Student Clinical Practicum Handbook

Class of 2013

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Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program
Table of Contents
Faculty and Staff Clinical Practicum Syllabus Introduction Requirements for Rotations and Student Responsibilities Preceptor Evaluation Mid-rotation Evaluations Patient Encounter Logs Skills Log Time Log Student Evaluation of the Clinical Rotations Clinical Seminars and Psychiatry Seminars Site Visit Evaluation Post-Rotation Examinations Attendance Planning Elective Rotations General Elective Final Preceptorships Student Responsibilities Course Grade Computations Description of Course Components and Requirements Preceptor Evaluation Professional Conduct Clinical Seminars Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine Seminars On-site Faculty Evaluation Post-Rotation Examinations Standardized Patients General Elective Patient Community Medicine Report Final Course Grade What to Expect From Your Clinical Rotations How to Manage Clinical Practicum Seminar and Post-Rotation Exam Schedule 4

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Rotation Objectives Emergency Medicine Family Practice/Ambulatory Medicine Internal Medicine Obstetrics/Gynecology Pediatrics General Surgery Community Medicine Rotation General Elective Rotation Out-of-State Rotation Guidelines Important Documents for Those Anticipating Out of State Travel Release of Liability, Waiver Emergency Medical Information International Studies Guidelines Clinical Coordinator Request for Out of State Rotation Full Faculty Approval for Out of State Rotation Underserved Populations Community Medicine and Cross-Cultural Clinical Project Letters of Intent (All Rotations) Final Preceptor Evaluation Fortnightly Evaluation Student Evaluation

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Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program
FACULTY AND STAFF

Shawn McNamara Interim, Program Director
443-840-1807

smcnamara2@ccbcmd.edu

Steven J Schwartz, MD Medical Director 443-840-2854 Sschwa27@jhmi.edu

Robert J. Solomon, MS, PA-C Clinical Assistant Professor 443-840-1930 Rsolomon@ccbcmd.edu

Jack Goble Jr., PA-C InterimAcademic Coord, Asst. Professor 443-840-1159 jgoble@ccbcmd.edu Ted Wilson, PA Adjunct Faculty, Clinical Asst. tedsretired@yahoo.com

Melecia Helwig, MS, PA-C Clinical Coordinator, Asst. Professor 443-840-1885 Mhelwig@ccbcmd.edu Shirley Shaw Program Administrative Assistant 443-840-2854 Sshaw@ccbcmd.edu Robert J. Solomon, MS, PA-C Clinical Assistant Professor 443-840-1930 Rsolomon@ccbcmd.edu

Susan Landry Adjunct Faculty, Program Director Mental Health Slandry@ccbcmd.edu

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University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Clinical Faculty / Preceptors 2012-2013 Claudia Kroker. Paul Place Baltimore. MD 21239 5 . PA-C Jesse. MD 21224 Northwest Hospital Center Dept. MD 21133 Mercy Medical Center Dept. MD 21202 Good Samaritan Hospital Dept. PA-C Emchugh7@aol. MD wrowe@mdmercy.com 410-332-9694 Erica McHugh. MD 21237 Internal Medicine Internal Medicine Internal Medicine Internal Medicine Johns Hopkins @ Bayview 4940 Eastern Avenue Baltimore. of Cardiology 5601 Loch Raven Boulevard Baltimore.org 410-521-2200 Wilma Rowe. MD Claudia.pratt@medstar.com 410-932-8230 Internal Medicine Franklin Square Hospital 9000 Franklin Square Drive Baltimore. PA-C rmartin@lifebridgehealth.kroker@medstar. of Internal Medicine 301 St.edu 410-303-4999 Regina Martin. of Internal Medicine 5401 Old Court Road Randallstown.e.net 443-777-7116 Jesse Pratt. MD Sschwa27@jhmi.net 410-777-8032 Steven Schwartz.

com 410-467-6040 Community Medicine Family Medicine Family Medicine Family Medicine Family Medicine Family Medicine Private Practice 76 Frederick Street Taneytown. PA-C Ms_garcia7@msn.net 410-288-6226 6 . Morrill.edu 301-314-8151 Community Medicine Community Medicine Community Medicine Bruce Lewis. Joppa Road.com 301-681-4860 Ann C. MD 21236 Private Practice 6730 Holabird Avenue Baltimore.Community Medicine Access Carroll. MD Primary and Alternative Medicine 10801 Lockwood Drive. MD 21217 Pioneer Health Center 8341 Pioneer Drive Severn.com 410-612-0374 Community Medicine Jeanne Hoover Jeanne. Ste. 1515 W. North Avenue. MD 21040 Baltimore City Health Dept.com 410-247-9595 Heather Teitelbaum. MD markfrydenborg@concentra. MD Jwelsh23@hotmail.gov 410-396-0176 Marisa Garcia-Faust. Campus Drive College Park.umd. MD 20742 Total Urgent Care West Shore Professional Building 2120 Emmorton Park Road Suite E Edgewood. 2nd Floor Baltimore. tblack@carrollhospitalcenter.org 410-871-1478 Mark Frydenborg. Inc. PA UM/College Park Health Center Building 140. MD 21157 Concentra Medical Center York.net Jean Welsh. Dir.hoover@baltimorecity. MD 21222 Jason Tate. PA-C blewis@totalurgentcare.sanai@verizon. MD Ali. Exec. MD 21144 Tammy Black. MD 20901 Private Practice 4136 E. 2 Locust Lane. 310 Silver Spring. PA-C hteitelbaum@health. Suite B Baltimore. MD Jtatemd@verizon. MD 410-529-8334 Ali Sanai. Suite 301 Westminster.

MD 21144 Private Practice 7211 Park Heights Avenue Baltimore. MD 21208 Private Practice 202 Hospital Drive Glen Burnie. MD 410-760-2358 Marisa Garcia-Faust. PA-C jnorris@gbmc. Suite 104 Pikesville. 1515 W.gov 410-396-0176 Cynthia Newton. MD 21157 Private Practice 413 Pulaski Highway. North Avenue.org 410-368-2514 Beth Aronson. PA-C rsears@stagnes.net 410-655-4600 Cristeta Gatdula. Agnes Hospital Department of OB/GYN 900 Caton Avenue Baltimore. 2nd Floor Baltimore. PA-C cindynewt@comcast. MD 21208 Baltimore City Health Dept.net 443-442-2312 Pediatrics Pediatrics Pediatrics Pediatrics Pediatrics Pediatrics Pediatrics 7 .org 443-849-4511 Rosemarie Sears.hoover@baltimorecity. MD baronson@gbmc. MD 21061 Pioneer Health Center 8341 Pioneer Drive Severn.OB/GYN OB/GYN OB/GYN OB/GYN GBMC Labor & Delivery 6701 N. Suite 205 Baltimore. PA-C Ms_garcia7@msn.net 410-848-4424 Balbir Chauhan. MD 21204 St.org 410-486-6540 Jeanne Hoover Jeanne. Rosenstein. Heiligman. MD 21217 Carroll Children’s Hospital 230 Washington Heights Westminster. MD 21085 Private Practice 4000 Old Court Road. MD sondrakheiligman@yahoo. MD 21229 Private Practice 106 Old Court Road. MD alrosenstein@comcast. MD 410-679-2122 Alfred B.com 410-318-8550 Joe Hubicki Hubicki@comcast. MD 21236 Jenn Norris. Suite 204 Joppa.com 410-467-6040 Sondra K. MD 21208 Johns Hopkins @ White Marsh 4324 Campbell Boulevard Baltimore. Charles Street Towson.

net 410-332-9809 Darlene Leftwich. 102 Barton Court Abingdon. PA-C jnrjilbert@verizon. 9000 Franklin Square Drive Baltimore. Med. MD 21239 Felicia Pryor. 201 E. MD 21237 8 Emergency Medicine . MD 21009 Franklin Square Hospital Department of Emer. PA-C Edavisonpac.Emergency Medicine Union Memorial Hospital Department of Emer. University Parkway Baltimore.net 410-368-2000 (ER) Tania Boyadjieva.net 410-332-9809 Carol Kniola. Paul Place Baltimore. PA-C kathipa@comcast. PA-C Tania_zvet@hotmail. PA-C Yongwon1376@gmail.72@verizon. 5601 Loch Raven Boulevard Baltimore. Paul Place Baltimore. Med. 900 Caton Avenue Baltimore.net 301-552-8665 Keith Burgess. PA-C keithmusicman@comcast.com Yongwon Lee.net 410-554-2107 Elena M. Castro. MD 21202 Emergency Medicine Harford Memorial Hospital Department of Emer. PA-C nkirk21@gmail. MD 20706 Mercy Medical Center Department of Emer. MD 21218 Doctors Community Hospital Department of Emer.net Gwendy McCoy Gwendy@comcast. Agnes Hospital Department of Emer.com 410-952-3084 Eric Davison. 8118 Good Luck Road Lanham. PA-C feliciatp@aol. Med. Med. MD ecastrokaouk@gmail. PA-C samster@verizon.com 443-843-5500 Stephanie SingerNicole Kirk. MD 21229 Kathi Burroughs.com 443-444-4040 Emergency Medicine Emergency Medicine Emergency Medicine Emergency Medicine Good Samaritan Hospital Department of Emer. Med. 301 St. MD 21202 St. PA-C darerpac@hotmail.com 443-777-7046 Emergency Medicine Mercy Medical Center Department of Emer. Med. Med. 301 St.com 301-552-8665 John Gilbert. Med.

MD 21239 St.com 410-245-5000 Jean Sturdivant. MD 21229 Mercy Medical Center Department of Surgery 301 St. MD 21133 Sinai Hospital of Baltimore Department of Surgery 2401 W.S. Paul Place Baltimore. PA-C jstark@lifebridgehealth. x. PA-C Garrett63@hotmail. 52749 Roy Ruehle.picard@medstar. Belvedere Avenue Baltimore. MD 21045 Peter Wessels. 55433.org 410-601-6412 Surgery Surgery Surgery Surgery Surgery Surgery 9 . MD 209101484 Franklin Square Hospital Department of Surgery 9000 Franklin Square Drive Baltimore.com 410-332-9827 Butch Jackson. PA-C pwessels@hcgh. B. Agnes Hospital Department of Surgery 900 Caton Avenue Baltimore. MD 21215 Maureen Cutting. MD 21237 Northwest Hospital Center Department of Surgery 5401 Old Court Road Randallstown. 5755 Cedar Lane Columbia. PA-C mfirko@stagnes.l.net 443-444-3731 Margaret Firko.cutting@medstar.Emergency Medicine Howard County Hospital Department of Emer.org 301-754-7258 Daniel Picard.net 443-777-7123 Jeff Stark. jsturdiv@lifebridgehealth. x. PA-C Rruehle21286@yahoo. Med.org 410-368-2414 Ralph Garrett. PA-C Maureen. MD 21202 Holy Cross Hospital Department of Surgery 1500 Forest Glen Road Silver Spring.org 410-521-2200. PA-C jackbu@holycrosshealth. MD Daniel.org 410-740-7777 Surgery Surgery Good Samaritan Hospital Department of Surgery 5601 Loch Raven Boulevard Baltimore.

6. Pediatrics. 1. In addition. 2. 254 Introduction The clinical portion of the Physician Assistant Program begins in June of 2012 and extends through May of 2013. 7. 8. Family Practice Internal Medicine Pediatrics Obstetrics and Gynecology Emergency Medicine Surgery Community Medicine Elective General Elective All rotations (Family Practice. 5." 10 . 253.Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Clinical Practicum Syllabus Class of 2013 PAST 251. which begins in June of 2013 and runs approximately two months in duration. 252. 4. Both the General Elective and PCP are planned by the Clinical Coordinator for scheduling. There are twelve months of clinical rotations divided among the clinical courses of PAST 251. Internal Medicine. Students are reminded that the purpose of the educational sessions is to prepare students to provide physician supervised primary health care to all persons and in all environments without regard to the student's own personal beliefs and biases. and Community Medicine) are approximately 6 weeks in duration and are scheduled and selected by the Clinical Coordinator. 3. and 254. Emergency Medicine. 253. "The subject matter in PA education can be of a very sensitive and sometimes disturbing nature. 252. OB/Gyn. students are given the priveledge of site selection and set-up if they are in good standing with the program. and Surgery. there is a General Elective Rotation which is 6 weeks in duration and a Final Preceptorship (PAST 255).

