CHESHIRE, HALTON AND WARRINGTON MULTI-AGENCY PUBLIC PROTECTION ARRANGEMENTS (MAPPA

)

Annual Report

2005-2006

Protection through Partnership

CHESHIRE, HALTON & WARRINGTON MULTI-AGENCY PUBLIC PROTECTION ARRANGEMENTS (MAPPA)

CONTENTS

FOREWORD by Gerry Sutcliffe, MP
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Criminal Justice and Offender Management i ii iii

NATIONAL OVERVIEW INTRODUCTION
1. What is MAPPA? 2. The Role of the Strategic Management Board (SMB) 3. Key Achievements during 2005/06 4. Who is involved? 5. Domestic Abuse and MAPPA 6. Case Studies 7. Facts and Figures 8. Contact Points

page 1 page 2 page 3 pages 4-6 page 7 page 8 pages 9-11 page 12

Front cover photographs: Chester Magistrates' Court The Bridge, Halton Golden Gates, Warrington

Protection through Partnership

Annual Report 2005-2006

CHESHIRE, HALTON & WARRINGTON MULTI-AGENCY PUBLIC PROTECTION ARRANGEMENTS (MAPPA)

FOREWORD

by Gerry Sutcliffe, MP

Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Criminal Justice and Offender Management

Making our communities safer and reducing re-offending is our highest priority and one of our biggest challenges. That is why the work undertaken through these multi-agency public protection arrangements (MAPPA) is so important. The supervision and management of sexual and violent offenders who pose the highest risk of serious harm, whether in the community or in custody, is complex and challenging; and is an aspect of public service where the public rightly expects all reasonable action to be taken. Although we have made significant progress in the last five years with the development of MAPPA across England and Wales, the review this year of a number of tragic incidents where people have been murdered or seriously injured reminded us of the importance of reviewing performance, improving practice and learning lessons. It is vital that these tasks are undertaken by the probation, police and prison services, as well as by those other agencies that contribute to the assessment and management of offenders. The publication of MAPPA Business Plans by each Area in this year’s annual reports offers a helpful and necessary programme of local development and review and must lead to enhanced practice. It will be essential that this progress is transparent and shared with local communities. In addition to this, however, it is important that no opportunity is missed to consider other measures that will further enhance public safety. That is why we are undertaking the Child Sex Offender Review, to look at how a particular group of offenders, who provoke anxiety for many, are best managed in the community. The review is consulting a wide range of practitioners and key stakeholders including the MAPPA lay advisers, and will report around the end of the year. Finally, in commending this report to you, I want to take the opportunity to thank all those involved locally in working with sexual and violent offenders, or in ensuring that these arrangements are fit for purpose. Where MAPPA is working well it is based on maintaining high professional standards and effective multi-agency collaboration in the delivery of robust risk management plans. While it is not possible to eliminate risk entirely, where all reasonable action is taken the risk of further serious harm can be reduced to a minimum and fewer victims will be exposed to repeat offending.

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MAPPA: THE FIRST FIVE YEARS (2001-2006)
A National Overview of the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements for the period 2001-2006 by the Responsible Authority National Steering Group (RANSG)
It is now just over 5 years since the implementation of the Criminal Justice and Courts' Services Act 2000 that led to the formation of the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements, commonly known as MAPPA. As the national strategic body overseeing the implementation and development of these arrangements it is important for us to review the progress made, to identify the challenges ahead and set out the national plans for improvement. It is also an opportunity for the first time to provide a national commentary on the MAPPA annual statistics and to explain what they are telling us about the growth and complexity of these arrangements. Much has been achieved in terms of enhancing public safety in the last 5 years and the arrangements are rightly described as world leading. Yet we are acutely conscious that a number of serious case reviews and other reports published this year indicate there is still much to do to ensure that the arrangements are fit for purpose and apply consistently across England and Wales. Unless those operating these arrangements ensure that all reasonable action is taken to reduce the harm caused by sexual and violent offenders they will have failed. While we recognise that it is never possible to eliminate risk entirely the public are entitled to expect the authorities to do their job properly. Making our communities safer and reducing re-offending is our highest priority and one of the greatest challenges facing the agencies and staff involved. Over the last year all agencies responsible for establishing, maintaining or contributing to these public protection arrangements have been extremely busy: the probation service, the prison service, the police service who form the Responsible Authority in each area, plus the range of agencies who have a duty to co-operate in these arrangements and include health, housing, education, social services, youth offending teams, Jobcentre Plus, and electronic monitoring services. In addition to the agencies, each area has this year benefited from the input of lay advisers. These are people recruited locally but appointed by the Secretary of State to offer key support to the strategic management of the MAPPA process. Their role is essentially to ask often fundamental questions of senior practitioners and bring a community perspective to a process that could otherwise lose sight of its main function: to protect members of the public from serious harm. Together, all of those inputting to MAPPA have ensured that more high risk sexual and violent offenders have been identified and proactively managed this year than ever before. A full RANSG overview is available on http://www.probation.homeoffice.gov.uk/output/page30.asp

