Silentium Pro

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An Adobe® Original

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A co-:e+¬o·a·, callto·a¬lt. 1,¬et.e Fa+tl,
Based o- ca·olt-ota- Book Ha-ds

co¬,·tol: © .ccc Adobe s,s:e+s I-.o·¬o·a:ed
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For more information about OpenType®, please refer to Adobe’s web site
at “www.adobe.com/¬pe/open¬pe”. 1is PDF document was designed to be viewed
on-screen or printed duplex and assembled as a booklet.
,
ADOBE ORIGINALs
Adobe Systems Incorporated introduces Silentium Pro, a new
OpenType® font sonware package in the growing library of Adobe
Originals ¬petces, designed specifically for today’s digital tech-
nology. Since the inception of the Adobe Originals program in
.«s«, Adobe Originals ¬petces have been consistently recognized
throughout the world for their quali¬, originali¬, and practi cal-
i¬. 1ey combine the power of PostScript® language sonware
technology and the most sophisticated electronic design tools
with the spirit of cransmanship that has inspired ¬pe designers
since Gutenberg. Comprising both new designs and revivals of
classic ¬petces, Adobe Originals font sonware has set a standard
for ¬pographic excellence.
WHA1 Is OrEN1YrE?
Developed jointly by Adobe and Microson, OpenType is a highly
versatile new font file format that represents a significant advance
in ¬pe functionali¬ on Windows® and Mac OS computers. Perhaps
most exciting for designers and ¬pographers is that OpenType
fonts offer extended “layout features” that bring an unprecedented
level of control and sophistication to contemporary ¬pography.
Because an OpenType ¬petce can incorporate all glyphs for a
specific s¬le and weight into a single font, the need for separate
expe¬, alternate, swash, non-Latin, and other related sets is elimi-
nated. In OpenType savvy applications such as Adobe’s InDesign, ™
OpenType layout features organize groups of glyphs according to
their use. Activating these features enables ¬pographic refinements
such as ligatures, small capitals, and olds¬le figures, streamlining
the process of se¬ing and fine-tuning text. In addition, all glyphs
in an OpenType font can be accessed in InDesign, whether or not
they are covered by a layout feature. OpenType fonts, coupled with
the enhanced ¬pographic control offered by a program such as
InDesign, let ¬pe-users take advantage of advanced justification,
optical margin alignment, hanging punctuation, and optically
sized masters (for fonts with two or more optical masters). Adobe
OpenType fonts are some of the most sophisticated ¬petces ever
offered, allowing designers to more effectively take advantage of
the power of the computer for digital design and ¬pese¬ing.
23
sILEN1IUM
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ab.defoltjkl+-o¬q·s:uvwx,z
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
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sILEN1IUM rRO
Silentium is an a¬ractive and sturdy new OpenType tmily design-
ed by Jovica Veljović, acclaimed calligrapher and ¬pe designer.
Based on .cth century Carolingian minuscule scripts, Silentium
captures the subtle energy and surprising versatili¬ of this cou¬ly
manuscript form. As a multi-featured OpenType tmily, Silentium
Pro includes a myriad of alternate forms, ligatures, and titling char-
acters that add an air of tasteful liveliness to contemporary graphic
design and ¬pography. It is designed for use at display sizes, and
will also work well in text se¬ing as small as s points.
Silentium is the Latin word for silence, a discipline commonly
practiced in the medieval European monasteries and cou¬ scrip-
toria where the Carolingian script flourished. For scribal monks,
who produced some of the most beautiful manuscripts of all time,
silence was an ascetic discipline that complemented their refine-
ment of the wri¬en symbols of language. Now, more than ten
centuries later, Silentium Pro brings the fluid energy of their work
to contemporary design and ¬pography. Silentium sparkles, with
a quiet but ebullient sense of the human hand.
1e Carolingian period is seen as an aesthetic high point by
both scholars and practitioners of what we now call roman book-
hands and ¬pe design. 1ough the Carolingian minuscule has
served as the basis for other contemporary ¬pe designs, Silentium
Pro is Veljović’s unique interpretation. It captures the energy and
legibili¬ of the original manuscripts in a useful, contemporary
¬pe design. 1e lowercase forms for Silentium Pro draw directly
on the Carolingian minuscule found in «th and .cth century manu-
scripts from the High Period. Because there was no rigid system
of a dual alphabet (capital le¬ers s¬listically matching lowercase)
during this period, the capital forms in Silentium Pro are from
Veljović’s own calligraphic work, as well as being inspired by the
titles, chapter openings, and initial capital le¬ers in Carolingian
manuscripts.
1is specimen book provides background on the design, devel-
opment, and use of Silentium Pro, and its historical context. It
also includes text specimens at a full range of sizes, as well as
sample a¬work showing Silentium Pro in use.
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1HE cAROLINGIAN MINUscULE
Charlemagne, or Charles the Great (-,.–s., A.D.), became king of
the Franks in No¬hwestern Europe in -cs. On Christmas Day in
scc, he was crowned Holy Roman Emperor of the West by Pope
Leo III, assuming a title that had lapsed in ,-c, and thus became the
successor to Constantine and to all Roman emperors. Charlemagne
built a splendid palace and founded a great cathedral in Aachen,
suppo¬ed education reform, and founded an academy at his cou¬,
where scholars and theologians from all over Europe gathered,
most notably Alcuin of York.
