North Yorkshire and City of York

MAPPA Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements
Annual Report 2006-07

Keeping communities safe
During the past year, a number of new police and probation appointments have been made to the expanding unit, to be joined by a new post of MAPPA co-ordinator funded by police and probation. This is a strategic post to support the work of the Strategic Management Board (SMB), and is vital to ensure that our ambitious business development plans for the coming year are achieved. In conclusion, this report demonstrates how the MAPPA process of identification, assessment and management of sexual and violent offenders is achieved by applying a structured approach, from prison release through to supervision and monitoring in the community.

This report, like those in previous years, demonstrates the positive working relationships that exist between all agencies that together make up the MAPPA structure. Communities in North Yorkshire and the City of York should feel confident and reassured that through our strong partnerships approach and stringent management of offenders, we are reducing crime and making our communities safer. Realistically, it must be borne in mind that whilst the level of risk in individual cases may be reduced, it can never be entirely removed. Locking people up and throwing away the key, is not a practical solution for all but the highly dangerous few. The vast majority of violent and dangerous offenders will, at some stage, be released into the community, and it is the responsibility of the probation service, in conjunction with the other MAPPA agencies, to work with these offenders to help reduce the likelihood of them committing serious further offences. The MAPPA agencies are crucially important in this vital work, as by working together in a co-ordinated way, it is possible to share information about an offender and prepare joint risk management plans that should reduce the chances of serious further offences being committed. In North Yorkshire the three MAPPA Responsible Authorities, Police, Probation and Prison Service, have been developing closer ways of working. Since February 2006, the Probation Public Protection Manager has been co-located within the

We hope that you find it both informative and reassuring.

Pete Brown Chief Officer North Yorkshire Probation Area

Grahame Maxwell Chief Constable North Yorkshire Police

Norman Griffin Governor HM YOI Northallerton

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MAPPA procedures, when operating well, can be effective in reducing the likelihood of serious further offences being committed by those subject to MAPPA. In North Yorkshire, the MAPPA agencies have continued to undertake regular quality audits of samples of their MAPPA cases, and the findings of these audits is that in the great majority of cases, MAPPA procedures are shown to have significantly increased the degree of protection afforded to the public.

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Sexual and violent offences are dreadful crimes that deeply affect the lives of victims and their families and inspire fear in local communities. Their impact can be profound and long lasting, leaving victims feeling unsafe even in their own homes.

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Welcome to this, the sixth annual report of the North Yorkshire and City of York Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA).

joint Probation and Police Public Protection Unit at police headquarters in Newby Wiske. This has greatly improved communication exchange and the day to day management of violent and sex offenders subject to MAPPA in North Yorkshire.

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Managing Registered Sex Offenders

person any changes of address or travel arrangements. Failure to report will lead to their arrest and prosecution. Back in police headquarters, the past year has seen a number of newly created posts in the PPU including a Detective Inspector who is responsible for the day to day management of the Unit. A new SOPO officer is responsible for providing support and guidance to staff from the MAPPA agencies who are involved in investigating and dealing with MAPPA offenders and potential MAPPA offenders and on the appropriate use of Sexual Offences Prevention Orders (SOPOs). In addition, a researcher and an analyst are now able to prepare detailed reports and analyses to assist in the effective management of sex offenders in the community. The current high profile interest in the management of violent and sex offenders has prompted a lot of debate in the media about public safety. By working closely with partner agencies and sharing information appropriately the Public Protection Unit plays a vital role in monitoring and managing violent and sex offenders in the community.

