al Qaeda leaders will emerge
because the ideology it propounds still,
alas, has many fanatical supporters.
But the removal of an enemy who
bankrolled and directed global Islamist
terrorism has brought justice to the
families of those who died in the
atrocities he inspired. Osama Bin
Laden could run but history will record
that in the end he could not hide.
K
AXPAYERS will today be even
more bewildered at the decision,
made last month, to give an extra
£650million in aid to Pakistan.
At the time the Prime Minister said it
was aimed at tackling poor schooling,
which he said was a “root cause” of
Islamic extremism.
That looks even more pie in the sky
following the tracking down of Osama
Bin Laden to a purpose-built
compound next to a Pakistan military
base.
The political and military elite in
Pakistan are by no means poorly
educated but that has not stopped
them falling into the grip of Islamist
sympathisers.
Until they can prove they will give no
quarter to Al Qaeda not a penny of
British money should line their pockets.
8
LEADING bookmaker is already
paying out on a “No” triumph in
the AV referendum. That is good
news and undoubtedly reflects
the mood of the nation. But a low
turnout could yet gift the result to the
Left-wing “Yes” campaign. So
remember to vote on Thursday or a
noisy minority may still sneak a
thoroughly undeserved triumph.
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 13
AREN’T you fascinated by the
relationship between Sir Trevor
Nunn, 71, and Nancy Dell’Olio
“49”? Sir Trevor’s wife Imogen
Stubbs (50) read English
Literature at Oxford.
She is clever, beautiful, the
mother of his children and an
accomplished actress. Ms
Dell’Olio, on the other hand, is…
what exactly?
She is known for the high-
profile men with whom she
consorts, authoring an
autobiography in which she
gloats about seducing Sven-
Goran Eriksson when she knew
he was married and for wearing
flashy outfits. Men clearly see
something in her. My ladylike
upbringing prevents me from
suggesting what.
LEGGINGS are a guilty pleasure.
We know we look like over-
stuffed sausages in them. We’re
aware that they cling to all our
least attractive bits. We know
we’d look so much better in
something tailored and
flatteringly cut to enhance our
less offensive features.
Yet we are drawn inexorably to
leggings, wooed by the sheer
pleasure of pulling on a garment
so forgiving it’ll neither pinch
nor rub no matter how unbridled
our lunch. So scant thanks to the
expert who warned that wearing
leggings causes “lazy muscles
and leaves legs and stomachs
flabby”. Some mercy please,
allow us to cherish our leggings
and focus your unwelcome
attentions elsewhere.
DID you see President Obama
mercilessly taking the mickey
out of Donald Trump in what
amounted to the roast to end all
roasts? The Donald was in turns
furious, embarrassed, livid and
fed up to the back teeth.
He seemed chronically
incapable of doing what was
required under the circumstances
– smiling through the humiliation
and giving a convincing
impression of being a good
sport. Someone should have
given him a few lessons in
appearing self-deprecating and
oozing good humour when, deep
down, your ego is wilting.
A sulk is never a good look.
One-nil to President Obama.
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A wedding with a
legacy for Britain
W
E’VE heard a lot
about the Olym-
pic legacy but
while we’re still
blissfully basking
in the afterglow,
let us contemplate with opti-
mistic cheer the Royal Wed-
ding’s legacy. When the com-
memorative mugs are chipped
and the bunting stowed away
under the stairs what apart
from our glorious memories
will linger and remain?
Here’s hoping for a lasting
change in our beauty ideal.
Every generation has its pet
picture of what constitutes
true beauty. For Chaucer, a
desirable woman boasted a
high, domed forehead, thin lips
and saucy gap between her
front teeth. For Botticelli she
had a swan-like neck, sloping
shoulders, alabaster skin and
high-set spherical breasts.
In the Twenties she was flat-
chested and boyish with mar-
cel wave in her perky chin-
length hair and, if she was a
little fast, subtly rouged knees.
By the Fifties she was soignee
and sophisticated, complete
with elegant chignon and ciga-
rette holder. We all know Twig-
gy’s freckly gawky coltishness
embodied all that was care-
free, youthful and delicious
about Sixties woman.
Before the wedding Cheryl
Cole could be said to encapsu-
late all that we considered
beautiful. We thrilled to hair
extensions, false eyelashes,
acrylic nails, perma-tan, lip-
gloss like strawberry jam, acres
of visible cleavage and teeny-
tiny legs balanced atop poten-
tially lethal seven-inch heels.
Women the length and breadth
of the country did their best to
“do a Cheryl”. Neon orange
skin, fake nylon follicles, talons
and dazzlingly bleached teeth
became the ultimate aesthetic
aspiration.
Every female in the surpris-
ing TV success The Only Way
Is Essex is a living breathing
homage to the Cheryl Cole
school of beauty. It seemed
there was no other desirable
way for a woman to appear.
After the wedding we feel
very differently. Catherine Mid-
dleton as a bride was the
antithesis of all that we
thought we found beautiful.
She was modestly dressed.
She wore minimal understated
make-up. Her bouncy brunette
hair flowed with its usual infor-
mal exuberance. She was pink
with excitement, not Jaffa
orange. Her eyes shone with
happiness. She was slim as a
wand but oozing the vitality of
an outdoorsy young woman
who enjoys a hearty breakfast.
S



UDDENLY scales fell
from our eyes. We
realised that what we
had thought exquisite was
somewhat tawdry and more
than a tad vulgar.
In Catherine, Duchess of
Cambridge, we saw the real
thing. Her beauty, echoing her
mother Carole’s slender grace
and elegance, was as sustain-
ing and nourishing as a Con-
stable painting or an Elgar
cello concerto.
She is a refreshing aesthetic
role model in whom we can all
revel and rejoice. May she and
her handsome Prince live hap-
pily ever after.
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GARDENERS will have nodded with approval at father of the
bride Michael Middleton’s recipe for coming back to earth with
consummate serenity after all the fuss and frolics.
Mr Middleton was seen smiling and tranquil as he tackled
the lawn of the family home in Bucklebury atop his ride-on
motor mower. Setting about the pressing yet soothing familiar
Sunday afternoon task of mowing a lawn run riot is guaranteed
to calm even the most discombobulated soul.
As I re-potted my citrus plants and coaxed my rampant
clematis into submission, I noted that horticultural therapy was
working wonders at dispelling my Post Nuptial Depression.
Wise Michael Middleton (hasn’t he a wonderful head of hair,
ladies?) evidently employed the same tried and tested method.
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WHAT a shame it takes a royal
knees-up to persuade us to throw
street parties.
There were a flurry of them round
our way and carousers were united
in roaring their approval. There’s
nothing more reassuringly neigh-
bourly than breaking bread, or in
our case chocolate fudge cake, with
your neighbours. Instead of being
unidentified irritants who slam
doors at dawn, play music you
loathe and scuttle past you in the
mist and rain, they become human
beings with names, personalities
and the ability to add hugely to the
bonhomie of your very existence.
Most of us aren’t hostile to those
who live cheek by jowl with us. We’re
just so busy, harassed and frenzied
we don’t have time for life’s niceties.
Friday’s street jamborees proved
it’s well worth carving out a chunk
of time just to make the effort.
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NATURAL BEAUTY: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, stunning on her wedding day
UNAMUSED: Donald Trump
Picture: PA
Victory123
14 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
high-intensity light that
allows one partner to
read without disturbing
the other. You may have
tried reading with an
ordinary torch held
either in your hand or
between your teeth. I
have something much
better – a little light
whose one end slips into
the book and other end
bends over to illuminate
the pages.
For those of us who
sleep about half as long
as our partners such
things are somewhere
between a politeness
and a necessity. And if
your partner nuzzles in
to nibble your ear and
finds they are biting a
headphone – well they
won’t make that mis-
take again. As long as
custom, sentimentality
and the housing short-
age means that couples
share a bedroom these
issues will be crucial to
human happiness. (The Queen and
the Duke of Edinburgh, who do not
have a housing problem, have slept
in separate rooms for decades.)
D



ARRIAGE, as the Arch-
bishop probably said, is a
marathon not a sprint and
as we get older our sleep patterns
change, possibly in opposite
directions. Husband
sleeps more than he
did; wife sleeps less.
Or vice versa. Hoov-
ering at 5am; water-
ing the garden at
5.30; Sudoku at six.
All these things can
come into play. I’m
not much of a
sleeper myself: I
usually hear Sailing
By on the radio at
12.45am and Farming
Today at 5.45am which
for someone who has
rarely been on water and
almost never in a field is
highly educational.
But I now learn it may not be alto-
gether healthy. Researchers at Uni-
versity College London have con-
ducted a many-years-long study into
sleep patterns and their effects.
Six to eight hours a night is the
ideal. If that’s what you’re used to
and you start to deviate from it in
either direction as you get older that
may not be entirely good news. Much
less sleep increases the risk of heart
disease because sleep is a relaxant to
the system; a lot more sleep is likely
to lead to a slowing down in your
mental functions. Too little sleep is a
brain-addler too. If your sleep is off,
your mind may become four to seven
years older than its real age.
So if you haven’t understood this
article so far it may be because you
are getting too much sleep or else
that I’m not getting enough (more
likely the latter).
Allow me to add a footnote here:
this research was conducted on 5,400
civil servants over many years. I am
not a neurologist (or at least not as
far as I can remember) but it does
occur to me that if you’re not a civil
servant these results may not be rel-
evant. (I am not a civil servant either
and never could have been.)
Now you mustn’t worry
about this or resort to
taking lots of pills you
don’t already take
because it’s all just
statistics and these
changes affect a
smallish minority
of the sample. I
am sure there are
plenty of civil serv-
ants who spend all
day sleeping on the
job and are still bright
as buttons when they’re
awake.
I don’t really know how
my brain is working and
I certainly do not intend
to take any tests to find out. In any
case, my own research (conducted
on a very small sample of one) sug-
gests that the strongest link with
sleeplessness is obesity. The less
you sleep, the more time you have
to eat.
When Barbra Streisand was mar-
ried to actor Elliott Gould they had
his and hers fridges beside the bed.
This is a disastrous idea to be avoided
at all costs. If you tend to binge in
the small hours, don’t keep food by
the bed and don’t summon the foot-
man. Make the effort to make your
way to the kitchen. It may at least
burn off a calorie or two.
davidleorobson@gmail.com
F
NE of the best things about the Royal Wedding is that
William and Catherine have probably been sleeping
together for years. So they will already know one of the
key elements of a happy married life – they can sleep
together. And this is no mealy-mouthed attempt to say
something else without using the word. By “sleeping
together” I mean sleeping together – to snore or not to snore?
Do they get equal shares of the duvet (or has she only got equal
shares since Friday)? Are they as one about eating Duchy Origi-
nals shortbread in bed? Is it windows open or windows closed?
And if they’re listening to Radio 4 at 1am and God Save The
Queen comes on, do they both leap out of bed and stand to
attention or does she feel she should but he doesn’t need to?
When it comes down to it, these are the sorts of things that
make a real difference in the lives of the highest and the lowest
in the land. Among the finest marital aids available is a small
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AT RISK? Sleeping
Beauty Picture: DISNEY

www.express.co.uk/
FOR
BRlLLlAN1
HOLlDAY
lDLAS &
AMAZlNC
DLALS,
CO1O
/sou
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 15
Six drugs will be
tested in fight to
slow Alzheimer’s
How staying slim slashes risk of dementia
?@:B<P
THE bitter row surrounding this
Thursday’s referendum on electoral reform
may have been getting plenty of politicians
hot under the collar but the majority of the
British public remain detached from the
whole affair.
With the Yes to AV campaign, fronted by
Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, already
known to be trailing their No rivals in the
polls, insiders tell me plans had been in
place for a “big media push” on bank
holiday Monday, only for the strategy to be
scuppered following the death of Osama
Bin Laden.
“There was no point competing with the
Royal Wedding but bank holiday Monday
had long been identified as the ideal day to
get on people’s televisions before they
went back to work,” says one well-placed
Yes campaign mole.
“Then we had a load of interviews
cancelled due to the Bin Laden news.”
CYNICS suggest that former Blairite favourite
James Purnell’s decision to emerge from the
shadows and front a new movement of Labour
modernisers came only
after he couldn’t find
anything more useful to do.
Party colleagues remind
me that Purnell, pictured,
who walked out of Gordon
Brown’s Cabinet in 2009,
recently attempted to
become chief executive of
charity Save The Children.
Ironically he lost out to
Justin Forsyth, Brown’s former director of
strategic communications.
DOWNTON Abbey star Hugh Bonneville
may be making a guest appearance on
Doctor Who this weekend but the actor
reveals he is banned from watching the
show in his own house.
Bonneville, who appears as Captain John
Avery, says he will be unable to watch the
episode with his family as the show
recently petrified his son.
“Slightly sore topic: my nine-year-old got
so freaked out about Bill Paterson’s demise
in the Daleks episode last year he had
some sleepless nights,” he says.
“So we have had a slight embargo on
Doctor Who, which was annoying for me
because I’d got them all recorded and then
had to wipe all of them!”
WHEN quizzed on his Royal Wedding gift,
David Cameron announced he had bought
Anglesey-based William and Kate a book of
photographs of the scenic Welsh island.
The photographer, long-term Anglesey
resident Glyn Davies, tells me he is now
pinning his hopes on meeting the pair when
the Prince is back on search-and-rescue duty.
“The fact the Prime Minister bought a book
of my photographs is a big accolade,” says
Davies, whose book is entitled Anglesey
Landscapes.
“I know Kate’s keen on photography so I’m
hoping when she looks through the book and
realises I live on the island too she will come
to say hello.”
He adds optimistically: “I have limited
edition prints for £1,000. If they bought one of
those that would be great.”
SCARY Spice Mel B won’t be letting
husband Stephen Belafonte near her when
she gives birth to her third child.
Mel, pictured, who has daughters
Phoenix Chi, 12, and Angel, four, from
previous relationships,
doesn’t have much faith
in her man keeping cool
in the delivery room.
“Will he be my birthing
partner? Oh God, no, he’s
going to be horrendous,”
she tells new! magazine.
“I mentioned to him
that we’re going to pack
our overnight bag and he
went white. I instantly had a flash forward
that he’s going to be all over the place.”
<$dX`cd\Xk1_`Zb\p7\ogi\jj%Zf%lb
NEW Alzheimer’s drugs that will
delay the disease for five times
longer than current treatment
could be available within a dec-
ade, a leading scientist will claim
today.
Six drugs already licensed for
other conditions are to be tested
to see if they could treat the
changes that occur in the brain in
Alzheimer’s.
Scientists hope the medicines
will slow down progress of
the disease, which can lead to
memory loss and sufferers being
unable to walk, speak and swallow.
The Alzheimer’s Society
scheme has won backing from
campaigner and Downton Abbey
creator Julian Fellowes.
Lord Fellowes of West Stafford
will today host a launch recep-
tion at the House of Lords, joined
by the broadcaster Fiona Phil-
lips, a fellow Alzheimer’s Society
ambassador.
Lord Fellowes said: “This pro-
gramme is more than a ray of
hope for 750,000 people with
dementia, their carers and
families.
“At a time when the number of
people with this condition is
rising it is wonderful to see the
Alzheimer’s Society striding
ahead in the race to find a cure
and new treatments.”
Experts estimate that half of
the £17billion spent on Alzheim-
er’s each year in the UK could be
saved if patients developed the
disease five years later than they
do now.
Jeremy Hughes, chief execu-
tive of the Alzheimer’s Society,
said: “This is an exciting day in
the race to find new treatments
and eventually a cure. There are
not enough clinical trials for
dementia in the UK, which is why
Alzheimer’s Society is respond-
ing by launching Drug Discovery.
“We need £4,000 every day for
the next 10 years for the first
phase of this ground-breaking
initiative and we are asking all
those concerned with dementia
to help us raise this.”
Most studies suggest that the
earlier patients can be given
drugs and therapy to prevent
memory loss, the more effective
these treatments are in slowing
down progress of the disease.
More than 750,000 people in
the UK suffer from dementia and
around 450,000 have the most
common form, Alzheimer’s. Char-
ities and doctors fear that as the
population grows older, the
number of cases will spiral, at a
cost of millions of pounds.
The charity has examined 30
drugs used to tackle illnesses as
diverse as heart disease, infection
and inflammation and shortlisted
six for further study.
The £15million Drug Discovery
Programme will explore at least
three of the drugs over the next
10 years, and hold clinical trials.
It costs about £613million and
takes 20 years to deliver a new
treatment from scratch. Testing
existing drugs is more time and
cost-effective.
Ms Phillips said: “I know from
caring for both my mum and
my dad the devastating impact
that dementia can have on the
person living with the condition
and their families. Investing in
treatment development has to be
a priority.” Lord Fellowes is hosting launch
9pAfN`cc\p
9pAfN`cc\p PEOPLE who pile on
weight in middle age are
at risk of developing
dementia as they grow
older, a study has found.
This is just the latest
age-related illness to be
associated with obesity.
Researchers believe it
further emphasises the
importance of watching
your weight to minimise
future health problems.
Study author Dr Weili
Xu, said: “Currently, 1.6
billion adults are over-
weight or obese world-
wide and over 50 per cent
of adults in the United
States and Europe fit into
this category.
“Our results contribute
to the growing evidence
that controlling body
weight or losing weight in
middle age could reduce
your risk of dementia.”
Researchers studied
8,534 pairs of twins age 65
or older. Of those, 350
were diagnosed with
dementia and 114 had
possible dementia.
Information on each
participant’s height and
weight had been taken 30
years earlier.
Nearly 30 per cent had
been either overweight or
obese during middle age.
The study found that
people who were over-
weight or obese at mid-life
had an 80 per cent higher
risk of developing demen-
tia, Alzheimer’s disease or
vascular dementia in later
life compared with people
with normal body mass
index. The results
remained the same after
considering other factors,
such as education, diabe-
tes and vascular disease.
A quarter of those with-
out dementia had been
overweight in mid-life,
compared with more than
a third of those with
questionable dementia.
It also emerged that 39
per cent of those with
diagnosed dementia were
overweight in mid-life.
Only three per cent of
those with no dementia
had been obese in mid-
life, compared with five
per cent of those with
questionable dementia
and seven per cent of
those with diagnosed
dementia.
The study, carried out
at the Karolinska Insti-
tutet in Stockholm,
Sweden, was published in
the journal Neurology.
Victory123
16 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
Spotted...
Day&
EDITED BY LIZZIE CATT WITH LISA HIGGINS
AXZb`\jXm\jljXcc
]ifdk_\mXdg`i\j
FEISTY author Jackie Collins has
issued an attack on misery memoirs,
chick lit and vampire novels which
depict women as victims.
Jackie, 73, who is renowned for her
powerful glitzy heroines, says times
have not changed for the better in the
book charts. “When I grew up all the
women (in novels) were having
nervous breakdowns in Harrods and
waiting for some man to marry them.”
The London-born writer, who now
lives in Beverly Hills, rants on: “Then
we went on to chick lit and all the
women were looking in the mirror to
see if they had spots or were too fat –
and were waiting for some man to
marry them. Same thing.”
Jackie, who has had eight of her 27
novels adapted for the screen, adds:
“Then we moved on to vampires. All
girls wanted was to get bitten in the
neck by a vampire.”
She says that despite her books
featuring sex and passionate affairs,
they always maintain a sense of
realism that is more useful to women.
“I’ve written books about real
people. They’re certainly not
‘bonkbusters’. That’s a word from the
Eighties. It’s not all sex and mystery,
it’s relationships and people.”
Meanwhile Jackie, whose latest
tome Goddess Of Vengeance was
released last month, says she enjoyed
her recent appearance on talk show
Piers Morgan Tonight with her sister,
actress Joan. “He [Piers] had a little
bit of a crush on Joan but it was fun to
do and Joan and I went to dinner later.
We wanted to put to rest these stupid
rumours that we hate each other.”
STAND BY FOR KYLIE: THE MUSICAL
LIMPED OFF WITH A SPRAINED LEG. I SUPPOSE I SHOULD FEEL BAD. BUT I WON!!!!’
REALIST: Jackie Collins COOK: Heather Mills
IN LONDON: ROD STEWART
walking on the terrace at the Royal
Festival Hall on the South Bank… AMANDA HOLDEN
walking along Drury Lane, Covent Garden…
HOLD on to your
hotpants! Kylie
Minogue’s planned
musical is on its way.
Rumours that the
pint-sized popstrel was
working on a theatrical
production based on
her 32-year career and
involving her hit songs
have been confirmed by
her long-term creative
collaborator and stylist
William Baker.
The 37-year-old says
that he is helping to
mastermind the project.
“We’re both working
on the Kylie musical,
using all her songs,
which will hopefully be
done next year some
time. I can’t wait!”
Kylie admits she is
terrified of theatre
critics. “Music critics
are one thing but
theatre critics are
something else. I
suppose if it doesn’t
work then that’s it.”
STYLIST:
Baker
with Kylie
MACCA’S ex-wife
Heather Mills
moans she never
gets taken out for dinner.
Charity campaigner
Heather, 43, who runs a
vegan café in Hove,
Sussex, and who recently
brought out her own meat
and dairy-free cookbook,
is romancing snooker
player and former Tenerife
holiday rep Jamie
Walker, 37. But she’s not
impressed with his dating
efforts. Telling the
audience at her cooking
demonstration for the
Foodie Festival in Hove,
East Sussex, she said: “I
never get taken out to
dinner, maybe once every
three months. I say the
food’s better here at home.”
She added: “I wish I had
never said I can cook!”
JONATHAN ROSS TWEETS: ‘JUST HAD A LOVELY GAME OF TENNIS BUT MY OPPONENT
&
P
i
c
t
u
r
e
:

W
I
R
E
I
M
A
G
E
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 17
Night
AND JACK TEAGUE email us at diary@express.co.uk
&
NUDE SCENES: Cleese
SUPPORT: Laurence and wife Jackie
JESSICA
ALBA finds it
hard to balance
worldly experience
with her Hollywood
looks now she’s hit 30.
The Fantastic Four
star, who is expecting
her second child with
her husband, actor CASH
WARREN, can’t seem to
come to terms with the
milestone that she hit
last week.
“I feel better now than
I ever have but now it’s all
about how do you get that
30-year-old brain on the
20-year-old face?” pouts
Jessica – adding that she
may be older but she doesn’t
feel wiser.
“It’s crazy my 20s are
over because it feels like
they flew by,” she says.
“It definitely showed
me that whatever I
thought I knew, I
don’t know a damn
thing about!”
JOHNNY DEPP was
thrilled to share acting
tips with his hero and
friend KEITH RICHARDS in
the forthcoming fourth
Pirates Of The Caribbean
film: On Stranger Tides.
But there’s one creative
area where Keef, 67, will
always reign: booze.
Depp, 47, reveals the pair
would head for his trailer
after a long day’s filming and
have a drink. “I’m a wine
man and I do like a good
glass of red,” father-of-two
Depp, whose partner is
French singer VANESSA
PARADIS, tells Radio Times.
“So I would have my glass
of wine and Keith would
have his usual.” But the
Stones legend’s choice was
characteristically unique.
“I’ve no idea what his
usual is. It looks like nuclear
waste and it’s a combination
only he would know.”
&
MYSTERY TIPPLE: Johnny (right) couldn’t work out what Keef was drinking
Secrets...
WHICH top British actor was once
threatened with expulsion from his
drama school after bullying fellow
male students?
JOHN
CLEESE has
finally
explained why he
strips off in films – to
guarantee people go
to watch.
Cleese, 71, who has
showed off his body
in A Fish Called
Wanda and episodes
of Monty Python’s
Flying Circus, is
tactical when it
comes to nude
scenes.
“I’ve been nude in
several films and
people ask me
why,” he tells us.
“I just say it’s the
best way of getting
the paying audience
in really!”
But Cleese, whose
girlfriend Jennifer
Wade, 40, posed
nude for a new
sculpture exhibition
by artist Jonathan
Wylder, says we
won’t be seeing him
posing in the buff
anytime soon.
“Me? Ha! No way.”
HE MAY be more
used to grabbing
the limelight and
holding it to ransom
with his garish shirts
and flamboyant
approach to DIY
but Laurence
Llewelyn-Bowen
played the supportive
father role over the
bank holiday
weekend watching
his 15-year-old
daughter Cecile
perform at the
Festival Of The
Burning Pig.
The Cirencester
music, food and beer
event was in aid of
the 90th anniversary
of the Royal British
Legion and TV presenter
Laurence, 46, pictured
here with wife Jackie, 45,
designed the festival logo.
Musician Cecile played
with her band The Cocktail
Slot. Let’s hope there were no
embarrassing dad disco moves
on the dance floor.
&
Picture: FEATURE FLASH
Picture: GETTY IMAGES
Victory123
18 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
How £80m cost of Clegg’s
poll hits public services
Bookies point to a No for Clegg’s AV
9pDXikpe9ifne
Gfc`k`ZXc:fii\jgfe[\ek
THE £80million bill for Nick Clegg’s
AV referendum has had to be met
by councils, despite the economic
crisis, it was claimed yesterday.
Figures show that the average
council will have splashed out the
equivalent of nearly 10 per cent of
its budget ahead of Thursday’s
historic vote.
Critics say the money could have
been better used to protect public
services or cut the national budget
deficit.
Mole Valley District Council in
Surrey has spent £127,501 on the
referendum, 22 per cent of the
£566,817 budget cuts it is driving
through this year.
Both Durham County Council
and Birmingham City Council will
have spent almost £1million each.
There has been a groundswell of
support for the No To AV campaign
in recent weeks, with some polls
putting it at least 16 points ahead
of its rival.
Bookmaker Paddy Power said
the odds on a negative outcome
tumbled from 10/11 at the end of
February to 1/16 yesterday.
Ken Robertson from Paddy
Power said: “From a betting point
of view the writing has been on the
wall for the AV issue for the past
couple of weeks, with 90 per cent of
all bets placed supporting the ref-
erendum to be rejected.”
But details of the huge costs
involved to stage the referendum
will infuriate millions of hard-
pressed taxpayers.
Joan Ryan, deputy campaign
director of No To AV, said: “The
Alternative Vote system is un -
wanted, unfair and – on top of this
– far too expensive at a time when
public finances are stretched.
“The money being wasted on this
Lib Dem lifeboat would be better
spent protecting public services.
“If you want to make sure that
AV doesn’t cost any more than
it has done already, vote No on
Thursday.”
The huge financial burden comes
ahead of an expected final week of
mud-slinging between the Tories
and Nick Clegg’s Liberal Demo-
crats over the referendum. Lib Dem
Energy Secretary Chris Huhne
hurled more fuel onto the fire over
the weekend when he claimed that
the Prime Minister was leading a
campaign based on “made-up
facts” more commonly seen in
American politics.
Tensions are expected to
heighten today as Paul Boateng,
former Labour MP and Chief Secre-
tary to the Treasury, joins the fight
against change.
In a speech at today’s No To AV
“One Person, One Vote” he is
expected to say: “For the last three
weeks Chris Huhne and his Lib
Dem colleagues have been telling
Labour supporters to vote Yes in
order to block the Conservatives.
“The irony is overwhelming. A
Cabinet minister propping up a
Conservative Government imple-
menting Conservative policies is
trying to unite the Left.
“If Chris Huhne finds the Tories
so distasteful, you have to ask, why
is he in government with them?”
FG@E@FE1G8><()
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Supporter Care: 0300 790 9903
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Yes, I will help The Blue Cross care for unwanted pets.
Neglect, mistreatment and abandonment are a fact of life for too many of Britain’s pets. When every
day seems to bring yet another shocking news story involving the abuse of a defenceless animal,
the time has clearly come for the country’s animal lovers to do what they can to help.
Every single month The Blue Cross works tirelessly to give hundreds of cats, dogs, horses and small
pets the safe, happy lives they deserve. With your help, we can take in these animals who desperately
need us – some may have been horribly mistreated, while others simply need a loving new home.
Please give whatever you can today and show that Britain is still a nation of animal lovers.
Are we a nation
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 19
Briton found
strangled on
paradise isle
Price rise
threat as
gas field
may shut
Girl killed
by horse
Popular Lianne was found dead in her ocean-front flat The Caribbean island of St Maarten where tragic Lianne Burns worked for a tour company
@dgfik
DXjj`m\
9p>`c\jJ_\c[i`Zb
FAMILIES could face
fresh energy woes after
Britain’s largest
supplier warned it may
shut a major gas field.
Centrica’s warning
follows the
Government’s oil and
gas tax hike and
prompted fears of price
rises and the loss of
secure energy sources.
Centrica, which
owns British Gas, is
closing three fields in
Morecambe Bay,
Lancashire, for
maintenance.
It says it may not
reopen one of them
after supplementary
energy tax rose from
20 to 32 per cent in the
Budget. The field
concerned is taxed at
81per cent of profits.
Instead the
company would
import gas when
needed, putting it at
the mercy of market
prices. It warned that
UK oil and gas
producers face some
of the highest taxes in
the world, making
profits marginal.
Shadow Chancellor
Ed Balls said that
because of the “tax
raid”, Britain risked
“losing jobs,
investment and secure
energy supplies”.
The warning came
as industry body Oil &
Gas UK said North
Sea oil platforms
could be taken out of
service prematurely as
companies lose tax
relief.
A WOMAN who left Britain to start a new
idyllic life in the Caribbean has been found
murdered.
Lianne Burns was discovered strangled
in her ocean-front apartment on the para-
dise island of St Maarten.
The apparently motiveless death of the
popular tourist manager has rocked the
close-knit community on the tiny and
remote tourist island.
Lianne, 43 – known to friends and family
as Lee – was said to be “totally happy and
content” working for a small company
that ferried tourists around the historic
sights of the French-Dutch controlled
territory.
Last night it emerged that police had
arrested a man, who it is understood knew
Ms Burns well, and were questioning him
on suspicion of murder.
In Britain, her family in Leigh-on-Sea,
Essex, have been left devastated.
Her identical twin sister, Lisa Burns, said:
“The impact of Lee’s death has resonated
globally. So many people have been affected
in England.
“The devastation in St Maarten where
the community saw her every day, has been
immense.”
She added: “Lee touched so many
people’s lives. I have lost a massive piece of
me.
“Lee’s incredible personality, brilliant
sense of humour and zest for life had a mas-
sively positive effect on everyone she met,
wherever she was in the world.
“We will be bringing Lee home when the
authorities allow and a service will be held
for family and friends locally.”
Lee moved to St Maarten permanently
12 years ago after falling in love with the
island during an excur-
sion while working
aboard a cruise ship.
Each year she made
a point of returning to
visit friends and family
in Leigh-on-Sea.
She had previously
worked as a fitness
instructor in nearby
Southend.
Her half-sister, Kim
Spooner, said: “She
loved her life in St
Maarten – she was
living in paradise.”
Lee’s mother, Vivi-
enne Spooner, said:
“We are in total shock.
We have lost an amaz-
ing daughter, sister
and friend.
“We take huge com-
fort from the fact that
Lee was a free spirit
who lived life her way –
and always to the
fullest.
“We would like to
thank everyone who is
supporting us through
this dreadful time.”
A spokesman for the
Foreign Office said:
“We were made aware
of the death of a
British national on
April 29. We are provid-
ing consular assistance
to the family at this
difficult time.”
A GIRL of 13 has died
after being crushed by
her horse.
She is said to have
been tending the horse
in a field when it
became frightened and
stood on her chest.
Named as Elizabeth
Colton, she was flown
to Lancaster Royal
Infirmary but died
during surgery. The
tragedy happened in
Garsdale, Cumbria, on
Friday.
Her parents, Annette
and John, who live in
the village, were too
distressed to speak.
P
i
c
t
u
r
e
s
:

C
A
S
C
A
D
E

N
E
W
S

A
N
D

A
L
A
M
Y
Victory123
20 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
9pJ`dfe<[^\
F
N December 14, 2001, George
Bush was asked whether he
would prefer the US in vasion
force that had toppled the
Taliban government of
Afghanistan to capture
Osama Bin Laden or to kill him. “I
don’t care,” he replied in his toughest
Texan drawl, sounding more like a
Wild West sheriff than the President
of the United States. “Dead or alive,
it’s… Either way. It doesn’t matter to
me. But we’re going to get him.”
In fact, the instructions that had
been given to agents hunting the
Al Qaeda leader were more explicit.
“I don’t want Bin Laden and his thugs
captured,” the director of the CIA’s
counter-terrorist centre had insisted.
“I want them dead. I want Bin Lad-
en’s head shipped back in a box filled
with dry ice. I want to be able to show
his head to the President.”
At the time, the world’s most
wanted man was holed up in a net-
work of caves in Tora Bora, the harsh
mountain region to the south of Jala-
labad. He was resigned to his own
death – he had told his son to shoot
him rather than let the Americans
take him alive. He had made his will.
Within days of that statement by
Bush, however, Bin Laden was walk-
ing over the rocky border into Paki-
stan. He had been allowed to escape
by a reluctance at the top of the US
chain of command to risk too many
American troops.
This failure, according to a damn-
ing US Senate report eight years later,
represented “a lost opportunity that
forever altered the course of the con-
flict in Afghanistan and the future of
international terrorism”. It would
take nearly 10 more years and a new
president in the White House before
the search finally ended.
Three weeks after 9/11 US forces
with British missile support invaded
Afghanistan, whose fundamentalist
Islamist government was accused of
harbouring Al Qaeda on its soil.
They quickly won control of at least
two-thirds of the country and thou-
sands of Al Qaeda fighters fled, some
into Pakistan and others to the
border region of Tora Bora. Here,
mujaheddin fighters, financed by the
US to resist the Soviet occupation in
the Eighties, had developed a complex
network of caves. In the intervening
years Bin Laden, who had fought with
the mujaheddin, used his family’s
engineering firm – one of Saudi
Arabia’s wealthiest private compa-
nies – to expand the network further.
Reports that the tunnels were wide
enough to drive tanks down and that
the underground complex included
a hospital, mosques and a hotel and
was comfortably carpeted, turned
out to be wildly exaggerated. Never-
theless, the caves represented a
formidable fortress. The entrances
were in narrow valleys overshadowed
by towering peaks and attacking air-
craft were vulnerable to sniper fire
long before they came near. Further-
more the tunnels were so deep, sealed
with concrete and steel doors, that
not even bunker-busting 5,000lb
bombs could reach them.
The Russians had eventually
devised a way of dislodging the
mujaheddin with anti-tank mines
lowered on detonating cords, followed
by smoke pots. So when Bush started
to talk about “smokin’ the terrorists
out”, it was an accurate description of
the proposed strategy.
But it never happened. Both
General Tommy Franks, leader of US
Central Command, and Defence Sec-
retary Donald Rumsfeld rejected calls
to send troops to seal the border.
Instead, fewer than 100 special opera-
tions troops were detailed to work
with Afghan soldiers.
At a crucial moment in the siege,
Al Qaeda sent a message saying they
would surrender in the morning if
there was an overnight ceasefire. The
US forces flatly refused to comply
but the Afghan commanders agreed.
By morning, Bin Laden and the Al
Qaeda fighters had vanished. One
mujaheddin leader later put it: “It
would have been easy to get Bin
Laden there. I don’t know why there
was no plan to block the passes. And
why weren’t there more Americans?
Believe me, there were more journal-
ists than soldiers.”
K

HE Americans were left clutch-
ing at the straws of rumour
and wishful thinking: Bin
Laden had died somewhere in the
mountains, or he was mortally ill with
kidney disease. These hopes were
confounded 11 months later when
the Al Qaeda leader released a tape
referring to the recent attacks in Bali,
Yemen and Moscow. Bin Laden
seemed to be alive and well.
There were suggestions that he had
got out of Pakistan by sea and had set
up camp in Yemen (his family’s origi-
nal homeland), Somalia or Djibouti.
The more probable answer was that
he was still in northern Pakistan –
TEENAGE: Bin Laden, 1971
FIGHTER: In the Eighties
LEADER: In 2006 video
‘Five years ago he
killed 3,000. Now
he makes videos’
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 21
SHOCK:
George
Bush
receives
the news of
the Twin
Towers
attack. It
was the
start of a
10-year
quest to
find those
responsible
most likely in the wild tribal terri-
tory of Waziristan. In this semi-
autonomous area, tribesmen could
cross freely into Afghanistan but
US troops across the border were
forbidden under their rules of
engagement from following them
back into Pakistan.
Outsiders attempting to enter
certain Waziri valleys were killed,
their eyes gouged from their sock-
ets, their tongues ripped out and
notes pinned to their bodies saying
this was what happened to agents
working for the Americans. Notices
went up offering £600 for the head
of an Afghan working with the
Americans and £3,000 for a US sol-
dier. Such sums were a fraction of
the £15million put on Bin Laden’s
head by the Americans but at least
it was possible to claim the smaller
rewards and live to tell the tale.
By 2003 the US was embroiled in
an ill-advised and ill-fated new con-
flict in Iraq. Bin Laden was report-
edly delighted. It would give him
a new breeding ground – Al Qaeda
had no presence in Iraq before Bush
and Tony Blair invaded and it
meant US forces were distracted.
Bush stopped mentioning Bin
Laden and officials in Washington
tried to play the subject down. “To
be honest, I’m relatively relaxed
about the Bin Laden situation,”
said the US State Department’s
chief counter-terrorism strategist
in early 2007. “Five years ago the
guy killed 3,000 people in New York
City; now he makes videos.”
At least Bush faced up to the fail-
ure in his memoirs. “I also knew I
was leaving behind unfinished busi-
ness,” he wrote, referring to his last
days in office in January 2009. “I
wanted badly to bring Bin Laden
to justice. The fact that we did not
ranks among my great regrets. It
certainly wasn’t for lack of effort.”
His replacement in the White
House, Barack Obama, was a prom-
inent opponent of Bush and Blair’s
adventure in Iraq and transferred
troops from there to Afghanistan.
He now says he ordered the CIA to
make the killing or capture of Bin
Laden its top priority.
The fulfilment of that order came
about through dogged detective
work. Ever since 9/11, the CIA had
been chasing leads relating to Bin
Laden’s inner circle, particularly his
couriers. One of these couriers was
tracked down to an affluent area
north of Islamabad, the Pakistani
capital, two years ago, and last
August his precise address was
established. The compound in
Abbottabad was conspicuously
large and kitted out with tight secu-
rity. When the CIA learned that
there was a family living with the
courier, suspicion grew that this
might be Bin Laden’s hideout.
By February detailed planning
began for a military raid. Obama
gave the final go-ahead last Friday,
when much of the world’s attention
– including America’s – was focused
on the events in Westminster Abbey.
As we learned yesterday morning,
the operation achieved precisely
what it set out to do.
The big question now is not how
Bin Laden managed to escape
detection in the wild tribal valleys
but how he survived undetected
and unmolested for so long in an
ordinary Pakistani town.
K?<K<E$P<8IJ<8I:?=FI9@EC8;<E
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=IFDK?<KN@EKFN<IJKF9@EC8;<EËJ?@;<FLK
SEPTEMBER 2001
Osama Bin Laden is identified
as the prime suspect in the
9/11 attacks. He issues a video
denying involvement
OCTOBER 2001
Air strikes are launched on
Afghanistan
NOVEMBER 2001
US forces find a video showing
Bin Laden displaying inside
knowledge of the 9/11 attacks
DECEMBER 2001
Bin Laden is besieged in Tora
Bora but later escapes to
Pakistan
NOVEMBER 2002
A new tape shows he is still alive
MARCH 2003
The US leads an invasion of Iraq

OCTOBER 2004
In another video Bin Laden
admits to organising 9/11
SEPTEMBER 2007
He issues a video calling on the
US public to embrace Islam
AUGUST 2010
The CIA identifies Bin Laden
courier’s home in Abbottabad
FEBRUARY 2011
Bin Laden is confirmed to be
living in the compound
MAY 2011
Bin Laden killed
ATROCITY: The
9/11 act of
terrorism which
caused pain,
grief and
disbelief across
the world
P
i
c
t
u
r
e
s
:

E
P
A
;

A
F
P
;

R
E
U
T
E
R
S
Victory123
22 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
Magic! Emma’s
grown up to top
best-dressed list
Emma shows the style that helped give her the title
9pEXk_XeIXf
HARRY Potter star Emma Watson has
proved her Hogwarts schoolgirl days
are firmly behind her by topping a list
of the world’s best-dressed women.
The 21-year-old who found fame as
Hermione Granger in the hit films con-
firmed her style icon status by knock-
ing Cheryl Cole off top spot in the poll.
Cheryl, 27, who is expected to be con-
firmed as a judge on the US X Factor,
came second, followed by Twilight
actress Kristen Stewart, 21, in Glam-
our magazine’s Best-Dressed Women
list, published this week.
X Factor judge Dannii Minogue, 39, is
fourth, followed by TV presenter Alexa
Chung, 27, chart star Rihanna, 23,
supermodel Kate Moss, 37, Gossip
Girl’s Blake Lively, 23, reality star Olivia
Palermo, 25, and Glee actress Lea
Michele, 24.
Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes’s
daughter Suri is a new entry in 21st
place – despite being only five years
old. Spotted in high-heels and designer
clothes from Burberry to Marc Jacobs,
she has been said to have “the most
covetable wardrobe in Hollywood”.
David Cameron’s wife Samantha, 40,
at 19th, is a another newcomer. Reality
star Katie Price, 32, was named worst-
dressed woman, followed by Lady
Gaga, 25. Victoria Beckham, 37, is down
seven places at 15th in the best-dressed
list. But Beyonce, 29, suffered the
biggest drop, from ninth to 36th.
Emma Watson followed in the foot-
steps of Juliette Binoche, Uma Thur-
man and Julia Roberts as the face of
Lancome cosmetics. She is rumoured
to have signed a six-figure deal.
Jl]]\i\[
Pictures: IAN WEST/PA & DAVID FISHER/REX
Singer
and
fashion
icon
Cheryl
Cole was
knocked
off the
top spot
by
Emma
Watson
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 23
Murder hunt after a family
of four is stabbed to death
Friends in tears yesterday outside the house where Alice Ding, inset, and her family died
The Dings’ home in a leafy Northampton suburb
Picture: NICK WILKINSON/NEWS TEAM
9pJXiX;`ofe
A MURDER investigation has
been launched after a university
lecturer, his wife and two young
daughters were stabbed to
death in their home.
Jifeng Ding, 46, a senior
lecturer at Manchester Metro-
politan University, and his wife
Helen were discovered down-
stairs in their detached house.
The bodies of their daughters
Nancy, 18, and Alice, 12, were
found upstairs.
Neighbours in Wootton, a
quiet suburb outside North-
ampton, alerted the authori-
ties after the family was not
spotted over the weekend.
The four bodies were
found on Sunday at around
6pm after police forced
entry to the house.
Yesterday the area outside
the property was cordoned off
as forensics officers worked to
establish the family’s last
moments.
It is thought they may have
been dead for some time.
Mr Ding, known as Jeff, had
worked in the university’s chem-
ical and environmental science
department for the past 15
years.
His wife is understood to have
been a teacher at a school in
Northampton.
Their eldest daughter Nancy,
a sixth former at Northampton
School for Girls, was hoping to
go to Cambridge University. Her
sister Alice was a keen violinist
who often achieved top grades.
Detectives initially suspected
Mr Ding had killed his wife and
children before committing sui-
cide but that theory has been
discounted, while a botched
burglary is also thought unlikely.
Yesterday police revealed that
all four victims had died from
stab wounds but so far no
motive for the killings is known.
Detective Superintendent
Glyn Timmins, of Northamp-
tonshire Police, said: “What we
can say is that the family have
died as a result of violence
inflicted upon them.”
Tearful teenagers left flowers
at the family’s home yesterday,
while shocked neighbours
expressed their horror at the
deaths.
Andrew Dixon said: “This is
suburbia – it’s not the Bronx. I
knew them as Jeff and Helen.
He was quiet but a well-to-do
man. This area is very Middle
England. You don’t expect to
hear such tragic news happen-
ing in your own street.”
Another neighbour said: “This
is a nice area and the children
play out all the time. Nobody
saw or heard anything unu-
sual.”
A friend of Nancy said: “She
was an amazingly talented girl,
very clever and brilliant at
music. I cannot believe what
has happened. We are all totally
shocked. It’s horrendous.”
J_fZb\[
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Victory123
24 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
Our price
spring...a
Rise in men
wearing ties
Couple saved after
Find my bigamist wife
...so I can get a divorce
Tie
style
from
Ross
Inshore lifeboat stands by as the couple prepare to abandon the stricken yacht
FORGET dress down
Fridays – more than half
of British men now wear
a tie at work.
The comeback was
revealed in a poll for
dry cleaning company
Johnson Cleaners.
TV’s Mad Men are said
to have inspired 55 per
cent of men to don ties.
Fans include Jonathan
Ross and Ant and Dec.
9pAXe;`jc\p
9pEXk_XeIXf
BRITAIN is on drought alert after
one of the driest springs on record,
prompting fears of a hosepipe ban.
Experts say there is little chance of
significant rainfall over the next few
weeks after the driest March in more
than 50 years and the driest April for
more than 80 years.
And early forecasts for May suggest
a lower than average rainfall for most
of the UK with the dry and warm
weather set to go into June and July.
Reservoir levels have fallen prompt-
ing fears the Environment Agency
will be forced to bring in hosepipe
bans in the worst-affected areas.
Jonathan Powell, at Positive
Weather Solutions, described the
threat as “very real”. He said: “There
will be some rain around, but nothing
of any significance, with only average
or below average rainfall expected for
June and July.”
The Environment Agency last night
played down concerns about a
summer hosepipe ban.
It said there had been 13 per cent
drop in the amount of rain over the
past three months, causing lower river
levels in some parts of the country.
The agency has warned people to
“use water wisely”.
However, agency bosses said most
reservoirs and aquifers were “at nor-
mal levels” for the time of year follow-
ing rainfall in January and February.
But they said farmers may be asked
to reduce the amount of water they
take from rivers.
Head of water resources, Trevor
Bishop, said: “Hot dry spells are a
normal part of most years and the
Environment Agency, water compa-
nies and other water users such as
farmers and industry have developed
plans to cope with these without
restricting water use in the short
term.”
Meanwhile, thousands are set to
return to work today after what has
been a two-week break for many
taking advantage of the unusually
close bank holidays and the Royal
Wedding. Most of the UK has had two
weeks of sunshine, with families head-
ing to the coast rather than going
abroad for good weather.
But celebrations at Cambridge

