OFFENDING BEHAVIOUR PROGRAMMES: OPERATIONAL

PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT STRATEGY AND REVISED POST-PROGRAMME REPORT PURPOSE
To introduce the strategy for operational Programme Managers, and to launch the revised post-programme report template and guidance notes on conducting the review meeting.

Probation Circular
REFERENCE NO: 03/2004 ISSUE DATE: 7 January 2004 IMPLEMENTATION DATE: Immediate EXPIRY DATE: March 2008 TO: Chairs of Probation Boards Chief Officers of Probation Secretaries of Probation Boards CC: Regional What Works Managers Regional Managers Effective Practice Training Managers AUTHORISED BY: Meg Blumsom: Head of OBPT ATTACHED: Operational Programme Management Strategy The Revised Post-Programme Report and the Progress Review Meeting

ACTION
Chief Officers should: • Circulate the Operational Programme Management Strategy and ensure it is used to inform local arrangements. • Implement the revised post-programme report template and guidance notes on the review meeting. These should be in place by 31 March 2004.

SUMMARY
At the request of areas, a strategy setting out the role and responsibilities surrounding programme management has been developed. This aims to clarify the role of operational Programme Managers whilst seeking to retain flexibility in how this role is implemented locally. Also at the request of areas and through HMIP audit findings, the postprogramme report template has been reviewed and revised. Guidance notes on its completion are also provided, as is further guidance on how the progress review meeting should be conducted. Examples of completed post-programme reports using the revised templates will be issued in January via the RWWMs.

RELEVANT PREVIOUS PROBATION CIRCULARS
57/2002

CONTACT FOR ENQUIRIES
Sandra Fieldhouse, OBPT, Room 225, Horseferry House Email: sandra.fieldhouse@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

National Probation Directorate
Horseferry House, Dean Ryle Street, London, SW1P 2AW General Enquiries: 020 7217 0659 Fax: 020 7217 0660

Operational Programme Management Strategy and the Revised Post-Programme Report

OPERATIONAL PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT STRATEGY
Version 1.0 December 2003

Contents 1 Introduction

2

Defining the operational responsibilities

programme

management

3

Models of programme management

4

Operational programme management: training & support

5

Implementing and reviewing the strategy

Appendix
A An example of a Programme Manager job description

2

1

Introduction

There is well documented evidence that good programme design is vital in changing offending behaviour but alongside this is emerging evidence that well designed programmes delivered badly may make offenders worse. Effective programme management should provide the supporting conditions for a programme to succeed. Unlike in the Treatment Manager role, the tasks involved in effective programme management cut across a number of organisational levels. Indeed it is unlikely that one person can fulfil the full range of programme management responsibilities. Given this, it is normally inappropriate to expect one member of staff to monitor treatment integrity alongside managing the programme as a whole. This strategy aims to support programme management by: 1. Defining operational programme management responsibilities at three levels 2. Setting out the models of delivery developed to date 3. Setting out the required training for operational Programme Managers. 4. Building in a review process The strategy covers the range of accredited programmes in the core curriculum, focusing initially on the general offending programmes. Some of the more specialist programmes, for example sex offender treatment, may require additional training and procedures, which will be identified in each of the programme management manuals or as later additions to this strategy. Although this strategy applies specifically to accredited programmes, it is recognised that an integrated approach towards programme management across the What Works projects is needed. Other What Works units will be requested to map this strategy onto their approaches to programme management, after which this strategy can be further refined. This strategy aims to build on the National Management Manual by clarifying programme management responsibilities. It does not prescribe one model of implementation, as probation areas have unique needs in terms of organisational structure, size and operational approaches. The strategy aims to clarify the 'operational' programme management role. It is recognised that some areas have developed an 'overlapping' role of What Works Implementation Manager' that cuts across the three levels outlined. A working group comprising of NPD staff, RWWMs, Programme Managers and an EPTM was commissioned to develop the strategy on behalf of NPS. The working group undertook a national consultation process. Areas were given the opportunity to respond via a postal survey. In addition, members of the working group conducted interviews in 16 areas either by telephone or face to face. Staff interviewed included ACOs, Programme Managers, Effective Practice Managers and EPTMs. Comments were also received on drafts of the strategy from Regional Managers, RWWMs, Community Reintegration Unit in NPD, NPD Diversity Unit, the Offending Behaviour Programmes Board, HM Prison Offending Behaviour Programmes Unit and NPD HR department. The strategy recognises: • the shift away from the management of programmes as a specialist and separate task and towards their integration into the wider service delivery model; • the shift to programmes being one of many structured interventions to be delivered; • case management as being one of the major underpinning success factors for offender supervision. 3

The progress areas are making in developing their model of programme management was clear from the interviews and questionnaires. The importance of integrating programme management responsibilities into the management of the wider organisation is acknowledged throughout the strategy. The strategy accepts that the core skills of programme management are not dissimilar to the skills needed in effective project or service management and this is acknowledged in the training and development section.