Requirements for all Rotations and Student Responsibilities 1. b. These evaluations are submitted to the clinical coordinator by the 3rd Friday of every rotation. Skills Log i. Satisfactory Preceptor Evaluation Students must pass all rotations. Complete the entire log as it pertains to your clinical day. click on add/edit daily time log. c. Please ask your preceptor to sign off on all your logs. a. ii. you will receive an Incomplete grade (refer to student manual). 3. All areas with red arrow are required information for EVERY clinical encounter. If it is incomplete. A description of the Preceptor evaluation is found below under Course Grade Computation. 11 . This should only be about 4-5 pages of information for your preceptor to sign. The student is responsible for seeing that the evaluations are submitted on the first class day after the end of the rotation. 1) All typhon encounters need to be completed by the end of your rotation. 2. Under Other Logs and Reports. If you attend any conferences. try not to get behind! I will be checking routinely. iii. b. 2) You all should print out the summary of patients encountered and time log during your rotation. or dismissal from the Program depending on the circumstances surrounding the failure. Patient Encounter Logs i. Patient Encounter Logs Students keep a record of each patient contact through Typhon logging system. Time Log i. Skills performed during a rotation and their frequency is also maintained electronically---this will be assessed through your documentation of CPT codes. click on my time log. please indicate this under the ―My Clinical Conference Log‖ iii. Electronic (scanned) and paper copies will be accepted. no maximum). I would like the remaining sections (sections without red arrow) completed for at least 3 encounters daily. Failure of a rotation will require repeating that rotation. At least one needs to be submitted for each rotation. more may be required for those having difficulty. ii. This should be completed daily. delaying graduation. This should reflect the hours spent on site by the student and any absences during the rotation. This information can be found in the following sections: a. Fortnightly Evaluations (aka Mid-rotation Evaluation) These evaluations are designed to assure that students get timely feedback from clinical instructor so that deficiencies identified early on can be corrected by rotation’s end. You should log encounters daily. Typhon should be logged for EVERY patient (there is a minimum. The student has the responsibility to make an appointment with the preceptor to have the fortnightly evaluation completed. My Time Log--enter in the month for the summary of your time log. Case log totals (graphical)--enter in the dates spent at the rotation.

or will be late she/he must notify the preceptor directly and Clinical Coordinator. This can be done by email at the beginning of each rotation.5% from the final rotation grade. Attendance Students are required to attend the clinical site a minimum of forty hours per week. no later than one hour before the scheduled arrival time. The student must make up all missed time before the end of the rotation. time and case logs must be turned in with other materials no later than the first campus day following the end of rotation. clinical site. If the preceptor is unavailable directly. These mid-rotation exams will not count for grade however will be used as a counseling tool as to your progress. The retest grade will be averaged with your previous exam grade. but must include student name. telecommunications. or 7:00 to 3:00. Exceptions may be made in certain circumstances as deemed appropriate by the Course Instructor. contact is to be made as soon as possible. preceptor and whether or not she/he has been notified. Post Rotation Examinations Students must perform satisfactorily on all post-rotation exams. weekend and on-call attendance. a mid-rotation exam will be administered as a courtesy. They are to include constructive criticism and may offer suggestions for solutions for issues raised. night. A voice mail message is satisfactory in this case. Due to the importance of attendance as part of a medical team. and plan for making up the time. Generally. Rotations. the student must continue to call until contact is made. For students on a two-month rotation.Student Evaluation of the Clinical Rotation These evaluations. 9:00 to 5:00. attendance will be during the regular work week and day shifts: 8:30 to 4:30. These evaluations are summarized for preceptors at the end of each clinical year. See descriptions below. Students must notify the Clinical Coordinator if the schedule will be other than the routine Monday through Friday for eight hours per day. general surgery and obstetrics. If you fail a post-rotation exam. A clinical absence form is required for each event of absence. this must be signed by the preceptor and faxed to the PA Program office (443) 8401405 on the first day back on clinical site. each absence will lead to a deduction of . or by electronic means. See description in sections to follow for grading information. These exams will be based upon general medicine and your clinical rotation specialty. particularly emergency medicine. may require evening. reason for absence or lateness. 12 . On-site visits are conducted as a matter of routine. you have a one-time opportunity to retest. These forms are posted on Typhon (under ―My evaluations‖) and should be completed at the end of your rotation. Following notification of the preceptor the student must contact the clinical coordinator. In emergencies. Clinical Seminars and Psychiatry Seminars Clinical seminars are mandatory for students on required rotations. In the event that a student is unable to attend the clinical site for an assigned day for any reason. Site Visit Evaluation Faculty will evaluate student clinical performance during each rotation either in person. Students attending family medicine rotations attend a psychiatry seminar.

The Program takes these policies seriously. Required Immunizations.pdf Personal Health Insurance Coverage Students are required to carry some form of health care insurance while attending the Program and must provide the Program with verification of coverage by the start of the fall semester. Safety and Security Students. It is everyone’s responsibility to read and observe policies on safety and security for each and every institution that you are assigned or enter. 13 . At minimum.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00050577. Breech of professional conduct or attendance policies will at the very least lower the student’s marking by one letter grade and may result in failure of the course and dismissal from the program. the name badge and program emblem may not be worn unless the student is completing a Program clinical assignment).htm Exposure to Blood: What Health Care personnel needs to know: http://www. students will introduce themselves to patients and hospital personnel as physician assistant students. Neither CCBC nor the Essex PA program’s clinical affiliates provide health services to students beyond routine first-aid care. should any site practices be concerning to the student. All sites used by the program are safe. Outside Work in a Clinical Setting Students who elect to work in a health care capacity must dress appropriately so as not to confuse or misrepresent their work role with their PA student status (i.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/bbp/Exp_to_Blood.cdc. Students may go to the health care provider of their choice.e. Students must not represent themselves as anything other than a physician assistant student. This includes medical care for accidents or injuries which may occur on Campus or at any of the College's affiliated institutions Student Identification/Patient Introductions Physician assistant students must be clearly identified as such (see dress code).. the program should be notified immediately. and Clinical Faculty are responsible to ensure that appropriate security and personal safety measures are addressed in all locations where instruction occurs. Students are responsible for all medical fees incurred while attending the Essex PA Program. Faculty.cdc. regardless of former experience or title. Some health care services are available from the Towson University Dowell Health Center. Allowing health insurance coverage to lapse at any time while in the program will result in immediate removal of the student from clincial site or classes and may ultimately result in program dismissal. Health Screenings and Health Insurance Immunization of Health-Care Workers: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC): http://www. while attending the clinical site.

The opportunity to strengthen experience already gained in one of the standard rotations. 2012 November 19. the 14 . etc. 2013 February 18. 2012 August 27. Equally important is that students not represent themselves as Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant student Planning Rotations Students in good standing with the program (see Student Policy Manual) may have the privilege of selecting their own general elective rotation and primary care preceptorships.Chart Entry Signature All clinical documents and chart entries must be signed with the students' full name followed by PA-SI (Year I) or PA-SII (Year II and Graduating students use the PA-SII designation). Experience in a specialty which is not ordinarily offered by the Program 3. Clinical experience of particular interest to the student—a potential career path 2. Students on probation may have these rotations assigned. Procedure for developing an individual site follows below. Student Responsibilities All materials related to the planning of the general elective and FP rotations must be submitted to the clinical coordinator by the following deadlines. General Elective Students are encouraged to select sites for the general elective which can provide: 1. 2012 July 16. 2013 The responsibility for submitting all appropriate documentation and requirements listed below rests solely with the student. 2012 January 7. For Electives during: Rotations 2 Rotations 3 Rotations 4 Rotations 5 Rotations 6 Rotations 7 Rotation 8 Final P receptorship June 4. Avoid Misrepresention It is imperative that students represent themselves accurately as physician assistant students while in the clinical setting. If all obligations are not met by the dates listed above in this syllabus. but may occur during any of the eleven remaining rotations. PharmD. Students who fail to identify themselves appropriately will be dismissed from the program. Fianl Preceptorships Specific requirements are listed on pages 49-51. The general elective is generally not scheduled for the first clinical rotation. Locations may include affiliates with which the program already has an agreement (if available) or sites that the students identify on their own. 2012 October 8. 2013 April 8. MD. regardless of former title—RN.

other students assigned for one of the required rotations will take first priority over the Elective. 336. 5. Policies and procedures for processing student grievances are located in the following locations: PA Program Student Policy pg. CCBC College Catalog pg. Violation of this policy will result in course failure and dismissal from the program. School of Health Professions Honor Code pg. the student is responsible for giving all pertinent information to the Clinical Coordinator (CC) so that the contracts can be properly prepared. *These contracts protect the institution and individual and students will not be permitted on any clinical site without written authorization from the CC.student will receive an ―F‖ grade for the rotation and will have to repeat it at the end of the clinical year prior to the Final Preceptorship. Contacting Other PA Programs for Sites: If the student requests a rotation out of the area. Rotation objectives: It is imperative that the student and preceptor reach an agreement about what is expected of each party in terms of clinical education during the rotation. Towson Graduate Catalog pg. Affiliation Agreement: If a prospective preceptor or institution does not have an existing Affiliation Agreement with the College. you will NOT initiate this communication. Once a dialog is established. the program will initiate contact with the PA program in the requested destination. 27. you may then continue it as long as the Clinical Coordinator from both programs are ―Copied‖ on emails that pertain to site arrangements. Community Medicine or Final Preceptorship requests. As the student. Letter of Intent: This is a signed letter from the prospective preceptor agreeing to accept the student for a specific type of rotation on specific dates. 15 . students may be responsible for hand delivering the contracts and returning them to the CC if it becomes necessary. Students negotiate with the preceptor in establishing personal objectives for the elective. Additionally. 36-37. Site Selection: If the student selects a site that is one of the Program’s standard sites. Out of state PCPs will need to be requested 4 weeks prior to the above deadlines for the corresponding rotation. The initial contact to the other program’s Clinical Coordinator will be done by our own Clinical Coordinator.

2 For students attending both Clinical and Psychiatry Seminars an average of the two scores will be used for this component Example: Application of Grading Criteria Rotation 1a Grade Score S 86 Preceptor Evaluation S 0 Professional Behavior A 6 Seminars/Project S 0 Site Visit Evaluation Complete 0 Data Logging B 0 Post Rotation Exam 92 Rotation Grade Average of Rotation 1 and 2: 92 + 82 = 174 / 2 = 87 Rotation 1b Grade Score S 86 S 0 A 6 S 0 In-Complete -10 B 0 82 PAST 251 Grade: B 16 . two or more items will constitute a rating of ―U‖ for the rotation.Course Grade Computation Rotation grades are based on the preceptor evaluation. other categories probable rotation failure) 1 As noted by clinical coordinator. post-rotation examination and professional behavior. One infraction of professional behavior on the evaluation is rated as an ―N‖. clinical seminar or report/literature review grade. preceptor. Clinical Seminars Facilitator or other professionals at the clinical site. faculty site visitor. faculty site-visit evaluation. Grades for each rotation will be calculated on a 100-point scale as follows: Rotations Grades Preceptor Evaluation Professional Behavior1 Clinical SeminarPsychiatry Seminar2 On-Site Faculty Evaluation Data Logging Post Rotation Exam* S = 86 U = 40 S= 0 N = -10 U = -20 A = +6 B = +2 C = 0 F = -10 S = 0 N = -5 U = -10 Complete = 0 Incomplete = -10 A = +8 B = 0 C = -8 F = -50 S-Satisfactory N-Needs Improvement (possible rotation failure) U-Unsatisfactory (for preceptor grade rotation failure.

etc. and indicates professional conduct which could be improved or were a problem during the rotation. faculty site visitor. Responsibility for final assessment of professional conduct rests with the Clinical Coordinator. or clinical seminar faculty. Clinical Seminars Students attending rotations will meet on the first day back on campus with an assigned faculty member per the senior schedule. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that evaluations are submitted electronically or via paper copy. Clinical case presentation or psychiatry seminar Case Discussion to include the following: Basis of diagnosis Review of diagnostic criterion Disease etiology Rationale for the plan chosen       If the faculty has any concerns after this review. 17 . CT.). Requirements for the seminar include: Review of your clinical database information (to include electronic patient logs). The clinical write-up is due to the assigned faculty member on the 15th of the month. points are deducted for overall behavior that needs improvement and additional points if unsatisfactory. The faculty will prepare questions on your submitted cases. along with affecting your grade for the rotation. and submitted electronically once per month. Labs. These evaluation links are emailed to all preceptors during your rotation. you may be required to give additional case presentations and/or clinical write-ups. See the senior schedule for times and dates seminar schedule is available on-line. Clinical write-up: These should be SOAP notes. The only time that professional conduct plays a role in the student’s rotation evaluation is if it has been a problem. All students will submit their case presentation in the form of a clinical write-up along with pertinent associated work (i. The clinical database information must be complete and current by the end of each week.Description of Course Components and Requirements Preceptor Evaluation The preceptor evaluation constitutes a majority of the student grade for the rotations.e. assesses whether or not the student’s performance was satisfactory or unsatisfactory. This should be completed by the 15th of every month. Professional Conduct Exemplary professional conduct is expected of all physician assistant students at all times. Preceptors complete a standard evaluation form. ECGs. Therefore. All written work and case presentations must use The Student Guide to Recording Medical Data as a guide. The following individuals may also note problem professional conduct: clinical coordinator. A professionalism assignment will be assigned to all students with an infraction. The clinical case presentation is a ―mini grand rounds‖ session.

Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine Seminars The program does not require that physician assistant students attend a separate psychiatry rotation. unemployment. The program however is committed to assuring and documenting sufficient clinical experience in psychiatry. Therefore clinical students attending family medicine attend a Psychiatry/Behavior Medicine Seminar scheduled on the first day back on campus with Psychiatry Faculty. the family medicine rotation is where students will see and manage the largest percentage of behavioral problems. Anxiety Disorder. PSYCHIATRY REQUIREMENTS FOR FAMILY MEDICINE ROTATIONS Students are required to submit TWO (2) cases of patients who present with a primary psychiatric condition (Mood Disorder. While clinicians are exposed to psychiatric problems in almost any setting. Each student is required to complete and submit two (2) cases while on the Family Practice rotation. Additionally. The format for the submission of the 2 cases is below AND the write-up is to be emailed to the address listed below. Substance-Use Disorder. etc). The case used for the oral presentation SHOULD NOT be one of your write-up cases. Please use the written case presentation format as the template for your oral presentation. the student is to send the Clinical Coordinator (CC) (via email) the following information: TOTAL # OF CASES SEEN IN LAST WEEK TOTAL # OF CASES SEEN FOR PSYCHIATRIC PROBLEM TOTAL # OF CASES SEEN FOR PSYCHOSOCIAL PROBLEM TOTAL # OF CASES SEEN FOR MEDICAL TREATMENT WITH PRIMARY PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSIS TOTAL # OF CASES SEEN FOR MEDICAL TREATMENT WITH PSYCHOSOCIAL PROBLEM LIST THE SPECIFIC PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSES SEEN IN THAT WEEK AND THE NUMBER OF CASES OF SEEN FOR EACH DIAGNOSIS: Alcohol Dependence Major Depression Schizophrenia 4 3 1 18 . Students should plan to submit a write-up of a case on the 3rd Friday of their Family Practice rotation. each week. each student will make one (1) oral presentation of a case when he/she is back on campus for the end-of-rotation group sessions. or psychosocial problem (divorce. Finally. etc) REGARDLESS of the primary cause for the visit to the Family Practice office.