University got out of hand on Sunday
as 1,000 drunken students took part
in a raucous party in the city centre.
Passers-by were shocked to see
students stripping off and vomiting
at the annual party, known as Caesar-
ian Sunday, which takes place on
Jesus Green on the first bank holiday
of the summer term.
One said: “The way the students
were behaving was disgusting. It’s
not something I’d expect to see in
Cambridge on a Sunday afternoon.”
Students at Oxford University took
the opportunity to make the most of
the glorious weather by swimming in
the River Cherwell.
As dry weather had left the river at
its lowest level in years, none chose to
jump from the Magdalen Bridge as is
tradition.
:feZ\iej
THE real husband of a bigamous
bride who went on to “marry” four
other men is trying to track her down
– so he can finally divorce her.
Paul Rigby wed Emily Horne in
December 1996 while he was a young
soldier on leave. But the glamour
model, now 32, left him – only to
embark on three further “marriages”.
She was jailed for six months for
bigamy in 2004. In 2009 she was
convicted again after it emerged she
had still not divorced Paul and had
“married” a fourth victim she met
while working in a massage parlour.
In that case a judge at Manchester
Crown Court imposed a suspended
sentence and Horne vowed to end her
only legal marriage for good.
“I’m delighted to be free but I think
it is about time I got a divorce,” she
said then. But yesterday Paul, 33,
claimed there had been no divorce
and he had spent seven years trying
to find her to serve divorce papers.
“I try every couple of years,” he said.
“I have had six or seven searches done
and come up with nothing.
“Every time I try to start a new
relationship and marriage comes up I
say I can’t, and the relationship
breaks down.
“I probably call her every name
under the sun, but as long as she gives
me a divorce I’ll wish her all the best
because she’s going to damn well
need it. I just want to make it final.”
Paul married Horne at York Register
Office a day after her 18th birthday
following a whirlwind romance. Five
months later they split and he moved
to Northern Ireland.
***slip
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 25
for balmy
hose ban
1 in 10 girls
can’t cook
Loud music puts millions
at risk of losing hearing
yacht strikes rocks
Hostess Fay Ripley
ONE in ten British
women has never
cooked a roast and one
in 20 can’t boil an egg.
Only two per cent of
the 2,000 questioned
used a recipe book.
The shocking figures
emerge in the Good
Food channel’s latest
cookery show Perfect,
hosted by Cold Feet
star Fay Ripley.
9pJXiX_N\jkZfkk
9pEXk_XeIXf
Dfi\Xi\Õp`e^kfk_\jle
Students go wild
during an organised
fight at a Cambridge
party on Sunday
AN estimated 3.5 million people
went abroad during the past two
weeks, travel industry group ABTA
said yesterday.
For those taking advantage of the
back-to-back bank holidays –
getting in a foreign holiday and
only having to take three days of
annual leave – Spain, Florida and
Dubai were popular destinations.
An ABTA spokesman said
compared to the same period last
year more people chose to go
abroad. He added: “Many people
made use of the bank holidays.
“The long holiday and the Royal
Wedding have been a really good
boost for people coming into the
UK and for British people going
abroad.”
The good weather continued
right up until the end of the break
yesterday.
Parts of the UK boasted
temperatures hotter than the
Mediterranean.
A COUPLE were dramatically
plucked to safety when their yacht
ran aground off a beauty spot.
A man and a woman, thought to
be in their 60s, were rescued by an
inshore lifeboat crew after two
attempts to tow the 32ft yacht to
shore failed.
Hundreds of people gathered on
the beach to watch the drama unfold
on Sunday.
The Blithe Spirit had sent out a
distress call after it ran aground on
rocks off the headland at Torquay,
Devon, during the afternoon.
Coastguards launched the rescue
mission after receiving the SOS call
from the couple, who live in nearby
Dartmouth.
A search and rescue helicopter
from the Chivenor Royal Marine
base near Barnstaple, north Devon,
was scrambled.
The woman, who was skipper, is
thought to be a member of the Royal
Dart Yacht Club and a competent
sailor. The couple are believed to
have been cruising around Brixham
and ran into trouble as their £60,000
vessel was returning to Dartmouth.
A Coastguard spokesman said:
“The yacht contacted us to say she
was encountering engine problems
as she approached Torquay harbour
and required assistance. We tasked
the marina launch vessel and another
yacht to assist.
“The launch vessel arrived at the
entrance to the harbour but by the
time it established communications
the Blithe Spirit had run aground at
Corbyn Head.”
Torbay RNLI spokesman Colin
Bower added: “Two attempts were
made to get a line on to the stricken
yacht but it snapped and a decision
was made to abandon that method
and get them off the boat.”
The couple, who were said to be
badly shaken and distressed, were
yesterday in the care of friends.
MILLIONS of Britons are risking
their hearing by listening to music at
a volume louder than a pneumatic
drill, a study revealed yesterday.
One in 10 turn their radio up
louder than 110 decibels – the noise
of a drill on a building site.
Experts warn this is nearly 40 per
cent higher than is safe.
One in six listen to their MP3
player at a volume more deafening
than a plane taking off.
And one in 20 regularly plug into
music more thunderous than a train
hurtling past in a station, a car alarm
or even screaming children.
But 17 per cent admit they have
been left with ringing ears after
listening to blaring music.
The Hearing Company polled 2,000
Britons on their music listening
habits to mark the start of National
Deafness Week today. Director Peter
Worthington said: “These results
prove that most Brits are blissfully
unaware how a simple everyday
pleasure of listening to music can
actually be harmful to their hearing.
“Damage begins when ears are
exposed to noises louder than 85
decibels for prolonged periods of
time. A pneumatic drill, for example,
reaches 110 decibels, which means
that millions of Brits are listening to
their music at a level of almost 40 per
cent higher than is naturally safe. A
shocking statistic.”
The study also found one in 20
listen to music at its highest volume
level – and often noisier than road
works. And one in five listen to music
at full blast while driving.
***slip
Victory123
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 27
Britain 2011:
Drunk at age
one, high on
drugs by six
Shock figures from the Royal Bolton
Picture: WALES NEWS
9pAXe;`jc\p
A ONE-year-old child has been
treated in hospital for being drunk
and a six-year-old was admitted while
high on illegal drugs.
Two two-year-olds needed treat-
ment at the same hospital for the
effects of alcohol while children as
young as 13 who have taken deliber-
ate overdoses are among hundreds of
youngsters who have also been
treated there.
Health chiefs say the figures are
worrying because drugs and alcohol
can cause “significant harm” to such
young children, but stressed they
were working to tackle the problem.
The figures, obtained under a Free-
dom of Information Act request, show
that children just a few months old
regularly attend the Royal Bolton
Hospital in Lancashire because of
drugs and alcohol.
The information covers everything
from the effects of alcohol to poison-
ing, including overdoses, of medicines,
controlled drugs, illegal drugs and
solvents.
The disturbing statistics for the
past three years reveal that:
¬A one-year-old has been treated for
alcohol intoxication and two two-year
-olds for ingesting alcohol .
¬A further nine children aged 12 and
under, as well as hundreds of teen-
agers, have been seen for some form
of alcohol poisoning.,
¬Nine babies under the age of one,
and more than 100 one and two-year-
olds, needed medical help after drugs
poisoning.
More than 70 three to 10-year-olds
and hundreds of teenagers have
ended up in the Royal Bolton’s A&E
department as a result of medicines
and drugs. These included a six-year-
old who took controlled drugs, a one-
year-old with solvent poisoning and
teenagers as young as 13 taking
deliberate overdoses.
The hospital, which is one of the
busiest in north west England cater-
ing for about 263,000 patients, says
many of the incidents involving the
very young are thought to be acci-
dents caused by parents giving sick
children too much medicine, or tod-
dlers helping themselves to drinks.
But teenagers dabbling with alco-
hol and drugs was another cause.
Heather Edwards, the hospital’s
head of communications, said: “Alco-
hol and drugs cause a lot of difficul-
ties for individuals, families and soci-
ety and are a burden on the NHS.
“It is not good news that young
people are coming into contact with
substances that could harm their
health, accidentally or knowingly.”
The news comes weeks after it
emerged a three-year-old was treated
in a West Midlands hospital for
alcoholism.
The unnamed youngster was one of
13 children diagnosed as alcoholic by
the Heart of England NHS Trust
between 2008 and 2010.
In the same period, 106 teenagers
aged 13 to 16 were also treated for
their addiction to alcohol.
PC Richard
John among
the cannabis
plants before
the thieves
struck
POLICE swooped on £300,000
of cannabis plants in a huge
raid – then had the haul stolen
from under their noses.
Detectives boasted about
the giant drugs bust and even
posed for pictures.
But as two police
community support officers
guarded the front of the
cannabis factory, thieves
broke in at the back.
A neighbour rang the police
– but by then an estimated
£15,000 of cannabis plants
had been taken. Police
yesterday confirmed they
have launched an internal
investigation into the blunder.
An insider said: “There was
such a lot of cannabis we had
to bring in council experts to
dispose of it. While we were
waiting, the thieves broke in.
“There should have been a
team of officers to guard the
building. There are a few red
faces around.”
The sophisticated drugs
farm was found by chance in
a former nightclub in Merthyr
Tydfil, south Wales.
Four Vietnamese men, aged
17 to 48, are in custody
awaiting trial on charges of
producing cannabis.
Dopes! Police’s haul
of cannabis is stolen
Victory123
28 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
By J`dfe<[^\
Lionel Logue was Ceorge VI's
speech therapist. In tonight's
Channel 5 special report his
grandson explains that the
ñlm didn't tell the real story
N
HEN Mark Logue was
growing up he was aware
his grandfather had been
King George VI’s speech
therapist but he knew
nothing more about him.
Anyone who has seen the multi-
Oscar-winning film The King’s Speech
could tell him that the Australian-
born Lionel Logue met the Duke of
York on a weekly basis from 1926,
occupied the best seat in Westminster
Abbey when the Duke was crowned,
sat with him at Sand ringham while
he made his annual Christmas broad-
cast and received his intimate
confidences by letter over several
decades. But Mark was never told
any of that.
“My father was quite a forward-
thinking person who didn’t dwell in
the past,” says the 45-year-old father
of three who earns a living creating
visual effects for bands such as U2
and The Rolling Stones. “He had a
family and a life he had made for him-
self and he didn’t particularly keep in
touch with his brothers. I knew who
my grandfather was and what he did
but my father was his youngest son
and none of us in my family knew
Lionel at all or had ever met him.
I’m the youngest of four and he died
13 years before I was born.”
That all began to change in 2001
when Mark’s father Tony died and he
came into possession of an archive of
papers. Now that his grandfather is a
household name he has become the
custodian of his memory. His book
about Lionel, co-authored with jour-
nalist Peter Conradi, is already a best-
seller and tonight’s Channel 5 film
called The King’s Speech: Revealed
follows him on a journey to Australia
to trace Lionel’s roots.
“It was only when I inherited the
archive that I became aware my
grandfather wrote a diary,” he says.
“Even then I put it to one side for
another five years. I was aware of its
importance but I just didn’t have
the time to go through it – looking at
my grandfather’s handwriting was
enough to put me off – and I thought,
‘One day I’ll have time for this.’ About
five years ago I started going through
it properly, transcribing things.”
At the same time a British-born
screenwriter called David Seidler had
resumed work on a play and film
script which he had begun 25 years
earlier. As a former stammerer,
Seidler wanted to explore Logue’s
pioneering approach to speech ther-
apy and his unique relationship with
the King, whom the country had first
known as Prince Albert and was called
Bertie within the Royal Family.
Approaching Lionel’s elder son
Valentine, a neurosurgeon, he asked if
he could consult the family archives,
including Logue’s diaries and his cor-
respondence with the King. Unfortu-
nately he ran into royal opposition.
“Back in the Sixties a writer had
approached my uncle Valentine for
help with a book about Harley Street,”
says Mark. “Valentine gave him access
to my grandfather’s letters without
thinking he needed to get permission
from the Royal Family. Technically
he didn’t. It was just a courtesy. The
author wrote a chapter about Lionel
Logue and the King, which was sent
to the Royal Family for approval. But
they didn’t like it.”
The view from Clarence House,
where George VI’s widow the Queen
Mother was living, was that the story
had been told adequately in a biog-
raphy 10 years earlier. She didn’t want
the details pored over again.
“The Queen Mother really didn’t
want the story told,” says Mark. “The
chapter was removed and after that
an agreement was made that any
future approaches should be for-
warded to the Royal Family for
approval. That’s what happened and
it was the same answer every time:
they didn’t want the story told.” In
Seidler’s case the Queen Mother
wrote to him: “Please, not during my
lifetime. The memory of those events
is still too painful.” She was referring
to her husband’s agonies in trying to
overcome a stammer that became
horribly obvious whenever he had to
speak in public – a duty that became
much more frequent when he had
to take over the throne after his elder
brother Edward VIII abdicated. Logue,
convinced there was a link between
stammering and emotional trauma,
worked on the assumption that the
Duke’s speech difficulties were partly
the result of being bullied by his over-
bearing father, George V.
Seidler was happy to oblige the
82-year-old royal consort. After her
death in 2002, he resumed work
around 2005 using only the materials
that had been published. The script
was well advanced by the time he
made contact with Mark Logue who
was happy to let him see the archive.
K



HAT meant it was too late to
address any major discrepan-
cies, notoriously the claim that
Lionel, portrayed by Geoffrey Rush as
a coarse outsider with an Australian’s
disdain for stuffy British convention,
insists on calling his royal client Ber-
tie. It is clear from Logue’s letters and
diaries that he used the same deferen-
tial language as everyone else.
This was the first thing some of the
Logue family commented on when
they saw the finished film which stars
Colin Firth in the royal role that won
him this year’s best actor Oscar.
“My cousin Robert had a conversa-
tion with Geoffrey Rush just after the
screening, saying my grandfather
would never call the King Bertie and
it was clearly inaccurate,” says Mark.
Despite that, he says, the family were
‘The Queen Mother
didn’t want the
painful tale told’
‘I became aware
my grandfather
wrote a diary’
The new Express
iPad app download today
A £2.99 initial download gives 30 days free access to the paper and unlimited
live news and video access. After this initial period, there is a monthly cost of £7.99.
Owners of the Apple iPad can now
download the Sunday Express iPad
edition to enjoy and read wherever
you are without having to be online
or connected to the internet.
/lmx
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 29
QUESTING GRANDSON: Mark Logue
P
i
c
t
u
r
e
s
:

K
O
B
A
L
;

N
A
T
I
O
N
A
L

P
O
R
T
R
A
I
T

G
A
L
L
E
R
Y
;

R
E
X
;

C
H
A
N
N
E
L

4
pleased with the film, even Valen-
tine’s widow Anne, who had damned
the project but ended up wanting
director Tom Hooper’s contact
details to congratulate him.
Mark thinks the Bertie device, as
well as the use of a humble terraced
house as Logue’s home rather than
the mansion where he actually lived,
are quite justified.
?
E EXPLAINS: “Of course
the film takes massive crea-
tive licence but by suggest-
ing that he’s the one person that
can get away with calling the King
Bertie it is highlighting the fact that
this was not an ordinary profes-
sional relationship. My grandfather
was interested in how the King was
feeling and the King told him. Right
from their first meeting in 1926 he
writes that the Duke of York suffers
from bouts of depression. So they
must have had a conversation about
it and the Duke must have been
candid about it.”
Mark now wants a memorial for
his grandfather and is trying to get
a blue plaque erected at 146 Harley
Street where the royal consulta-
tions took place. English Heritage
turned down his initial application
but he is not downhearted. “Part
of the problem is that if you’re
a medical practitioner and you’re
claiming to have been a pioneer
in the field of voice therapy, there
needs to be an independent peer
review that what you’re saying is
actually substantiated,” he says.
“Unfortunately my grandfather
wasn’t reviewed, he didn’t publish,
he didn’t teach, so it’s difficult to
prove he was a pioneer in a conven-
tional medical sense. Since I first
applied, however, there have been
academic studies of his methods
that do substantiate his contribu-
tion, so I’m hoping there is enough
stuff now to get him accepted.”
It’s important that there should
be some lasting tribute, he says,
because although his grandfather
was given a CVO medal by George
VI, his remarkable contribution to
the story of the Royal Family was
unfairly overlooked in his lifetime.
“The King’s doctors or dentists
almost always got knighted, how-
ever brief or trivial their relation-
ship with him was,” says Mark. “I
don’t know why my grandfather
wasn’t. Perhaps it was because he
was Australian. But he has been
recognised now and I hope the
plaque will come eventually to give
him his rightful place in history.”

¬ The King’s Speech: Revealed is
on Channel 5 tonight at 8pm.
ROYAL CHALLENGE: Colin Firth as King George VI, main picture; Lionel Logue, left, and the Queen and King
K_\kilk_XYflk
K_\B`e^Ëj
Jg\\Z_
‘In real life he’d
never have called
him Bertie’
Victory123
30 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
Facebook face-off in race to
be in the new Big Brother
9pEXk_XeIXf THE rush to be part of the
hotly-awaited new series of
hit reality show Big Brother
starts today.
Would-be housemates are
invited to apply online to win
a place in Britain’s most cel-
ebrated house, with the
series appearing on Channel
5 for the first time.
TV presenter Emma Willis
plus singers Myleene Klass
and Cheryl Cole are in the
frame to host the show from
Elstree Film Studios, in
Hertfordshire, this summer.
And in a new twist,
applicants can use their
Facebook profiles to con-
vince Big Brother that they
have what it takes.
The new series will be
preceded by a celebrity ver-
sion with possible house-
mates to include act ress
Joanna Lumley, business-
man Mohamed Al Fayed,
football pundit Andy Gray
and boxer Ricky Hatton.
Channel 5 says it wants to
“bring back the fun” to
Big Brother and
will be looking for
party people, not
oddballs.
Jeff Ford, Channel
5’s director of pro-
grammes, said: “We
will bring a com-
pletely fresh perspec-
tive to the Big Brother
pheno menon.”
¬For an online applic-
ation form, visit www.
bigbrotherauditions.com
Emma Willis
is one of
those tipped
to host the
new show to
be filmed at
Elstree
studios,
inset
/lmx
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 31
pfli_\Xck_
INSIDE: The super salad guide ¬ÊAre you sitting
comfortably? ¬ÊA bug’s bite gave me arthritis
Picture: WARREN SMITH
N
HEN Carole and Sean
Daly’s seven-year-old son
Finn lost his first milk
tooth last year, the tooth
fairy didn’t get a look in.
Instead Carole popped
it in a jar filled with milk and sent it
to a lab in Cheshire to help protect
him against future ill-health. Three
thousand other families have done
the same, a figure that is rising fast.
If Professor Sara Rankin, a
biologist at Imperial College
London gets her way the tooth fairy
will become redundant.
“We are well aware it could take
decades for stem cell development
to reach a point where it could be
used in a health emergency and that
it might not happen at all,” says
Carole. “Yet if ever there came a
time in Finn’s life when that
moment did arise and we hadn’t
done all we could to protect him,
we’d feel we’d failed as parents.
“We’re not prepared to take that
chance so even though it cost £950
we’d rather invest in that than, say,
a holiday that would last a week.”
Professor Rankin has joined
forces with artist Gina Czarnecki to
get 12,000 children to send in their
baby teeth to decorate a 2m-high
“coral castle” designed to raise
awareness that they contain
potentially valuable stem cells.
The cells are already being
used to treat cancers including
leukaemia and blood disorders and
there are clinical trials going on
to determine their potential in
repairing cardiac tissue following
a heart attack.
In the future it is hoped they
may be used to cure conditions
such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s
and diabetes, as well as arthritis,
joint injuries and some visual
problems. Some scientists are even
proposing cosmetic benefits, using
the cells isolated from teeth to grow
new teeth, providing a more natural
alternative to dentures, implants
and bridges.
Carole, from Widnes, Cheshire,
discovered the stem cell harvesting
service run by BioEDEN in a local
newspaper article. “I cut out the
feature but then forgot about it.
It was only when Finn got his first
wobbly tooth that I remembered.
“Mind you it wouldn’t have been
the end of the world if we’d have
lost that tooth as there would have
been more. In fact BioEDEN
warned us that in some cases they
can’t get enough cells from the
tooth you send, in which case you
just send in the next one. If none
of them work you get a refund.”
Had Carole known stem cells
could be collected from cord blood,
the baby’s blood that remains in the
placenta and umbilical cord after
birth, when Finn was born, she
admits she would have done this
instead. The practice has now
become so popular in countries
including the US and UK that it is
forecast to be a $15billion
(£9billion) industry by 2015.
However Professor John Hunt,
head of the division of clinical
engineering that houses the UK
Centre for Tissue Engineering at
the University of Liverpool,
believes stem cells derived from
milk teeth that fall out provide a
significantly greater potential for
future healthcare than cord blood.
“There is good reason to believe
the cells in milk teeth are far more
proliferative so even if you only get
a few cells out of a tooth they
multiply rapidly and differentiate
into different cell types. It’s also
much simpler to send off a tooth
than get in a third party to extract
cord blood in the minutes after
birth. The only warning I would give
is not to go near companies that
just freeze the tooth.
“The tooth needs to be cracked
open and the pulp withdrawn and
processed in the lab to see if the cells
do or do not expand.”
It was Songtao Shi, a paediatric
dentist at the US National Institute
of Health in Bethesda, Maryland,
who first made the link between
stem cells and milk teeth. In 2000
he discovered wisdom teeth contain
stem cells in the pulp at the centre
of the tooth. When his six-year-old
daughter and her friends started
losing their baby teeth he thought
he’d check them too and so he
asked the parents to store the teeth
in a glass of milk overnight.
To his delight, he found between
12 and 20 cells from a typical incisor
tooth turned out to be stem cells.
Cynics claim harvesting stem
cells from teeth remains a huge leap
of faith, with years of trials and
testing required before we know
whether, once thawed, they will
even work. Even BioEDEN, one of
only two companies in Britain
offering to store the teeth, agrees
the success rate remains unknown.
“We point out the solid science but
are open about the fact that we are
banking milk teeth based on future
technological potential rather than
currently established scientific
fact,” explains chief executive
Lorna Green.
That said, just last year surgeons
in Mexico performed a stem cell
implant to regenerate bone tissue
in a patient’s jaw using stem cells
obtained from his own wisdom
teeth 28 days earlier and expanded.
Meanwhile the Laboratory for
Regenerative Medicine at
Cambridge University reports that
enormous strides are being made in
stem cells almost on a daily basis.
Professor Hunt is optimistic
extracting stem cells from milk
teeth will be a success. “There is
compelling evidence that milk teeth
are going to work and if you think
that most people under 30 are going
to live to over 100, they are going to
need the regenerative therapy these
stem cells have potential to create.”
BioEDEN offers the option of a
small sample of cells being used for
research. Professor Hunt hopes this
will increasingly be taken up.
“That is what would enable people
like me to get these cells and do the
research required to work out how
to use them therapeutically, rather
than me having to use my own
children’s teeth. Last week my
daughter’s tooth fell out and she
said, ‘leave a note for the tooth fairy
with the tooth that once the magic
has been taken out this needs to go
to my daddy’s lab please’.”
¬ To contact BioEDEN, visit www.
bioeden.com or call 01925 607351.
Interview by KATE HILPERN
:flc[fli
YfpËjd`cb
k\\k_jXm\
_`jc`]\
fe\[Xp6
Stem cells from Finn Daly’s
first baby tooth are being
harvested in the hope it will
protect him from future illness
‘Most people
under 30 will
live to over 100’
SMILES AHEAD: Sean and Carole with their seven-year-old son Finn,
whose first milk tooth has been sent off for pioneering research
Victory123
32 Daily Express Tue
pfli_\Xck_
<
NJOY your salads, they could be the key
to a long and healthy life. Eating leafy
greens such as rocket and lettuce can
help head off a heart attack say
researchers at the University of
Pittsburgh. The leaves contain nutrients
which help prevent and repair damage to the
heart and circulatory system.
Greens increase levels of nitric oxide, a
molecule crucial to cardiovascular health. Low
levels are associated with an increased risk of
heart disease but treatments such as bypass
surgery and angioplasty can add to the damage
by disrupting the chemical pathway our bodies
use to harness nitric oxide.
However researchers found the body can get
around this damage by creating an alternative
source from the nitrates in leafy greens.
Low levels of nitric oxide are also
a risk factor for diabetes so their
findings may also explain why a
diet rich in fruit and veg has also
been linked to a reduced risk of
blood sugar problems.
Writing in The Journal
Of Clinical Investigation,
scientists say the discovery
helps explain the benefits of the
Mediterranean diet and add: “It is
thought many different dietary micronutrients
and macronutrients act synergistically to reduce
vascular disease and other chronic diseases.”
Expert dietitian Dr Frankie Phillips says there
is a lot to be said for the idea of foods working
together and there is no better way to achieve
this sort of synergy than with a salad. For
instance tomatoes contain lycopene, an anti-
cancer compound which becomes more
powerful when combined with vitamin E, which
is abundant in olives. Tomatoes and olives are
perfect salad partners.
Here are some simple tips and perfect
matches that will give mealtimes an extra
health boost.
MIXING IS MAGIC
Variety really is the spice of life and as
Dr Phillips says: “Studies have shown the
greater the number of different foods you eat
in a day, the more likely you are to meet your
recommended nutrient levels.”
A study of more than
59,000 women by
researchers at Harvard
School of Public Health
found those who ate the
widest variety of foods
had the lowest levels of
cardiovascular disease
while those who ate
the least varied were
significantly more likely
to die from cancer.
UNKINDEST CUT
There is solid science to support the suggestion
that salad leaves should be torn and not cut.
Structurally, lettuce is like bubblewrap and
made up of lots of cells containing pockets of
nutrients and water. Dr Phillips explains: “If you
use a knife you cut through these cell walls and
lose nutrients, vitamin C in particular.”
If you tear the leaves, they break away
between each bubble, minimising damage to
the cell walls and subsequent loss of nutrients.
Tearing also reduces bruising and wilting for
the same reason.
BEST DRESSED
When making a vinaigrette, choose the right oil
as some supposedly healthy polyunsaturated
ones aren’t as good as you might think.
Sunflower, safflower, corn and many other
vegetable oils are high in omega-6 fatty acids
and compete with omega-3 fatty acids, which
in turn makes it harder for our body to absorb
those heart-friendly omega-3s.
Ideally we should have twice as much
omega-6 as we do 3, a ratio of two to one but
the increased use of vegetable oils and our low
consumption of oily fish has seen the balance
shift dramatically. Our average ratio is now an
unhealthy eight to one. That’s bad news on two
fronts because not only does omega-6 block
omega-3, high levels of omega-6 are also
associated with inflammation, a
contributor to heart disease, diabetes
and many other health problems.
Redress the balance by using an oil
high in omega-3 such as rapeseed
or flaxseed or, for a stronger
flavour, walnut or sesame. Try
olive oil which contains omega-9
and does not compete with 3.
GO FOR GARLIC
Add crushed garlic to dressings, it’s full of
allicin, a plant chemical which reduces the risk
of heart disease.
The World Health Organisation recommends
garlic as a natural treatment for hardening of
the arteries and high cholesterol.
Although these protective benefits have been
known for some time it’s only recently that
researchers at the University of Alabama
discovered allicin works by helping cells
communicate. This makes arteries and
blood vessels more elastic, reducing blood
pressure and the risk of cardiovascular disease
and stroke.
Allicin is created by a chemical reaction which
occurs when the cloves are chopped or crushed.
It is also broken down by heat, so crushed raw
garlic has the highest levels.
KNOW YOUR ONIONS
Onions come from the same family as garlic and
contain heart-healthy allicin. They are also high
in an antioxidant plant chemical called
quercetin which has proven cardiac benefits.
Researchers at the Institute of
Food Research found eating as
little as 100g of onion reduces
the chronic inflammation that
leads to hardening of the
arteries and heart disease.
Large population studies
have confirmed a clear link
between onion intake and a
reduced risk of heart disease,
stroke and some cancers.
China, which has the world’s
highest consumption of onion
and garlic, has one of the lowest
rates of stomach cancer which is
40 per cent lower than average.
Red onions, which also possess the added
bonus of providing visual appeal to any salad,
are proven to lower cholesterol. Animal studies
have shown eating them every day for eight
weeks can cut dangerous LDL cholesterol by
20 per cent.
Spring onions, another salad favourite, are a
surprisingly good source of iron and a cup full
contains the same amount as 3oz of prime beef.
J8C8;
Whether you opt for a bowl of leaves
or a medley of colourful vegetables,
JANE SYMONS tells you how to get
the most from this summer dish
Victory123
esday May 3 2011 33
Picture: ALAMY
pfli_\Xck_
GOLD CARROT
A carrot and sweetcorn salad is sweet in more
ways than one. Both are rich in lutein, a
carotenoid plant chemical which protects
against age-related macular degeneration,
the most common cause of blindness
in the UK.
“Use an oil-based dressing as this
helps the body absorb carotenoids,”
explains Dr Phillips.
The classic combination of carrots and
raisins is also great for eye health
as raisins are packed with
vitamin A which also reduces
the risk of macular-degeneration
and antioxidants which guard
against cataracts.
WHY WALDORF IS FIVE-STAR
As long as you use a low-fat
dressing, a Waldorf salad of apples,
celery and walnuts is packed full
of heart-healthy nutrients.
Apples are rich in quercetin,
which prevents thickening of the
arteries, and researchers at the
University of Illinois have shown that
soluble fibres such as the pectin in apples
strengthens the immune system and reduces
inflammation associated with heart disease
and diabetes.
Celery contains a phytonutrient with the
catchy name of 3-n-butylphthalide which
protects against hypertension and stroke by
relaxing the smooth muscles lining the blood
vessels and arteries.
It also contains apigenin, a plant chemical
with anti-cancer properties. Researchers at
Harvard Medical School who compared the
diets of more than 1,000 women with ovarian
cancer with a similar number of healthy women
the same age, found a diet high in apigenin
reduced the risk of the disease by 28 per cent.
Apigenin has been shown to target cells the
cancer uses to spread and grow.
Walnuts are a simple way to crack cholesterol
problems. A study in The American
Journal For Clinical Nutrition
found eating just 5oz of nuts
a week halves the risk of
cardiovascular problems.
Walnuts are the best as they
also cut levels of dangerous
LDL cholesterol by up to
27 per cent.
CAN’T BEET IT
Freshly cooked beetroot is proven
to help lower hypertension. One-in-four
adults has high blood pressure but a
study at Barts and the London School
of Medicine found drinking 500ml of
beetroot juice daily can significantly
reduce levels.
Beetroot is rich in nitrates, the
messengers that also make greens
so healthy.
PEP UP IRON INTAKE
A spinach salad is packed with iron which is
essential for energy as it fuels the transport
system that carries oxygen around the body.
Yet iron from vegetable sources is not as
readily absorbed as haem iron, the form found
in red meat.
However you can maximise uptake by
combining iron-rich foods such as spinach with
those which are rich in vitamin C as this will
enhance absorption.
Oranges aren’t the only fruit when it comes
to good sources either and some vegetables
are surprisingly high. A cup of red peppers for
instance contains around 50 per cent more
vitamin C than a cup of orange juice.
CABBAGES ARE KING
Coleslaw could reduce your risk of
cancer. Cabbage, the key ingredient,
contains a plant chemical called
indole-3-carbinol (IC3) which
protects against a range
of tumours.
IC3, which is found in all
cruciferous vegetables, binds on
to carcinogens and stimulates the
release of enzymes that defuse
them. A large Dutch study found a
diet high in cruciferous vegetables
such as cabbage, broccoli and
cauliflower halves the risk of bowel
cancer. Researchers in Singapore
reported a 69 per cent cut in lung
cancer risk and a study reported in the
International Journal Of Cancer found it
lowered the risk of bladder cancer.
Use a low-fat crème fraîche instead of
mayonnaise for the dressing to cut down on the
calories and fat.
ON THE BUTTON
A mushroom salad is low in calories, high in
nutrients and keeps you feeling full.
Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of
Public Health in the US put them to the test by
asking volunteers to eat a lunchtime meat meal
of 650 calories for four days and then swap to a
mushroom-based one with only 330 calories for
the same period.
They found satiety scores were the same and
there was no temptation to increase snacks to
account for the lower calorie intakes on the
mushroom meal days.
Mushrooms are a good source of potassium
which protects against high blood pressure,
as well as selenium which has
anti-cancer properties and appears
to play an important role in the
immune system.
There is no need to splash out
on expensive exotic varieties
either as a study at Tufts
University in the US found
that basic button
mushrooms enhance
production of dendritic cells
in bone marrow which produce
T-cells, the frontline soldiers of the
immune system.
CRESS IS MORE
Eating watercress regularly could
cut the risk of cancer and heart
disease according to a study at the
University of Ulster.
The flavoursome leaves contain
powerful antioxidants which bind
on to harmful compounds in the blood.
Researchers discovered smokers who consumed
an 85g bag of cress daily for eight weeks cut
their levels of DNA damage, the precursor of
cancer, by 23 per cent.
Levels of triglycerides, unhealthy fats
associated with heart disease, were also cut by
10 per cent.
;;8PJ
SLICE OF LIFE:
Take the healthy option
for a growing family
Picture: ALAMY
Victory123
34 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
pfli_\Xck_
J
ITTING still for long
periods can damage your
health. Don’t assume you’re
off the hook just because
you work out at the gym or
take regular walks. New
research shows that even if you
exercise regularly in your free time,
long periods of inactivity in front
of the computer or on the sofa can
cause significant harm.
Last week a study found
spending 10 years in a desk job
almost doubles the risk of some
bowel cancers.
Other recent research has found
that remaining sedentary for too
long can increase the chances of
developing heart problems as well
as metabolic syndrome, a condition
that can lead to diabetes.
Although they don’t fully
understand why, scientists warn
the chemical reactions triggered
in the body by being inactive for
long periods can’t be cancelled out
by taking more exercise.
The good news is short, sharp
bursts of activity every 20 to 40
minutes, even for as little as one or
two minutes, can undo the damage
caused. In the future scientists
predict micro-breaks will be
promoted as much as exercise is
today. Here are some ways to get
you out of a slump:
WALK UP THE ESCALATOR
OR TAKE THE STAIRS
In the Fifties Jerry Morris, the first
scientist to prove the correlation
between health and exercise,
conducted an experiment and
found bus drivers were roughly
twice as likely to suffer a heart
attack than bus conductors.
The only factor that could explain
it was the conductors were running
up and down up to 750 stairs a
day whereas drivers remained
sedentary.
Scientists have since learned that
even if you only walk quickly up one
flight of stairs, you can burn 15 or
so calories. Stair-climbing has the
added benefit of exercising your
glutes (bottom) and quadriceps
(thighs). Most important, your
heart gets a good workout says
Anthony Delamare, a fitness and
weight-loss coach. Plus it is
low-impact and safe for your knees.
A study in the European Heart
Journal found taking the stairs
could save your life. Banning the
use of lifts and escalators at work
led to better fitness, less body
fat, trimmer waistlines and a drop
in blood pressure.
This translates to a 15 per
cent cut in the risk of dying
prematurely from any cause,
the team at the University of
Geneva in Switzerland found.
“This suggests stair-climbing
can have major public health
implications,” says lead researcher
Dr Philippe Meyer.
MAKE YOURSELF MORE DRINKS
Take advantage of television ad
breaks or a computer file download
to make another cuppa or get a
glass of water. This will ensure
continuous blood circulation in
your arms and legs and will keep
them from getting too strained.
“A break could be as short as one
minute and not necessarily entail
exercise to be of benefit,” says Dr
Genevieve Healy, who conducted
a recent study on inactivity at the
University of Queensland in
Australia. Simply standing up
burns 60 more calories per hour
than sitting.
“If you rotate the spine left
and right while standing it can
increase the blood flow to parts
of the spine that become
under-nourished when you sit
for longer than 30 minutes,”
adds Simon Fairthorne, a
physiotherapist for Bupa.
SPACE OUT YOUR
HOUSEHOLD CHORES
Housework is an excellent
opportunity to tone and
strengthen muscles and get
the heart pumping, says
Juliette Kellow, dietitian
and adviser to Weight Loss
Resources.
You will need to maximise
the effort involved. If you’re
8i\pflj`kk`e^
Zfd]fikXYcp6
As scientists discover long periods in a desk
job can double the risk of cancer, KATE
HILPERN has five tips to get you moving
50WING
5f£Þ8 ?
We all have plans for the future. Perhaps yours involve spending less time in the
office and more time in the garden. At Macmillan, we’ve got plans too. We want
to provide the best possible cancer care to everyone in the UK who needs us.
Whatever seeds you’re sowing, an up-to-date will can help you plan your
future. And by including a gift to Macmillan, you can help to secure ours too.
To find out how we can plan a better future together, call 0800 107 4448,
email plantogether@macmillan.org.uk or send us the attached form.
If you would like us to contact you, just fill in your details below.
Name:
Telephone:
Email:
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Please send this completed form to: FREEPOST RSBR-ZYKK-EKSR, Legacy Team,
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Email is an inexpensive way to update you about our work. Please provide your email address if you’re happy for us to contact you.
We will use your details to send you further information on will writing, legacies and for research purposes. We may also use
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L£T’5 PLñNA 0£7Tfk IUTUk£ T06£7K£R
2
3
5
8
7
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 35
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KI<8KD<EK
ASTHMA sufferers
are being put at
risk because many
GPs don’t have the
skills needed to
treat the condition
properly, a charity
has warned.
Asthma UK has
revealed education
on the disease is
not a priority
despite over half of
GPs agreeing the
number of deaths
could be reduced
with better care.
Just under
two-thirds of GPs
reported they felt
public awareness
of asthma could
be improved,
while 47 per cent
admitted their
own knowledge
was lacking.
The study
comes after
announcements
that NHS training
budgets could
be cut.
The charity is
calling on the
Department of
Health to make
asthma a higher
priority within the
reformed NHS.
Neil Churchill of
Asthma UK said:
“Asthma training
is not being given
the priority
it deserves
despite the fact
that asthma
hospitalises
someone every
seven minutes.”
pfli_\Xck_
Picture: CAMERA PRESS
loading or unloading the
dishwasher, for instance, don’t
bend over repetitively, squat
repetitively instead.
Even for 30 seconds, this will give
your thigh muscles and buttocks a
workout. Repetitive reaching up
or over to the side can strengthen
your core muscles too.
The trick is not to move your
whole body when reaching, only
use your arms while holding your
stomach muscles tight.
Be sure to space out your chores
if you want to counteract long
periods of sitting down. “Be more
creative in the kitchen,” says
Juliette. “Peeling, chopping,
stirring, whisking and beating all
burn more calories than simply
heating up a ready meal. Have a go
at making your own bread as
kneading dough is hard work.”
With the average British woman
spending more than 16 hours a
week cleaning the home, you may
even be able to cancel your gym
membership. In one hour you can
burn 193 calories by vacuuming,
173 by dusting, 193 by mopping the
floor, 113 by ironing and 180 by
cleaning windows.
PLACE THINGS OUT OF REACH
Put the TV remote control on a
shelf so you have to get out of your
seat to get it.
It doesn’t sound like much but it
can improve cardiovascular health
and muscle strength, as well as
toning the legs and buttocks and
strengthening the bones.
Stretch when reaching for an
item. Stretching your body can
help it to become more flexible,
bringing a greater range of motion
to muscles and joints. You can gain
flexibility in your hamstrings, back,
shoulders and hips.
Make the most out of your walk,
adds fitness and weight loss expert
Laura Williams. “Pump your arms
and squeeze your buttocks when
you’re walking to turn a short stroll
into a mini-workout that will tone
tops of arms and behind,” she says.
“Add in a couple of flights of
stairs as it’s even better for burning
calories.”
SIT ON A SWISS BALL
These over-sized gym balls (left)
are often used for sit-ups but the
combination of sitting on a
movable object and having no back
support means your core and spine
muscles have to contract
constantly to keep you balanced
in a central and upright position.
This can undo some of the damage
caused by sitting in a chair.
It can also make your back
stronger and help you lose weight,
adds Anthony Delamare. “Just
sitting on one means you can burn
an average 350 calories extra per
day and it decreases back pain.”
If you use a normal chair,
maximise the effort involved in
your micro-breaks by getting up
properly. “Replicate a squat at the
gym, tilting your pelvis out and
focusing on your legs doing the
work rather than your back. If you
do this every time you get off your
chair, it’s like doing 100 squats a
day without setting foot in a gym,”
says personal trainer Dan Roberts.
TAKE A BREAK: Sitting
for too long can cause
all sorts of problems,
so follow our handy tips
/lmx
Victory123
36 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
pfli_\Xck_
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Picture: JAMIE JONES
ACNE
TOOTHPASTE
Although it lacks clinical
evidence, many people
claim toothpaste on a
spot works wonders.
One theory is many
contain triclosan, an
antibacterial which
reduces redness. The
dry paste is also said to
act as a mop to absorb
and draw out a spot.
CLAY
Healing can be achieved
by using a clay-based
face pack. Dab on the
affected area and leave
for as long as possible
before rinsing.

CRUSHED ASPIRIN
Aspirin is derived from
salicylic acid which is
an ingredient found in
many face washes. Try
crushing an aspirin (not
paracetamol) into a fine
powder, adding a drop
of water and applying
the paste directly to the
affected area.