2

Models of Programme Management

The consultation process gathered a wide range of programme management models operating across areas. This strategy does not aim to prescribe one model, as the needs, size and resource allocation in each area is different. The models of operational programme management identified through consultation fall into three types: Model A Geographical or integrated Programmes are managed in districts or clusters, with programme managers/TMs managing either a single programme or a range of programmes. Programmes are delivered alongside other interventions/case management. The Programme Manager usually line manages programme delivery staff. Model B Functional Programme delivery teams are separate to the delivery of other services. The operational Programme Manager(s)/TM(s) manage all programmes in that unit and line manage the programme staff. Model C Specialist Programmes are managed by type across an area but are delivered by programmes teams e.g. SOTPs across the area. The Programme Manager may or may not have line management responsibility. This model is often used in the implementation of new programmes. A common feature in the feedback was that areas began by using a specialist model but as the number of programmes increased and the need to integrate service delivery became apparent they are beginning to move to a more integrated or functional model. This moves programmes from being a specialist intervention delivered or understood by few to a core business activity delivered, or at least fully understood, by the majority. Strengths and weakness of the models An integrated approach brings with it: • greater ownership and knowledge of programmes as they are being delivered alongside and by those involved in other aspects of service delivery; • increased communication and information exchange; • direct links between case management, programmes and other interventions; • the ability to break down barriers and avoids an 'us and them' culture, as programme managers may also be managing the case managers However, weaknesses included: • tension between middle managers in addressing the range of priorities; • possible reduction in integrity or quality of delivery if tutors only spend a small proportion of their time delivering programmes; • resource allocation can neglect key quality aspects, for example treatment management With the specialist model the strengths include: • cohesive delivery team with high levels of expertise and knowledge;

4

dedicated resources including treatment management, tutor preparation and de-brief time

However, weaknesses include: • tutor burn-out; • lack of area-wide ownership; programmes feel imposed; isolation/detachment of programmes team from other aspects of delivery • gaps in resources if one or two staff members leave; • poor links between programmes, other interventions and case management In planning delivery areas should seek to maximise the strengths of the chosen model whilst minimising the weaknesses. The consultation process identified the necessity of improving the integration between programmes and the wider service delivery model if programmes are to become one of the core interventions.

3

Defining the Operational Programme Management Responsibilities

Starting from the description of Programme Manager responsibilities in the National Management Manual, the consultation process assisted in the identification of the key responsibilities for operational programme management However, the operational responsibilities cannot be viewed in isolation, as effective delivery of a programme requires a whole service commitment. Three levels of programme management are defined as: • • • Strategic management - this refers to the higher level service management and direction of interventions and includes a range of departments e.g. HR, Finance and IT Operational management - the day-to-day delivery and maintenance of programmes and includes involvement from a number of departments e.g. HR, Finance and IT Supporting management - work alongside other departments e.g. HR, Finance and IT

Whilst the majority of the day-to-day programme management tasks are of an operational nature it is impossible to ensure effective delivery without ownership by and the involvement of all levels of the service. The table below identifies the proposed level for each responsibility. Some naturally cross more than one level. The table indicates the level of the responsibility and not necessarily the individual holding it; for example, areas may have ‘operational’ managers involved in strategic tasks.

Resources
1. Ensure appropriate resource implement programmes effectively allocation to

Strategic

Operational

Support

2. Ensure adequate resources are available to deliver the programmes to the required standard 3. Identify gaps in resources and report to the strategic level 4. Facilitate the maintenance of a pool of trained staff to deliver the programme 5. Contribute to identifying resource gaps 6 Set and implement local targets to meet national targets 7 Manage budgets

a a a a a a a a a a a

5

Staff development and training
1. Ensure procedures exist for the recruitment and selection of programme staff 2. Workforce planning- ensure a pool of trained staff to deliver and manage each programme, including the maintenance of area/regional training capacity 3. Implement steps to improve staff performance 4. Implement procedures for capabilities of programmes staff 5. Ensure procedures for the development of programme staff assessing appraisal the and

Strategic

Operational

Support

a a a a a a a a a
Strategic Operational Support

6. Ensure systems are in place for an integrated appraisal structure 7. Implement appraisal procedures for programme staff: 8. Implement TM strategy

Delivery
1. Ensure an appropriate policy is in place to improve the accessibility of programmes to a diverse range of offenders 2. Ensure effective scheduling of programmes to achieve targets 3. Ensure enforcement procedures exist 4. Ensure a strategy for the timely access to programmes for all 5. Ensure rotas, etc exist to enable continuity of delivery 6. Implement steps to improve the continuity of delivery 7 Ensure timely and good quality administration of the psychometric tests 8. Manage attendance on the programme to ensure the no of absences and catch ups do not exceed that specified in the manuals 9. Ensure timely communication of info from programmes to case managers 10. Ensure offenders have timely access to programmes 11. Ensure availability of equipment for the day to day delivery 12. Contribute to the development and maintenance of rotas and contingency plans 13. Contribute to the timely communication of information relating to enforcement 14. Implement steps to improve performance 15. Identify steps to improve performance and ensure an appropriate implementation strategy 16 Identify difficulties with or changes to the management of programmes and process through Change Control 17 Champion and disseminate best practice

a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

a

a

Monitoring and Evaluation
1. Ensure the availability of systems and databases for lists of programme staff 2. Ensure systems are available in order to monitor and evaluate programmes (IAPS) 3. Ensure a strategy for communicating the monitoring and evaluation results to the area and beyond e.g. sentencers 4. Ensure teams have access to and make use of the monitoring and evaluation results 5. Contribute to the wider dissemination of monitoring and evaluation evidence 6. Contribute to the collation of monitoring and evaluation information 7. Contribute to the dissemination of such information 8. Contribute as appropriate to the maintenance of the monitoring and evaluation systems 9. Contribute to maintaining the referral and allocation system (IAPS) 10. Contribute information for the database holding the names of TM & tutors and their status