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By Detective Sergeant Jackie Smart
The joint Police and Probation Public Protection Unit (PPU) is based at police headquarters at Newby Wiske, although a number of staff are located in dispersed locations throughout the area. The Unit provides specialist advice and support to our MAPPA partner agencies. The Unit comprises a small team of police and probation staff who co-ordinate the registration and monitoring of registered sex offenders and violent offenders. The Unit includes a number of public protection officers who have direct responsibility for the management of registered sex offenders. These officers are based at local police stations and their responsibilities include home visits and liaison with other agencies to share information and assess the risk offenders pose to the public. Persons required to register as ‘sex offenders’ have to report to the police providing certain personal information, as well as their fingerprints and a photograph. They also have to notify in

The Local Authority view…
“Having joined the MAPPA core group as the City of York Children and Families representative in Spring 2006, I was instantly struck by the parallels between MAPPA processes and those employed with respect to child protection concerns in my own agency; where children considered at risk of significant harm are subject to a multi agency protection plan which is regularly reviewed and revised according to agreed national standards. Whilst child protection processes focus on a named child however, MAPPA panels focus on a known perpetrator, who may present a

risk to specific individuals, particular groups, staff members, or the wider community. The focus of MAPPA action plans therefore has to be much wider and the breadth of membership of the MAPPA panels is essential to ensure key agencies are present to provide advice, and where necessary, resources, to provide the robustness needed to minimise the risks presented by some of the most high risk perpetrators as they return to the community.”

John Roughton
Acting Group Manager Children’s Services City of York Council

Lay Advisor view…
“2006 has been an interesting year for MAPPA Lay Advisors nationwide. It has been three years since the first Lay Advisors were appointed and a major review into the working of Public Protection arrangements has been under way. The publication of the new guidance for Lay Advisors is expected in the summer of 2007 and it is hoped that they will improve the role of Lay Advisors and clarify the degree of access to the process that can be expected. For the role requires the trust and co-operation of all agencies. The highlight of my year was the national conference for Lay Advisors held in Leeds in February 2007. It brought together Lay Advisors from across England and Wales and established a valuable datum for the appointment and use of Lay Advisors in the future. A wide variety of practice was revealed and the evidence gathered will be used in completing the national guidelines. In particular I valued the contribution and presentations made by the Public Protection Unit in the Home Office, the work of the Prison Service, the Crown Prosecution Service and the responsibilities of the Parole Board.

Within our own area I have attended all MAPPA SMB meetings. I have also attended level 3 meetings and visited a prison and a probation office. I have been struck by the care taken to handle MAPPA cases to ensure public protection. The complexity and sensitivity of the issues involved in MAPPA cases requires a highly professional response by all agencies involved and the efforts made by individual practitioners is a credit to the individuals concerned and their Responsible Authorities. There is a vacancy for a second Lay Advisor in our area and I would encourage anyone who is interested in serving the community to consider applying for the post. It is an interesting and informative role and with the publication of the new guidelines, the role of Lay Advisors will be clarified and the scope of involvement laid down thus enabling the role to be resourced fully. I support the planned appointment of the MAPPA coordinator for our area, this is a vital post and will complete the staffing levels agreed for our area.”

Venerable Simon Golding
Lay Advisor

Keeping victims at the heart of MAPPA
At the heart of public protection work is the need to protect victims. The Criminal Justice System has devoted increased attention to victim issues over recent years with additional support being provided through the arrest and pre-court stage by Victim Support and Victim Witness Care through what can be a lengthy and difficult time. After conviction, a victim liaison officer (VLO) from the probation service will write to identified victims to offer the facility of contact and information. If willing, victims receive basic information covering the offender’s progress whilst in custody and can have their views taken into account by authorities which consider release on any form of licence. This can lead to additional licence conditions that may restrict direct contact or exclude offenders from certain clearly defined geographical areas. Victim staff may continue to be involved in the MAPPA process after the prisoner has been released and serve to ensure that victim needs are taken into account when considering how best to manage individuals within the community.

