BRITISH SCHOOL O F ARCHAEOLOGY IN EGYPT A N D EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT T W E N T Y - T H I R D YEAR, 1 9 1 7

CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY .AND PALETTES
W. M. F L I N D E R S P E T R I E
HON. C
L LL.D., D.LIT.,
F.R.S.,
F.B.A.,
M.R.I,A.

LONDON

BRITISH SCHOOL O F ARCHAEOLOGY I N EGYPT UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, GOWER STREET, W.C.
AND

CONSTABLE & CO., LTD.,10 ORANGE STREET, LEICESTER SQUARE, 1V.C.
AND

BERNARD QUARITCH,

11

GRAFTON STREET, NEW BOND STREET, W.
1921

P R m T E ~ BY
EAZELL, WATSON' AND VINEY, C D . ,

W N D O N AND AYLESBURY

BRITISH SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY IN EGYPT AND EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT
PATRON;

F.-M. VISCOUNT ALLENBY, G.C.B., G.C.M.G.

G E N E R A L C O M M I T T E E (*Execstiue Memders) Lord ABERCROMEY HENRY BALFOUR Rev. Dr. T. G. RONNEY Prof. X. C. BOSANQUET Rt. Hon. VISCOUNT BRYCEO F
~ECHMONT

*Prof. J. B. BURY "SO~IERS CLARKE E O W A ~CLOUD II Sir W. Rovn I ~ A W K I N S Prof. Sir S. DILL *Miss ECKENSTEIN Sir GREGORY FOSTER Sir JAMES FRAZER "Prof. ERNEST GARDNER

Prof. PERCY GARDNER Rt. Hon. Sir GEORCE T. GOLDIE Dr. GOWI.AND Mrs. J. R. GREEN Rt. Hon. F.-M. LORD GRENFELL Mrs. F. LL. GRIFFITH Dr. A. C. HADDON Rev. Dr. A. C. HEADLAM D. G. HOGARTH *BASILHOLMES Sir HENRY H. HOWORTH Baron A. YON HWCEL Prof. A. S. HUNT Mrs. C. I-I. W. JOHNS Sir HENRY MIERS

J. G. MILNE KOBERT MOND Prof. MONTAGUE ~VALTKR MORRISON *Miss M. A. MURRAY P. E. NEWDERRY F. W. PERCIVAL Dr. P l ~ c r i e s Dr. G. W. PROTHERO Dr. G. A. REISNER Sir WII,LIA~I ,RICHDZOND Prof. F. W. ~IIDGEWAY Mrs. %KONO Lady TIRARD E. TOWRY WHYTE

Zfonorary Treasurer-*I-I. SEPTON-JONES PETRIE Honorary Director-Prof. FLINDERS Honorary Secretary-Mrs. 13. F. PETRIE

AMERICAN BRANCH

THE EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT
President JAMES HENRYBREASTED, PH.D. Via-Presidents CHARLES F. THWING, D.D., LL.D. BENJAIIIIN IDE WHEELER, PH.D., L.H.D., LL.D WILLIAM COPLEY WINSLOW, PH.D., L.H.D., LL.D.

WILLIAM J. HOLLAND, PH.D., Sc.D., LL.D. E D ~ I U NJ. D JAMES, PH.D., LL.D. F. W. SHIPLEY, PH.D.

i

Hon. Sewdary Prof. MITCHELL CARROLL, PH.D. Hon. Treasurer Rev. WILLIAM C. WINSLOW, D.D.