Strategic

Operational

Support

a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

The list of responsibilities set out above is not intended to be exhaustive or overprescriptive. Although a responsibility may be held at one level, this does not prevent it from being carried out by a person at another level. An example of an operational Programme Manager job description is attached at Appendix A. The operational programme management role is recognised as a middle manager’s role. Key features of effective programme management There needs to be excellent communication and information exchange between the three levels of programme management. The strategic role is a vital one and communication between the lead ACO and programme manager(s) is essential to successful implementation and delivery. At a strategic level there is a need to ensure sufficient resources are allocated at a time of competing demands on budgets. Although resource allocation tends to be at the strategic level, a 'whole area' approach to detailed planning is required, e.g. to ensure tutor continuity and maintain a pool of tutors. This will need good quality and timely information from operational managers. There also needs to be close links with supporting functions in the organisation (e.g. HR department) in terms of workforce planning, recruitment and retention. Programme management must involve good quality communication about the interventions and their delivery. This includes communications to sentencers as well as internal communications to other staff, for example, PSR writers and Case Managers. Although much of this work falls to the operational programme manager, is it not solely their duty. All managers have the responsibility for ensuring effective case management as a whole and on a case by case basis. Systems, processes and practice need to support the integration of interventions into supervision as a whole. Effective interventions are only possible when delivery staff, managers and support staff work together in a coherent and consistent fashion. The links between programme management and case management are critical and must 7

not be overlooked or minimised. Programmes are just one form of intervention and it is the case management model that ensures effective sequencing, readiness, appropriate referral, assessment of risk and work targeting the associated factors. The operational Programme Manager should ensure that the area diversity policy and strategy is implemented and maintained. They must ensure that services meet the needs of a diverse range of offenders and that these needs are communicated throughout the organisation and appropriate strategic direction taken. Information relating to the appropriateness of services can be gained from a number of sources including offender perception data or other forms of offender feedback. Offender perception questionnaires can provide immediate information which Programme Managers can communicate to enable targeted corrective action on readiness, obstacles to attendance and delivery issues. Psychometric test data is crucial in measuring the effectiveness of programmes and ensuring appropriate treatment targets are being met. Although the responsibilities for ensuring timely administration - and quality data collection and inputting – are not those of the programme manager alone, s/he has a responsibility to promote the importance of the tests throughout the organisation, and to ensure resources are in place to implement and maintain the administration and data inputting into IAPS. The Programme Manager or a delegated representative should take proactive steps to quality assure the data collection, such as randomly sampling completed forms with the aim of ensuring all questions have been completed. Continuing gaps in data suggest that action needs to be taken to ensure offenders have time to complete the tests and to give them appropriate support and clear instructions.

4

Required training and support for operational Programme Managers

The consultation process highlighted the fact that many of the skills and competencies required by an operational Programme Manager are similar to those of a generic middle manager. Required knowledge was also felt to be similar with the exception of the theoretical basis of the programmes and a detailed understanding of the content. Occupational Standards for Operational Programme Management The Core Standards for programme management can be found in the Programme Manager Core Competencies. However, wider use of other Occupational Standards is advised in the development of competence based job descriptions for staff undertaking this role The Management Standards have five core elements and these clearly map across to the role of programme manager. For example: Unit A4 – Contribute to improvements at work. This has a direct link to the responsibilities list e.g. Delivery responsibility 4 (above) “Ensure strategy for the timely access to programmes for all”. It might then, in conjunction with other similar tasks appear in a competence based job description as “Contribute to Area policy and strategy” Unit B1 – Support the efficient use of resources. This links to the Resources responsibilities 3, 5 & 7 (above) and could be translated into a job description as “Maintain managerial oversight of accredited programmes and ensure that they are delivered within budget” Particular skills and competencies relevant to the role of operational programme management include: • Scheduling, timetabling and capacity planning • Project management skills including resource management • Presentational and motivational skills

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Using monitoring and evaluation systems and management information

Particular knowledge required for the operational programme management role includes: • What Works and effective practice • Knowledge of research findings • Required skills of tutors and treatment managers • Knowledge of the theory and content of programmes Specific Training and Knowledge Required for Programme Management Programme managers should have a clear vision of the wider What Works Strategy and how the area plans to implement this over the next few years. This should include knowledge about the case management model and the role of programmes within it. 1 Awareness of the programmes being managed Although completion of the initial tutor training may be desirable and beneficial, it may not always be achievable in practice and is therefore not mandatory. Whilst all middle managers require sufficient knowledge about programmes on offer in their area, the operational Programme Manager must have the following detailed knowledge about each programme they manage: • The number of sessions and the delivery structure • The type and delivery structure for pre and post programme work • Management requirements for example frequency of supervision • Previous audit or quality assurance findings and the action plan for improvements • Targeting and sequencing • Diversity strategy, policy and requirements for each programme • Research findings 2 Awareness of Quality Assurance Whilst the TM quality assures the actual delivery of the programme materials, the operational PM needs to ensure the quality of the supporting environment e.g. appropriate referrals. Therefore training in the quality assurance framework and the role they play within this is required. 3 Sharing issues and good practice Operational Programme Managers should have a forum in which to share practice and explore good practice examples. These should be developed on the same lines as the Treatment Managers support days. The events should aim to explore new information or research findings, identify examples of good practice and identify solutions to obstacles. Although specific training and knowledge are identified for the role of operational programme management, the progression route is not different from that of a generic middle manager. Areas must ensure that the specific training and knowledge is available to those taking on the role. 5 Implementing and Reviewing the Strategy A review of this strategy should be undertaken alongside the planned review of the Treatment Manager Strategy.