Email address: mhelwig@ccbcmd.edu 19 .

purpose) MEDICAL CONDITIONS (List all conditions for which patient is being treated) MEDICATIONS (List all conditions for which patient is being treated) DSM-IV-TR PROVISIONAL DIAGNOSIS(ES) o (All disorders. history of prior treatment) MENTAL STATUS EXAMINATION o (Performed yes/no. history of prior treatment)    PRESENCE OF PSYCHOSOCIAL PROBLEM OR ISSUE? o (What is relationship of this problem to patient’s current physical functioning?)   HISTORY OF SUBSTANCE USE/ABUSE: o (Drug of choice. frequency of use. form short/long. onset.FAMILY PRACTICE MEDICINE ROTATION PSYCHIATRY CASE PATIENT CONTACT FORM Please complete the following information for the two (2) case write-ups of the patient with a primary psychiatric disorder during the Family Practice rotation. all 5 axes) DISPOSITION & TREATMENT     20 . results) o Delusions: Type o Hallucinations Type o Suicidal Ideation o Homicidal Ideation o Orientation X 4 (person. duration.  PATIENT DATA o Gender o Age o Marital Status REASON FOR FAMILY PRACTICE VISIT HISTORY OF PRESENT PROBLEM: o (Nature of problem. place. duration. onset. time.

Regardless. A student who fails a single rotation. 6a. it will become apparent that there is no such thing as a typical rotation or a standard approach. Post Rotation Exams Following completion of each of the required rotations students take a multiple-choice examination designed to measure knowledge and skill gained during a rotation in core knowledge and the specialty discipline. Description of Rotations The clinical practicum focuses on the assessment and overall management of patients presenting to the clinical site. Final Course Grade A point score is calculated for each rotation and an average of all rotations for the course becomes the final course grade using the following program parameters for letter grades: 90 . Once the student repeats the rotation and receives a passing grade. 2b. case presentation. A student may not earn any higher than a ―C‖ for courses where a rotation was failed. Schedules change and personality conflicts arise. & 3b = Rotations 4a & 4b = Rotations 5a. Students participate in all aspects of patient care including the assessment of clinical 21 . 3a. A schedule of exam times is listed on the Senior Schedule. has not previously failed any rotations. Student performance is evaluated. The preceptor can be kept abreast of program changes or schedule modifications. 5b. didactic learning is applied and new skills are practiced. & 6b Any student who receives an ―F‖ on any given clinical rotation will receive an ―F‖ for the course grade regardless of average score for all rotations.100 80 – 89 70 – 79 Below 70 = = = = A B C F PAST 251 PAST 252 PAST 253 PAST 254 = Rotations 1a & 1b = Rotations 2a. and is in good standing with the program may be allowed to repeat the rotation – timing and scheduling at the discretion of the Clinical Coordinator. The site and preceptor are evaluated against program standards. Student performance during an on-site evaluation may include any or all of the following: review of chart entries. if the opportunity for repeating the rotation is granted or not. Not everything goes as planned. What to Expect From Your Clinical Rotations At the core of a physician assistant education are the clinical rotations—where students become adept at interacting with patients. A failure in any program course may result in dismissal from the program. the student will receive an ―F‖ grade for the course. Site visits are also intended to keep the student in touch with the program over the course of the rotation. a repeat course grade will be entered as a ―C‖.On-Site Faculty Evaluation Site visits to rotations where PA students are assigned serve several purposes. The student must develop a high degree of flexibility and initiative to benefit fully from each rotation. After passing through a few sites. The student must pass the exam in order to pass the rotation. and observation of interaction with staff and / or patients.

Due to these variations. That means that personal.findings. preceptors. in collaboration with the preceptor. financial or any other considerations should have been as well organized as possible to allow the student to focus on the necessities of the program. Some preceptors have precious little time to spend with students one-on-one. The instruction style of the preceptor is. It is clear that some individuals are better instructors for certain students than others. Clinical sites within the same specialty vary. those people with whom they are the most comfortable. The final decision on student placement rests with the clinical coordinator. That person may be an administrative person who is in charge of Physician Assistant student rotations and will obtain input from other Physician Assistants. to work with. Objectives Each rotation specialty has a directed set of objectives. Schedule When the student was accepted into this program. etc. quite possibly. The student is encouraged. Each has its own inherent assets and liabilities. Some sites are highly structured with a heavy patient load and limited student/preceptor conference time. With the numerous aspects of scheduling clinical rotations. where allowed. while others may have a low patient turnover rate with a lot of time for one-on-one instruction from the preceptor. Every clinical site is different. There are no perfect rotations. which must be taken into consideration. it is not possible for the student to choose which clinical site he or she wants. Students are referred to the PA Program required text list for independent reading and study. clinicians. Students are responsible for independent reading and study for any topic area that cannot be covered on the clinical site. They may expect students to rapidly find their niche as a member of the medical team. the most variable feature of the clinical rotation. Preferences may be accommodated where possible. assign students to other preceptors or expect students to identify individuals with whom they chose to spend their time. Preceptors There is one preceptor listed on the evaluation form who is responsible for evaluating the student’s performance during the rotation. 22 . developing differential diagnoses and implementing treatment plans. Students will be exposed to both outpatient and inpatient settings. if possible. which are met through observation and participation at the clinical site and by attending conferences and seminars with the preceptor. it was emphasized that the demands of the program would require the student’s full attention during its 26 months. regarding the student’s performance to arrive at a final grade. it will be up to the student to glean the maximum from each rotation and to supplement what cannot be met clinically with readings based on the objectives for that rotation.

but also extremely beneficial to make every attempt to maintain an attitude of mutual respect for all colleagues and accept all they have to offer. However. to stay until all patients are seen and all documentation complete. Religious Holidays Absences will be approved. If a student chooses a passive role. This is especially true in the medical field. If. 23 . all missed hours must be made up. it is best to take a day to observe the style of patient care and learn the routine of that particular site. Preceptors and staff will evaluate how eagerly you approach tasks on rotation. Prompt attendance is also noted. Call the preceptor early in the morning to assess the clinical situation. the learning experience will be minimal. How are patient write-ups done? Who co-signs notes and orders? Who is in charge? How are patients followed in the system? Some rotations will have very specific requirements. you will be assessed on your willingness to work. It is not only necessary. a politely assertive stance is taken. the opportunity for learning is limitless. Students who do not report to the site must notify the preceptor and CC. it is imperative that students take the initiative in each rotation. but note it and it will appear as part of your evaluation. Inclement Weather Policy Students are not required to attend the clinical site on days when the college is closed due to inclement weather. Therefore. however.How to Manage When starting a new rotation. whether a student or a practicing professional. without direct supervision. while others may not be as structured or have a predictable routine. Preceptors may not mention lateness. the student must inform the preceptor and not perform the task until supervision is provided. Students who feel that they are unable to reach the site safely due to inclement weather when the college is not officially closed will be excused provided that the absence procedure is followed. it is strongly recommended that students attend the clinical site. Should a situation arise in which the student is requested to do something that he or she is uncomfortable doing. Attendance Minimum attendance requirements are described earlier in the syllabus. Preceptors do note behaviors such as avoiding an assignment at the end of the shift versus demonstration of willingness to go beyond what is required. provided that the preceptor and Clinical Coordinator are notified in advance and clinical time is made up. The student must make the preceptor and other colleagues aware of whom they are and that they are willing to learn from every situation. However. However. Attitude The amount of knowledge and expertise gained from each rotation is largely determined by the student’s attitude and behavior. if the commute can be made safely. Do you stand back and wait to be told what to do or do you ask and volunteer for tasks? There are always things to learn from different people in different professions.

Behaviors. 24 .Problems Invariably. problems will arise during rotations. Failure to recognize one’s clinical limitations. their Faculty Advisor or their Faculty Session Advisor as soon as a problem develops in an attempt to lessen. The student should contact the Clinical Coordinator. Misrepresentation of the student’s status. include. at any time. Personality conflicts do occur and students may feel awkward if one arises. if not solve the difficulty. All efforts will be made to reach a conclusion that is mutually satisfactory to both the student and the preceptor. It is up to the student to clarify with the preceptor at the outset of the rotation what the expectations are. It is crucial to identify difficulties as early as possible so they don’t interfere with the student’s ability to learn or jeopardize a fair assessment of the student’s performance. Unprofessional conduct (see the PA Program Student Handbook for expansion on professional conduct). which will lead to immediate dismissal. eliminating unexpected surprises at the end of the rotation. particularly with the person responsible for their grade. The mid-rotation evaluation is another tool used to measure progress. will be removed from the clinical site and are subject to Program dismissal. Students failing to do so. but are not limited to:      Performing at an unsafe level as assessed by the clinical staff or Program Faculty. Falsification of medical information. Please Note The Program expects all students to adhere to standards of professional conduct and patient safety.

Lance Greenway. Physician Assistant Program Towson University ∙ CCBC Essex Faculty SOAP Note Session Assignments Faculty Member Melecia Helwig Office Room N327 mhelwig@ccbcmd. Lydia Li. Lacie Payea.edu 443 840-1885 Class of 2013 Advisees Abdelkarim. Susanna Bonsal. Kara Richardson. Brittany Hamilton. Stephen Manthripragada. Edward Peng. Michael Shinaberry. Lauren Zager. Brooke Skellan. Juliet Fuhr. Kerin Hergenhahn.edu 443-840-1159 Robert Solomon rsolomon@ccbcmd. Melanie Haroun. Lydia Burgess. Sarah Mikula. Brittany Griffin. Jennifer Molina. Kimberly Winter. Xinqi Schaffer. Laurel Xuan. Shannon Hanssen. Thomas Saville. Adina Felton. Kun Steen. Jamie Leigh. Lauren Duncan. Elvin Prada. Mackenzie Bergmann. Laura Shawn McNamara Office Room N322 smcnamara@ccbcmd.edu 443 840-1807 Jack Goble Office Room N325 jgoblejr@ccbcmd.edu Office Room N326 443 840-1930 25 . Stephen Fonfara.Clinical Practicum Seminar 2012-2013 Students will meet in Clinical Seminars on first campus day after rotation and perform case presentations to the following faculty. Qing Muffoletto. Xiaqing Bishop. Abigail Doyle. Kristina Barrett.

** SOAP Notes are due by the Friday of the 3rd week of each rotation to the respective group leader 26 .

Much emphasis is placed on collection and accurate recording of medical histories and physical findings. physical exams. 2. 27 . 4. and that they avail themselves of the current medical literature. with accuracy. Be introduced to the principles of proper patient triage in a hospital emergency department. Goal With the recognition that one cannot master all of Emergency Medicine in a 6 week rotation. Reading and Study Students will utilize Blueprints Emergency Medicine (latest edition) as the primary source for reading and independent study. It is also imperative that students explore other texts on the program’s textbook list and sources of reference recommended by individual clinical instructors. a focused history and physical exam. the program’s philosophy includes an emphasis on collection and analyses of medical data using critical thinking skills in a systematic approach to presenting problems and complaints. Minimum objectives are listed here to guide student learning and instructor facilitation of student learning. 3. Accurately and concisely present case summaries in accordance with program and/or institutional guidelines. While only limited objectives are listed here it is important that students take advantage of all learning opportunities that arise in the clinical setting. Students will complete the objectives for the rotation through supervised clinical practice. Students are expected to gain mastery of a substantial fund of knowledge to function effectively with the wide spectrum of problems in the medicinal practice. Review of the program’s handbook Recording Medical Information will provide guidance for recording histories. objectives and reading assignments will provide the student with additional direction for learning. Accurately develop a plan of investigation and order the appropriate laboratory and diagnostic tests for complaints presenting to the emergency medicine in a cost-effective manner and within applicable reimbursement guidelines and regulations.Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Emergency Medicine Rotation Description The Emergency Medicine Clinical Practicum focuses on recognition and management of problems common to the emergency medicine clinical setting and on prevention of accidents and preventable illness. Objectives At the conclusion of the rotation the student will: 1. discharge summaries and presenting cases. and attendance at grand rounds and other lectures or presentations available at the clinical site. Collect and record. Referring to Emergency Medicine lecture outlines. independent reading and study. participation in planned Emergency Medicine Seminars.