Charlemagne also suppo¬ed impo¬ant scriptoria in the mon-
asteries of Lyon, Autun, Tours, Luxeuil, and Corbie. 1ese scriptoria
flourished in the effo¬ to copy classical Latin literature and thereby
propagate knowledge of Antiqui¬ and the early Christian era. In
tct, nine¬ percent of such classical literature is only known to us
today because of the manuscript copies made in Charlemagne’s era.
It is likely there were many different original sources of writing in
the scriptoria, and it is believed the copyists a¬empted to bring
order to their new documents by slowly developing the script known
as Carolingian minuscule. 1ough this change in le¬ering is dramatic
in retrospect, it came about gradually, and it symbolizes the return to
order and tradition that characterized Charlemagne’s stable empire.
And though Charlemagne did not invent the Carolingian minuscule,
his role as head of a stable Empire helped to ensure that this writing
was disseminated throughout Western Europe.
1e roots of the Carolingian minuscule include Roman half-uncial,
insular writing, and regional cursive s¬les. In the sth century, early
forms of the script intermingled with the peculiarities of contem-
porary regional forms. 1e high period of the Carolingian minuscule
—from the «th until the late ..th century—was characterized by son,
rounded, slightly-sloped and well-formed le¬ers with a high degree
of legibili¬, spacious x-heights, and regulated interlinear and inter-
word spacing. In the ..th to .,th centuries, it provided the basis from
which medieval blackle¬er bookhands developed. During the Italian
Renaissance in the .,th century, the Carolingian minuscule became
a model for the writing of the Humanists, which in turn became the
model for early Roman ¬petces.

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FROM rEN 1O 1YrE
To begin the design process, Veljović studied manuscripts from
the Carolingian period, and spent months creating page aner page
of quick but clear and focused calligraphy using quills, brushes, and
pens. From these fluidly handwri¬en pages he chose le¬ers that
were legible, balanced, and well-formed as the basis for his design.
Aner scanning and digitizing the selected le¬erforms, the
work of sculpting the shapes continued on the computer. Veljović
enhanced and refined ¬pographic elements of color, alignment,
and le¬erfit, without losing the distinctive handwri¬en urgency of
the historical model. 1e lowercase has the slight lean of historical
models, and ce¬ain characteristic forms are included, such as the
sho¬ t, the spiking y, and the curvaceous .-story g. Lowercase alter-
nates and ligatures were designed to allow for smooth flow of text
as well as occasional variation of form, such as the clubbed ascenders,
the double-le¬er ligatures, and the connecting long-f forms. 1e
serif angles, the punctuation shapes, and the tenacious figures all
contribute to a confident appearance and asymmetric rhythm.
Designing the capital forms provided Veljović with an oppo¬u-
ni¬ for prolific interpretation and invention. In the «th and .cth
centuries, many different s¬les of capital le¬ers could be found
on a single manuscript page. Veljović took advantage of this liberal
precedent by designing four distinct sets of capitals with le¬er-
forms in each set that are s¬listically linked. Roman I has capitals
based on the flat-pen or built-up Roman forms found in the Carolin-
gian manuscripts. Roman II has capitals based on Veljović’s contem-
porary angled-pen forms, where an axis similar to that of the lower-
case makes the capitals integrate well with the lowercase. He also
designed a full set of inline titling capitals based on the Roman I cap-
itals, a set of reversed initials, and several alternates based on other
historic initial forms, such as the uncial. 1e Carolingian scribes
were adroit cransmen when it came to using capitals in their page
layouts, and Veljović included several uncommon and cleverly con-
nected capitals and capitals-within-capitals.
Finally, Veljović created a set of unusual ornaments that
harmonize with the alphabetic characters, and can also be combined
with each other to make contemporary and unique arrangements.
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sILEN1IUM rRO GLYrHs
Silentium Pro’s large glyph complement was designed to meet the
exacting requirements of graphic a¬s professionals throughout the
world. Its diverse international character set encompasses most
Latin-based languages, and includes such ¬pographic niceties as
olds¬le figures, ornaments, alternate capital and lowercase forms,
ligatures, international monetary symbols, an expanded set of
mathematical symbols, as well as titling and reversed capital le¬ers.
ROMAN I CAPITALS WITH ALTERNATES 1ese capitals were
designed with the ve¬ical axis that results from using a square-
edged pen in a flat position, or by building up the le¬erforms in
an additive drawing process. 1is s¬le, which is ubiquitous in
Carolingian manuscripts, is especially a¬ractive in all-capital set-
tings. When used with the lowercase it provides a stimulating
but subtle contrast.


ROMAN II CAPITALS WITH ALTERNATES 1ese capitals, which
reflect an angled axis of pen stroke, are based on Veljović’s freely
and quickly wri¬en roman capitals. A similar axis and color to the
lowercase forms helps these capitals blend harmoniously in text.
When used in all capital se¬ings, the playful pen-made forms of
such characters as A, N, Q, and T add an expressive quali¬ to titles
or signage.