9

Appendix A Example of a Programme Manager Job Description
POST TITLE: PROGRAMME MANAGER

Ensure the effective delivery of accredited programmes for the PURPOSE OF JOB: Area, ensuring programmes are delivered in line with the National Management Manual for the Effective Delivery of Accredited Programmes in the Community, the National Audit Performance Standards and the Area Plan. RESPONSIBLE TO: Assistant Chief Officer

PRINCIPAL RESPONSIBILITIES: Ensure that all practical arrangements are in place to support the effective delivery of accredited programmes. (PM1, A2, A4) Ensure that accredited programmes are appropriate and accessible to a diverse range of offenders (PM1, A1, A4, F103) Maintain managerial oversight of the accredited programmes and ensure that they are delivered in line with the relevant programme delivery standards and criteria and within budget. (PM1, A2, A4, B1) Line manage and develop programmes teams i.e. appropriate Treatment Managers, Tutors at PO and PSO grades and Clerical Staff. (PM1, C4, C5, C10, C13, C15) Provide regular supervision to appropriate staff at agreed intervals (no less than quarterly) and assess individual performance and competence of staff in role in line with annual appraisal procedures. (PM1, C10, C13, C15) To review, evaluate and report on all aspects of the delivery of accredited programmes to ensure a high quality service. (PM1) Contribute to the development of quality assurance and audit systems relating to accredited programmes. (PM1) Participate in the delivery of accredited programme assessment centres and to the recruitment of other staff as required. (PM1, C8) Ensure that staff, sentencers and offenders have access to relevant information on accredited programmes. (PM1, D4) Analyse and disseminate information with regard to the achievement of Area objectives and at the level of local and individual achievement (D4) Contribute to the development of Area policies and strategy, particularly in relation to current role and responsibilities (A4, D4) Develop and maintain collaborative working relationships with colleagues throughout the Area, regionally and nationally. (PM1, C5) Represent the Area in meetings or other forums that are related to accredited programmes. (PM1) Attend and contribute to regular supervision sessions with the relevant Assistant Chief Officer. (C2, D2)

10

Ensure the continuous development of your own knowledge and skills. (C2) Attend service management meetings and other meetings as may be specified for particular purposes (D2, D3) Work with other co-located managers to give consistent, coherent and co-ordinated leadership and to ensure a safe and conducive working environment (C4, C5) Promote the Area policies on equal opportunities and anti-discriminatory practice. (F103) Ensure constructive contribution to health, safety and security of all staff and service users in the working environment (E203) This job description is a guide to the principal responsibilities of the role and is not intended to be an exhaustive list of duties. It will be reviewed in the light of changes to the role and the work of the National Probation Service CORE COMPETENCES: Programme Manager PROGRAMME MANAGER OCCUPATIONAL STANDARDS PM1 Manage the local implementation of externally validated evidence-based programmes to address offending behaviour PM1.1 Develop a local schedule of externally validated evidence based programmes to address offending behaviour PM1.2 Monitor and adjust local implementation of the schedule of externally validated evidence-based programmes to address offending behaviour PM1.3 Monitor the effectiveness of the Agency’s systems that support implementation of the externally validated evidence-based programmes to address offending behaviour PM1.4 Review and improve the local implementation of externally validated evidencebased programmes to address offending behaviour PROBATION SERVICE MANAGEMENT STANDARDS A1 A1.1 A1.2 A1.3 A2 A2.1 A2.2 A2.3 A4 A4.1 A4.2 B1 B1.1 B1.2 B2 B2.1 B2.2 Maintain activities to meet requirements Maintain work activities to meet requirements Maintain healthy, safe and productive working conditions Make recommendations for improvements to work activities Manage activities to meet requirements Implement plans to meet customer requirements Maintain a healthy, safe and productive work environment Ensure products and services meet quality requirements Contribute to improvements at work Improve work activities Recommend improvements to organisational plans Support the efficient use of resources Make recommendations for the use of resources Contribute to the control of resources Manage the use of physical resources Plan the use of physical resources Obtain physical resources 11

B2.3 B2.4 B3 B3.1 B3.2 C2 C2.1 C2.2 C4 C4.1 C4.2 C4.3 C5 C5.1 C5.2 C5.3 C8 C8.1 C8.2 C10 C10.1 C10.2 C10.3 C10.4 C10.5 C10.6 C13 C13.1 C13.2 C13.3 C13.4 C15 C15.1 C15.2 D2 D2.1 D2.2 D4 D4.1 D4.2 D4.3 D4.4

Ensure availability of supplies Monitor the use of physical resources Manage the use of financial resources Make recommendations for expenditure Control expenditure against budgets Develop your own resources Develop yourself to improve your performance Manage your own time and resources to meet your objectives Create effective working relationships Gain the trust and support of colleagues and team members Gain the trust and support of your manager Minimise conflict in your team Develop productive working relationships Develop the trust and support of colleagues and team members Develop the trust and support of your manager Minimise interpersonal conflict Select personnel for activities Identify personnel requirements Select required personnel Develop teams and individuals to enhance performance Identify the development needs of individuals Plan the development of teams and individuals Develop teams to improve performance Support individual learning and development Assess the development of teams and individuals Improve the development of teams and individuals Manage the performance of teams and individuals Allocate work to teams and individuals Agree objectives and work plans with teams and individuals Assess performance of teams and individuals Provide feedback to teams and individuals on their performance Respond to poor performance in your team Help team members who have problems affecting their performance Contribute to implementing disciplinary and grievance procedures Facilitate meetings Lead Meetings Make contributions to meetings Provide information to support decision-making Obtain information for decision-making Record and store information Analyse information to support decision-making Advise and inform others 12