ICE
Ice’s ability to numb and
soothe the skin might
help calm redness.
Press a cube on to the
skin for a few minutes.
EGGS
Whisk an egg white until
thick, add a teaspoon of
honey and a teaspoon
of lemon juice. Apply to
the face for 10 minutes.
ROSACEA
COTTON WOOL
Damp cotton wool in a
plastic bag can cool skin
and a cold compress
reduces redness.
VITAMIN E
Open up a vitamin E
capsule and apply the
contents to drier areas.
CAMOMILE TEA
Drinking camomile tea
may reduce flushing and
help calm rosacea due
to stress.
ANTI-DANDRUFF
SHAMPOO
When allowed to run
down the face during a
shower, it has been
suggested anti-dandruff
shampoo can improve
rosacea. This may point
to it being seborrheic
dermatitis. Leave on
the skin for as long as
possible before rinsing.
¬ Extracted by AHALYA
ALVARES from Acne And
Rosacea: The Complete
Guide by Alison Bowser
(Vermilion, £10.99).
Acne and rosacea
can impact our
daily lives. Try
these quick tips to
deal with flare-ups
8
S DOCTORS struggled for
more than two years to
diagnose her symptoms,
Emma McNally feared she
had cancer. Weight loss,
tiredness and constant
stomach problems, which meant
she was continually dashing to the
bathroom, took a terrible toll on her.
“At the time I’d just started a new
job in customer relations,” recalls
Emma, now 31. “I couldn’t have any
sort of normal life. I was also losing
blood and I was convinced I had
cancer. It was horrific.”
So it came as a relief when Emma
was diagnosed with colitis, an
inflammatory condition which
causes clusters of ulcers to form in
the large intestine. She assumed
she could now have treatment.
However as the condition
worsened Emma soon found herself
facing a battle for life. “I was going
to the bathroom up to 20 times a
day and my weight dropped to six
stone,” she explains. “I tried
changing my diet but nothing
worked. During a holiday to Cyprus
I ended up in hospital
for a week. That’s
when I realised how
serious it was.”
Soon she barely
had the strength to
get out of bed and
ended up spending
the next four months
in hospital. “It was
depressing. My best
friend got married and I wasn’t well
enough to go. I had no life.”
Returning to hospital after a
weekend at home, Emma was told
her condition was so grave that
emergency surgery to remove her
entire large intestine (also known as
the colon) was the only option. In a
healthy person the function of the
large intestine is to absorb water
from food and pass waste material.
“By now my weight was down to
five-and-a-half stone. It was spelt
out to me that if I didn’t have the
operation I could be dead within
24 hours. My mum passed out in
the consultant’s room.”
Ulcerative colitis affects about
120,000 people in the UK and it is
estimated there are 20,000 people
who have had their colon removed.
During surgery, Emma’s ileum,
the end of the small intestine, was
also diverted and re-routed through
a hole in her abdomen. It was then
connected to an external pouch to
collect body waste. The procedure
is known as an ileostomy. “I really
struggled, not just psychologically
but practically,” says Emma. “The
pouch used to become detached,
which I found humiliating. I felt
unfeminine and I became reclusive.
I was only in my mid-20s and I went
from being grateful I was alive to
wondering how I’d deal with this.”
Then, nine months later, Emma
was told there was another option.
Although not suitable for everyone
she was offered surgery which
involves folding loops of the small
intestine back on themselves to
construct an internal waste pouch.
Known as ileo-anal pouches or
J-Pouches, they are an increasingly
popular alternative to external bags.
Emma’s ileostomy was reversed
and in 2004, in two stages to reduce
the risk of infection, she had surgery
and the new pouch was connected.
There are disadvantages: the new
internal waste reservoir is smaller
than the colon so some patients
report having to use the toilet
frequently but for Emma it has
proved a revelation.
“I have to be wary of my diet but
at last I can control
the condition rather
than it controlling
me,” she says.
She is now the
practice manager for
a firm of solicitors.
“My weight is back
to over eight stone
and I can do things
other people take for
granted. I can go to the gym, go
swimming, go camping and wear a
bikini. I can put myself in social
situations which I would have
avoided because of the restrictions
of having a bag.”
Up to 4,000 patients in the UK
have had the same treatment. Neil
Mortensen, professor of colorectal
surgery at Oxford Radcliffe
Hospitals, says: “Colitis often affects
young people and there are body
issues about having an external
pouch. An internal pouch is now the
favoured option when it becomes
necessary in severe cases of colitis
to remove the large intestine. The
operation is not always successful
but about 80 per cent of patients
are happy with the outcome.”
Emma adds: “I want people to
know normal life can go on and
how amazing this treatment can be.”
¬ Visit www.iasupport.org.uk for
information or call 0800 0184 724.
ADRIAN LEE
@XdYXZb
`eZfekifc
f]dpc`]\
Ulcerative bowel
disease ravaged
Emma McNally’s
body and turned
her into a recluse,
until pioneering
surgery gave her
a sense of hope
‘I was told I
could be
dead within
24 hours’
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 37
pfli_\Xck_
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GETTING TO THE HEART OF MEDICAL MATTERS
Q
MY 20-year-old son suffers
from hay fever. He contacted
his GP for a hay fever jab but
was told doctors don’t do them.
Is this correct and if so, where
can he get one? What other
treatments are there?
A
IN the past some GPs have
given an injection of a
long-acting steroid to treat
severe hay fever. Though this can
be effective, it shuts down the
body’s own production of
steroids. This can be potentially
very dangerous, especially if you
are ill or involved in an accident
so GPs no longer give them.
A second jab containing
extract of pollen also used to be
given but caused a severe allergic
reaction in some patients so is
no longer available.
However a new type of
treatment, Grazax, is available
for reducing the body’s reaction
to grass pollen which in turn
helps to prevent hay fever
symptoms. Each tablet contains
a minute amount of grass
pollen and is placed under the
tongue on a daily basis for at
least three months.
It is available on prescription
but your son may have to have
an allergy test first to confirm
his symptoms are due to grass
pollen and not another type
of flower.
Q
TWO or three days a week I
am plagued with a headache,
usually around my left eye,
which I believe is called a cluster
headache. It often flares up if I
drink just one glass of wine the
night before and tends to last
all day. Do you know why these
are happening and what I can do
to avoid them?
A
CLUSTER headaches occur
on one side of the head or
face. Several can occur in a short
period then go away for months
or even years. Typically an attack
of cluster headaches will last
between six and 12 weeks and
not appear again for at least six
months.
It is thought changes in brain
chemicals may be to blame and
these may be linked to the
brain’s own body clock. This is
why many sufferers find attacks
start at the same time each year
and even the same time of day.
Alcohol can be a trigger as
can hot temperatures or
strong-smelling substances,
particularly perfumes and
solvents. As prevention is better
than the cure, if you are in
“cluster period” the only answer
may be to avoid drinking.
Treatments include an
injection of the anti-migraine
drug sumatriptan (which you can
learn to give yourself) and
breathing 100 per cent oxygen.
Verapamil tablets have been
shown to help and some
recommend a steroid injection at
the start of a cluster period. All
are available on prescription.
You can get more information
from Ouch (the Organisation
for the Understanding of
Cluster Headache) 01646 651 979/
www.ouchuk.org
Q
THE tendon connecting my
big toe to my ankle on my
right foot has disappeared and
consequently my big toe tends
to drop down. If left in this
position it becomes painful and
slightly swollen at the joint.
I have also lost some feeling
under the toe and sensitivity in
that area. To overcome this I tape
a small plastic splint under the toe
to keep it rigid. Is this a problem
and will my toe ever get better?
A
THIS is actually quite a
common problem although
it more usually affects the
second, third or fourth toes,
when it is called a “hammer toe”.
Although it may occur because
of problems with the tendons
inside the foot, it can also arise
from the toes being squashed
into poorly fitting footwear.
Shoes that are too narrow are
often to blame as the toes are
constantly having to flex into an
abnormal position.
Arthritis in the big toe joint
can affect the function of the
tendons that straighten the toe.
You need to see your doctor who
will be able to advise you on the
best form of treatment.
You may need an X-ray to check
whether you have arthritis and, if
so, you may need surgery to
correct it. Alternatively you may
just need special exercises to
strengthen the muscles that
straighten the toe.
In the meantime make sure
you wear shoes that give your
toes plenty of room. You should
avoid wearing footwear that has
to be kept on by flexing your
toes such as slip-on sandals or
ballet flats that do not have good
back support.
Instead wear shoes that are
kept on your feet by some form of
strap across the top of your foot.
¬ If you have a health question
for Dr Rosemary please write
to her in confidence at The
Northern & Shell Building,
10 Lower Thames Street,
London EC3R 6EN or email
health@express.co.uk
Dr Rosemary’s reply will appear
in this column. She regrets that
she cannot enter into personal
correspondence and that, due
to the volume of letters, she
cannot reply to everyone.
LONG-SUFFERING: Hay fever is a problem that affects lots of people
Picture: PHOTOLIBRARY.COM
PALLADIUM0844 412 2957
THE WIZARD OF OZ
Tue 7pm, Wed - Sat 7.30
Wed & Sat 2.30, Sun 3pm
wizardodozmusical.com
£25 DAY SEATS FROM 10AM IN PERSON
FORTUNE 0844 871 7626
THE WOMAN IN BLACK
Mon - Sat 8pm, Tues 3pm Sat 3pm
www.thewomaninblack.com
LYRIC THEATRE 0844 412 4661
THRILLER – LIVE!
The songs of Michael and the Jackson 5
Tues – Fri 7.30, Sat 4 & 8, Sun 3.30 & 7.30
“THE HITS JUST KEEP ON COMING.
A GREAT NIGHT OUT!” D.TEL
NEW LONDON THEATRE
020 7452 3000 / 0844 412 4654
WAR HORSE
Mon, Wed – Sat 7.30, Tues 7.00
Thur & Sat 2.30
warhorselondon.com
DOMINION 0844 847 1775
WE WILL ROCK YOU
by QUEEN & BEN ELTON
Mon – Sat 7.30, Mat Sat 2.30
Extra show last Wednesday
of every month at 2.30
www.wewillrockyou.co.uk
APOLLO VICTORIA 0844 847 1696
WICKED
WickedTheMusical.co.uk
Mon - Sat 7.30pm Wed & Sat 2.30pm
WEST END
THEATRES
expresslistings
ADELPHI 0844 412 4651
LOVE NEVER DIES
Mon – Sat 7.30pm, Wed & Sat 2.30pm
www.loveneverdies.com
PRINCE OF WALES 0844 482 5114
'FANTASTIC FUN' Classic FM
MAMMA MIA!
Mon – Thur 7.30, Fri 5.00 & 8.30,
Sat 3.00 & 7.30
www.Mamma-Mia.com
NOËL COWARD 0844 482 5141
MILLION DOLLAR
QUARTET
milliondollarquartet.co.uk
Mon-Sat 8pm, Thurs & Sat 3pm
GARRICK THEATRE 0844 412 4662
Rupert Everett, Kara Tointon
and Diana Rigg
PYGMALION
By Bernard Shaw
OPENS NEXT WEEK – 12 MAY
SHAKESPEARE'S GLOBE
0207 401 9919/0871 297 0749
ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL
Performances Monday - Sunday
Now open
shakespearesglobe.com
BETTY BLUE EYES
"A SMASH - HIT
MUSICAL IS BORN" Times
Novello Theatre - 0844 482 5170
Bettyblueeyesthemusical.com
Mon - Sat 7.30pm, and Sat 2.30pm
VICTORIA PALACE 0844 811 0055
BILLY ELLIOT
THE MUSICAL
Mon – Sat 7.30pm Thur & Sat 2.30pm
billyelliotthemusical.com
APOLLO THEATRE 0844 412 4658
ALISON HERMIONE
STEADMAN NORRIS
ROBERT RUTHIE
BATHURST HENSHALL
NOEL COWARD'S
BLITHE SPIRIT
Mon - Sat 7.30pm, Thurs & Sat 2.30pm
Extra Mats Apr 20, 27, & May 4, June 1
FINAL WEEKS MUST CLOSE JUNE 18
OLD VIC 0844 871 7609
CAUSE CÉLÈBRE
By Terence Rattigan
Anne-Marie Duff
***** Times & Sun Tel
Mon - Sat 7.30, Wed & Sat 2.30
www.oldvictheatre.com
ALDWYCH THEATRE 0844 847 1714
DIRTY DANCING
THE CLASSIC STORY ON STAGE
Mon – Thur 7.30pm, Fri 5 & 8.30pm, Sat 3 & 7.30pm
DirtyDancingLondon.com
TRAFALGAR 0844 871 7632
LAST CHANCE TO SEE
Tracie Bennett as Judy Garland
END OF THE RAINBOW
endoftherainbowlondon.com
FINAL 3 WEEKS – ENDS 21 MAY
HAYMARKET 0845 481 1870
MUST END 11 JUNE
'TREVOR NUNN'S
SUPERB PRODUCTION' Dtel
FLARE PATH
by Terence Rattigan
Mon - Sat 7.30, Wed & Sat 2.30pm
DUKE OF YORK'S 0844 871 7623
GHOST STORIES
Tonight at 8pm
ghoststoriestheshow.co.uk
VAUDEVILLE THEATRE0844 412 4663
MATTHEW FOX OLIVIA WILLIAMS
'Scorching performances' Independent
IN A FOREST
DARK AND DEEP
by Neil Labute
Mon - Sat 7.30, Wed & sat 3pm
PRINCE EDWARD THEATRE 0844 482 5152
JERSEY BOYS
Tue – Sat 19.30 Tue, Sat & Sun 15.00
www.JerseyBoysLondon.com
SAVOY THEATRE 0844 871 7687
Olivier Winner Best New Musical
LEGALLY BLONDE
Mon – Sat 7.30pm, Thur & Sat 2.30
Legallyblondethemusical.co.uk
QUEENS 0844 482 5161
LES MISÉRABLES
25 YEARS YOUNG
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
DRURY LANE 0844 871 8810
SHREK THE MUSICAL
Previews begin 6 May from£15
shrekthemusical.co.uk
AMBASSADORS 08448 112 334
STOMP
Mon & Weds – Sat 8pm
Wed, Thurs & Sat 3pm, Sun 3pm & 6pm
CRITERION THEATRE 0844 847 2483
London's Funniest Comedy
THE 39 STEPS
Mon – Sat 8pm, Wed 3pm, Fri 4.30pm & Sat 4pm
COMEDY 0844 871 7622
KEIRA ELISABETH ELLEN CAROL
KNIGHTLEY MOSS BURSTYN KANE
THE CHILDREN’S HOUR
BY LILLIAN HELLMAN
Mon - Sat 7.30pm, Wed & Sat 2.30pm
TICKETS AVAILABLE £15 - £60
LYCEUM0844 844 0005
Or book online www.thelionking.co.uk
Groups 15+ 0844 847 1522 or 020 7845 0949
Disney Presents
THE LION KING
Tue-Sat 7.30pm, Wed, Sat & Sun 2.30pm
HER MAJESTY'S 0844 412 2707
THE PHANTOMOF
THE OPERA
Eves 7.30, Mats Tue & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantomOfTheOpera.com
‘SHOCKINGLY
GOODFUN’
THETIMES
JONATHANROSSSAYS
‘AWESOME’
‘MAGNIFICO’
THE SUN
DOMINION THEATRE
we wi l l r o c k y o u . c o . u k
0844 847 1775
Victory123
38 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
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FIGHTING BACK: A healthy lifestyle helped Kelly-Anne recover
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Television presenter
Kelly-Anne Lyons spent
her teens drained of
energy, all because
of a woodland bug
J
HE has a successful career in
children’s television and to her
young viewers she is full of life
and bursting with energy. Yet
as a schoolgirl Kelly-Anne
Lyons, who stars in the popular
BBC show Dick And Dom’s Funny
Business, was diagnosed with arthritis,
a debilitating condition most commonly
associated with older people.
More surprisingly the illness was the
result of Kelly-Anne, 26, being bitten by
a woodland parasite.
“I am from a small town called
Basking Ridge in New Jersey,” explains
Kelly-Anne, an American who moved to
England three years ago while working
as a model. “My best friend lived behind
me and we used to run through the
woods around our houses.”
When she was 13 Kelly-Anne must
have been bitten by a tick. Yet she
didn’t realise it until the infection had
attacked her body.
Ticks, which are normally transmitted
by larger animals such as deer and
sheep, can carry bacteria called
Borrelia. If they bite human flesh they
can cause Lyme disease. This can
trigger flu-like symptoms and tiredness.
Left untreated, it can lead to arthritis,
which is inflammation of the joints, and
heart problems. It can also affect the
nervous system, eyes, kidneys and liver
and in rare cases can be life-threatening.
“Usually when you get a bite a rash
comes up like a red bull’s eye,” says
Kelly-Anne. “Doctors take the tick out
and give you medicine. I never had the
bull’s eye rash so they think the tick
probably went in my hair.”
Soon she began experiencing flu-like
symptoms, suffered from chronic fatigue
and was repeatedly misdiagnosed.
She says: “They told me I had flu or
had overstretched myself because I was
a busy child.” During the next six to
eight months, the lively teenager
suffered from inexplicable tiredness,
high temperatures and joint pain.
“One day my knee swelled up,” she
recalls. “I went to the school nurse who
said: ‘You have arthritis and I guarantee
the reason you’ve been so sick is you’ve
had Lyme disease’.” Blood tests
confirmed the diagnosis.
As she was allergic to non-steroidal
anti-inflammatory drugs, usually
prescribed for arthritis she was taking
up to 20 tablets a day. “That’s a lot for
a child,” she says. “Yet my hospital trips
helped put everything into perspective.
I’d walk past five-year-olds with
leukaemia so I never thought ‘poor me’.”
She also had physiotherapy to
mobilise her joints and ate a healthy
diet. According to Professor Hill Gaston,
professor of rheumatology at Cambridge
University, the link between the disease
and arthritis is now well established.
“Lyme disease causes arthritis,” he
says. “Yet if people know about the tick
bite and take antibiotics most patients
won’t develop arthritis at all. Even when
it does develop, most patients will
respond to antibiotics.”
Not everyone gets the rash which can
make detection difficult. According to
the Health Protection Agency there are
now up to 3,000 cases of Lyme disease
in England and Wales each year. It can
be found in areas such as the New
Forest and Dartmoor.
Kelly-Anne has been in remission
from her condition for eight years and is
now a supporter of the charity Arthritis
Care. “Living and coping with arthritis
while I was growing up was tough but I
was luckier than some because I was able
to continue doing what I loved,” she says.
“This was due to taking the proper
medicine and living a healthy lifestyle
but many people with arthritis have to
stop doing sports and hobbies which
can be isolating when you’re young.”
CAROLINE DAY
¬ÊKelly-Anne Lyons is promoting
Arthritis Care Week which runs from
May 9 to 15. For more information visit
www.arthritiscare.org.uk
I READ your recent
reply to a reader
concerned about
low iron levels
(April 26).
In 2002 I was
hospitalised with
DVT in both legs
and a lung
infection. My
haemoglobin
levels were found
to be very low and
the hospital began
a long, invasive
search to find
where I was
bleeding internally.
Eventually a
scan showed one
of my kidneys had
shrivelled and died
and the remaining
kidney and liver
were enlarged. I
wasn’t losing
blood but not
making enough
due to my kidney,
liver, arthritic joints
and long bones.
I was given
injections to boost
blood supply and
occasional iron
infusions and
tablets. I am now
much better,
though waiting for
knee and hip
replacements.
My experience
shows a course of
iron tablets is not
always the answer.
Indeed in my case
it would have been
dangerous.
Mrs Brenda
Lay, by email
For your chance to win call 0907 181 2773 or text DXIMAC
followed by your answer, name and address details to 86660.
Calls cost 77p per minute from a BT Landline
plus network extras and last 2.5 minutes. Calls
from other networks and mobiles may cost more.
Texts cost £2 plus your usual network operator
rate. Entrants must be 18 or over. Competition
closes at midnight on June 8. Winners will be
selected at random from all correct entries. For
full T&Cs see www.express.co.uk/compterms.
Helpline 0870 010 8656. The Editor’s decision is
final. For SMS you may receive other related
promotional offers/services: if you do not wish to,
send STOP at the end of your message.
Express Newspapers reserves the right to offer
these promotions in its portfolio of titles. Prize is
subject to availability. Images are for
representational use only.
N@E8E`D8:
NFIK?™(#')'
Two lucky readers will each win a
21.5-inch sleek, top-of-the-line Mac
desktop, which features a backlit
LED screen, a 3.06GHz Intel Core 2
Duo processor, a 500 GB hard drive
and 4GB of memory. It also comes
with a wireless keyboard and Apple’s
Magic Mouse. It’s a must-have for
home entertainment, work tasks, HD
video and music storage and, what’s
more, we’re throwing in an Apple
iMac Care Plan too.
TO ENTER
Just
answer the
following
question:
Which
fairytale
character
is poisoned
by an
apple?
Snow
White;
Cinderella
or Sleeping
Beauty?
)
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APPLE AND iMAC
ARE REGISTERED
TRADEMARKS OF
APPLE INC
/sou
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 39
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T’S always nice to be surprised
and one place you don’t expect
to be surprised in is an ITV1
cop drama. It’s turning into
something of a bonanza week
for fans of the sleuth genre,
with Exile unravelling slowly on
BBC1 and Brenda Blethyn as
north-east case-cracker Vera
on ITV1.
At first sight CASE SENSITIVE
(ITV1) looks like another needless
addition to the catalogue. It’s got
the feisty woman detective with the
unusual name (Zailer). Check. The
messy love life and cat-and-mouse
tension thing with the male
opposite number. Check. It’s got
institutional sexism and too much
booze. Check.
However, if the coppers in this
two-part adaptation of Sophie
Hannah’s thriller The Point Of
Rescue seem two-dimensional
that’s only because the plot they’re
caught up in is far more significant.
Det Sgt Charlie Zailer (Olivia
Williams) and Det Con Simon
Waterhouse (Darren Boyd), both
fresh from an unfortunate drunken
clinch with each other, visited one
of those architect-designed posh
houses made of glass and chrome
to investigate the suspicious deaths
of Geraldine Bretherick and her
five-year-old daughter Lucy. “This
all looks pretty straightforward,”
observed Waterhouse in an
oft-repeated line that promised
the opposite of what it seemed to.
Criminologists from the local
university were called in, one cute
and sexy, the other bearded and
arrogant, to peer at the evidence
and pick over the mother’s diary
rantings. They concluded it was
a case of ‘family annihilation’, an
unbalanced mother doing herself
and her offspring in to wreak
revenge on her spouse or to protect
themselves from him.
Either looked possible when we
met said spouse, stressed-out,
irritable businessman Mark
Bretherick, now in grieving mode.
Meanwhile, as details of the
deaths hit the headlines married
hotel manager Sally Thorne
recalled having a one-night stand
with Mark Bretherick. So off she
went to find him, a move better
explained in the novel than in
this small-screen version, only to
discover it was a different Mark
Bretherick she’d slept with. As
sometimes happens.
A simple case of double identity,
except that the sleep-around Mark
Bretherick had described his
distinctive house and shown his
conquest a photograph of his wife
and daughter.
However, to the Mark Bretherick
suspected of murder or driving his
wife to it, Sally’s tale was salvation.
Or it would have been if she hadn’t
legged it pronto. Oh, and if she
hadn’t pretended to be another
person and someone in a silver car
wasn’t after her.
It’s a cracking plot, both gripping
and unguessable. Some of it tends
to look less steady in the cold light
of day but in the thrill of the chase
these things don’t register. As
excitement and chases go, this
is first-class stuff and concludes
this evening.
Not being THE HOTEL
INSPECTOR (Channel 5) myself, I
couldn’t see what was wrong with
the Welcome Traveller Inn, the
strugging, family-run guesthouse
in west Wales featured last night.
Well, apart from the sign. This
featured a Welsh dragon and looked
as though it had been done by a
junior school art class working
collectively together. Its foot was
resting on something that might
have been a football or equally a
severed head.
Not really the sort of welcome I’d
fancy anywhere.
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David Coleman (left) was
the face of BBC sport for
more than 25 years. As
he celebrates his 85th
birthday this documentary
looks back at the indelible
imprint he’s left on sports
broadcasting, from football
World Cups to 11 Olympic
Games. Coleman was a
presenter, commentator,
quizmaster and an ace
interviewer, as well as
being affectionately known
for his on-air gaffes.
Contributions from the
Princess Royal, Lord Coe,
Sir Ian Botham and his
own family leave us in no
doubt about his talents.
Orson Welles’ masterpiece tells the story of
press magnate Charles Foster Kane through
flashbacks. Intrigued by the dying Kane’s last
uttered word, rosebud, a reporter sets out to
find a new angle on his subject’s life.
Our junk food addiction
is dropping down the
age ladder, to the extent
that we’re rearing a
generation of fast-food
babies. This startling
documentary reveals
babies and toddlers on
a diet of chips, burgers
and kebabs, all washed
down with fizzy drinks.
It explores why some
parents resort to junk
food feeding and follows
three families as they
attempt to get back on
the right nutritional track.
Simrin Choudhrie (above) has the ultimate
undercover story, being seven months’ pregnant
during filming. Descended from Indian royalty and
one of Britain’s wealthiest women, she is leaving her
lavish lifestyle behind to head for the poorest parts of
Sheffield. There she seeks out community helpers
who will appreciate her £250,000 gift.
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Mark Logue (left), grandson of Lionel Logue,
the Australian speech therapist celebrated
in the film The King’s Speech, embarks on a
journey to discover more about his fascinating
forebear’s experiences with the royal family. As
curator of the Logue family archive, Mark has
a wealth of material at his fingertips, including
family photographs and letters between Lionel
and King George VI. All these fascinating time
capsules unlock a past that was hidden until
recently. Lionel witnessed the rise of Prince
Albert, Duke of York (as George then was),
through the abdication crisis to his unexpected
elevation to the throne. Lionel kept diary notes,
recording everything from the king’s jokes to
what Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, wore.
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Victory123
40 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
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(S) SUBTITLES (R) REPEAT (AD) AUDIO DESCRIPTION (SL) SIGN LANGUAGE (W) WIDESCREEN v Regional variations opposite „ Recommended „Ê„ Outstanding Film
99:Fe\ 99:Knf @KM( :_Xee\c+ :_Xee\c,
EXILE:
Olivia Colman
stars in the
psychological
thriller,
9pm
POINTLESS:
Alexander
Armstrong
hosts the
quiz show,
4.25pm
EMMERDALE:
Gennie is
secretly
relieved to hear
Katie tell Nikhil
she only wants
to be friends,
7pm
HOLLYOAKS:
Mercedes
reveals her big
secret to the
Costellos,
6.30pm
NEIGHBOURS:
Sonya is
overcome with
guilt following
Callum’s
accident,
5.30pm
8.00 Holby City Greg struggles
to remain detached when a young
patient asks him to speak on her
behalf and argue she does not
need surgery – despite medical
evidence to the contrary, and
Ric’s return to work brings out
Dan’s competitive side. (W) (S)
8.00 Britain’s Next Big Thing
The retailers bring their open days
to a close, and the entrepreneurs
with the most successful pitches
now face a series of tricky pricing
negotiations and design meetings.
Meanwhile, Elaine Weston’s
skincare range is put to the test.
8.00 Countrywise
Paul Heiney and the team
explore the landscape along
Offa’s Dyke, the 1,000-year-old
fortifications that divide England
and Wales. Rachel de Thame
uncovers the wild floral beauty
found in historic graveyards. (S)
8.00 Supersize Vs
Superskinny A 42-year-old with
a taste for greasy food, trades
diets with a 21-year-old whose
obsessive diet has taken its toll on
his self-confidence. Meanwhile,
the eating disorder group heads
out for a day of clothes shopping.
8.00 The King’s Speech:
Revealed Mark Logue
embarks on a cross-continental
journey to explore the life of his
speech-therapist grandfather,
whose work was celebrated in
Oscar-winning drama The King’s
Speech. See Pick Of The Day.
9.00 Exile Tom struggles to
cope as he gets closer to the
truth – and as he finally begins to
develop a picture of what really
happened, he is stunned by a
revelation that hits uncomfortably
close to home. John Simm and
Jim Broadbent star. (AD) (W) (S)
9.00 The Quite Remarkable
David Coleman Documentary
highlighting the varied career
of sports broadcaster David
Coleman, with contributions
by Michael Parkinson, Bobby
Charlton and Princess Anne.
See Pick Of The Day. (W) (S)
9.00 Case Sensitive
Zailer and Waterhouse’s search
for Esther Taylor leads them
to a bird sanctuary, and they
receive news that a woman has
been found drowned in a river.
Meanwhile, Sally Thorne begins
to realise she is in terrible danger.
9.00 The Secret Millionaire
Pregnant heiress Simrin
Choudhrie disguises herself
as an expectant mother taking
part in a reality TV show to
examine efforts to improve
conditions for asylum-seekers in
Sheffield. See Pick Of The Day.
9.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation
A jailed policeman is killed during
a brawl in a prison corridor and
intricate forensic work confirms
that the murder was ordered from
outside the institution. Crime
drama, starring George Eads. (S)
10.00 BBC News (W) (S)
10.25 Local News, Weather v
10.35 Party Election
Broadcast (R) (W) (S) v
10.40 See You In Court
Documentary charting the
emotional and financial toll of
libel action, providing an insight
into 12 cases as they unfold over
the course of two years. (S) v
11.30 The Lock Up Sgt Rich
West deals with man who has
given himself a headache by
hitting the cell door. (W) (S) v
10.00 Later Live – With Jools
Holland With Adele, R Kelly and
Young the Giant. An extended
edition is on Friday at 11.35pm.
10.30 Newsnight, Weather
Analysis of the day’s main
headlines, presented by
Jeremy Paxman. (W) (S)
10.00 ITV News, Weather
Latest headlines. (W) (S)
10.30 Local News (W) (S) v
10.35 The Fast And The
Furious: Tokyo Drift
2006 (12) An American teenager
who is sent to live with his father
in Tokyo after a brush with the law
becomes involved in illegal street
racing. But when he ends up
owing money to gangsters after
losing a race against a driver with
Yakuza connections, he has to
learn to master the Japanese
style of driving to win and pay
back his debts. Action adventure,
starring Lucas Black, Nathalie
Kelley and Bow Wow. (W) (S)
12.30 The Zone Shopping and
interactive gaming. (W) 2.30
Crossing Jordan. Woody and
Tallulah argue over how to handle
a schizophrenic murder suspect
(W) (S) 3.30-5.30 ITV Nightscreen
10.00 Campus George prepares
to conclude her report, and her
impending departure plunges
womanising lecturer Matt into
a crisis as he contemplates
the possibility that he may
have developed genuine feelings
for another person. (AD) (S)
10.00 CSI: Miami Horatio helps
his son Kyle look for a missing
army friend, visiting a garage
where they discover the body of
an Iranian man who has been
burned to death. (AD) (R,S)
10.55 CSI: NY Acting on a tip-off,
Mac and the team discover old
enemy Suspect X, a trained
assassin, has resurfaced. In
an attempt to stop the killer
striking again, they set a trap
to lure her into the open. (R,S)
11.55 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation A taxi driver is
beaten to death by an angry mob
that believes he was responsible
for running over a teenager. (R)
12.50 SuperCasino 4.00 Meals In
Moments (R) 4.10 Brian Sewell’s
Grand Tour (R) 4.55 Animal Rescue
Squad (R) 5.10 Wildlife SOS (R)
5.35-6.00 House Doctor (R) (S)
11.20 Party Election
Broadcast (R) (W) (S) v
11.25 The Secrets Of Scott’s
Hut Ben Fogle travels to
Antarctica, where he joins a
project hoping to preserve the
hut from which explorer Captain
Robert Scott launched his ill-fated
polar expedition in 1911. (R) (S)
12.55 BBC News Regular bulletins
throughout the night. (S) 4.00 BBC
Learning Zone: Schools: SEN
Skills For Life (S) 5.00 Wanna
Be A Rockstar (S) 5.30-6.00 Let’s
Play With The Orchestra (S)
11.05 Misfits New series. The
outcasts realise Nathan is still
alive and dig him up, while
Simon’s behaviour leads a
psychiatric patient who was
previously obsessed with him to
exact revenge. Comedy drama,
starring Robert Sheehan. (AD) (S)
12.05 UK & Ireland Poker Tour
(S) 1.05 Freesports On 4 (R,S) 1.30
The Grid (R,S) 2.00 British Formula
3 International Series (R,S) 2.25
KOTV Boxing Weekly (S) 2.50 ITU
Triathlon (R,S) 3.45 FIVB Beach
Volleyball (R,S) 4.35 Rat Race
Urban Adventure (R,S) 5.05-6.00
Full Metal Challenge (R) (SL) (S)
7.00 The One Show
Alex Jones, Matt Baker and a
team of reporters present topical
stories from around the UK. (S)
7.30 EastEnders
Ian feels humiliated after the
previous night – and decides to
play Jane at her own game. (S)
7.00 Coast Neil Oliver participates
in an aerial dogfight. Miranda
Krestovnikoff visits the island of
Skomer, where she witnesses
Manx shearwaters, and Alice
Roberts discovers the musical
properties of the beach sand
on Porth Oer. (AD) (R) (W) (S)
7.00 Emmerdale Lisa comes
face to face with Derek in court,
but is shocked to see Zak and
struggles to remain focused. (W)
7.30 Military Driving School
Major John McBride supervises
a physical challenge on his last
day at Leconfield. (W) (S)
7.00 Channel 4 News
Including sport and weather. (S)
7.50 Referendum Broadcast
7.55 4thought.tv (S)
7.00 5 News At 7
Round-up of the day’s headlines
from around the world. (S)
7.25 Referendum Broadcast
7.30 Highland Emergency
An RAF helicopter crew tries to
locate an elderly hiker stranded
in the mountains. (R,S)
6.00 Breakfast Latest headlines. (S)
9.15 Animal 24:7
RSPCA inspector Jayne Bashford
investigates a case of animal neglect.
10.00 Homes Under The Hammer
Developers explore property in Devon,
London and Greater Manchester. (S)
11.00 Don’t Get Done, Get Dom
A man who received a £3,000 bill
after using a smartphone. (W) (S)
11.45 Cash In The Attic Raising
money for a day out in London. (W (S)
12.15 Bargain Hunt
David Harper and Kate Bliss go
head-to-head in Lincoln. (R) (W) (S)
1.00 BBC News, Weather
1.30 Local News, Weather v
1.45 Doctors Ed’s father offers to
take him back to Glasgow. (W) (S)
2.15 Escape To The Country
Nicki Chapman helps a retired couple
from Nottingham find a property in
the Dorset countryside with two living
rooms, at least three bathrooms, an
artist’s studio and a study. (R) (W) (S)
3.00 BBC News, Weather (S) v
3.05 CBBC: Gastronuts (R) 3.35
Prank Patrol Down Under (R) 4.00
Dead Gorgeous. Followed by Diddy
Dick & Dom. (R) 4.30 Blue Peter 4.55
Shaun The Sheep 5.00 Newsround
5.15 Weakest Link Back-stabbing
general knowledge quiz. (W) (S)
6.00 BBC News, Weather
6.30 Local News, Weather v
6.55 Referendum Broadcast On
Behalf Of The Yes Campaign v
6.00 CBeebies Fun for youngsters.
7.00 CBBC: Little Howard’s Big
Question (R) 7.25 Newsround 7.30
Trust Me I’m A Genie 7.40 League
Of Super Evil (R) 7.50 Frankenstein’s
Cat (R) 8.00 Copycats (R) (W) (S)
8.30 CBeebies Fun for youngsters.
11.35 The Pink Panther Show (R)
12.00 Daily Politics (W) (S)
12.30 GMT With George Alagiah
Latest news and analysis. (W) (S)
12.55 Diagnosis Murder Jesse is
accused of killing a basketball player.
Dick Van Dyke stars. (R) (W) (S)
1.40 Restoration Roadshow
From Burghley House in Lincolnshire.
Last in the series. (R) (W) (S)
2.10 To Buy Or Not To Buy
From Matlock, Derbyshire. (R) (W) (S)
2.55 Flog It! A collection of valuable
railway posters is auctioned. (R) (S)
3.40 Helicopter Heroes
A nine-year-old boy is critically injured
in a farm accident, and Helimed 99 is
his only hope of survival. Elsewhere,
a horse whisperer is trampled. (R) (S)
4.25 Pointless Quiz show. (R) (S)
5.10 Cash In The Celebrity
Attic With TV chef Anton
Mosimann and his wife Kathrin. (S)
5.55 Referendum Broadcast On
Behalf Of The Yes Campaign v
6.00 Eggheads Quiz show, hosted
by Dermot Murnaghan. (W) (S)
6.30 Great British Menu
Chefs from the South West region
prepare fish dishes. (W) (S)
5.30 ITV News Latest headlines. (S)
6.00 Daybreak Featuring the
trailer for forthcoming sci-fi film
Transformers: Dark of the Moon.
8.30 Lorraine With Lorraine Kelly. (S)
9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show
Guests air their differences. (W) (S)
10.30 This Morning The latest gossip
from Britain’s Got Talent. (W) (S)
12.30 Loose Women
The UK’s Eurovision Song Contest
hopefuls Blue join the panel. (W) (S)
1.30 ITV News, Weather (W) (S)
1.55 Local News (W) (S) v
2.00 60 Minute Makeover
Designer Richard Randall and the
team visit Stanford-le-Hope in Essex,
to transform the home of a mother
who lost one of her children in a car
crash a few years ago. (W) (S)
3.00 The Alan Titchmarsh
Show The host chats to Stephen
Mulhern, Matthew Wolfenden and
Chelsea Halfpenny. (W) (S)
3.59 Local Weather (W) (S) v
4.00 Midsomer Murders
The sleepy village of Burton Mantle
becomes the venue for foul play. (R)
5.00 Britain’s Best Dish
Ed Baines, Jilly Goolden and John
Burton Race judge day two of the
North of England heats. (W) (S)
6.00 Local News, Weather v
6.25 Election Broadcast (S) v
6.30 ITV News, Weather
6.50 Referendum Broadcast On
Behalf Of The Yes Campaign
6.15 The Hoobs (AD) (R) (SL) (S)
6.40 The Hoobs (AD) (R,S)
7.05 Freshly Squeezed
Reviews of the new albums by
Beastie Boys and Jennifer Lopez. (S)
7.30 Everybody Loves Raymond
Debra suffers from PMT. (R,S)
7.55 Frasier US comedy. (R,S)
8.25 Friends Chandler dates a
woman with a prosthetic leg. (R,S)
8.55 Wife Swap USA (R,S)
9.55 Relocation, Relocation (R,S)
10.55 A Place By The Sea
A couple search North Wales for a
property to convert into a B&B. (S)
12.00 Channel 4 News (S)
12.05 Make Do & Mend
Jo Behari faces a flat-pack challenge.
12.35 The TV Book Club (R,S)
1.05 Jamie At Home (R,S)
1.35 The Bounty Hunter
1954 (PG) A professional manhunter
searches for three murderous train
robbers who are masquerading as
peace-loving residents. Western,
with Randolph Scott. (W) (S)
3.10 Countdown Alastair Stewart
guests in Dictionary Corner. (S)
4.00 Deal Or No Deal (AD) (S)
5.00 Come Dine With Me
Amateur cooks in Hertfordshire take
turns hosting meals for their rivals in
the hope of claiming the prize. (R,S)
6.00 The Simpsons (AD) (R,S)
6.30 Hollyoaks Texas teams up
with Mandy to take her inheritance
back from Cindy. (AD) (S)
6.00 Milkshake! Fun for youngsters.
9.15 The Wright Stuff Panellists
Gail Porter and Neil Stuke are joined
in the studio by actress Claire Goose.
11.05 Extreme Fishing With
Robson Green The actor samples
the delights of Bangkok’s fish market
before trying to land arapaima. (R)
12.05 Meals In Moments Edith
Bowman prepares eggs Benedict.
12.10 5 News Lunchtime (S)
12.20 Law & Order The team
investigates a fire at a concert. (R,S)
1.15 Home And Away Xavier
worries his secret will be revealed. (S)
1.45 Neighbours (AD) (S)
2.15 The Vanessa Show Topical
discussion and celebrity guests.
3.05 Chinese Food In Minutes
Ching-He Huang prepares her own
versions of Chinese classics. (R,S)
3.15 Confessions Of A Young
Bride 2005 (PG) An advertising
executive is engaged to be married,
but faces a host of obstacles as
she prepares for her wedding
day. Comedy, starring Shannon
Elizabeth and Eddie McClintock.
5.00 5 News At 5, Weather
5.30 Neighbours Tash tries to
find Chris a boyfriend. (AD) (R,S)
6.00 Home And Away Marilyn is
concerned that Nicole will choose
Roo as her birthing partner. (R,S)
6.25 OK! TV All the latest celebrity
news, plus Jennifer Hudson chats to
Kate Walsh and Matt Johnson. (S)
12.00 FILM: Trespass 1992 (18)
Thriller, with Bill Paxton. (S) Followed
by Weatherview. v 1.45 Sign Zone:
Madagascar (R) v 2.45 Sign Zone:
The Hairy Bikers: Mums Know Best
(R) 3.45 Sign Zone: Great British
Railway Journeys (R) 4.15 Sign
Zone: One Man And His Campervan
(R) 4.45-6.00 BBC News (S)
„
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 41
k\c\m`j`fe\ogi\jj
I<>@FE8CM8I@8K@FEJ
BBC1 Variations WALES: 1.30-1.45 BBC Local News;
Weather 3.00-3.05 BBC News, Weather; BBC Local News
6.30 BBC Local News 6.55-7.00 Party Election Broadcast
10.25 BBC Local News; Weather 10.35 Referendum
Broadcast On Behalf Of The Yes Campaign 10.40 Red
Letter Day 11.10 See You In Court 12.00 The Lock Up
12.30 Film: Trespass 2.15-2.45 Sign Zone: The Trillion
Dollar Con-Man: Panorama
BBC2 Variations WALES: 5.55-6.00 Party Election
Broadcast 11.20-11.25 Referendum Broadcast On Behalf
Of The Yes Campaign
ITV1 Variations ITV1 ANGLIA: 1.55-2.00 Local News,
Weather 3.59-4.00 Anglia Weather 6.00-6.25 Local
News 10.30-10.35 Local News, Weather ITV1 MERIDIAN:
1.55-2.00 Local News 3.59-4.00 Meridian Weather
6.00-6.25 Local News 10.30-10.35 Local News ITV1
CHANNEL: 1.55-2.00 Local News 3.59-4.00 Channel
Weather 6.00 Local News, Weather 6.15-6.25 Local
News: Comprehensive round-up. 6.29-6.30 Local News
6.50 Teenage Cancer 6.59-7.00 Local News 10.30-
10.35 Local News 12.30 Countrywise 12.55 Nightwatch
With Steve ScottITV1 WEST: 1.55-2.00 Local News 3.59-
4.00 ITV West Weather 6.00-6.25 Local News 10.30-
10.35 Local News ITV1 WALES: 1.55-2.00 Local News
3.59-4.00 ITV Wales Weather 6.00-6.25 Local News,
Weather 10.30-10.35 Local News, Weather ITV1
WESTCOUNTRY: 1.55-2.00 Local News 3.59-4.00
Westcountry Weather 6.00-6.25 Local News
S4C 7.00 Cyw: Igi, Tigi, Bip A Bop 7.30 Cyw: Ffi-Ffi A’i
Ffrindiau 7.40 Cyw: Ribidires 7.55 Cyw: Wmff 8.05 Cyw:
Yn Yr Ardd 8.20 Cyw: Wibli Sochyn Y Mochyn 8.30 Cyw:
Nodi 8.45 Cyw: Holi Hana 8.55 Cyw: Cwpwrdd Cadi 9.10
Cyw: Gel A Ffion 9.15 Cyw: Oli Dan Y Don 9.30 Cyw:
Siliwen 9.35 Cyw: Seren For 9.40 Cyw: Chwarae Clai
9.45 Cyw: Sali Mali 9.50 Cyw: Twm Tisian 10.00 Cyw: Y
Brodyr Coala 10.10 Cyw: Bach A Mawr 10.25 Cyw: Cled
10.35 Cyw: Dwdlam 10.50 Cyw: Y Dywysoges Fach
11.05 Cyw: Cegin Twts 11.20 Cyw: Oli Dan Y Don 11.35
Cyw: Cwm Teg 11.40 Cyw: Y Diwrnod Mawr 11.55 Cyw:
Sam Tan 12.05 Cyw: 123 12.20 Cyw: Wmff 12.30 Cyw:
Cwpwrdd Cadi 12.45 Cyw: Holi Hana 12.55 Cyw: Igam
Ogam 1.05 Cyw: Bob Y Bildar 1.20 Penawdau Newyddion
A’r Tywydd 1.25 Diwrnod Mawr Y Plant 1.55 Ffermio 2.25
0 Ond 1 2.55 Penawdau Newyddion A’r Tywydd 3.00
Wedi 3 4.00 Stwnsh: Tair Slic 4.25 Stwnsh: Salon 4.55
Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Teledu Eddie 5.35 Stwnsh:
Sgorio 6.00 Pobol Y Cwm 6.30 Pobol Y Cwm 7.00 Wedi
7 7.25 Darllediad Etholiadol Gan Llafur Cymru 7.30
Newyddion A’r Tywydd 8.00 Darllediad Refferendwm Y
Bleidlais Amgen – Ie 8.05 Pobol Y Cwm 8.30 O Gymru
Fach Followed by Penawdau Newyddion. 9.35 Pethe
10.05 Porthpenwaig 11.05 Penawdau Newyddion A’r
Tywydd 11.10 Sgorio 12.15 Diwedd
RADIO 1
FM: 97.6-99.8 MHz
6.30 The Chris Moyles Show. 10.00 Fearne Cotton.
12.45 Newsbeat. 1.00 Greg James. 4.00 Scott Mills.
7.00 Zane Lowe. 9.00 BBC Radio 1’s Review With
Nihal. 10.00 Nick Grimshaw. 12.00 Nihal. 2.00 Gilles
Peterson. 4.00-6.30 Dev.
RADIO 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
5.00 Vanessa Feltz. 6.30 Chris Evans. 9.30 Ken
Bruce. 12.00 Jeremy Vine. 2.00 Steve Wright In The
Afternoon. 5.00 Richard Allinson. 7.00 Jamie Cullum.
8.00 Jo Whiley. 9.30 Nigel Ogden: The Organist
Entertains. 10.00 They Write The Songs. 11.00 Mark
Radcliffe’s Music Club. 12.00 Janice Long. 2.00-
5.00 Alex Lester.
RADIO 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
7.00 Breakfast. 10.00 Classical Collection. 12.00
Composer Of The Week: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.
12.00 News. 1.00 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert. 2.00
Afternoon On 3. 4.30 In Tune: Sean Rafferty presents
music and arts news. 6.30 Composer Of The Week.
7.30 Radio 3 Live In Concert. 10.00 Night Waves:
Anne McElvoy presents the arts and ideas programme.
10.45 The Essay. 11.00 Late Junction. 1.00-7.00
Through The Night.
RADIO 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198 kHz
5.30 News Briefing. 5.43 Prayer For The Day. 5.45
Farming Today. 6.00 Today. 9.00 The Jam Generation
Takes Power. 9.30 The Prime Ministers. 9.45 (LW)
Daily Service. 9.45 (FM) Book of the Week: Millions
Like Us: Women’s Lives In War And Peace 1939-1949.
10.00 Woman’s Hour. 11.00 Saving Species. 11.30
The Walpole Chronicle. See Radio Choice. 12.00
News. 12.01 (LW) Shipping Forecast. 12.04 Call You
And Yours. 12.57 Weather. 1.00 The World At One.
1.30 The Music Group. 2.00 The Archers: Ruth tries a
distraction technique. 2.15 Afternoon Play: Lost
Property: The Wrong Label: By Katie Hims. 3.00
Making History: With Helen Castor. 3.30 The Doll:
Short Stories By Daphne Du Maurier: East Wind, by
Daphne du Maurier. 3.45 Russia: The Wild East. 4.00
Word Of Mouth: The linguistic skill involved in
conducting a successful interview. 4.30 Great Lives:
Lynne Truss nominates Lewis Carroll for recognition.
5.00 PM: With Eddie Mair. 5.54 (LW) Shipping
Forecast. 5.57 Weather. 6.00 Six O’Clock News.
6.26 Referendum Campaign Broadcast. 6.30 Clare
In The Community: Comedy, starring Sally Phillips.
7.00 The Archers: The candidates prepare for battle.
7.15 Front Row: Mark Lawson presents. 7.45 Writing
The Century. 8.00 Lebanon: The Next Generation.
8.40 In Touch: Tony Shearman talks about his work as
the UK’s first blind football manager. 9.00 All In The
Mind. 9.30 The Jam Generation Takes Powe. 9.59
Weather. 10.00 The World Tonight: News round-up.
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Absolutist: By John
Boyne. 11.00 Jon Ronson On. 11.30 Today In
Parliament. 12.00 News, Weather. 12.30 Book of the
Week: Millions Like Us: Women’s Lives In War And
Peace 1939-1949. 12.48 Shipping Forecast. 1.00
World Service. 5.20-5.30 Shipping Forecast.
RADIO 5 LIVE
MW: 909, 693 kHz
5.00 Morning Reports. 5.30 Wake Up To Money.
6.00 5 Live Breakfast. 10.00 Victoria Derbyshire.
12.00 Shelagh Fogarty. 2.00 Richard Bacon. 4.00 5
Live Drive. 7.00 5 Live Sport. 7.45 5 Live Sport:
Champions League 2010-11. 9.40 5 Live Sport: Final
Whistle. 10.30 Tony Livesey. 1.00-5.00 Up All Night.
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089, 1071, 1107 kHz
6.00 Alan Brazil And Ronnie Irani. 10.00
Keys & Gray. 1.00 Hawksbee And Jacobs.
4.00 Adrian Durham And Darren Gough.
7.00 Kick-off. 10.30 Ian Collins. 1.00-6.00
Mike Graham.
BBC WORLD SERVICE
on digital only
5.00 The World Today. 8.30 Business Daily.
8.50 From Our Own Correspondent. 9.00
News. 9.06 Alive In Chernobyl. 9.30 The
Strand. 9.50 Witness. 10.00 World Update.
11.00 News. 11.06 Outlook. 11.30
Discovery. 11.50 From Our Own
Correspondent. 12.00 World, Have Your Say.
12.30 Business Daily. 12.50 Sports News.
1.00 News. 1.06 Alive In Chernobyl. 1.30
The Strand. 1.50 Witness. 2.00 Newshour.
3.00 World Briefing. 3.30 Outlook. 4.00
News. 4.06 Alive In Chernobyl. 4.30
Discovery. 4.50 From Our Own Correspondent.
5.00 World Briefing. 5.30 World Business
Report. 5.50 Witness. 6.00 World, Have Your
Say. 7.00 World Briefing. 7.30 Click. 7.50
From Our Own Correspondent. 8.00 News.
8.06 Alive In Chernobyl. 8.30 Outlook. 9.00
Newshour. 10.00 News. 10.06 World
Briefing. 10.30 The Strand. 10.50 Witness.
11.00 World Briefing. 11.30 World Business
Report. 11.50 Sports News. 12.00 World
Briefing. 12.30 Outlook. 1.00 World
Briefing. 1.30 World Business Report. 1.50
Witness. 2.00 News. 2.06 Alive In
Chernobyl. 2.30 Outlook. 3.00 The World
Today. 3.30 The Strand. 3.50 Witness. 4.00
The World Today. 4.30 Click. 4.50-5.00
From Our Own Correspondent.
CLASSIC FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00 Classic FM Brighter Breakfast. 9.00
John Suchet. 1.00 Jamie Crick. 5.00 John
Brunning. 8.00 The Full Works Concert.
10.00 Smooth Classics. 2.00-6.00 Anne-
Marie Minhall.
ABSOLUTE RADIO
MW: 1215, 1197, 1242 kHz
6.00 Christian O’Connell’s Breakfast Show.
10.00 Russ Williams. 1.00 Leona Graham.
5.00 Geoff Lloyd. 8.00 Ben Jones. 11.00
Iain Lee. 1.00-6.00 Mark Crossley.
RADIO WALES
MW: 882, 657 kHz FM: 93.9-95.9,
103.7-103.9 MHz
5.30 News, Weather. 5.32 Look Up Your
Genes. 6.00 Good Morning Wales. 9.00
Jamie Owen & Louise Elliott. 12.00 The Radio
Wales Phone-In. 2.00 Roy Noble. 5.00
Good Evening Wales. 6.55 Party Election
Broadcast. 7.00 News. 7.02 Science Cafe.
7.30 The Evening Show. 9.58 Weather And
Travel. 10.00 Chris Needs. 1.00-5.30 As
BBC World Service.
IX[`f:_f`Z\
The Walpole Chronicle
Radio 4, 11.30am
Hugh Walpole was one of the most
successful writers of his generation
but today he is largely forgotten.
Each of his novels outsold the one
before, and on his literary tours of
America he pulled in even bigger
audiences than Charles Dickens,
who had done the circuit 80 years
before. It was said that, “the works
of Walpole will go on forever,” but
today only a couple are still in print.
Eric Robson travels to the Lake
District, where Hugh settled,
and tries to discover why he was
parodied by London’s literary set.
ALYCIA YANG

6.00 Teleshopping
1.00 Chinese Food In Minutes
1.05 Dharma & Greg
1.35 Dharma & Greg
2.00 Build A New Life In The
Country Architect George Clarke
lends his expertise to couple Adrian
and Denise Nuttall. (R) (S)
3.00 Neighbours (AD) (S)
3.30 Home And Away (AD) (S)
4.00 Two Guys, A Girl And
A Pizza Place Sharon gets a
boyfriend, so Pete and Berg decide
to sabotage her new relationship.
4.30 Two Guys, A Girl And A
Pizza Place Pete feels jealous
when Berg sits on the bench
with the Boston Celtics.
5.00 Dharma & Greg
Dharma fills in at the office for Greg,
who has injured himself doing a
particularly strenuous yoga exercise.
5.30 Dharma & Greg
An elderly Native American begs
Dharma to let him die in the flat
she shares with Greg.
6.00 Malcolm In The Middle
Malcolm meets a chess-playing
layabout who could be an older
version of himself.
6.30 Home And Away
Xavier persuades Miranda to give
him another chance. (AD) (S)
7.00 Neighbours Sonya is overcome
with guilt following Callum’s accident.
7.35 Zoo Days Brief highlights of the
series viewing the animals and staff
of Colchester and Chester zoos.
7.45 FILM: The Goonies 1985 (PG)
Children’s adventure, starring Sean
Astin, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin
and Martha Plimpton. (AD) (S)
10.00 Archer The secret agents protect
a billionaire’s teenage daughter.
10.30 $#*! My Dad Says
Vince and Bonnie quit their jobs and
sell their home after meeting self-help
guru Charlotte Ann Robinson.
11.00 Sex Lessons A wry look at
videos detailing the dangers of
sexually transmitted infections.
11.30 Sex Lessons A 1970s British
film that caused an outcry.
12.00 Teleshopping
6.00 Teleshopping
12.00 Whose Line Is It Anyway?
American unscripted comedy show.
12.30 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation Grissom and Sara
investigate the discovery of two
murder victims hidden in pipes at a
building site in the middle of a field.
1.30 FILM: What I Did For Love
2006 (PG) Romantic comedy, starring
Jeremy London, Dorie Barton, James
Gammon and Jonny Acker. (S)
3.15 Numb3rs The FBI launches
an investigation into bank computer-
hacking as criminals try to gain
access to the identities and
financial assets of customers. (AD)
4.10 FILM: Family Gathering
2010 (PG) A fashion designer returns
home to help her father and brother
run the family farm. Drama, starring
Natasha Henstridge. (S)
6.00 Numb3rs Don investigates a
series of attacks involving the use
of different weapons, and tries to
determine if they are the work
of a serial killer. (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation Grissom and Sara
investigate the discovery of two
murder victims hidden on a building
site, while Catherine and Nick look
into a shooting that appears to
be a hunting accident. (AD) (S)
8.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation Grissom tries to
identify a bomber terrorising the
Las Vegas business community –
a task made doubly difficult by the
interference of a well-meaning
security guard. (AD) (S)
9.00 Justified Givens and Gutterson
try to rescue a pregnant convict being
held by two unscrupulous people-
traffickers. With Timothy Olyphant.
10.00 FILM: The Glimmer Man
1996 (18) A Buddhist New York
homicide detective travels to Los
Angeles to help a local cop solve a
series of brutal murders where the
victims are crucified. Action thriller,
starring Steven Seagal.
11.55 Steven Seagal: Lawman
A teenager is caught with a shotgun.
12.25 Wife, Mom, Bounty Hunter
,LJ8
Victory123
42 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
ITV2 Freeview 6 - Sky 118
6.00am Coronation Street 6.50 Emmerdale
7.15 Loose Women 8.10 Judge Judy 9.25
Odd One In 10.10 The Planet’s Funniest
Animals 10.35 Judge Judy Noon Coronation
Street 1.00 Emmerdale 1.30 The Jeremy Kyle
Show 3.40 Holiday Showdown 4.40 Loose
Women 5.40 Judge Judy 6.30 The Only Way
Is Essex 8.00 Peter Andre: The Next Chapter
9.00 The Vampire Diaries 10.00 Film: You, Me
And Dupree (2006) (12) 12.15am Film: Eyes
Wide Shut (1999) (18) 3.00 Emmerdale
ITV3 Freeview 10 - Sky 119
6.00am Maigret 7.05 Dr Quinn: Medicine
Woman 8.05 Duty Free 8.35 The Ruth Rendell
Mysteries 9.45 Ironside 11.00 Upstairs,
Downstairs 1.10pm Heartbeat 2.15 Monarch
Of The Glen 3.20 Dr Quinn: Medicine Woman
4.20 Dickinson’s Real Deal 5.20 George And
Mildred 5.55 Heartbeat 7.00 Monarch Of
The Glen 8.00 Agatha Christie’s Poirot 9.00
Wycliffe 10.10 Brides In The Bath 12.10am
Numb3rs 1.05 Agatha Christie’s Poirot
ITV4 Freeview 24 - Sky 120
6.00am The Force 6.15 The Professionals
7.05 The Saint 8.00 Police, Camera, Action!
9.00 World’s Wildest Police Videos 9.55 The
Prisoner 10.55 The Professionals Noon
Police, Camera, Action! 12.25 Motorsport
UK 1.30 British Touring Car Championship
Highlights 3.00 Live Indian Premier League
Cricket 7.30 Police, Camera, Action! 8.00
Minder 9.00 Jean-Claude Van Damme: Behind
Closed Doors 10.00 Film: Casino (1995) (18)
1.25am Minder 2.30 Police, Camera, Action!
2.55 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
SKY1 Sky 106
6.00am Brainiac: Science Abuse 7.00 Lion
Man 7.30 Wild Vets 8.00 Oops TV 9.00 The
Real A&E 10.00 Law & Order 11.00 Mental
Noon UK Border Force 1.00 Stargate SG-1
3.00 My Pet Shame 4.00 Oops TV 4.30
Futurama 5.00 Oops TV 5.30 Futurama 6.00
A League Of Their Own 6.30 The Simpsons
8.00 A Different Breed 9.00 Film: The Naked
Gun 2 1/2: The Smell Of Fear (1991) (15)
10.40 Brit Cops: Frontline Crime UK 11.40
Fringe 12.40am Ross Kemp In Search Of
Pirates 1.25 UK Border Force 2.10 Cold Case
2.55 A Town Called Eureka 3.40 So You Think
You’re Safe? 4.30 Zoo Vet At Large 4.55 Bite
Size Brainiac 5.15 Don’t Forget The Lyrics US
E4 Freeview 28 - Sky 136
6.00am One Tree Hill 6.45 Desperate
Housewives 7.35 Friends 8.00 Wildfire 9.00
One Tree Hill 9.55 Friends 10.25 Gilmore
Girls 11.10 Desperate Housewives 12.10pm
Wildfire 1.05 Heartland 2.05 Hollyoaks 2.40
Gilmore Girls 3.30 Ugly Betty 4.25 Friends
6.00 My Name Is Earl 7.00 Hollyoaks 7.30
Friends 9.00 90210 10.00 The Cleveland
Show 10.30 The Ricky Gervais Show 11.00
Bob’s Burgers 11.30 The Cleveland Show
Midnight The Big Bang Theory 1.00 How I
Met Your Mother 1.45 My Name Is Earl
MORE4 Freeview 14 - Sky 138
9.00am Deal Or No Deal 9.45 Room For
Improvement 10.55 How Clean Is Your House?
11.25 Film: Butch Cassidy And The Sundance
Kid (1969) (PG) 1.35pm Deal Or No Deal 2.35
Come Dine With Me 3.05 Coach Trip 3.40
Location, Location, Location 4.40 A Place In
The Sun: Home Or Away 5.45 Relocation,
Relocation 6.50 Come Dine With Me 7.55
Grand Designs 10.00 Film: Catfish (2010) (12)
Midnight Grand Designs 1.05 Film: Catfish
(2010) (12) 2.55 Come Dine With Me
GOLD Sky 110
6.00am Sykes 6.30 Bread 7.00 The Brittas
Empire 7.30 Sykes 8.00 Waiting For God 8.40
Dear John 9.20 Just Good Friends 10.00
Keeping Up Appearances 10.40 Last Of The
Summer Wine 12.40pm Open All Hours 1.20
Dinnerladies 2.00 The Thin Blue Line 2.40
Waiting For God 3.20 Dear John 4.00 Just
Good Friends 4.40 Keeping Up Appearances
5.20 Last Of The Summer Wine 7.20 Open All
Hours 8.00 Dinnerladies 8.40 The Thin Blue
Line 9.20 The Royle Family 10.00 Only Fools
And Horses 11.40 Gimme Gimme Gimme
1.00am Only Fools And Horses
SKY LIVING Sky 107
6.00am Nothing To Declare 7.00 The Jerry
Springer Show 8.00 Maury 9.00 America’s
Next Top Model 10.00 Nothing To Declare
11.00 Maury Noon CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation 3.00 Criminal Minds 4.00
Charmed 6.00 America’s Next Top Model 7.00
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 8.00 Cougar
Town 8.30 Hot In Cleveland 9.00 Katie 10.00
The Hunks 11.00 Criminal Minds Midnight
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
BBC THREE Freeview 7 - Sky 115
7.00pm Total Wipeout 8.00 Young Voters’
Question Time 9.00 Fast Food Baby. See
Digital Choice. 10.00 EastEnders 10.30 Two
Pints Of Lager And A Packet Of Crisps 11.00
Family Guy 11.45 Fast Food Baby 12.45am
Two Pints Of Lager And A Packet Of Crisps 1.15
Total Wipeout 2.15 So What If My Baby Is Born
Like Me? 3.15 The Gatwick Baby: Abandoned
At Birth 4.15 Fast Food Baby
BBC FOUR Freeview 9 - Sky 116
7.00pm World News Today 7.00 Weather
7.30 Birds Britannia 8.30 Johnny Kingdom’s
Year With The Birds 9.00 Film: Citizen Kane
(1941) (U) See Digital Choice. 11.00 Orson
Welles Over Europe Midnight Arena: The
Orson Welles Story 2.50 Birds Britannia 3.50
Johnny Kingdom’s Year With The Birds
COMEDY CENTRAL Sky 112
9.00am Everybody Loves Raymond 10.00
Two And A Half Men 11.00 The King Of Queens
11.30 Scrubs 1.00pm Two And A Half Men
2.00 Everybody Loves Raymond 3.00 Two
And A Half Men 4.00 Scrubs 5.30 Everybody
Loves Raymond 6.00 Two And A Half Men
7.30 The King Of Queens 8.00 Scrubs 9.00
Two And A Half Men 10.00 Scrubs 10.30
Comedy Store 11.00 South Park Midnight
Sex And The City 1.15 Two And A Half Men
2.15 Comedy Store 2.45 Comedy Central At
The Comedy Store 3.15 Scrubs 4.10 Shortcuts
Shuffle 4.20 The King Of Queens
FX Sky 124
8.00am Babylon 5 10.00 Law & Order Noon
NCIS 2.00 Shark 3.00 Third Watch 4.00 Law
& Order 6.00 Shark 7.00 NCIS 9.00 The
Listener 10.00 Arrested Development 11.00
True Blood 12.05am NCIS 1.05 Shark 2.05
Nip/Tuck 3.05 Babylon 5 4.05 Third Watch
DISCOVERY Sky 520
6.00am How Do They Do It? 6.30 How It’s
Made 7.00 How Do They Do It? 7.30 How It’s
Made 8.00 How Do They Do It? 8.30 How It’s
Made 9.00 Mark Williams On The Rails 10.00
Building The Biggest 11.00 How The Universe
Works Noon Discovery Atlas 1.00 Future
Weapons 2.00 Hitler’s Generals 3.00 World
War Two: The Complete History 4.00 Deadliest
Catch 5.00 Bear Grylls: Born Survivor 6.00
Mythbusters 8.00 How It’s Made 9.00 Wheeler
Dealers 10.00 Deadliest Catch 11.00 Flying
Wild Alaska Midnight Bear Grylls: Born
Survivor 1.00 Deadliest Catch 2.00 Future
Weapons 3.00 Hitler’s Generals
HISTORY Sky 529
6.00am The Universe 7.00 Ancient
Discoveries 8.00 American Pickers 9.00
Clash Of The Gods 10.00 Ice Road Truckers
11.00 American Pickers Noon Clash Of
The Gods 1.00 Ancient Discoveries 2.00
American Pickers 3.00 Ice Road Truckers
4.00 Clash Of The Gods 5.00 The Universe
6.00 Ancient Discoveries 7.00 America: The
Story Of The US 8.00 American Pickers 9.00
Monster Moves 10.00 Mud Men 11.00 How
Britain Bridges The World Midnight Monster
Moves 1.00 Deep Wreck Mysteries 2.00 How
Britain Bridges The World
YESTERDAY Freeview 12 - Sky 537
6.00am Porterhouse Blue 7.00 Sharpe 11.00
The Onedin Line Noon Churchill’s Bodyguard
1.00 Fred Dibnah’s Building Of Britain 1.30
Fred Dibnah’s Made In Britain 2.00 Antiques
Roadshow 3.00 Love And War 4.00 Enemy
At The Door 5.00 The Thirties In Colour 6.00
Antiques Roadshow 7.00 Enemy At The Door
8.00 Fred Dibnah’s Building Of Britain 8.30
Fred Dibnah’s Made In Britain 9.00 Love
And War 10.00 The Thirties In Colour 11.00
Antiques Roadshow Midnight Pornography:
A Secret History Of Civilisation
HOME Sky 246
7.00am Ground Force America 8.00 Extreme
Makeover: Home Edition 9.00 Cash In The Attic
10.00 DIY SOS 11.00 Ground Force America
Noon Renovation Realities 12.30 DIY SOS
1.00 Fantasy Homes By The Sea 2.00 DIY
SOS 3.00 Homes Under The Hammer 4.00
Ground Force America 5.00 DIY SOS 6.00
Extreme Makeover: Home Edition 7.00 Escape
To The Country 8.00 Extreme Makeover: Home
Edition 9.00 If It’s Broke, Fix It 10.00 Escape
To The Country 11.00 Renovation Realities
11.30 DIY SOS Midnight Extreme Makeover:
Home Edition 2.30 Renovation Realities
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC Sky 526
8.00am Megafactories 9.00 Remaking The
Shroud 10.00 Rome Revealed 11.00 Sea
Patrol UK Noon Britain’s Greatest Machines
With Chris Barrie 1.00 Aftermath 2.00 Border
Wars 3.00 Megafactories 4.00 Air Crash
Investigation 5.00 Inside 9/11 6.00 Russian
Bigfoot 7.00 Seconds From Disaster 8.00
Hunt For Aliens 9.00 UFO UK: New Evidence
10.00 Ancient Astronauts 11.00 American
Skinheads Midnight Hunt For Aliens 1.00
UFO UK: New Evidence
GOOD FOOD Sky 249
5.00am Perfect 6.00 Alive And Cooking
6.30 Saturday Kitchen 7.00 Madhur Jaffrey’s
Flavours Of India 7.30 Indian Food Made Easy
8.00 Ace Of Cakes 9.00 MasterChef Goes
Large 10.00 The Hairy Bikers’ Cookbook
11.00 Perfect Noon Neven Maguire: Home
Chef 12.30 Matt Tebbutt’s Market Kitchen 1.00
Ace Of Cakes 2.00 The Hairy Bikers’ Food
Tour Of Britain 3.00 Perfect 4.00 MasterChef
Goes Large 5.00 Ace Of Cakes 6.00 Neven
Maguire: Home Chef 6.30 Rachel’s Favourite
Food 7.00 Perfect 8.00 The Hairy Bikers’
Food Tour Of Britain 9.00 Ace Of Cakes 10.00
MasterChef Goes Large 11.00 Indian Food
Made Easy 11.30 Madhur Jaffrey’s Flavours Of
India Midnight The Hairy Bikers’ Food Tour Of
Britain 1.00 Perfect 2.00 Home Shopping
UNIVERSAL CHANNEL Sky 113
6.00am Life Is Wild 7.00 Teleshopping 8.00
Quincy ME 9.00 Monk 10.00 Law & Order:
Criminal Intent 11.00 Sea Patrol Noon Cold
Case 2.00 Film: No Surrender (2011) (PG)
4.00 Quincy ME 5.00 Monk 6.00 Sea
Patrol 7.00 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 8.00
Cold Case 9.00 Without A Trace 10.00 CSI:
NY 11.00 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Midnight Cold Case 1.00 Without A Trace
TELEVISIONX Sky 903
9.00pm Freeview 10.10 John Cherry: Soccer
Stud 1 10.30 Jobs For The Boys 2 10.55
Jasmine: Twenty Four Seven 11.00 Freeview
11.10 Deadly Sins Of Mistress Sinclair 4 11.30
Gentleman’s Relish 2 11.55 Fantasy Fetish 1
Midnight Freeview 12.10 Fantasy Fetish 1
12.30 Euro Extreme All Stars 1 12.55 Dolls
In Uniforms 17 1.00 Freeview 1.10 Dolls In
Uniforms 17 1.15 Flash In The Attic 1 1.35
Naughty Little Knee Highs 1 1.55 Stud Hunt
2009: Day One 2.15 Wet Dreams 2.35 Babe
Spotting 3 3.00 Fame Fantasies 4 3.30 Lara’s
UK Swingers 4 3.55 With A Loving Touch
4 4.00 Fighting Females 4 4.20 Dolls In
Uniforms 4 4.35 The Great British Bang Bang
2 5.00 This Porn Life 4
FILMS
t