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INTRODUCTION
As the responsible authority for the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements in Cheshire, Halton and Warrington we are pleased to introduce the fifth annual report.
This report reflects the work of MAPPA within your area. It illustrates the close working of not only the “responsible authority” of Police, Probation and Prison Services, but all of our partners in the many other organisations who daily manage the risks of offenders re-offending within your neighbourhoods. The past five years has seen the development of these working arrangements with the incorporation of the Prison Service as a responsible authority, the employment of a full-time MAPPA Co-ordinator, the appointment of Lay Advisors (members of the public) and the creation of specialist Public Protection Units within the Cheshire Constabulary. Additionally the Strategic Management Board has strengthened its ability to ensure an effective and pro-active response in delivering its responsibilities, through the formulation of working sub-groups to ensure that public protection arrangements are coherently managed. The last year has also seen the development of a business plan, the outline of which can be seen within this report. There has been much publicity over recent months about sex offenders living within the community in Approved Premises (hostels). We can assure you that these premises form an important part within the system of public protection to enable offenders to be closely supervised and monitored. This is significantly safer than allowing them to disperse into the community and live in less secure accommodation, where they would be less tightly monitored, and behavioural concerns would be allowed to go undetected. The only other alternative would be to detain them for the rest of their lives. These and other measures enable us to be responsive to the management of a small group of high-risk sexual and violent offenders within our communities, which is highlighted within the statistics contained within this report. In this context, effective monitoring has resulted in 23 offenders being returned to custody for breaching their licence conditions and 2 for breaching restraining orders. It is acknowledged that multi-agency public protection arrangements can never provide the public with absolute protection but we will endeavour to ensure that all reasonable steps are taken to protect the public. Over the period covered by this report one offender was charged with a serious further offence. We hope you will find this report useful in understanding how multi-agency public protection arrangements operate within Cheshire, Halton and Warrington.

Peter Fahy - Chief Constable, Cheshire Constabulary

Steve Collett - Chief Officer, Cheshire Probation Area

Ian Lockwood - Area Manager, North West Prison Service

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1. WHAT IS MAPPA?
Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements have been established across the country to protect the public from potentially dangerous offenders.
These arrangements involve an agency, usually the Police, Probation or Youth Offending Team, identifying an individual whom they assess as more likely than not to commit a serious offence. A Risk Assessment is made by the agency who first raises a concern about an offender. A meeting is then convened involving other agencies, from which an effective Risk Management Plan is drawn up. This involves the delegation of specific responsibilities and actions to those agencies who can contribute to the Risk Management Plan. These actions might include conditions on a licence of someone being released from prison, the imposition of a Sexual Offences Prevention Order, work with families to protect children, ensuring safe housing or curfew restrictions. MAPPA is a three tier process. Offenders who are managed under MAPPA include all Registered Sex Offenders and all those sentenced to twelve months or more in prison for a violent or sexual offence. • Some of these offenders will not be assessed as posing a high risk to the public and they will be managed by a Single Agency (Level 1) although this would not preclude good liaison with other agencies. • Other offenders will be assessed as posing a high risk to the public, and require multi-agency management through a local risk management meeting structure (Level 2). These meetings are held monthly throughout Cheshire, Halton and Warrington and local managers from the various agencies agree what actions need to be taken to reduce the risks presented by these offenders.