COMMUNITY JUSTICE STANDARDS E203 Contribute to the prevention and management of abusive and aggressive behaviour

E203.1 Contribute to preventing abusive and aggressive behaviour E203.2 Deal with incidents of abusive and aggressive behaviour E203.3 Contribute to reviewing incidents of abusive and aggressive behaviour F103 Develop, maintain and evaluate systems and structures to promote the rights, responsibilities and diversity of people F103.1 Develop, maintain and evaluate systems and structures to promote the rights and responsibilities of people F103.2 Develop, maintain and evaluate systems and structures to promote the quality and diversity of people F103.3 Develop, maintain and evaluate systems and structures to promote the confidentiality of information

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POST-PROGRAMME REPORT AND PROGRESS REVIEW MEETING

December 2003

Contents:

Chapter 1

Introduction

Chapter 2

The purpose of the post-programme report

Chapter 3

The pro-forma and good practice guidelines for report writing

Chapter 4

Good practice guidelines for conducting a review meeting

Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D Appendix E Appendix F Appendix G Appendix H Appendix I Appendix J Appendix K

ART pro-forma ASRO pro-forma CALM pro-forma Cognitive Skills Booster pro-forma DID pro-forma ETS pro-forma IDAP pro-forma One-to-One pro-forma R&R pro-forma Think First pro-forma Women’s Offending Behaviour Programme pro-forma

2

Chapter 1

Introduction

Preparation of a post-programme report is required by the accreditation criteria and has been a focus within programme audits. However, not all programmes have been supported by a centrally designed or approved proforma. Even where one had been introduced with the roll-out of the programme, areas expressed dissatisfaction with the structure and content. This has led to local adaptations, resulting in a wide variation in both quality and content. This is supported by findings from programme audits In addition to the above, there appears to be lack of clarity about the purpose of the post-programme report and a lack of consistency in how the review meetings are conducted. In order to review the post-programme report and the review meeting, a working group was established with the aim of: • • • • • Agreeing the purpose, structure and content of the pro-forma Identifying the links with other processes and ensuring consistency Agreeing the purpose of the review meeting Developing guidance on the completion of the pro-forma Developing guidance on conducting a review meeting

The working group contained NPD staff, Regional What Works Managers, area staff including a treatment manager, a programme tutor and a case manager, and a Prison Service national resettlement manager. The good practice guidelines and pro-forma contained in this paper relate to all OBPs with the exception of SOTPs. The pro-forma is largely in line with the structure and content of the Prison Service pro-forma and should therefore promote communication. Chapter 2 The purpose of the post-programme report

The post-programme report is an account of an offender’s progress against the treatment targets of the programme, and identifies the offender’s strengths and remaining weaknesses. It enables the tutor to present a structured report of progress against each target, using evidence demonstrated during and outside of the sessions. It should provide evidence for the level of understanding of each skill area, progress made during practice time and evidence of the individual's application of newly acquired skills. The post-programme report cannot make a full assessment of risk: this is the duty of the case manager, using OASys and other risk/needs assessment tools. The report feeds into this process by providing evidence of deficits prior to the programme, skills developed during the programme and an account of progress made. It must also identify remaining areas of skill deficit that could contribute to an increase in the risk of reoffending. It should do this by indicating the likely scenarios for relapse and by proposing what steps could be taken to overcome these. The report must link to the OASys planning and review process and structure. The case manager must use the report in establishing future objectives. Tutors should aim to evidence progress during the programme by looking to a number of sources: • • • • • • Offender participation during sessions Offender feedback on sessions and the whole programme Course work, assignments, practice work Self report or report from others e.g. hostel staff, community punishment staff, significant others Descriptions of managing real life situations Baseline assessments from IAPS/OASys/PSR 3

Chapter 3

The pro-forma and good practice guidelines for report writing

The report is prepared by at least one of the tutors and is countersigned by the treatment manager to ensure quality and consistency. The report template should as a minimum include: • • • • • • A short summary of the specific treatment targets for that programme Space to summarise overall level of participation and engagement (using IAPS and tutor notes for this information) Each skill area or treatment target should be listed and a short report on each, summarising evidence of the starting point for that individual and evidence of the end point, thereby indicating the level of progress made There must be a section to suggest areas for further work identified by the tutors. This section must incorporate likely scenarios for relapse and ways of reducing the risk of harm presented by the offender to others or self Where applicable, the relevant post-programme sessions must be identifiable Offender’s comments on the report and the identified areas for further work

Pro-formas are attached at appendices A to K.