F. 1895. (Out of print. WAINWRIGHT. by J. VI. net. 64 plates. arc recziz)ed by the Hon. 16s. (This latter is out of print. 25s. 40 plates. 1912. by GUYBRUNTON. 43 plates. (IPS preparation. 1911 .by W. PETRIE. net.) XIV. PETRIE. ST. 25s. ~ g o . ENGELBACH. by ill.. PETRIE. 35 plates. )(coloured). 25s. W. 53 plates.PUBLICATIONS O F THE EGYPTIAN RESEARCH ACCOUNT AND BRITISH SCHOOL O F ARCHAEOLOGY I N EGYPT I. ( I n prcpnration. THE LABYRINTH AND GERZEH. ATHRIBIS. H. HILDA PETRIE. 1906 . HARAGEH . . 2 5 plates. WALKER. F. M. QUIBELL. (Out of print j obtainable in joint volume NAQADA AND BALLAS. 43 plates. M. by W. M. PETRIE. TEMPLE OF THE KINGS. F. and G. XXVII.73 plates. net. 25s. by J. FLINDERS PETRIE. 25s. MAHASNA. z by A. W. 355. XIX HISTORICAL STUDIES. (Out of print. s . FLINDERS PETRIE. 1903. IV. 1 9 ~ 9 by .) XVII. 25s.) VII. SAQQARA MASTABAS I. THE RAMESSEUM. X. QURNEH. M. BALLAS. MURRAY. 1911. by W. 56 plates. KNOBEL. M. 1916. by W. by W. and G. F. MURRAY. 1909. 39 plates (4 coloured and ao photographic). LAHUN I. P. by L. by W. IX. 37 plates. 1914. by J. by W. net. M. V. WALKER. PETRIE. F. H. XVIII. by W.E. M. M. GARSTANG and KURTSETHE. QUIBELL.76 plates. PETRIE. 1899. net. 35s. LOAT. PETRIEand J. H. 58 plates. PETRIE. M. MACKAY. 1913. 43 plates. 2 5 s net. and GUROB. .) XV. net. XXIV.) 25s. M.) XX. EL KAB. by J. LAHUN 1 1 . by J. 455. (Out of print. E. PREHISTORIC POTTERY OF EGYPT3 by W. by W. F. HIERAKONPOLIS I.C. Umiversidy Collcge. 1go1 . THE PALACE OF APRIES (MEMPHIS 11). nrt. 1912. 40 plates. 1913. PETRIE. net. 1908. F. text by W. E. B. M. ii. net. by F.) VIII. 35 plates. net. F. M. TOOLS AND WEAPONS. nef. 1907. (Out of print. MEMPHIS I. GARSTANG. net. 7 2 plates. QUIBELL. WALKER. 6 2 plates. or Two Guineas for the Two Annual Volumrs. XXX. A. M. 5 2 plates. net. M. F. 20s. F. PETRIE. and W. by W. ROMAN PORTRAITS (MEMPHIS IV). FLINDERS PETRIE and J. 1 9 1 ~ . 1905. WALKER and Subscriptionr of One Guinea for the Annual Single Volumes. by R. THE PYRAMID. (Studies.) 2 4 plates. SCARABS AND CYLINDERS. HELIOPOLIS I AND KAFR AMMAR. lgo8. 2 3 plates XXVIII. ass. net. SAQQARA MASTABAS 1 1 . 81 plates. 50s. vol. 1900. ntt. 30s. THE OSIREION. net. 1896. n d . XXXI. by W. 50s. HYKSOS AND ISRAELITE CITIES.( I n preparation. 25s. 1917. 25s. 24 coloured plates. ENGELBACH. In double volume with 94 plates. (Out of print. net. net. FL~NDERS PETRIR and J.) XII. 1904. A. M.40 plates.) XXIX. 58 plates. MEYDUM AND MEMPHIS (III). XI. G o w Street. by W. by W. PETRIB. F. XIII.. 1915. by MARGARET A. net. (Out of print. 1898. F. by W. XXVI. London. RIQQEH AND MEMPHIS VI. In double volume F. 25s. 1897. XXXII. HIERAKONPOLIS 1 1 . M. TARKHAN 1 1 . 16s. GIZEH AND RIFEH. deruo l oc ( se t a l 6 net. 47 plates. Sewetary.) 11. XXI. MURRAY.E. W. XXIII. PREHISTORIC EGYPT. 1910. M. E. EL ARABAH. XVI. net. E. GARROW DUNCAN. 25s.) 1 1 1 . M.J. WAINWRIGHT. by W. net. TARKHAN I AND MEMPHIS V. GEORGE CAULFEILD. H. QUIBELI. THE TREASURE. F. GREENand J. with 109 plates. F. MACKAY. F. 54 plates. PORTFOLIO OF HAWARA PORTRAITS. net. by HILDAPETRIE. where also copies o f the above works can b# obtained. PETRIEand J. 25s. 25s. a t d h Edwards L i b r a v . M. PETRIE. XXII. 32s. PETRIE. by R. net.. XXV. M.