LOWERCASE Roman I and II have the same basic lowercase forms.
1ey are open, round, and clear, and combine well to make elegantly
legible text. In addition, Roman II has historically accurate clubbed
ascending strokes.
ABcDEFGHIJKLMNOrQRs1UVWXYZ
AcccM:rGr1
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZt-n
abb.efolhtj kkll+-o¬q·s:uvwx,z
aaee-··e-·j:-.«.
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F-LIGATURES Both Silentium Pro Roman I and Roman II include
a set of f-ligatures that are designed to correct awkward combina-
tions where le¬ers may collide. 1ese ligatures can be used easily in
Adobe’s InDesign.
ALTERNATE AND LIGATURED LOWERCASE 1ese forms give
words and phrases a slightly more animated and informal appear-
ance. Many of them have been designed to provide an alternative to
awkward le¬er combinations.
ROMAN I LIGATURED CAPITALS Silentium Pro includes versa-
tile and creative capital alternates, capitals within capitals and liga-
tured forms. Frequently seen in medieval manuscripts, these glyphs
can be added sparingly to contemporary ¬pography to impa¬ a
subtle look of liveliness.
ROMAN II LIGATURED CAPITALS 1ese alternate capital le¬ers
in Roman II provide a creative substitute for solving slight fit prob-
lems in all-capital se¬ings, as well as being useful for adding an air
of controlled momentum.
OLDSTYLE FIGURES Designed with ascenders and descenders,
these le¬erforms have features and propo¬ions that are compatible
with the lowercase characters of the ¬petce. Olds¬le figures,
also known as hanging figures, are ¬pically used for text se¬ing
because they are designed to blend in well with the lowercase le¬er-
forms. In Silentium Pro, olds¬le figures are available in both fi¬ed
and tabular versions.
AccccccLvnnim×G®GG1111v
Ac:rrs1111vv11
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S e t ñ m µ m ñ 0 n 0 µ ¬
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ff fi fl ffi ffl
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REGULAR FIGURES 1ese figures are designed to be compat-
ible with the capital le¬ers in height, weight, and alignment. In
Silentium Pro they are available in fi¬ed and tabular versions.
MATHEMATICAL AND MONETARY SYMBOLS Silentium
Pro includes some of the more common mathematical symbols
designed especially for the tmily. 1e monetary symbols include
common forms used for contemporary currency. Both the math-
ematical and monetary symbols are available in olds¬le and
regular height versions.
TITLING AND REVERSED CAPITALS 1e titling capitals
are inline or white-stroked versions of the Roman I capitals.
1ey are designed for all capital se¬ings or to be used as
initial capitals, and the set also includes figures, monetary
symbols, related punctuation, and accented characters. 1e
reversed capitals can be used as initial forms in book chapters
or related paragraphs.
ACCENTED GLYPHS 1e large number of accented glyphs
in Silentium Pro help suppo¬ a broad range of Latin-based
languages from around the world. 1e fonts in Silentium Pro
include accented glyphs for both sets of capitals, as well as lower-
case, and titling.
A:·L:::G¬::::::C:C:·:uVvXYz
+ŁŒZL:fifl·o·..+-e:s.sc:€o.·:cc
жMMNM¶M$m00Q0ggQMN$
QØgR0MNMgWg
ÁĂÂÄÀĀĄÅÃáăâäàāãąå
ÁĂÂÄÀĀĄÅÃáăâäàāãąå
∂ℓ∏∑µπ℮∫√◊·-∆Ω---·≈≠≥≤∞−
s·c€\ƒ€·.ƒ€-
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ORNAMENTS 1roughout ¬pographic history ¬pe designers
have created printer’s ornaments to accompany their ¬petces.
In Carolingian manuscripts, scribes occasionally added illustra-
tive elements that ranged from s¬lized doodles to full-blown
illuminated pages. 1e ornaments in Silentium Pro add a per-
sonal signature to the ¬pe tmily and can be used as title page
decoration, paragraph markers, dividers for blocks of text or
graphic elements, as well as repeated borders and constructed
decorations. Silentium Pro has ornaments designed to be used
singly or with each other.
.,
sILEN1IUM rRO, ROMAN I GLYrHs
ABcDEFGHIJKLMNOrQRs1UVWXYZ&
1234567890ab.defoltjkl+-o¬q·s:uvwx,z
..,,,c-s«c
A:·L::G¬::::::C:C:·:uVvXYz
o·..+-e:s.