Guidelines for completion
The report should be completed within 2 weeks of the end of a programme, countersigned by the treatment manager and sent electronically to the case manager. The case manager should receive it in time to read it before the progress review meeting, which should be held within 3 weeks of the end of the programme. Basic details on the front of the report will be entered automatically by IAPS when version 3.4 is available and in use by areas. Section 1 Course summary

A course summary is presented on the front of the report: this may be helpful in reminding the case manager about the aims of the programme, and will be useful to any case manager, personal officer, resettlement manager or PSR writer who sees the report at a later stage. Section 2 Overview

This provides an overview of the level of attendance, participation and engagement. IAPS collects data on attendance and a score for sessions in relation to participation and engagement. A mean score for the latter two will be entered automatically by IAPS version 3.4: in the meantime, the tutor should enter this. However, the mean score is not enough. Tutors should keep notes about each individual offender’s level of participation and engagement for each session. At the end of the programme this provides a reminder of strengths or weaknesses in relation to these two aspects. The tutors can enter text into this section to summarise. The summary should aim to identify issues relating to engagement and participation that can support the suggestions for further work. For example, an offender may have demonstrated reduced engagement in work on victims: this may, alongside other evidence, indicate a need to undertake further work due to a higher level of denial.

4

It is important to reward the offender for managing to complete the programme. It may be useful in this section to note the numbers who started and the numbers completing: this can serve to remind the offender of the commitment and dedication s/he has shown and can motivate the offender. Noting the number of catch-up sessions is also encouraged, as a low number may also act as recognition of the offender’s commitment. Section 3 Progress made

This section sets out each of the targets for the programme and requires the tutor to consider each one in relation to three aspects: • • • How far the offender understood the content of the programme and how far they were able to see its importance How well the offender practised each skill Evidence of the offender using this skill in day-to-day life

Understanding the content and recognising its importance is the first step in changing. Without this, the offender is unlikely to either want to practise the skill or apply it in day-to-day life. Evidence for this can be taken from involvement in each session, from what they are saying and doing and from homework/assignments. Tutors should not feel they have to rely solely on their observations during sessions but can use external sources, e.g. hostel staff, mentors/volunteers etc. It is as important to record high levels of understanding and recognition of importance as it is to record lower levels. Again, remember this is a progress report and not simply a report on remaining gaps. Practising a skill is the only way to improve your competence in it. A focus on this in the report is therefore important. Records of sessions should include individuals’ performance in practice time, not only in role-plays but also in other exercises such as moral dilemmas, scenarios etc. Again, remember to include the positive indicators. Cognitive skills training does not stop at the end of the session; the true indicator of progress is that the offender begins to apply new skills in their day-to-day life. Tutors can gather such evidence by asking the offender for examples, by reviewing homework/assignments or from outside sources. Section 4 Risk

The previous pro-forma did not focus on risk. Section 4 is the opportunity to do this. It provides space to identify remaining areas for improvement and also identify how these might contribute to situations in which a return to 'old' thinking and behaving is likely. Section 5 Suggestions for further work

Although it is the case manager’s responsibility to review the supervision plan and establish further objectives, the tutors should suggest areas for further work. The precise nature of the work is deliberately not specified at this stage, as the review meeting aims to identify this. The case manager uses this information to shape the supervision plan review. The report does not aim to produce SMART objectives, as this is the purpose of the review meeting and of the case manager's review of the supervision plan. NB: in the case of ETS, R&R, Think First and One-to-One, reference should be made to suitability for future Cognitive Skills Booster attendance. This should normally take the form of confirmation that the offender would benefit from completing the Booster. Exceptions to this would be where offenders have achieved so little that they have nothing to build on by attending the Booster; where their skills are so well developed that they are felt to have nothing to gain by attending; and where there are significant reservations about an offender’s suitability for attendance on groupwork programmes in the future. 5

Section 6

Participant’s comments

Involvement and ownership by the offender is important. The offender will only take the suggestions in the report seriously if s/he owns them and feels they are relevant. The report must be shared with the offender in advance of the meeting so that s/he can enter comments. Consideration should be given to how best to present the report to the offender. Where literacy is an issue the case manager and tutors should provide the offender with additional support and avoid simply giving him/her the report to read without an offer of help. Note: Report Pro-formas (Appendices A-K) When printing or distributing them, please check that the layout of the pro-formas has survived. If necessary, cut and paste each of them into a new document. Chapter 4 Good practice guidelines for conducting a review meeting

The post-programme report makes an important contribution to continuity in supervision. It provides evidence on which further supervision can be based. The progress review meeting (previously referred to as the review meeting, the handover meeting, the three-way meeting or the course summary meeting) takes this process a stage further by establishing specifically how progress made during a programme will be taken forward during the remainder of the offender’s order or licence. It is good practice to combine the progress review meeting with a review of the OASys supervision plan, where timing allows. In particular, this will enable objectives set previously (in section 5.1 of the initial supervision plan or section 7.1 of subsequent reviews) to be reviewed in section 6.2 of the review before setting fresh objectives in section 7.1 of the review. A tutor (i.e. one who tutored on the programme that the offender attended), the offender and the case manager should be present at the progress review meeting. It is good practice for the treatment manager to attend if circumstances allow. Other staff involved in the offender’s supervision should attend if available. Attendance at the progress review meeting by a significant other (e.g. a partner or a mentor) is often valuable. Experience shows that offenders are normally able to participate well in the meeting, even when up to ten or so people are present. The case manager (or a representative) should chair the meeting, and should use the information from the programme - together with other relevant information about the offender - to set supervision objectives related to the programme’s treatment targets within the context of ongoing supervision. Issues of risk will always be discussed at the meeting, but only if it is combined with a review of the supervision plan will the full range of such issues necessarily be discussed. To ensure that the meeting is motivational for the offender, it should aim to focus on the progress made as well as on remaining deficits.