• A small number of offenders are deemed to be the 'critical few'. These offenders are the most dangerous, the resources required to manage them cannot be found at local level or the case is so complex that there is a need for very senior staff from the agencies involved to effectively develop a Risk Management Plan. Meetings for these offenders are held as the need arises and these meetings are known as Multi Agency Public Protection Panels (MAPPPs/Level 3) There are many causes of crime, likewise there are many ways in which crime can be reduced, however no one agency has all the resources to meet the needs of offenders, or indeed victims. A multi agency approach is a successful and effective means by which to reduce re-offending and also harm being caused to the public.

WHO IS INVOLVED?
The Police, Prison and Probation Services are the Responsible Authority and hold the ultimate responsibility for ensuring that MAPPA is effectively implemented and managed. For MAPPA to be effective we need the support and assistance of many other agencies and to this end we have, on the Strategic Management Board, representatives from the key agencies in the area including the Youth Offending Teams, Children's Services and Community Services, Mental Health Services, Housing and the Fire Service. Without these other agencies MAPPA would not be as successful as it has proven to be. Together senior managers from these agencies make up the Strategic Management Board for MAPPA.

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2. THE ROLE OF THE STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT BOARD (SMB)
AIMS
To reduce the likelihood of harm being caused by an offender who has been assessed as posing a significant risk to an individual or the general public. (Violent and Sexual Offender Register). This will enhance the information sharing between these three agencies in particular and will enable a much closer monitoring of offenders through their prison sentence and on release. It will also encourage even greater co-operation between the three agencies and links into the Offender Management model being introduced.

HOW WILL THIS BE ACHIEVED?
• By ensuring there is effective communication/ information exchange between agencies; • By ensuring that effective and appropriate risk management plans are devised and implemented; • By ensuring that effective and appropriate training is offered to all involved in MAPPA; • By creating methods by which the general public can be made more aware of the work of MAPPA; • By regularly evaluating the work of MAPPA and the means by which offenders are managed; • By monitoring the performance of all aspects of MAPPA including the attendance of agencies at relevant meetings; • By ensuring that there are two Lay Advisers on the Board who will, to some measure, speak on behalf of the community.

Through not only the representation on the Strategic Management Board but also through good practice and an understanding of the need to continue to develop multi-agency approaches, the Strategic Management Board has formal links with the Local Criminal Justice Board and the three Local Safeguarding Children Boards. It is hoped that in the near future the Probation and Prison Services will be 'linked' to the Police through a key piece of technology known as VISOR

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3. KEY ACHIEVEMENTS DURING 2005/06
What Have We Achieved This Year?
Workers and Police staff in connection with an assessment 'tool', known as Matrix 2000. Over the past year some 350 staff members from Children's Services, Probation, Police, Prison, Housing, Health and Adult Services have been trained in MAPPA. • The Evaluation and Monitoring Group has developed and is refining a process for data collection and analysis. This Group will be focussing on ensuring that the right people are being discussed, the right people are represented round the table and that decisions made lead to effective Risk Management and protection of the public. By working with us the community as a whole has a role to play in reducing offending and harm being caused. It is helpful to understand the current legal system and that many of those offenders deemed potentially dangerous cannot remain in prison for life. Indeed many of these offenders have a desire to stop offending and need not only the services of professional agencies but also their families and the communities from which they have come. Nationally this has been a difficult year with considerable media interest. However MAPPA locally, through effective risk management and robust enforcement procedures, has successfully minimised the risk to the public. 25 offenders in total were returned to prison for failing to comply with the restrictions imposed upon them. The participation of the Lay Adviser on the Strategic Management Board is the start of the community becoming more involved in this challenging area of work and Christine, a local Lay Adviser, has written an account of her time on the Board.