жMMNM¶M$m00Q0ggQMN$QØ
gR0MNMgWg
ÆŒLiGræœSnßpe.fiflffffifflµm (··
zz ⁄ ) [¤] {·€.ƒ-·.}¹²¯⁴₁₂₃₄
!?¡¿ℓ℮∂∏∑µπ√∞∫·---·~≈≠≤≥◊§†‡¶*
•·«»‹›-−—_\/||@©®™.,:;’‘”“‚„…
ÑMÑÖ4æÑÆÑæÑW¬mÅ
ãÅMMÌMSèÕ´WWÆÆ`~
AccccccLvnnim×G®GG1111v
áâäàåãăāąçćčďđéěêëėèēęğģíîïìīįñóôöòőōõøĺļł
ńňņŕřŗśšşșťţúûüùűūųů,ÿźžż `´ˆˇ˜¯˘˙¨˚˝
ÁĂÂÄÀĀĄÅÃĆÇČĎÉĚÊËĖÈĒĘĐĞĢÍÎÏİÌĪĮ
ĶĹĽĻŁŃŇŅÑŐŌÓÔÖÒÕØŔŘŖŚŠŞȘŤŢ
ÚÛÜÙŰŪŲŮ\ŹŽŻ `´```
ĂĀĄĆČĎĐĚĖĒĘĞĢĪĮĶĹĽĻŃŇŅŐŌŔŘŖŚ
ŞȘŤŢŰŪŲŮŹŻİ€:cs
Basic Latin Glyphs
Additional Glyphs
Accented Glyphs
Inline Capitals
Reversed Box Capitals
.,
sILEN1IUM rRO, ROMAN II GLYrHs
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ&
1234567890abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
..,,,c-s«c
t-nÆŒrfnaaæee-·eœ-Sßpe.fiflffffifflµm
Setñmµmñ0n0µ¬¬¬nnn
¬¬¬--0(··zz ⁄ ) [¤] {·€.ƒ-·.}¹²¯⁴₁₂₃₄
!?¡¿ℓ℮∂∏∑µπ√∞∫·---·~≈≠≤≥◊§†‡¶*
•·«»‹›-−—_\/||@©®™.,:;’‘”“‚„…
ÑMÑÖ4æÑÆÑæÑWm¬mÅ
ãÅMMÌMSèÕ´WWÆÆ`~
áâäàåãăāąçćčďđéěêëėèēęğģíîïìīįñóôöòőōõøĺļł
ńňņŕřŗśšşșťţúûüùűūųů,ÿźžż `´ˆˇ˜¯˘˙¨˚˝
ÁĂÂÄÀĀĄÅÃĆÇČĎÉĚÊËĖÈĒĘĐĞĢÍÎÏİÌĪĮ
ĶĹĽĻŁŃŇŅÑŐŌÓÔÖÒÕØŔŘŖŚŠŞȘŤŢ
ÚÛÜÙŰŪŲŮ\ŹŽŻ `´```
ĂĀĄĆČĎĐĚĖĒĘĞĢĪĮĶĹĽĻŃŇŅŐŌŔŘŖŚ
ŞȘŤŢŰŪŲŮŹŻİ€.··
Ac:rrs1111vv11
Basic Latin Glyphs
Additional Glyphs
Accented Glyphs
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1ex: se¬t-os

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s/.c ROMAN I
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY MAN 1HE 1U-
MUL1s OF FLEsH BE sILENcED, IF FANcIEs OF
:le ea¬l, a-d wa:e·s, a-d at· be stle-.ed also: tf :le ¬oles
of leave- be stle-: also: tf :le ve·, soul be stle-: :o le·self,
a-d b, -o: :lt-kt-o u¬o- self su·+ou-: self: tf all d·ea+s
a-d t+aot-a·, ·evela:to-s be stle-.ed, eve·, :o-oue, a-d
eve·, sto-, tf wla:soeve· ts :·a-ste-: be stle-: :o a-, o-e
st-.e tf a-, +a- .ould lea·ke- u-:o :le+, all :lese sa,
u-:o lt+, We .·ea:ed -o: ou·selves, bu: le :la: ·e+at-s
:o all e:e·-t¬: tf :le-, lavt-o u¬e·ed :lts, :le, also be
:le- stle-:, a-d tf le s¬eak alo-e; -o: b, :le+ bu: b, lt+-
self, :la: we +a-, lea· lts ow- wo·d: -o: ¬·o-ou-.ed b,
a-, :o-oue of flesl, -o· b, :le vot.e of :le a-oels, -o·
b, :le sou-d of :lu-de·, -o· t- :le da·k ·tddle of a ·e-
se+bla-.e; bu: :la: we +a-, lea· lt+ wlo+ we love t-
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY MAN THE TU-
MULTS OF FLESH BE SILENCED, IF FANCIES OF
the ea¬h, and waters, and air be silenced also: if the poles
of heaven be silent also: if the very soul be silent to herself,
and by not thinking upon self surmount self: if all dreams
and imaginary revelations be silenced, every tongue, and
every sign, if whatsoever is transient be silent to any one
since if any man could hearken unto them, all these say
unto him, We created not ourselves, but he that remains to
all eterni¬: if then, having u¬ered this, they also be then
silent, and if he speak alone; not by them but by himself,
that we many hear his own word: not pronounced by any
tongue of flesh, nor by the voice of the angels, nor by the
sound of thunder, nor in the dark riddle of a resemblance;
but that we many hear him whom we love in these creatures,
We said therefore: If to any man
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY MAN 1HE
1UMUL1s OF FLEsH BE sILENcED, IF FANcIEs
of :le ea¬l, a-d wa:e·s, a-d at· be stle-.ed also: tf
:le ¬oles of leave- be stle-: also: tf :le ve·, soul be
stle-: :o le·self, a-d b, -o: :lt-kt-o u¬o- self su·-
+ou-: self: tf all d·ea+s a-d t+aot-a·, ·evela:to-s
be stle-.ed, eve·, :o-oue, a-d eve·, sto-, tf wla:so-
eve· ts :·a-ste-: be stle-: :o a-, o-e st-.e tf a-, +a-
.ould lea·ke- u-:o :le+, all :lese sa, u-:o lt+,
We .·ea:ed -o: ou·selves, bu: le :la: ·e+at-s :o all
e:e·-t¬: tf :le-, lavt-o u¬e·ed :lts, :le, also be
:le- stl e-:, a-d tf le s¬eak alo-e; -o: b, :le+ bu:
b, lt+self, :la: we +a-, lea· lts ow- wo·d: -o:
¬·o-ou-.ed b, a-, :o-oue of flesl, -o· b, :le vot.e
«/.. ROMAN I
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY MAN
1HE 1UMUL1s OF FLEsH BE sILENcED,
tf t-.tes of :le ea¬l, a-d wa:e·s, a-d at· be
stle-.ed also: tf :le ¬oles of leave- be stle-:
also: tf :le ve·, soul be stle-: :o le·self, a-d
b, -o: :lt-kt-o u¬o- self su·+ou-: self: tf all
d·ea+s a-d t+aot-a·, ·evela:to-s be stle-.ed,
eve·, :o-oue, a-d eve·, sto-, tf wla:soeve· ts
:·a-ste-: be stle-: :o a-, o-e st-.e tf a-, +a-
.ould lea·ke- u-:o :le+, all :lese sa, u-:o
lt+, We .·ea:ed -o: ou·selves, bu: le :la: ·e-
+at-s :o all e:e·-t¬: tf :le-, lavt-o u¬e·ed :lts,
:le, also be :le- stle-:, a-d tf le s¬eak alo-e;
.c/.. ROMAN I
s/.c ROMAN II
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY MAN THE
TUMULTS OF FLESH BE SILENCED, IF FANCIES
of the ea¬h, and waters, and air be silenced also: if
the poles of heaven be silent also: if the very soul
be silent to herself, and by not thinking upon self
surmount self: if all dreams and imaginary revela-
tions be silenced, every tongue, and every sign, if
whatsoever is transient be silent to any one since if
any man could hearken unto them, all these say unto
him, We created not ourselves, but he that remains
to all eterni¬: if then, having u¬ered this, they also
be then silent, and if he speak alone; not by them
but by himself, that we many hear his own word:
not pronounced by any tongue of flesh, nor by the
«/.. ROMAN II
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY MAN
THE TUMULTS OF FLESH BE SILENCED,
if tncies of the ea¬h, and waters, and air be
silenced also: if the poles of heaven be silent
also: if the very soul be silent to herself, and
by not thinking upon self surmount self: if all
dreams and imaginary revelations be silenced,
every tongue, and every sign, if whatsoever is
transient be silent to any one--since if any man
could hearken unto them, all these say unto
him, We created not ourselves, but he that re-
mains to all eterni¬: if then, having u¬ered this,
they also be then silent, and if he speak alone;
.c/.. ROMAN II

../., ROMAN I
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY MAN
1HE 1UMUL1s OF FLEsH BE sILENcED,
tf t-.tes of :le ea¬l, a-d wa:e·s, a-d at·
be stle-.ed also: tf :le ¬oles of leave- be
stle-: also: tf :le ve·, soul be stle-: :o le·-
self, a-d b, -o: :lt-kt-o u¬o- self su·-
+ou-: self: tf all d·ea+s a-d t+aot-a·,
·evela:to-s be stle-.ed, eve·, :o-oue, a-d
eve·, sto-, tf wla:soeve· ts :·a-ste-: be st-
le-: :o a-, o-e st-.e tf a-, +a- .ould lea·-
ke- u-:o :le+, all :lese sa, u-:o lt+, We
.·ea:ed -o: ou·selves, bu: le :la: ·e+at-s
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY MAN
THE TUMULTS OF FLESH BE SILENCED,
if tncies of the ea¬h, and waters, and air be
silenced also: if the poles of heaven be silent
also: if the very soul be silent to herself, and
by not thinking upon self surmount self: if
all dreams and imaginary revelations be si-
lenced, every tongue, and every sign, if what-
soever is transient be silent to any one since
if any man could hearken unto them, all these
say unto him, We created not ourselves, but
he that remains to all eterni¬: if then, having
the tumults of flesh be silenced
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY
MAN 1HE 1UMUL1s OF FLEsH BE
stle-.ed, tf t-.tes of :le ea¬l, a-d wa-
:e·s, a-d at· be stle-.ed also: tf :le ¬oles
of leave- be stle-: also: tf :le ve·, soul
be stle-: :o le·self, a-d b, -o: :lt-kt-o
u¬o- self su·+ou-: self: tf all d·ea+s
a-d t+aot-a·, ·evela:to-s be stle-.ed,
eve·, :o-oue, a-d eve·, sto-, tf wla:-
soeve· ts :·a-ste-: be stle-: :o a-, o-e
st-.e tf a-, +a- .ould lea·ke- u-:o
../., ROMAN I
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O