Purpose of the progress review meeting

When to hold the meeting

The meeting should be held within three weeks of the end of the programme. It is good practice to schedule in these meetings at the same time as scheduling the programme sessions: this helps the offender to see the review as an important part of the programme and the case manager and tutor have ample prior warning about the date and time. Arrangements for meetings should be confirmed at the end of the programme, taking care to fit in with offenders’ individual circumstances.

Holding a progress review meeting

The meeting should adopt the following structure:

6

1. Introductions: everyone to say who they are and why they are present. Explain that a written record of the meeting will be kept and given to those attending. 2. Purpose of meeting: • Review what the offender has learned • Identify where the offender needs to make further progress • Agree objectives for building on learning from the programme, and for putting it into practice, during the remainder of the order or licence and beyond 3. Invite offender to summarise their view of the programme (good way to get them involved as a major player in the meeting). Follow-up questions can include: • What do you think you gained from the programme? • What parts were most useful? How might you use them in the future? • What parts were most difficult? 4. Post-programme report: check everyone is familiar with the report. Simply reading out the report should be avoided. Ask the offender if they agree that the report is a fair account of how they performed on the programme. Give time for the offender’s views, and acknowledge any inaccuracies or misunderstandings, but do not spend too much time dealing with differences of opinion: these will often be of minor significance in the context of the whole report. Invite the tutor to comment on the report: this can be an opportunity to stress any key messages that they would want the offender to hear. The case manager can also make their own comments, drawing (where possible) on their broader knowledge of the case. 5. Objectives: the suggestions for further work in the report should be the starting-point for these, though other objectives may arise in the meeting. They need to be expressed as SMART objectives. The aim here is to produce objectives arising out of the programme, for incorporation into the supervision plan when it is reviewed. Objectives should be agreed with the offender, and may relate to: • The further development and practice of skills taught on the programme • Application of skills in high-risk situations in order to avoid further offending; application of skills to the achievement of pro-social goals • Assessments for further programmes or interventions Wherever possible, objectives should have an obvious connection to previous objectives in the supervision plan. In the case of ETS, R&R, Think First and One-to-One, reference should be made to suitability for future Cognitive Skills Booster attendance (see Chapter 3, Section 5 above). 6. Close meeting: explain what will happen next, e.g. further appointments, arrangements to implement objectives. If certificates of completion are awarded in your area to offenders who complete programmes, this is a good time to give the certificate to the offender. 7. When completing the supervision plan review in OASys, objectives agreed at the progress review meeting must be included in the supervision plan (the OASys documentation refers to these as ‘course review objectives’ – see section P7.1 in the Supervision and Sentence Planning section of OASys). Where the progress review meeting and supervision plan review are combined, this will be easily done (see Purpose of the progress review meeting above). Where the supervision plan review takes place some time after the progress review meeting, care must be taken to include the objectives as previously agreed.

7

National Probation Directorate – ART Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix A

National Probation Service Aggression Replacement Training Accredited Programme Post-programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

Aggression Replacement Training (ART) contains 18 group-based sessions. There are also five individual sessions before and after the group sessions, delivered by case managers. This report deals with the group sessions only. ART is based on the assumption that violent offending has multiple causes: violent offenders tend to lack personal, interpersonal and cognitive skills. Specifically, they tend to be impulsive, to be over-reliant on aggressive means for achieving goals, to have poor self-control, and to have poorly developed moral reasoning. The programme consists of three interrelated components. They are: Skillstreaming - this involves the acquisition of constructive skills to replace destructive strategies. Constructive social actions are presented in terms of step-by-step instructions in managing key social situations. The teaching method involves modelling, role-play, feedback, and techniques to help offenders transfer the learning to real-life situations. Anger control training – offenders learn to understand what causes them to feel angry and act aggressively, and then learn techniques to reduce their anger and aggression. Moral reasoning training – this is used to increase the likelihood that offenders will choose to apply the skills learned in the other two components. It aims to enhance offenders’ moral reasoning skills through exercises in considering moral dilemmas and in the development of social perspective taking. The programme is designed to address the following targets: Pro-violence attitudes and beliefs – attitudes supportive of criminal behaviour generally; hostile and suspicious attitudes to others. Social perspective taking – ability to consider others’ views; an appreciation of why this is important. Interpersonal skills – ability to handle social situations. Anger control – impulsive, loses temper easily, poor conflict resolution skills, poor emotional control. These targets are closely equivalent to items in the OASys assessment; progress in addressing them will be reflected when OASys is updated.

National Probation Directorate – ART Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix A

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
A)

Progress made

Pro-violence attitudes and beliefs
Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Social perspective taking:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – ART Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix A

Interpersonal skills:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Anger control:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

National Probation Directorate – ART Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix A

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – ASRO Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix B

National Probation Service ASRO Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors Section 1 Programme Summary