28 .5. Demonstrate knowledge of the symptoms. MRI  Suturing and CT scans  Burn dressing  Casting/Splinting 9. Reconciliation involves comparing the patient’s current list of medications against the physician’s admission. and necessary therapeutic intervention for management of acute and emergent situations:  Diabetic emergencies  Blood dyscrasias  Altered mental status. physical findings. Recognize the need and make appropriate referrals for management of medical problems beyond the scope the Emergency Medicine and for follow-up of problems identified in the Emergency Medicine setting. Smoking Cessation. awaiting the arrival of a physician:  Cardiac arrest or failure  Acute chest pain/myocardial infarction  Respiratory arrest or failure  Acute endocrine imbalances  Hypertensive crisis  Ingestion of poisonous/toxic substances  Seizures  Shock : hypovolemic & cardiogenic 10. Perform Medication Reconciliation with guidance from the institution’s medical team. Diet. Competently perform skills common to the emergency medicine practice:  Venipuncute  EKG recording and initial assessment  Administration of oral. topical  Use of sterile technique and parenteral medications  Catheterization  Intradermal skin testing  Initial assessment of radiographs. appropriate diagnostic tests. Promote lifestyle changes through patient education for prevention of disease: a. Weight Management. frequency. Safety Practices Emergency Medicine Rotation Continued 6. and route — and using this list to provide correct medications for patients anywhere within the health care system. altered  Respiratory distress consciousness and seizure  Chest pain  Psychiatric emergencies  Respiratory and cardiac arrest  Cardiac rate and rhythm  Stroke/Other cerebral vascular events abnormalities. 7. Exercise. dosage. EKG  Alterations of blood pressure abnormalities. Through a process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications a patient is taking — including name. and/or discharge orders. Sun Exposure. transfer. Recognize and initiate therapy. syncope  Fever and sepsis  Eye emergencies  Headache  Substance abuse  Abdominal pain/Acute abdomen  Poisoning  Foreign body  Drug and alcohol toxicity  Common pediatric emergencies  Allergic disorders  Dermatology emergencies  Bacterial/Viral and other  Orthopedic emergencies/joint pain and infectious processes limitation of motion  Common male and female  Visual changes/Common eye problems genitourinary complaints 8.

initial laboratory tests and imaging studies. mental status exam. and plan for initial management:  Anxiety  Suicidal Ideation  Bipolar Disorder  Substance related disorders  Borderline Personality  Mood Disorders/Depression    Conversion reaction  Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders  Eating Disorders  Psychiatric emergencies (Delirium) Sleep Disorders Geriatric Psychiatry (Abuse/Neglect) 29 . presenting signs and symptoms. course of the disease. identify each item in the differential diagnosis in terms of etiology/pathophysiology. Discuss the psychological effects of emergency room care on patients and their families and demonstrate the ability to counsel these individuals Psychiatric Objectives: 12. For each of the common medical conditions listed.11.

and interim or episodic history and physical examination. Reading and Study Students will utilize Blueprints Family Medicine (latest edition) and Rakel: Essential of Family Medicine (latest edition) and Ferri’s Clinical Advisor. Students are expected to gain mastery of a substantial fund of knowledge to function effectively with the wide spectrum of problems in the medicinal practice. Accurately and concisely present case summaries in accordance with program guidelines. physical exams.Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Family Practice and Ambulatory Medicine Rotation Description The Family Medicine Clinical Practicum focuses on prevention of disease and recognition and management of problems common to the family medicine clinical setting. Minimum objectives are listed here to guide student learning and instructor facilitation of student learning. Goal With the recognition that one cannot master all of Family Practice and Ambulatory Medicine in a 1. with accuracy. 30 . independent reading and study. and that they avail themselves of the current medical literature. It is also imperative that students explore other texts on the program’s textbook list and sources of reference recommended by individual clinical instructors. the program’s philosophy includes an emphasis on collection and analyses of medical data using critical thinking skills in a systematic approach to presenting problems and complaints. Objectives At the conclusion of the rotation the student will: 1.5 month rotation. 2. Students will complete the objectives for the rotation through supervised clinical practice. discharge summaries and presenting cases. participation in planned Family/Internal Medicine Seminars. a complete medical history and physical exam. Collect and record. Much emphasis is placed on collection and accurate recording of medical histories and physical findings. Referring to Family Practice/Ambulatory Medicine lecture outlines. objectives and reading assignments will provide the student with additional direction for learning. and attendance at grand rounds and other lectures or presentations available at the clinical site. Review of the program’s handbook Recording Medical Information will provide guidance for recording histories. While only limited objectives are listed here it is important that students take advantage of all learning opportunities that arise in the clinical setting. latest edition as the primary source for reading and independent study.

transfer. and/or discharge orders. an admission history and physical examination. prepare admission orders. With supervision and using appropriate consultation and referral will recognize. document patient course in progress notes and complete discharge summaries appropriate with the clinical site’s policies. EKG abnormalities. with accuracy and in the appropriate format. Family Practice and Ambulatory Medicine Rotation Con’t… 5. Identify the symptoms. 6. and necessary therapeutic intervention for management of acute and emergent situations:  Diabetic emergencies  Respiratory distress  Altered mental status. assess and implement initial management for problems and disorders common to the practice of internal medicine:  Altered mental status/Seizure  Hypertension Disorders  Diabetes/other common endocrine disorders  Parestesias  Shortness of breath  Joint pain and limitation of motion 31 . physical findings. Collect and record. initial laboratory tests and imaging studies. identify each item in the differential diagnosis in terms of etiology/pathophysiology. and plan for initial management:  Anxiety  Suicidal Ideation  Bipolar Disorder  Substance related disorders  Borderline Personality  Mood Disorders/Depression    Conversion reaction  Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders  Eating Disorders  Psychiatric emergencies (Delirium) Sleep Disorders Geriatric Psychiatry (Abuse/Neglect) 7. and route — and using this list to provide correct medications for patients anywhere within the health care system. dosage. altered  Chest pain consciousness and seizure  Respiratory and cardiac arrest  Cardiac rate and rhythm  Stroke/Other cerebral vascular abnormalities. frequency. Psychiatric Objectives: For each of the common medical conditions listed. Reconciliation involves comparing the patient’s current list of medications against the physician’s admission. mental status exam. 4. appropriate diagnostic tests. Accurately develop a plan of investigation and order the appropriate laboratory and diagnostic tests for presenting medical complaints in a cost-effective manner and within applicable reimbursement guidelines and regulations. Through a process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications a patient is taking — including name. events syncope  Alterations of blood pressure  Eye emergencies  Fever and sepsis  Substance abuse  Headache  Abdominal pain 8. course of the disease.3. presenting signs and symptoms. Perform Medication Reconciliation with guidance from the institution’s medical team.

32 . Perform screening for and initiate preventive management and patient education for the following problems and possible sequelae:  Type II diabetes  Colon/Rectal cancer  Cardiovascular disease  Breast cancer  Injuries  Testicular and prostate cancer  Domestic violence  Skin cancers  Sexually transmitted infectious diseases  Cervical cancer and other preventable adult infections  Bone and joint disorders  Childhood infectious diseases  Alcohol/substance abuse  Undesired pregnancy 10. Promote lifestyle changes through patient education for prevention of disease:  Diet  Weight management  Exercise  Limitation of sun exposure  Smoking cessation  Safety Practices 11.      Allergic disorders Common skin problems Chest pain Acute abdominal pain Common gastrointestinal problems Disorders of the immune system       Fever Bacterial/Viral and other infectious processes Blood dyscrasias Visual changes/Common eye problems Common male/female genitourinary complaints Common pediatric problems 9. Competently perform skills common to the family medicine practice:  Venipuncute  EKG recording and initial assessment  Administration of oral. Recognize the need and make appropriate referrals for management of medical problems beyond the scope of routine Family Medicine. topical and parenteral medications  Use of sterile technique  Intradermal skin testing  Catheterization  Suturing  Initial assessment of radiographs  Casting/Splinting 12.

Minimum objectives are listed here to guide student learning and instructor facilitation of student learning. habits. objectives and reading assignments will provide the student with additional direction for learning. Students will demonstrate the ability to collect and communicate medical histories and physical findings as well as application of knowledge gained and critical thinking skills acquired in the classroom.Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Internal Medicine Rotation Description The 1. While only limited objectives are listed here it is important that students take advantage of all learning opportunities that arise in the clinical setting.5 month Internal Medicine Clinical Practicum provides the student with the opportunity to further develop the attitudes. independent reading and study. Emphasis is given to patient education and prevention of injuries and illness. 33 . and an interim or episodic history and physical examination. Objectives At the conclusion of the rotation the student will: 1. Each student must spend sufficient time in a long-term care facility while on this rotation to complete the long-term care objectives described below. Goal With the recognition that one cannot master all of Internal Medicine in a two-month rotation. Review of the program’s handbook Recording Medical Information will provide guidance for recording histories. knowledge and skill required of the physician assistant. discharge summaries and presenting cases. It focuses on the assessment and management of acute and chronic problems common to the practice of internal medicine. participation in planned Internal Medicine Seminars. Collect and record a complete medical history and physical exam. Referring to Internal Medicine lecture outlines. physical exams. Students will complete the objectives for the rotation through supervised clinical practice in the internal medicine setting and long-term care unit. It is also imperative that students explore other texts on the program’s textbook list and sources of reference recommended by individual clinical instructors. Reading and Study Students will utilize Lange: Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment (latest edition) and Blueprints Medicine (latest edition) as the primary sources for reading and independent study. the program’s philosophy includes an emphasis on collection and analyses of medical data using critical thinking skills in a systematic approach to presenting problems and complaints. Students are expected to gain mastery of a substantial fund of knowledge to function effectively with the wide spectrum of problems in the medicinal practice. and attendance at grand rounds and other lectures or presentations available at the clinical site. and that they avail themselves of the current medical literature.

problems. Through a process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications a patient is taking — including name. and route — and using this list to provide correct medications for patients anywhere within the health care system. probable disease mechanisms. 3. Reconciliation involves comparing the patient’s current list of medications against the physician’s admission. with accuracy and in the appropriate format. and/or discharge orders. Perform Medication Reconciliation with guidance from the institution’s medical team. Competently manage long-term care patients to include the following:  Admission to the facility: initial evaluation and management plan. physical examination. prepare admission orders. 4. Give a concise verbal presentation of the history. Promote age appropriate positive lifestyle changes through patient education for health maintenance and prevention of disease including:  Diet/Exercise/Weight management  Limiting sun exposure  Smoking cessation  Safety Practices 7. initial laboratory results. 5. an admission history and physical examination. Collect and record. frequency. plans for further assessment and management of an assigned patient in accordance with program guidelines for case presentations.Internal Medicine Rotation – Continued 2. 6. dosage. document patient course in progress notes and complete discharge summaries.  Patient progress reports tailored to specific needs of the long-term patient to include: o Special history taking requirements with attention to mental status issues o Physical exam with special attention to patient disabilities o Medication reconciliation o Management planning with particular attention to:  activities of daily living  patient safety  patient’s need for social services  family and other personal social history o End-of-life issues o Discharge planning 34 . transfer. Accurately develop a plan of investigation and order the appropriate laboratory and diagnostic tests for presenting medical complaints in a cost-effective manner and within applicable reimbursement guidelines and regulations.

initial laboratory tests and imaging studies. Make appropriate referrals for management of medical problems beyond the scope of routine internal medicine practice. presenting signs and symptoms. including HIV Myocardial infarction Venous thromboembolism Fluid. identify each item in the differential diagnosis in terms of etiology/pathophysiology. course of the disease.Internal Medicine Rotation – Continued 8. Perform screening for and initiate preventive management and patient education for the following problems and possible sequelae:  Type II diabetes  Breast cancer  Cardiovascular disease/dyslipidemia  Gynecologic cancers  Domestic violence  Testicular and prostate cancer  Sexually transmitted infectious diseases  Skin cancers and other preventable infections  Bone and joint disorders  Colon/Rectal cancer  Alcohol/substance abuse 10. electrolyte. and acid-base disorders Altered mental status/ Seizure Disorders 9. topical and  Use of sterile technique parenteral medications  Catheterization  Intradermal skin testing  Initial assessment of radiographs  Central lines  Lumbar puncture 11. and plan for initial management:             Cough Dysuria/other urinary complaints Back pain/joint pain Chest pain Abdominal pain Anemia Hypertension COPD/obstructive airway disease HIV infection Congestive heart failure Liver disease Diabetes mellitus             Dyslipidemias Substance abuse Depression Common cancers Acute renal failure Pneumonia Dyspnea Infectious Disease. For each of the common medical conditions listed. 35 . Competently perform skills common to the internal medicine practice:  Venipuncture/ABGs  EKG recording and initial assessment  Administration of oral.

While only limited objectives are listed here it is important that students take advantage of all learning opportunities that arise in the clinical setting. and attendance at grand rounds and other lectures or presentations available at the clinical site. care of the pregnant women from preconception through the post-partum period. Much emphasis is placed on collection and accurate recording of medical histories and physical findings.Moore: Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology (latest edition) as the primary source for reading and independent study.5 month rotation. a complete gynecologic and obstetrical history and physical exam. and that they avail themselves of the current medical literature. physical exams. independent reading and study. (2) family planning.5 month Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinical Practicum focuses on (1) the assessment and management of reproductive problems for women from adolescent to adult years. Review of the program’s handbook Recording Medical Information will provide guidance for recording histories. discharge summaries and presenting cases. Perform and document. Reading and Study Students will utilize Blueprints Obstetric and Gynecology (latest edition) and Hacker .Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Obstetrics/Gynecology Rotation Description The 1. participation in planned OB/GYN Seminars. Goal With the recognition that one cannot master all of Obstetrics and Gynecology in a 1. Students will complete the objectives for the rotation through supervised clinical practice. and on application of knowledge gained and critical thinking skills presented in the classroom. Referring to Obstetrics and Gynecology lecture outlines and objectives will provide the student with additional direction for student learning. Students are expected to gain mastery of a substantial fund of knowledge to function effectively with the wide spectrum of problems in the medicinal practice. the program’s philosophy includes an emphasis on collection and analyses of medical data using critical thinking skills in a systematic approach to presenting problems and complaints. and maintains of reproductive health for men and women. Objectives At the conclusion of this rotation the student will be able to: 1. Minimum objectives are listed here to direct student learning and instructor facilitation of student learning. 36 . There is also an emphasis on patient education and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. with accuracy. It is also imperative that students explore other texts on the program’s textbook list and sources of reference recommended by individual clinical instructors.

4. and necessary therapeutic intervention for management of acute and emergent gynecologic situations:  Pelvic Pain  Severe vaginal bleeding  Lower abdominal pain  Dysuria/Hematuria  Leg/calf pain  Dyspareunia  Sexual abuse  Domestic abuse  Breast mass/discharge 9. Accurately and concisely present case summaries. Bacteria Vaginosis. Accurately develop a plan of investigation and order the appropriate laboratory and diagnostic tests for gynecologic and obstetric presenting complaints in a cost-effective manner and in accordance with appropriate reimbursement guidelines and regulations. Identify symptoms. and management of complications  Family planning  Intrauterine devices  Progestin only agents: oral. Through a process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications a patient is taking — including name.2.  Male and female sterilization implants 37 . endometriosis  Breast mass/malignancies  Amenorrhea / Dysfunctional uterine  Pelvic Malignancies bleeding/Menstrual pain  Sexually transmitted diseases 8. 6. frequency. Perform and document with accuracy complete and appropriate labor and delivery assessment. transfer.Continued 3. 5. and/or discharge orders. Chemical-allergic-foreign  Urinary complaints body vaginitis  Menopause  Infertility  Hirsutism  Urinary incontinence  Infertility  Uterine myomas. Trichomoniasis. Assess and implement initial management for issues. problems and disorders common to the practice of gynecology:  Vulvovaginitis  Menstrual irregularities/Menstrual pain  Candida. and route — and using this list to provide correct medications for patients anywhere within the health care system. Perform Medication Reconciliation with guidance from the institution’s medical team. Obstetrics/Gynecology Rotation . 7. education. appropriate diagnostic tests. physical findings. Reconciliation involves comparing the patient’s current list of medications against the physician’s admission. Provide family planning services. injection. dosage. Perform and document with accuracy interim or episodic gynecologic and obstetrical history and physical examination.