Under the provisions of the ‘Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000’, the VLO has statutory responsibility for victim work in cases of serious sexual and violent crime where the offender receives a prison sentence of 12 months or more. This was further extended under sections 36-44 of the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 to include victims or victims’ families of serious sexual and violent offences, where offenders have been made the subject of hospital orders with restriction. During the coming year, in an exciting new development, the three VLOs are being seconded from probation to Victim Support to join a new Victim Care Unit (VCU) which has been set up as part of the Public Value Partnerships. The VCU will see all victims’ services combined into one unit which will provide a better and more integrated service to victims throughout North Yorkshire and the City of York. The new VCU will continue to operate closely with the other MAPPA agencies.

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Public protection and approved premises
The aim of approved premises is to protect the public from offenders who pose a significant risk of harm to others. Everything possible is done to ensure that the public is protected from offenders where a risk is posed. Management of serious sexual and violent offenders is a joint responsibility of the Police and National Probation Service, working closely within Home Office guidelines. Locally such cases are subject to the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA). The MAPPA system includes all local agencies meeting regularly to discuss cases in detail.
Approved premises in North Yorkshire
There is one approved premises in North Yorkshire, Southview. It provides accommodation for those who are on bail, subject to probation supervision or to licence on release from prison. It is not a permanent home for offenders; it is used to rehabilitate offenders to enable them to play a positive role in society. Southview offers a high level of supervision in order to protect the public from those who pose the most serious harm. All residents are subject to thorough risk assessments. They have an individual supervision or sentence plan that addresses the causes of their offending. This may include receiving drug or alcohol treatment, attending programmes, improving basic skills and working towards employment or longer term accommodation. Southview also imposes a night-time curfew and some residents have other specific curfew requirements. There is CCTV surveillance and staff are on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Hostel rules are strictly enforced and there is close liaison between the police, supervising probation staff, courts, prisons, social care and other partner agencies. Illegal drugs, solvents or alcohol are banned at Southview. Residents are only allowed to bring in prescribed drugs, and these are handed to staff who administer them according to the doctor’s instructions. Residents who break these rules may be returned to court or prison.

Your questions answered
What sort of offenders live at Southview Approved Premises – is it just sex offenders? Southview Approved Premises accommodates offenders who have committed a very wide range of crimes. It is not a specialist accommodation or treatment centre for sex offenders; it holds a range of offenders on bail or licence in the community for whom no other types of accommodation would be suitable. Why is this type of accommodation needed in North Yorkshire? Facilities like these are a vital part of the public protection process. Southview enables the successful resettlement of offenders back into the community, while contributing to the reduction of re-offending. What would happen if Southview Approved Premises wasn’t available? If some high risk offenders were not able to go to an approved premises on release, or as a condition of bail or a community order, then they would be placed in other, less secure forms of accommodation, such as local authority housing, voluntary sector hostels, privately rented flats or bed and breakfast establishments. It is much more difficult to manage offenders safely and effectively in these settings. This would significantly reduce the protection afforded to the public, since offenders would be less tightly monitored and lapses of behaviour would be less likely to be detected. I live near Southview Approved Premises – is it safe? Approved premises are the safest option for many offenders as it allows their risk to be managed. They are required to comply with all the conditions of their order or licence, including the curfew and any additional restrictions imposed on their movements. Facilities such as Southview are a vital part of the public protection process. They enable successful resettlement of offenders back in to the community, while contributing to the reduction of re-offending. Residents living at Southview are also required to comply with house rules which set out the standards of behaviour expected of them. There are rules forbidding them to act in such a way as to cause disruption to neighbours and the immediate community, or to bring the premises into disrepute. Any breach of the conditions of residence or the house rules renders an offender liable to clear sanctions; either eviction; a return to court or their immediate recall to prison. The policy is stringently enforced and there are examples of offenders being recalled to prison as a preventative measure to avoid the risk of further offences being committed.

Southview Approved Premises adds to public safety, not diminishes it.