lx. Strictly. Every change therefore between this corpus and previous registers is on pl. many irregularities have been noticed. I t contains all the forms published in the various works enumerated at the beginning of the volume named. a turning back to some other type has to be made.-the most open. because some types continue to vary to a great extent. In all additions the principle of arrangement must first be observed before inserting a new form. such as bottles. the additions had made a complete revision of types I to 19 needful. each type searched for in the corpus. the bowls are classed by the slope of the edge. lx. the two sides of a jar often differ perceptibly. the vertical and the different degrees of incurving. In some cases obvious inversions of order occur. In unifying the various additions-some 700which have been found since the 300 types of Naqada. All that can be hoped for is to arrange the types so that they can be searched for in the shortest time. were mostly due to those who made 5 additions not recognising the principles of arrangement. All of these alterations of designation are completely stated on pl. makes any single-line order necessarily illogical. or the mode of using it. The changes of numbers from the previous English publications. but are here restored to F. Such principles may be arbitrary. and such slight differences are immaterial. The forms are chiefly classed from the most open. to the most closed. and noted by its letter and number on the card register. or else a corpus would become so confused that identification of forms would be difficult. In the Decorated pottery especially. Even different types had been given the same letter by different discoverers. and after tracing out that line. to the present corpus numbers. but the minimum of change has been made. to describe the present corpus. unified as a whole and provided with sequence dates. Additions to this have been made into a new class. some large classes of vases are divided into those under or over certain proportions. and the remainder of common pottery be returned to the grave and covered in. On the same plate are conversion tables for reducing Reisner's short corpus psed in Nubia. the most sloping. The practical use of it is by the graveside. Another criterion is the proportion of height to width . and we must put together all those which . Variations should be ignored when they are within the chances of copying. Such pottery as is worth removal. Some other slight changes became needful also in other classes. and the resulting limits of the date of the grave may then be added as the date on the card. Another confusion has been caused by not noticing what is included in an established class. 3. the almost upright. after the discussion of the dating in the previous volume on Prehistoric Egypt. 2.THE CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY IT is hardly needful. The principles which must be observed in all additions to the corpus are as follow : I. therefore. A needless multiplication of new types has been made. In this part. when the differences from established types were but slight or imperceptible. the present corpus makes an entire break with the previous registers. The indefinite variation over so large a number of features. and especially any new type that should be drawn. but yet they must be kept up. and some editing of the whole became absolutely necessary. then the pottery can be laid out in order. So soon as a grave is cleared and planned. under the heading of each volume in which a type has previously appeared. The limits of date can be copied out. no vase is perfectly like another. can then be separated. such as the black polished pottery in F class. In carrying this out. such as shallow saucers.