 Antepartum care  Medical complications of pregnancy  Monitoring labor and delivery  Identification of the high risk  Fetal monitoring/fetal distress patient  Prolonged pregnancy  Premature labor  Substance abuse during pregnancy  Prenatal diagnosis and ultrasound  Antepartum bleeding 12. Testing stool for blood 11. Use of sterile technique 13. Endometrial biopsy 12. Pap smear and visual cervical assessment 7.Continued 10. Urinalysis 9. topical and parenteral medications (including immunizations) 6. Forms of contraception 11. 38 . Be able to discuss and propose management for obstetric issues. uterine sizing 3. Recognize the need and make appropriate referrals for major medical and psychiatric problems. Pelvic exam. and other problems beyond the scope of routine outpatient obstetrics and gynecology. Venipuncture 5. Breast exam 2. and Pap smears basic behavior modification techniques Smoking cessation Basic nutritional needs for women from menarche through the postmenopausal years 13. Administration of oral. Wet prep/KOH prep 8. Pelvimetry 4.Obstetrics/Gynecology Rotation . Educate patients and partners about:  Normal menstrual function  Pregnancy  Labor and delivery  Peurperium  Lactation  Sexually transmitted diseases  Safe sexual practices  Maintenance of normal weight/exercise     Preventive measures such as selfbreast exam. Vaginal and cervical cultures 10. Competently perform clinical skills common to the OB/Gyn setting: 1. mammography.

39 .

knowledge and skill required of the physician assistant. objectives and reading assignments will provide the student with additional direction for learning. physical exams. Minimum objectives are listed here to guide student learning and instructor facilitation of student learning. Review of the program’s handbook Recording Medical Information will provide guidance for recording histories. Obtain and document complete and appropriate newborn. Goal With the recognition that one cannot master all of Pediatric Medicine in a one-month rotation.Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Pediatric Clinical Practicum Description The 1. and that they avail themselves of the current medical literature. independent reading and study.5 month Pediatric Clinical Practicum provides the student with the opportunity to further develop the attitudes. Obtain and document a complete and episodic pediatric medical history and physical exam and patient progress. and well-child checks and developmental assessment. discharge summaries and presenting cases. and attendance at grand rounds and other lectures or presentations available at the clinical site. It focuses on the assessment and management of the infant. habits. well-baby. the program’s philosophy includes an emphasis on collection and analyses of medical data using critical thinking skills in a systematic approach to presenting problems and complaints. 40 . While only limited objectives are listed here it is important that students take advantage of all learning opportunities that arise in the clinical setting. participation in planned Pediatric Medicine Seminars. Objectives At the conclusion of the rotation the student will: 1. Students are expected to gain mastery of a substantial fund of knowledge to function effectively with the wide spectrum of problems in pediatric medicine. Reading and Study Students will utilize Blueprints Pediatrics (latest edition). and record medical orders for signature of the clinical supervisor. and adolescent presenting with acute or chronic problems. child. Students will demonstrate the ability to collect and communicate medical histories and physical findings as well as application of knowledge gained and critical thinking skills acquired in the classroom. Nelson: Textbook of Pediatrics 17th edition and Harriet Lane Handbook: A Manual for Pediatric House Officers 16th edition as the primary sources for reading and independent study. Referring to Pediatric Medicine lecture outlines. and for routine well-child care with emphasis on parent/patient education and prevention of injuries and illness. Students will complete the objectives for the rotation through supervised clinical practice. It is also imperative that students explore other texts on the program’s textbook list and sources of reference recommended by individual clinical instructors. 2.

presenting signs and symptoms. sprain/strain/fracture. 6.  Chest radiographic abnormalities—infiltrate. proteinurea. atelectasis  Headache  Rashes  Bruising/petechiae 41 . problems.  Anemia. 5. dipstick abnormalities hyperaeration. initial laboratory tests and imaging studies. and plan for initial management:  Fever  Seizure  Cough. identify each item in the differential diagnosis in terms of etiology/pathophysiology. presenting signs and symptoms. burns. hemocult positive stool. splenomegaly  Abnormal eye examination—strabismus  GU problems—dysuria. identify each item in the differential diagnosis in terms of etiology/pathophysiology. plans for further assessment and management of an assigned patient in accordance with program guidelines for case presentations. and route — and using this list to provide correct medications for patients anywhere within the health care system. probable disease mechanisms. Through a process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications a patient is taking — including name. tenderness diarrhea. joint swelling  GI problems—abdominal pain. Perform Medication Reconciliation with guidance from the institution’s medical team. thrombocytopenia hematuria. initial laboratory tests and imaging studies. course of the disease. and/or discharge orders. initial laboratory results. WBCs in urine. 4. Give a concise verbal presentation of the history.  Heart murmur abdominal mass.Pediatric Clinical Practicum – Continued 3. transfer. head injury. tenderness hepatomegaly. frequency. and plan for initial management:  Abuse and Neglect  Suicidal Ideation/Risk  Substance related disorders  ADD and ADHD  Mood Disorders/Depression  Conversion reaction    Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders   Eating Disorders  Autism Psychiatric emergencies Sleep Disorders Bipolar Disorder 7. For each of the common pediatric conditions listed. mental status exam. frequency. course of the disease. Reconciliation involves comparing the patient’s current list of medications against the physician’s admission. dosage. unexplained injuries/child  Ear pain abuse and neglect  URI—viral and bacterial  Joint or limb pain—limp. leukocytosis. Develop and record an initial plan of investigation and order the appropriate laboratory and diagnostic tests for pediatric presenting complaints in a cost-effective manner and in accordance with appropriate reimbursement guidelines and regulations. physical examination. Child/Adolescent Psychiatry Objectives: For each of the common medical conditions listed. wheeze  Poor vision/hearing loss  Sore throat/pharyngeal inflammation  Trauma—bites.

Educate parents and pediatric patients.  Growth and nutrition problems effects of teratogenic agents  Prevention of illness and injury  Pediatric pharmacological therapeutics  Physical and sexual child abuse  Poisoning prevention and treatment  Fluid and electrolyte management 9. Accurately and appropriately list key factors and identify importance. topical and parenteral medications (including immunizations)  Intradermal skin testing  Developmental screening  Use of sterile technique 10. and basic nutritional needs for children from birth through adolescence. and plan for initial management:  Abuse and Neglect  Suicidal Ideation/Risk  ADD and ADHD  Substance related disorders  Conversion reaction  Mood Disorders/Depression  Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders  Psychiatric emergencies  Eating Disorders  Sleep Disorders  Autism  Bipolar Disorder 42 . learning problems. Child/Adolescent Psychiatry Objectives: For each of the common medical conditions listed. basic behavior modification techniques. 11. and/or management of the following issues:  Immunization schedules  Issues unique to adolescence—sexual problems/concerns. course of the disease. and other problems beyond the scope of routine outpatient pediatrics. on normal child development. Competently perform clinical skills common to the pediatric setting:  Venipuncture  Administration of oral. presentation. importance of immunizations. identify each item in the differential diagnosis in terms of etiology/pathophysiology. mental status exam. Make appropriate referrals for major medical.8. sex education and prevention of unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. psychiatric. presenting signs and symptoms. and recognition of medical emergencies. prevention of injuries. where appropriate. risk taking behaviors  Developmental disorders/behavior problems  Medical genetics and congenital malformation—prenatal diagnostics. 12. initial laboratory tests and imaging studies.

Assess post-surgical patient status and accurately record findings 3.Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program General Surgery Rotation Description This rotation will familiarize the student with operating room techniques. Reading and Study Students will utilize Blueprints Surgery (latest edition) and Lange: Current Surgical Diagnosis & Treatment latest edition as the primary source for reading and independent study. 2. pre-operative and post-operative patient management. post-operative and discharge orders. discharge summaries and presenting cases. Objectives At the conclusion of the rotation the student will: 1. the program’s philosophy includes an emphasis on collection and analyses of medical data using critical thinking skills in a systematic approach to presenting problems and complaints. While only limited objectives are listed here it is important that students take advantage of all learning opportunities that arise in the clinical setting. 4. Accurately collect and record the appropriate history and physical examination for surgical admission and pre-admission testing. Demonstrate operating room protocol and the practice of aseptic techniques.5 month rotation. Develop a differential diagnosis. Minimum objectives are listed here to guide student learning and instructor facilitation of student learning. objectives and reading assignments will provide the student with additional direction for learning. 5. Review of the program’s handbook Recording Medical Information will provide guidance for recording histories. health services and personnel affiliated with surgery. a plan of investigation and order the appropriate laboratory and diagnostic tests for patients presenting to the surgical setting. Referring to Surgical Medicine lecture outlines. Goal With the recognition that one cannot master all of Surgical Medicine in a 1. various surgical procedures. Students are expected to gain mastery of a substantial fund of knowledge to function effectively with the wide spectrum of problems in pediatric medicine. Write admission. and that they avail themselves of the current medical literature. physical exams. It is also imperative that students explore other texts on the program’s textbook list and sources of reference recommended by individual clinical instructors. 43 .

General Surgery Rotation – Continued 7. Efficiently and accurately present cases. transfer. risks. Assess and recommend a course of action for management of surgical emergencies  Acute abdomen and  Eye. and potential complications for the use of anesthesia and sedation in the operative patient:  General  Intravenous induction agents  Local  Inhalation agents  Regional  Muscle relaxants  Spinal  Nerve blocks  Conscious sedation 44 . MRI and CT scans  Wound dressing 9. 8. Reconciliation involves comparing the patient’s current list of medications against the physician’s admission. Perform Medication Reconciliation with guidance from the institution’s medical team. benefits. nose and throat injury abdominal injuries  Chest injury  Blunt trauma  Urinary tract injury  Airway obstruction  Cardiac/Respiratory Arrest  Head injury 10. Demonstrate the ability to accurately perform clinical surgical procedures commonly performed by Physician Assistants  Surgical gowning and gloving  Surgical Assisting  Sterile and aseptic technique  Wound closure (sutures and staples)  Venipuncture  Collect arterial blood specimens  Administration of oral topical  EKG recording and initial assessment and parenteral medications  Catheterization  Nasogastric tube placement  Initial assessment of radiographs. monitoring needs. Describe the indications. dosage. frequency. and route — and using this list to provide correct medications for patients anywhere within the health care system. Discuss the indications.6. and/or discharge orders. Through a process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications a patient is taking — including name. ear. contraindications and possible complications of common surgical procedures:  Cholecystectomy  Colon resection  Mastectomy  Total joint replacements  Wound debridement  Appendectomy  Colonoscopy  Sigmoidoscopy  Endoscopy  Thoracotomy  Laparoscopy  Laparotomy 11.

Select and monitor appropriate agents for post-operative pain management:  Psychological Interventions  Epidural/Spinal Anesthesia  Systemic Opiates  Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs  Cryoanalgesia  Patient-Controlled analgesia (PCA)  Peripheral Neural Blocks General Surgery Rotation – Continued 13. Promote lifestyle changes through patient education for prevention of disease:  Diet  Weight management  Exercise  Limitation of sun exposure  Smoking cessation  Safety Practices 45 . Evaluate.12. prevent and implement management of patients with post-operative problems and complications:  Infection  Renal Dysfunction  Venous Stasis and circulatory  Bleeding complications  Hypothermia  Pulmonary complications 14.

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Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Community Medicine Rotation Description The community medicine practicum is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to experience patient care within a community service agency or another setting which serves disadvantaged or special populations. Goal With the recognition that one cannot master all of Community Medicine in a 1. transfer. physical exams. dosage. Outline cases. 47 . Objectives At the conclusion of the rotation the student will: 1. frequency. It is also imperative that students explore other texts on the program’s textbook list and sources of reference recommended by individual clinical instructors. Reading and Study Students will utilize Current Medical Diagnoses and Treatment. 2. 7. the program’s philosophy includes an emphasis on collection and analyses of medical data using critical thinking skills in a systematic approach to presenting problems and complaints. 6. interdisciplinary. Demonstrate to the program faculty and preceptor. counseling. initial care plans. and route — and using this list to provide correct medications for patients anywhere within the health care system. case management. 8. Generally. Describe the special needs of patients served by this clinical site and obstacles meeting those needs to include genetics and Healthy People 2010 standards. Review of the program’s handbook Recording Medical Information will provide guidance for recording histories. Perform Medication Reconciliation with guidance from the institution’s medical team. Become increasingly competent with charting interim notes and/or focused history and physical examinations. and/or discharge orders.5-month rotation. latest edition and Bates: Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking latest edition as the primary source for reading and independent study. and referrals needs. 4. Referring to Community Medicine lecture outlines. While only limited objectives are listed here it is important that students take advantage of all learning opportunities that arise in the clinical setting. Minimum objectives are listed here to guide student learning and instructor facilitation of student learning. discharge summaries and presenting cases. and that they avail themselves of the current medical literature. objectives and reading assignments will provide the student with additional direction for learning. Through a process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications a patient is taking — including name. Students are expected to gain mastery of a substantial fund of knowledge to function effectively with the wide spectrum of problems in pediatric medicine. mastery of material related to the site’s particular specialty. 3. Implement management plans after discussion and approval by the preceptor. including collection of diagnostic data. Reconciliation involves comparing the patient’s current list of medications against the physician’s admission. these will be primary care settings. Outline potential solutions to core issues for the community or special population. 5. Give accurate and concise verbal case presentations with the special circumstance/need of the clinical site in mind.