Times quoted are BST
ENTERTAINMENT SATELLITE, CABLE AND DIGITAL
SKY MOVIES PREMIERE Sky 301
10.00am Tooth Fairy (2010) (PG) Family comedy,
starring Dwayne Johnson. 11.45 Ondine (2009) (12)
Romantic drama, starring Colin Farrell and Alicja Bachleda.
1.30pm Centurion (2009) (15) Ancient Roman action
thriller, starring Michael Fassbender. 3.15 Space Chimps
2: Zartog Strikes Back (2010) (U) Animated sci-
fi comedy sequel, with the voice of Zack Shada. 4.45
Dragon Hunters (2008) (PG) Animated adventure, with
the voice of Forest Whitaker. 6.15 The Scouting Book
For Boys (2009) (15) Drama, starring Thomas Turgoose.
8.00 Tooth Fairy (2010) (PG) Family comedy, starring
Dwayne Johnson, Ashley Judd, Stephen Merchant, Ryan
Sheckler and Seth MacFarlane. 10.00 4.3.2.1 (2010)
(15) Crime thriller, with Emma Roberts. Midnight
Centurion (2009) (15) Neil Marshall’s action thriller,
with Michael Fassbender, Dominic West and Olga Kurylenko.
2.00 Thor: 35mm Special
SKY MOVIES COMEDY Sky 304
6.05am My Girlfriend’s Boyfriend (2010) (PG) With
Alyssa Milano. 8.05 The Brady Bunch Movie (1995)
(12) With Shelley Long. 9.45 Hannah Montana: The
Movie (2009) (U) With Miley Cyrus. 11.40 Old Dogs
(2009) (PG) With John Travolta. 1.15pm Dance Flick
(2009) (15) With Shoshana Bush. 2.45 Billy Madison
(1995) (PG) With Adam Sandler. 4.20 The Top Ten
Show Box office hits. 4.35 Fired Up! (2009) (12)
With Nicholas D’Agosto. 6.15 Hannah Montana: The
Movie (2009) (U) With Miley Cyrus. 8.00 Old Dogs
(2009) (PG) With John Travolta. 9.35 Dance Flick
(2009) (15) With Shoshana Bush. 11.05 Billy Madison
(1995) (PG) With Adam Sandler. 12.40am The
Brady Bunch Movie (1995) (12) With Shelley Long.
2.20 Thor: 35mm Special Behind the scenes on the
superhero adventure. 2.50 Fired Up! (2009) (12) With
Nicholas D’Agosto. 4.25 My Girlfriend’s Boyfriend
(2010) (PG) With Alyssa Milano.
SKY MOVIES ACTION & ADVENTURE Sky 305
7.15am A Force Of One (1979) (15) With Chuck
Norris. 9.00 Outlander (2008) (15) With James
Caviezel. 11.00 Terminator Salvation (2009) (12)
With Christian Bale. 1.00pm Terminator 2: Judgment
Day (1991) (15) With Arnold Schwarzenegger. 3.20
The 6th Day (2000) (15) With Arnold Schwarzenegger.
5.30 Armageddon (1998) (12) With Bruce Willis.
8.00 Terminator Salvation (2009) (12) See Today’s
Choice. 10.00 Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
(15) With Arnold Schwarzenegger. 12.20am The 6th
Day (2000) (15) With Arnold Schwarzenegger. 2.25
Damage (2009) (15) With Steve Austin. 4.15 The 300
Spartans (1962) (PG) With Richard Egan.
SKY MOVIES FAMILY Sky 306
6.35am Asterix Conquers America (1994) (U)
Animated adventure, with the voice of Craig Charles. 8.00
Open Season 2 (2008) (PG) Animated comedy,
with the voice of Joel McHale. 9.20 Family Show The
latest films from the UK and the US. 9.50 The Secret
Of Moonacre (2008) (U) Fantasy adventure, starring
Dakota Blue Richards. 11.35 Bolt (2008) (PG) Animated
adventure, with the voice of John Travolta. 1.15pm Percy
Jackson & The Lightning Thief (2010) (PG)
Fantasy adventure, starring Logan Lerman. 3.15 Happily
N’Ever After 2 (2009) (U) Animated adventure, with the
voice of Helen Niedwick. 4.35 The Secret Of Moonacre
(2008) (U) Fantasy adventure, starring Dakota Blue
Richards. 6.20 Bolt (2008) (PG) Animated adventure,
with the voice of John Travolta. 8.00 Percy Jackson &
The Lightning Thief (2010) (PG) Fantasy adventure,
starring Logan Lerman. 10.00 King Ralph (1991) (PG)
Comedy, starring John Goodman. 11.40 Happily N’Ever
After 2 (2009) (U) Animated adventure, with the voice
of Helen Niedwick. 1.05am Open Season 2 (2008)
(PG) Animated comedy, with the voice of Joel McHale.
2.35 King Ralph (1991) (PG) Comedy, starring John
Goodman. 4.20 Asterix Conquers America (1994)
(U) Animated adventure, with the voice of Craig Charles.
5.50 The Top Ten Show Box office hits.
SKY MOVIES DRAMA & ROMANCE Sky 308
6.00am Pearl Harbor (2001) (12) With Ben Affleck.
9.05 Brothers (2009) (15) With Jake Gyllenhaal. 10.55
Adventureland (2009) (15) With Jesse Eisenberg.
12.50pm The Top Ten Show Box office hits. 1.05
Meet Joe Black (1998) (12) With Brad Pitt. 4.05 Say
Anything (1989) (15) With John Cusack. 5.55 It’s
Complicated (2009) (15) With Meryl Streep. 8.00
Brothers (2009) (15) With Jake Gyllenhaal. 10.00 Say
Anything (1989) (15) Romantic comedy drama, starring
John Cusack, Ione Skye and John Mahoney, and featuring
a cameo from Cusack’s real-life sister Joan. Written and
directed by Cameron Crowe. 11.50 Crazy/Beautiful
(2001) (12) With Kirsten Dunst. 1.40am The Top Ten
Show Box office hits. 2.00 A Man For All Seasons
(1966) (U) With Paul Scofield. 4.05 Amelia (2009)
(PG) With Hilary Swank.
SKY MOVIES CLASSICS Sky 311
7.20am The Molly Maguires (1970) (PG) Fact-based
drama, starring Sean Connery. 9.25 Animal Crackers
(1930) (U) Comedy, starring the Marx Brothers. 11.05 A
Star Is Born (1954) (U) Musical drama, starring Judy
Garland and James Mason. 2.00pm Road To Utopia
(1945) (PG) Musical comedy, starring Bob Hope and Bing
Crosby. 3.30 Night And The City (1950) (PG) Crime
thriller, starring Richard Widmark. 5.10 The Grapes Of
Wrath (1940) (PG) Depression-era drama, starring Henry
Fonda. 7.20 The Lady Eve (1941) (U) Comedy, starring
Henry Fonda and Barbara Stanwyck. 9.00 Champion
(1949) (PG) Boxing drama, starring Kirk Douglas. 10.50
The Molly Maguires (1970) (PG) Fact-based drama,
starring Sean Connery. 1.05am The Grapes Of Wrath
(1940) (PG) Depression-era drama, starring Henry Fonda.
3.25 Night And The City (1950) (PG) Crime thriller,
starring Richard Widmark. 5.10 The Heiress (1949) (U)
Oscar-winning period drama, starring Olivia de Havilland.
TCM Sky 317
7.00am Girl With Green Eyes (1964) (U) 8.50
North And South 9.50 Bonanza 10.55 The Mask
(1994) (PG) 12.55pm Follow That Dream (1962)
(U) 3.00 North And South 4.00 Bonanza 5.05
Bandido (1956) (PG) 6.50 East Of Eden (1955)
(PG) 9.00 Pale Rider (1985) (15) 11.15 Species
II (1998) (18) 1.05am Pale Rider (1985) (15) 3.20
The Screening Room 3.50 Teleshopping 5.00
Follow That Dream (1962) (U)
FILM4 Freeview 15 - Sky 315
11.00am The Gunfighter (1950) (U) 12.40pm Ice
Cold In Alex (1958) (PG) 3.15 Carry On Nurse
(1959) (PG) Comedy, with Kenneth Williams, Hattie
Jacques, Joan Sims, Kenneth Connor, Charles Hawtrey,
Shirley Eaton and Leslie Phillips. 4.55 Funny Face
(1956) (U) Musical, starring Fred Astaire, Audrey Hepburn,
Kay Thompson, Michel Auclair and Robert Flemyng, with
songs by George and Ira Gershwin. 7.00 Star Trek III:
The Search For Spock (1984) (PG) Sci-fi sequel,
directed by Leonard Nimoy, with William Shatner, DeForest
Kelley and Christopher Lloyd. 9.00 Million Dollar Baby
(2004) (12) Oscar-winning drama, directed by and starring
Clint Eastwood, alongside Hilary Swank. 11.35 Johnny
Mnemonic (1995) (15) 1.25am The Pawnbroker
(1965) (12) 3.40 4Films For
TODAY’S CHOICE
TERMINATOR SALVATIONʄ„„„ÊÊ
Sky Movies Action& Adventure/HD, 8pm
In a future dominated by deadly robots, the resistance
leader John Connor (played by Christian Bale) fights to
stop the creation of an advanced new terminator.
Connor is also searching for the teenager that will go
back in time to become his father – still following me?
Away from that, a mysterious stranger with no memory
of who he is or where he’s been is about to learn the
shocking truth about his origins.
This, the fourth instalment in the Terminator series, is
an improvement on the third film, but is still way short in
terms of quality of the first two.
Sci-fi thriller, with Bale and Sam Worthington.
ANDY DEAN
SPORT
SKY SPORTS 1 Freeview 41 - Sky 401
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 7.00
Good Morning Sports Fans 8.00 Good Morning
Sports Fans 9.00 The Sky Sports Years 10.00
Netbusters 10.30 SPL Round-Up 11.00
Premier League Review Noon The Sky Sports
Years 1.00 Live Masters Tennis. The Madrid
Masters. 8.00 The Sky Sports Years. A look
back at Sky’s coverage in 2006. 9.00 British
Rally Championship. The Pirelli International
Rally. 10.00 The Sky Sports Years 11.00
A League Of Their Own Midnight UEFA
Champions League Highlights 1.00 Boots ’n’
All 2.00 Football Asia 2.30 Football’s Greatest
3.00 UEFA Champions League Highlights 4.00
The Sky Sports Years 5.00 Football Asia 5.30
Football’s Greatest
SKY SPORTS 2 Freeview 42 - Sky 402
6.00am Aerobics Oz Style 6.30 Kings Of The
Extreme 7.00 WWE: Afterburn 8.00 Soccer AM:
The Best Bits 9.00 European Tour Golf 10.00
PGA Tour Golf 11.00 Wonderful World Of Golf
12.30pm PGA Tour Classic 1.30 Netbusters
2.00 SPL Round-Up 2.30 The Sky Sports Years
3.30 Premier League Review 4.30 Netbusters
5.00 Cycle Sports World 5.30 Football Asia
6.00 Premier League Review 7.00 Live UEFA
Champions League. Barcelona v Real Madrid
(kick-off 7.45pm). 10.15 Football’s Greatest.
The career of Zinedine Zidane. 10.45 Poker.
The World Poker Tour event from Venice. 11.45
Golfing World. Magazine show. 12.45am Sports
Unlimited 1.45 Poker 2.45 Golfing World
SKY SPORTS 3 Sky 403
8.00am NASCAR 9.00 Elite League Speedway
11.00 Aerobics Oz Style 11.30 Racing News
Noon Boots ’n’ All 1.00 NASCAR 2.00 Kings
Of The Extreme 2.30 Wild Spirits 3.00 Elite
League Speedway 5.00 WWE: Smackdown
7.00 British Rally Championship. The Pirelli
International Rally. 8.00 Sports Unlimited.
Offbeat activities. 9.00 Ironman Triathlon.
Highlights of the event at Port Macquarie in
New South Wales. 11.00 Cycling. The Tour
DoonHame. 11.30 British Rally Championship.
The Pirelli International Rally. 12.30am
NASCAR 1.30 British Rally Championship
2.30 Cycling 3.00 Cycle Sports World
ESPN Sky 417
6.00am ESPN Kicks: Scottish Premier League
6.15 Russian Premier League Football. CSKA
Moscow v Spartak Moscow. Action from the
top-flight clash at the Luzhniki Stadium. 8.00
Pardon The Interruption 8.30 ESPN Press Pass
9.00 Talk Of The Terrace 10.15 ESPN Kicks:
Scottish Premier League 10.30 Between The
Lines 11.00 ESPN Game Of The Week 11.30
Bundesliga Review Show 12.45pm ESPN
Kicks: Premier League 1.00 ESPN Press Pass
1.30 Between The Lines 2.00 Pardon The
Interruption 2.30 ESPN Kicks: Scottish Premier
League 2.45 ESPN Game Of The Week 3.15
Serie A 4.45 ESPN Kicks: Serie A 5.00
Eredivisie Review Show 6.00 ESPN Pardon The
Interruption 6.30 FA WSL Review Show 7.00
AFL Review Show. The latest round of fixtures.
8.00 Friday Fight Nights. Tim Coleman v Sergio
Rivera. Coverage of the recent light-welterweight
bout at the Cosmopolitan Resort in Las Vegas,
Nevada. 10.00 Premier League Review. 11.00
Russian Premier League Rivew. The latest round
of fixtures. 11.30 NBA Tonight Midnight Live
Major League Baseball. Boston Red Sox v Los
Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Coverage of the
American League clash at Fenway Park. 3.00
ESPN Press Pass 3.30 Planet Speed 4.00
AFL Review Show 5.00 FA WSL Review Show
5.30 ESPN Game Of The Week
BRITISH EUROSPORT Sky 410
7.30am Cycling 8.30 Eurogoals 9.00 WATTS
10.00 WTA Tennis 11.00 Live WTA Tennis.
The Madrid Open. Coverage of the second
day’s play. 12.45pm Tennis: Mats Point 1.15
Champions Club 2.00 Live Under-17s European
Championship Football. Serbia v Denmark (kick-
off 2.00pm). Coverage of the opening match of the
tournament. 3.45 Eurogoals 4.00 Live Under-
17s European Championship Football. Germany
v Netherlands (kick-off 4.00pm). Coverage of the
opening Group B match for both sides at the Stadion
FK Smederevo in Serbia. 5.45 Tennis: Mats Point
6.15 Snooker: The World Championship 7.00
Boxing. Memorable bouts involving American
boxers. 8.00 Boxing. Bernard Hopkins v Jean
Pascal. 9.00 Boxing 10.00 Extreme Sports:
Freeride Spirit 10.30 World Series By Renault.
The second round of the season from Spa-
Francorchamps. 11.00 Video Gaming 11.30
Snooker: The World Championship
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 43
Victory123
44 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
:8CM@E8E;?F99<J b||| Wottersor
;@C9<IK Scott Adors
=8@K?#?FG<8E;JL< ||so W||d
ILG<IK8E;K?<@EM<EKFINo 40
To order Calvin And Hobbes Magical World paperback priced £12.99 (UK free delivery), send a
cheque/PO made payable to Express Bookshop to PO Box 200, Falmouth TR11 4WJ, telephone 0871
988 8367 (calls cost 10p/min froma BT landline) or order online at www.expressbookshop.com
To order Dilbert – Thriving On Vague Objectives £6.99 (UK postage free), please send a cheque or PO to Express Bookshop, PO Box
200, Falmouth TR11 4WJ, phone 0871 988 8367 (calls cost 10p/min froma BT landline) or order online at www.expressbookshop.com
To order copies of the Rupert 1966 Facsimile (£25), call 0871 988 8370 (calls cost 10p/min
froma BT landline), send a cheque/PO to The Official Classic Rupert Bear Shop, PO Box 200,
Falmouth, TR11 4WJ or visit www.classicrupertbearshop.com. UK delivery is free.
“I was worried and pressed the
wrong button. They all vanished
when you arrived.” But the inventor
is already some distance from him,
so he hurriedly presses his round
badge and is immediately lifted into
the air. “I don’t really like this kind
of flying,” he mutters. “I do hope
there will be no more mistakes!” As
before, he is pulled through the air
behind the inventor, until they reach
the giant funnel and are shot into it.
© Express Newspapers 2011
Next moment Rupert does the same,
And back they go the way they came!
Hurled through the air, the two arrive,
Then in the funnel’s mouth they dive.
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Today’s New Moon turns your
attention to money. Whether for personal
reasons or through work, the spotlight will
focus on financial funding and management.
However, if you intend to invest or make big
purchases, Thursday or Friday is probably
your best bet. Call me to hear when to cool
down your frustration at home.
0907 181 2948 (01)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXARI TO 83088
You’re one of the canniest members
of the Zodiac family, especially on the topic
of money. However, you’ll have to do some
fancy footwork to dodge the pitfalls strewn in
your financial path today. Plan ahead, by all
means, but don’t commit yourself yet. Call
me to hear when it’s important that you steer
your own path.
0907 181 2948 (02)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXTAU TO 83088
After all the social razzmatazz over
the last few weeks, it’s great to grab some
time to yourself. Although it’s back to work
after the long weekend, the more you keep
in the background, the better. Today hidden
information comes to light that could prove
most useful. Call me to hear when you must
put your security first.
0907 181 2948 (03)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXGEM TO 83088
Arrangements or appointments you
plan to make today will probably have to be
rescheduled, so save yourself the trouble
and postpone them until Thursday. Follow
your own intuition rather than what others
tell you to do, even if they are the experts.
Call me to hear when to ask questions
before you make that decision.
0907 181 2948 (04)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXCAN TO 83088
Your mind is totally focused on
work, ambitions and the great blue yonder.
Today’s New Moon triggers a fresh start but
the stars advise against making any moves
now. Yet by all means contemplate that big
project or plan the next stage of your career.
Call me to hear when your plans may be
truly scuppered.
0907 181 2948 (05)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXLEO TO 83088
Try not to commit yourself to any
fresh travel arrangements after 7.45am.
Bookings made before this time are sound
but those made after are likely to be hit by
problems. The same applies to legal or
financial matters. So plan to move later in
the week. Call me to hear when you must
keep a grip on your spending.
0907 181 2948 (06)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXVIR TO 83088
Celebrating on this day: writer Ben Elton, 52, and comedian Rob Brydon, 46.
If you possibly can, avoid financial
dealings today because there’s a greater
than average chance of making mistakes.
Unless you’re extra careful, you could find
yourself steered in the wrong direction. If it
doesn’t sound right to you, well, it probably
isn’t. Call me to hear when you must put
your own emotions first.
0907 181 2948 (07)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXLIB TO 83088
The planets have been spotlighting
your creative and romantic side for a little
while but the focus is intensifying and it
looks as though fresh developments are in
store. Although making new commitments
isn’t recommended today, partnerships are
taking a different turn. Call me to hear when
it’s essential not to go over the top.
0907 181 2948 (08)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXSCO TO 83088
Bogged down with work tasks or
frantically chasing a deadline? There’s a
strong chance that schedules will prove
more flexible than you expect, with demands
and pressures lessening throughout the day.
Carry on as normal but don’t begin any new
projects until Thursday. Call me to hear when
you must keep an eye on your finances.
0907 181 2948 (09)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXSAG TO 83088
It may be back to work after the
bank holiday but a little escape wouldn’t do
you any harm today. With others in an easy
mood, you could find you’ve more time to
coast. So why not put a hot date or romantic
rendezvous on your agenda? Call me to
hear when a family matter will interfere with
your plans.
0907 181 2948 (10)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXCAP TO 83088
If you’ve had domestic hiccups
lately and lots of sorting to do around the
house, you should feel on firmer ground
today. However, if you’re making decisions
concerning the home and family, make sure
everyone’s in agreement before making any
sweeping changes. Call me to hear when to
factor in unexpected delays.
0907 181 2948 (11)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXAQU TO 83088
Important meetings? Chances are
they turn out to be a waste of time, there’s a
hitch or people don’t show up. Essentially,
it’s probably for the best if you do your own
thing and don’t rely on others. It’s a good
day, however, for wriggling out of onerous
commitments. Call me to hear when you’re
in danger of buying a pig in a poke.
0907 181 2948 (12)
TO RECEIVE DAILY TEXT FORECASTS SEND DXPIS TO 83088
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 45

K<8J<I
KF;8PËJ8EJN<IJ19<>@EE<I4).2@EK<ID<;@8K<4(028;M8E:<;4*,(%
K?<;8@CP<OGI<JJ*'$J<:FE;:?8CC<E><
><KK?<9I@CC@8EK<OGI<JJGLQQC<J8GGFEPFLIG?FE<KF;8P
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fxµress |to w|B 2/C |e|µ||ne 0870 0|0 8ó5ó
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LesLs your loqic and word power. Lach qrid number
represenLs a leLLer. Lvery leLLer ol Lhe alphabeL is used. Use Lhe qiven
leLLer or leLLers · below Lhe main qrid · Lo sLarL. Jfclk`fekfdfiifn%
;@==@:LCKP18/¹0, K8I><K125 mins, :CL<1No Lippinq in back lor Spike.
P<JK<I;8PËJJFCLK@FE18Zifjj1 Pus, Hallway, Relax, Bizarre, Perhaps,
SouLh, 1urban, PundiL (clue), Binqe, Miracle, AmaLeur, L|ecL, Skillle, Roe.
;fne1 ParapeL, BeaL, Solar, Ransack, LxcavaLe, Lll, Ambush, Amoral, Fez,
Squirrel, Aqround, Clear, Mesh, 1resLle.
8
9
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=
>
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@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
¹ 2
?
3 ^ 5 6 7 8 9 ¹0 ¹¹ ¹2 ¹3
¹^ ¹5 ¹6 ¹7 ¹8 ¹9
B
20 2¹ 22 23 2^ 25 26
EXTRA LETTER CLUES: '0'.(/(),-/ (Hear up Lo six LxLra LeLLers,
deducL Lwo minuLes lor each clue leLLer heard) ¬Ê/|ternat|ve|y text ;O8CG?8
to /,'// ano we w||| text tne s|x extra |etter c|ues o|rect to your moo||e.
¬Ê1exts cost £| µ|us norma| network oµerator rate. FULL 5CLUTICN:
'0'.(/(),-,, ACPC55 CNLY: 0907 !S! 256!, DCWN CNLY:
0907 !S! 2562. ¬ÊCa||s cost 77µ µer m|nute from B1 |ano||nes µ|us
network extras. Ctner networks ano moo||es may vary.
New/|µnaµuzz|e¹Books, vo|s |, 2 ano 3 (µuo||sneo oy |am|yn Cctoµus) cost £5.99 eacn, U|
µostaçe free. far||er vo|umes (2·||) ava||ao|e, £ó.99eacn. Seno cneque or µosta| oroer to fxµress
Booksnoµ, PCBox 200, la|moutn, Cornwa|| 1P|| 4wJ, or ca|| 087| 988 83ó7 (ca||s cost |0µ
µer m|nute) w|tn your creo|t caro numoer or oroer at www.exµressoooksnoµ.com
/|µnaµuzz|e¹©20|| /corn fo|tor|a| |to ¬/|| /|µnaµuzz|e¹woros aµµear |n Cnamoers ||ct|onary
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8:IFJJ
2 BreaLhes (8)
9 Disreqard (6)
10 Beach qrains (^)
11 HalL (^)
13 RelaLive darkness (5)
14 Lnqlish ciLy (9)
16 AnaesLheLic (5)
19 Lnd parL (^)
20 Loq boaL (^)
21 His aqe (anaq.) (6)
22 Joined Lhe armed lorces (8)
;FNE
1 Lverqreen planL (9)
3 LisLlessness (5)
4 Fizzy waLer (^)
5 ProLecLs, mainLains (9)
6 RosLer (^)
7 Wears away (6)
B Famous sporLsperson or
enLerLainer (9)
12 Keep in ollicial cusLody (6)
15 1anLalise (5)
17 Raised area ol land (^)
1B Leqal documenL (^)
¬Tc crder ycur ccpycf the newSmaII Crcsswcrds bcck vcIumes
1-5at £5.99each(pubIished byHamIyn0ctcpus), phcne the
Express Bcckshcp cn0B71 9BBB367(caIIs ccst 10p per
minute frcma BTIandIine), send a cheque made payabIe tc The
Express Bcckshcp tc SmaII Crcsswcrds, P0Bcx200, FaImcuth
TR11 4WJ, cr crder cnIine at www.expressbcckshcp.ccm
JD8CC:IFJJNFI;
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9
10 11
12 13
14 15
16 17 18
19 20
21
22
P<JK<I;8PËJJFCLK@FE
8:IFJJ! Nashville, 7 Attain, 9 Vein,
!0 Cripe, !2 Fits, !3 Cuillemot, !4 Ante,
!6 Titan, !S Cche, !9 5tress, 20 Increases.
;FNE! Navigate, 2 5tir, 3 Handle,
4 Vigilante, 5 Lei, 6 Laptop, S Pestless,
!! Bunion, !2 Fedora, !5 Aces, !7 Tic.
For today's solution
call: '0'.(/(),/)
Ca||s cost 77µ µer m|nute froma B1 |ano||ne µ|us
network extras. Ctner networks anomoo||es may vary.
Fill the grid so that every column, row, and 3x3 square includes all oI the digits Irom one to nine.
YE5TEPDAY'5 5CLUTICN
¬1Coroer fxµress Suooku
Puzz|es (more tnan |00
µuzz|es ano so|v|nç t|µs) at £5.99
or tne newfxµress Suooku
C|·PCHw|tn more tnan |,000
µr|ntao|eµuzz|es, at £9.99, senoa
cneque or µosta| oroer to:
fxµress Booksnoµ, PCBox 200,
la|moutn 1P|| 4wJ, te| 087| 988
83ó7 (ca||s cost |0µ/m|n froma
B1 |ano||ne) or oroer on||ne at
nnn%\ogi\jjYffbj_fg%Zfd
JL;FBL
KXi^\k122 mins C\m\c1Moderate
Ca||s cost 77µ µer m|nute from B1 |ano||nes µ|us network extras.
Ctner networks ano moo||es may vary.
Extra clues: '0'(*)),-'0
Ca||s cost 77µ µer ca|| from B1 |ano||nes µ|us network extras.
Ctner networks ano moo||es may vary.
Today's solution: '0'.(/(),.*
1 4
5
9
9 7
3
1
9 2
3
2 7
4
3 6
1
5
7
1
8
7
6
2 1
5
7
4
8
2 5 9
2 7
1 6 9
5
4
3 8
6 9
4 5 3
1
8
7 2
3 1
8 7 2
6
5
4 9
5 1
2 4 3
7
8
9 6
3 6
5 8 7
2
9
4 1
2 4
1 9 6
3
7
8 5
7 4
3 8 5
6
9
1 2
1 5
6 2 4
7
3
9 8
6 8
9 1 7
4
2
5 3
K?<8CG?89<8K<I

K8I><KK@D<132 minuLes
CAN you crack the
Alphabeater? Each grid
number represents a letter
· or black square. As in
Alphapuzzle, every letter oI
the alphabet is used. But
you have to complete the
grid tooI Use the given
letters and black squares
below the grid to start. The
grid is 'rotationally
symmetrical' · in other
words, it looks the same iI
you turn the page upside
down. Jfclk`fekfdfiifn%
Extra letter clues
'0'.(/(),-'
(DeducL Lhree minuLes lor
each exLra clue leLLer heard)
Full solution
'0'.(/(),,/
¬AlLernaLively, LexL ;O9<8Kto /,'//and we will LexL Lhe six LxLra LeLLer clues Lo your mobile. 1exLs cosL E¹ plus your usual operaLor raLe
P\jk\i[XpËjjfclk`fe
9cXZbjhlXi\j1 2, ^, 6, 8,
¹0, ¹2, ¹5, ¹8, 22, 26, 28,
38, 39, ^0. 8Zifjj1
MoraliLy, Play, LxLol, 1sar,
Proxy, Fee, Milieu, Beck,
FeLe, Cheque, LlL, Abash,
ZesL, Ha||i, SpaL, Decorous.
;fne1 MinL, Swipe, Bask,
1ea, Aversive, Scam,
Fudqe, 1rove, Flame, L|ecL,
Blur, Breezier, Owe, Lynx,
Chuqs, 1aqs.
¹ 2 3 ^ 5 6 7 8 9 ¹0 ¹¹
®
¹2 ¹3

M
22 23 2^
®
25 26 27 28 29
®
30 3¹ 32 33
¹^ ¹5 ¹6 ¹7 ¹8 ¹9 20
3^ 35
B
36 37
W
38 39 ^0
¬fn(oy a cna||ençe? 1ry 1ne
U|tra /|µnaµuzz|e at £ó.99(U|
µostaçe free) ca|| 0B71 9BB
B367or oroer on||ne at www.
exµressoooksnoµ.com Ca||scost
|0µ a m|nute froma B1 |ano||ne.
Ca||s cost 77µ µer m|nute
from B1 |ano||nes µ|us network
extras Ctner networks ano
moo||es may vary.
8
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K8I><K
E P E
D Y C
P N T
H0W many wcrds cf fcur
Ietters cr mcre can ycu make
frcm the Ietters shcwn here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine·letter word. No plurals.
KF;8PËJK8I><K
>ff[ !4, m\ip^ff[ 2!,
\oZ\cc\ek 2S (or more) Jfclk`fe
kfdfiifn%
P<JK<I;8PËJJFCLK@FE
eight <EC@>?K<E ghee heel
heeling hilt hinge hint length
lengthen light lighten lithe
neigh nigh night ninth thee
then thin thine thing
The Target
uses
words in
the main
body oI
Chambers
2!st
Century
Dictionary
(!999
edition)
Call '0'.(/(),/, Ior
today's Target solution
Ca||s cost 77µ µer m|nute fromB1 |ano||nes µ|us
network extras. Ctner networks ano moo||es may vary.
:IFJJ;FL9K
:XepfldXb\knfZfddfe]`m\$c\kk\i
nfi[j]ifdk_\e`e\c\kk\ij^`m\e#
lj`e^\XZ_c\kk\ifecpfeZ\6PflZXe
ÆYlkfecp`]fe\c\kk\i]\Xkli\j`eYfk_
nfi[j`ek_\jhlXi\jfek_\i`^_k%
K_\i\ËjXkc\Xjkfe\nXpkf[f`k#Xe[
pfl_Xm\kf_Xm\k_\i`^_kc\kk\iXkk_\
Zifjjfm\iÆYlkn_`Z_fe\`j`k6
KXi^\kk`d\j1Averaqe:
(/d`ej Cood: (+ d`ej
LxcellenL: (' d`ej
YesLerday's soluLion:
DFLCK#P@<C;
(across or down)
5ee iI you can Iind the answer within
our target time. II you need help, ring
our clue·line below to Iind out the
crossover letter. Jfclk`fekfdfiifn%
8 8 8 9 : C K ? @
S0LUT!0N
'0'(*)),-'.
Both today's words in a moment
STUCK? CALL F0R A CLUE
'0'(*)),-'(
Halve your Target TimeI
:XccjZfjk..gg\iZXcc]ifd9KcXe[c`e\jgclje\knfib\okiXj%
Fk_\ie\knfibjXe[dfY`c\jdXpmXip%
:ILJ8;<IGI@Q<:IFJJNFI;
ACR0SS
1 LnLrusLed wiLh oxidaLion (^)
3 Our caper is Lerribly
insecure (¹0)
9 Cable provides company on
Lhe road (^)
10 Fellow naLive Lo map ouL
Lhreesome in bed (¹0)
11 Basic inqredienLs lor a
salad (3,8)
15 HypoLheLical arLicle on rice
Lo be composed (9)
17 Morninq belore our love
allair (5)
1B Lesson abouL molar (5)
19 Makinq a pledqe LhaL's
hopelul (9)
20 1ake Lemporary charqe and
mainLain delence (^,3,^)
24 A qal sewinq, workinq lor
ciLy·dweller (¹0)
25 1he navy is behind iron
planL (^)
26 DisLincLly and secreLly
runninq alLer woman (¹0)
27 LccenLric kinq, say (^)
D0WN
1 WaLch luncLion in Lhe
shorLesL duraLion (6,^)
2 Wander abouL, improvinq
brew wiLh riqhL lruiL (¹0)
4 River varieLy ol heron (5)
5 lsland cauqhL Lwice by
anoLher old piece (9)
6 1erribly iraLe aL evil exacLinq
revenqe (¹¹)
7 Leave ouL ol Lhe room
iLsell (^)
B Appease by chanqinq
seaL (^)
12 Drops exhibiLor alLer 30
days (5,6)
13 WiL Lurns a rope inLo an arL
lorm (5,5)
14 Scared Lo end lreiqhL beinq
LransporLed (¹0)
16 OuLsLandinq escape alLer
summiL (3·6)
21 Seek Lime Lo |oin
unprepared sLudenL (5)
22 Old silver keys (^)
23 ReqisLer a lish (^)
?<I<ËJPFLI:?8E:<KFN@E8E8D8Q@E>™('':8J?GI@Q< Complete today's crossword
correctly and send your grid to: Crusader Crossword, May 3, PC Box !257S, 5utton ColdIield B73 9BT.
¬Êfntr|es must oe µostmarkeo Hay 4 at tne |atest. 1ne w|nner w||| oe tne f|rst correct entry orawn after tne c|os|nç oate of Hay |0.
N
@E
™('':8J?
NAME
ADDPE55
PC5TCCDE
¬ÊThe new Crusader Crcsswcrds VcIs 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 (pubIished by HamIyn 0ctcpus)
are avaiIabIe ncw at £5.99 each. Tc crder ycur ccpy phcne the Express Bcckshcp cn
0B71 9BB B367 (caIIs ccst 10p per minute frcm a BT IandIine), send a cheque made
payabIe tc The Express Bcckshcp tc Crusader Crcsswcrds, P0 Bcx 200, FaImcuth
TR11 4WJ, cr crder cnIine at www.expressbcckshcp.ccm
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10
11 12
13 14
15 16 17
18 19
20 21
22 23
24 25
26 27
C8JK=I@;8PËJJFCLK@FE
8:IFJJ1 ¹ SLraiqhLen, 6 Bald, ¹0 Whimper,
¹¹ Dealinq, ¹2 DeparLure, ¹3 KnelL, ¹^ Drone,
¹5 LssenLial, ¹7 CaleLeria, 20 Palsy, 2¹ Rile,
23 Voracious, 25 1reason, 26 ShuLLle,
27 Dyke, 28 Real Lennis.
;FNE1 ¹ Sowed, 2 Rainprool, 3 lmperlecL
Lense, ^ HirsuLe, 5 Lndless, 7 Alive, 8 DiqiLally,
9 1alkinq picLure, ¹^ DecoraLed, ¹6 lll·qoLLen,
¹8 Revenqe, ¹9 Aerosol, 22 Freak, 2^ Specs.
mensateaser: Win the Rock & Chips: The Complete Collection DVD boxset
For your chance to win, call: 0907 181 2719
Calls cost 77p per minute plus network extras and last 2.5 minutes. Other networks may vary. Maximum call
duration 2.5 minutes. Lines close at midnight on Monday, May 9. Normal Express rules apply. The Editor’s
decision is final. Winners will be selected at random from all correct entries received by the closing date.
Catch up with the Trotters as they return for a third hilarious helping of Rock & Chips in this hour-long
comedy drama starring Nicholas Lyndhurst and James Buckley. Rock & Chips: The Frog and the Pussycat
is out now to own on DVD (RRP £12.99). Also out is Rock & Chips: The Complete Collection (RRP
£24.99), essential additions for all fans of Britain’s favourite sitcom, Only Fools and Horses.
For more brain-teasing puzzles and information about Mensa membership visit www.mensa.org.uk
or telephone 01902 772771. Mensa does not accept hyphenated words, and uses the Oxford
Dictionary of English (Second Edition Revised) as its official reference.
Answer for Teaser 26/04/11: Heroes
Rearrange the letters of
EVADE THE POWER ISSUES
to give the name of a TV comedy
drama series. What is it?
Victory123
46 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 47
IT seems ridiculous in the
21st century that Prince
William’s wife cannot be
known as Princess Catherine as
she was not born a princess so
can only be known as either
Princess William or the Duchess of
Cambridge (“HRH title is given to
‘Princess Catherine’”, May 2).
Such obscure royal etiquette
should be consigned to history. It is
not good enough that she will only
be Her Royal Highness.
To the media and most people,
of course, Catherine will simply
remain Kate but to deny her the
use of her own name does not sit
well in the modern world.
Valerie Crews,
Beckenham, Kent
WHILE I sympathise
with those who think
Kate Middleton should
hold the title of Princess Catherine,
I do not think we should allow the
emotion of the marriage to override
centuries of history, including the
endowment of titles.
Our monarchy has been
successful for so long because
it sticks firmly to the age-old
traditions that make occasions
such as the scenes we witnessed
in London truly majestic and
thoroughly British.
We are the envy of the world and
the price we have to pay is to ‘stick
to the script’.
P Harrison,
By email
Mfk\ÊefËXe[Zfej`^egfcc
i\]fid`[\Xkfk_\[ljkY`e
THE concept of the AV voting
system is fundamentally flawed
(“Cameron in TV row with Clegg
over vote reform”, May 2).
Most voters only have a few
issues of great importance to them
and their choice of candidate will
be relatively clear.
The task of then selecting a rank
order for the remaining candidates
is irrelevant and likely to receive
only cursory attention.
It is unreasonable to expect
Joe Public to carry out a detailed
analysis of each candidate/party
prior to an election and I am sure
this won’t happen.
Let’s vote against the
introduction of AV and consign it
to the dustbin where it belongs.
Jean Mills,
Northfleet, Kent
8Mnflc[eËkgifm`[\kil\
i\]c\Zk`fef]flin`j_\j
I HAVE approached the AV debate
with an open mind but can’t give
any credence to a ‘yes’ vote.
I believe that AV wouldn’t be
democratic, fair or would give a
true reflection of the wishes of the
electorate. The result would be
influenced by tactical voting.
So on Thursday it has to be an
almighty ‘no’.
Christopher Chambers,
Margate, Kent
9i`kX`edljkhl`k<Lfm\i
k_`jZiXZbgfkd\i^\i`[\X
I DIDN’T know whether to laugh
or cry upon reading that the EU
wants to merge the UK and France
and has spent millions of our
money in reaching this crackpot
conclusion (“EU wants to merge
EU with France”, May 2).
While I’m pretty sure that this
idea is totally unworkable, the fact
it has even been floated is surely
a massive reason why we should
back the Daily Express crusade
and get out of the corrupt
organisation known as the EU
without further delay.
We’re pouring money we do not
have into the EU to enrich those
who hold power there and to
enable them to come up with potty
ideas and decisions.
Just think what could be done
within the UK with the millions we
pay annually into the EU.
Pressure on David Cameron
and MPs for a referendum on EU
membership should be intensified.
Geoff Manning,
Lower Kingswood, Surrey
K`d\_Xj]`eXccpZfd\kf
_XckZfjkcp9iljj\cj]`XjZf
IS the EU plot to merge us with
France a late April fool? No, only
those unelected idiots in Brussels
plotting against us behind closed
doors once again.
Surely it is time to bring this EU
fiasco to an end before we and
other European countries drown
in the costly and reckless stupidity
foisted upon us all.
The royal wedding proved we are
a united sovereign nation.
Mike McIntosh,
Croydon, Surrey