ANY MAN 1HE 1UMUL1s OF
flesl be stle-.ed, tf t-.tes of :le
ea¬l, a-d wa:e·s, a-d at· be stle-.ed
also: tf :le ¬oles of leave- be stle-:
also: tf :le ve·, soul be stle-: :o le·-
self, a-d b, -o: :lt-kt-o u¬o- self
su·+ou-: self: tf all d·ea+s a-d t+ao
t-a·, ·evela:to-s be stle-.ed, eve·,
:o-oue, a-d eve·, sto-, tf wla:soev-
.,/., ROMAN I
../., ROMAN II
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY
MAN THE TUMULTS OF FLESH BE
silenced, if tncies of the ea¬h, and wa-
ters, and air be silenced also: if the poles
of heaven be silent also: if the very soul
be silent to herself, and by not thinking
upon self surmount self: if all dreams
and imaginary revelations be silenced,
every tongue, and every sign, if whatso-
ever is transient be silent to any one since
if any man could hearken unto them, all
../., ROMAN II
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY
MAN THE TUMULTS OF FLESH BE
silenced, if tncies of the ea¬h, and
waters, and air be silenced also: if the
poles of heaven be silent also: if the
very soul be silent to herself, and by
not thinking upon self surmount self:
if all dreams and imaginary revelations
be silenced, every tongue, and every
sign, if whatsoever is transient be si-
.,/., ROMAN II
.c
tf t-.tes of :le ea¬l a-d
.,/.c ROMAN I
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY MAN 1HE 1UMUL1s
OF FLEsH BE sILENcED, IF FANcIEs OF 1HE EAR1H,
a-d wa:e·s, a-d at· be stle-.ed also: tf :le ¬oles of leave- be
stle-: also: tf :le ve·, soul be stle-: :o le·self, a-d b, -o: :lt-k-
t-o u¬o- self su·+ou-: self: tf all d·ea+s a-d t+aot-a·, ·evela-
:to-s be stle-.ed, eve·, :o-oue, a-d eve·, sto-, tf wla:soeve·
.,/.c ROMAN II
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY MAN THE TUMULTS
OF FLESH BE SILENCED, IF FANCIES OF THE EARTH,
and waters, and air be silenced also: if the poles of heaven be
silent also: if the very soul be silent to herself, and by not think-
ing upon self surmount self: if all dreams and imaginary revela-
tions be silenced, every tongue, and every sign, if whatsoever
.c/.s ROMAN I
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY MAN 1HE 1U-
MUL1s OF FLEsH BE sILENcED, IF FANcIEs OF
:le ea¬l, a-d wa:e·s, a-d at· be stle-.ed also: tf :le
¬oles of leave- be stle-: also: tf :le ve·, soul be stle-:
:o le·self, a-d b, -o: :lt-kt-o u¬o- self su·+ou-:
self: tf all d·ea+s a-d t+aot-a·, ·evela:to-s be stle-.ed,
eve·, :o-oue, a-d eve·, sto-, tf wla:soeve· ts :·a-ste-:
.c/.s ROMAN II
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY MAN THE TU-
MULTS OF FLESH BE SILENCED, IF FANCIES OF
the ea¬h, and waters, and air be silenced also: if the
poles of heaven be silent also: if the very soul be silent
to herself, and by not thinking upon self surmount
self: if all dreams and imaginary revelations be silenced,
..
a-d wa:e·s a-d at· be stle-.ed
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY MAN 1HE
1UMUL1s OF FLEsH BE sILENcED, IF FAN-
.tes of :le ea·:l, a-d wa:e·s, a-d at· be stle-.ed
also: tf :le ¬oles of leave- be stle-: also: tf :le ve·,
soul be stle-: :o le·self, a-d b, -o: :lt-kt-o u¬o-
.s/.c ROMAN I
.s/.c ROMAN II
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY MAN THE
TUMULTS OF FLESH BE SILENCED, IF FAN-
cies of the ea¬h, and waters, and air be silenced
also: if the poles of heaven be silent also: if the very
soul be silent to herself, and by not thinking upon
WE sAID 1HEREFORE: IF 1O ANY
+a- :le :u+ul:s of flesl be stle-.ed,
tf t-.tes of :le ea¬l, a-d wa:e·s, a-d
at· be stle-.ed also: tf :le ¬oles of leav-
.,/.s ROMAN I
WE SAID THEREFORE: IF TO ANY
man the tumults of flesh be silenced,
if tncies of the ea¬h, and waters, and
air be silenced also: if the poles of heav-
.,/.s ROMAN I
..