This year we have managed 537 Registered Sex Offenders and 414 other violent and dangerous offenders. During 2005/06 there has been one serious further offence committed by an offender managed under MAPPA. A more robust Strategic Management Board and the high levels of support and assistance given by the many other agencies involved in MAPPA enable us to remain vigilant.
This last year has seen the consolidation of the Strategic Management Board and its three sub-groups which will enhance the overall work of MAPPA in the area. The Strategic Management Board has produced and reviewed a Business Plan for the next three years. • The Communications and Strategic Partnerships Sub-Group has produced this Annual Report and an information leaflet which is available on request. The Group is also planning to hold events to bring MAPPA to the attention of as many people as possible. • The Training Group has held events with all the agencies involved in MAPPA as well as with Prison Chaplains, Trainee Probation Officers, Social

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4. WHO IS INVOLVED?
CHESHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
As an authority with a duty to co-operate, the County Council plays a strong role on the Strategic Management Board for MAPPA. It has now reorganised its former Social Services and Education Departments to create a new Children's Service and a new Community Services Department. Both Services are strongly represented on the Board and have in common the shared agenda to give parents the support they need to ensure that their children are: • Healthy: enjoying good physical and mental health and living a healthy lifestyle; • Safe: being protected from harm and neglect and growing up able to look after themselves; • Enjoying and achieving: getting the most out of life and developing broad skills for adulthood; • Making a positive contribution: to the community and to society and not engaging in anti-social or offending behaviour; • Achieving economic well-being The importance of the role of the County Council on MAPPA is exemplified by its lead role on child protection and the protection of vulnerable adults, as well as other specific duties under the Mental Health Act and other welfare legislation. Children's Social Services as well as Housing are represented on the Strategic Management Board. Warrington Borough Council restructured in 2005, creating five new Directorates. The Children's Directorate includes both Children's Social Services and Education whilst Adult Social Services have moved into the Community Services Directorate. One of Warrington Borough Council's stated key ambitions is to make Warrington communities safer, stronger and sustainable. In this context, local authority staff work closely with local partners to assess, monitor and jointly manage the risks posed by individual offenders.

CHESHIRE YOUTH OFFENDING TEAM
Cheshire Youth Offending Team (YOT) has developed its response to managing risk significantly since its inception in 2000. In 2002/03 the YOT completed a Risk Asset (the national form for assessing risk) in only 3 cases. In 2003/04 this rose to 47 and in 2004/5 115. In the year ending March 31 2006 the YOT completed 234 Risk Assets. The context for this has been the implementation and development of the YOT Policy on Risk. The work of MAPPA is central to this and Cheshire YOT staff attend many Local Risk Management meetings and regard risk management as a key part of its service delivery. Looking ahead, the process is set to continue. The YOT takes time to study its practice through formal and informal reviews and also takes note of national developments such as the recent Monckton Enquiry to ensure that risk remains at the centre of its thinking.

HALTON BOROUGH COUNCIL
There is an integrated approach across Adults and Children's Services. Halton Borough Council has developed robust internal policies and procedures to ensure the implementation of MAPPA. A comprehensive training programme is in development and formal links have been made through the cross-Directorate Training Manager with other statutory agencies. Future work is anticipated to focus on the development of greater awareness and understanding of MAPPA across agencies and within the local community. The need to develop more structured local monitoring systems around MAPPA implementation is recognised.

WARRINGTON BOROUGH COUNCIL
Warrington Borough Council has contributed strongly to MAPPA since its inception in 2001. Both Adults and

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HALTON AND WARRINGTON YOUTH OFFENDING TEAM
Halton and Warrington Youth Offending Team is a multi-agency partnership working across the two local authority areas to reduce youth crime. The team assess all young people (between 10 and 17 years old) it works with for issues of serious risk of harm to others as well as issues of vulnerability. If serious harm is assessed there are procedures to involve partner agencies through the MAPPA procedures at the local level. This puts in place strategies to minimise the potential harm posed to the community or individuals concerned. It is very rare for young people to be regarded as so potentially harmful that the Level 3 MAPPA process is invoked but the Youth Offending Team is an integral part of the protection mechanism if it is required. In addition, Gareth Jones, the Head of Service, contributes to the Strategic Management Board for MAPPA in Cheshire, Halton and Warrington in order to promote the safety of in the management of risk within the wider Cheshire area.