Cfe^dXp\ek_lj`Xjk`Z
m\i^\ii\dX`eXk8YY\p
I WRITE in defence of verger Ben
Sheward filmed doing cartwheels
at Westminster Abbey.
Last summer we were on a family
trip to London and toured the
Abbey, one of the least expensive
but most enjoyable things you can
do in the capital.
We were most fortunate to have
Mr Sheward as our guide. His
enthusiasm for the building and
devotion to duty are unparalleled,
while his knowledge of the Abbey
knows no bounds. In short, he
could not do enough to ensure
our visit was both enjoyable
and informative.
Long may he remain a custodian
of our national church.
John Downham-Clarke,
By email
BXk\Ëj]Xj_`fej\ej\`jXe
\oXdgc\kfpfle^nfd\e
KATE Middleton looked stunning
on her wedding day. Let’s hope
young women take note of her
fashion sense and copy her style of
dress, which is understated, classic,
beautiful and chic.
This is in stark contrast to the
midriff trousers, stomachs hanging
out, fake tan and tattoos most girls
seem to sport nowadays.
This is apart from blokes with
their trousers halfway down their
legs, showing their underpants.
I may be a lady of a certain age
but one of these days I’m going to
pull their trousers up.
C Gardiner,
Bristol
8iZ_Y`j_fgj_flc[_Xm\
^fk`eki`d]fijg\Z`Xc[Xp
WHAT a beautiful royal wedding.
Prince William looked so smart
in his uniform, along with Prince
Harry and his John Wayne walk.
As for Catherine, she was totally
gorgeous in her bridal gown
and her younger sister Pippa a
delightful sight to behold as the
chief bridesmaid.
The big disappointment was the
Archbishop of Canterbury, who
needed a trim. Did he not realise
how offputting his long eyebrows,
unbrushed hair and straggly beard
would look on this special day?
Philip Hudson,
Doncaster, S Yorks
JkfgÊ]fli$c\^^\[]i`\e[jË
_fle[`e^[\c`m\ipg\fgc\
WHILE delivering leaflets I pushed
one firmly through a letterbox, only
to find that a dog on the other side
of the door wanted my finger rather
than my paper offering.
The A&E department at my local
hospital did a good job to fix the
resultant teeth marks on my finger,
so I survived. The following day
when I was pushing through the
leaflets, this time with a wooden
ruler, I encountered another dog.
This one took the ruler from me,
not just the leaflet.
Please would all dog owners
‘cage’ the inside of their letterbox
to catch the post or put up a
letterbox by the front door.
Peter Ashcroft,
Huntingdon, Cambs
9i\XbflkYlek`e^X^X`e#
efnk\iific\X[\i`j[\X[
I WAS about to take down my royal
wedding bunting when I received
news that at last Osama bin Laden
had got his just rewards. What a
great reason, I thought, to have
another street party.
S Vaughan,
By email
GENTLEMAN, legend, icon, true champion. All overused
clichés in the lexicon of sport but in the case of the late,
great Sir Henry Cooper, every single one totally applicable
(“Tributes to Our Enry a true sporting gent”, May 2).
As someone who worked closely with Sir Henry in
his role as a dedicated patron of Sparks, the children’s
medical research charity founded by leading sportsmen
and women, he was an inspirational ambassador.
To boxing devotees, his legendary status was forged
forever by that unforgettable left hook that floored
Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali.
The fact that Henry Cooper never became a world
champion, to add to his reign as a British and European
champ, was down to a matter of size rather than any lack
of talent.
However, if a combination of skill, courage, compassion
and a Corinthian spirit defines true sporting greatness,
Sir Henry Cooper was a world champion on every count.
Paul Connew,
St Albans, Herts
0+P<8IJFC;8E;JK@CC
B<<G@E>8K@>?K;@8IP%%%
K
PL pursu|t of 0saæa b|r Lader
|as succeeded after I0 years,
yet feW rea||se t|e coæp|ex|ty
of t|e operat|or t|at |ed to ||s
|||||rç. forturate|y, | |ave |r æy
possess|or a trarscr|pt of a top secret
æeet|rç a Wee| aço at t|e W||te
Pouse betWeer t|e US Pres|dert ard
t|e D|rector of C0AIIA|LS, t|e Covert
0perat|ors for t|e Assass|rat|or of
Ierror|sts ard Ierror|sæ Advocates |r
|rterrat|ora| Locat|ors of Secrecy.
D|rector of C0AIIA|LS: "Nr
Pres|dert, S|r, | aæ |appy to report
t|at We |ave fourd 0saæa b|r Lader."
0baæa: "ßood reWs! | corçratu|ate
you. But W|at too| you so |orç?"
DC: "|t |as beer a very coæp|ex
operat|or, S|r. Pe's beer ||d|rç."
0baæa: "So |oW exact|y d|d you f|rd
||æ after a|| t||s t|æe?"
DC: "0ur ser|or |oç|st|cs operat|ves
dev|sed a p|ar of t|e utæost curr|rç."
0baæa: "ßo or."
DC: "0ur object|ve Was to d|scover
||s |ocat|or, so We started by |oo||rç
|r a|| t|e |||e|y p|aces, t|er |r a|| t|e
ur|||e|y p|aces We cou|d t||r| of. I|er
our æer caæe up W|t| ar |rfa|||b|e
p|ar based or t|e æost sop||st|cated
tec|ro|oçy at our d|sposa|."
0baæa: "You æear We used
sate|||tes proçraææed to scar t|e
Afç|ar|star/Pa||star area ard searc|
for traces of 0saæa's DNA?"
DC: "Lver better t|ar t|at: W|at We
d|d Was serd a |etter to every |oæe |r
Afç|ar|star ard Pa||star, p|us every
cave |r t|e æourta|rous reç|ors
betWeer t|eæ, purported|y coæ|rç
froæ t|e Reader's D|çest ard
addressed to Nr 0.B. Lader, |rforæ|rç
Nr Lader t|at ||s raæe |ad beer
se|ected as a poss|b|e W|rrer of a
æ||||or·pourd pr|ze draW. W|er a||
t|e |etters but ore |ad beer returred
æar|ed 'rot |roWr at t||s address', We
|reW t|e ore reæa|r|rç address æust
be W|ere |e Was to be fourd."
0baæa: "Br||||art. So W|er car our
c|aps çet t|ere ard f|r|s| t|e job?"
DC: "Po|d or, |'|| çet æy d|ary out."
0baæa: "Let's æa|e |t soor, car We?
We dor't Wart ||æ çett|rç aWay aça|r.
PoW about toæorroW?"
DC: "Parç or a b|t. We æustr't rus|
t||s. 0ur æer |ave çot to p|c| up t|e|r
çurs ard aææo ard stuff t|er çet over
to Pa||star, W||c| |s a |orç Way aWay."
0baæa: "Sorry, you're qu|te r|ç|t.
Later |r t|e Wee|, t|er?"
DC: "Pææ, |'æ pretty t|ed up ear|y |r
t|e Wee|."
0baæa: "PoW about fr|day t|er?
|t'|| put everyore |r a çood æood for
t|e Wee|erd."
DC: "Are you æad? I|at's t|e day of
t|e Roya| Wedd|rç |r t|e UK. We dor't
Wart to be coæpet|rç W|t| t|at for
reWs coveraçe."
0baæa: "ßood po|rt. Naybe Saturday
Wou|d be a better |dea."
DC: "|'æ rot sure about Saturday.
I|e Surday papers usua||y |||e a
b|t æore rot|ce. |f We |eave |t urt||
Surday, t|e Norday papers car rur a
b|ç sp|as| or |t."
0baæa: "Na|. |t's Arsera| aça|rst
Narc|ester Ur|ted or Surday. Let's say
f|rst t||rç Norday æorr|rç, Pa||star
t|æe. I|er |t'|| be too |ate for t|e UK
Norday papers ard We car ç|ve ar
exc|us|ve to t|e US press."
Ard t|e rest |s ||story.
Sport|rç |eçerd
Perry's æar| of
true çreatress
J?FLC;B8K<9<GI@E:<JJ:8K?<I@E<6
9<8:?:FD9<I
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:?8DG@FE1?\eip:ffg\i#n_f_Xj[`\[X^\[.-
P\j Ef
K\ek_`e^jpfle\m\ibe\nXYflk%%%:XdYi`[^\ Wl||lA| HAk!S!ON
Just in case the royal couple need something to read,
here are a few facts about the ancient university city
of which they are now Duke and Duchess.
(%In 1996, Cambridge University Library became
one of the first places to ban mobile phones.
)%In 2001, Cambridge psychologists showed that
sheep can remember the faces of up to 50 other
sheep for at least two years.
*%Residents of Cambridge spend more per head
on takeaway meals than any other place in Britain.
+%In 1812, St John’s and Trinity Colleges in
Cambridge ordered that students appearing in hall
or chapel in pantaloons or trousers instead of
breeches should be considered as absent.
,%In 2009, Cambridge awarded an honorary MA
degree to city road sweeper Allan Brigham.
-%The award was not for 30 years of road-sweeping
but his work as a tour guide in his spare time.
.%The composer Johannes Brahms declined a
Cambridge degree as he had a fear of boats and
would have had to cross the Channel to collect it.
/%Trinity College, Cambridge has produced 32
Nobel Prize winners.
0%Dorothy Hodgkin in 1964 became the sole
female to win any of Cambridge’s 88 Nobel Prizes.
('%Until the 19th century, Cambridge dons were
not permitted to marry.
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|ro||. eiµress|ettersGeiµress.co.u| (|rc|u1e ]our o11ress or1 te|eµ|ore rur|er)
Victory123
48 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 49
:Y^iZYWn96K>9H=6C9
Z"bV^a/YVk^Y#h]VcY5ZmegZhh#Xd#j`
K^h^i8^in7jh^cZhheV\Zhdca^cZVi
lll#ZmegZhh#Xd#j`$X^in
IZa/%'%-+&',&+'
City&Business City&Business
Investors warm to materials firm Cookson
HENK POTTS, investment
analyst at Barclays
Wealth, shares his
knowledge. For further
information please see
www.stockbrokers.
barclays.co.uk
K?<@EM<JKD<EK8E8CPJK
advantages through its
dominant market position
and its focus on R&D and
product innovation in
markets slated for continued
growth. Given management’s
active efficiency drives
margins could be enhanced
even more.
Risks include any potential
slowdown in economic
growth, while rising input
costs (raw materials) can
also weigh on the group’s
earnings.
electronics and foundry
castings is also favourable.
Cookson stands to benefit
from the revival in capital
spending in its end-markets,
which have not yet recovered
from their pre-crisis levels of
2008.
Its exposure to emerging
markets is key, where fixed
asset investment has been
growing well in excess of GDP
growth – particularly in China.
Investors will also note
Cookson’s pricing power
exposure to emerging
markets.
The revenue growth outlook
for the sector in general
remains positive. The firm’s
ceramics business – which
accounts for about 70 per cent
of its operating profit – should
be supported as end-market
demand increases off the back
of a strong global outlook for
steel. The outlook for
operational performance and
enhance financial stability.
Investors may welcome
management’s announcement
of an 11.5p dividend, pointing
to a return towards a
progressive dividend policy.
Cookson has also pulled
though the recession in a
strong position by focusing on
products with higher margins
as well as an increased
GLOBAL materials science
firm Cookson operates in
more than 40 countries and
its core businesses are
ceramics, electronics and
precious metals.
In March Cookson reported
a strong set of annual results
where revenues and operating
profits came in at the top end
of expectations. Earlier this
year management had
presented a new set of
three-year strategic targets
which aimed to improve
BAE extends Falkands deal
THE dollar hit a 17-month
low against the euro in vola-
tile trading yesterday. US
shares also came under pres-
sure as an initial relief rally
following the death of Osama
Bin Laden fizzled out.
Hopes Bin Laden’s death
could reduce security risks
drove safe haven gold and sil-
ver prices lower in early trad-
ing, while oil fell sharply
before rallying as traders sug-
gested supplies could be hit
by retaliatory attacks.
Strong eurozone manufac-
turing data fuelled sugges-
tions that the European Cen-
tral Bank would keep raising
interest rates.
By contrast economists
expect the US Federal
Reserve to keep borrowing
costs low to help kick-start
the world’s biggest economy
as data showed the pace of
American manufacturing
growth slowed in April for a
second successive month.
This sent the single Euro-
pean currency 0.5 per cent
higher to $1.4876, after earlier
rising as high as $1.4902.
Meanwhile, the dollar fell to a
three-year low against a bas-
ket of major currencies.
The price of US oil futures
see-sawed between a near 3
per cent slide and 31-month
highs above $114.50.
Lawrence Eagles, global
head of commodities research
at JPMorgan Chase, said: “It
is unlikely that the oil indus-
try will see his death as mark-
ing a seminal shift in oil-
market security and arguably
there has been an incremen-
tal increase in security risks
in the short term.”
Dollar and
shares fall
on death of
Bin Laden
Interest reprieve for homeowners Cleaner Reckitt in pay dispute
Orders boost sparks
rebirth of confidence
9p;Xm`[J_Xe[
JkfZbDXib\kj<[`kfi
The contract tasks BAE with keeping HMS Clyde operational in the Falklands
UK firms’ confidence in Britain’s
economic prospects has rebounded
at its fastest rate for two years
as manufacturers respond to the
strongest pick-up in orders from
at home and abroad since the
mid-Nineties.
British business confidence
rose for the first time this year in
April, according to the Lloyds
Bank monthly snapshot baro-
meter, which claimed the positive
outlook for manufacturing would
help to offset the negative impact
on the North and Midlands from
public spending cuts.
In a separate report by the CBI,
manufacturers saw the volume of
orders from domestic and overseas
customers grow at the quickest
pace since 1995 in the three months
to April.
The business group said a higher
proportion of firms had responded
to another solid rise in output by
taking on extra staff than at any
time since January 1995 – the third
consecutive quarter increase –
although it warned that profit
margins were being squeezed by a
rapid rise in production costs.
Lucy Armstrong, chair of the
CBI’s SME (small and medium-
sized enterprise) Council, said:
“Smaller manufacturers are enjoy-
ing strong demand for goods at
home and abroad, underpinning
robust growth in production.
“Head count has increased for
the third consecutive quarter as
firms try to keep up with demand
and output is expected to rise
again in the coming months.
“However, inflationary pressures
remain a dark cloud, with rising oil
and commodity prices pushing up
the cost of production and eating
into profit margins. Manufacturers
have raised output prices rapidly
to cope and expect to continue
doing so over the next quarter.”
The CBI said that during the
quarter 39 per cent of more than
400 firms surveyed reported higher
domestic orders compared with
23 per cent suffering a drop. Export
orders were higher for 37 per cent,
while 14 per cent reported a decline
in volumes. Output is expected to
continue rising at a similar pace to
the past three months.
While plant capacity is seen by
many manufacturers as a possible
constraint on output over the
next three months, 10 per cent
of companies plan to spend more
on machinery and training.
The Lloyds Bank barometer
showed 54 per cent of businesses
were more optimistic about eco-
nomic prospects in April compared
with 45 per cent the previous
month, although it could take
months for these results to filter
through to official statistics and
second quarter economic growth
is expected to remain subdued.
Trevor Williams, chief economist
at Lloyds Bank Corporate Mar-
kets, said: “It is far too soon to say
that this is a new upward trend
but if sustained it would point to
an improvement in the economy in
the second half.
“Opportunities are there for
businesses with the right products
and prices to benefit from the
most positive business prospects
we’ve had for a year.”
DEFENCE giant BAE Systems has
secured a six-year contract extension
worth an estimated £60million to
provide maintenance support to the
Royal Navy’s Falklands protection ship
HMS Clyde.
The new arrangement to 2018 builds
on an existing five-year agreement,
which has kept the vessel ready for use
by the Navy more than 99 per cent of
the time. Since 2007, HMS Clyde has
carried out a protection role which
previously required two ships.
The UK company has an engineer
permanently based in the Falklands
working with local firms and the Navy
to enable the vessel to be serviced
without making an 8,000-mile trip back
to the UK.
Mick Ord, managing director of BAE’s
surface ships division, said: “This
provides real value to the Ministry of
Defence. Minimising return trips to the
UK and ensuring rapid defect
rectification helps to reduce costs and
deliver maximum availability of
warships to meet operational
commitments.”
CILLIT Bang and Dettol
group Reckitt Benckiser
(RB) is facing a pay revolt at
this Thursday’s annual meet-
ing after its remuneration
scheme came under fire from
corporate governance advi-
sory group Pirc.
Pirc argues that the £24bil-
l i on consumer products
giant’s incentive and per-
f or mance- bas ed s har e
scheme is not challenging
enough for directors and is
concerned that no absolute
limits apply to awards under
the l ong-term i ncenti ve
scheme.
Two years ago Bart Becht,
RB’s chief executive who
recently surprised the mar-
ket by announcing he would
retire in September, enjoyed
a £92million pay package
after cashing in incentive
shares. His £4million pay last
year was topped up by £14mil-
lion in performance shares.
Pirc has been a long-stand-
i ng cri ti c of Recki tt’ s
remuneration arrangements.
At last year’s AGM 16 per
cent of Reckitt shareholders
voted against its executive
pay report.
The Anglo-Dutch company
has delivered 600 per cent
returns to investors since its
creation in 1999.
HOMEOWNERS are set to
be given another reprieve
this week with policymakers
expected to keep interest
rates on hold at 0.5 per cent
following Britain’s lacklustre
economic performance in the
first quarter.
Experts believe the latest
set of gross domestic product
(GDP) figures – showing a
disappointing 0.5 per cent
rise between January and
March – have killed off any
chance of a rate hike in May.
Indeed Howard Archer,
chief economist at IHS Glo-
bal Insight, believes the odds
are against a hike in borrow-
ing costs happening before
November. He had previously
pencilled in August.
He said: “Latest growth
and inflation developments
appear to have killed off any
prospect of an interest rate
hike at the conclusion of the
Monetary Policy Commit-
tee’s meeting on Thursday.
“The MPC’s concern over
the underlying strength of
the UK economy and its abil-
ity to withstand the fiscal
squeeze that is increasingly
kicking in from the start of
April has likely been height-
ened by the muted rebound
in GDP growth in the first
quarter of 2011.”
Victory123
50 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
Walker has even taken some of IRC’s food with him to Everest
I=:6>BB6G@:I
Dominion targets oil
reserves in Tunisia
MALCOLM Walker, the founder
of frozen food retailer Iceland,
is looking to buy the owner of
Piccolino, Zinc and Bank bars
and restaurants.
He is part of a consortium,
W2D2, which has made a
£5.7million bid for Aim-listed
Individual Restaurant
Company at 9½p a share.
Members of the consortium
already hold 54 per cent of the
group and are looking to take
the company private.
IRC owns 33 restaurants in
Britain, but has struggled to
grow because of a lack of
financing. Raising funds from
existing shareholders would
prove expensive, so Walker
and his team believe it would
be better to recapitalise the
firm privately.
The IRC board has not
recommended the offer.
Chairman Robert Breare is
leaving it to investors to make
up their own minds in “light of
their own circumstances”.
The offer represents only an
11.8 per cent premium to the
undisturbed share price, IRC
stock has little liquidity and is
difficult to sell.
An IRC backer for five years,
Walker is such a fan he has
taken some of the firm’s food
on his trip to scale Everest.
BANKS take centre stage this
week, with investors keen to hear
the reaction of state-backed
lenders Lloyds and RBS to the
Independent Commi ssi on on
Banking (ICB) report.
¯

LLOYDS Banking Group –
which was told by the ICB that
the disposal of branches it agreed
with European regulators did not
go far enough and that it would
have to sell more – leads the first-
quarter updates on Thursday.
Currently 41 per cent owned by
the taxpayer, Lloyds gives little
financial detail in this update but
after staying in the black through-
out 2010 there are worries that its
margins may have come under
pressure.
It could face questions over the
impact of a worsening consumer
environment on debt losses as well
as the recent ruling on payment
protection insurance. Lloyds is the
most exposed of Britain’s banks to
miss-selling claims.
New boss Antonio Horta-Osorio
isn’t expected to update on his
strategy for the firm until June but
his plans will still be in the
spotlight, including reports that
he is preparing to sell Scottish
Widows for more than £5billion.
¯Ê
CURRENTLY 83 per cent
owned by the state, Royal Bank
of Scotland reports its first quar-
ter figures on Friday. It returned to
profitability in the fourth quarter,
as sharply lower bad debts offset
slower investment banking reve-
nues and the City will hope this
has continued into 2011.
RBS says it is on track with its
recovery plan, despite the
wider investment banking
slowdown and regula-
tory challenges ahead.
It has warned that
there will be “inevita-
ble” costs passed down
to customers and share-
hol de r s f r om t he
changes that have been
mooted by the ICB.
¯Ê
BRITAIN’S fourth big-
gest supermarket
chain, Morrisons,
posts first-quarter
figures on Thurs-
day. It is unlikely to
have avoided the consumer spend-
ing squeeze but should still reveal
a resilient performance.
Tesco reported a 0.7 per cent
drop in its fourth-quarter sales
while Sainsbury’s has already pre-
pared the market for a tough 2011.
But analysts expect Morrisons
to better the Tesco decline, and
same-store sales growth has
already been pencilled in.
The company’s Fuel Britannia
petrol offer is likely to have helped,
with added benefit from shoppers
trading down, giving the store’s
reputation for value a boost.