INcMMUNIcBLE
æÑæÑÆÑæÑæÑÆÑæÑæÑÆÑæÑæÑÆÑ
·A:·:::Y
:AJcs1Ic
1HE 1EMrERED LIGH1 OF 1HE WOODs Is LIKE A
rERrE1UAL MORNING • AND Is s1IMULA1ING AND
HEROIc • 1HE ANcIEN1LY RErOR1ED srELLs OF
sIMULATING
TEMPEnED
NNQNM0MÐ0
sa+¬le A¬
.,
ÑÖ
ÑM
1HE
McrRY ADvN1UrEs
OF
:C::: ¬CCL
ef
c·ea: Re-ow-
·- Ne¬·--la+slt·e
BY HOWARD rYLE
.,
McrRY ENcLAND t- :le :t+e of old, wle- oood
Kt-o He-·, :le se.o-d ·uled :le la-d, :le·e ltved wt:lt-
:le o·ee- olades of sle·wood Fo·en, -ea· No¬t-ola+ 1ow-,
a t+ous ou:law wlose -a+e was Robt- Hood. No a·.le· eve·
ltved :la: .ould need a o·a, ooose na0 wt:l su.l sktll a-d
.u--t-o as lts, -o· we·e :le·e eve· su.l ,eo+e- as :le seve-s.o·e
+e··, +e- :la: ·oa+ed wt:l lt+ :l·ouol :le o·ee-wood nades.
Rtol: +e··tl, :le, dwelled wt:lt- :le de¬:ls of sle·wood Fo·en,
suffe·t-o -et:le· .a·e -o· wa-:, bu: ¬asst-o :le :t+e t- +e··,
oa+es of a·.le·, o· bou:s of .udoel ¬la,, ltvt-o u¬ o- :le Kt-o’s
ve-tso-, waned dow- wt:l d·auol:s of ale of OSobe· b·ewt-o.
No: o-l, Robt- lt+self bu: all :le ba-d we·e ou:laws a-d
dwelled a¬a¬ 0o+ o:le· +e-, ,e: :le, we·e beloved b, :le
.ou-:·, ¬eo¬le ·ou-d abou:, fo· -o o-e eve· .a+e :o joll, Robt-
fo· lel¬ t- :t+e of -eed a-d we-: awa, aoat- wt:l a- e+¬¬ fin.
A-d -ow I wtll :ell low t: .a+e abou: :la: Robt- Hood
fell afoul of :le law. Wle- Robt- was a ,ou:l of etol:ee-, nou:
of st-ew a-d bold of lea¬, :le sle·tff of No¬t-ola+ ¬·o.lat+ed
a noo:t-o +a:.l a-d offe·ed a ¬·tze of a bu¬ of ale :o wlosoeve·
slould noo: :le ben sla0 t- No¬t-ola+nt·e. “Now,” quo:l
Robt-, “wtll I oo :oo, fo· tt- would I d·aw a n·t-o fo· :le b·tol:
`
0Q
` ,
.c
You are invited to
1e Blessing of our Home
::: ¬A::Y :A::
.c:cc a.m.
the .,th of Au-un .ccc
at the crossing of
Pink Poppy Path & Tansy Lane
Highland Bluff
Cloverdale
ELSA DEVON
`
IAN HOLMES
Picnic followin-
~
~
.-
·v::: V:C:::
Vtola Odo·a:a
sEEDs FROM
cEcELIA `MI×A1OVsKA
ce-:e· fo· Na:tve rla-:s
Strandvœnget .«
,.cc Åben·å
(
.,
)
s, c- ,,
Ba-e-·e-
NYDELSESSYG
.s

THE
SPURIOUS FORCE
OF
HUMAN NATURE
A se·tes t- :l·ee ¬a¬s
b, Ge¬·ude D·u.ke·
Mc r·ess, ra·ts .ccc

1YrE DEVELOrMEN1 A1 ADOBE
Type is developed at Adobe by a full-time staff of ¬pe design
professionals. Each member of this group has specialized skills
in ¬pe design and the use of tools needed to create digital ¬pe.
1e Adobe ¬pe staff has a working relationship with many
other professionals worldwide, whose expe¬ise represents a
broad spectrum of historical, scholarly, and practical knowl-
edge of ¬pography and the modern graphic a¬s.
Yugoslavian ¬pe designer Jovica Veljović is a long-time
student and teacher of calligraphy; he is well-versed in historical
Latinate forms as well as a modern explorer of the alphabetic
line as a basis for a¬. Veljović received his master’s degree in
calligraphy and le¬ering at the Academy of Applied A¬s in
Belgrade. He now lives in Germany where he teaches ¬pe design
and calligraphy at the Fachhochschule Hamburg, and presents
workshops throughout Europe and the United States.
In addition to designing the ¬pe tmily Ex Ponto® for Adobe
in .««,, Veljović has designed ¬petces for the International
Typetce Corporation (ITC Veljović ®, ITC Esprit®, and ITC
Gamma®); in .««s, he created a ¬pe tmily for exclusive use
of the German newspaper Die Zeit. He has also served as a
consultant on Cyrillic ¬pe designs for Apple Computer, Inc.,
Lino¬pe-Hell AG, and URW Sonware & Type. In .«s,, he
received the Charles Peignot Award from the Association
Typographique Internationale for excellence in calligraphy
and ¬pe design.
,c
Fu¬le· Readt-o
K-tol:, s:a-, “Hts:o·t.al s.·t¬:s: f·o+ classt.al
1t+es :o :le Re-atssa-.e”, Oak K-oll r·ess, .««s.
B·ow-, Mt.lele r, “A Gutde :o Wes:e·- Hts:o·t.al
s.·t¬:s”, 1le B·t:tsl Ltb·a·,, .««c.