to classes). Abydos.). so as to allow of intermediate forms being inserted. I. It is usual to find vases of the same form of various sizes.T. C. R. Tark. Diospolis.C. Archaeological S ~ r v e y of Nubia.D. Reisner. The date such as 32-38 means that the examples extend between 32 and 38 . Petrie. Additions should be spaccd apart in the lettering. and the U. 38 means that dated examples are only known a t 32 and at 38 . E. No date.. P. as near as may be. Ayrton and Loat. At the bottom right is the sequence date of the reference. as no more distinctive method has appeared. Nub. only to tomb numbers). Firth. University College collection. 1908-9 (with references. grave number if from Nagadeh. m. De M. and even in different material. and R. 4. At the bottom left is the refetence to the source. De Morgan Age de L a Pierre. It should be observed that there is a different system in the corpus of white cross-lined pottery arranged by the forms. 32. Ger. N. The system of the corpus follows the classification in " Naqada " into nine classes. or else to the long jars sometimes brown and soft. 8. The works referred to are as follow : Ab. scale I : 6. Mahasna.C. Harageh (not yet published). r. The first object of all divisions must be the most rapid identification of a form. as in B. The class of Late refers to distinctive styles of pottery. examples in Prehistoric Egypt. Of course variations closely alike may have consecutive letters. g. Har. Petrie. (32-38) means that only one dated example is known.6 THE CORPUS OF PRE~ISTORIC POTTERY may reasonably have been intended to be alike. in a grave of uncertain date between 32 and 38. Tarkhan I and I I . Gerzeh (in The Labyrinth. Differences of size and of material may be largely ignored. hard and thin. etc. etc. Mah. The lettering should follow the natural order of forms. Engelbach. Amr. At the top right of each figure is the type number and letter. MacIver. Wainwright. . Petrie. yet contemporary. in any case distinct from the previous classes.. N. not as a b c d but as c. arranged by the subject of the designs. Archaeological Survey of Nubia. with N and U.D. Peet. To separate them detracts from ihe value of the ranges of types in date. El Amrah. Petrie. scale I : 3. 5. 7. Naqada (not marked to types. and the existing classes provide for that. those without reference being from the Naqada corpus. Nub. Ab. Cemeteria of Abydos. Di. Roycsl Tombs.

where several are known C. see type 5 m. for a type. c. II. the best defined are selected. The references are : The top right number and letter is the type. is unique. T . A. from the mere catalogue numbers used in Naqada. Naqadeh graves. with B or T. and four copies of the unusual types. S. cemeteries. Reisner. Gerz. Reisner in the first volume of the Archaeological Survey of Nubia. the vase with animals along the length of it.A. Diospolis. A. with sequence dates when known. 1907-8 : these were abandoned in the succeedimg volumes: also the alterations which have proved to be necessary in unifying all the cov$us numbers of many publications. by Ayrton and Loat. types that have been published in recent works. of Nubia. not drawn sepaSince that was issued many more forms have been U.W. Ayrton and Loat. The curved spray in 498 is unique . and the hippopotamus hunt is very rare. according to the Plain numbers. F. Also a list of the sources of the type drawings of white Cross-lined pottery. N. Wainwright. THE REGISTERS ON pl. . letters just stated. so far as they can be distinguished in the photographs of Mahasna. lxi is a list of the pottery types in University College.THE CORPUS OF SLATE PALETTES THE plates of slates in Naqada were merely a R. and D. All these registers are needed when referring to previous works. Gerzeh. registered. Naqadu . The inclusion of so Firth. xl are given the cor$us equivalents of the numbers used by Dr. numbers for this final ewpus.G. with number of grave. and the same for Black-incised pottery. Naqada. The bottom left reference is the source. Mahasna. Wainwright. Cemeteries of Abydos I . with reference to their sources when known : D. the earliest and latest are quoted. The figures at the bottom right El Amrah. mostly rather different M. Gerzeh. A. Below are references to a few more types. rately. and cemeteries b. On pl. 11. catalogue of the forms found. Gerzeh .. Tarkmhan Hu (Diospolis) references. Dios+olis.I. without framing T . The present corpus includes all the W. N. are the Sequence Dates . many new forms has made it necessary to adopt fresh G. a regular corpus or excluding duplicate forms. Tavkhan. the figures of women with a fringe girdle in IOO K are very rare .S. and some unification of the whole is necessary. of Arubia.

BLACK TOP. . I.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC PQTTERY. B 1-10.

Mah.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. BLACK TOP. . B 11-20.>go U. see L.C. n U .C.7 U. II.

* l _ _ . B L A C K TOP.b4 Mah.C.83 0V 57. r -. 8.C. B 21--25.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. 22w U. 31-38 5h U.

B L A C K TOP.1:6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY. E3 25-34. . IV.

B 35-51. . BLACK TOP. V.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

. B 53-644 V I.1:6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY. BLACK TOP.

CORPUS OF . VSI. . B 65 78.PREHISTORIC POTTERY. B L A C K TOP.

B 79-99. .1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. BLACK TOP. VIII.

.