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National perspective - Ministerial foreword (2006-07)
“These are the sixth MAPPA annual reports, and the first with a foreword by the Ministry of Justice. I want, first of all, to underline the Government’s continued commitment to these arrangements. Protecting the public from dangerous offenders is a core aim for the new Department. Just as the effectiveness of MAPPA locally depends on the quality of working relationships, we will work with the Home Office, the Police, and others, to develop the best possible framework within which the MAPPA can operate. On 13 June, the Government published a Review of the Protection of Children from Sex Offenders. This sets out a programme of actions which include developing the use of drug treatment for sex offenders and piloting the use of compulsory polygraph testing as a risk management tool, enhancements to the regime operating at Approved Premises, and also a range of actions impacting directly upon the way the MAPPA work. I want to highlight two of them here. Firstly, research tells us that the arrangements are already used successfully to disclose information about dangerous offenders but we think this can be improved upon. MAPPA agencies will be required to consider disclosure in every case. We will pilot a scheme where parents will be able to register a child-protection interest in a named individual with whom they have a personal relationship and who has regular unsupervised access to their child. If that person has convictions for child sex offences and the child is at risk, there will be a presumption that the offences will be disclosed to the parent. Secondly, as MAPPA has developed over the past 6 years, best practice models have been identified which show that specific roles and approaches are required to ensure it is managed effectively. We are committed to strengthening MAPPA arrangements and ensuring that robust performance management is in place. To achieve this, we intend to introduce new national standards, which will ensure a consistent approach across Areas and we will be making available £1.2million to support Areas in implementing the standards. We aim to do everything that can reasonably be done to protect people from known, dangerous offenders. We know that there is always room for improvement. I commend this annual report to you as an indication of the commitment, skills and achievements of the professionals, and lay advisers, in managing and monitoring this essential, often difficult area of business.” Maria Eagle MP Parliamentary Under Secretary of State

Key achievements 2006-07
• Effective and regular MAPPA level 2 and 3 meetings continue throughout North Yorkshire. • Joint risk training and briefing events involving MAPPA agencies and the Public Protection Unit. • Expanded joint Police/Probation Public Protection Unit. • Agreement to create and fund a new strategic post of MAPPA co-ordinator. • Completion of quality audits on level 2 and level 3 cases. • Increased co-operation between MAPPA and the newly established Safeguarding Children Boards, including joint training. • Exploratory work on the feasibility of introducing‘Circles of Support and Accountability’ for improving the safe management of sex offenders in the community.

MAPPA Agencies
TOGETHER WORKING
The following organisations have a legal duty (set out in the Criminal Justice Act 2003) to work together to protect the public.

• Police • Probation • Prisons • Youth Offending Teams • Jobcentre Plus • Local Education Authorities • Local Housing Authorities • Registered Social Landlords • Social Care • Strategic Health Authorities, Primary Care Trusts and NHS Trusts • Electronic Monitoring Providers

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MAPPA Statistics for 2006/07
For the reporting period 1 April 2006 – 31 March 2007

MAPPA statistical commentary
i) Registered Sex Offenders (RSOs): The number of MAPPA Category 1 RSOs in North Yorkshire continues to show a small year-on-year increase (below 10%), which is in line with the national trend. The main reason for the steady increase is the length of time offenders are required to remain on the register which may be registration for periods up to 10 years or for life. ii) Breaches of the registration requirement: There has been a slight increase in the number of RSOs who were cautioned or convicted for breaches of the registration requirement (from 10 in 05/06 to 12 in 06/07) but given the rise in overall numbers of RSOs this is in effect little change from last year. This illustrates the preparedness of Criminal Justice staff including Police, CPS and court service to enforce registration requirements. It demonstrates the continuing effectiveness of a robust approach to the management of registered offenders, the vast majority of whom (97% in North Yorkshire) remain fully compliant with the requirements of the Sexual Offences Act 2003.