The Unit will be reviewing public protection arrangements within the Constabulary and with its partners during 2006/07, following receipt of guidance from the National Centre of Policing Excellence.

NORTH WEST PRISON SERVICE
The Prison Service has been one of the three Responsible Authorities involved in MAPPA since the introduction of the Criminal Justice Act 2003. This has enabled establishments across the North West to focus on further developing their own internal public protection arrangements as well as developing links with Police and Probation staff working in the community. The main focus of prison establishments has been to ensure that the risk offenders pose to others is minimised whilst in custody as well as effectively managing the sentence to reduce the risk posed on release. MAPPA offenders are now prioritised for OASys, an electronic Prison and Probation risk assessment method, which assesses the risks offenders pose and explores reasons behind offending. This then forms the basis of sentence management. Public Protection Committees have been established in all North West prison establishments where the management of those offenders posing a potential risk to the public is discussed and risk management plans agreed and monitored. These Committees are multi-disciplinary which allows a range of expertise to contribute to decision-making processes.

CHESHIRE CONSTABULARY PUBLIC PROTECTION UNITS
In April 2005 the Constabulary, following a fundamental review in relation to how it delivers its policing services, created specialist Public Protection Units, located within each of its three Basic Command Units. The Crime Manager, a Detective Chief Inspector, has responsibility for these Units which are led by a dedicated Detective Inspector who attends all Local Risk Management Meetings [LRMM's], acting as co-chair, with a Senior Probation Officer. These arrangements ensure that resources are focused on those offenders who are identified as posing a risk of serious harm to the public, by reducing that risk through a multi-agency response. Within these Public Protection Units are specialist officers who have responsibility for the management of registered sex offenders. This process is supported by a Strategic Public Protection Unit (SPPU) based at Police Headquarters. The head of the Unit co-chairs the MAPPA Strategic Management Board with the Probation and Prison Services, and chairs the Training Sub-Group, which has responsibility for delivering training in MAPPA.

CHESHIRE PROBATION AREA
Historically Probation has been the agency responsible for the management of offenders in the community and over the past five years has benefited greatly from the multi-agency approach now at the centre of the Criminal Justice System. Cheshire Probation Area has welcomed the opportunity of engaging with its many partners in the community to develop a holistic approach to reducing the potential for offenders to cause harm. Cheshire Probation Area also appreciates the many opportunities now available to increase awareness amongst many organisations of issues impacting on offenders, methods of risk assessment and also risk management. Victims are also at the core of the work

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of Probation and Probation staff from the Area's Victim Liaison Unit work closely with victims of violent and sexual offences and are therefore able to clearly represent the victims' concerns and anxieties in individual cases.

reduce disability and mental distress and manage risk, has to be considered in this context. Secure Services' representation on the MAPPA Strategic Management Board is making both a contribution to arrangements for public protection and in developing a robust integrated approach to risk management and public protection in partnership with the criminal justice system.

CHESHIRE & WIRRAL PARTNERSHIP NHS TRUST
• Provides specialist mental health, learning disability and drug and alcohol services across a wide geographical area covering Wirral and much of Cheshire; • Recognises that it has a significant contribution to make to arrangements for public protection; • Enables the services and staff in its organisation to fulfil its obligations to public protection; • Has identified eight nominated officers to lead on MAPPA, covering all localities and specialties, and who have received appropriate training in MAPPA and risk management; • Provides a point of contact and advice for Trust staff and colleagues in the Police and Probation Services; • Has appointed the Director of Nursing and Therapies as lead responsibility for MAPPA across the organisation. These arrangements are now well established and are helping to ensure that effective communication is maintained and that Trust staff and services have increasingly strong working relationships with colleagues across the local criminal justice agencies.