¯Ê
CLOTHES retailer Next,
led by chief executive
Simon Wolfson (pictured),
delivers a trading update for
the first three months of the
year tomorrow.
According to broker UBS it
is expected to report a 5 per
cent decline in same-store
sales amid the squeeze
on househol d
incomes from
the VAT rise
and soar-
ing input
costs. The City will also be looking
for an update on raw material costs
after the company warned its
ranges could be up to 10 per cent
more expensive this autumn and
winter as a result.
However, total sales, including
new retail space and online, should
show decent growth.
¯Ê
TOMORROW’S interim results
from software group Sage will
be watched for further news on a
sales revival under the leadership
of new boss Guy Berruyer.
The Newcastl e-based f i rm
returned to sales growth in the six
months to September as its target
market of small and medium sized
businesses began to get back on
track following the downturn.
It has al so mai ntai ned i ts
improved performance in the final
three months of 2010.
Analysts forecast that a continu-
ation of improved conditions will
have helped sales to grow by 2 per
cent to £733.8million over the
half-year.
Pre-tax profits are expected to
come in at £178million, up from
£177.5million a year earlier.
7G>:;>C</L::@6=:69
Concerns over Lloyds after PPI ruling
;DJG96NH
TODAY
INTERIMS: Aberdeen Asset
Management.
AGMs: F&C Asset Management.
WEDNESDAY
FINALS: Blacks Leisure.
INTERIMS: Avon Rubber, Numis Corp,
Sage, Spirent Comms.
TRADING UPDATES: JD
Wetherspoon, Legal & General, Next,
Standard Chartered.
AGMs: Aviva, BAE Systems, BBA
Aviation, CRH, Logica,
Moneysupermarket, Nichols,
Provident Financial, Rightmove,
Savills, Weir.
THURSDAY
FINALS: Rugby Estates, Vedanta.
INTERIMS: Smith & Nephew (Q1).
TRADING UPDATES: Aer Lingus,
Carphone Warehouse, Diageo, Flybe,
Go-Ahead, Lloyds Banking, Morrisons,
Rexam, St James’s Place, Thorntons.
AGMs: Aga Rangemaster, Amec,
Costain, James Fisher, GKN, GSK,
Johnson Service, Reckitt Benckiser,
Rio Tinto, Schroders, Standard
Chartered.
ECONOMY: Bank of England interest
rate decision.
FRIDAY
TRADING UPDATES: Rentokil Initial,
Royal Bank of Scotland.
AGMs: Admiral, Cobham, Forth Ports,
IMI, Laird, Millennium & Copthorne,
Psion, Rolls-Royce.
City&Business
9p;Xm`[:iX`b
OIL explorer Dominion Energy hopes
moving from the Plus market to Aim
will give it the financial firepower to
strike the black stuff in Tunisia.
Dominion, which announced its
withdrawal from Plus on April 6,
hopes to complete the move by
August. It is being advised by St
Helens Capital Partners.
The company holds two explo-
ration licences in Tunisia covering
more than 3,000 square miles, which
it says are near to several proven and
producing oil fields.
Executi ve chai rman Masoud
Alikhani, who holds the same post at
Berkeley Mineral Resources, said
cash raised in the float would be used
to complete seismic surveys. It is
hoped drilling will begin next year.
He said he was unable to give an
estimate of costs at the moment
because auditors were currently
looking at the situation.
However, Alikhani said: “The cost
of drilling will be much less than in
Algeria and Libya because the
reserves are not as deep down.”
He said he was confident about the
extent of the reserves, pointing out
that Tunisia produced 81,000 barrels
of oil a day in 2009 and China National
Petroleum Corporation and Petrofac
had shown interest in the area.
“It is not as big as Libya but it is a
good country for energy,” he said. It is
intended that gas from the fields will
be piped to Italy, while oil will be sold
mainly to local refineries.
He insisted recent political upheav-
als would not affect Dominion’s plans.
“It is a stable and quiet country now.
The people are happy,” Alikhani said.
Dominion is also eyeing entry into
Russia and is talking to companies
there about possible joint ventures.
N8CB<ID8I:?<JFE@I:N@K?™,%.D9@;
/lmx
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 51
McIlroy rise
proves he is
an idol threat
Picture: BRIAN SNYDER
1. Who scored two penalties for West Bromwich
Albion to give manager Roy Hodgson revenge
against his former employers at Liverpool?
2. Which Scottish golfer has become the
first European to win the Arnold Palmer
Invitational at Bay Hill?
3. Who scored his first goal for England in
the recent friendly against
Ghana?
4. Which horse won
the richest prize in
Turf history in the
Dubai World Cup?
5. What is the real first
name of former Canadian
heavyweight boxer
Razor Ruddock?
6. Which non-League
team knocked Newcastle United out of the
FA Cup in 1972?
7. Which horse did Walter Swinburn ride to
victory in the 1995 Derby?
8. Who was the only post-War British
winner of the Open Championship before
Tony Jacklin’s 1969 triumph?
9. Which German city hosted the World Athletics
Championships in 1993?
10. Which golf event first took place in
Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1927?
N:HI:G96N¼H8GDHHFJ>OHDAJI>DC
ACROSS: 1 Young. 2 Gooch. 5 Cruyff. 6 Funk.
10 Test. 11 Taylor. DOWN: 1 Yashin. 3 Hampden
Park. 4 Nordic. 5 Campese. 7 Kaymer. 8 Roeder.
9 Eight. SPORTSWORD: (Alan) SUNDERLAND.
Jhe £xpress 0rossqu|z |s e two·|a·oae che||eaçe to test
your sports |aow|edçe. kaswer eech quest|oa ead thea
erreaçe the |etters thet fe|| |a the sheded squeres |ato e
we||·|aowa sportsword or the suraeme of e femous
sport|aç persoae||ty. Jhe |est |etter of eech easwer w|||
be the f|rst |etter of the aext.
Jhe so|ut|oa w||| be pub||shed tomorrow, or ce||
0901 !8! 2581. 0e||s cost 11p per m|aute from 8J |ead||aes
p|us aetwor| extres. 0ther aetwor|s ead mob||es mey very.
1 0 T O T A C K L E A N S W E R S : 1 C h r i s B r u n t . 2 M a r t i n L a i r d .
3 A n d y C a r r o l l . 4 V i c t o i r e P i s a . 5 D o n o v a n .
6 H e r e f o r d U n i t e d . 7 L a m m t a r r a . 8 M a x F a u l k n e r
( i n 1 9 5 1 ) . 9 S t u t t g a r t . 1 0 R y d e r C u p .
R A T I N G S : 0 - 3 p o o r , 4 - 6 a v e r a g e , 7 - 9 g o o d , 1 0 w o r l d c l a s s .
Zijjhl`q
(
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ACROSS
1. Which snooker player won his
first ranking title at this year’s China
Open tournament? (5).
2. Name the athlete who won the
1955 BBC Sports Personality of the
Year award. (5).
6. Which Australia Test cricketer
scored 268 against Pakistan at
Melbourne in 1983? (6).
7. Who was Olympic middleweight
boxing champion in 1948 and
Olympic light-middleweight champion
in 1952 and 1956? (4).
10. Name the England rugby union
hooker from 1987 to 1995 who
wrote the autobiography Beware of
the Dog (5).
11. Which SFL Third Division side
play at Borough Briggs and are
managed by Ross Jack? (5).
DOWN
1. Which former Northern Ireland
defender is assistant manager of
Oldham? (7).
3. Where is Murrayfield
Stadium? (9).
4. Name Chelsea’s winner of
the 2005 PFA Player of the Year
award. (5).
5. Which is the first element of a
triple jump? (3).
6. Name the Trinidad & Tobago
striker who played for Aston Villa
from 1989 to 1998. (5)
8. Which ex-Bolton striker is
manager of the Finland team? (11).
9. Who scored Stoke’s 1972 League
Cup final winner? (7).
SPORTSWORD CLUE:
Spain World Cup-winning footballer.
!
4
6
9
2 3
5
8 1
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Sport
DAILY EXPRESS
°
LANCASHIRE’S
Walker Cup
contender Jack Senior
defeated the wind to
take the Lytham
Trophy at the weekend
by five shots. It was the
latest in a run of titles
for Senior, 22, that has
included the South of
England Open, the
New South Wales
Open, the Egyptian
Amateur Open and the
Hampshire Hog over
the past year.
D8IB@E>PFLI:8I;by NeiI Squires
8[[i\jjk_`jÊYX[ilc\Ë KM\p\Xg`eZ_f]JXck
TIME for the R &A to
jettison the nonsensical
rule which cost Webb
Simpson his first PGA
Tour victory in New
Orleans at the weekend.
Simpson lost out to
Bubba Watson in a
play-off after incurring a
one-stroke penalty on the
15th when the ball moved
as he was addressing it.
Why, when he was seeking
IT WILL be interesting to
see if Elliot Saltman is
elevated into a featured
TV group for his European
Tour return at the
Spanish Open this week.
Saltman, who served a
three-month suspension
for a serious breach of the
ball-marking rules at the
Russian Open last
September, would wish for
a quiet return. But such
no advantage, should he
be punished for something
beyond his control?
Simpson, who called the
penalty on himself, was
aggrieved and said: “I
better limit my comments
on that rule because I
think it’s such a bad one.
“When the wind or other
natural things affect the
golf ball, the player
shouldn’t be penalised .”
has been the notoriety of
his case that Sky Sports
would be forgiven leading
the scrutiny in how he
marks his ball .
“I wish to emphasise
again that I do not cheat,
have never cheated and
do not believe I have done
anything wrong,” said
Saltman, who conceded
he may receive a frosty
reception from fellow pros.
WnCZ^aHfj^gZh
K\\
FEK?<
T
HERE was a
significant move
yesterday in the
world rankings.
Not at the
top where Lee
Westwood still rules by
virtue of his outstanding
win in Korea, and
not by much –
the move in
question was
one place –
but its upshot
is that Rory
McIlroy is looking d o w n
on Tiger Woods for the first
time in his career.
The new world No6 goes into
his defence of the Wells Fargo
Championship at Quail Hollow
this week having swapped
positions with his boyhood idol.
McIlroy has made it past the
greatest golfer of this generation
at 22. It would be easy in the
whirlwind, globe-trotting life he
lives to overlook such points on
his career map but he should take
time out this week, think about
that fact and recognise what an
achievement that is.
Much has been made of the
young guns storming the golf
world – Rickie Fowler, Ryo
Ishikawa, Matteo Manassero –
but McIlroy is their standard-
bearer and the first to pass the
man they all idolised.
His Masters meltdown threw
up many questions which will not
be answered until he again finds
himself under the blowtorch with
nine holes of a Major to play. But
in the stampede to doubt him, it
should not be overlooked how far
he has travelled and how quickly.
He is barely out of adolescence.
Where Ernie Els and Luke Donald
have invested their millions in
wine production, McIlroy spent
his winnings from Augusta on a
state-of-the-art five-a-side football
pitch for the grounds of his home
back in Northern Ireland.
Yet when the force is with him
he can do things of which other
golfers are incapable. The six
straight threes with which he
capped a 10-under-par 62 to take
the title at Quail Hollow a year
ago ranks among the finest
rounds played anywhere by
anyone over the past decade.
No wonder he travelled back to
North Carolina yesterday with a
warm glow.
“I can’t wait to defend the title,
it’s one of my favourite courses in
the world,” said McIlroy.
“I’ll have great feelings
from last year and if I
can play half as well as I
did at the weekend I’ll
have a great chance. It would be
great to get my first win of the
year at Quail Hollow. My game is
in better shape going into the
event than it was last year.”
So too the body. The back
concerns of 12 months ago have
melted away as McIlroy has built
himself up into a more durable
athlete. When tested in Leeds last
week by the fitness guru he shares
with Westwood, Steve McGregor,
the results were impressive. He has
put on half a stone
in muscle since the
start of the year.
While McIlroy is
growing stronger,
Woods – and specifically his left
knee – is appearing ever more
frail. The medial cartilage injury
he suffered at Augusta and which
rules him out of Quail Hollow is
said by Woods to be “minor” – a
bulletin backed up by the fact he
hit shots in an exhibition in China
the week after The Masters.
But after four operations, the
shot joint is time-limited. Part of
the point of his swing changes
under Sean Foley is to take the
pressure off the knee.
If Woods is a fading force
physically, then as a golfer his
aura has dimmed too. The Woods
of today is not the Woods who
adorned McIlroy’s bedroom walls
a decade ago. When McIlroy dared
to state so publicly before last
year’s Ryder Cup and again earlier
this year, you would have thought
he had committed high treason.
He was merely being honest .
The truth was most of the
Europeans fancied taking on
Woods at Celtic Manor given the
way he was playing before the
event and his results since have
been those of a mere mortal rather
than a golfing superman.
In the light of McIlroy’s rise and
Woods’ struggles, the Ulsterman
may never have to look up to his
hero again.
TIGER
TAMER:
McIlroy
has moved
above
Woods for
first time
Victory123
52 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
RACING: RECESSION BUSTER TIPS 11-1 WINNER
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6 (c) 1c kLM0N0 8kkN0h£5 (!0) C | |oore 8·lc P Mc0oaa|d 68
1 (ì) 0£L£5JIkL 0kRN J We]res 8·lc ................... 0 0|bboas ~
5P f0k£0k5J: ll·4 |oorv|||e, l0·1 Storef|e|1 ||]er, 7·c C|o|sor, A|ror1
brorc|es, S lr1eµu|, lc Just |||e Heover, cS Ce|est|o| ùoWr.
20!0: 0a Jhe h|çh Jops 9·3, M featoa 5·! (J Jate), drawa (1), 9 raa.
2.40
fk££8£JJIN0.00.0k hkN0I0kP
£2,261 (5) !m 4f 93yds (!0)
! (c) 874S·1c hkIL JI8£kI05 (!3) ! Wo|for1 4 7·ì ........... 0 feat|maa „66
2 (ì) l1c14c· 80LLIN J00IJh (!85) ! |oster|] S 7·S ............. 0 k||aa 63
3 (S) |18|8/0 0kk £5 5kLkkM (24) b ||||sor ì 7·c ...........0 5w|ft(5) 65
4 (l) ì032·Lì h005J0N 0YNIM0 (24) (0) N k|c|or1s c 8·l1
P Mu|reaaaa 6!
5 (l0) 1444·Ll 0kPk8L£ 00£5J (!3) (0&0) C | |oore 7 8·l1
P Mc0oaa|d 62
6 (8) Sll8·0ì 0£kN Ikkkk0hJ (!3) (0) ||ss ! Woççott S 8·lc
k R|astoa 63
1 (7) 1ì080L· ¬ 8£N£kJh (!48) K k]or 4 8·ll ..........................P Ma||a 63
8 (4) ì/1·7c k0k055 Jh£ 5£k (8) C Hor|er 4 8·ll ......... 5 0e 5ousa 58
9 (c) 4|·Lc08 VkL0kN (2) (0,f) | borres ì 8·7 ................. P haaaçaa 65
!0 (1) l32·814 VkLkNJIN0 0Y5J£k (8) (0) b Hos|or 4 8·7
P 0oaaçhy(3) 60
J0N00£ 5JkkP: Nos. 2, 9 0h££k PI£0£5: No. 6.
5P f0k£0k5J: 1 Coµo||e Cuest, ì·c Ho|| !||er|us, 7·c bo|||r Ju1|t|, S Vo|ort|ro
O]ster, l0 ùeor lorroc|t, lc bereot|, l4 Across !|e Seo, lc Ot|ers.
20!0: Moarea|e 6·9·!, 0 fa|r|ey 1·! (0 P|pe), drawa (!!), !! raa.
3.!0
MkI0£N fILLI£5' 5Jkk£5
£2,261 (5) !m 2f 32yds (8)
! (c) |ì M0LkNNkk0h (8) K keve|e] S 7·7 .............. J ham||toa ~
2 (S) | P005I£ NkN5I£ (25) A C |oster 4 7·7 .........0 5w|ft(5) ~
3 (c) ìc 5ILV£k5 5PIkIJ (!3) K keve|e] S 7·7 ........... k 0u|haae 30
4 (ì) 6· kL£MkkkJIYk (!88) (J,5) ù | S|rcoc| 1 8·8 . J P 5peacer ~
5 (l) 8k00k 5Jkk | ùo1s 1 8·8 ...................................f Jy||c|| ~
6 (4) |||·9 Lk0Y 0f Jh£ kNI0hJ (14) H |cW||||ors 1 8·8
J P 5u|||vaa(3) ~
1 (8) 4c|· ¬ PkN00k0 0£ Lk00 (248) k |o|e] 1 8·8 .. P haaaçaa „58
8 (1) R00LkMkL00 (f) ! |oster|] 1 8·8 .................... 0 k||aa ~
0h££k PI£0£5: Nos. 2, 6.
5P f0k£0k5J: c |or1oro ùe |oço, 7·4 A|erorot|]o, l0·1 Woo|oro|oo, S broo|
Stor, c0 |o|orrorc|, cS S||vers Sµ|r|t, S0 |o1] Of !|e Kr|ç|t, |oos|e Nors|e.
20!0: kroafu| 3·8·8, L 0ettor| 3·!0 fav (M Jarv|s), drawa (!), 5 raa.
3.45
5P0kJP00L.00.0k hkN0I0kP
£2,261 (5) 1f (1)
! (S) 11lc·8 f££L Jh£ h£kJ (26) b Srort 4 7·ì ................... J £aves 65
2 (1) 44ccS7· RhI5P£k£0 JIM£5 (!98) (0&0) ||ss ! Woççott
4 7·S k R|astoa 66
3 (4) 4c5ì·!S ¬ £Zkk 0h0k0h (24) ! ù borror 4 7·4...... L Newmaa „68
4 (ì) 3!12!l fk£00£N0Y (!5) (0) K ùo|ç|e|s| 4 7·4 .........J faaa|aç 64
5 (c) 8cS00·L VIJ0 V0LJ£kkk (6!) (0) | Sr|t| 4 7·c .....5 Levey(5) 65
6 (l) cc/cSc·S Jk5J£ Jh£ VI0J0kY (!3) C SW|r|or| 4 7·0 ... P Mc0oaa|d 61
1 (c) l0!44·0 5kL£k05k (24) (0) |rs A ùuff|e|1 c 8·l1..P Mu|reaaaa 65
8LINk£k5: No. 4 0h££k PI£0£5: No. 1.
5P f0k£0k5J: S·c |re¢uerc], ll·4 |îro C|urc|, 4 !oste !|e V|ctor], c W||sµere1
!|res, 8 |ee| !|e Heot, l0 So|eroso, c0 V|to Vo|terro.
20!0: 0ame Lad 8·8·!3, 0 k||aa 3·! (J £asterby), drawa (8), 1 raa.
2.30
h580 MkI0£N k00JI0N 5Jkk£5 2Y0
£2,451 (0|ass 5) 5f !!yds (1 dec|ared)
! (1) c ¬ 5I0NIf£k (!8) (5) | C|orror 7·l ......... M har|ey(3)
„81
2 (ì) 8kJkN h£k0 | |vors 8·l1........................ 0athy 0aaaoa ~
3 (c) 8Lk0k80kN C Coi 8·l1............................................k k|rby ~
4 (4) 2 JhkJ'5 0kN0£k005 (28) k C|or|tor 8·l1...5 0rowae 49
5 (l) 5h00J f0k J0Y k Horror 8·8 .........................k huçhes ~
6 (S) ì 5J£k0Y Jh£ 80ff5 (!9) (f) H |o|rer 8·8 .... N 0a||aa 63
1 (c) S 0k£kM RhI5P£k£k (33) ù | ùov|s 8·c ........ 8 0ray(3) 68
5P f0k£0k5J: lS·8 S|çr|fer, ll·4 S|out |or Jo], 1 !|ot's ùorçerous, 8 b|oc||urr,
l0 bojor Hero, c0 ùreor W||sµerer, 11 Steo1] !|e buffs.
20!0: f|fth kve 8·8, 0 5weeaey 5·! Jtfav (J 0sborae), drawa (4), !5 raa.
3.00
8kJh 0hk0NI0L£ 5£LLIN0 5Jkk£5 2Y0
£!,684 (6) 5f !!yds (1)
! (4) 8 f00L50kP (22) J bo]|e 8·ll ........................ M 0av|es(3) ~
2 (l) 4 R0Lf0kN0 (1) k Horror 8·ll ............................k huçhes 52
3 (ì) Jk0I 0ZZI | |vors 8·c ............................................L Morr|s ~
4 (S) 7S1 ¬ MI00L£J0N fLY£k (!5) | |vors 8·c ..0athy 0aaaoa „64
5 (1) 1 MI55 M00k (8) | C|orror 8·c ................... 0 8|shop(1) 48
6 (c) 38 Mk5 M0P (!5) (f) k Horror 8·c .................k 0'Ne|||(5) 56
1 (c) L 5h£'5 k££L 005JY (3!) W C | !urrer 8·c J Payae(1) 5!
8LINk£k5: No. !.
5P f0k£0k5J: lS·8 Wo|fçorç, ll·4 ||11|etor ||]er, ll·c Joc| Uîî|, c |rs |oµ,
8 ||ss |uço, l4 S|e's kee| ùust], lc |oo|scoµ.
20!0: Joyous|y 8·6, k huçhes 1·2 (P £vaas), drawa (1), 1 raa.
3.30
8kJh J00kI5M PL05 hkN0I0kP
£!,684 (6) 5f !!yds (1)
! (l) 84Sc4ì· Jh£ NkM£ I5 fkkNk (!90) (0,0) | C|||or1 c 7·ì
0 5weeaey 51
2 (c) 3L441l ¬ kJhRkk8 (!0) (0,f) N Ou|r|or 4 7·c .. 0 8|shop(1)
„62
3 (c) cS10·1S 8kJ£L£0k (5) (0) | C|orror ì 7·S .......... M har|ey(3) 5!
4 (S) 58L4!! 5PI0 'N 5PkN (!3) (0) k Horr|s c 7·c ...............L Morr|s 56
5 (ì) ìL·16L8 LIJJL£ P£kI5h£k (2) (0) ||ss K Ceorçe 4 7·l ... 0 ho||aad 58
6 (1) !2440| kk0IkJ0k k00N£Y (5) (0&0) | |orr|s 8 8·lc .. k huçhes 54
1 (4) 05885c M£Jk0P0LIJkN 0hI£f (!4) | burço]re ì 8·8
0aa|e||e Mc0reery(5) 56
8LINk£k5: Nos. 4, 5 J0N00£ 5JkkP: No. !.
5P f0k£0k5J: ì·4 At|Woo|, S·c Sµ|c 'r Sµor, S |etroµo||tor C||ef, c bote|eur,
lc ko1|otor koore], lc !|e Nore ls |ror|, c0 ||tt|e |er|s|er.
20!0: Rest Lea|e 4·8·9, L kea|ry !6·! (P 8urçoyae), drawa (!!), !5 raa.
4.05
R£5J£kN 0kILY Pk£55 hkN0I0kP
£3,886 (4) 2m !f 34yds (3)
! (l) 4cì/S08· ¬ 8k00kM (J259) l W||||ors 7 7·S ................ I Moaçaa „18
2 (1) 1cl|!·4 N£V£k 0kN J£LL (!4) (f) J Os|orre 4 7·4
5oph|e 0oy|e(3) 13
3 (c) lS0lc·S 5k80kI00 (!5) (0&0) |rs A |errett S 7·c ...... P 0obbs 13
5P f0k£0k5J: S·4 So|or|1o, ì·4 Never Cor !e||, ll·4 bo11or.
:8KK<I@:BILB E<N:8JKC<8KI
98K?8KI
Corrertor|es · 070 ìl8l l0lc
kesu|ts · 070 ìl8l l0c4
Co||s cost ììµ µer r|rute fror o b! |or1||re
Corrertor|es · 070 ìl8l l0l1 kesu|ts · 070 ìl8l l0cl
Co||s cost ììµ µer r|rute fror o b! |or1||re
Corrertor|es · 070 ìl8l l0l4 kesu|ts · 070 ìl8l l0cc
Co||s cost ììµ µer r|rute fror o b! |or1||re
Jkk0k fk0J5: 00IN0: Coo1 to ||rr. |eft Hor1e1. J0P Jkk0k J00k£Y5 (2006·!!):
| Horoçor 1c Course W|rrers, l1ºStr||e rote, l W|rrers t||s seosor, ù A||or cì, l1º,
l, ! |oves cì, 7º, c, | |o||r cc, llº, 0, ! Hor||tor lì, 8º, c. J0P Jkk0k JkkIN£k5
(2006·!!): k |o|e] 1ì Course W|rrers, l4º Str||e rote, l W|rrers t||s seosor, !
|oster|] 1l, llº, 1, | ùo1s 10, lSº, c, C SW|r|or| cc, c0º, 0, | W |oster|] l8, 7º, l.
8LINk£k5 fIk5J JIM£: 1.l0 |o1] Of !|e Kr|ç|t (c|ee| µ|eces), |oos|e Nors|e (c|ee|
µ|eces), 4.4S |eor1r]s|o1oW (c|ee| µ|eces), Ar11orte (|||r|ers). 8£kJ£N
fkV00kIJ£5: c.40 Ho|| !||er|us(|cµ), Vo|ort|ro O]ster(|cµ). S.c0 A1or ùe
beou||eu(|cµ). 0kkR0kJk: |oWrur|ers |est or t|e stro|ç|t course |r soft or |eov]
çrour1. Sto||s !o1o]. Stro|ç|t Stor1s S|1e, kour1 lrs|1e. L0N0£5J JkkV£LL£k:
k|emarat|ya (1.l0) c4S r||es. 5Jk8L£ 5RIJ0h: 1.4S frequeacy fror C ùore to K
ùo|ç|e|s|. JkIf£0Jk: c.40, 1.l0, 4.lS, 4.4S, S.c0. Jk0kP0J: koces l·c.
Jkk0k fk0J5: 00IN0: ||rr. |eft Hor1e1. J0P Jkk0k J00k£Y5 (2006·!!): S
ùroWre cS Course W|rrers, lcºStr||e rote, 0 W|rrers t||s seosor, k Huç|es lì, l4º,
l, ù SWeere] lS, 8º, 0, J CroW|e] lS, l0º, 0, ù Ho||or1 l1, l8º, 0. J0P Jkk0k
JkkIN£k5 (2006·!!): | C|orror 1l Course W|rrers, l4ºStr||e rote, l W|rrers t||s
seosor, k Horror cc, lcº, l, | |vors lc, l0º, 0, k C|or|tor lS, c1º, 0, k Horr|s lc, ìº,
l. 8LINk£k5 fIk5J JIM£: 1.00 |oo|scoµ (|||r|ers), 1.10 ||tt|e |er|s|er (|||r|ers).
8£kJ£N fkV00kIJ£5: c.10 !|ot's ùorçerous. 4.0S bo11or. 4.1S Surset K|tt](|cµ).
S.l0 CroWr k|1çe(|cµ). 0kkR0kJk: |oWrur|ers ore fovoure1 |r roces uµ to o r||e.
Sto||s !o1o]. Sf & crlf Certre, lr lrs|1e. L0N0£5J JkkV£LL£k: 5teady Jhe 8uffs
(c.10), kthwaab (1.10), kreef (S.l0) lSS r||es. 5Jk8L£ 5RIJ0h: No Ouo||f|ers.
Jkk0k fk0J5: 00IN0: Coo1 to ||rr. |eft Hor1e1. J0P Jkk0k J00k£Y5 (2006·!!):
S ùe Souso 1ì Course W|rrers, c0º Str||e rote, l W|rrers t||s seosor, C |o|r|e] 1c,
l8º, 0, | Horoçor c7, l4º, 0, ù A||or c4, llº, 0, A N|c|o||s cl, lìº, 0. J0P Jkk0k
JkkIN£k5 (2006·!!): |Jo|rstor 1ì Course W|rrers, c4ºStr||e rote, 0 W|rrers t||s
seosor, ù N|c|o||s 11, l8º, 0, ! |oster|] 1l, llº, l, C SW|r|or| cì, lìº, l, K k]or c0,
l1º, l. 8LINk£k5 fIk5J JIM£: c.00 |us|co| Vo||e] (torçue stroµ). 8£kJ£N
fkV00kIJ£5: ì.10Ser1o||(|cµ |1|). 0kkR0kJk: |oWrur|ers |ove oro1vortoçe |r
roces uµ to sever fur|orçs. Sto||s !o1o]. ìf & crCertre, kero|r1er lrs|1e. L0N0£5J
JkkV£LL£k: Judas Jo (c.00) & 8ura|aç 5toae (8.00) c0S r||es. 5Jk8L£ 5RIJ0h:
ì.10 £adeavor fror| |orte|t| to |rs ù So]er, 5eada|| frorJ bet|e|| to C Crort. 8.00
8ura|aç 5toae fror A |o|re |r |rorce to ||ss Co] Ke||eWo].
:FDGLK<ID8E
2.!0 0h0I5kN (ab)
2.40 ha|| J|ber|us
3.!0 Paadoro 0e Laço
3.45 £zra 0hurch
4.!5 Louçh 0orr|b
4.45 P|cco|uc|
5.20 8ec|ermet
Jh£ 5000J: c.l0 C|o|sor c.40 Coµo||e Cuest 1.l0 |or1oro ùe |oço 1.4S
|îro C|urc| 4.lS A1||rçtor 4.4S koo1ee Oueer S.c0 keset !o ||t.
k0JJR£IL£k: c.l0 Storef|e|1 ||]er c.40 Coµo||e Cuest 1.l0 |or1oro ùe
|oço 1.4S |re¢uerc] 4.lS !oµ|s |||re 4.4S ||cco|uc| S.c0 bec|erret.
50N0kY £XPk£55: 1.l0 PkN00k0 0£ Lk00 (aap).
:FDGLK<ID8E
2.30 5I0NIf£k (treb|e)
3.00 M|dd|etoa f|yer
3.30 kJhRkk8 (aap)
4.05 8addam
4.35 Jap 0aace Ray
5.!0 0ut 0f Jhe 5torm
Jh£ 5000J: c.10 !|ot's ùorçerous 1.00 R0Lf0kN0 (aap) 1.10 At|Woo|
4.0S So|or|1o 4.1S JeWe||e1 S.l0 Areef.
500JIk: 1.00 Wo|fçorç (r|) 4.0S 5k80kI00 (aap).
k0JJR£IL£k: c.10 S|çr|fer 1.00 Wo|fçorç 1.10 At|Woo| 4.0S So|or|1o
4.1S So11|ers ber1 S.l0 Areef.
4.!5
5£N0kI0 00N5Jk00JI0N hkN0I0kP (5Jk) 3Y0
£2,261 (5) !m 3yds (9)
! (c) 11Sc·S k0LIN0J0N (!1) k |o|e] 7·ì .......................... P haaaçaa 51
2 (S) clì03|· kkLkkN 8kY (!82) J O'Keeffe 7·ì.............. P Mc0oaa|d 52
3 (ì) 4cl40·ì k£0IM£NJkL (!1) (0) |rs A ùuff|e|1 7·S .... 5 5aaders 56
4 (1) 3c11c·S 5k8kkJhk (9) ||ss | |errott 7·1 ................ J ham||toa 52
5 (4) 6444c·| fIMIk5 (21) C Hor|er 7·c ................................ 5 0e 5ousa 54
6 (8) Sc4l0·1 JkPI5 LI8k£ (!0) (0) | W |oster|] 7·c ..J P 5u|||vaa(3) 52
1 (l) S470·7 0££P kPPLk05£ (21) (f) | ùo1s 7·l ................ J £aves 56
8 (7) 48cc· P0kkk8 (221) J Co|1|e 8·l0 ............................... k Mu||ea 53
9 (c) 653LS2 ¬ L000h 00kkI8 (!8) K k]or 8·ì ........... P Mu|reaaaa „58
0h££k PI£0£5: No. 9.
5P f0k£0k5J: 1 !oµ|s |||re, l0·1 A1||rçtor, 4 |ouç| Corr||, l1·c keç|rerto|,
ì So|rot|o, l4 |ur|o|, lc ùeeµ Aµµ|ouse, Ko||or bo], ||r|os.
20!0: M|çhty 0|arets 9·3, Lee Jop||ss(1) 3·! (k fahey), drawa (2), 9 raa.
4.45
5JP 00N5Jk00JI0N hkN0I0kP 3Y0
£2,261 (5) 6f (!!)
! (S) 4l424·ì 8kkV£ 0k£kM (25) (0,f) K k]or 7·ì ............... J £aves 55
2 (1) lc·L4 5£k0£kNJ 50ZI£ (25) | ùo1s 7·ì .............5 8 ke||y(1) 51
3 (l) S||c·3! k000££ 00££N (!8) (0) | |orr|s 7·4 ..........5 J 0ra|ae 55
4 (l0) ì451·3c ¬ PI000L00k (!3) |rs ù Sor1ersor 7·c ....L 8etts(5)
„60
5 (4) cì|!!·4 PIJkIN (!3) | W |oster|] 7·l ...................... P Mu|reaaaa 55
6 (7) l06lL·ì 000NJkY RkLJZ (9) (0) ||ss | |errott 7·0..f Jy||c|| 53
1 (ll) 1cSS·ìì kN00kNJ£ (!5) ! |oster|] 8·l1 ........................... 0 k||aa 56
8 (c) 1cc4|·S 5kX0N£JJ£ (!0) (0) ||ss | |errott 8·ll .......8 Mchuçh 58
9 (ì) 4ì0L·|l M£kN0MY5hk00R (!9) A broWr 8·ll ........ 5 0e 5ousa 52
!0 (c) 4S|1c·1 k0MkN k0L£k (!3) C |o|r|urst 8·8 ...............J faaa|aç 51
!! (8) 1SSì·84 8kkk5J0N k5h (!5) | A|stor 8·ì ............... 0 feat|maa 51
8LINk£k5: No. 1 0h££k PI£0£5: No. 9.
5P f0k£0k5J: 4 ||cco|uc|, 7·c ||t||r, l1·c koror ku|er, ì koo1ee Oueer,
8 |eor1r]s|o1oW, brove ùreor, l0 Serçeort Suî|e, lc Soiorette, l4 Ot|ers.
20!0: Rh|spered J|mes 8·6, k harr|soa(3) 9·4 fav (M|ss J Raççott), drawa
(9), !! raa.
5.20
Lk JkXI5 hkN0I0kP
£!,6!9 (6) 1f (!6)
! (l0) 8S·ì 0kIV£ h0M£ (34) N W||sor 4 7·ì ................... L Newmaa 49
2 (lc) 6163!5· k0kM 0£ 8£k0LI£0 (!31) (0) b Hos|or 4 7·c
P Mc0oaa|d 54
3 (lc) 2·52435 08£Nk0k (49) (0) | Herr|rçtor c 7·c ........ k 0u|haae 49
4 (1) cSì·542 00NVIN0£ (68) (0) K |rer1erçost l0 7·1
k hefferaaa(3) 53
5 (c) 400· k£5£J J0 fIJ (200) | A|stor 4 7·c............... k R|astoa 48
6 (l) 3503·07 8khkMIkN kI0 (!0) (0) A C |oster c 7·c
L Jop||ss(5) 53
1 (S) |·4515c ¬ 8£0k£kM£J (6) |rs k Corr 7 7·l ...........5 8 ke||y(1)
„56
8 (l4) Sìc7ì·0 0hhkMkkN (46) (0&0) |rs k Corr c 7·0
J P 5u|||vaa(3) 55
9 (l1) 8S/5 Mk5 £ (22) | W |oster|] 4 7·0 ................. P Mu|reaaaa 48
!0 (4) |cS0·9ì J0M8£LLINI (!1) ù N|c|o||s 4 8·l1.................... k Mu||ea 53
!! (8) c1ìc7·8 8k00J0N£ PkPk 0I0 (25) K keve|e] 4 8·l0.. f Jy||c|| 50
!2 (ll) 01·7 00 PL£55I5 (!5) b ||||sor 4 8·l0 ................... 0 Judhope 55
!3 (7) 44·1555 0kkNIVkL 0k£kM (61) H |cW||||ors c 8·ì .... J £aves 53
!4 (ì) cSìì8·| 5h0NkkRkkhkN (32) (0) ||ss | |errott 8 8·ì
8 Mchuçh 50
!5 (c) |0/7888· 8kLkN0£ 0N JIM£ (!85) ||ss | |errott S 8·ì .. J faaa|aç 49
!6 (lS) 17|0/|| 0L£N0kIkN 5Jkk (8) (0) | Wotsor l0 8·ì
ke||y harr|soa ~
8LINk£k5: No. 8 VI50k: No. 6 J0N00£ 5JkkP: No. 2 0h££k PI£0£5: No. !4.
5P f0k£0k5J: 7·c bec|erret, S Corv|rce, lS·c Corr|vo| ùreor, 8 A1or ùe
20!0: 0a|||sto Mooa 6·9·!2, 0 ho||aad 9·4 fav (k 0urt|s), drawa (3), 6 raa.
4.35
200 Y£kk5 kJ LkN500RN fILLI£5' hkN0I0kP
£2,33! (5) !m 5yds (6)
! (1) 25!·423 50N5£J kIJJY (!9) W k SW|r|urr 4 7·ì ............k k|rby 64
2 (4) 1Sìcl1· JkP 0kN0£ RkY (202) (0&0) | C|or|rçs 4 7·4
J 0row|ey „68
3 (c) 1c0·6ìc ¬ 0k RINJkIN0hkM (!4) (0) ||ss K Ceorçe S 7·4
0 ho||aad 66
4 (S) !2·242! 5k00L£k5 8£N0 (!9) C bo|er S 7·4 ......... M 0av|es(3) 65
5 (c) lc1S|·c J£R£LL£0 (22) (0&0) |o1] Herr|es S 7·1 ...k huçhes 65
6 (l) 12!43·1 00MM£k0£ (!!8) S ùoW 4 8·l1............................ N 0a||aa 64
5P f0k£0k5J: 7·4 So11|ers ber1, S·c Surset K|tt], 4 ùr W|rtr|rç|or,
lS·c Correrce, 8 !oµ ùorce Wo], JeWe||e1.
20!0: Very Re|| ked 1·9·2, R 0arsoa(3) 8·! (P h|att), drawa (1), !! raa.
5.!0
8kJh k88£Y hkN0I0kP 3Y0
£!,684 (6) !m 5yds (8)
! (1) l·c31c8 ¬ 0k0RN kI00£ (!3) | C|orror 7·ì ....... 0 8|shop(1) 4!
2 (ì) S844|·1 5kkkN000 (!4) | Sour1ers 7·S ..............J McLauçh||a 42
3 (c) 4155·05 00J 0f Jh£ 5J0kM (35) S ùoW 7·S ................. N 0a||aa „41
4 (4) 0S11·c fIk£ 0kY5JkL (8) | C|orror 7·l .............. M har|ey(3) 45
5 (8) c1104L· 0hILR0kJh Lk55 (!60) | C|orror 8·l1. 5 h|tchcott 44
6 (S) 15·L kk££f (2!) | be|| 8·l1................................hay|ey Juraer 4!
1 (l) L9L50 8£LLk800L00 (8) ù ||r1er 8·7 ....................0 5weeaey 42
8 (c) LLLL·L 5Jk££J 0k£0 (1) | burço]re 8·ì ...............k Mc0arthy ~
8LINk£k5: No. 1 J0N00£ 5JkkP: No. 8.
5P f0k£0k5J: S·c CroWr k|1çe, 1 Out Of !|e Storr, Areef, S ||re Cr]sto|,
0kkYf0k0
c.08 Certro| ùo|s] (S·c·4) c.cì Noo|s
Co|ur|o (c·1·l) c.4ì ùrooµ]s k|c|or1 (c·c·
4) 1.0ì ùroro|er |eçor (S·c·1) 1.c8
|oW||or |ercur] (l·c·S) 1.48 Cor|o||]
bour1 (4·c·S) 4.08 |oµµ] kose (c·l·S) 4.cì
Noo|s C|ore|eor (S·l·1) 4.4ì |or1s|ur]
Street (Noµ) (c·c·l) S.0ì lrç|e|] |r|rcess
(4·c·1) S.cc Ke] ||ier (4·c·c) S.18 C|ero
!|ro (S·4·c) S.Sc kouç| lrµoct (S·1·c) c.ll
S|or|o||o |o| (S·l·4).
N0JJIN0hkM
ll.01 Ke||s|oro JeWe| (1·4·S) ll.l7 |||||e
|oors||re (4·1·S) ll.14 SW|ft A1e| (4·l·c)
ll.48 Surs||re ùove (l·4·c) lc.04 |o|u|ous
Croc|e (Noµ) (c·4·l) lc.l8 So|ocres |uc]
(4·S·1) lc.1c Coµ|o |ojor (c·l·c) lc.4ì b|ue
||ore (c·1·l) l.04 ùou||e kef|ei (l·S·4) l.l7
So|ocres C|over (4·l·S) l.11 koc| lt C|or||e
(l·S·c) l.Sl So|ocres but|er (S·l·c).
P£kkY 8kkk
ll.ll |os] |o|1 (S·c·l) ll.c8 beor|over
N|or| (c·1·4) ll.4c Sµortsror ko] (Noµ)
(4·l·c) ll.Sì b|||]s bu11] (1·c·l) lc.lc
HoW|srest As| (l·S·1) lc.cì Ascot |ort]
(c·S·1) lc.4c lceror Joss (4·1·c) lc.S8
|eero|o N|ro (S·1·l) l.lc |o|t|fu| |oç|e
(c·c·S) l.cì bo|er !ess (c·1·l) l.44 !|e
|eocerorçer (4·c·S) l.S8 bo||]roc k]or
(1·S·c).
50N0£kLkN0
c.l8 ù|stort |]st|c (S·1·l) c.1ì Nort| bruor
(c·S·4) c.Sì ||sro|ov|| K|rç (4·S·1) 1.lì
ù||tor Jerr] (c·c·1) 1.18 Surr|1çe C|orce
(1·c·l) 1.S8 ||rtor |o1] buç (l·c·S) 4.l8
|oW1]r|ssc|oW1] (4·c·l) 4.1ì Srooî]s
|re]o (S·c·c) 4.Sì Cos|er Koro|ero (c·l·S)
S.lì Sµ|r|t|||| Cer (c·1·4) S.11 Auturr
lce|or1 (4·l·S) S.4ì S|or|o||] Sµor| (Noµ)
(c·S·c) c.04 b|ue Scout (1·4·l) c.l8 Neor|]
Certo|r (c·c·l).
k£50LJ5
5RIN00N: !!.00 0orr|a Jouch ì·c (c·S·1
bACS | Lcc.cl !C L8ì.1l). ll.lc bo]s|1e b|r1
c·lf (1·c·4 L8.l0 !C Lcì.Sì). ll.1l broo|er1
Horr|er ì·c (1·4·c Ll7.8c !C Lcì.lc). ll.44
C|os|rç ||rotes S·cjf (l·4·c Ll1.40 !C
Lc7.cc). ll.S8 |u|ssorce S·cf (4·c·S Ll1.Sc
!C LS4.4c). lc.lì |o|er|co ll·4f (1·l·4 LlS.lS
!C L17.c7). lc.11 SroW] N|ç|t c·l (c·l·c
L1ì.8c !C Ll1S.14). lc.4ì Kev|rsfort |o|
c·lf (c·c·4 Ll1.lc !C L14.14). l.04 lr|s|oWer
Ace 1·l (S·c·l Lll.cì !C Lc7.c0). l.l7
borr]jo|rs C|r| 1·l (c·4·c LcS.cl !C Lìl.01).
l.11 Sµr|rç|oWr Joc|o S·l (l·c·c Lc4.1S !C
L71.S8). l.47 |rec|ous HoW| ì·c (S·c·1
Ll8.0ì !C Lìl.77). ||ocer Ll sto|e (koces
l·c) Lì1.40, (koces ì·lc) L408.00.
M0NM0k£: !!.01 Icemaa 8u||et 8·l (S·c·
c L4l.ì8 !C Lll1.ìc). ll.c1 |o|r bour1 S·c
(c·1·c Ll0.l7 !C L17.0S). ll.1ì |oµµer|e]
|or| S·l (4·1·S Lc1.10 !C L8c.cc). ll.Sl
H|||s|1e bor1|t 7·4f (c·l·S Ll1.84 !C
L1c.cc). lc.08 C|or|ost ||c|oe| S·c (c·c·l
LlS.77 !C LSì.40). lc.c4 Horest Ouo||t] c·l
(1·4·c Lcl.4l !C LSc.18). lc.17 C|o]tor
|o1] S·l (c·l·4 Lc0.48 !C L40.0c). lc.Sì
Se|ecto lce 4·l (ùH 1r1 l·4·S Llc.ì8 !C
L1l.ìl l·4·c !C L1l.ìl). l.ll !or|tei ì·l (1·S·c
L11.lc !C L80.14). l.cì |oWrs |orture c·l
(S·c·1 LSl.7ì !C L7ì.c1). l.44 Jurct|or !Wo
1·l (c·c·S Ll1.44 !C L1S.ìc). l.S8 !reoc|e
|iµress c·l (c·c·S L1c.c8 !C Lì7.c7).
||ocer Ll sto|e (koces l·c) LlS4.00, (koces
ì·lc) Lccc.00.
hkLL 0k££N: 2.!8 0ape 5car 4·l (c·l·1
Lc4.Sì !C Lll0.l8). c.1ì |]rr |or|e 1·l (c·1·
c Ll1.ll !C L4l.40) Nk !S res ror. c.Sì
Co|îoç|e Co|e S·4f (4·c·S Lll.c1 !C L1l.11).
1.lì |oççorrore Joc| ì·c (c·S·4 LlS.S4 !C
L4ì.S4). 1.18 Corµoss b|ossor 7·4f (l·c·c
L7.8S !C L1l.cl). 1.S8 kuestor 4·l (c·c·1
Lc7.ìl !C Llc7.c0). 4.l8 Westreot| SW|ft
ì·c (4·1·S Llc.7c !C L48.c0). 4.1ì Corµoss
!uc|er 1·l (1·c·l Ll0.c8 !C L1ì.8l). 4.Sì
Westreo1 So||o S·cf (1·l·c Lll.l0 !C
L1ì.ìc). S.lì Suµrere Corror c·4f (S·c·c
L7.c1 !C Lcì.1S). S.11 Westv|eW |oµµ] ll·4
(S·l·1 Lc8.8ì !C Ll0c.cS) Nk !l res ror.
S.4ì bo1e|| Jores 4·l (c·4·c Llc.18 !C
L1S.4c). c.04 Avors|1e Kr|ç|t 1·ljf (c·4·S
Ll4.lc !C L17.88). c.l8 !|ctoc C|||| 4·l (4·c·1
Lc0.cì !C LS0.0c). ||ocer Ll sto|e (koces
l·c) Ll41.00, (koces 7·l4) Lìc.c0.
0k£Yh00N05
:CF:BN@J<;FL9C<
PI000L00k (4.45 Newcast|e) aad 8£0k£kM£J (5.20 Newcast|e).
JkkIN£k5 (|ost l0 1o]s) ù kees ìSº (c W|rs
or1 l µ|oces fror 4 rurrers), | S|er|1or ìSº
(c/l/4), | C|or|rçs ìSº (l/c/4), l W||||ors
cìº (l/1/c), J | !urrer cìº (1/l/c), J W
|u|||rs cìº (l/1/c), | Sour1ers cìº (l/1/c).
J00k£Y5 A N|c|o||s c7º (1 W|rs or1 8
µ|oces fror lc rurrers), J ùer|or ccº
(c/1/8), k K|||oror c0º (l/c/S), k ||tî|otr|c|
Sìº (l/1/ì), k |||rt Sìº (c/c/ì), |ee !oµ||ss
Scº (c/1/7), J | Sµercer S4º (c/S/l1)
JkkIN£k5 (kurrers s|rce |ost W|r) | Wotsor
lì8, ù !|orµsor 8S, A berr] cl, ||ss |
b|oc|for1 c0, ||ss | |errott S8, A C |oster Sl,
ù | Surrers|] 17, ù bourtor 1c, J |orvert
14, |rs A ùuff|e|1 11, |rs ù Sor1ersor 1c.
J00k£Y5 (k|1es s|rce o W|r) A Cre|ç|tor 87,
A |cCort|] ìS, |r | C No|or S4, |r ù
Surrers|] 4ì, ù |cCreer] 1l, | |ot|ers c8,
C !ure|t] c8, C !|rrors c4, b Cro] c1, l
|orçor cl, ù |rç|or1 cl, ù SWeere] c0.
8est kaces for favour|tes:
|/| S.S0. SSº, 8.10. SSº, C!! c.00. S0º,
|KN 1.SS. 4Sº, |KN 4.cS. 4Sº, |KN c.c0. 1Sº.
8est kaces for 0uts|ders:
No ¢uo||f|ers.
8est kaces for Jra|aers:
NCS 4.4S. ! |oster|] (1 |r lS), NCS 4.lS. k
|o|e] (c |r ì), |KN 4.cS. J | !urrer (8 |r c0)
8est kaces for Joc|eys:
C!! c.10. | Horoçor (c |r 1), NCS 4.4S
8|ççest rat|açs drop:
bA! 1.10. bote|eur (Wor off c4, roW S7),
C!! 8.10. |or1uro| (8c/c7),
C!! ì.10. U|t|rote Ouest (cc/SS),
|/| c.S0. be|ero]r (ll4/l0c),
|/| c.S0. Nesroos (l04/7c).
|KN c.S0. buo||teo|r (70/8ì).
NCS S.c0. bo|or|or K|1 (c8/SS),
NCS c.40. Vo|1or (c8/S8).
VIJkL 5JkJI5JI05
I<:<JJ@FE9LJK<I
C8;9IFB<JËk`gg`e^Z_Xdg`fe#GXki`ZbN\Xm\i#
]fle[(($(ZiXZb\iD\dg_`jDXeXkN`e[jfip\jk\i[Xp%
0906 130 !111
0a||s cost £! per m|aute from a 8J phoae ||ae. 0a ||ae from 9.30am
‰
:FDGLK<ID8E
6.00 Mebsuta
6.30 ke|at|ve 5treaçth
1.00 Mastersh|p
1.30 8aadaaamaa
8.00 5t||ettoes|athemud
8.30 Patch Patch
Jh£ 5000J: c.00 |e|suto c.10 !|e W||c| ùoctor ì.00 |roçro| ì.10
bor1ororor 8.00 burr|rç Store 8.10 |or1uro|.
k0JJR£IL£k: c.00 ||ss kos|e c.10 ke|ot|ve Strerçt| ì.00 K|or1o¢ ì.10
bor1ororor 8.00 |eror Oueer 8.10 Sµ|r|t of Cor|stor.
Get your banker bets from the premier
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Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 53
RACING: AUSSIE STAR MAKES IMPRESSIVE START
Grand National
three after Cup
APPEAL:
Donald
McCain
8er|sh|re: 5I0NIfI£k (c.10 bot|) H|s
NeW|ur] secor1 to |oç|c C|t] Wos rot
eioct|] fror|e1 |] t|e W|rrer |ost Wee|, |ut
|e st||| sets t|e stor1or1 |r W|ot s|ou|1 |e
or |rforrot|ve offo|r.
Ra|es: fk££ J0 kIk (c.S0 |o|er|or) Or|]
just suµµ|ererte1 o ||urµtor success ot
|ortWe|| |ost Wee|, |ut os t|ot Wos ||s hrst
W|r over ferces, t|ere s|ou|1 |e rore to
core.
Newmar|et: kL£MkkkJIYk (1.l0NeWcost|e)
ù|1r't |roW too ruc| o|out t|e çore or
|er Kerµtor 1e|ut |ut s|e ottrocte1
suµµort |efore|or1 or1 |etter |s
ort|c|µote1 to1o].
North: MkN00kkh (8.10 Cotter|c|) brouç|t
o |orrer sµe|| to or er1 W|t| o 1eterr|re1
1|sµ|o] ot k|µor |ost t|re or1 |e |s |our1 to
to|e sore µeçç|rç |oc| orce rore.
0kLL0P5
ʬ 00NN£0JI0N5 of |ead|aç Iavestec
0erby coateader Ror|d 0om|aat|oa
have |ssued a wara|aç ahead of h|s
p|aaaed appearaace |a the 0aate
5ta|es at Yor| oa May !2.
Rh||e |t |s st||| the p|aa to rua, Jeddy
0r|mthorpe, rac|aç maaaçer to owaer
kha||d kbdu||ah, |s |eea to stress
that a m|aor setbac| meaas the co|t
may aot be at h|s best.
"Ror|d 0om|aat|oa has had a bru|se
oa h|s foot, as heary 0ec||, h|s
tra|aer, meat|oaed at the wee|ead,"
sa|d 0r|mthorpe."It has beea treated
but he's m|ssed a p|ece of wor|.
"Re w||| st||| ço to the 0aate but
obv|ous|y he |s |||e|y to aeed that
rua. Jhe 0erby |s st||| |a the p|aa but
heary [ust waated to ma|e peop|e
aware."
8£V£kL£Y: 0ood to f|rm
2.20~0kkVkJ (S ùe Souso, ll·c) l, Suµerµ|ei
(l0·1 cr1 fov) c, !|ç|t ||µµe1 (c·l) 1. 8 ror.
1
/4|,
c
l
/4|. (| Jo|rstor, 1·l fov |oster bor1). !ote.
LS.70, µ| Lc.c0, Ll.l0, Ll.c0. eiocto. LlS.40. CS|.
Lc1.7c. Nor·rurrer. bec|s|es.
2.50~kN0Jh£k RI5£ kI0 (| |ertor, l1·c) l,
k|o| (8·l) c, S|esostor (ì·c jt fov) 1. H'coµ ll ror.
1
/4|, |1. (| ||1ç|e], ì·c jtfov |e|o1|îe). !ote.
L8.00, µ| Lc.c0, Ll.70, Lc.l0. eiocto. L40.l0. tr|·
cost. Lclc.c8. CS|. LSS.c1.
3.20~0kN0£k£k (| Horoçor, 4·l jt fov) l,
/oµ|orot|or (7·c) c, |r|rce Aµo||o (4·l jt fov) 1.
H'coµ 7 ror. r|, l
1
/4|. (k |o|e]). !ote. L1.10, µ|
Ll.l0, Ll.80, Lc.l0. eiocto. Lcl.00. tr|cost. Lì4.ì8.
CS|. Lcl.1ì. Nk. So boîoor, Ur1erstor].
3.50~00N0 Z0k (J | Su|||vor, 1·l fov) l,
ùoctor /||voço (7·c cr1 fov) c, |||jo| |eµµer
(l1·c) 1. H'coµ 7 ror. l
1
/4|, r|. (|rs k Corr). !ote.
L1.40, µ| Ll.10, Lc.c0, Lc.l0. eiocto. Lcl.ì0. tr|·
cost. Lì7.cS. CS|. Llc.01.
4.20~MY 0k0h0 (A N|c|o||s, 7·c) l,
Hor1sore |o|cor (lS·c) c, |oWerfu| ||erre (7·l)
1. H'coµ ì ror.
1
/4|,
1
/4|. (ù N|c|o||s, 1·l fov V|o|ert
Ve|oc|t]). !ote. L4.c0, µ| Lc.10, LS.c0. eiocto.
L47.70. CS|. L1c.11.
4.50~00kX (S ùe Souso, ì·c fov) l,
A|ersçrove (c0·l) c, Vo|eo S| Vo|es (S·l cr1 fov) 1.
H'coµ ll ror. r|, |1. (| Jo|rstor). !ote. LS.40, µ|
Ll.10, Lc.c0, Lc.40. eiocto. Ll04.80. tr|cost.
L1cS.S4. CS|. L8l.8c. Nk. A||1|o||1u|o|.
P|acepot: £!!2.30. 0uadpot: £30.30.
0h£P5J0R: 0ood to f|rm
2.!5~80k (ù |ro|ert, ì·c fov) l, |orju K|rç
(lc·l) c, kojroçor (l4·l) 1. H'coµ l1 ror. s|1, l
l
/c|.
(k Ho|||rs|eo1). !ote. L4.10, µ| Ll.ì0, L1.80,
LS.40. eiocto. L4S.ì0. tr|cost. LS1l.c4. CS|.
L4S.c1. Nor·rurrers. Court W|rç, !|rocroc].
2.45~00L0 MIN£ (ù |ro|ert, ll·c) l, breîîo
ù| |ore (4·l cr1 fov) c, ùeceµt|ve (7·c) 1. 7 ror.
1
/4|, c|. (A bo|1|rç, ì·c fov Nuîoo|). !ote. L8.c0, µ|
Lc.40, Lc.00, Lc.c0. eiocto. L11.S0. CS|. Lc8.ì1.
3.!5~R000£N kIN0 (! |c|ouç|||r, 7·c cr1
fov) l, |otterofoct (lc·l) c, !r|µ|e ùreor (lc·l) 1.
H'coµ l0 ror. s|1,
l
/c|. (| Sour1ers, l0·1 fov ||rst
lr Corror1). !ote. LS.S0, µ| Ll.l0, LS.10, L4.40.
eiocto. L48.10. tr|cost. L8c0.78. CS|. Lìl.cl.
Nor·rurrer. !|e Jo||er.
3.45~5R£N0k8 (k |oWe||, l4·l) l, S|es
kos|e (l4·l) c, St OsWo|1 (lS·8 fov) 1. H'coµ l4 ror.
r|,
1
/4|. (J C O'S|eo). !ote. LcS.S0, µ| Ll.80, LS.c0,
LS.10. eiocto. Lc00.80. tr|cost. LSS1.ìc. CS|.
Ll81.ìì.
4.!5~MkLI0£ 0k MI50hI£f (ù |ro|ert, ì·c)
l, S|eWo||s|r|eout] (4·l) c, Creot S|ot (c·l fov) 1.
H'coµ S ror. c
l
/4|, rs. (A Corro||). !ote. L1.10, µ|
Ll.10, L1.40. eiocto. Lll.c0. CS|. Llì.07.
4.45~8I0k8L£ (ù Corror, 8·l) l, Vo|r|ro
(7·l) c, Arçe|ero bo||er|ro (ll·c) 1. H'coµ ll ror.
l
l
/4|,
1
/4|. (b |o|||rç, ì·c fov \ou've beer |oWe1).
!ote. Ll0.l0, µ| Lc.ì0, L1.c0, Lc.l0. eiocto.
L8ì.80. tr|cost. L44l.cì. CS|. Lì8.S0.
P|acepot: £626.00. 0uadpot: £92.30
k£MPJ0N: 5taadard
2.00~k00IkJ (ùKerr], 4·l fov) l, |ourtrot|
(l4·l) c, V|s|ors Of Jo|orro (l1·c) 1. H'coµ ll ror.
l
/c|, r|. (| J Scu1orore). !ote. LS.c0, µ| Ll.80,
Lì.c0, L1.00. eiocto. L7c.00. tr|cost. L1S8.l1.
CS|. Lc0.c0. Nor·rurrers. K|oteer, |eor
|oc||re, !|ur1er|rç Hore.
2.30~800M£kkN0 808 (S Sor1ers, ì·l) l,
ke1 Soc|s (ì·l) c, Coµµer |o||s (1·l jt fov) 1. 8 ror.
l
l
/4|, c|. (J H|||s, 1·l jtfov ||ro|). !ote. LS.70, µ|
Ll.40, Lc.S0, Ll.40. eiocto. Lì1.00. CS|. LSc.01.
Nor·rurrer. Corµtor S|utt|e.
3.00~00kLIJY kkJ (k | |oore, c·l fov) l,
SW|ss ùreor (ì·l) c, |o|r Vo|ue (ì·c cr1 fov) 1.
H'coµ ì ror. 4|, l
l
/c|. (C | |oore). !ote. L1.c0, µ|
L4.80, Ll.80. eiocto. Llc.00. tr|cost. L4S.lì. CS|.
Llc.c1. Nor·rurrer. |or1]'s Hero.
3.30~0IM£N5I0N (k | |oore, ll·4 cr1 fov)
l, ùore|||| ùorte (4·c fov) c, |oo|| (11·l) 1. l4 ror.
4|,
l
/c|. (J |ors|oWe). !ote. L1.l0, µ| Ll.l0, Ll.l0,
L7.S0. eiocto. Lc.c0. CS|. L4.80.
4.00~M£k0hkNJ 0f M£0I0I (N Co||or,
l4·l) l, A|| Act|or (ì·c fov) c, H|ç||or1 Kr|ç|t (8·l)
1. H'coµ l4 ror. l
l
/c|, |1. (W |u|r). !ote. Lc4.c0, µ|
Lc.00, Lc.00, L1.ì0. eiocto. Ll0ì.S0. tr|cost.
L1S4.c7. CS|. Lc1.14.
4.30~5£k5I0£ 5IZZL£k (J CroW|e], ì·c cr1
fov) l, b|oc|store Veços (l1·c) c, H|ç| Or A H|||
(l0·1 fov) 1. H'coµ 7 ror. ì|, r|. (k bec|ett). !ote.
L4.00, µ| Ll.80, L1.40, Ll.c0. eiocto. Ll7.c0. tr|·
cost. L80.74. CS|. Lcc.l4.
5.00~kkY 0f J0Y (k Huç|es, 4·l) l, C|ou1's
|r1 (ì·c jt fov) c, Ouororo (l1·c) 1. H'coµ ì ror.
1
/4|,
1
/4|. (J k Jer||rs, ì·c jtfov lvor] S|||). !ote.
Lc.10, µ| L4.ì0, L1.ì0. eio. LcS.00. CS|. Ll8.c4.
P|acepot: £56.90. 0uadpot: £9.00
RkkRI0k: 0ood to f|rm
2.!0~k008k0 (A besc||îîo, 1·l fov) l,
Hot|oWo] (c·l) c, Cre] bo] (ì·c) 1. H'coµ 8 ror. l|,
l
l
/4|. (A Corro||). !ote. L4.40, µ| Ll.ì0, Lc.l0, Ll.l0.
eiocto. LcS.c0. tr|cost. Lcc.cl. CS|. Lc0.c4.
2.40~IkI5h 80Y (ù |ert|ror, S·c jt fov) l,
|oro1|se ||oce (S·c jt fov) c, Coro Corre|o (ll·l)
1. H'coµ 8 ror.
l
/c|,
1
/4|. (N W||sor). !ote. L1.S0, µ|
L4.40, Lc.c0, Ll.l0. eiocto. Lc.00. tr|cost. LS1.cc.
CS|. L8.01. Nor·rurrer. |ove1 !o b|ts.
3.!0~V00kJI0NkL (J |orr|rç, l0·1 cr1 fov)
l, No]orro (c·4 fov) c, Wort| (S·l) 1. ì ror.
l
/c|, l
1
/4|.
(| Jo|rstor). !ote. L4.S0, µ| L1.40, Lc.40.
eiocto. L8.ì0. CS|. L8.S7. Nor·rurrer. |o|e Uµ.
3.40~Jk£k50k£ RkY(k W|rstor, ì·c jt fov)
l, Cerro's ùe||ç|t (ll·c) c, Coe||s (ì·c jt fov) 1. 8
ror.
l
/c|, c
l
/c|. (| C|or|rçs). !ote. L4.S0, µ| Lc.l0,
Ll.l0, Lc.10. eio. Lc1.c0. tr|cost. LSS.c1. CS|.
Lc0.c4. Nk. ke1 ||te. A|| bets, 1e1uct l0µ |r L
4.!0~f0XL£Y(| ùW]er, ì·l) l, /oforoor (l0·ll
fov) c, Ore|r|c (lS·c) 1. c ror. s|1, 4
l
/c|. (b
|ee|or). !ote. Lc.80, µ| L1.c0, Ll.l0. eiocto.
Ll0.00. CS|. L7.cl. Nk. Heover|] Sorç, ||o]
|us|c. A|| bets, 1e1uct c0µ |r t|e µour1
4.40~5£k0£kNJ Jk0Y (S ùroWre, S·c fov)
l, lroç|ror] Wor|1 (7·l) c, bert|e b|u bo] (ì·l) 1.
H'coµ c ror. c|, 4|. (k C|or|tor). !ote. Ll.80, µ|
Ll.c0, L1.S0. eiocto. L7.70. CS|. L7.1c. Nor·
rurrer. Korstort|r.
5.!0~kNJ0N 00LIN (C Cot||r, l0·1 fov) l, ùr
ùorce] (8·l) c, Sµortor Sµ|r|t (ì·c cr1 fov) 1.
H'coµ l1 ror. r|, c
l
/c|. (J ùur|oµ). !ote. L1.c0, µ|
Ll.l0, L1.80, Ll.ì0. eiocto. L1S.10. tr|cost.
L78.70. CS|. Lc7.cS. Nor·rurrers. boc| |or !eo,
C|||Wort| |oss, ùe|oçoo bo], So|1|ers |o|rt.
P|acepot: £6.50. 0uadpot: £4.30.
RIN050k: 0ood to f|rm
2.25~M£MPhI5 MkN (| Cos|or, ll·l) l,
Arjoror|o (1·l fov) c, |||ert|ro (7·c cr1 fov) 1.
H'coµ 7 ror. l
l
/4|,
l
/c|. (| |vors). !ote. Lì.70, µ|
Lc.c0, Ll.10, Lc.c0. eiocto. L1ì.S0. tr|cost.
Llì4.1c. CS|. L44.c4. Nor·rurrers. Croc|e's
Cores, Sc|oo||o] C|orµ.
2.55~N0kVILL£ (Cot|] Corror, S·l) l, NeW
|e]f (4·l fov) c, Co||ect Art (lS·c) 1. H'coµ ll ror.
s|1, l|. (| |vors). !ote. LS.40, µ| Ll.S0, Ll.l0,
Lc.70. eiocto. Lc1.c0. tr|cost. LlSc.1S. tr|fecto.
LllS.40. CS|. Lc4.cc. Nk. |¢uu|eus ||ctor.
3.25~RkkL0 RkY (! ùurcor, 7·l) l, S|o||oW
bo] (1·l fov) c, !|rs|u (ì·c cr1 fov) 1. H'coµ 7 ror.
r|, c|. (J ùur|oµ). !ote. L7.ì0, µ| L1.10, Ll.S0,
Ll.ì0. eiocto. L40.70. tr|cost. Lll1.cc. tr|fecto.
Lcl7.l0. CS|. L1S.c4. Nor·rurrers. |]r|c |oet,
S|o|o| Hor.
3.55~hkkkY L00k (ù O'Ne|||, l0·1 cr1 fov)
l, ls|esror (8·l) c, !|e !|c||orre (S·l) 1. H'coµ c
ror. l
l
/4|,
l
/c|. (H Cor1], c·l fov |orîorte). !ote.
L1.40, µ| Lc.c0, L1.10. eiocto. Llc.00. CS|.
Lcc.7l.
4.25~£N0LkN0 k0L£5 (Wbu|c|, ll·l0 fov) l,
W||st|e Or b] (4·l cr1 fov) c, K|e|toroc|os (11·l)
1. lc ror.
l
/c|, 1|. (J Nose1o). !ote. Lc.l0, µ| Ll.l0,
Ll.80, Lll.c0. eiocto. LS.40. tr|fecto. Lc8ì.70.
CS|. LS.0S. Nor·rurrer. Cerr|e.
4.55~M0N5 0kLP£ (K O'Ne|||, S·l) l, |o1er
(S·c fov) c, Co|1tre| (l0·1 cr1 fov) 1. H'coµ ì ror.
l
1
/4|, l
l
/4|. (| Co|e). !ote. Lì.40, µ| L1.70, Ll.70.
eiocto. Ll8.l0. CS|. Llì.71.
5.25~8£5J 8£ 0kk£f0L (ù O'Ne|||, ì·l) l,
We|s| lr|et (c·l cr1 fov) c, W||tecrest (l0·l) 1.
H'coµ 7 ror. r|, s|1. (| Us|er, 1·l fov ùorot|]'s
ùorc|rç). !ote. L8.c0, µ| Lc.S0, Lc.c0, Ll.70.
eiocto. Lì1.c0. tr|cost. L4c1.71. tr|fecto. L488.S0.
CS|. L47.1l.
Jac|pot: Not woa, poo| of £35,411.55
carr|ed over to Newcast|e. P|acepot:
£6!.50. 0uadpot: £!0.10.
k£50LJ5
8 · 8ath
0 · 0atter|c|
£ · £xeter
f · fa|eaham
N · Newcast|e
kcross Jhe 5ea ...... N 2.40
kdam 0e 8eau||eu .. N 5.20
kd||açtoa............... N 4.!5
k|emarat|ya ........... N 3.!0
k|moad 8raaches... N 2.!0
kaaya .................... £ 5.50
kaddaate ............... N 4.45
krbour h||| ............. £ 1.50
krco fe||ce ............ £ 5.50
kreef ..................... 8 5.!0
krçaum.................. f 3.20
kssass|ao .............. f 4.25
kthwaab ................ 8 3.30
8addam ................. 8 4.05
8aham|aa k|d......... N 5.20
8ah|ra.................... £ 8.20
8a[aa hero ............. 8 2.30
8a|aace 0a J|me .... N 5.20
8aadaaamaa .......... 0 1.30
8ar|stoa ksh ......... N 4.45
8arah||| 8rowa|e .... £ 6.20
8ate|eur ................ 8 3.30
8eauchamp V|||aç . £ 6.50
8ec|ermet ............. N 5.20
8eheraya ............... £ 6.50
8e|| harbour .......... f 3.20
8e||aboo|ou ........... 8 5.!0
8eaeath ................. N 2.40
8|ac|bura .............. 8 2.30
8o|||a Jud|th .......... N 2.40
8o||ywood .............. £ 1.20
8rave 0ream ......... N 4.45
8roctuae Papa 0|o . N 5.20
8roo| 5tar ............. N 3.!0
8ua||teo|r .............. f 2.50
8ura|aç 5toae ....... 0 8.00
8ushwac|er ........... £ 6.50
0apab|e 0uest ....... N 2.40
0ara|va| 0ream ...... N 5.20
0asper's 5hadow ... £ 5.50
0e|est|a| 0awa ....... N 2.!0
0h||worth Lass ....... 8 5.!0
0ho|saa ................. N 2.!0
0|der Lo||y ............. £ 8.20
0ome Jo M|ad ........ 0 6.00
0ommerce ............. 8 4.35
0oav|ace................ N 5.20
0ouatry Ra|tz ....... N 4.45
0rossbarry 8reeze f 3.55
0rowa k|dçe .......... 8 5.!0
0ub|sm .................. £ 6.20
0aac|aç freddy ..... 0 8.30
0ar £s 5a|aam ....... N 2.40
0araz kose ............ f 5.00
0azeea .................. 0 8.00
0eaa Iarracht ........ N 2.40
0eep kpp|ause ....... N 4.!5
0e||çhtfu| 0||che .... f 4.25
0hhamaaa .............. N 5.20
0|rty 8ert|e ........... £ 8.20
0r R|atr|açham ..... 8 4.35
0ream Rh|sperer ... 8 2.30
0r|ve home ............ N 5.20
0rop Jhe hammer .. 0 1.30
0u P|ess|s .............. N 5.20
£|[aaz .................... 0 6.30
£| 0|eço ................. £ 1.20
£adeavor ............... 0 1.30
£zra 0hurch ........... N 3.45
fa|ry Jrader .......... £ 8.20
fee| Jhe heat ........ N 3.45
fee||aç Pec||sh ..... f 2.50
f|m|as ................... N 4.!5
f|re 0rysta| ........... 8 5.!0
f|ve 0ut 0f f|ve .... f 3.55
foo|scap ................ 8 3.00
free Jo k|r ............ f 2.50
frequeacy ............. N 3.45
froçaa| .................. 0 1.00
frosty 5pr|aç ........ f 2.50
0eorçe 8ea[am|a ... 0 1.00
0|eaca|ra 5tar ....... N 5.20
0|oba| Party .......... £ 1.50
0reeaoc| ............... £ 1.50
ha|| J|ber|us .......... N 2.40
hardw|c| Rood ...... f 2.50
hatchet Maa .......... £ 5.50
heart 0f 0uba|....... 0 1.30
he|'s kaçe| ............ 0 6.30
h|b||| ..................... f 2.20
hope kad Praey ..... £ 1.50
houstoa 0ya|mo .... N 2.40
hypaos|s................ 0 8.30
I fee| f|ae ............. 0 6.30
Imper|a| Reapoa .... 0 6.00
Iadepub ................. N 2.!0
Jac| 0zz|................ 8 3.00
Jewe||ed ................ 8 4.35
Judas Jo ............... 0 6.00
Just L||e heavea ... N 2.!0
kadouat ................. f 4.25
ka||aa 8ay ............ N 4.!5
kaaoa|op .............. f 5.00
kasbaa .................. £ 6.20
khaadaq ................ 0 1.00
kyzer 0h|ef............ 0 8.30
Lad|es 8est ........... £ 5.50
Lady 0f Jhe ka|çht N 3.!0
Lemoa 0ueea ......... 0 8.00
L|tt|e 0arme|a ....... f 5.00
L|tt|e Per|sher ....... 8 3.30
L|v|aç|athefuture .. £ 1.50
Louçh 0orr|b ......... N 4.!5
Maada|ay k|aç ....... 0 1.00
Maadurah .............. 0 8.30
Mar|e 0e Laufoa .... f 5.00
Mar|ço|ds Ray ....... £ 1.20
Mastersh|p ............ 0 1.00
Meaadmyshadow ... N 4.45
Mebsuta ................ 0 6.00
Metropo||taa 0h|ef 8 3.30
M|dd|etoa f|yer ..... 8 3.00
M|da|çht fua ......... f 5.00
M|samoa ................ £ 6.50
M|ss Muça ............. 8 3.00
M|ss kos|e ............. 0 6.00
Mo|aaaarch ............ N 3.!0
Moatybe||a ............ £ 8.20
Mooav|||e ............... N 2.!0
Motar[m................. f 2.20
Mr kedwood ........... £ 1.50
Mr Ro|f .................. 0 1.00
Mrs £ ..................... N 5.20
Mrs Mop ................ 8 3.00
Mu[aade| ................ 0 1.00
Mu|t|tude 0f 5|as ... £ 8.20
Mus|ca| Va||ey ....... 0 6.00
Mut'kb .................. f 2.20
Nesaaas ................. £ 6.50
Never 0aa Je|| ....... 8 4.05
N|çht Jrade ........... 0 1.00
N|| Na| Joo ........... £ 5.50
Nodd|es Ray .......... £ 6.20
Not My 0ho|ce ....... 0 1.00
0|e Maestro ........... £ 1.50
0|||aaaa ................. 0 8.00
0aea|te|aheavea .... 0 6.00
0taçe 0e 8r|oa ...... f 4.25
0ut 0f Jhe 5torm .. 8 5.!0
Paadoro 0e Laço ... N 3.!0
Party P|ctures ....... £ 1.50
Patch Patch ........... 0 8.30
Pet|t f|eur ............. f 5.00
Petroç|yph ............ f 2.50
P|cco|uc| ............... N 4.45
P|t||a .................... N 4.45
Poos|e Naas|e ........ N 3.!0
Pur|ab ................... N 4.!5
0uot|d|aa ............... £ 8.20
kad|ator kooaey .... 8 3.30
ka|e|çh 0uay ......... 0 1.00
keç|meata| ............ N 4.!5
ke|at|ve 5treaçth .. 0 6.30
keset Jo f|t .......... N 5.20
ko|aata .................. £ 6.20
komaa ku|er .......... N 4.45
komaay 0uest ....... £ 8.20
koodee 0ueea ....... N 4.45
kud|va|e ................ £ 6.50
kushwee ................ f 2.20
kyedaae ................ 0 1.00
5abor|do ................ 8 4.05
5abratha................ N 4.!5
5add|ers 8ead ....... 8 4.35
5affroa house ....... £ 8.20
5a|erosa ................ N 3.45
5araaçoo ............... 8 5.!0
5axoaette .............. N 4.45
5eada|| .................. 0 1.30
5erçeaat 5uz|e ...... N 4.45
5harmoa ................ f 2.20
5he's kee| 0usty ... 8 3.00
5hout for Joy........ 8 2.30
5hua|awa|haa ....... N 5.20
5|ça|fer ................. 8 2.30
5||ver 5tory ........... f 3.20
5||vers 5p|r|t ......... N 3.!0
5|x R|ves ............... 0 8.30
5p|c 'a 5paa ........... 8 3.30
5p|r|t of 0oa|stoa .. 0 8.30
5p|r|toathemouat .. 0 1.30
5pread 8oy ............ 0 8.00
5tar 0a|e ............... £ 1.50
5teady Jhe 8uffs ... 8 2.30
5t||ettoes|athemud 0 8.00
5toaef|e|d f|yer..... N 2.!0
5toaethrower ........ f 3.20
5treet 0red ........... 8 5.!0
5uaset k|tty .......... 8 4.35
Jap 0aace Ray ...... 8 4.35
Jap|s L|bre ............ N 4.!5
Jaroum .................. £ 5.50
Jaste Jhe V|ctory .. N 3.45
Jemo|a .................. £ 6.20
Jhat's 0aaçerous .. 8 2.30
Jhe Iroa 0|aat ....... f 3.55
Jhe Name Is fraa| . 8 3.30
Jhe Rh|ch 0octor .. 0 6.30
Jhey k|| Lauçhed ... 0 1.30
Jhuader 0a ............ £ 8.20
J|aa|||at ................. £ 1.20
Joffee Nose ........... 0 8.00
Jombe|||a|.............. N 5.20
Jreçoay 8r|dçe ...... £ 5.50
Jrepa|o .................. £ 5.50
0bea|or ................. N 5.20
0|t|mate 0uest ...... 0 1.30
Va|aat|ao 0yster ... N 2.40
Va|daa ................... N 2.40
V|to Vo|terra ......... N 3.45
Rh|spered J|mes ... N 3.45
R|c|ed 5trea| ....... 0 8.00
R|c|ed R||ma ........ 0 8.30
R||||am hoçarth ..... £ 6.20
Ro|fçaaç ............... 8 3.00
Roo|ama|oo ........... N 3.!0
Yearboo| ............... 0 6.00
Zazam|x ................. f 3.55
IN0£X
00I0£: J@Q@E> <LIFG< accounted Ior Biç
Zeb (2nd), Captain Cee Bee (3rd) and CcIden
SiIver (4th) when producing a devastating
perIormance in the Cueen Mother Champion
Chase at Cheltenham (2m, gd) in March and
Henry de Bromhead's charge will take the
world oI beating iI |umping with the same
brilliance this aIternoon. CcIden SiIver won
this race !2 months ago and Captain Cee Bee
took the top novice event at the same meet·