1: 6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY. Xe U. L' . P 23-34. P O L I S H E D RED.C.

1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. . XI. P O L I S H E D RED. P 35-41.

1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. P 41-62. War 00 U.C. N 1509 i-" . XII. POLISHED RED.

P 63-82. .1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. Xlll. POLISHED RED.

XIV. . P 82-99.1:6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY. POLISHED RED.

C. xv.CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY' FANCY. F 5-24. . C13' ' U U.

.C.. F 24-39... XVI. k3w-+. (--U7 .. . ' .1 :6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. FANCY. US. _ .reb etay (S" 03-69 U. . .

XVII. 0 .C.1: 6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. FANCY. U. czsE7 U.C. F 40-55.

N ILII U 40-SS V. U. F 58-69.C.C.C. XVIII. U. FANCY. a U. .1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.C. U C.

80 F 80 F 80 G 80 H 80 80 M 80 N L.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.v. v.6 7 ) 41-61 L.3 L .SSb c3 34 J v Bob U.P.V.~ A%*.C.S k 235 (98 . ?. F 70-99. Di.P. 4 .v. L.P. BLACK POLISHED. XIX. 75 U.C.

1:6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY* W H I T E CROSS-LINED. C 1-15. . XX.

XXI. C 16-31.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. . WHITE CROSS-LINED.

XXII.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. . WHITE CROSS-LINED. C 32-47.

C 48-74.1: 6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. XXIII. W H I T E CROSS-LINED. .

C 75-85.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. XXIV. . W H I T E CROSS-LINED.

C 91-100. .1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. W H I T E CROSS-LINED. XXV.

BLACK INCISED. N 2-40. . xxv I.CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

1:3 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. . XXVII. N 50-80. BLACK INCISED.

W 1-23. 1C I b 1 .1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. XXVIII. WAVY HANDLED.

. 6ur. 66-71 D . W A V Y HANDLED.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. XXIX. W 24--47. 71-7s Mlh. v"' 6'' C&.C~-63) 47 A 47 M Mak.

W A V Y HANDLED. S1 W 48-90.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. XXX. 56 A 56 G M r h. Mak. 77 .

-&. . & \: * + $ ? 'P "= +r h .C. W.1:6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY. ' H ". D 1-14.C. G er. XXXI. U. Lj & m 3 1-r DECORATED.

L/ . DECORATED. D 15-29. U.C. XXXII.I: 6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

DECORXTED. D 33b /' --. D 31-42. '6' 34 K 40-52 U. .--. XXXIIIo .C.1: 6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

C. @yjJ 43 T N 1 7 2 3 eo U. .1:6 43 A CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. D 43-49. 43 c DECORATED.

D 50-66. DECORATED. .1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. xxxv.

XXXVI. D 61-76.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. DECORATED. incised .

1: 6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY. XXXVII. D 78-93. DECORATED. .

XXXVIII. . ROUGH. R 1-40.1:6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

.

. XL. R 50-74. ROUGH.1: 6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

ROUGH. Har W .1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. R 74-81. XLI.

1: 6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. . R 81-84. ROUGH. X LII .

XLlll . R 84-86. ROUGH.1:6 CORPUS O F PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. XLIV.. 9. . ROUGH. An. R 87-100.

.

L 17-32. . XLVI.1:6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. LATE.

1:6

CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

LATE.

L 33-36,

XLVII.

1: 6

CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

LATE.

L 36-43.

XLVIII.

1:6

CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY.

LATE.

L 44-52.

XLIX.

0 Mak Mak Mak.1:6 CORPUS O F PREHlSTORlC POTTERY. Mah. 08-SO) 69-78 Mak . L. (-1 Mak. L 53-64. LATE.

1: 6 CORPUS OF PREHISTORIC POTTERY. L 66-97. LATE. LI. .

.1:4 CORPUS O F SLATE PALETTES. LII. 2--15.

LI I I. 16-24.1:4 CORPUS OF SLATE PALETTES. .

24-45. L 1.V .1:4 CORPUS OF SLATE PALETTES.

LV . 46-57.1:4 CORPUS OF SLATE PALETTES.