1. Category 1 MAPPA offenders:
Registered Sex Offenders (RSO)
i) The number of RSOs living in North Yorkshire on 31 March 2006 – Area total, and broken down to named Police Operational Command Unit level: Total 359 BCU Central Eastern Western RSO 157 113 89

a) The number of RSOs in North Yorkshire per 100,000 head of population: 48 (an increase of 6.25%) iii) Sexual Offences Prevention Orders (SOPO’s): The number of SOPO applications has continued to rise (from 7 in 05/06 to 15 in 06/07) and this has in turn led to a significant increase (from 5 to 11) in the number of full SOPO’s ii) The number of sex offenders having a registration requirement who made by the courts. This reflects an increased confidence in and use of this new were either cautioned or convicted for breaches of the requirement, order (introduced in May 2005) by both the police and the courts. between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2007: Total 12 iv) Notification Orders: This is a relatively new civil order available under the iii) The number of (a) Sexual Offences Prevention Orders (SOPOs) applied for (b) interim SOPOs granted and (c) full SOPOs imposed by the courts in North Yorkshire between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2007: (a)15 (b)0 (c)11 iv) The number of (a) Notification Orders applied for (b) interim Notification Orders granted and (c) full Notification Orders imposed by the courts in North Yorkshire between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2007: (a)1 (b)0 (c)1 v) The number of Foreign Travel Orders (a) applied for and (b) imposed by the courts in North Yorkshire between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2007: (a)0 (b)0 Sexual Offences Act 2003 for sex offenders with no relevant convictions within England but relevant and related convictions abroad and North Yorkshire has now had its first Notification Order applied for and granted. v) Foreign Travel Orders: A further civil order from the SOA 2003 seeking to prevent RSOs travelling abroad to target potential victims overseas. vi) Violent and other sexual offenders: This total is to record those offenders convicted to 12 months or more incarceration for specified violent or nonregisterable sex offences, who are now subject to community supervision by Probation, Youth Offending Teams and Mental Health services. The overall number of Category 2 living in North Yorkshire & City of York is relatively constant and is now the same as in 2004/5 following a slight downward fluctuation last year.

vii) Other offenders: This category is made up of those offenders who do not fit either Category 1 or 2, but who have a past relevant MAPPA conviction for violence or sexual offending and are seen to pose significant risk of serious harm, yet are not subject to current sex offender registration or licence supervision. This 2. Category 2 MAPPA offenders: figure has shown a large increase over last year which is due to a range of factors Violent offenders and Other Sexual offenders (V&OS) including: an increasing number of referrals to MAPPA received from the mental vi) The number of violent and other sexual offenders (as defined by Section health services; the transfer of offenders to Category 3 from Categories 1 & 2 on 327 (3), (4) and (5) of the Criminal Justice Act (2003)) living in North completion of their registration/supervision requirements in order to continue Yorkshire between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2007: managing the risks; changes over the past year to the way data is gathered. The Total 165 introduction of central screening of all MAPPA referrals in the coming year is likely to lead to more robust and consistent interpretation of the definition for Category 3 which is expected to lead to an overall reduction of offenders in this category.