LAY ADVISER - Christine's account
When I was first appointed as Lay Adviser to the Strategic Management Board (SMB) I knew very little about the Criminal Justice System and public protection. However, since my appointment, I have had the opportunity to gain more knowledge and whilst still remaining 'lay', I now appreciate the risks and complexity of managing offenders in the community. During the past year I have attended regular SMB meetings, observed a Level 2 Local Risk Management Meeting, assisted at the Probation annual Staff Conference, attended national and local training events and, more recently, observed part of a Probation Board meeting. Through these experiences I have become aware of the role of some of the many agencies involved with the rehabilitation and management of offenders. As a Lay Adviser I am invited to challenge or voice the public view at SMB meetings. I think that my presence on the Board is a reminder to SMB members of their accountability to the public. Although public protection has nationally had a bad press recently, I am comforted that in Cheshire, Halton and Warrington there is genuine care and commitment to managing offenders and maintaining public safety.

CHESHIRE AND MERSEYSIDE SPECIALISED SERVICES COMMISSIONING TEAM
This team also includes Secure Services, responsible for secure medium and low mental health and learning disabilities services across Cheshire and Merseyside. Secure Services operates within complex health, social care and criminal justice systems and a policy context, which covers human rights, criminal law, the Mental Health Act and related health and social care policy. The role of Secure Services which is to treat illness,

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5. DOMESTIC ABUSE AND MAPPA
Within the area there is a concerted approach to the issue of domestic violence. A number of initiatives have been developed by the Police, most recently in Halton. The Probation Service has developed a Community Domestic Violence Programme designed to challenge men who abuse their partners. The Probation Service and the Police recognise the importance of a multiagency approach to domestic abuse and those men who are on the programme are subject to Level 2 MAPPA meetings (Local Risk Management Meetings). The impact of domestic abuse can be devastating and the effects long-lasting. It is a known fact that when partners take the step of moving away from their abuser they put themselves in greater danger. Children are also at risk even if they are not the focus of the anger, as they often 'get in the way'. For example in Cheshire alone, during the month of the World Cup (June 2006) 1,021 children were present in the household when the Police were called to an incident. Domestic abuse is therefore a serious problem and one which MAPPA can do much to alleviate by effective and collaborative multi-agency working. This will ensure that the perpetrator learns to stop abusive behaviour by also involving and protecting their partner and children. The facts and figures for 2005/06 demonstrate that around 150 such offenders were managed within MAPPA. This is a significant figure and the Strategic Management Board is closely monitoring the impact this has on the overall capacity of MAPPA in the area. This Report contains an account of one such case and the involvement of an aspect of Probation work which many are unaware of, namely its work with Victims and the appointment of Women's Safety Workers to work with victims of domestic abuse. CASE STUDY: ANN'S STORY My name is Ann and I live in Warrington. I became involved with the National Probation Service last October through the Women's Safety Worker (WSW) as my ex-partner was sentenced to a community order with a condition that he attend the Community Domestic Violence Programme (CDVP). I was seen by a WSW who gave me information on the CDVP and what information/contact I would be receiving over the coming months. I was also given the opportunity to raise any issues or concerns that I had and if there was anything that the WSW could do to try and alleviate any those issues. I was also informed that if any problems did happen that I could make contact again. I wish to name the WSW, Julie, as without her assistance and the information she has provided me I do not think that I would have 'moved on' and progressed as much as I have. She has spoken to various agencies (Police, Women's Aid and Housing) all of which have supported me and helped me through what has been a difficult time. I am having ongoing contact with Julie as there are still outstanding offences in relation to my ex-partner (most recently as April this year when another incident happened). When the incident in April happened I contacted Julie and told her what had occurred and the problems I was experiencing in making contact with an agency. Julie contacted the relevant agency and explained the situation. I was contacted then within days. I have appreciated all the work the WSW has provided me with and very much value all that has been done. If you would like to speak to me regarding my statement I would welcome any contact from you, via the Probation Service's Victim Liaison Unit (telephone: 01244 665111).