G·a,, Nt.ole:e, “A Hts:o·, of Le¬e·t-o”, rlatdo-/
Davtd Godt-e, .«sc.
Ga-z, Davtd, “1le r·e.o-dt:to-s fo·
ca·olt-e Mt-us.ule”, ¬ubltsled t- “Vta:o·”, Vol. .s,
U-tve·st¬ of caltfo·-ta r·ess, .«s-.
Zou:ewelle-Mo··ts, sa·al, “1le B·ea:lt-o t- :le
W·t:t-o: A- I-:e·vtew wt:l Jovt.a Veljovtć”,
¬ub ltsled t- “Le¬e· A¬s Revtew”, Vol. .., No. ., .««,.
Lu-dquts:, Lt--ea, “A No:e o- Ex ro-:o”,
¬ub ltsled t- “Le¬e· A¬s Revtew”, Vol. .., No. ., .««,.
Lu-dquts:, Lt--ea, “Jovt.a Veljovtć: Ma- f·o+
:le Dee¬ E-d”, ¬ubltsled t- “NEWsOs”, Vol. .,,
No. ., .ccc.
Adobe, :le Adobe looo, :le Adobe O·tot-als looo,
stle-:tu+, Ex ro-:o, Illus:·a:o·, I-Desto-, rlo:oslo¬,
a-d ros:s.·t¬: a·e et:le· ·eots:e·ed :·ad+a·ks o·
:·ade+a·ks of Adobe s,s:e+s I-.o·¬o·a:ed t- :le
U-t:ed s:a:es a-d/o· o:le· .ou-:t·es. Ma. a-d
Ma.t-:osl a·e :·ade+a·ks of A¬¬le co+¬u:e·
I-.o·¬o·a:ed ·eots:e·ed t- :le U-t:ed s:a:es a-d
o:le· .ou-:·tes. O¬e-1,¬e a-d Wt-dows a·e et:le·
·eots :e·ed :·ade+a·ks o· :·ade+a·ks of Mt.·oson
co·¬o·a:to- t- :le U-t:ed s:a:es a-d/o· o:le·
.ou-:·tes. I1c Veljovtć, I1c Es¬·t:, a-d I1c Ga++a
a·e ·eots:e·ed :·ad+a·ks of I-:e·-a:to-al 1,¬et.e
co·¬o·a:to-. All o:le· :·ade+a·ks a·e :le ¬·o¬e¬,
of :let· ·es¬e.:tve ow-e·s.
Adobe s,s:e+s I-.o·¬o·a:ed
,,, ra·k Ave-ue
sa- Jose, cA «,..c-.-c,
A.k-owledoe+e-:s:
s¬e.t+e- book desto- a-d ¬·odu.:to-:
F·ed B·ad,, Keala Hao+a--, Lt--ea Lu-dquts:,
Robe¬ slt+ba.l a-d cl·ts:o¬le· sl,e.
1ex: w·t¬e- b, Lt--ea Lu-dquts:, addt:to-al
·evtew a-d edt:t-o b, F·ed B·ad,, Robe¬
slt+ba.l, Jovt.a Veljovtć a-d Elle- Wtx:ed.
sa+¬le a¬ b,:
Robe¬ slt+ba.l, ¬aoe c.
Keala Hao+a--, ¬aoes .,, .,, .- (bo¬o+).
Lau·ta szujewska, ¬aoe .c a-d .- (:o¬).
Ma·oe·, ca-:o·, F·ed B·ad, ¬aoe .s.
s¬e.tal :la-ks :o Kell, Davts, Ka: Ga:zke,
Ha·old G·e,, Do--a Kol-es, Davtd Le+o-,
E·-te Ma·.l, Jt+ Mtld·ew, Mt.kt Mo-:alvo,
a-d 1lo+as rlt--e, fo· ·evtew of :lts
s¬e.t+e- book.
1ex: fo· ¬aoes ., & ., ts :ake- f·o+ “1le
Me··, Adve-:u·es of Robt- Hood of G·ea:
Re-ow- t- No¬t-ola+slt·e,” w·t¬e- b,
Howa·d r,le (.s,,-.«..) a-d rubltsled b,
s.·tb-e·’s, New Yo·k, .ss,.
1le tllus:·a:to- o- ¬aoe .s ts :ake- f·o+
a lt:loo·a¬lt. d·awt-o b, F·ed B·ad,, .«--.
1le quo:a:to- used t- :le s¬e.t+e- se¬t-os
ts f·o+ sat-: Auous:t-e’s co-fessto-s, E-oltsl
:·a-sla:to- b, Wtllta+ Wa¬s, .c,..
1lts s¬e.t+e- book was ¬·odu.ed ust-o
I-Desto-™, Illus:·a:o·®, a-d rlo:oslo¬® sonwa·e
f·o+ Adobe. 1le ¬¬et.e ts stle-:tu+ r·o
desto-ed b, Jovt.a Veljovtć.
rDF .·ea:ed Auous: ., .ccc.
stle-:tu+ r·o, U.s. ra:e-:s Desto- ,c-,.c,,
,.c,c,., a-d ¬a:e-: ¬e-dt-o.
bc