ing (beating Sizinç Eurcpe in the process),
while Pyanair (2m5I, gd) sixth J'y VcIe could
be interesting dropping back in trip under
Puby Walsh.
5.30
80YL£5P0kJ5.00M 0hkMPI0N 0hk5£ (0kk0£ !)
%14,828 (!) 2m (6)
! ll/llcc· 8I0 Z£8 (48) (0&0) C A |urµ|] l0 ll·lc ......................8 J 0eraçhty
2 l8l/l|1· 0kPJkIN 0££ 8££ (48) (0&0) | | Hort] l0 ll·lc ........... k P Mc0oy
3 |c|8|c· 0hkN0IN0 000k5£ (23) H 1e bror|eo1 7 ll·lc ................ M 0arcy
4 lclll4· 00L0£N 5ILV£k (48) (0&0) W | |u|||rs 7 ll·lc .............P Jowaead
5 l1/cc1l· 5IZIN0 £0k0P£ (48) (0&0) H 1e bror|eo1 7 ll·lc ....J J Murphy
6 1U/cc1c· J'Y V0L£ (41) (0) W | |u|||rs 8 ll·ì ........................................ k Ra|sh
8LINk£k5: No. 3.
5P f0k£0k5J: ì·4 S|î|rç |uroµe, c b|ç /e|, 7·c Co|1er S||ver, S Coµto|r Cee bee,
l4 J'] Vo|e, l00 C|orç|rç Course.
20!0: 0o|dea 5||ver 8·!!·!2, P Jowaead !2·! (R P Mu|||as), !! raa.
PUNCHEST0WN ATR / RTE1
2.20
0k£5hkM'5 5£LLIN0 h0k0L£
£2,380 (0|ass 5) 2m (5 dec|ared)
! 400· ¬ hI8IkI (24) (0) |rs S Hurµ|re] ì ll S ........J 0oy|e
2 4/lc· M0JkkJM (f20) (0&0,f) |rs | |eorce ì ll S
0 Jume|ty
3 1lc· M0J'k8 (!2) (0) | Cre|ç|tor c ll S..... k 0re|çhtoa(3)
4 4Sc· k05hR££ (!6) (0,J) ! Vouç|or 7 ll S
M|ss k|ex 0uaa(1)
5 ff·| 5hkkM0N (9) | Cre|ç|tor 8 l0 lc ....................0 0rosse
8LINk£k5: No. 3 VI50k: No. 4 J0N00£ 5JkkP: Nos. 2, 5
0h££k PI£0£5: No. !.
R·factor: h|b||| (!33), kushwee (!!1), Motar[m (!!5).
5P f0k£0k5J: ll·8 H|||||, 1 kus|Wee, l0·1 |ut'A|, S |otorjr,
cS S|orror.
2.50
J0J£P00L hkN0I0kP 0hk5£
£2,640 (5) 2m 5f !!0yds (6)
! 711· P£Jk00LYPh (44) N Ou|r|or ì ll lc ..Mr J 0u|a|aa(1)
2 |S1· 80kILJ£0Ik (!3)(J) | W||||ors 7 ll ll ..........P Mo|oaey
3 |S·4 hkk0RI0k R000 (9) |rs C bo||e] c ll 8 .k Jhoratoa
4 ì|1· fk05JY 5PkIN0 (!9)(J) ù !|orµsor 8 ll S .0 0rosse
5 2·ll ¬ fk££ J0 kIk (4)(J,5) ! Vouç|or 8 ll l(ìei)J farre||y
6 c1ì· f££LIN0 P£0kI5h (20) | C|oµror ì ll 0
Mr J 0araer(1)
VI50k: No. 5 J0N00£ 5JkkP: No. 6
0h££k PI£0£5: Nos. !, 3.
R·factor: free Jo k|r (93), 8ua||teo|r (90),
hardw|c| Rood (88).
5P f0k£0k5J: l0·ll |ree !o A|r, 4 |etroç|]µ|, S buo||teo|r,
8 Hor1W|c| Woo1, lc |ee||rç |ec||s|, c0 |rost] Sµr|rç.
5.50
fkkM£k5 fkI£N0 MkI0£N h0k0L£
£2,120 (0|ass 4) 2m !f (9 dec|ared)
! c0·| 0k5P£k'5 5hk00R (8) W Co|1sWort|] S ll 0 ..k f||at
2 |ì· hkJ0h£J MkN (23) C J Cro] S ll 0 ............... h 5|e|toa
3 |11· Lk0I£5 8£5J (!0) C | |1Wor1s ì ll 0 ... M 0r|ff|ths(5)
4 000· NIk Nkk J00 (43) J W |u|||rs S ll 0 ...... J 0erham(3)
5 0 kk00 f£LI0£ (5) W Co|1sWort|] 4 l0 l0 .. J J 0'8r|ea
6 1· Jkk00M (22) | W||||ors 4 l0 l0 .................. R keaaedy
1 Jk£00NY 8kI00£ (f302) S burrouç| 4 l0 l0
N 5cho|f|e|d
8 40|· Jk£PkL0 (!4) |rs A botc|e|or 4 l0 l0 ....M 0u|a|aa(5)
9 4ì1· ¬ kNkYk (!0) ù bourtor 4 l0 1.................... P 8reaaaa
J0N00£ 5JkkP: Nos. !, 3, 5, 8.
R·factor: kaaya (!08), Lad|es 8est (!02),
0asper's 5hadow (68).
5P f0k£0k5J: ll·8 Aro]o, 1 |o1|es best, 4 !orour, l0 Hotc|et
|or, lc Arco |e||ce, c0 !reçor] br|1çe, !reµo|o, cS Ot|ers.
6.20
0hIL0k£N'5 h05PI0£ h0kP h0k0L£
£5,280 (3) 2m 1f !!0yds (1)
! 0Sb· 8kkNhILL 8k0RNI£ (25) (0) | Ho||s 8 ll lc J J 0'8r|ea
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3 |/||· J£M0IN (5!) ù bourtor ll ll 4 ......................... P 8reaaaa
4 Sc1· ¬ kk58kN (!0) | ùoce ì l0 ì ........................0 £|sworth
5 1|·c 008I5M (8) (f) | Horr|s S l0 l ............................ 0 Poste
6 Sl·l k0LkNJk (1) (0) J |rost 6 !0 0(1ex) ..............h frost
1 |04· N000I£5 RkY (!2) J |orvert 8 !0 0 ...........0 £aç|aad
VI50k: No. 2 J0N00£ 5JkkP: Nos. !, 5.
R·factor: kasbaa (!32), 0ub|sm (!3!), 8arah||| 8rowa|e (!29).
5P f0k£0k5J: 1 W||||or Hoçort|, l0·1 ko|orto, 4 borr||||
broWr|e, 7·c Kos|or, S Cu||sr, l4 !ero|r, c0 No11|es Wo].
FAKENHAM ATR
EXETER ATR
Corrertor|es · 070 ìl8l l0lS
kesu|ts · 070 ìl8l l0c1
Co||s cost ììµ µer r|rute fror o b! |or1||re
Corrertor|es · 070 ìl8l l0lì
kesu|ts · 070 ìl8l l0cS
Co||s cost ììµ µer r|rute fror o b! |or1||re
Jkk0k fk0J5: 00IN0: Coo1 to ||rr. |eft Hor1e1. J0P Jkk0k
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(2006·!!): N Her1ersor c0 Course W|rrers, 4Sº Str||e rote, l
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K|rç ì, ìº, 0, J | !urrer c, l7º, 0. 8LINk£k5 fIk5J JIM£: c.c0
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l4º, 0, J |oçu|re 8, l4º, 0, ù |rç|or1 S, l8º, 0. J0P Jkk0k
JkkIN£k5 (2006·!!): | Ho||s 4c Course W|rrers, l7º Str||e
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J W |u|||rs 8, l0º, 0, S burrouç| S, llº, 0. 8LINk£k5 fIk5J
JIM£: S.S0 !reµo|o (torçue stroµ), c.S0 ku1|vo|e (torçue stroµ),
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8r|dçe fror | b|ors|or1 to S burrouç|. c.c0 Jemo|a fror k
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!urrer.
3.20
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! ìc·4 8£LL hkk800k (8)(J) | W||||ors 7 l0 l1 L Jreadwe||
2 |cS· 5ILV£k 5J0kY (40)(J) ! Vouç|or 8 l0 l1.. 5 Jhomas
3 4Uc· ¬ 5J0N£Jhk0R£k (88)(J) ! Vouç|or c l0 l1
k k|||oraa(3)
4 0· kk0k0M (32)(J) | W||||ors 4 l0 ì ...............P Mo|oaey
J0N00£ 5JkkP: Nos. 2, 3.
R·factor: 5toaethrower (!25), 5||ver 5tory (!!8),
8e|| harbour (!!!).
5P f0k£0k5J: c·4 S||ver Stor], c Storet|roWer, ll·4 be|| Hor|our,
l0 Arçour.
3.55
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£6,640 (3) 3m !!0yds (4)
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3 01·| Jh£ Ik0N 0IkNJ (8) N K|rç 7 l0 lc 0emma 0·0av|soa(5)
4 11|· ¬ ZkZkMIX (60) (f) N Her1ersor c l0 lc ..f de 0||es
J0N00£ 5JkkP: No. 2.
R·factor: Zazam|x (!29), f|ve 0ut 0f f|ve (84+),
Jhe Iroa 0|aat (18).
5P f0k£0k5J: 4·S ||ve Out Of ||ve, ll·l0 /oîor|i, 11 !|e lror
C|ort, S0 Cross|orr] breeîe.
6.50
00M8£ h005£ hkN0I0kP 0hk5£
£4,080 (4) 2m !f !!0yds (6)
! ||1· 8£h£kkYN (2!) (0) C J Cro] 8 ll lc .....5 0|emeats(1)
2 c|·c ¬ 805hRk0k£k (1) (f) J W |u|||rs ì ll l0
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3 lc|· MI5kM0N (255) (0,J) ù kees 8 ll 7 .....................k f||at
4 1ìì· N£5Nkk5 (209) (0) | C k|re|| l0 ll c .........J Maçu|re
5 4l·4 8£k00hkMP VIkIN0 (1) S burrouç| ì l0 lc
N 5weeaey(1)
6 1/|f· k00IVkL£ (5!) W C | !urrer 7 l0 lc .......M 0u|a|aa(5)
J0N00£ 5JkkP: Nos. 2, 5, 6 0h££k PI£0£5: No. 2.
R·factor: 8ushwac|er (!06), 8eheraya (!05), Nesaaas (!03).
5P f0k£0k5J: l1·8 bus|Woc|er, ì·c ||soror, S beouc|orµ
V|||rç, l1·c ku1|vo|e, 8 Nesroos, be|ero]r.
1.20
N0VI0£5' hkN0I0kP 0hk5£
£3,020 (5) 3m (4)
! ||1· £L 0I£00 (23) J SroW1er ì ll lc ................k McLeraoa
2 1c4· ¬ MkkI00L05 RkY (31) A Hore]|o|| 7 ll l0
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3 ì1·1 80LLYR000 (1) |rs A botc|e|or 8 ll 1 .M 0u|a|aa(5)
4 |||· JINkLLIkJ (51)(J) ù kees 8 !0 0 M|chae| Murphy(3)
8LINk£k5: No. 2 J0N00£ 5JkkP: No. 3.
R·factor: Mar|ço|ds Ray (!00), £| 0|eço (93), 8o||ywood (9!).
5P f0k£0k5J: c·4 |or|ço|1s Wo], lS·8 bo||]Woo1, 4 || ù|eço,
l1·c !|ro|||ot.
1.50
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£2,!10 (5) 3m (9)
! 5P!· kk800k hILL (3!) H W||sor 7 ll l0 ............... Mr M Ra||(3)
2 f3!· ¬ 0L08kL PkkJY (!0) ù C !urrer 7 ll l0 M|ss J 8uc|(1)
3 3P·3 0k££N00k (8) ù | Surrers|] l0 ll l0
Mr 0 5ummersby(1)
4 PP5· h0P£ kN0 Pkk£Y (!1) b Sor1ersor c ll l0
Mr M hamptoa(1)
5 262· LIVIN0INJh£f0J0k£ (!1) k C|oµror 8 ll l0
Mr 0 £dwards(3)
6 U4S· Mk k£0R000 (!0) |rs S Cor1rer 7 ll l0
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8 930· PkkJY PI0J0k£5 (23) A J |orrort 8 ll l0 .Mr R 8|dd|c|
9 8P4· 5Jkk 0kL£ (23) C C|or|ers 7 ll l0 Mr k Roo||acott(3)
8LINk£k5: No. 5 J0N00£ 5JkkP: No. !
0h££k PI£0£5: Nos. 2, 4, 1, 8, 9.
R·factor: 0|oba| Party (83), krbour h||| (11),
L|v|aç|athefuture (12).
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Stor Co|e, l0 Creeroc|, |r ke1Woo1, lc Ot|ers.
4.25
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2 3|!· ¬ 0Jk0£ 0£ 8kI0N (23) k Wo|e]·Co|er 7 lc 4
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3 !!·4 0£LI0hJf0L 0LI0h£ (8) S Ar1reWs l0 lc 0
M|ss 0 kadrews
4 22·c k55k55IN0 (8) J | !urrer 7 ll l0 ....... M|ss L k||aa(5)
R·factor: 0taçe 0e 8r|oa (!00), kssass|ao (93),
0e||çhtfu| 0||che (92).
5P f0k£0k5J: 4·c Otoçe ùe br|or, ì·c Ko1ourt, ll·c Assoss|ro,
8 ùe||ç|tfu| C||c|e.
5.00
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£3,020 (4) 2m 4f (6)
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2 0cc· P£JIJ fL£0k (24) J S Sr|t| 7 ll 8 5 Jw|stoa·0av|es
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4 7ì·1 0kkkZ k05£ (8) (f) | brerror l0 ll c .0 J|mmoas(1)
5 c10· MkkI£ 0£ Lk0f0N (209) C beo||] c ll 0 J Messeaçer
6 44|· MI0NI0hJ f0N (226) | Aµµ|e|] c l0 c k k|||oraa(3)
J0N00£ 5JkkP: Nos. !, 4 0h££k PI£0£5: Nos. !, 4.
R·factor: kaaoa|op (!!2), 0araz kose (!!0), L|tt|e 0arme|a (!06).
5P f0k£0k5J: lS·8 ||tt|e Corre|o, 7·4 |et|t ||eur, S Koror|oµ,
c ùoroî kose, 8 |or|e ùe |oufor, c0 ||1r|ç|t |ur.
8.20
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2 000JI0IkN | k We||er c ll c........................ R keaaedy
3 5kffk0N h005£ |rs S Cor1rer c ll c
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5 L· M0NJY8£LLk (45) | W||||ors 4 l0 lc ...........5 P Joaes
6 M0LJIJ00£ 0f 5IN5 W C | !urrer 4 l0 lc
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R·factor: 8ah|ra (!00), 0|der Lo||y (92),
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cS koror] Ouest, 11 Ot|ers.
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3.20 5toaethrower
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4.25 0taçe 0e 8r|oa
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1.SS ||ve Out Of ||ve 4.cS Assoss|ro S.00 |et|t ||eur.
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5.50 kaaya
6.20 kasbaa
6.50 8ushwac|er
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1.50 0|oba| Party
8.20 8ah|ra
Jh£ 5000J: S.S0 !orour c.c0 borr|||| broWr|e c.S0
bus|Woc|er ì.c0 |or|ço|1s Wo] ì.S0 C|o|o| |ort] 8.c0
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ì.c0 || ù|eço ì.S0 Creeroc| 8.c0 bo||ro.
GRAND NATIONAL
winning trainer Donald
McCain turns his
attention to the Flat
tomorrow when he
saddles 9-2 favourite
Overturn for the
Totesport.com Chester
Cup.
McCain said: “If
there is one Flat
race I’d like to
win, that’s the
one. The
Chester Cup
has always
appealed to
me.”
Overturn, the
winner of last
year’s Northumberland
Plate, has the favoured
number one draw
The other leading
contenders are also
trained by Grand
National winning
trainers.
David Pipe, successful
with Comply Or Die at
Aintree in 2008, will
be represented by
last year’s winner
Mamlook, a 10-1
shot.
Gordon Elliott,
who trained
Silver Birch to
win the 2007
National, will
saddle Diraar,
a 9-1 chance
with the
sponsor.
Frankel threat
FLAWLESS WIN:
So You Think
impressed at the
Curragh yesterday
By Chris Goulding
SO YOU THINK showed that he
can jump in the ring with Frankel
after his effortless victory in the
High Chaparral Stakes at the
Curragh yesterday.
Hailed in his native
country Australia as a
champion, he lived up to that
billing when having his first
outing for Aidan O’Brien.
Sweeping into the lead when
Seamie Heffernan let him
have his head with a
furlong to travel, he
was 10 lengths
clear of his
n e a r e s t
rival when
crossing the
line.
“He’s an
i n c r e d i b l e
specimen –
unique,” said
O’Brien. “He
came home
like he was
going to the start. We’ve
had some good horses
from Australia but when
this fellow walked
through the door, we’ve
never experienced
anything like it.
“He will come back to
the Curragh for the
Tattersalls Gold Cup.”
The Tattersalls Gold
Cup, which takes place
on May 22, is also on
the agenda for the
Derby and Arc
winner Workforce.
That contest will
certainly be worth
seeing but a box
office sellout will be
a bout with
Frankel.
The chance of
the pair meeting,
hopefully, will be
in the Juddmonte
I n t e r n a t i o n a l
Stakes at York in
August.
Victory123
54 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
RUGBY UNION: WALES STAR’S BAN LIFTED BY TOULON
Henson can’t
take it as red
By Neil Squires
Picture: PATRICK BLANCHARD
Ê?\n`ccY\_\i\lek`ck_\\e[f]
k_\j\Xjfe#k_\en\n`ccj\\Ë
LOOKING TO THE FUTURE: Henson’s reprieve by Toulon will be a boost for Wales, who want him in World Cup
Coach Lee looks
for best of British
LEE: Relishing contest
SUPERBIKES
OLYMPICS
JOHN HOPKINS became
the first American to
win a race in the MCE
Insurance British
Championship, as he
held off Scot Stuart
Easton in the second
race of the second
round at Oulton Park.
“That was awesome.
I’m so happy, that was
really tough,” said
Samsung Suzuki rider
Hopkins, who snatched
the lead with two laps
left in Cheshire.
“I just stuck at it and
gave it everything I
had,” he added, after a
first win in 11 years.
SARAH STEVENSON,
one of Britain’s big
hopes, is one fight away
from a crack at the
Taekwondo world title.
Stevenson, 28, has
secured bronze at the
World Championships
in South Korea.
But she fights world
and Olympic champion
Hwang Kyung-Seon for
a final place today and
paid tribute to parents
Diane and Roy, fighting
cancer and a brain
tumour. She said: “Any
pain I’m going through
is nothing compared to
what they’re suffering.”
COACH Jason Lee has
called on his Great
Britain squad to show
their “fighting spirit” at
the Sultan Azlan Shah
Cup in Ipoh, Malaysia.
World and
Commonwealth
champions Australia,
Commonwealth silver
and bronze medallists
India and New Zealand,
Asian Games
champions Pakistan
and Korea also take
part, with GB facing
hosts Malaysia first on
Thursday.
Lee said: “We would
not normally be able to
attend a high-calibre
international
tournament as Great
Britain this early in an
Olympic cycle, so
competing in the
Sultan Azlan Shah Cup
is a unique opportunity.
“The high heat and
humidity of Malaysia
will be a true test of the
team’s quality and
fighting spirit, things
we will need in
abundance come 2012.”
Alastair Brogdon and
Stephen Dick are
replaced in the squad
by Richard Springham
and Dan Fox, who will
make his debut
alongside Iain Lewers.
GAVIN HENSON’S Toulon
career looks set to end
shortly – but not in the
ignominy he feared.
Wales centre Henson’s
suspension for fighting with a
team-mate in a restaurant has
been lifted to enable him to
complete the season with the
French club. He is set to play in
Toulon’s final Top 14 fixture
against Montpellier on Saturday
and in the play-offs if they qualify.
However, that looks likely to
spell the full stop on his French
trouble, with the Dragons having
expressed a desire to bring him
back to Wales.
“We are always looking for
high-quality players and Gavin is
definitely one,” said Dragons
manager Robert Beale. “We have
to wait and see how the situation
at Toulon unfolds and where Gavin
sees his future in rugby.”
Even his former region, the
Ospreys, are not ruling out the
possibility of a return to the
Liberty Stadium. “You never say
that they gave me the opportunity
to return to the English game.
“But I’m excited about the
opportunity to play with Wasps. I
have been really impressed with
some of their young players and
I’m looking forward to being part
of a team aiming to get back to the
top of their game.”
The future of former Wasp
Danny Cipriani is up in the air
again only three months into his
career with Melbourne Rebels.
Cipriani, who was dropped from
the Rebels’ starting line-up last
Saturday, has been linked with a
season. After that we will see,”
said Toulon director of rugby
Philippe Saint-Andre yesterday.
Toulon’s leniency will be
welcomed by Wales, who want to
include Henson in the squad to
face the Barbarians on June 4. If
he had been sacked, he would
have gone into that game having
played no club rugby for seven
weeks.
He will still have to face Wales
coach Warren Gatland for a
dressing down over his off-field
behaviour but the door is now
open for an international return
after a two-year absence.
Potential employers have not
been put off by his reputation for
career with his potential
World Cup involvement
for Wales ruling him out of
the start of next season’s
league programme.
“He took a yellow card,
not a red one. He will be
here for the rest of the
temporary return to
Europe next season during
the World Cup after the
conclusion of the Super-15
season.
Toulon were one of the
clubs reported to be
interested, with Saint-
never,” said Ospreys managing
director Mike Cuddy.
Wasps were also interested in
signing him last year and could
make a move. After a poor season,
they underlined their ambition
to bring back happier times
yesterday, when they confirmed
the signing of England hooker
Steve Thompson from Leeds.
Thompson, 32, will leave after
Leeds’ final league game against
Northampton on Saturday
whether or not they are relegated.
“It has been a difficult season
for Leeds on the pitch but I have
really enjoyed my time there and
met some great people,” said
Thompson. “I am very grateful
Andre doing little to dampen
speculation yesterday.
“We are looking for a World Cup
joker who can play No10 or 12 and
kick because Jonny Wilkinson,
Felipe Contepomi and Matt Giteau
will be away,” he said. “We’re
looking at different options but
nothing is done yet. Every 10 or 12
in the world is linked with Toulon.”
Cipriani himself is understood
to be willing to take up a permanent
contract in either England or
France if he can be sprung from
his two-year contract in Australia.
A move back to Europe would put
him back in contention for a return
to the national squad after the
World Cup.
HOCKEY
By Graham Wilson
/lmx
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 55
BOXING: PORTRAIT OF A LEGEND AND POTENTIAL SUCCESSOR
Ammer time for Haye
Pictures: GETTY IMAGES and NICK POTTS
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FAVOURITE:
Sir Henry,
with three
Lonsdale
British and
Empire
heavyweight
belts, proved
more popular
than world
champ Haye
IT IS not hard to imagine
what Sir Henry Cooper
would have had to say
when the forthcoming
slag-fest between David
Haye and Wladimir
Klitschko breaks out.
The bluff, no-nonsense
Cockney’s demand for a bit of
respect and grace which would
have greeted the renewal of the
trash-talk war between the
modern heavyweights would
have made big headlines, too.
Until his death on Sunday,
Enry’s reputation and voice
still resonated throughout
boxing and beyond, 40
years after his last fight.
Yet if the differences in
style outside of the ring
between the old-fashioned
gent Cooper and the
seemingly brash, sometimes
disdainful Haye are vast,
there is also, at the deepest
level of what happens
between the ropes, a notable
similarity.
It is not just their shared
south London roots. More than
that, both men have shared a
willingness to be fearless and to
confront adversity at the fraught
edges of their hard business.
In Haye’s case, it has yet to
catapult him towards opponents
of the quality faced by Cooper –
one word: Ali – and the paucity of
the division means it never will.
But it has already brought him a
version of the world title Enry
never won.
In the sad aftermath of
Cooper’s death at 76 and the
widespread mourning and
outpouring of admiration it has
created, Haye has the chance
later this summer to remind the
British public that, beyond all
the bluster, he shares the same
fighting spirit as the most popular
boxer in the nation’s history.
He can re-cement into place a
love affair with their sport which
has been tested sorely in recent
times – not least by Haye himself
in his mismatched fight with
Audley Harrison – but which still
endures powerfully.
When Haye meets Klitschko in
Hamburg on July 2 – a ticket row
permitting – in a bid to unify his
WBA belt with the WBO and IBF
versions held by the Ukrainian, it
will be one of those occasions
which is a reminder that Britain
still loves a big fight night like few
other sporting events.
It will be a summer evening
and every bar in the land will be
over-spilling for this true test
of Haye’s credentials as a
heavyweight.
In fact, before 57,000 at
Hamburg’s Imtech Arena, the
attendance will outstrip the
crowds which witnessed Cooper’s
most famous nights against
Cassius Clay, as he was then
known, at Wembley in 1963 –
35,000 – and then again when his
nemesis had become Muhammad
Ali, at Highbury in 1966, where
there were 40,000.
Cooper, it was said, knew his
limitations as a stylist, but he
always fought like a lion, often
through a mask of blood. And
there was always Enry’s Ammer,
his fabled left hook which floored
Clay at Wembley, to be called
upon.
A record of 14 defeats in a
55-fight career which included
one draw suggests that Cooper
was correct in his self-analysis.
Yet these flaws never diminished
his standing with a public which
adored and respected him
immensely because he was so
much one of them. And because
they never hindered his courage
and determination to make the
very best of what he had.
Frank Bruno was his true
inheritor, both in terms of
popularity and in perseverance,
although his reign as world
champion was brief.
Ironically, Lennox Lewis, by
far the finest of all British
heavyweights, never enjoyed the
same affection.
And now, in the era of Haye,
the public senses it has a unique
and highly skilled fighter but
cannot be truly sure about him
until he takes on his biggest
challenge against Klitschko.
True enough, Haye’s mouth
runs off in graceless fashion and
he was publicly rebuked by
Cooper for a particularly tasteless
attack on Wladimir in 2009. The
build-up to Hamburg will indeed
be ugly, but Haye’s charisma
usually shines through and you
get the sense he is simply suiting
the needs of a global media
industry, which is more voracious
than in Cooper’s days at the top.
It is a fact, too, that his
heavyweight reign has yet to be
spectacular.
The aficionados know, however,
that Haye is a sharp, accurate,
highly mobile and clever boxer
with a huge heart who is always
willing to take risks.
When he climbed from the
canvas to take the WBA and
WBC cruiserweight belts from
Frenchman Jean-Marc Mormeck
in Paris in 2007, it fashioned the
truest vision of the character he
will take with him into the ring in
Hamburg in July.
And he also has his own version
of the Ammer, in his Hayemaker
right hand. Cooper understood
this and long ago tipped him for
success.
Haye has his own reasons for
seeking glory in Germany. If he
achieves it by calling upon his
own reserves of the boxing
values which drove Cooper, it will
ensure him at least a small taste
of the love and affection the
British public heaped upon
Our Enry for so many enduring
decades.
8]^Z[HedgihLg^iZg
JOHN
DILLON
ON WHY David Haye has
the potential to win the
hearts of a public now
mourning idol Sir Henry
/lmx
Victory123
56 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
CRICKET: BOWLER TARGETS ENGLAND RETURN
CRICKET SCOREBOARD
Picture: ROB GRIFFITH
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FIGHTER: Finn hopes to
return with England soon
ECB 40 League - Group A
Middlesex v Kent
LORD’S: Kent (2pts) beat Middlesex
by eight wickets
MIDDLESEX
S Newman c van Jaarsveld b Tredwell 49
D Malan c Blake b Mahmood ..............9
P Stirling c Stevens b Ball .................17
N Dexter b Ball ....................................2
G Berg b Stevens ..............................15
T Scollay b Stevens .............................3
O Rayner c van Jaarsveld b Shaw ....23
B Scott lbw Shaw .................................9
T Murtagh b Shaw ...............................7
A Ireland not out ................................22
C Collymore not out .............................2
Lb5 w9 nb4 .................................18
Total (9 wkts., 40 overs) .........176
Fall: 22, 41, 44, 77, 83, 119, 131, 136, 166.
Bowling: Mahmood 6-0-27-1, Ball 8-1-
41-2, Stevens 8-0-33-2, Tredwell 8-0-24-
1, Riley 3-0-20-0, Shaw 7-0-26-3.
KENT
S Northeast not out ............................63
R Key c Scott b Murtagh ......................8
M van Jaarsveld c Murtagh b Malan ..85
D Stevens not out ..............................13
B2 lb6 w1 ......................................9
Total (2 wkts., 31 overs) .........178
Fall: 22, 141.
Bowling: Collymore 7-1-18-0, Murtagh
3-0-27-1, Ireland 7-0-35-0, Rayner 6-0-
23-0, Malan 4-0-30-1, Stirling 4-0-37-0.
Umpires: M Gough & N Llong.
Sussex v Holland
HOVE: Sussex (2pts) beat Holland by
five wickets
HOLLAND
E Szwarczynski run out ...................111
W Barresi c Hodd b Naved-ul-Hasan 21
T Cooper c Hodd b Yardy ..................20
W Diepeveen c & b Nash ....................7
T de Grooth lbw Nash ..........................3
P Borren c Panesar b Nash ...............13
B Kruger b Naved-ul-Hasan ..............11
M Bukhari not out ..............................16
S Mott not out ......................................6
Lb9 w8 ........................................17
Total (7 wkts., 40 overs) .........225
Fall: 64, 109, 123, 129, 147, 199, 208.
Bowling: Arif 4.3-0-35-0, Khan
3.3-0-30-0, Naved-ul-Hasan 8-0-34-2,
Adkin 2-0-25-0, Yardy 8-0-36-1,
Panesar 8-0-26-0, Nash 6-0-30-3.
SUSSEX
E Joyce c Seelaar b Bukhari ...............4
C Nash c Kruger b Bukhari ................16
Naved-ul-Hasan b Bukhari ...............17
M Goodwin not out ..........................109
M Yardy b Westdijk ............................39
J Gatting c Kruger b Mott ...................25
A Hodd not out .....................................6
Lb7 w3 ........................................10
Total (5 wkts., 36.5 overs) ......226
Fall: 4, 28, 47, 127, 205.
Bowling: Bukhari 7-0-38-3, Mott 6.5-
0-45-1, Borren 6-0-35-0, Westdijk 8-0-
44-1, Seelaar 4-0-32-0, Kruger 5-0-25-0.
Umpires: N Cowley & J Lloyds.
Yorkshire v Derbyshire
HEADINGLEY CARNEGIE: Derbyshire
(2pts) beat Yorkshire by 52 runs
DERBYSHIRE
U Khawaja b Shahzad .......................20
C Hughes b Sidebottom ....................11
W Durston c Shahzad b Pyrah ..........95
G Smith b Sidebottom .......................30
W Madsen st Brophy b Rashid ..........66
J Clare lbw Pyrah ................................1
P Jones c Brophy b Pyrah ...................8
G Park c Pyrah b Rashid .....................2
L Sutton not out ...................................2
J Needham not out ..............................1
Lb1 w8 ..........................................9
Total (8 wkts., 40 overs) .........245
Fall: 26, 42, 138, 203, 205, 223, 238, 242.
Bowling: Sidebottom 8-0-38-2, Shah-
zad 8-1-42-1, Pyrah 8-0-41-3, Rashid 8-0-
57-2, Wainwright 6-0-48-0, Root 2-0-18-0.
YORKSHIRE
A Gale c & b Durston .........................74
A Lyth c Park b Groenewald ..............15
J Root lbw Durston ............................45
J Bairstow c Madsen b Hughes ...........4
G Brophy c Madsen b Durston ............5
J Sayers c Park b Jones ....................12
R Pyrah c Sutton b Clare .....................3
A Shahzad lbw Jones ..........................1
A Rashid not out ................................12
D Wainwright c Khawaja b Jones ........6
R Sidebottom c Khawaja b Clare .........8
B1 lb5 w2 ......................................8
Total (39 overs) .......................193
Fall: 35, 125, 138, 145, 156, 164, 167,
168, 177.
Bowling: Durston 7-0-25-3, Jones 7-0-
38-3, Groenewald 4-0-21-1, Clare 8-0-28-
2, Needham 5-0-32-0, Hughes 8-0-43-1.
Umpires: N Cook & J Evans.
Group B
Hampshire v Surrey
THE ROSE BOWL: Surrey (2pts) beat
Hampshire by four wickets
HAMPSHIRE
J Adams b Dernbach ...........................7
J Vince c Davies b Arafat ....................8
S Ervine b Arafat ...............................10
N McKenzie c Maynard b Spriegel ....21
L Dawson lbw Linley ..........................34
N Pothas b Linley ..............................15
B Howell b Dernbach .........................15
D Cork b Dernbach ..............................0
C Wood lbw Schofield .........................4
D Briggs c Davies b Dernbach ..........16
S Jones not out ....................................0
B1 lb4 w4 nb2 .............................11
Total (30 overs) .......................141
Fall: 16, 16, 27, 68, 97, 99, 100, 111, 140.
Bowling: Arafat 6-0-39-2, Dernbach
7-2-33-4, Spriegel 7-0-28-1, Linley 6-0-
21-2, Schofield 4-0-15-1.
SURREY
R Hamilton-Brown lbw Wood ...............1
S Davies c Howell b Jones ..................0
J Roy b Wood ....................................76
Z de Bruyn c Briggs b Jones ...............5
T Maynard c Wood b Briggs ..............14
G Wilson b Briggs ................................0
M Spriegel not out .............................29
C Schofield not out ..............................2
B2 lb2 w5 nb6 .............................15
Total (6 wkts., 33.3 overs) ......142
Fall: 1, 1, 24, 45, 45, 140.
Bowling: Jones 7-1-22-2, Wood 6.3-
1-37-2, Cork 6-0-21-0, Briggs 8-0-27-2,
Ervine 6-0-31-0.
Umpires: M Eggleston & N Mallender.
Leicestershire v Durham
GRACE ROAD: Durham (2pts) beat
Leicestershire by 69 runs
DURHAM
P Mustard run out ..............................27
K Coetzer c Boyce b Wyatt ..................7
B Stokes c White b Hoggard .............50
G Muchall c Dixey b Hoggard ............32
D Benkenstein b Henderson ................4
I Blackwell c & b Wyatt ......................98
G Breese c Cobb b Henderson .........44
B Harmison not out ..............................3
M Claydon b Malik ...............................1
C Rushworth c Hoggard b Malik ..........0
G Onions not out .................................1
Lb5 w7 p6 ...................................18
Total (9 wkts., 40 overs) .........285
Fall: 17, 59, 112, 125, 127, 271, 275,
282, 282.
Bowling: Wyatt 6-0-36-2, Malik 8-0-
54-2, White 8-0-74-0, Hoggard 8-0-49-2,
Henderson 8-0-41-2, Cobb 2-0-20-0.
LEICESTERSHIRE
J Cobb b Blackwell ............................87
J du Toit c Mustard b Onions ...............4
J Taylor c Muchall b Blackwell ...........29
P Nixon lbw Blackwell ..........................0
M Boyce c Breese b Claydon ............35
W White c Stokes b Rushworth .........21
P Dixey lbw Claydon ............................6
C Henderson c Benkenstein b Stokes .. 11
M Malik c Mustard b Stokes ................0
M Hoggard b Stokes ............................8
A Wyatt not out ....................................1
Lb4 w8 nb2 .................................14
Total (37.2 overs) ....................216
Fall: 7, 104, 104, 149, 175, 188, 207,
207, 209.
Bowling: Onions 6-0-32-1, Rush-
worth 8-0-55-1, Claydon 6-0-31-2,
Blackwell 8-1-49-3, Benkenstein 7-0-39-
0, Stokes 2.2-0-6-3.
Umpires: M Benson & J Steele.
Warwickshire v Scotland
EDGBASTON: Warwickshire (2pts)
beat Scotland by 6 runs
WARWICKSHIRE
V Chopra c Davey b Parker ...............31
W Porterfield c & b Parker .................64
K Barker c Davey b Parker ................56
M Yousuf c Davey b Parker .................0
J Troughton c Mommsen b Parker ......4
D Maddy c Maiden b Goudie ...............1
R Clarke b Goudie ...............................0
T Ambrose c Berrington b Mommsen 13
C Woakes b Goudie ..........................31
A Miller not out .....................................2
M Holmes b Goudie .............................5
B2 lb5 w10 ..................................17
Total (40 overs) .......................224
Fall: 100, 108, 108, 116, 118, 118,
151, 217, 218.
Bowling: Parker 7-0-47-5, Goudie 7-0-
36-4, Drummond 8-0-49-0, Haq 8-0-26-0,
Burnett 5-0-31-0, Mommsen 5-0-28-1.
SCOTLAND
G Maiden c Maddy b Miller ..................1
R Flannigan b Maddy ........................20
E Chalmers lbw Woakes .....................8
J Davey c Troughton b Barker ...........91
R Berrington b Maddy ..........................5
P Mommsen run out ..........................42
G Goudie c Barker b Woakes ............13
C Burnett run out .................................2
G Drummond run out .........................11
R Haq not out ......................................3
M Parker not out ..................................1
B1 lb4 w16 ..................................21
Total (9 wkts., 40 overs) .........218
Fall: 4, 18, 69, 79, 183, 193, 196, 214, 215.
Bowling: Miller 8-0-30-1, Woakes
7-1-30-2, Barker 8-0-55-1, Clarke 4-0-
16-0, Holmes 6-0-28-0, Maddy 7-0-54-2.
Umpires: G Sharp & P Willey.
Group C
Essex v Lancashire
CHELMSFORD: Essex (2pts) beat
Lancashire by seven wickets
LANCASHIRE
S Moore c Napier b Phillips ...............45
K Brown c Mickleburgh b Tsotsobe ...47
S Croft c Mickleburgh b Tsotsobe .......9
P Horton lbw Bopara ...........................8
M Maharoof b Bopara ..........................2
G Cross c Wheater b Phillips .............24
L Procter c Napier b Tsotsobe ...........24
S Mahmood b Tsotsobe ......................9
S Parry not out .....................................9
S Kerrigan lbw Bopara .........................3
G Keedy run out ..................................2
Lb1 w5 nb2 ...................................8
Total (36.4 overs) ....................190
Fall: 87, 103, 109, 116, 117, 151, 173,
180, 187.
Bowling: Napier 5-0-20-0, Wright 6-0-
38-0, Tsotsobe 7.4-0-43-4, Comber 2-0-
7-0, Bopara 8-0-49-3, Phillips 8-0-32-2.
ESSEX
M Pettini lbw Mahmood .......................7
A Cook c Procter b Mahmood ...........17
R Bopara not out ...............................75
J Foster st Cross b Kerrigan ..............77
A Wheater not out ..............................14
Lb2 w2 ..........................................4
Total (3 wkts., 34.1 overs) ......194
Fall: 23, 32, 167.
Bowling: Mahmood 8-1-28-2, Kerrig-
an 8-0-49-1, Maharoof 6-0-30-0, Parry
5-0-35-0, Keedy 4-0-27-0, Procter 3-0-
19-0, Croft 0.1-0-4-0.
Umpires: M Bodenham & R
Kettleborough.
Gloucestershire v Unicorns
BRISTOL: Gloucestershire (2pts) beat
Unicorns by 24 runs
GLOUCESTERSHIRE
I Cockbain lbw Wheeldon ..................15
A Gidman c Knappett b Wheeldon ......4
H Marshall lbw Wheeldon ....................0
C Taylor not out ...............................100
K Williamson c Knappett b Querl .......41
W Gidman c Peploe b Querl ..............16
E Young c Thompson b Saker .............4
J Fuller not out .....................................3
B5 lb1 w6 ....................................12
Total (6 wkts., 40 overs) .........195
Fall: 7, 7, 26, 129, 173, 186.
Bowling: Saker 8-2-38-1, Wheeldon
8-1-31-3, Miles 8-0-32-0, Querl 8-0-50-
2, Peploe 8-0-38-0.
UNICORNS
J Thompson c Young b Payne ............6
M Thornely lbw W R S Gidman .........31
J Knappett c A P R Gidman b Payne ..2
C Benham st Batty b Payne ................2
K Parsons not out ..............................62
J Campbell lbw A P R Gidman ..........26
N Saker lbw W R S Gidman ................2
R Querl c W R S Gidman b Payne ......8
C Peploe b Fuller .................................7
D Wheeldon c Williamson b Fuller .......7
J Miles not out .....................................3
B3 lb3 w9 ....................................15
Total (9 wkts., 40 overs) .........171
Fall: 23, 33, 43, 48, 91, 97, 121, 149,
163.
Bowling: Lewis 7-1-51-0, Fuller 7-0-
27-2, Payne 8-1-23-4, Young 8-0-26-0,
Gidman 8-0-29-2, Gidman 2-0-9-1.
Umpires: S Garratt & R Robinson.
Somerset v Glamorgan
TAUNTON: Somerset (2pts) beat
Glamorgan by 10 runs (D/L Method)
SOMERSET
M Trescothick c Wallace b Harris ........6
C Kieswetter not out ..........................95
P Trego c Rees b Harris ..................100
J Buttler not out .................................10
Lb3 w8 ........................................11
Total (2 wkts., 27 overs) .........222
Fall: 10, 184.
Bowling: Harris 5-0-36-2, Wagg 7-0-
52-0, Owen 2-0-40-0, Croft 4-0-35-0,
Cosker 6-0-34-0, Allenby 2-0-17-0,
O’Shea 1-0-5-0.
GLAMORGAN
G Rees c Kieswetter b Dibble ............37
A Petersen run out .............................15
J Allenby c Sub b Gregory .................41
M O’Shea lbw Gregory ......................25
G Wagg b Kirby .................................20
B Wright not out .................................28
M Wallace c Compton b Kirby ...........10
W Owen not out ...................................0
B1 lb4 w4 ......................................9
Total (6 wkts., 19 overs) .........185
Fall: 48, 74, 114, 122, 146, 172.
Bowling: Dibble 4-0-30-1, Kirby 4-0-
42-2, Gregory 3-0-24-2, Trego 5-0-51-0,
Mendis 3-0-33-0.
Umpires: P Hartley & S Malone.
Foster is Saints’ saviour
FOSTER: Penalty leveller
STEVE FINN maintained
he is happy “slipping
under the radar” at the
moment which is just as
well because day one of
Middlesex’s Division Two
Championship match
against Gloucestershire
tomorrow is not likely to
break crowd records.
But if you thought the big
man’s 6ft 7in frame had drifted
under the radar of those who
matter in the England set-up
after what he himself describes
as a disappointing winter, you
would be much mistaken.
Finn may be no better than
an outside bet to make the Test
squad to face Sri Lanka after an
Ashes series that saw him burn
brightly yet all too briefly, but he
is very much part of their plans.
He admitted yesterday at
Lord’s that he has had no
contact with “the powers that
be”. But last week he met up to
discuss progress with England’s
physio and conditioning coach.
He remains a work in progress
as far as England are concerned.
Centrally contracted players
are just on loan to their counties,
in his case Middlesex, and not
the other way round.
Finn, 22, made a blistering
start to his England Test career,
which numbers 11 games, and
he has 46 wickets. However,
over the final three, at Brisbane,
Adelaide and Perth, an
inability to provide the
economy Andrew Strauss
and coach Andy Flower
demanded if not the
wickets – he got 14 – cost
him his place for the
Ashes finale.
It was a first setback
and one that still
hurts deeply.
“Straussy told me
on Christmas Day
during the practice
session before the
Boxing Day Test
that I was going to
be left out and the
reasons why. But it
was pretty obvious
I was going for too
many runs,” he
said. “I understood
why and I did not
feel bitter.
“But to be on the
sidelines in your
bib, mixing drinks
during the two most
important moments
of the series and
the most historic
moments for any
England cricketer,
really hurt. Those
sort of things you
remember for a long
time and I don’t want
it to happen again.”
Returning stronger
has, therefore, been the
redemptive theme of Finn’s
spring. And when he returns to
the England set-up – and few
believe he will not – he says it
will be as a better, more
economical bowler.
To that end, he is hoping to
continue a bright start in a
Championship in which he has
contributed 16 wickets, at under
19 apiece, to an unbeaten start
by Middlesex.
He said: “I know that I will
have to work mighty hard to get
back. It is going to take some
eye-catching performances, but
hopefully I can get there.”
Finn is on the first steps of his
career but knows inconsistency
accompanies young bowlers and
that the antidote is overs.
He has bowled 116 of them so
far this season and, although he
insists there is no noticeable
change in his action or, for that
matter, his physique, he feels he
is cutting out “the four-balls”
that cut short his Test winter.
“I knew what was going wrong
in Australia but an Ashes series
is not an easy place to correct
things. You need to step back
and you cannot do that in the
middle of a Test match. But I
feel a better bowler now after
the experience and if I can use
that to help my career then all
the better,” he said. “I’ve bowled
plenty of overs this season and
things are going well.”
Finn concedes that Jimmy
Anderson, Stuart Broad, Chris
Tremlett, Tim Bresnan and
possibly Ajmal Shahzad
may be considered to
have their noses in
front of his, and
that Chris Woakes
and Graham
Onions may be
breathing down
his neck.
And such a
list makes his
appearance in
Mi ddl es ex’ s
game against
Sri Lanka at
Uxbridge on
May 14 or the
England Lions
showdown at
Derbyshire five
days later more likely
than a call to Cardiff for
next month’s first Test.
But once he can get
himself back on to that
radar, then he intends to
stay on it.
°MICHAEL YARDY
returned to action for the
first time since returning
from the World Cup with
depression by captaining
Sussex in the Clydesdale40
victory over the Netherlands
yesterday. He took one
wicket and scored 39.
Finn on
his way
back to
heights
gZedgih
GIDEON
BROOKS
JAMIE FOSTER’s late
penalty earned
St Helens a dramatic
point which did nothing
for coach Royce
Simmons’ blood
pressure on his 51st
birthday.
A hat-trick of tries
from Kirk Yeaman
looked to have given
Hull a third successive
win, but Saints refused
to throw in the towel
– and not for the first
time this season, Foster
came up with the goods
under pressure four
minutes from time
when Danny Washbrook
was adjudged to have
taken out debutant
Nathan Ashe in the air.
Bath-bound Kyle
Eastmond, back in
action for the first time
since being disciplined
by the club in March,
went for a drop-goal
winner that would have
put Saints a point clear
at the top but it was
charged down.
Saints, decimated by
injury, were 18-0 down
to a revitalised Hull but
turned it around in
thrilling fashion.
“Our ball control in
the first half was very
poor and that burns up
a lot of energy,” said
Simmons. “I’ll go away
happy with a point.”
Two Yeaman tries and
another by Tom Briscoe
stunned Saints but
they hauled themselves
back through Foster,
only for Tom Armstrong
to grab Hull’s fourth.
The second half was
all Saints and James
Roby, Ade Gardner and
Tony Puletua capped a
stunning comeback,
Foster’s goal pushing
them ahead for the first
time.
Hull regrouped and
Yeaman completed the
fifth hat-trick of his
career. Danny Tickle’s
conversion reclaimed
the lead but Foster had
the last word.
HULL 24
ST HELENS 24
RUGBY LEAGUE
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 57
SNOOKER: BETFRED.COM WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP
Higgins’ heartache
has a happy ending
Picture: ANDREW YATES
‘NEW SENSATION’:
Judd Trump
Johnson’s
torment at
title failure
By Tony Paskin
ADAM JOHNSON has admitted he
is frustrated by Manchester City’s
failure to challenge for the title.
Roberto Mancini’s side tightened
their grip on a Champions League
spot with a 2-1 win over West Ham
on Sunday, moving seven points
clear of Liverpool and Tottenham.
They also have an FA Cup final
against Stoke to look forward to on
May 14 as they look to end a 35-year
trophy drought.
But Johnson acknowledges that
City, who have been in the top four
since September and briefly led the
table in January, should have
produced a more sustained push for
the Premier League title.
They are 11 points adrift of leaders
Manchester United with a game in
hand and Johnson, whose return
from an ankle problem has given
City another dimension, said: “I’m
disappointed that we are not in
there. We should be and a lot of
neutral people think we should be
with the squad we have.
“There were a couple of iffy results
which we should have won, but it
has been a learning process for us.”
Mancini’s squad has been
regularly subjected to questions over
its unity after a string of bust-ups.
But Johnson claims the group is
the closest he has ever worked with,
tighter even than his former squad
at Middlesbrough which contained a
host of home-grown players. He said:
“We have the belief. It’s just about
going on the pitch and doing it.
“I don’t think beating United in
the FA Cup semi-final made a major
difference around the club, we
always had that belief.
“A lot is made about us not being a
close group but I’ve not been in a
better dressing room for banter and
the lads knitting as one.”
Johnson claims the Champions
League has been his dream since
watching Newcastle’s brushes with
Europe’s top competition more than
a decade ago.
Kenny Dalglish’s side beat
Barcelona 3-2 on one memorable
night at St James’ Park and Johnson
wants a slice of that next season.
“I used to watch Newcastle in the
Champions League,” he said.
“I remember Barcelona and those
nights – Faustino Asprilla and
people like that.
“Night matches were a bit special
for me. I can’t remember if I was
allowed to stay up, actually, but I
remember the 3-2 game against
Barcelona. Keith Gillespie set a few
up with crosses. It was a game that
stuck in my memory.
“As an Englishman growing up,
watching English clubs in the
Champions League was massive.”
Midfielder Nigel de Jong will have
a scan on his hip problem today and
hopes to be available to face Everton
on Saturday.
AMBITION: Johnson, left, wants more
JOHN HIGGINS last night
placed an emotional fourth
world title at the top of his
list of achievements.
He outlasted the 21-year-old
tournament sensation Judd Trump
18-15 in a thrilling final at the
Betfred.com World Championship
in Sheffield. It earned him £250,000
– and puts him clear in fourth
place in the all-time pantheon of
champions.
Only Stephen Hendry – with
seven titles – and Steve Davis and
Ray Reardon, with six, stand above
him. And yesterday’s Crucible glory
came just 12 months after the
‘frame-fixing’ affair that turned his
world upside down.
Higgins, who has now won 24
ranking titles, was cleared of all
corruption charges but banned
for six months and fined £75,000
on lesser charges.
He returned in November in
superb form, winning the UK
Championship before Christmas.
But Higgins, 35, was hit by
another blow earlier this
year when father John
Snr lost his battle
with cancer.
Last night, he
emerged to
‘Needles and Pins’
by the Searchers –
his father’s
favourite song.
And in a crackling
Crucible atmosphere, ‘Wizard of
Wishaw’ Higgins and new star
Trump put on a match befitting of
the occasion to light up the arena.
Cheered on by wife Denise, his
children and other family, Higgins
pulled away from Trump in the final
stages. And he clinched victory in
characteristically determined style,
coming back from 60-0 down and
getting a snooker on the pink to
pinch it 62-61.
Despite missing 15
tournaments during his
ban, Higgins has still
remained at No2 in the
world rankings. And this
took his ‘half-season’
earnings to £472,000 – well
clear of all his rivals.
Higgins said: “It was an
unbelievable feeling as I
potted the final black.
With everything
that has happened,
I rate this as by far
the biggest and
best of my four
titles here. That is three in the past
five years – and now I want seven. I
have got a few years left to battle it
out with the likes of Judd.
“I must give him huge credit – I
was frightened of him out there and
he plays a brand of snooker I have
never seen before. I’m certain he is
a future multiple world champion.
“The atmosphere at the entrance
out there tonight was something I
will remember until my dying day. I
have won big titles, but never in my
life have I heard anything like it.
“If you had told me I would miss
15 tournaments this season and
then it would end like this, I would
never have believed you.”
Higgins beat Stephen Lee in the
first round, then Rory McLeod,
Ronnie O’Sullivan and Mark
Williams in the semi-final went the
same way. And this year’s world
title can be added to those he won
in 1998, 2007 and 2009.
Trump, though, can take pride in
his displays which saw him beat
two former world champions in
Neil Robertson and Graeme Dott.
“It has just been incredible right
from the start of the 17 days,” he
said. “I have built up this huge
fanbase which has given me such
great support. The whole experience
has been mind-blowing and I can’t
be too disappointed about losing
the final after playing like that.
“I lost to the better player in
John, he deserved to win – but I will
be back for another crack at this.”
Trump shot to prominence by
winning the recent China Open,
making it clear he would be a force
to be reckoned with in Sheffield as
he surfed a winning streak.
He emerged yesterday afternoon
with a surprise 10-7 lead over his
vastly more experienced opponent.
A Higgins onslaught was all too
predictable, but Trump held his
own over the first four frames,
breaks of 104 and 99 keeping him
12-9 ahead.
However, a huge moment in the
22nd frame cost Trump the chance
of opening up a four-frame
advantage. In characteristically
bold fashion he took on a risky blue,
not only missing it but leaving it
over the pocket to allow Higgins to
close the gap.
And sensing a turning point,
three-time winner Higgins turned
up the heat on the young
left-hander.
He rattled in breaks of 93, 113
and 57 to make it four frames on
the spin and ensured it was him
who went into the evening climax
with a lead of 13-12.
It looked ominous when Higgins
took that run to five frames, but
Trump kept hopes alive by hitting
back, taking advantage of rare
errors to level at 14-14.
But Higgins ultimately showed
his experience and class to pull
clear at the end.
gZedgih
HECTOR
NUNNS
GRINNING
CONCLUSION:
John Higgins
can’t help but
smile after
winning the
world title for
the fourth
time last night
Ê@nXj]i`^_k\e\[f]_`dÆAl[[
`jX]lkli\nfic[Z_Xdg`feË
***
Victory123
58 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
FOOTBALL: NPOWER CHAMPIONSHIP
By Ian Ridley
Picture: SEAN DEMPSEY
GOLF
USPGA TOUR ZURICH CLASSIC OF
NEW ORLEANS (Avondale,
Louisiana)—Final Rnd (USA unless
stated): 273 B Watson 69 (Watson
won at second play-off hole),
W Simpson 69. 275 J Dufner 66,
K J Choi (Kor) 69, T Gainey 69.
npower Championship
CARDIFF (0) .......... 0 MIDDLESBRO (3) 3
Lita 3
Robson 13
Att: 25,183 Smallwood 21
PORTSMTH (0)...... 0 NORWICH (0) ..... 1
Jackson 50
Att: 17,113
Norwich are promoted.
npower League One
PLYMOUTH (0) ...... 1 SOUTHMPTN (1) . 3
Bolasie 90 Lambert 45, 59 (pen)
Dickson 49
Att: 13,118
Plymouth are relegated.
RUGBY LEAGUE
Engage Super League
HULL .................. 24 ST HELENS ......... 24
Hull—T: Yeaman (3), T. Briscoe. G: Tickle
(4).
St Helens—T: Foster, Roby, Gardner,
Puletua. G: Foster (4). Att: 11,933
RUGBY UNION
NATIONAL LEAGUE—One: Tynedale
37 Blaydon 35.
SNOOKER
WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP (Crucible
Theatre)—Final: J Higgins (Sco) bt
J Trump (Eng) 18-15.
TENNIS
ATP & WTA MADRID OPEN
(Spain)—Selected, Men’s 1st Rnd:
Gael Monfils (Fra) bt I Karlovic (Cro)
6-3 7-6, J Isner (USA) bt M Fish (USA)
7-6 4-6 7-6, F Cipolla (Ita) bt Andy
Roddick (USA) 6-4 6-7 6-3. Women’s
2nd Rnd: M Sharapova (Rus) bt
E Makarova (Rus) 6-3 3-6 6-1, A
Santonja (Spa) bt A Petkovic (Ger) 6-2.
P W D L F A Pts
Brighton (C) ..............45 28 10 7 84 39 94