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6. CASE STUDIES
CASE STUDY: PAUL A fifteen year old boy, whom we shall call Paul, was convicted of a sexual assault on a six year old girl and received a nine month Referral Order. Paul was, therefore, placed on the Sex Offenders Register and made subject of a Local Risk Management Meeting. Paul's school requested a multi-agency meeting, following the Local Risk Management Meeting, to consider the implications for his schooling and plan his future educational provision. The Area Child Protection Committee (ACPC)/MAPPA procedures were used, together with Guidance on the Assessment and Management of Child on Child Sexual Behaviour, to complete a risk assessment. The risk assessment provided the necessary information to develop a management strategy. This enabled Paul to continue to have access to educational provision and ensure the safety of other pupils. The multi-agency group made the decision that Paul was at high risk of re-offending and in need of an alternative educational package. Agencies were able to work together to co-ordinate a range of activities including; - home tuition - physiotherapy - life skills - work on his sexualised behaviours - exploring the possibility of engaging Paul in activities which would enable his mother, who was his principal carer, to also have some time and support for herself

CASE STUDY: JOHN During 2005/06 an incident took place, which although not serious, gave a clear picture of the quality of the work undertaken by both MAPPA and the Probation Service in managing some of the most 'risky' people in our community. For the purpose of this account the individual shall be named John. Between 20.12.04 and 21.02.06 John, aged 31 years, was the subject of four Risk Assessments. Bearing in mind he was in custody for a year this meant that between 12.12.05 and 21.02.06 there had been three assessments. From these risk assessments risk management plans were drawn up. Initially, in this case, the Probation Service drew up the plans and the members of the Level 3 Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel refined and accepted these as the most effective means by which to manage the risk John presented to the public. There was a high level of supervision and disclosures shared with members of the Level 3 meeting. There were regular meetings of the Multi Agency Panel to ensure all parties involved were kept as well informed as was possible because it was well understood that John could re-offend at any time. Concerns about John's thought processes, acknowledgement of sexual motivation, and belief that he 'had to offend', coupled with information gleaned from those around the table, led to the recall of John before he could commit any offence and thereby harm any child, woman or other. Whilst returning someone to prison may not always be a mark of success, the close co-operation of all those working with John meant that there was an immediate and pro-active response to the information and concerns which were shared by the various agencies involved in managing the risk he potentially posed to the community.

KEY FACTORS IN THE SUCCESSFUL MANAGEMENT OF THIS CASE WERE: • Full risk assessment • Multi-agency working • Good co-operation from school • Emphasis on Paul's need for continued education • Parental engagement

KEY FACTORS IN THE SUCCESSFUL MANAGEMENT OF THIS CASE WERE: • Comprehensive reports and assessments • Continuous liaison between key agencies • Regular reviews to identify any changes in risk • Good supervision leading to John sharing his beliefs and motivations • Immediate action

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7. FACTS AND FIGURES
1. Category 1 MAPPA offenders: Registered Sex Offenders (RSO) i) The number of RSOs living in Cheshire, Halton and Warrington as at 31 March 2006 The number of RSOs per 100,000 head of population ii) The number of sex offenders having a registration requirement who were either cautioned or convicted for breaches of the requirement between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006 iii) The number of (a) Sexual Offences Prevention Orders (SOPOs) applied for (b) interim SOPOs granted and (c) full SOPOs imposed by the courts in your Area between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006 iv) The number of (a) Notification Orders applied for (b) interim Notification Orders granted and (c) full Notification Orders imposed by the courts in your Area between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006 v) The number of Foreign Travel Orders (a) applied for and (b) imposed by the courts in your Area between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006 537 50

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a) 15 b) 0 c) 4 a) 3 b) 0 c) 3 a) 0 b) 0

The number of Registered Sex Offenders living in each Police Basic Command Unit as at 31 March 2006 were: Western 154 Northern 198 Eastern 185

WHY IS THERE AN INCREASE IN REGISTERED SEX OFFENDERS?
Every year there are more and more successful prosecutions of sex offenders, coupled with the fact that many are registered for life. The number will continue to rise for some time yet. The fact that so many sex offenders are on the Register for life should give the community an increased sense of protection as they remain monitored by all those who are involved and most notably by the Police.