12 font. Max. observing the results. first on a small scale 48 . students will:  Complete a service project utilizing the plan-do-study-act model below which is mutually agreed upon with the sponsoring agency and the student and approved by the programs project director. 1‖ margins. Selecting Changes All improvement requires making changes. but not all changes result in improvement. This is the scientific method used for action-oriented learning. Organizations therefore must identify the changes that are most likely to result in improvement.Special Requirement for Community Medicine In lieu of write-up and post rotation exam. The aim should be time-specific and measurable.  Demonstrate an awareness of economic and social issues that influence the delivery of health care in the community. it should also define the specific population of patients that will be affected.  Present overview of project during the clinical seminar Setting Aims Improvement requires setting aims. Plan Do Develop a plan for improving quality at a process Execute the plan. Times New Roman. and  Submit a paper discussing the service project. Testing Changes The Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle is shorthand for testing a change in the real work setting — by planning it. 1500 words. Establishing Measures Use quantitative measures to determine if a specific change actually leads to an improvement. trying it. using the model below as your guide. and acting on what is learned.  Demonstrate an awareness of cultural influences that effect health beliefs and practices within the community.

physical exams. 3. Goals At the conclusion of the rotation the student will: 1. psychiatry. While only limited objectives are listed here it is important that students take advantage of all learning opportunities that arise in the clinical setting. Accurately perform and record a complete. Minimum objectives are listed here to guide student learning and instructor facilitation of student learning. discharge summaries and presenting cases. It is also imperative that students explore other texts on the program’s textbook list and sources of reference recommended by individual clinical instructors. Develop differential diagnoses for each case. initial care plans. objectives and reading assignments will provide the student with additional direction for learning. surgery. Objective With the recognition that one cannot master all of the elected clinical practicum in a five-week rotation. counseling and referrals. 2. interim and/or focused history and physical examination. Students may decide to choose a setting not usually provided by the program with approval of the Clinical Coordinator. Students are expected to gain mastery of a substantial fund of knowledge to function effectively with the wide spectrum of problems in the medicinal practice. Outline management of cases. and that they avail themselves of the current medical literature. internal medicine. or emergency medicine.Study Evaluate feedback to confirm or to adjust the plan Act Make the plan permanent or study the adjustments Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program General Elective Rotation Description The elective rotation is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to gain additional experience in one of the traditional settings such as family practice. Review of the program’s handbook Recording Medical Information will provide guidance for recording histories. including collection of lab data. 49 . OB/GYN. Referring to lecture outlines. the program’s philosophy includes an emphasis on collection and analyses of medical data using critical thinking skills in a systematic approach to presenting problems and complaints. Lange: Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment latest edition and Bates: Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking larest edition as the primary source for reading and independent study. Reading and Study Students will utilize Blueprints Medicine (latest edition).

Through a process of identifying the most accurate list of all medications a patient is taking — including name. and route — and using this list to provide correct medications for patients anywhere within the health care system. The Clinical Coordinator may assign students not in good standing to rotation sites that will fulfill weak areas of clinical knowledge. Present case summaries to the preceptor emphasizing the significant medical and psychosocial aspects. Has the potential for employment as a graduate. If the prospective preceptor or institution does not have an existing affiliation agreement with the College. transfer. If the site selected offers experience in one of the nine required rotations. Will provide additional experience in the student’s area of interest. 50 5. 6. It is imperative that the student and preceptor reach an agreement about what is expected of each party in terms of clinical education during this rotation. 2. 2. dosage. Reconciliation involves comparing the patient’s current list of medications against the physician’s admission. 4. Obtain preliminary approval from the Clinical Coordinator before approaching a prospective preceptor. Student Responsibilities 1. Perform Medication Reconciliation with guidance from the institution’s medical team. However. and/or discharge orders. Provides the opportunity to round out the student’s clinical education in a setting or specialty not usually provided by the program. the student may use the program’s objectives for the experience. Implement management after discussion and approval by the preceptor.4. . title. General Elective Rotation . Have the Letter of Intent form signed by the prospective preceptor and turn it into the clinical coordinator by the established due date. Students must be in good standing to be eligible to participate in the elective rotation. significant negative and positive findings and problem lists. appropriateness of facility and interest on the part of the preceptor. the student is responsible for giving all pertinent information (name. it is to the student’s benefit to come to an understanding with the preceptor regarding personally identified learning needs. Provides the opportunity to augment the student’s previous experience in a standard operation. 3. and 4. Make initial contact with the potential preceptor to determine feasibility. frequency. Site Selection Students are encouraged to select sites which: 1. 3. Negotiate and define specific personal rotation objectives with the preceptor and have the preceptor sign the form.Continued 5.

6. 3. 5. significant negative and positive findings and problems lists. address. Implement management after discussion and approval by the preceptor. Students may be responsible for hand delivering the contracts and returning them to the College if it becomes necessary. the student will be able to: 1. initial care plans. 6. 2. 5. 4. the student will: 1. Present case summaries to the preceptor emphasizing significant medical and psychosocial aspects. Specific Goals (Negotiated and agreed upon by the student and preceptor) At the end of the rotation. 51 . General Goals At the end of this rotation.) to the Clinical Coordinator so that the contracts can be properly prepared. Develop differential diagnoses for each case. 2. Perform and record a complete. phone numbers. 4. counseling and referrals. Use the problem oriented medical record system. etc. Outline management of cases. We both agree to the objectives listed above. including collection of lab data. 3. interim and/or focused history and physical examination. The Clinical Coordinator will manage the affiliation agreement.institution.

___________________________ Student Signature/Date ___________________________ Preceptor Signature/Date (May remove page to use when agreeing on a site – turn in with Letter of Intent) 52 .

Towson University • CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Essex Campus PAST 254: Final Preceptorship Summer 2013 (June-July) Instructor: Melecia Helwig. 15. Guidelines for finding a Primary Care/Final Preceptorship Letter of Intent Due: Mar. There will be no exceptions to this rule. Primary care sites traditionally include Family Practice.2013 1. the final clinical experience of the program. Pediatrics. Students are expected to find their preceptors with physicians or organizations that are not currently clinical affiliates of the program. Sending a resume with a cover letter explaining that you are looking for primary care placement site for your final clinical experience is an excellent way to introduce yourself. 4. Emergency departments. The four essential characteristics which must be met in order to be considered primary care sites are:  Ambulatory care is provided  First line care is provided—patient point of access into the health care system  Comprehensive care is provided within the setting—more specialized care coordinated by primary care provider  Longitudinal care is provided—the patient is managed over time even if additional consultants are needed 3. symptom. fast-track clinics. organ system or diagnosis. Internal Medicine Outpatient Practice. The goal of the PCP is for the student to find a site outside existing program sites in a primary care that will round out the student’s clinical experience as a medical team member which allows continuity of care and/or has the potential for employment. allows the student an opportunity to integrate didactic and clinical experience in preparation for practicing as a Physician Assistant. Primary care is care provided by clinicians specifically trained for and skilled in comprehensive first contact and continuing care for persons with any undiagnosed sign. or health concern not limited by problem origin. Th 2:30-3:30pm Prerequisites: matriculation of all previous PA courses. The student will also be exposed to the health promotion and disease prevention aspects involved in total patient care. 2. T 10:00-11:00 am. OB/GYN. MS. School of Health Professions 53 . and Ambulatory Medicine. and inpatient departments do not meet qualifications for primary care. Course Goals and Rationale The primary care preceptorship. It is recommended that you find a placement which may lead to employment.edu Office hours: M/W 9-10 am. specialized outpatient care limited to industrial or occupational medicine. Through networking and using contacts already established among faculty and clinical instructors. students should identify sites where they would like to complete this preceptorship. This is done much the same way you find a job. The student will be exposed to the many health services provided in the primary care clinical setting and learn how to work closely with individuals providing these services. PAC Room N327 Office phone: 443-840-1885 /Mobile: 44-652-2128 Email: mhelwig@ccbcmd.

Attendance may not for any reason be split between two different sites. Approval of the clinical coordinator must be received before the student contacts the potential preceptor. but not limited to. 8. 6. Endocrine emergencies. for the following. the following packet of information must be sent by the student to the preceptor:  Affiliation Agreement  Objectives  Letter of Intent General Course Objectives: At the conclusion of the course the student will: 1.5. Respiratory distress. until the arrival of a physician. After receiving clinical coordinator approval. but not limited to conditions: 54 . Drug overdose 7. Recognize and implement management of patients with approval by the preceptor with the following. Develop a differential diagnosis and/or problem list 5.  A position is open at the site for which the student is under serious consideration (must be verified in writing from the individual at the site responsible for hiring) 7. Collect a complete. nurse. Students must complete the preceptorship at a single location. and paramedical staff 8. emergent conditions:  Chest pain/Myocardial infarction. including roles of the attending physician. and verification of vaccinations and health requirements  Dates of the preceptorship 10. Accurately develop a plan of investigation. understand and perform clinical skills commonly performed by Physician Assistants 2. 9. interim and/or focused history and physical examination 6. physician assistant. Students may have a site which does not meet the above definition approved (by the clinical coordinator and the program director) for two situations only:  The site is located in a Health Resources Shortage Area or other designation underserved area or. Be familiar with. coordination with other programs. students will write a cover letter which will be sent to prospective preceptors with a CV and the objectives for the rotation. Once the site is approved and preceptor agrees. Cover letter content:  Reason for selecting the site and how it will meet student’s personal goals  Student past experience before or during the program that will be an asset to the practice  Statement that 40hr/week is the minimum requirement  This is the last rotation before graduation  Response from preceptor needed no later than April 1 (the sooner the better)  An affiliation agreement will be necessary and will be forthcoming from the clinical coordinator if the answer is yes  Program will provide letter of insurance. Understand hospital protocol. house staff physician. Recognize and/or initiate therapy. and confirmation of student status in the program. Acute abdomen. ordering appropriate laboratory and diagnostic tests 4. Seizures. Identify abnormal findings on physical examination 3.

ii. We will accept both paper and paperless evaluation forms. Patient Encounter Logs i. Neurological Conditions. telecommunications. Time Log i. These evaluations are submitted to the clinical coordinator by the 15th of every month. iii. click on my time log. b. or by electronic means. These forms are posted on Typhon (under ―My evaluations‖) and should be completed at the end of your rotation. Failure of a rotation will require repeating that rotation. These evaluations are summarized for preceptors at the end of each clinical year. Skills Log i. no maximum). Endocrine disease. 55 . I would like the remaining sections (sections without red arrow) completed for at least 3 encounters daily. Cardiac disease. or dismissal from the Program depending on the circumstances surrounding the failure. Musculoskeletal Conditions. Gastrointestinal illnesses. c. Required Texts Students will utilize Lange: Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment (latest edition) and Harrison’s: Principles of Internal Medicine (latest edition) as the primary sources for reading and independent study. If you attend any conferences. Respiratory disease. try not to get behind! I will be checking routinely. This should reflect the hours spent on site by the student and any absences during the rotation. All areas with red arrow are required information for EVERY clinical encounter. delaying graduation. Under Other Logs and Reports. please indicate this under the ―My Clinical Conference Log‖ iii. On-site visits are conducted as a matter of routine. Geriatric Conditions Methods of Evaluation Satisfactory Preceptor Evaluation Students must pass all rotations. You should log encounters daily. 3) All typhon encounters need to be completed by the end of your rotation. This should be completed daily. ii. The student has the responsibility to make an appointment with the preceptor to have the fortnightly evaluation completed. The student is responsible for seeing that the evaluations are submitted on the first class day after the end of the rotation. Typhon should be logged for EVERY patient (no minimum. click on add/edit daily time log. Skills performed during a rotation and their frequency is also maintained electronically--this will be assessed through your documentation of CPT codes. Genitourological illness. If it is incomplete. They are to include constructive criticism and may offer suggestions for solutions for issues raised. a. Complete the entire log as it pertains to your clinical day. Student Evaluation of the Clinical Rotation These evaluations must be turned in with other materials no later than the first campus day following the end of rotation. Site Visit Evaluation Faculty will evaluate student clinical performance during each rotation either in person. you will receive an Incomplete grade (refer to student manual). Fortnightly Evaluations These evaluations are designed to assure that students get timely feedback from clinical instructor so that deficiencies identified early on can be corrected by rotations end. Patient Encounter Logs Students keep a record of each patient contact through typhoon logging system.

Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Out-of-State Rotation Request and Approval Students may request out-of-state placement for the Community Medicine. the student must submit an agreement with the Program that includes. but not limited to. No formal notification of behavioral problems Adequate Program faculty available to evaluate the site and monitor the student’s performance A completed request form must be submitted to the Clinical Coordinator along with the Letter of Intent. Before approving the request. 56 . the following:      Dates of Rotation Method of monitoring the student’s progress Method of evaluating the site Agreement to return to campus for all scheduled classes and activities or arrangement to submit assignments. All students requesting out-of-state rotations must be in Good Standing GPA > 3. the Clinical coordinator will verify the interest of the Preceptor and the capability of the site to accommodate a student. Requirements *A minimum of two rotations must have been completed successfully before a student will be allowed to leave the state for Community Medicine or Elective rotations. Any special requirements or assignments * Or approval by clinical coordinator and program director after review of student’s academic progress and site requested. If approved. signed by the Preceptor who will be supervising the student. All rotations must have been completed successfully before a student will be allowed to leave the state for the Primary Care Preceptorship.0 *No grades of ―C‖ in any course. Elective and Primary Care Preceptorship rotations only.