LVI. 58-75. .1:4 CORPUS O F S L A T E PALETTES.

LVII. . 76--87.1': 4 CORPUS OF SLATE PALETTES.

LVIII. 88-92. .1:4 CORPUS O F S L A T E PALETTES.

LX.D. 111 i W 19 2 5 4 I ~ 2 7 5 3 25 2 rof 3 639% 7 8 8 ~ 8 2d sqb 7 iz. f boc. 3 439 4 +e D 76 8C I I ~ 34-d 5 Ion 6 7 8 42% S$ 18h b ~ a sj f 16% 59 m 61k n a 9 10 5 1e 61 a I l 62a 6 Sc 4x4 43C 68% 4rw 43k 12T46~ 13 4 6 k 44k 44C 44 c 466 63a 44-k 441 60 1 .D.49% 79k 85e 66 b 76c 74a 76s 85L 74% 63s ssa 25 49L 26 11 barn 8 4 ~ ~ 8qN 90% 27 49% 2s 'ld l01 a l01 tf 30 49L sob G 102 L436- 7%W L 43b 5 3v 53 L*r 2 18% 4 JI 3 38. 20 1s 19 17 65e 4bh 46d 4bk 69e 66p 69f 691.D. I ALTERATIONS IN CORPUS NUMBERS. I 14a. X 4 5 6 I L31k 2 T90k 3 T954 53 S 53 t 5 Ic 58e 49 I L lzc' LP. B 576 B 573 7 6 ~ 76w P I6k P E.F 1 1 L44 - L. 6 D 12& 1 3 3 a 4 33 8P 1 8 F 8 0 m IS 3 3 f 16 133 L.P.\ X I W41 2 43k 80 F 8Se 4 $8 W 1qk W 27 I ] . 21 4bd 4bFb 11 69% 74c 22 74d 23 4 9 L 24.P. 99n8 a7t8 9 see T .D. I B 3 L r Ii P l k 33n 9 I8n 10 r 8 k I 1 3a l 2.% 98k 98k loo& lk 2 3 F 8 1 - E. .VI E.REISNER'S EQUIVALENTS T O CORPUS TYPES. I V I T27s L3t 366 3 6 ~ 57c tl F UCW 38f 36% 2 Tl4j 3 2 7 . 7'c 71 7Sm E. 14 45r I rb 6s 4bl4 44n 62a 601. l ' E. VIII I T bod 2 60& 7Sd 75e 81c 7s k 0Zk 3 bOj looa BP Sld 956 97b l& g6vn 97k g?. GE R2 E H ' = N EW NO.D. v 6 36 62a 98 8bk 66 c 5 Rqca 6 7'& 683 93 k 94c 725 7 l " 8 R44h R45k 0 R4Sa - 4y. no fig. I" ! blr xrx U ta x L i Ic 4 31c .