3. Category 3 MAPPA offenders:
Other Offenders (OthO)

viii) Offenders managed through MAPPA meetings at levels 2 and 3: The number of offenders managed at level 3, (the highest level of management for vii) The number of ‘other offenders’ (as defined by Section 325 (2)(b) of the “critical few”), has remained fairly static over the past year, showing only a the Criminal Justice Act (2003)) between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2007: small increase (from 17 to 21). However, there has been a very considerable increase in the number of offenders managed at level 2 (from 81 to 179). In Total 81 part, this is due to changes in the way that data is gathered, but it does largely reflect the increase in Category 3 (Other) offenders noted in (vii) above. Increased viii) Offenders managed though level 3 (MAPPP) & level 2 use of Level 2 (multi- agency) risk management is a cause for concern since it (local inter-agency management) represents a significant increase in the demands made upon limited resources. This identifies how many MAPPA offenders in each of the three Categories An ongoing review of MAPPA procedures has concluded that a central screening (i.e. (1)- RSOs, (2)- V&OS and (3)- OthO (see above) have been managed process is required for all MAPPA referrals which is being introduced in the through the MAPPP (level 3) and through local inter-agency risk coming year. It is anticipated that more rigorous and consistent interpretation of MAPPA referral criteria will in time reduce the number of cases currently requiring management (level 2) between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2007: management at level 2. Level 2 Level 3 Level 1 Cat.1 (RSO) 60 7 292 Cat.2 (Violent) Cat.3(Other) 60 72 5 9 100 0 ix) Breaches and further offending: (a) The number of cases managed at levels 2 and 3 where the offenders were returned to custody for breach of licence has increased by 45% (24 in 05/06 and 35 in 06/07). In part this is accounted for by the overall increase in numbers of MAPPA offenders but is also clearly suggests that vigilance and effective offender management is successfully tackling breaches in agreed licence conditions. (b) The small number of offenders returned to custody for breaching civil Sexual Offences Prevention Orders suggests that most offenders are now familiar with MAPPA requirements and are generally compliant. (c) The number of offenders convicted for serious further offences is one more than last year (from 1 to 2). Whilst any serious further offending is a regrettable tragedy, this year’s figures continue to indicate that the MAPPA is successful in managing those offenders who pose the greatest threat to the wider community.

(ix) Of the cases managed at levels 3 or 2 (i.e. (viii)) between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2007, how many, whilst managed at that level: (a) Were returned to custody for a breach of licence? (b) Were returned to custody for a breach of a sexual offences prevention order? (c) Were charged with a further serious sexual or violent offence? (a) (b) (c) Level 2 28 1 1 Level 3 4 0 1

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‘The critical few’ - MAPPA level 3 protection panel
Probation Public Protection Manager
Chair of the meeting

Health Representatives
There will be normally two decision-makers for resources/decisions relating to mental health, disability, general health etc.

Assistant Chief Probation Officer
With strategic responsibility

Senior Police Officer
With strategic lead on public protection

Prison Representative
If a custody case

Police Legal Advisor
Only attends if legal issues are identified

Senior Police Officer
From local police area with responsibility for intelligence

Victim Liaison Officer (VLO)
(probation-led). Only attends if there is an identified victim and the panel needs more information

Police Public Protection Officer
If a violent or sex offender in the community

Social Care
A senior manager representing one of the following areas: child protection, vulnerable adults, families, learning disabilities

Approved Premises’ Manager (probation)
This person has strategic responsibility for decisions relating to Approved Premises (previously known as probation hostels)

Senior Probation Officer Education Representative
Strategic level, to arrange co-ordinated links with schools/childcare providers, if necessary In charge of day-to-day management of the local area’s MAPPA cases and line manager of the Probation Officer

Local Housing Manager Probation Officer
If the offender is under probation supervision and/or licence, then this person is the day-to-day ’offender manager’ Senior manager who can make allocation decisions for accommodation on release from prison or after a period of residency in an Approved Premises