WAIVER. to determine that my behavior violates any such rules and regulations and warrants my termination from the Activity. I recognize that due to the circumstances of foreign study programs. I also agree that I will (a) not buy. sell or use illegal drugs at any time. foreign political.RELEASE OF LIABILITY. through the Representative. all such laws and standards for each country to or through which I will travel during the Activity. 3. the Activity or the other participants in the Activity. DISCHARGE AND COVENANT NOT TO SUE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE COUNTY INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM THIS IS A RELEASE OF LEGAL RIGHTS READ AND UNDERSTAND BEFORE SIGNING Name of Student:_____________________ Activity:______________________________ I. I will become informed of. ________________________________________________________ will be participating in cross cultural study abroad in_________________________ (the ―Activity‖) for the period of [INSERT DATES OF ACTIVITY]. harmony and welfare of the College. through its identified representative (the ―Representative‖). procedures for notice. manners. drug use and behavior. politics. I recognize that behavior which violates those laws or standards could harm the College’s relations with those countries and the institutions therein. hearing and appeal applicable to student rights at the College do not apply. 57 . for violating the rules and regulations or for any behavior detrimental to or incompatible with the interests. I agree that the College has the right to enforce the rules and regulations. different standards of design. social and economic conditions. including dress. I consent to being sent home at my own expense with no refund of fees. as well as my own health and safety. I understand that each foreign country has its own laws and standards of acceptable conduct. and that it will impose sanctions. I will comply with all rules and regulations issued by the College or any coordinating institution. I hereby agree as follows: 1. If I am asked to terminate my participation. safety and maintenance of buildings. up to and including termination of my participation in the Activity. I understand that participation in the Activity involves risk not found in study at the Community College of Baltimore County (the “College”). in its sole discretion. (b) not engage in abusive use of 2. and will abide by. It is within the sole discretion of the College. legal. morals. These include risks involved in traveling to and within and returning from one or more foreign countries. public places and conveniences.

action. It is my express intent that. including reasonable attorneys’ fees. I further represent that there are no health – related reasons or problems which preclude or restrict my participation in all or part of this Activity. the Board of Trustees of the College. 6. in its sole discretion. arising out of or related to any loss. I also understand the College. this Release shall bind the members of my family and my spouse. damage. The College. and expenses of any nature which I may have or which may hereafter accrue to me. and that I have currently in effect health insurance as required by the College to provide for and pay any medical costs that may be attendant as a result of my participation in the Activity. and defend Releasees from any claim by my family. I do release. In signing this Release. determines that circumstances within a foreign country may require the cancellation of the Activity within that country. The College will provide me with as much advance notice as possible of its intention to cancel all or a portion of the Activity. 58 5. hotels and other suppliers of services connected with the Activity and that the Releasees are not responsible for the actions of these entities. causes of action. costs. 8. if necessary. or otherwise. I understand and agree that the Realeasees are hereby granted permission to authorize emergency medical treatment for me. damage. officials. I. 10. with respect to the Releasees. transportation carriers. while I am engaged in the Activity. the Travel Agent will inform me of the specific terms and coverage of any such insurance. and my family. if I am alive. including but not limited to suffering and death. and that Releasees assume no responsibility for any injury or damage which might arise out of or in connection with such authorized medical treatment. or injury. I further agree to save and hold harmless. statements. employees or agents of the College (the ― Releasees‖) from and against any and all liability from any harm. or inducements. apart from the foregoing written statement have been made. or assigns. and (d) abide by dress and cultural codes suitable in the countries visited. heirs. 9. . or in transit to or from the premises where the Activity or any adjunct to the Activity. I agree that the Releasees are not representatives or agent for the Travel Agent. In consideration of being permitted to participate in the Activity. injury. acknowledge and represent that I have fully read this Release and that I understand what it means and that I sign this Release as my act and deed. personal representatives. or me arising out of my participation in the Activity. 4. that may be sustained by me or by any property belonging to me which there caused by the negligence or carelessness of the Releasees. (c) participate in all classes and scheduled activities unless ill. demands. indemnify. forever discharge and covenant not to sue the College. I am aware that travel insurance may be available through [INSERT THE NAME OF THE TRAVEL AGENT] (the ―Travel Agent‖). If available. 7.alcohol. officers. an overseas institution or a foreign government may prematurely terminate all or a portion of the Activity. waive. No oral representations. occurs or is being conducted. estate. if I am deceased. claims. administrators.

or if I am younger than 18 years my legal guardian has read and signed (or will read and sign prior to the Activity) this Release in the space designated below. DATE:_________________________ ___________________________________ Student/Participant I: (a) am the parent or legal guardian of the above participant/student. I am fully competent to sign this Agreement and I have executed this Release for full. adequate and complete consideration fully intending for me and for my family. 12. administrators. my legal Guardian. This Release shall be effective on the date it has been signed by me. the validity of the remaining portion shall not be affected thereby.11. heirs. (c) am and will be legally responsible for the obligations and acts of the student/participant as described in this Release. personal representatives or assigns to be bound by the same. DATE:_________________________ c:\bwh\mydocs\release of liability for student travel 5/17/00 ____________________________________ Parent/Guardian 59 . and if applicable. If any term or provision of this Release shall be held illegal. or in conflict with any law governing this Release. and (d) agree for myself and for the student/participant to be bound by its terms. estate. I further agree that this Release shall be construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Maryland. unenforceable. (b) have read the foregoing Release (including such parts as may subject me to personal financial responsibility). I hereby represent that I am at least 18 years of age as of the date of this Release.

ALL PARTICIPANTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE COST OF ANY MEDICAL CARE THAT MAY BE REQUIRED. Will you be taking any medication during the travel study course: ____YES ____NO If yes. please indicate the nature of the medication and reason for medication: _____________________________________________________________________ Please list the name. Do you have any known reactions to: YES NO YES NO MEDICATIONS ___ ___ FOOD ___ ___ INSECT BITES ___ ___ PLANTS ___ ___ b. HOWEVER. (Name of Participant – Please Print) I further agree to release The Community College of Baltimore County. a. instructors and travel agencies from any financial or other liabilities which may result from authorizing necessary medical treatment and/or medication for the above named participant. please indicate known reaction or health conditions: _____________________________________________________________________ 2. its Academic Escorts.________________ 1. Date _________________ I (we) do hereby grant permission for _____________________________________________ to authorize necessary medical treatment and/or medication for: _________________________________ in case of an emergency. Are there any other health conditions the ___ ___ director should be aware of? If yes.MEDICAL COLLEGE TRAVEL PROGRAM OPTIONAL MEDICAL EMERGENCY INFORMATION THE PURPOSE OF THIS FORM IS TO PROVIDE NECESSARY MEDICAL INFORMATION IN THE EVENT A MEDICAL EMERGENCY OCCURS DURING YOUR STUDY ABROAD IN [INSERT NAME OF TRIP OR PROGRAM AND THE DATES]. and telephone number of a person to be contacted in case of an emergency: EMERGENCY CONTACT: Name ____________________Relationship________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ (Street Address) (City) (State) (Zip Code) 60 . COMPLETION OF THIS FORM IS OPTIONAL. ADDRESS____________________________DATE OF BIRTH ______________________ Month Day Year ____________________________ BLOOD TYPE (if known)________________ PHONE NUMBER_____________________ SOCIAL SECURITY NO. address.

61 . I acknowledge that this form is incorporated into and becomes a part of the ―Release of Liability. true and correct. Name of health and accident company______________________________________ Policy or enrollment number______________________________________________ * For those tour members under the age of 21 . Discharge and Covenant Not To Sue Community College of Baltimore County.Phone Number_______________________________________________________________ (Area Code) (Home) (Business) The health information printed above is. Any conflict regarding the terms of this form shall be resolved in accordance with the laws of the State of Maryland. International Studies Program‖ which I signed on [Insert Date of Release]. If you have your own insurance. Your Name______________________________ (Please Print) Signature of Participant______________________________ Signature of Parent (s)*______________________________ TITLE & DATE OF TRIP______________________________________________________ The Community College of Baltimore County does not provide health and accident insurance as part of its Travel Study Program. please provide us with the information requested below. Waiver. to the best of my knowledge.

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These learning activities would be determined in advance. or Field Trips. of student learning experiences without personal direction by the instructor. 1. signed by the campus International Education Travel Studies Coordinator. Faculty may teach the course on load. leading class discussion or other activities in which the instructor is present and the entire time is devoted to conducting teaching/learning activities. The campus Office of Student Life. The number of credits and title of the travel studies course is to be indicated on the Approval Form. c. a geological or archeological site. A minimum of 12 CCBC students are to be enrolled in the designated travel studies course. The attached approval form is to be completed by the appropriate faculty member. b. Program Approval. or other location appropriate for directs instruction. and Cooperative Education Placements. in a museum or gallery. or they may be offered with special permission granted by the CCBC Director of International Education. Internships. Following MHEC instructional guidelines. wildlife or wetland sanctuary. Academic Policy. 50 minutes each. A minimum of 15 hours of 50 minutes each of actual class time in direct instruction. Supervised Laboratory. hosting a guest lecturer. or Foundation Office may sponsor travel programs not requiring college credit. Direct instruction would include lecturing. International travel studies programs are to be offered for CCBC academic credit. Studio. A minimum of 45 hours. an historical or architectural site. a botanical garden. Registering students may choose to audit the course.CCBC INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL STUDIES GUIDELINES FOR APPROVAL AND OPERATION The following guidelines and policies of operation are to be followed for the implementation of an international travel studies trip sponsored by The Community College of Baltimore County. and the 63 . A minimum of 30 hours of 50 minutes each. or overload at the adjunct rate. hours of instruction are to be calculated as follows: One semester hour of credit may be awarded for: a. Alumni. Direct instruction might take place in a classroom or alternatively. actively guiding the students’ activities. in which students engaged in learning activities under the personal direction and supervision of the instructor. 2. presenting instructional material. The instructor would be present throughout these meetings. whether in a classroom or in some other appropriate instructional location. Direct Instruction. This is to be negotiated with the appropriate academic dean. Practica. and again signed by the system Director for International Education.

the appropriate academic dean. The campus International Education Travel Studies Coordinator is responsible for determining the cost of the course. Cancellation. approved by the CCBC attorney will be completed by each participating student. Budget and Finance.00 64 . all funds paid to the agency for the trip minus any verifiable cancellation fees or penalties imposed by airlines. during the activity time itself. and CCBC director of international education. ground transportation companies and/or organizations to whom admissions fees have been paid.23. CCBC will reserve the right with all international travel studies programs to cancel all arrangements and agreements with a travel agency at any time if. The coordinator is responsible for overseeing the finances of each international studies program on their respective campus. the agency must agree to refund CCBC. Ebersole 5. Waiver and Health Form. 5. 3. hotels. which do not involve academic credit. This budget is to be shared with the CCBC Director of International Education for review. International Exchange Programs. However. the agency is not adequately fulfilling the obligations and commitments outlined in the agreement. International exchange programs between CCBC and foreign institutions. 6. within two weeks. the students would be self-guided or supervised by someone other than the instructor. who need not be present. 4. Expenses for the instructor and percent of overhead for the college are to be built into the overall budget in addition to all trip costs. The Waiver and Health Form. A log sheet for documenting hours of instruction during a travel studies course will be completed by the instructor. B. In the event CCBC decides to cancel an agreement with an agency concerning a proposed trip. CCBC will reserve the right to demand certified proof of any cancellation penalties. should be sent through the designated approval process involving the campus international education coordinator.learning documented by the instructor. in the opinion of the College.

_____________________________________________ Signature of Participating Faculty and Staff ________________________________ (Date) Signature of Campus International Education Coordinator _____________________ (Date) Signature of Academic Dean ____________________________________________ (Date) Signature of CCBC Director of International Education _______________________ (Date) 5._____________________________________ Dates of the Travel Course .____________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ (Please attach course syllabus and outline) Objectives of the Travel Experience .00 65 .23._____________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Estimated Cost of the Travel Course .CCBC INTERNATIONAL STUDIES APPROVAL FORM International Destination (s) -_____________________________________________ Title of College Course and Number of Credits .

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Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Clinical Coordinator . Estimated number of patients seen on an average day _____.Request for Approval Out-of-State Clinical Rotations Student Name________________________________________________________________ Rotation Dates________________________________________________________________ Preceptor Name_______________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Phone________________________________Fax_______________________ Email__________________________________________________________________ Specialty____________________________________________________________ Estimated number of hours per day/week at facility ______. Any other facilities the student will working at and/or other supervising preceptors ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Date_________________________ Student in Good Standing Yes No Contact Person________________________Phone number/email___________________ Approved Yes No Clinical Coordinator___________________ Revised 6/4/10 MKH 67 .

teaching and evaluation: Name: ________________________________________________________ Address: _____________________________________________ Phone:___________ Fax Number: ________________________ Email Address: ______________________ Clinical Coordinator Approval The site and preceptor have been contacted and I have found: ____ Supervision is adequate. Method(s) of monitoring student progress and evaluating the site will be (check all that apply) ____ Weekly telephone conversations initiated by the student. ____ The student will have completed minimum number of rotations prior to this out-of-state placement (two for Elective or Community Medicine--all for the PCP ____ The signed letter of intent is attached to this request. Day ________ Time_________ ________________________________________________________________________ Clinical Coordinator signature Date Program Director Approval I have reviewed the request and checked with appropriate faculty to see that there are no objections and have 68 .0) ____ There are no formal notification of problem behaviors in the student file.Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Full Faculty Approval Form – Out of State Rotations Student Name: _______________________ Class of _____ Date of Request: _______________ Rotation or Preceptorship for which out of state placement is requested (please check): __ Rotation # _____ __Community Medicine __Elective __ Primary Care Preceptorship Dates of Rotation: From___________________ to ___________________________ Individual Responsible for student supervision. Day______ Time___ ____ Site visit ____ Phone conferences with the preceptor. I have reviewed the student academic record and have found: ____ The student has a GPA of _____ (must be > 3. ____ The Preceptor has interest and experience in teaching students. Approximate Date(s)_______________ ____ Regular email correspondence. ____ There is ample space and patient population for student instruction/meeting objectives.