~ 1381 s b a 33 b 3 ~ N 6 23sN 376 45 476 N 80 h 8 0 h T Y P f S IN M A M A S N A BY A ' I R T O N AND L O A T .377 S L e Zln 21h DlbsU147 90WI 4ba D.33 I t N 8A 13C IOUC.C lbs I b t NlZLO 20 k ?-OH. U 997-3.A = C + E M E T E F \ l E S OF A B Y D O S IS. A-EL AM R A H C. 43c LAC.\ 38 ? I U.REGISTERS. a 3 3 l q a NB 5 8 8 [ ~ B . N 5 6 ' k DV. .B.C.C. 4 1 N 31 57U.C. 47UC- 85A 856 535aN 31.C L7 N 30 U.40N 3 2 4 2 D 4 Z N 32 42H 5t)U.c.C 491JC.32 46M 73N L 3 6 P N 3r\r S1 47 46 3A LU.C.iv B O N 32. 852.zS5 4bk 21d Z l e N1426 96 "4 Dio. C + + E 4 4 N 33 4 4 N 2LU.C. 2OU. 54U. 6 4 N 32 32 U. 3SU.1~ 1Su.j 3 S k N 1761 5-4 N (319 81a 3baDiosRl03~ N 1 5 0 9 81% 37a N 5 6 5 T S .U-I09 jd" 6 4 Q D.C. tA.C. 23U.UNlVERSITY COLL.C.Z++ 77w 15b I sd niors 148 7 s e N 1 8 7 ~I ~ N A 1817 I 2 IUL.C.D. 53% 60. 6 N 31 i Z D l 6 N 31 1LIi 1 4 . ADDITIONAL . 4SrlC. L~A!"G~~z.B.L. T V P E 5 COLLEG E WHITE CROSS-LINED S. . 197A 3 6 h 5 S p rouqh 4 11 5 0 ~ 4 ~ 4 4 . 4 3 5 48U. 98a 98C lzd 1 36 I3y . 193 45-m I O N 7N 31 33N 34 32 bLD.C. G A R ~ T A ~ GJ. 31. 5SU.U. 8 8 N 31 9DiIN 31 9 H 17 U.C.c. 4 a N 3 Z 4 6 D 1 6 h 31? 97 939 9BN s8N 93bD 67U. 740 7 4 N 33 7 4 ~\ ) A 20% 219 4 M 18 N 45 J 5 A 5 D 14A 44? 347 NB 17-1 7Sd 24 3 UIk 29 3le 199 769 Qla N C 6 ISk l S r \ Bin50 019 Am.C. 73N BLACK INCISED T Y P E SOURCE S. $068 88k qawula L a b N 147% 98s 99PI b 2 Ib N 1489 9 0 ='g 33 9 N 1484 2bg 27f 45 F 275 29c 31 311 31s IS3 N 36 5 M 63 U.N38 Z Z N 41-63 23M 24-N 4 6 ZbN 3014 40 3% L+& 28N.C. II 36D 36H 36R 63H 63 N 78 790 79H 79N 77 N 7s N 79bN 3z 31 32. 92 931) 93M 85cN 3 2 8Sd~ 31 IN 3r 9LN LIA 9St-J 32 67 68 ?a 67 9 U D ~ O P 68 67D 67 L 67 N 33 68 N 33 3SU. LIN 33 4 2 5 53u. 3 M 6 0 U.C. 65D 65M 66E 66M %5C.154 26 k 3 9 h Z. l3 S 8 U.alol 2 1h 21 7n 22d. U. D = D I O S P O L l s PARVA.C. 6 A 341 336 37X 39T 40 1 4 I5 16 L l7D t.C 58 3r 59 Bo 6% u . ' .C.D i o ~ . loE 46 N l0 H U. 43BSlUL. r o u g h 576 N 1695 9 5 6ZmD.c.32-381 6 3 N 32 82 1bU. M=M A H A S N A .C. jab N I260 N '327 8SP 39a N 1464 lb33 9llT qz k 49 k N 1 ~ 4 6 916 ad 5 3a 53 6 5 6 e N L914 9 1 L "7" N 4x1 9 3 bk.C. Lqk 405 Z j b DiozIJ3fl =9 C 31 6 414. ZON 21 23 24 26 2s 30 ZON.C.C. 31U C.34S 9 5 ' ~ ' " ~ 74k N 1672 95k 10 L" p1 1367 78 F 79r 81d DB. N B l04 6 2 n 66c 66 6 67 6.U .31 24 24N.e 2. 41 1237 69 p '3% ?-!E L1 L 45 71N 7LN 99 1oaE lOaM 42-U. 8 1 N 3 3 84N 33 86N D D 50N r o k so^ 5s 5-a s o 33 37 38 64B 64 H 64N 643 64U 80 65N. U .