Managing the ‘critical few’
THE ROLE OF THE MAPPA CHAIR IN THE CASE OF ‘X’
“I have been chairing the level 3 MAPPA meetings* since taking up this post in November 2005. Without doubt it has been one of the most challenging and interesting roles that I have undertaken in my 20 years to date in the National Probation Service. A diagram above shows who may be sitting at the MAPPA table and I don’t intend to repeat that here. What I want to do is explain what it feels like to be at that table. Let’s look at the case of ‘X’ as an example, who in this case is a male sex offender. The meeting on X lasts about an hour and follows a set agenda. It starts with a reminder of the statutory authority and purpose of the meeting, and a statement on confidentiality. We then look at the reason for X being referred to MAPPA and each agency in turn shares the relevant information that they have about X. There follows a crucial discussion which seeks to draw out from the information shared a clear understanding of the nature and severity of the risks that X presents in the community. Particular attention is paid to the risks presented to identified past victims and possible future victims if X re-offends. The meeting then agrees a risk management plan which is intended to manage and minimise each of the identified risks. This plan will cover the contributions to be made by all the involved agencies, and will also include any disclosures to third parties that may need to be made. The meeting concludes by drawing up an action plan of who is to do what, by when, and setting a date for the next meeting which will review the actions, update the information and then update the plan. My role as chair is to manage the process of this meeting. There is a core group of individuals from each of the agencies who attend most meetings, and in working together on such difficult issues over a long period of time they have built up a high level of mutual trust and understanding. They have got past the generalised and stereotypical views that can often get in the way of effective inter-agency working and are able to challenge and question each other in a wholly constructive way. In working together with a priority on public protection they are able, where necessary, to enhance the provision of resources. And what of X? Well he has been told that he is subject to MAPPA and given information about most aspects of the risk management plan. He has been released on licence and is abiding by the conditions of his licence, with its additional requirements and restrictions. Although he is co-operating well with the agencies working with him, he continues to be regarded as posing a potential risk and MAPPA members continue to meet regularly to review his case and update his risk management plan.” John Bourton Probation Public Protection Manager
*See previous page for full explanation of the MAPPA management levels

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What is MAPPA?
The North Yorkshire & City of York Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements, or MAPPA, are the means by which local agencies work together to best protect our community from the serious harm that some offenders may still present after being convicted for offences of a sexual or violent nature.
The four key stages of MAPPA

STAGE 1 Identification

STAGE 2 Information Sharing

STAGE 3 Risk Assessment

STAGE 4 Risk Management

Early identification of those offenders who should be considered under the MAPPA is vital. Three categories of ‘MAPPA offender’ have been defined to focus risk management. Category 1 Registered Sex Offenders: for the period of their registration. Category 2 Violent & Other Sex Offenders: often summarised as violent

The exchange of information is an essential element of effective public protection. The North Yorkshire & City of York MAPPA protocol covers this area in detail but information sharing must:

Whilst agencies use various methods to assess risk it is important that we have a common understanding of the terms used to describe risk. The MAPPA use definitions taken from the Probation Service risk assessment tool called OASys. ‘Serious Harm’ is a risk which is life threatening and/or traumatic and from which recovery, whether physical or psychological, can be expected to be difficult or impossible. Levels of risk Low: no significant, current indicators of risk of serious harm.

High: there are identifiable indicators of risk of serious harm. The potential event could happen at any time and the impact would be serious. Very High: there is an imminent risk of serious harm. The potential event is more likely than not to happen imminently and the impact would be serious. Level 3: MAPPP – Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel Used for the management of the ‘critical few’. Where the offender is assessed under OASys as being a high or very high risk of causing serious harm, and presents risks that can only be managed by a plan that requires close co-operation at a senior level due to the complexity of the case and/or because of the unusual resource commitments it requires; OR although not assessed as a high or very high risk, the case is exceptional because of the likelihood of media scrutiny and/or public interest in the management of the case. Remember defensible decisions are those taken where:• all reasonable steps have been taken; • reliable assessment methods have been used; • information has been collected and thoroughly evaluated; • decisions are recorded and subsequently carried out; • policies and procedures have been followed; and • everyone adopts an investigative approach and is proactive.

This structure of risk management has been designed to enable resources to be used in the most effective and efficient manner. • The principle is that cases should be managed at the lowest level consistent with providing a defensible risk management plan. • When deciding about the level of risk, the nature of the risk and how it can be managed should be considered. • The levels of risk management do not necessarily equate directly to levels of risk but generally the higher the assessed level of risk, the higher the level of management required. Level 1: Ordinary risk management Used in cases where the risk posed by the offender can be managed by one agency without actively or significantly involving other agencies. Level 2: Local inter-agency risk management Used where the active involvement of more than one agency is required but where either the level of risk or complexity of managing the risk, is not so great as to require referral to level 3.