Student Eligibility Requirements  All prior rotations must have been completed successfully.  Good Standing with a GPA of > 3. 69 . and  Submit an article (after approval by the project director) to a physician assistant journal and or the PAXI newsletter. stimulate student interest in delivery of health care services to domestic and international health professional shortage areas and allow students to be of service to communities from which they receive clinical learning opportunities. The goal of the project is to promote PA student awareness of cross-cultural health issues. concise verbal case presentations. interim and/or focused history and physical examination. Outlining the management of cases. Sites must be located in officially designated underserved areas. and no formal notification of any problem behaviors. Objectives In addition to traditional student clinical/community medicine experience objectives of:  Practicing cost-effective medical care. Determining differential diagnoses for each case presented and giving logical.0. which demonstrates completion of the previous four objectives.     Giving accurate.  Demonstrate an awareness of economic and social issues that influence the delivery of health care in the community. _____ Denied Reason: ________________________________________________________________________ Program Director Signature Date Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Underserved Populations Community Medicine and Cross-Cultural Clinical Project The Physician Assistant Program has made limited stipends available through the Division of Allied Health and Human Performance to fund student Community Medicine Rotations to underserved populations in the United States and internationally. and Implementing management after discussion and approval by the preceptor/clinical instructor. initial care plans. orderly explanations for the diagnosis. including collection of lab data. Students approved to participate and receive college support will:  Complete a service project which is mutually agreed upon with the sponsoring agency and the student and approved by the programs project director._____ Approved. no "C" grades in any course. counseling and referrals.  Demonstrate an awareness of cultural influences that effect health beliefs and practices within the community.  Performing and recording complete.

Also see program Out-of-State Rotation requirements and guidelines.   Completion and approval of the project application. of the clinical year. Applications for participation in this project must be received no later than September 15. 70 .

Sincerely. I will complete and sign the student evaluation form. ____________________________ Preceptor ____________________________ Preceptor (Print) ____________________________ E-Mail Address ____________________________ Fax ****Please attach a copy of the agreed upon objectives ___________________________ Organization (Print) ___________________________ Address (Print) ___________________________ ___________________________ Telephone Number Clinical Coordinator: ____________________ Approval________ Date_____________ 71 .Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program LETTER OF INTENT Elective Rotation Date___________________ Melecia K. PA-C Clinical Coordinator/Assistant Professor Towson University/CCBC-Essex Physician Assistant Program (443) 840-1885 (443) 840-1405 Fax Dear Clinical Coordinator: I will be acting as preceptor for ______________________. She or he will work under my direction during her or his Elective rotation from ___________________ through _____________________. At the end of the rotation. I understand that the student will attend the clinical site a minimum of 40 hours per week. I also agree to complete a formal affiliation agreement with CCBC  Essex. The student and I have discussed the objectives for this rotation and a copy is attached. MS. Helwig. if necessary.

Towson University  CCBC Essex

Physician Assistant Program LETTER OF INTENT
Final Preceptorship
Date___________________
Melecia K. Helwig, MS, PA-C Clinical Coordinator/Assistant Professor Towson University/CCBC-Essex Physician Assistant Program (443) 840-1885 (443) 840-1405 Fax

Dear Clinical Coordinator: I will be acting as preceptor for ______________________. She or he will work under my direction during her or his Primary Care Preceptorship rotation from ___________________ through _____________________. I understand that I am not displacing incoming 2nd year students by accepting this student. I understand that the student will attend the clinical site a minimum of 40 hours per week. At the end of the rotation, I will complete and sign the student evaluation form. I also agree to complete a formal affiliation agreement with CCBC  Essex, if necessary.

Sincerely, ____________________________ Preceptor ____________________________ Preceptor (Print) ____________________________ E-Mail Address ___________________________ Organization (Print) ___________________________ Address (Print) ___________________________ ___________________________ Telephone Number

****Please attach a copy of the agreed upon objectives Clinical Coordinator: ____________________ Approval________ Date_____________

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Class of 2013 Physician Assistant Program Clinical Evaluation
Year II Rotations – ___ month Rotation

Student:_______________________________ Rotation ______ Month(s)/Year___________ Site __________________________________ Rotation Type: Emergency □ Family Medicine □ Community Med □ OB/Gyn □ Pediatrics □ Elective □ Surgery □ Internal Medicine □ Preceptor _____________________________ Contributing Evaluators _________________ _____________________________________

Rotation

____
Return to PA Program, Clinical Coordinator – fax No. (443) 840-1405

EVALUATION AND GRADING Evaluation is based on the degree of achievement of each of the learning objectives and the general amount and quality of change and growth. How well the student took advantage of learning opportunities, attitudes toward learning and developing, the quality and content of the supervisory meetings, motivation and development of professional attitude are criteria that will be included. The final grade, however, may or may not parallel the evaluation comments. It is theoretically possible to have an excellent evaluation but only a S grade if, for example, the student made extraordinary progress but started from a below par position. The final performance may only be minimally competent and passing, while the evaluation reflects the enormous change and progress that was made. The reverse could also be true. The grade, in other words, ties into professional standards, while the evaluation is individualized. The preceptor grade is a recommended grade. The Clinical Coordinator will review the preceptor recommendation and comments as well as the faculty evaluation, the student’s performance in faculty sessions, and the student’s overall professional behavior before assigning the final clinical grade. SUGGESTIONS FOR PREPARING THE FINAL STUDENT EVALUATION  Set a date, time and meeting place for review of the evaluation with the student.     Remind yourself and your student that it is the work and learning that are being evaluated, not the person. Consider whether or not this particular evaluation should include additional staff members, and if so, inform your student of this with an explanation. Involve the student in discussion and interaction as much as possible. Be as detailed and specific as possible, backing up your evaluative comments with illustrations. 73

Check type of observation and appropriate description for each of the following skill categories.
HISTORY TAKING SKILLS Type of Observation: History is incomplete; fails to include pertinent information. Direct Observation Indirect Observation History is complete & accurate; important/ relevant information is included. Not Observed History is consistently comprehensive, accurate, thorough and precise.

History is generally complete & accurate, but occasionally important information has been omitted.

REMARKS:

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION SKILLS Type of Observation: Direct Observation P.E. inadequate for the following reasons: critical portions of exam omitted fails to follow any logical sequence; misses obvious finding REMARKS: P.E. is generally complete. Occasionally: fails to follow a logical sequence misses important findings

Indirect Observation Exam is thorough. Follows logical sequences. Technically reliable & appropriate to presenting complaint

Not Observed Exam is thorough and precise. Follows logical sequences even in difficult cases. Always technically proficient

ORAL SKILLS Type of Observation: Case presentations are disorganized, poorly integrated & confusing.

Direct Observation Case presentations are generally organized but sometimes verbose, incomplete or confusing.

Indirect Observation Case presentations are organized & complete. Able to explain and summarize data effectively.

Not Observed Polished communication skills. Able to explain & summarize data completely & concisely. Presentation of information is orderly and succinct.

REMARKS:

WRITTEN SKILLS Type of Observation: Poorly prepared writeups Includes irrelevant information. Fails to provide relevant data.

Direct Observation Write-ups need improvement. Sometimes excludes relevant data, includes extraneous information.

Indirect Observation Write-ups concise, orderly & complete. Relevant information included. Important problems and progress noted.

Not Observed Write-ups outstanding (well written, precise, thorough). Articulate, concise statements of problems & progress included.

REMARKS:

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INTERACTION WITH PATIENTS Type of Observation: Direct Observation Lacks communication skills. Cannot adequately explain information to patients. Fails to listen to patients. REMARKS: Attempts to explain information to patients, but occasionally has difficulty. Usually listens to patients.

Indirect Observation Communicates effectively. Offers appropriate explanations. Listens attentively to patients.

Not Observed Communicates effectively, shows empathy & is conscientious if offering explanations, relates well even to difficult patients.

APPLICATION OF BASIC MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE TO PATIENT MANAGEMENT Type of Observation: Direct Observation Indirect Observation Has difficulty recalling & applying basic knowledge. REMARKS: Occasionally unable to apply basic knowledge & relate it to cases. Is able to relate basic knowledge to cases.

Not Observed Recalls broad base of knowledge & is readily able to relate it to cases.

INTEGRATIVE SKILLS/PROBLEM SOLVING Type of Observation: Direct Observation Fails to integrate data. Unable to identify problems & priorities leading to incomplete differential diagnosis. Has some difficulty integrating data, identifying & assessing problems & priorities.

Indirect Observation Evaluates available data effectively. Understands & identifies problems & priorities.

Not Observed Effectively analyzes data, synthesizes information to arrive at a concise assessment. Consistently establishes appropriate priorities.

REMARKS:

CLINICAL MANAGEMENT SKILLS Type of Observation: Direct Observation Therapeutic program is incomplete or inaccurate. Fails to address patient needs. Fails to adequately interpret and/ or utilize lab data. Therapeutic program usually complete & accurate, but frequently fails to recognize constraints of setting and/or address patient needs. Occasionally fails to adequately interpret and/or utilize lab data.

Indirect Observation Therapeutic program is complete & accurate; addresses issues of clinical problem. Interprets & utilizes lab data adequately.

Not Observed Therapeutic program is comprehensive; plans are precise; can suggest a variety of plans (i.e. Can creatively problem solve & individualize treatment plans). Consistently interprets & utilizes lab data accurately.

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does not correct them. lack of enjoyment in work. (ie: ___________________) Indirect Observation Learns/masters new skills easily.REMARKS: TECHNICAL/PROCEDURAL SKILLS Type of Observation: Direct Observation Has great difficulty learning/mastering new skills. Indirect Observation Often initiates and/or participates in discussion. Some evidence of independent study. Preceptors Signature ___________________________________ Date _____________________________ 76 . Does not take initiative: needs constant directions. Student did not contact preceptor within reasonable time before rotation began (usually two weeks prior). Insecure: performance may be affected by lack of self-confidence. proceeds on own without checking with appropriate person. Not Observed Learns/masters new skills exceptionally easily. No independent study. Professional manner needs refinement. off on tangents. Impracticality: impractical plans and suggestions. REMARKS: CHECK ANY BEHAVIORS YOU THINK ARE OR MAY BECOME A PROBLEM OR MAY IMPACT OVERALL GRADE Incomplete or sloppy work: unfinished chart work. Appearance not always appropriate for site. LEARNING BEHAVIOR Type of Observation: Rarely interacts or participates in discussion. Not Observed Often initiates and/or participates in discussion. Direct Observation Sometimes participates or initiates discussion. lateness. chronic complaining. Shows strong evidence of independent study. conferences. Little evidence of independent study. dangerous orders. makes same errors repeatedly. Does not know own limitations: not cautious enough. (ie: ________________) REMARKS: Has some difficulty learning/mastering new skills. Unresponsive to correction: when deficiencies pointed out. not available for rounds. assignments not done. overestimates abilities. Absenteeism: repeated absence from activities. Poor attitude: negativism. Does not always appreciate role of other health professionals.

4) Has not shown satisfactory improvement in clinical skill over the course of the rotation. U Unsatisfactory Performance – 1) Has not fully met goals and objectives. The preceptor will award the ―U‖ if any one of the above is true.OVERALL PERFORMANCE (Circle One) S Satisfactory Performance – Has met goals and objectives as established by the program and the clinical site. performs safely and competently. 3) Has performed in a manner which was dangerous to patient or staff. The preceptor will indicate with a check all of the factor s which apply to the awarding of the ―U‖ grade. 2) Has performed incompetently on one or more of the defined skills areas. and has made significant progress over the course of the rotation. PRECEPTOR COMMENTS: Date:___________________ Signature: __________________________________________ (Preceptor) STUDENT COMMENTS: Date: __________________ Signature: ___________________________________________ (Student) PROGRAM FACULTY COMMENTS: 77 .

safety.CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program Fortnightly Evaluation C2013 PA student________________________ Rotation #_______ Clinical Site________________ Indicate his/her strengths and weaknesses in the categories below. responsibility. appropriate questions) Physical Examination (consider ability to discern normal and abnormal) Procedural Skills (consider ability to learn. If you have not observed the student in any of these situations. please leave the section blank or indicate no comment. relationship to medical team) Evaluator’s Overall Comments: Score____ Score____ Score____ Score____ Score____ Evaluator's signature____________________________ Date_______________________ Student’s Comments: Student’s Signature__________________________Date ___________________ You may fax this form back to Melecia Helwig @ (443) 840-1405 78 . Scoring Codes: Requires no supervision and/or prompting 5 Requires little supervision and/or prompting 4 Able to perform with routine supervision and/or 3 prompting Requires frequent supervision and/or prompting 2 Requires complete supervision and/or prompting 1 Dangerous to patient even with supervision and/or 0 prompting Basic Fund of general medical knowledge Medical Interview (consider organization. judgment) Professionalism (consider demeanor. Please feel free to put comments on line supplied.Towson University .

etc) and what condition the facility was in. 2. 3. 12 hours rotating shifts. nights only. These forms will also be used and shared with the new students as they select their clinical sites in the future. but be professional in your comments. This form is provided in an effort to continually evaluate the clinical experiences provided. What other office / support staff with whom did you work? How were you received by them? 5. What were the hours of your shift? (7-3:30pm.Towson University  CCBC Essex Physician Assistant Program 2012-13 Student Evaluation of Clinical Experience Preceptor(s)_________________________ Rotation Discipline__________________________ Site______________________________ Rotation Number ________________ Please fill out the following evaluation as objectively as possible – be open and honest. Describe briefly the physical setting of your rotation (Hospital. etc) 4. Evaluations at the end of the year are reviewed and summarized before we share that information with the site and new students. Office. and other amenities available at your site? 79 . Please describe the parking. 1. meals. Clinic. Did you work with your primary preceptor or many? Please describe how you were supervised. Please note: Your completion of this evaluation will not be individually shared with site or affect your grade.

write prescriptions. Please describe how this rotation prepared you in accordance with the goals and objectives. Please describe what procedures / skills you were allowed to perform at this rotation (write orders. Enjoyed Rate how you personally liked this discipline of medicine 5 4 OK 3 2 Disliked 1 Overall Evaluation of this site to others 80 5 4 3 2 1 . 8. perform venipuncture. order labs. suture.) 7. Any other comments about this site or rotation. 10. 9. perform biopsies.6. Please describe how the didactic sessions in the first year prepared or did not prepare you for this rotation. Please describe how this rotation could be better improved to prepare you as a PA. etc.

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