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MAINTAINING A BALANCE
There are many offenders who fall within the criteria of MAPPA but not all pose a significant risk of causing significant harm. Of the 951 MAPPA offenders in this past year 527 in total have been managed through either Level 2 or Level 3. This is just over half of the total number of offenders. Those in the 'other' category, who are for the most part Domestic Abuse perpetrators, are managed at Level 2 because of the need for a multi-agency approach to this form of offence, not necessarily because they are assessed as posing a significant risk of harm. Offenders who are managed at Level 1 are managed according to the risk they pose which, when under the supervision of the Probation Service, is reviewed every sixteen weeks. Those registered sex offenders who are under the sole management of the Police are reviewed according to the requirements of the risk assessment which can be quarterly to annually. Risk is a dynamic feature and all agencies remain alert to changes in an offenders risk, attitude and compliance. There is therefore some movement between the levels of management according to the outcomes of the continual assessment process.

2. Category 2 MAPPA offenders: Violent Offenders and Other Sexual Offenders (V&OS) vi) The number of violent and other sexual offenders (as defined by Section 327 (3), (4) and (5) of the Criminal Justice Act (2003)) living in your Area between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006

236

3. Category 3 MAPPA offenders: Other Offenders (OthO) vii) The number of 'other offenders' (as defined by Section 325 (2)(b) of the Criminal Justice Act (2003)) between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006. 4. Offenders managed though Level 3 (MAPPP) & Level 2 (local inter-agency management) viii) Identifies how many MAPPA offenders in each of the three categories (i.e. (1) - RSOs, (2) - V&O and (3) - OthO above) have been managed through the MAPPP (Level 3) and through local inter-agency risk management (Level 2) between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006. Category 1 Category 2 Category 3 6 at Level 3 4 at Level 3 5 at Level 3 255 at Level 2 84 at Level 2 173 at Level 2

178

(ix) Of the cases managed at levels 3 or 2 (i.e. (viii)) between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006, how many, whilst managed at that level: (a) Were returned to custody for a breach of licence? 5 at Level 3, 18 at Level 2 (b) Were returned to custody for a breach of a restraining order or sexual offences prevention order? 2 at Level 2 (c) Were charged with a serious sexual or violent offence? 1 at Level 2

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Protection through Partnership

Annual Report 2005-2006

CHESHIRE, HALTON & WARRINGTON MULTI-AGENCY PUBLIC PROTECTION ARRANGEMENTS (MAPPA)

MANAGING THE RISK: Recalls to prison
Any breach of either a prison licence or a Sexual Offences Prevention Order (SOPO) is taken very seriously. If these breaches are assessed as increasing the risk to the public then immediate action is taken. In the case of those under the supervision of the Probation Service such offenders will be returned to prison. In the case of those who breach their SOPO, the Police will prosecute.

THE 'CRITICAL FEW'
Those offenders who are assessed as posing a significant risk of causing significant harm to the public and who, to manage the risk effectively, need to be managed at Level 3 remain a relatively small number. There have been fifteen such cases in the past year which represents 1.6% of those offenders who are assessed as posing a risk and are managed through MAPPA.

Protection through Partnership

Annual Report 2005-2006

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CHESHIRE, HALTON & WARRINGTON MULTI-AGENCY PUBLIC PROTECTION ARRANGEMENTS (MAPPA)

FURTHER INFORMATION AND CONTACT POINTS:
For further information, you can contact: MAPPA Co-ordinator............................................................... Telephone: 01244 394500 Cheshire Police Headquarters, Strategic Public Protection Unit Detective Chief Inspector........................................................ Telephone: 0845 4580000 Cheshire Probation Area Headquarters Assistant Chief Officer (Public Protection)................................Telephone: 01244 394500 HM Prison Service Risk Management Co-ordinator...............................................Telephone: 01257 248600

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Protection through Partnership

Annual Report 2005-2006

Protection through Partnership

A copy of this Annual Report is available from the following websites: www.cheshireprobation.org.uk www.cheshire.police.uk