~. 2bB '7A.(.G 72U.C3 8 g 31 29 u. DiosU. 2 7 E 34U. 5 U. 7 4 a D. 5 0 U R C L S AND j A DATES. POTTERY Ihl UNIVERSITY LXI.c. rz N 38 35 L78 15 I C N ZOEZON 5 2 .C. U..C.rM \BC I8L 7 U C 6UC.284 81k 95 b5d. 14u. eAiy 74U. 34 3 0 H 3 0 N 34 L6 C 49E 4 9 Cl 50 YI 71 U. 330 93c!' 10 j ~ . 17A 97N 66U. 31cD 34 31aD 3-1. 13M LIUC.?s IC D.C. 21U. S 5 Miii 34: 6 D 9641) 6 L 66u. 34 19 32 N 33 43~D 34 43bD 311rB 3 4 IBA 3 4 N 31 36 N 31 57U.C.C. 63 65 U. 68 69 70E 94 6 9 N 3 3 95 4U.c. 29 3 3 U.r l e a y 3 0 m 6 9 M ~ 251 .t. 770 60 *l 3 1 77W 44U. F B 5.C 45UG. ~ ~341 c.C 6 4 ~1.I%I j m 7 3 l.L. l o 9 l q l r N I 2 2 9 S+& I9k D 1 o s U . . ~5 3hu. 20 IIA. 1 c L3c F1 1481 5-824dr?1866 61 141411 416 Zyk N l 8 2 6 6 s L b L r ~ k 41 j 241 N 1888 68$lrn 24% N 411 6 ~ p 41n 67b N 4 1 ~8 " 04 ~ 24n 366' 363 l 0 5 18UC.C.C. 21 C 94m D. N 1 8 6 5 91 I).U. N Z N A q A D A . B 3 4 6 70 a n Am all 72% lb Im Lt 2k 67 y' 879 7 6 S81r N 432 7 6 c 64& N D 671 67P U 78 bad' 68ln 4 k N 1768 68k 6 2 6 N 1489 769 N 13.~1. L/ U. 32 2 5 ~ 1.C 301) 3 2 N.C. 2 2 .Un 68c N 1904 54.181 69 7 4 ~ N 75b N 1865 1484 953. zb~t 4 7 ' L 4ce NI464 63 L ' 6 9 ~ 43 9 43h 2 3 U.C. 33Q5 40 L"N 1358 6 3 k %SW 9B 9H 9N ZOD LOL 13 U-C.D B 2k B . 53 32 32 32 5Z-N sbN 58N 65U.C 6ZUC.c. 91 160 4 S D 9 u.c.C :TM 72B 72H 96E 96 L 69U. IOA l2A 53N 32 7" 75E 75N 760 76 H 76 L 76 M 75aN 32 10 12 6 N 41-47 I O N S7 7 5 k N 31 2ZA L O A 34? 7 6 N 31-2 43U. N 32.M 32d" 22 S 321r" 326 Gef2. N 47 7 9 . 73 l 4 73U. 3 ~ 0B6w Aw. 4 3 D LP4 32 4 3 H 1N 31 4 3 M SbUC.R.C.C.77 N 1661 p 1a 4 5b 14\b Ilh NB84 SS& rLg SQlr N 12-11 N lb\9 Y~LC*" 3Sfi 22eDiosU353 2 ~ N d 15-95 2 Z j NI471 j 220 236 N A l37 2 1 4 F N D 83 24 9 L5% 25c S ~ W U . U 3 7 4 92 b N 1449 4 6 3 F 32L 34h 35bl' M643 Grtz. 41 . U. 61 U. 5 4 55 76 A 7br 76W 5b 57 58 60 31 32 2SN 4lU.L.C 22 22N.C. U. 84 u.C .c~ 49U.8 1I. fi U .52 634 77% 288 46 SP 74~ 7 81% D. 6lU.lol .a N 1335- D 1 bd Ibb N 1036 T Y P E SOURCE 3 6 2 76a 6eN1426 N1668 9 IIE N l q t l 7 6 a N I1fj IZ& F11410 ~ i m r\l 650 7 b Q 76fDicrU lbk 143 l b r D~o>U. 60 D . 75 No U c. 44h rf4P 72N 73B G-YZ.C. 58U.os.C lOL ILN 31 37U.C.C. 85bN 31 u. 24UC. H 61 62 638 ~ D B. 2 5I0 k . 2 7 D 24UC.52 s q . 3 9 U.

shtml . Ohio for ETANA Core Texts http://www.org/coretexts.Electronic publication prepared by Kelvin Smith Library Case Western Reserve University Cleveland.etana.

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