Southampton ............45 27 8 10 83 37 89
Huddersfield .............45 25 11 9 73 44 86
Peterborough ............45 22 10 13 101 75 76
MK Dons...................45 22 8 15 65 59 74
Bournemouth ............45 19 14 12 74 52 71
Leyton Orient ............45 18 13 14 67 61 67
Exeter ......................45 19 10 16 64 72 67
Rochdale ..................45 17 14 14 61 54 65
Brentford .................45 17 9 19 51 58 60
Carlisle .....................45 16 11 18 60 60 59
Colchester ................45 15 14 16 55 62 59
Sheff Wed .................45 16 10 19 66 65 58
Charlton ...................45 15 13 17 62 66 58
Tranmere ..................45 15 11 19 53 58 56
Oldham .....................45 13 17 15 52 58 56
Yeovil .......................45 15 11 19 54 66 56
Hartlepool ................45 15 11 19 47 65 56
Notts County .............45 14 7 24 45 59 49
Walsall .....................45 12 12 21 55 72 48
Dag & Red ................45 12 11 22 52 65 47
Bristol Rovers ...........45 11 12 22 47 80 45
Plymouth (R) .............45 15 7 23 50 70 42
Swindon (R)...............45 8 14 23 48 72 38
Clydesdale Bank Premier
ST MIRREN (0) ...... 0 HAMILTON (0) .... 1
Att: 5,037 Antoine-Curier 74
GREYHOUNDS
ROMFORD: 6.39 Big Appeal 7-2 (F3-1
£16.33). 6.56 Glowing Sunset 11-4f (1-3
£12.76). 7.11 Uncle Benny 5-2jt (1-6
£18.17). 7.27 Black Paws Down 5-2jt (3-4
£9.72). 7.43 Brave Stranger 5-1 (6-4
£40.55). 7.58 Bourne Masons 3-1 (5-6
£10.39). 8.14 Lynton Biffo 4-1 (3-6 £36.56).
8.47 Lord Bonville 4-1 (4-6 £23.68). 9.02
Genesis Cougar 7-2 (3-6 £25.68). 9.17
Lavally Sunrise 4-1 (6-1 £21.51). 9.30 Millie
On Air 7-2 (5-2 £26.65).
TODAY’S DIARY
UEFA Champions Lge
Semi Final Second Leg
Barcelona (2) v Real Madrid (0) ...... (7.45)
BLUE SQUARE BET—South Play-off
Semi-finals: Chelmsford v Ebbsfleet
United (7.45).
SPEEDWAY
National League: Dudley v
Scunthorpe (7.30pm).
Ê@n`ccj\\n_Xkk_\
dXeX^\inXekjXe[
kXb\`k]ifdk_\i\Ë
SPORT IN BRIEF
ADEL TAARABT has
kicked off a worrying week
for QPR by questioning
whether he will still be with
them next season.
They face a Football Association
hearing about midfielder Alejandro
Faurlin’s eligibility, knowing it is a
threat to their promotion to the
Premier League.
If found guilty of knowing that
Argentinian Faurlin was owned by
a third party apart from the club,
in breach of FA regulations,
Rangers could be fined – but could
also be docked points.
That would threaten their
automatic promotion as winners
of the Championship and could
also throw the play-offs into chaos,
with the possibility of appeal
hearings and matches having to
be rearranged.
With the verdict due on Friday,
QPR are now forced to endure an
anxious wait after the euphoria
of their 2-0 win at Watford that
should have taken them up to the
top flight.
And Taarabt’s teasing response
to questions about his future will
only increase the tension for
Rangers and their supporters.
“I am very happy with what I’ve
achieved at QPR. Now we have all
summer and after that I will see
with the manager what they want
to do and then we will take a
decision,” said Moroccan Taarabt.
He joined QPR from Tottenham
last summer for £1million but his
transfer value has soared as he has
scored 19 goals and become the
Championship’s Player of the Year.
“I hope I can prove to Spurs that
they made a mistake to sell me,”
added Taarabt.
“I have nothing against Harry
Redknapp. The last time I saw
him, he joked with me, ‘I sold you
for £1m and now you must be worth
£8-9m. The chairman will kill me’.”
Taarabt, 21, has blossomed in
his time at Loftus Road after being
made captain by Neil Warnock,
who has become an influential
figure in his career and could yet
be able to persuade him to stay in
west London.
“Neil told me when he arrived
at the club that one of the five
previous managers had told him,
‘This boy will get you the sack’,”
said Taarabt.
“But Neil told me that after
watching me in his first training
session, he called back and told
him, ‘No chance. I cannot get rid
of him with talent like this. I have
to make him what he can be’.”
Taarabt also revealed Faurlin
felt that he had let his team-mates
down when his case was first
exposed.
He added: “The first few days
Alejandro was a little bit worried
because he may have thought
that the lads would blame him.
But we told him, ‘Don’t worry, it
isn’t your fault’.
“Rangers did not cheat or do
anything wrong. We have played
every match with 11 men against
11. I don’t know what is happening
upstairs but the FA will come to
their decision and then we will see
what happens.
“We have won the Championship.
If the FA take that away it would
be a disaster for every player but
I will still tell people I am a
champion.”
Despite the fear of League
sanction, Warnock is drawing up
his shopping list for the summer.
Rangers are keeping tabs on
Watford hot-shot Danny Graham,
who has scored 27 goals for the
Hornets this season. They are
believed to be tabling a £3m bid,
with former Watford favourite
Heidar Helguson moving in the
opposite direction.
The Hoops also hope to snap up
wantaway Glasgow Rangers
defender Madjid Bougherra in a
cut-price £1m deal.
Defender Clint Hill, meanwhile,
will undergo an operation to clear
up an ankle problem.
Warnock said: “Clint has played
43 matches this season but, if you
saw the bits floating around in his
ankle on the X-ray, you wouldn’t
even know how he had managed
20 of the those.”
QPR told it
could soon
be ta-ta
Taarabt
AWAY DAY? Midfield star Adel
Taarabt, on left, is not sure
he will stay with Rangers
***/lmx
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 59
FOOTBALL: NPOWER CHAMPIONSHIP
PORTSMOUTH 0
NORWICH 1
=FFK98CC
J?FIKJ
°Ê
JOHN SCALES is tipping
Liverpool to beat Tottenham
in this month’s clash at Anfield,
which could settle who qualifies
for the Europa League.
Scales, who spent two years at
Liverpool and four at Spurs,
cannot recall a bigger encounter
between the sides in recent years,
but feels the momentum is with
Liverpool, who leapfrogged Spurs
and moved to fifth in the table at
the weekend.
He said: “Tottenham have a very
tough run-in when you haven’t got
the momentum, but they have a
game in hand on Liverpool.
“A resurgent Liverpool have put
game. It’s too close to call who will
finish fifth and I’m torn between
the two. Spurs have been so great
in Europe this year, so to miss out
completely would be a real shock.”
°Ê
PHILIPPE SENDEROS wants
to make up for his injury
nightmare by helping Fulham
finish in the top half of the table.
Swiss defender Senderos signed
in the summer but suffered an
Achilles problem in training before
the season had even started.
He made his debut in Fulham’s
would be a good year for us all.”
Eidur Gudjohnsen, meanwhile,
would be prepared to turn his loan
move at Craven Cottage into a
permanent transfer from Stoke. He
said: “I’d be glad to stay if both
parties can agree something. It’s a
great just to be playing again.”
°Ê
SOUTHAMPTON all but
secured promotion to the
Championship after confirming
Plymouth’s relegation to League
Two with a 3-1 win.
Nigel Adkins’ side are now three
points clear of third-placed
Huddersfield with a far superior
goal difference and he said: “This
was a big victory for the boys and
we’re in a great position now.”
testimonial against Charlton this
summer. He said: “The only club I
wanted to be at was Millwall and I
want to finish my career here. I
was delighted to put pen to paper.”
°Ê
STUART PEARCE will
announce his England
Under-21 squad for the European
Championship today, with Jack
Wilshere and Andy Carroll both
likely to be included.
But Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger
fears Wilshere will be burned out if
he plays in Denmark next month.
themselves in a
very strong
position. It has
been a
phenomenal
turnaround
Kenny Dalglish
has overseen
since taking
over.
“I would fancy
Liverpool to win
that one-off
3-0 win at
Sunderland on
Saturday and
said: “I’d waited
a long time and
I’m delighted to
have finally
pulled on the
shirt.
“We deserve to
be in the top
half. If we can
achieve that, it
°Ê
MILLWALL
have
rewarded
long-serving
defender Alan
Dunne, 28, with
a three-year
contract.
Dunne has
been with the
Lions since the
age of eight and
will have a
SCALES
DUNNE
SENDEROS
Sullivan: I didn’t need to go
SULLIVAN:
Watched
Hammers
game on TV
WEST HAM co-owner
David Sullivan has
defended himself and
his directors’ no-show
at Manchester City
and issued a rallying
cry for the Premier
League’s basement
club, warning there
is no room for
errors or bad luck.
Eyebrows were
raised when
neither Sullivan,
joint chairman
David Gold,
vice-chair
Karren Brady
nor honorary
life-president
Terry Brown
attended the
2-1 defeat, the
Hammers’ fifth
straight loss.
But Sullivan said
yesterday: “We would
never miss a home game,
however we do not think
missing an away game
that’s on TV over a Bank
Holiday weekend is
significant.
“I doubt any chairman
has missed less league
games than myself and
David Gold over the past
20 years.
“Watching our poor
away performances week
after week and not having
the ability to influence
things has impacted on us.
“My family think I’m
mad devoting so much
time and money to the
club and, as the match
was on TV, I decided to
watch it.
“We couldn’t influence
the result. We donated the
cost of a private plane to a
charity for terminally ill
children, we thought that
would do more good.
None of us draw any
salary or expenses from
West Ham. We are not
£20,000-60,000-a-week
footballers.
“We will be at Wigan
(West Ham’s last away
game on May 15) as will
4,500 supporters. We all
need to pull together and
hope for the best.
“If we play like we
played on Sunday after
the first 20 minutes, it
might just be enough. But
we have no room for errors
or bad luck now.”
Julian Dicks believes the
lazy attitude of some
players could cost West
Ham their place in the
Premier League and lead
to the sacking of manager
Avram Grant. Former
Hammers defender Dicks
says Grant must bear
overall responsibility for
the dismal season, but
maintains they would not
be in such a perilous
situation had a number of
players put in the effort.
“The last three games
are about the players
now,” said Dicks. “They
have to stand up and be
counted.
“They are all on good
money and it’s about time
that they started to earn
it. That hasn’t been the
case with some of them
this season.
“There are a few players
who aren’t good enough.
That’s not their fault, but
there are some players
who are good enough
who just don’t work
hard enough.”
EXCLUSIVE
By Frank Wiechula
Canaries fly after
Jackson’s thriller
Picture: HENRY BROWNE
By Michael Johns
MANAGER Paul Lambert
described promotion to the
Premier League as a
“miracle” after victory over
Portsmouth sealed a return
to the top flight.
He guided Norwich out of League
One last year and Simeon Jackson’s
winner at Fratton Park means his
team are guaranteed second place
in the Championship.
“It’s incredible what these players
have just done and two seasons
with back-to-back promotions is a
miracle,” said Lambert. “The main
thing was to survive after coming
up, but hopefully this will give the
club the financial backing.”
Lambert, 41, a European Cup
winner as a player, added: “This is
up there with anything I’ve done.”
He will relish rubbing shoulders
with Sir Alex Ferguson and Arsene
Wenger next season after a career
that has taken him from Livingston
to Wycombe and Colchester before
his move to Carrow Road. After this,
it is no wonder he is considered one
of the hottest managerial properties
in the country.
He will fancy his chances in the
top flight too, and he could be a
breath of fresh air in the way that
Ian Holloway has been at Blackpool.
Cardiff’s shock 3-0 home defeat
by Middlesbrough earlier in the day
meant that Lambert’s team knew
victory would seal promotion with a
game to spare.
Jackson struck in the 50th minute
by heading home David Fox’s deep
cross. It was a ninth goal in seven
matches for the striker, formerly of
Rushden and Gillingham, who will
now be lining up against Chelsea
and Manchester United. He said:
“It has been a magnificent effort by
everyone. I can’t believe it.”
The Canaries dropped out of the
Premier League six seasons ago and
hit rock-bottom when they were at
the foot of League One on the first
day of last season after their 7-1
defeat by Colchester.
Their reaction was to hire the
opposition manager and, 20 months
later, Lambert’s Norwich are the
first team to achieve successive
promotions to reach the top flight
since Manchester City in 2000.
They could even be crowned
champions if the FA hit QPR with
a points deduction following the
Alejandro Faurlin transfer affair.
“That has never bothered me,”
said Lambert. “To win the league?
I’d want that, but we cannot do any
more than win our last match.”
Majority shareholder Delia Smith
celebrated on the touchline with
Lambert after the final whistle as
fans spilled on to the pitch. She gave
her famous “Let’s Be ’Avin You”
speech last time Norwich were in
the Premier League, in 2005. This
time, she settled for: “I’m absolutely
ecstatic. I really can’t believe this.
“I am wondering whether I’ll wake
up in the morning and all this has
not happened. What an amazing
two seasons we have had after
relegation and then two successive
promotions. Paul has done a terrific
job. I think he is the tops – a brilliant
manager.”
Skipper Grant Holt, who has
spearheaded the promotion push
with 22 goals, was full of praise for
Lambert too. “The gaffer has been
fantastic,” he said. “He is a motivator
and has been great for us. We have
worked hard and I think when we’re
on it there’s no one better. We have
great team spirit and desire. It’s a
joy being with each other.”
Pompey boss Steve Cotterill said:
“Congratulations to Norwich. But
this is the two sides of football. I’m
delighted for their owners, who are
proper football people. But with a
bit of help and just a few more
players, that might have been us.”
PORTSMOUTH (4-4-2): Ashdown; Halford,
Dickinson (Lawrence 68), De Laet, Hreidarsson;
Ward (Cotterill 82), Mokoena, Mullins, Hogg;
Nugent, Kanu (Webber 85). Booked: Hreidarsson,
Mokoena.
NORWICH (4-4-2): Ruddy; R Martin, Whitbread,
Ward, Tierney; Crofts, Surman (Lappin 87),
Hoolahan, Fox (Lansbury 78); Holt, Jackson. Goal:
Jackson 50.
Referee: A D’Urso (Essex).
HE STOOPS TO CONQUER: Jackson’s header puts Norwich back in the Premier League after a gap of six seasons
HOW THEY STAND
P W D L F A Pts
QPR (C) ....................45 24 16 5 70 30 88
Norwich (P) ...............45 23 14 8 81 56 83
Cardiff ......................45 23 10 12 75 53 79
Swansea ...................45 23 8 14 65 42 77
Reading ....................45 19 17 9 75 50 74
Nottm Forest ............45 19 15 11 66 50 72
Leeds .......................45 18 15 12 79 69 69
Millwall .....................45 18 13 14 62 47 67
Burnley .....................45 18 13 14 64 60 67
Hull ..........................45 16 17 12 52 48 65
Leicester ..................45 18 10 17 72 69 64
Ipswich .....................45 18 8 19 60 64 62
Watford ....................45 16 13 16 76 68 61
Middlesbrough ..........45 16 11 18 65 68 59
Bristol City ...............45 16 9 20 59 65 57
Portsmouth...............45 15 12 18 52 59 57
Coventry ...................45 14 12 19 52 56 54
Barnsley ...................45 13 14 18 54 66 53
Derby .......................45 13 10 22 57 69 49
Crystal Palace ...........45 12 12 21 44 66 48
Doncaster .................45 11 15 19 55 78 48
Sheff Utd (R) .............45 11 9 25 44 75 42
Scunthorpe (R) ..........45 12 5 28 42 86 41
Preston (R) ...............45 9 12 24 51 78 39
***
Victory123
60 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
FOOTBALL: CHAMPIONS LEAGUE
Xavi joins the
war on Real
Messi is simply the
best says Ardiles
Picture: ANDRES KUDACKI
YOU’RE
OFF:
Real
Madrid’s
Pepe is
dismissed
by referee
Wolfgang
Stark
after
fouling
Dani
Alves and
will miss
tonight’s
second
leg
°
BARCELONA’S Champions League semi-final
second leg with Real Madrid should be stripped
of its ‘El Clasico’ status, according to Arsene Wenger.
Arsenal boss Wenger said: “They call it El Clasico,
but last week’s game was a non-Clasico.
“It was a game decided on the sending-off, which
looked a bit harsh. You have to say, football-wise,
Barcelona are ahead of anybody in Europe and it’s
difficult to beat them purely on commitment.”
BARCELONA and Real
Madrid have carried on their
war of words, exchanging
accusations, reprimands and
dark hints about racism,
conspiracies, violent play
and mutual antagonism.
On the eve of the Champions
league semi-final second leg at the
Nou Camp, Barcelona midfielder
Xavi called Madrid “pathetic and
lamentable”.
Madrid assistant coach Aitor
Karanka responded by accusing
Barcelona of racist language and
claimed the match was now less
important than UEFA’s decision
against Madrid. “UEFA’S decision
not to proceed with our complaint
means the game itself becomes
secondary,” said Karanka.
“That organisation talk about
principles like respect and fair play
and yet nothing has happened.
There are values [in life which are
more important] – and against
that, here the football passes into
a lesser importance. This is an
organisation who have T-shirts
devoted so much time to focusing
on, and arguing about, non-football
issues around this game,” he said.
“OK, I personally think it is
pathetic and lamentable that the
clubs are denouncing each other
to UEFA and it is also lamentable
what has been claimed about us.
“But this can be a great game.
We will attack because we are
always loyal to our philosophy of
football and I really want the fans
to see a great game.
“Having said all that, I am not
tired of playing Madrid, this is
pressure, this is tension, I love the
challenge and it’s what every top
player wants to be doing at this
time of year.
debating a video issued by Real
Madrid which purported to show
Sergio Busquets calling Madrid
full-back Marcelo a “monkey”.
Barcelona coach Pep Guardiola
used verbal dexterity in avoiding
any confirmation that he knew
Busquets had used such language,
but added: “We’re going to be very
upset if it’s proved that one of our
players made racist comments
against Madrid and we will take
action.
“But then UEFA have to decide,
no one else.”
UEFA have rejected Madrid’s
pleas for eight Barcelona players
to be sanctioned for “persistent
and pre-meditated unsporting
behaviour” in the first leg.
European football’s governing
body have also dismissed
Barcelona’s counter-claims
not to accept either
club’s claims against the
other following the
stormy first leg which
Barca won 2-0.
“There will be a player
on the pitch that racially
abused another player,
while others who have
done nothing wrong
won’t be there,” said
Karanka. Spain has been
“I wasn’t allowed by
my parents to go to
Wembley last time
Barcelona won the
European Cup there
(their first victory in this
competition, against
Sampdoria in 1992) but
they let my brothers go
which upset me. So it
would be very special to
go there this time and do
and messages talking about fair
play and respect and yet we have
seen the images which have been
round the world, including a player
making racist insults and covering
his mouth to make it so that you
can’t see it.
“But he will be on the pitch,
along with others. Other players
who have done nothing wrong
won’t be. That is the most
important thing today. The
football is not.”
What Karanka failed to address
was the fact that thousands of
Real Madrid fans made ‘monkey’
noises at defender Dani Alves in
the Bernabeu.
Xavi, for his part, despite his
critcism of Madrid, introduced a
note of perspective by saying his
club were not faultless either. “I
worry that so many people have
it by defeating our historic rivals.”
Just as the nonsense Jose
Mourinho spouted last week
obscured Lionel Messi’s pair of
outstanding goals, the fact that
amid all the abuse the startling
news that, six weeks after having a
tumour excised from his liver, Eric
Abidal is back in the Barcelona
squad was also lost.
It was the triumph of the human
spirit, rather than just adding a
top-class defender, which caught
the imagination.
Barcelona had said that Abidal
would not return until next season
but there he was last night training
fully after his team-mates greeted
him with rousing applause.
If there has to be a final word it
should be Guardiola’s. “After
tomorrow all this will be finished,”
he said. “That’s good.”
^c7VgXZadcV
GRAHAM
HUNTER
FROM BACK PAGE
way the players look
after their bodies, the
way that clubs and
national sides employ so
many people to look
after them means they
are better conditioned.
“So yes, I would now
say that Messi is the
very best, but you would
wonder just how much
better Maradona or Pele
would have been if they
had the advantage of
such advancements in
the game.
“Messi simply needs
to carry on the way he is
and his recognition as
the finest of all time will
not be long arriving.
“The big difference is
that Maradona played in
Argentina then in Italy,
while Pele stayed in
Brazil, and during their
time the pressures were
less intense than they
are now.
“Messi is under
constant pressure and
has to play in incredibly
high-intensity games all
of the time, the
Champions League
being the perfect
example.
“I certainly do not
subscribe to the
argument most widely
held against Messi, that
he needs to be a World
Cup winner like Diego
and Pele before he can
be the world’s greatest.
George Best never
played in the World Cup
but he is still recognised
as one of the all-time
greats, Alfredo Di
Stefano never won the
World Cup and Ryan
Giggs has never played
in one.”
Ardiles, who also
managed Newcastle and
Swindon as well as
abroad, added: “If it is
going to be Manchester
United against Barcelona
in the Wembley final as
we all suspect, then it is
going to be very difficult
for United because of
Messi. Barcelona are a
very good team, superb,
but with Messi they are
special, simple as that.
He takes them to a
different level.
“It is incredible to
think that there was a
physical problem with
him as a boy and that
they thought he would
never be able to take the
demands of football.
“The fact that he has
scored 52 goals is simply
incredible as he is not an
authentic scorer in the
sense he is not a
centre-forward or a
striker. He is the
archetypal No 10, like a
Maradona, Pele or a
Bobby Charlton.”
¬Ossie Ardiles, who is a
global ambassador for
Tottenham, is also an
ambassador for Football
40, which launches its first
public tournament at
Craven Cottage on May 29,
kick-off 3pm, with Spurs v
Arsenal and Chelsea v
Fulham, with the winners
playing in the final. See
www.football40.com
Harry Harris is ESPN
Football Correspondent
and Head of Comms for
Football 40.
***/lmx
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 61
°
SACKING managers is easy.
The difficult bit is picking the
next bloke. Liverpool had their man
standing by – or sitting in the front
row of the directors’ box – although
few expected Kenny Dalglish to
galvanise the team
as he has. The
cleverest
appointment
was by West
Brom. They
hired Liverpool
discard Roy
Hodgson, left
– and he has lost
just one of nine
games since.
Draw Last 6 Home Last 6 Away
power Games Games
BARCLAYS PREMIER LEAGUE
1 20% WDWLWD Aston Villa ............ v Wigan .................. DDLLWL 1
2 40% WWWWLW Bolton ................... v Sunderland .......... WLLdLL 1
3 20% WLDWDW Everton ................. v Man City .............. LdLLLW 1
4 20% WdLWWW Fulham ................. v Liverpool .............. dLLWLD 2
5 80% WWWWWW Man Utd ................. v Chelsea ................. dWWDLW X
6 30% DDDLWd Newcastle ............. v Birmingham .......... WDLDLL 1
7 30% WDWWDW Stoke .................... v Arsenal ................ LLDWDL 2
8 20% ddWLDD Tottenham ............ v Blackpool ............. LLLLDL 1
9 20% LWWWLL West Ham ............. v Blackburn............. LLLLdL 2
10 70% LWWDLD Wolverhampton ..... v West Brom ........... LLDWWD X
BEST IN SIX SEASONS: Aston Villa 2 draws, 0 win.
NPOWER LEAGUE ONE
11 80% WDDLWW Bournemouth ........ v Rochdale.............. LWWWLL X
12 20% LWDWWL Carlisle ................. v Yeovil ................... WLWWLD 1
13 30% DLDWLW Charlton ................ v Hartlepool ............ WLLDLL 1
14 20% LLWWWD Colchester ............ v Bristol Rovers ...... LWWWLL 1
15 40% DWdWDW Huddersfield ......... v Brentford ............. LWWLWD 1
16 20% LLLLLD Notts County ......... v Brighton ............... WWWDWD 2
17 30% LLLddD Oldham ................. v MK Dons .............. WWWLWL 2
18 30% DWWDWD Peterborough ........ v Dag & Red ........... DDLLLL 1
19 30% LWWLWW Plymouth .............. v Leyton Orient ....... WWLLLW 2
20 40% LLWWWW Sheff Wed ............. v Exeter .................. DLWLWL 2
21 20% WWWWWW Southampton ......... v Walsall .................. LdDDLD 1
22 30% LWLWLW Tranmere .............. v Swindon ............... LdLLWL 1
BEST IN SIX SEASONS: Huddersfield 1 draw, 1 win.
NPOWER LEAGUE TWO
23 40% WLLDWD Barnet .................. v Port Vale .............. WDLLdL 2
24 20% WDLLDW Bradford ............... v Crewe .................. LLLLLL 2
25 30% LWLDWD Burton Albion ........ v Acc Stanley .......... dLdDDd 2
26 80% WWWWWL Chesterfield .......... v Gillingham ............ DDDWWW X
27 70% WdWLLL Lincoln City ........... v Aldershot ............. DDWdDL X
28 70% DDLLDd Macclesfield ......... v Hereford .............. LDLddD X
29 20% WLLLWD Morecambe ........... v Northampton ........ LDLDDD 1
30 70% ddLLdL Rotherham ............ v Torquay ................ LWDDWD X
31 30% LDDWWd Shrewsbury ........... v Oxford Utd ........... LLWLdD 1
32 30% WLWWDW Stevenage ............ v Bury ..................... WWddWW 2
33 20% LWdWDD Stockport .............. v Cheltenham ......... LWLLLW 2
34 30% WDLWDW Wycombe .............. v Southend ............. LLLLDd 1
BEST IN SIX SEASONS: Stockport 1 draw, 1 win.
SCOTTISH FIRST DIVISION
35 20% LDWdWW Dunfermline .......... v Falkirk ................. WdDWWW 1
36 80% WLdLDW Partick .................. v Raith .................... WWdLWL X
37 70% LWLLDL Queen of South ..... v Dundee ................ dWDLWW X
38 30% dWLWLL Ross County ......... v Cowdenbeath ....... WLWDDD 1
39 30% DLLLLL Stirling .................. v Morton ................. WLWLWL 2
BEST IN SIX SEASONS: Queen of South 3 draws, 5 wins.
SCOTTISH SECOND DIVISION
40 80% LDDWWL Airdrie Utd ............ v East Fife .............. DLDWWW X
41 30% LLDdWL Alloa ..................... v Livingston ............ WWWWWW 2
42 30% WLLLLL Brechin ................. v Ayr ....................... LLWdLW 2
43 30% WLWDWL Dumbarton ............ v Forfar ................... DLWLLW 2
44 20% DLDLDL Peterhead ............. v Stenhousemuir ..... DDDLDW 2
BEST IN SIX SEASONS: Dumbarton 3 draws, 4 wins.
SCOTTISH THIRD DIVISION
45 20% WWDWDW Arbroath ............... v Elgin .................... LLWLLL 1
46 30% LWDDLD Berwick ................. v Albion .................. WWWDWL 2
47 30% LLLWLW East Stirling .......... v Annan Athletic...... LWWWdD 2
48 40% WDLWWW Queens Park ......... v Montrose ............. LLLDWL 1
49 20% WLLWWD Stranraer .............. v Clyde ................... WLLWDW 1
BEST IN SIX SEASONS: Queens Park 2 draws, 4 wins.
TREBLE CHANCE: Man Utd,
Wolverhampton, Bournemouth,
Chesterfield, Lincoln City,
Macclesfield, Rotherham, Partick,
Queen of South, Airdrie Utd. Perm
any 8 from 9 = 9 bets, or any 9
from 10 = 10 bets.
FOUR DRAWS: Man Utd,
Bournemouth, Chesterfield,
Partick, Airdrie Utd. Perm 4 from
5 = 5 bets.
TEN HOMES: Aston Villa, Everton,
Tottenham, Carlisle, Colchester,
Southampton, Morecambe,
Dunfermline, Arbroath, Stranraer.
Perm any 8 from 9 = 9 bets, or
any 9 from 10 = 10 bets.
SIX AWAYS: Liverpool, Blackburn,
Brighton, Crewe, Cheltenham,
Stenhousemuir.
EXPRESS POOLS SERVICE THE BANKER BEST BETS
Mick Dennis
FOOTBALL CORRESPONDENT FRANK AND FEARLESS
THE arguments in favour of
goal-line technology are so strong
even FIFA will be convinced soon.
But Chelsea scored two dodgy
goals against Spurs. Goal-line
technology would have ruled out
the first, but then there would have
been an almighty row about
Salomon Kalou’s late winner.
Harry Redknapp would have
said: “We can put a man on the
moon, we can check whether a ball
has crossed the goal-line, but we
can’t look at a TV and get an offside
decision right. It’s diabolical.” And
match after match, the calls for still
more technology would continue.
I BOUGHT tickets among home
punters at Watford, close to a
knuckle-dragger, who kept up
a witless monologue about
the opposition, going
through his limited
vocabulary of profanities.
When QPR scored, one
chap near us stood up,
cheered briefly and sat down.
Knuckle-dragger spat threats in
the QPR guy’s face and tried to get
others to attack him.
Of course, all clubs have nutters.
Of course, segregation is important.
But, although QPR fans and I don’t
get on, I understand why one would
sneak in to see his team win the
league. Yet that is seen as a crime,
while the vileness of the knuckle-
dragger is not only tolerated but
seen by many as obligatory.
Fergie,
Jose?
It’s all
gone
cuckoo
Scottish native, has nested in
England for more than 24 years.
Regular visitor to mainland
Europe. Attracted to silverware.
Do not approach if you are
wearing black.
AMID
the clamour of
abuse for offi cials, let’s
remember one thing – the
biggest blunder at the weekend
was not by a ref. It wasn’t even
by the assistant ref, Mike Cairns,
who thought Frank Lampard’s
shot had crossed the line. It was
by Heurelho Gomes, Spurs’
clown in orange, who
let the ball reach
the line.
Cuculus Nasus Rufus
(red-nosed cuckoo)
;iXn`e^k_\c`e\
;iX^^\[[fne
A
CCORDING to
orni thol ogi sts,
the numbers of
cuckoos nesting
in the UK are
declining so
quickly that their distinctive
song, which heralds spring,
might soon be lost for ever.
Never mind. We’ll still have Sir
Alex Ferguson’s completely cuckoo
appraisal of referees occurring with
predictable regularity.
With one-eyed bias so laughable
that at first you wondered if he was
joking, the ‘Moanchester’ manager
complained that Chris Foy missed a
penalty for United at Arsenal.
Foy should also have awarded the
Gunners a spot-kick, but with the
incurably partisan’s skewed logic
Ferguson reasoned that one was
difficult to see, so Foy should have
given the United one which should
have been easier to notice.
Meanwhile Jose Mourinho has
been handed an alibi for the likely
defeat of his Real
Madrid team in the
Champions League
semi-final second
leg tonight.
UEFA have put
Frank de Bleeckere in
charge – one of five
referees Mourinho has
already accused of favouring
Barcelona.
You will remember the imperious
Portuguese protested that the five,
all of different nationalities, were
part of a long-term, international
conspiracy to help Barca.
Why do you think they would do
that Jose?
Um…because the Catalan club
support a children’s charity.
And so Ferguson and the man
who wants his job have unwittingly
proved two universal truths about
football.
The first is that everyone who
cares about any club believes that
club get hurt by poor refereeing
decisions. The second is that
decisions which benefit that club
are shrugged off as
part of the game.
The conclusive
evidence is provided
by Mourinho’s career
and reputation,
because both were
built on winning the
Champions League with
Porto in 2004. And he only
achieved that with the help of two
refereeing mistakes.
He succeeded in eliminating
Manchester United because, on the
advice of an assistant, referee
Valentin Ivanov ruled out a Paul
Scholes goal for offside. Replays
showed Scholes was clearly onside.
Four of Mourinho’s players were
nearer the goal-line when the ball
was played to him.
Then, in the semi-final, Deportivo
La Coruna’s Jorge Andrade was
sent off by Markus Merk: a decision
so silly even Porto’s Deco protested.
There have been other key
moments in Mourinho’s career
when referees have helped him. For
his second Champions League
triumph, with Inter Milan last
season, he needed the unintentional
aid of referee Mejuto Gonzalez to
eliminate Chelsea. The Spanish
official did not give a penalty for a
blatant trip on Salomon Kalou in
the first leg.
Yet you do not hear Mourinho
saying: “Why Ivanov? Why Merk?
Why Gonzalez? Is it because I once
put a euro in a charity tin?”
There is a special nastiness about
the Special One’s referee-baiting.
To shore up his own renown he
thinks nothing of trashing honest
men doing a thankless job to the
best of their ability.
Yet how many times this season
has Stoke’s Tony Pullis told us he
has been on the wrong end of a bad
decision? How many times has
Blackpool’s Ian Holloway been
spitting feathers about match
officials? And so on and so on.
We all do it. We all find the
decisions that go against our teams
unacceptable but forget those that
help us. It turns out there is no
shortage of cuckoos after all.
°
AS WIGAN scrapped for their
Premier League lives against
Everton, almost a third of their
small ground was empty. It has
not been full all season. Not once.
The average attendance is
16,522, worse than four teams in
League One. If so few folk in the
town care whether Wigan go
down, why should the rest of us?
Victory123
62 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
FOOTBALL: BARCLAYS PREMIER LEAGUE
Fergie, you are
1
OCT 26: Gary Neville should have been sent
off for a second bookable offence on
Matthew Etherington at Stoke but referee
Andre Marriner gave him the benefit of the
doubt. Ferguson took Neville off at half-time
and United won 2-1.
2
OCT 30: Referee Mark Clattenburg allowed
Nani to tap the ball into an empty net after
Spurs goalkeeper Heurelho Gomes mistakenly
put it down to take a free-kick instead of
playing on. United won 2-0.
3
JAN 1: Gary Neville – again – should have
been red-carded as last defender and had a
penalty awarded against him for bringing down
Graham Dorrans at West Brom. Referee Chris
Foy let him off. United went on to win 2-1.
4
FEB 26: Wayne Rooney escaped a red card
from referee Mark Clattenburg early in the
game with the score 0-0 for throwing an elbow
into James McCarthy’s face at Wigan. United
eventually won 4-0, with Rooney scoring one
goal and having a hand in two others.
5
MAR 1: Patrice Evra brought down
Chelsea’s Ramires late in the Champions
League quarter-final, first leg at Stamford
Bridge. Looked a stonewall penalty but Spanish
referee Alberto Mallenco waved aside heated
Chelsea protests. United won the game 1-0.
6
APRIL 2: Nemanja Vidic escaped a second
yellow card and a dismissal from referee
Lee Mason at West Ham when United were
trailing 2-0. They eventually won 4-2.
7
APRIL 19: Newcastle’s Peter Lovenkrands
was tripped by Anderson in the box but
referee Lee Probert said ‘no penalty.’ The game
ended 0-0.
8
APRIL 23: Rio Ferdinand barged over
Everton’s Victor Anichebe at Old Trafford.
Looked a clear penalty but referee Peter Walton
was unmoved. United went on to win 1-0.
9
MAY 1: Nemanja Vidic clearly handled Theo
Walcott’s cross to deny Arsenal’s Robin van
Persie a header but the offence was missed by
referee Chris Foy and linesman Andy Garratt.
United lost 1-0.
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at 0he|sea)k_Xkn\ek
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1
DEC 28: Birmingham’s Nikola Zigic barged
into Rio Ferdinand to set up late equaliser
for Lee Bowyer but Lee Mason allowed the goal
to stand. United were held to a 1-1 draw.
2&3
MAR 1: David Luiz should have
received a red card for a second
cautionable offence when he fouled Wayne
Rooney. Referee Martin Atkinson then awarded
Yuri Zhirkov a ‘soft’ penalty for tumbling over
Chris Smalling’s leg. Chelsea came from 1-0
down to win 2-1.
4
MAR 6: Liverpool’s Jamie Carragher should
have been red-carded rather than just
cautioned by referee Phil Dowd for his
over-the-top tackle on Nani at Anfield. United
lost the game 3-1.
5
APRIL 19: Javier Hernandez was tripped in
the box by Danny Simpson as United chased
a late winner at Newcastle. Referee Lee Probert
said ‘no penalty’. The game ended 0-0.
6
MAY 1: Michael Owen was felled inside the
penalty area by Gael Clichy as United
chased an equaliser at Arsenal but referee
Chris Foy said ‘no penalty’. Arsenal won 1-0.
LET-OFFS: Nani, above, scored
contentious goal at Spurs, as
Rooney escaped at Wigan and
Evra fouled Ramires at no cost
SPOT OF
BOTHER:
Anderson got
away with
trip on Peter
Lovenkrands,
left, but foul
by Clichy on
Owen, below,
was missed
I CAN’T FACE IT:
Patrice Evra is
disgusted with
United on Sunday
Victory123
Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011 63
FOOTBALL: BARCLAYS PREMIER LEAGUE
Pictures: DAVID KLEIN, EDDIE KEOGH, JOHN GILES, MARTIN RICKETT and PHIL NOBLE
just wrong
PATRICE EVRA will not
have performed a forensic
analysis of contentious
decisions this season but
he refuses to blame referee
Chris Foy for Manchester
United’s title setback .
Clearly with one eye on the
decider with Chelsea on Sunday,
Sir Alex Ferguson complained
after the defeat by Arsenal that
key decisions do n ot go United’s
way in major games.
But his claim simply does n ot
stack up when you look at the
most controversial moments in
United’s campaign. So far nine
major decisions have gone for
them – and six against.
Evra believes that blaming
Foy only masked United’s own
shortcomings at the Emirates
on Sunday.
The saying goes that ‘two
wrongs don’t make a right’ but
at least the decisions of Foy and
his assistants balanced out –
leaving both teams aggrieved.
In the first half, Nemanja Vidic
clearly handled Theo Walcott’s
cross to deny Robin van Persie a
headed chance, while late in the
game Michael Owen was fouled
by Gael Clichy in the box as he
attempted to convert Wayne
Rooney’s pass into an equaliser.
Arsenal’s anger of course was
diluted because they took the
three points, while Evra was
more concerned by United’s
sub-standard display, which has
made Chelsea’s visit to Old
Trafford so important.
And he pulled no punches
when he admitted that United
were guilty of basking in the
afterglow of their Champions
League semi-final first-leg win
over Schalke last Tuesday.
“The problem [against
Arsenal] was Manchester
United, not the referee,” said
Evra. “It is easy to find some
excuse. We did not play the
United way and, when we don’t
play the United way, we don’t
deserve anything.
“Maybe we were too nice and
relaxed because we played very
well against Schalke and maybe
our minds were still on that
game. We didn’t deserve to win
at Arsenal on Sunday.
“In the first half they played
much better than us. In the
second half we played in the
right way only after we conceded
the goal, but that is not enough
if you want to win the title. We
didn’t feel in trouble. We knew
how Arsenal would play.
“Normally when we visit the
Emirates we play with speed,
power and aggression and create
more chances . That is why I am
very disappointed.”
United, effectively 18 points
ahead when they led 1-0 at
Stamford Bridge on March 1 – a
match they lost 2-1 – have seen
that lead whittled down to three
points, while their goal difference
is now the same as Chelsea’s.
Evra knows it is now effectively
a case of ‘win or bust’ on Sunday
because both teams will be
expected to win their last two
games; United have Blackburn
away and Blackp ool at home,
while Chelsea are at home to
Newcastle and away on the final
day to Everton.
He added: “We have our
destiny in our hands. We have a
massive game against Chelsea. If
we want to win the title then we
have to beat Chelsea, it’s as
simple as that. If we don’t beat
them, then we’ll be in trouble.
We have three games left and
need to win every game. Every
game is a final.”
United have had more
decisions go for them than
against this season. Gary Neville
could have been sent off at Stoke
and West Brom, Vidic escaped a
red card at West Ham, while
Rooney was n ot even punished
with a caution for his elbow on
Wigan’s James McCarthy.
Anderson, for tripping
Newcastle’s Peter Lovenkrands
and Rio Ferdinand, for pushing
over Everton’s Victor Anichebe,
got away with penalty decisions .
And no one will forget how
Mark Clattenburg allowed Nani
to tap the ball into an empty
net after Tottenham goalkeeper
Heurelho Gomes had mistakenly
placed it for a free-kick.
Probably the biggest break of
all was when Evra chopped down
Chelsea’s Ramires for what
looked a stonewall penalty in the
Champions League quarter-final
first leg against Chelsea, only for
the referee to remain unmoved.
But United can point to Ni kola
Zigic’s push on Ferdinand
that set up Lee Bowyer for
Birmingham’s equaliser when
the sides met in December.
There was Danny Simpson’s
trip on Javier Hernandez at
Newcastle when, to add insult to
anger, the striker was booked for
diving, plus Jamie Carragher’s
escape with a yellow card for his
horrific tackle on Nani.
What is most concerning
Ferguson in the build-up to
Sunday’s match is the feeling at
United that – the Ramires
decision apart – they have been
on the wrong end of a number of
controversial decisions against
Chelsea over the years.
Didier Drogba was offside
when he struck Chelsea’s winner
in the game at Old Trafford a
year ago . And last season, United
were unhappy on three counts
over John Terry’s winner at
Stamford Bridge. They contested
the free-kick awarded against
Darren Fletcher, claimed Wes
Brown had been pushed over in
the box when the cross came in
and that Terry was offside .
Frank Lampard’s penalty
winner in the Premier League
game at Stamford Bridge last
month was the third time
Chelsea have been awarded a
penalty against United.
Lampard also scored one in
2004 when Joe Cole went to
ground ‘easily’ under Roy
Keane’s challenge and again in
2008, when Michael Ballack
scored from the spot after
a ‘ball-to-hand’ controversy
involving Michael Carrick.
Twenty-four hours before the
defeat at Arsenal , Ferguson was
at Stamford Bridge to see
Chelsea get the benefit of two
controversial goals.
And Fergie-watchers believe
his complaint at the Emirates
was clearly designed more as
a marker for this Sunday’s
showdown than anything else.
Forget the
ref, we are
to blame
says Evra
gZedgih
RICHARD
TANNER
CHELSEA MAN UNITED
MAY 14: BLACKBURN v MAN UTD
A Lancashire derby which United
will be expected to win. However
it may not prove so simple, with
Blackburn the home side and
fighting hard to avoid being
sucked down into a final-day
relegation shoot-out.
MAY 22: MAN UTD v BLACKPOOL
Should be a straightforward three
points to close out the season
against a floundering Seasiders
team – and anything less than a
win would be a huge shock.
MAY 15: CHELSEA v NEWCASTLE
Carlo Ancelotti’s side will be
favourites at home against the
mid-table Magpies but outcome
will be far from a formality in the
ever-competitive Premier League.
Failure to win would be surprising
but not shocking.
MAY 22: EVERTON v CHELSEA
Trips to Goodison Park are never
easy and with the pressure on and
United favoured to beat Blackpool
along the M62, Chelsea face an
extremely difficult test to finish.
CLOSING DATES FOR TITLE BATTLE
SIMPLY BIASED:
Ferguson hurls
abuse at linesman
Andy Garratt
By Matt Law
CARLO ANCELOTTI has thrown down the
gauntlet to Fernando Torres to prove he
should keep his place for Chelsea’s decisive
clash at Manchester United.
Manager Ancelotti believes his team have
given themselves a “fantastic” chance of
winning the title after closing the gap on
United to three points.
Victory at Old Trafford on Sunday would
see Chelsea move ahead of United at the top
of the table on goal difference, but Ancelotti
must decide whether to stick with the
misfiring partnership of Didier Drogba and
£50million Torres.
Torres was substituted against Tottenham
last Saturday and replacement Salomon
Kalou scored the winner. Ancelotti, though,
says his team selection for the United
showdown will be made on how Torres and
Co perform in training this week.
“To make a decision about the line-up, I
have to forget the past,” said Ancelotti. “I
have to look at the next training session.
“For 60 minutes against Tottenham,
Drogba and Torres were a good
combination. But Torres got a bit tired and
I put Kalou on to try to find some more
space to attack.
“The shape is not so important, it’s better
that you put the players with the best ability
together. If we want to win there, we have to
use intensity. We did our job, to stay three
points behind Manchester United. That’s
fantastic but now we must prepare well.”
Kalou says he has no problem with being
left on the bench for the good of the team.
“It’s good to know I can come in and help
the team,” said Kalou. “It doesn’t matter
how many minutes I play, it’s all about team
spirit. Any time they need me, I’ll be ready.”
by Matt Law
WOJCIECH SZCZESNY has taken a swipe
at Arsene Wenger’s critics and claimed it
would be crazy for anybody at Arsenal to
doubt “the best manager in the world”.
And goalkeeper Szczesny, above, has also
told captain Cesc Fabregas he would be
making a huge mistake if he quits the
Emirates at the end of the season.
Despite beating Manchester United on
Sunday, Arsenal are set to finish a sixth
successive season without a trophy under
Wenger, but Szczesny insists he is still the
best man for the job.
He said: “It’s ridiculous. If you ask any of
the players, we will all stand by the manager.
He built this team from nothing and he’s the
best manager in the world.
“I don’t understand why anyone would
want him to leave. You can’t blame the boss
that we didn’t win anything because he
stood by the team and supported us, so I
don’t see why he should take the blame.
“We all take individual responsibility for
our mistakes and everyone has played their
part in this season’s disappointments. I
think we just have to take it as a team.
“The boss has put his reputation at stake
for players like me, of course. We have a
young team and we have a lot of years in
front of us, and a lot of trophies to win. Let’s
be patient and show next year we are good
enough to win the league.
“I wouldn’t understand anybody leaving
Arsenal. So no, I wouldn’t understand Cesc
or anybody else leaving.”
Carlo will be
train-spotter
Wenger
‘is best’
BIG TEST:
Torres
must
convince
Ancelotti
he should
start
against
United
MICK DENNIS’S VERDICT – Page 61
Victory123
64 Daily Express Tuesday May 3 2011
By 9pt Byline
Picture: MAGI HAROUN
MORE PUNCH WANTED:
Patrice Evra says United
must improve or see their
title hopes disappear
THIS IS
ALL OUR
OWN
FAULT
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9FPNFE;<IAL;;
GRAHAM: Successful
Graham: Cups or bust
By Matt Law GEORGE GRAHAM claims he
would have been sacked for going
six years without silverware as
Arsenal manager – his chairman
demanded a trophy every season.
Graham won two league titles, a
Cup Winners’ Cup, FA Cup and
two League Cups in nine years in
charge of a ‘boring’ Arsenal side.
A more entertaining style under
Arsene Wenger has brought three
Premier League titles and four
FA Cups, but Arsenal now face a
sixth successive season without a
trophy and Graham said: “I’m not
going to apologise for the way my
team played. My aim was to get
trophies. Peter Hill-Wood always
said before the AGM, ‘Just put a
trophy on the table and nobody
will have anything to say’.
“I probably wouldn’t be in the
job if I went six years without a
trophy. But if Arsene left Arsenal
all the biggest clubs in the world
would still be after him.”
Austria »3.00, Belgium »3, Bulgaria BGN 4.60, Canary Islands »1.95, Cyprus »2.15, Denmark 24 DKr, Finland »5.80, France »2.50, Germany »2.50, Gibraltar Gib £0.80, Greece
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9 770307 017223
THE EXPRESS 3 MAY 2011. No 35022
18
ABCDEFGHI JKLPQRS * TUW WBDS
The recycled content of UK
Newspapers in 2009 was 76.2%
D;MIF7F;HIIKFFEHJH;9O9B?D=
PATRICE EVRA has warned
Manchester United they will
blow their chance of a record
19th title if they play like they
did at Arsenal.
The 1-0 defeat means the visit
of Chelsea on Sunday is virtually
a title decider. Manager Sir Alex
Ferguson blamed referee
Chris Foy for not giving
United a penalty at the
Emirates. But Evra said: “The problem
was us, not the referee. We did not play
the United way and if we don’t do that,
we don’t deserve anything.
“We have a massive match against
Chelsea. If we want to win the title,
then we have to beat them. If we don’t,
then we’ll be in trouble. We have three
matches – and every one is a cup final.”
FULL STORY: PAGES 62-63
By Richard Tanner
Messi top of the
world says Ossie
LIONEL MESSI has
been hailed the
greatest player of all
time, eclipsing Diego
Maradona and Pele.
The accolade comes
from Ossie Ardiles, one
person in the world
qualified to make a
comparison between
Barcelona star Messi
and Maradona,
considered by
many as the
the world’s
No1.
Argentina’s
1978 World Cup
winner Ardiles
is a close friend
of Maradona
and was
involved in
nurturing him
in the national
side, but he
has opted for
Messi ahead of
Maradona and
the other
popular choice
for that
accolade,
Brazil’s Pele.
Ahead of the
Champions
League semi-final
second leg between
Barcelona and Real
Madrid, the man
credited with opening
the English floodgates
to top foreign stars
with his 1978 arrival at
Tottenham with Ricky
Villa, explained why he
believes Messi has now
edged ahead of
Maradona and Pele.
Former Spurs
manager Ardiles said:
“There is only one
player you can compare
with Messi and
that is
Maradona
– and in many
ways they are
very similar.
“For some
time I have
thought that
Diego could
never be
surpassed and
nor could Pele,
but no longer. I
would now say
that Messi will
go down in
history as the
No1 player of
all time.
“Sport has
improved,
sportsmen
move on and in
football the modern
game helps goalscorers
and the ball players.
The pitches are better,
the boots are better
and the rules have been
altered to favour the
attacking players. The
TURN TO PAGE 60, COL 1
EXCLUSIVE
By Harry Harris
HE’S No1: Messi
gets Ardiles vote
***/lmx
Victory123