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Risk Management

STAGE 4

Stage 4 – Risk management

Risk Assessment

STAGE 3

Stage 3 – Assessing risk

Medium: there are identifiable indicators of risk of serious harm. The offender has the potential to cause serious harm but is unlikely to do so unless there is a change in circumstances, for example, failure to take medicine, loss of accommodation, relationship breakdown, and drug or alcohol misuse.

Information Sharing

STAGE 2

Stage 2 - Information sharing

• have lawful authority; • be necessary; • be proportionate and undertaken in ways which ensure the safety and security of the information; and • be accountable.

Identification

STAGE 1

Stage 1 – The identification of MAPPA offenders

offenders imprisoned for 12 months plus. The full definition is more complex and includes those detained under hospital or guardianship orders. They usually exit MAPPA when statutory supervision ceases. Category 3 Other offenders: have been convicted of an offence which indicates that he/she is capable of causing serious harm to the public and the Responsible Authority reasonably considers that the offender may cause serious harm to the public.

MAPPA SMB planned activity 2007-2010
The North Yorkshire MAPPA Strategic Management Board (SMB) has produced a rolling three year business plan. This plan will guide the SMB with a clear focus upon further monitoring and evaluation, community engagement and communication, and training.

Improve quality standards of work undertaken on MAPPA cases building on evidence of ‘What Works’ and best practice. Review operational structure and organisation of Joint Public Protection Unit. Review resourcing of MAPPA. Review relevant national, regional and local agency inspections and reports for best practice and recommendations. Implement revised MAPPA guidance when published. Provide performance information in relation to operational MAPPA. Implement learning from Serious Further Offence reviews, Serious Case reviews and from any other relevant agency reviews which involve MAPPA offenders. Prepare and publish Annual Report in line with national timetable. Increase awareness and raise profile of MAPPA within Responsible Authority and duty to co-operate agencies. Improve information sharing with duty to co-operate agencies. Improve staff and core group members’ knowledge about MAPPA risk assessment and management.

developing MAPPA arrangements, Improve public confidence and knowledge of MAPPA.

Editorial note
This year’s annual report is designed and presented very differently from reports produced in previous years. We have chosen a less formal newsletter style for a number of reasons. The results of a nation-wide survey of MAPPA annual reports undertaken by Greater Manchester Probation Area showed that the more traditional report format used in past years did not meet the needs of local areas as successfully as the newsletter format. The newsletter format attracted more interest for readers whilst not detracting from the level of information imparted. Consultation with our own MAPPA agencies and feedback from our own staff confirmed this view. We hope you like the changes, and positively welcome any suggestions that you may have for future improvements. Please contact in the first instance, the MAPPA administrator (see contact details below).

Contacts
Mappa Administrator North Yorkshire Police and Probation Public Protection Unit Force Headquarters Newby Wiske Hall Northallerton DL7 9HA Telephone: 0845 60 60 299

Useful websites
www.nyprobation.org.uk
North Yorkshire Probation Area

www.northyorkshire.police.uk
North Yorkshire Police

www.stopitnow.org.uk
Aims to stop child sexual abuse by encouraging abusers and potential abusers to seek help. They provide adults with the information they need to recognise worrying behaviour in themselves or others, and with the confidence to take responsible action when they suspect that something is wrong.

www.saferchildrenyork.org.uk
A statutory inter-agency forum for agreeing how different services co-operate to protect children in York. It seeks to ensure that the children of York are protected from all forms of abuse and neglect by ensuring that everybody working with children works effectively together.

www.safeguardingchildren.co.uk
A multi-agency group of senior managers from agencies, organisations and professional groups responsible for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children in North Yorkshire.

www.victimsupport.org.uk
Victim Support is the independent charity which helps people cope with the effects of crime. It provides free and confidential support and information to help individuals cope with their experiences.

www.homeoffice.gov.uk
The Home Office is the government department responsible for leading the national effort to protect the public from terrorism, crime and anti-social behaviour.

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