The ASRO programme consists of 20 two-and-a-half-hour sessions run for groups of 4-12 participants. The programme aims to reduce crime by targeting substance abuse as an important factor in offending. MODULE 1: Motivating Participants to Change (Sessions 1-4). This module is devoted to enhancing motivation to change and is conducted in a motivational style, enabling participants to express and resolve ambivalence. The relationship between substance use and crime is explored and participants are asked to set goals for change. MODULE 2: The Personal Scientist (Sessions 5-10). The second module is based on the ‘personal scientist’ model of behavioural self-control. This is the process of teaching people to monitor their thoughts about using, set goals for change, identify possible consequences of drug use, make changes to behaviour and generate incentives for maintaining change. The overall aim of this module is to reduce the risk of re-offending by participants making and maintaining positive progress regarding their substance use. MODULE 3: Relapse Prevention (Sessions 11-16). In this module participants are taught to identify high-risk situations. They are then taught coping skills. This is achieved by using a 5-stage model: Orientation; Problem definition and goal setting; Generation of alternatives; Decision making and action; and Evaluation. Participants are encouraged to look at managing moods such as boredom, depression, anger and coping with conflicts. Relaxation training and interpersonal skills are taught to assist with this. MODULE 4: Lifestyle Modification (Sessions 17-20). This module facilitates the development of a non-drug and non-crime lifestyle. This is done by identifying what needs are being met by an anti-social lifestyle, selecting substitute activities which will satisfy those needs, and encouraging commitment to a new lifestyle by reviewing the decision to change, enhancing social support and abandoning the criminal identity. As a result of the programme participants who complete are expected to: • Have enhanced motivation to cease drug use and reduce their use or maintain their abstinence • Have attained self-control skills in relation to their drug use • Be able to use skills for relapse prevention • Think about changing their lifestyles

National Probation Directorate – ASRO Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix B

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments: (Include any details of parallel sessions)

Section 3
Substance use/addiction:
A)

Progress made

Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of using the skill outside of the session

Impulsiveness/hyperactivity/inattention:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of using the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – ASRO Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix B

Association with delinquent peers:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of using the skill outside of the session

Outcome Expectancies for substance use:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of using the skill outside of the session

Criminal lifestyle:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of using the skill outside of the session

Anti-social rationalisations:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of using the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – ASRO Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix B

ASRO Programme (integral) test results:
STAGES OF CHANGE Pre-course preference on the Stages of Change Questionnaire: Precontemplation Contemplation Action Maintenance

End of Module 1 preference on the Stages of Change Questionnaire: Precontemplation Contemplation Action Maintenance Post-course preference on the Stages of Change Questionnaire: Precontemplation Contemplation Action Maintenance

What these scores indicate for this participant: (The sub-scale for which the individual’s score is highest is interpreted as an indicator of where they might be in the cycle, at the time of measurement. There is no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answer, rather the measure is designed to help reflect on where they are in their own life and in regard to changing their substance use)

LOCUS OF CONTROL OF BEHAVIOUR Pre-Course score: End of Module 2 Score: Post-course Score: What these scores indicate for this participant: This is a single scale with a possible maximum of 85. A high score indicates externality – the individual perceives external factors affect their behaviour and control their life. A low score indicates they perceive themselves to have a high degree of control over their behaviour and life

BARRATT IMPULSIVITY SCALE Pre-course score: Post-course score: What do these scores indicate for this participant: This is a 30-item scale which indicates an individual’s ability to think issues through and plan ahead before acting. Higher scores indicate greater levels of impulsiveness.

SOCIAL PROBLEM SOLVING INVENTORY Pre-course scores: Positive Attitude __; Negative Attitude __; Rational Approach __; Impulsive/careless __; Avoids problem-solving __ Module end scores: Positive Attitude __; Negative Attitude __; Rational Approach __; Impulsive/careless __; Avoids problem-solving __ Post-course scores: Positive Attitude __; Negative Attitude __; Rational Approach __; Impulsive/careless __; Avoids problem-solving __ What do these scores indicate for this participant: (include progress and behaviour in this module particularly ‘Stop & Think’)

National Probation Directorate – ASRO Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix B

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

N.B. This report should be read with the understanding that whilst the ultimate goal of ASRO is the complete cessation of substance misuse, participants might lapse, or might continue to experience cravings. The programme accepts this, and equips participants with the skills to analyse why it happened (how they were feeling, what triggers were), and to cope better in future.

National Probation Directorate – ASRO Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix B

ASRO GUIDANCE NOTES FOR POST-PROGRAMME REPORT
The following table identifies how the areas to be addressed within the programme link to the particular modules and activities: TREATMENT GOAL Substance use/addiction Impulsiveness, hyperactivity, inattention Association with delinquent peers Outcome expectancies for substance use Criminal lifestyle Antisocial rationalisations MODULE ASRO in general Relapse prevention Lifestyle modification Motivation to change Relapse prevention Lifestyle modification Relapse prevention Social problem solving Changing social networks Decision-making Managing moods Changing self-image Social problem solving SESSION

This should assist in completing the relevant section of the report. Similarly, below is a list of questions that should be covered within the report, broken down into the particular programme modules where the issues would be addressed. These areas are not exhaustive and other comments might also be relevant to the participant’s progress. Module 1: Motivating Participants to Change • How well did the participant know what to expect in ASRO? • How well did they weigh up the pros and cons of substance use (with particular reference to crime)? • How well did the participant set goals for change? • How committed were they to completing ASRO? Module 2: Personal Scientist • What is the participant’s level of awareness of what self-control involves? • Which harm reduction methods were they able to identify? • How able were they to monitor their cravings for substances? • How well was the participant able to analyse triggers for and consequences of their substance use? • How able were they to identify and practise ways of altering triggers to substance use? • How able were they to identify and use alternative ways of getting the rewards of substance use? Module 3: Relapse Prevention • How well did the participant demonstrate understanding that a lapse is a signal for action to prevent relapse? • What high-risk situations for relapse did they identify? And how well was this done? • What was the participant’s level of understanding of how to cope with cravings? • How well did they demonstrate social problem-solving skills? • How well were they able to manage moods? • What level of understanding have they shown to counter positive outcome expectancies for substance use? • How well do they understand how to cope with conflict? Module 4: Lifestyle Change • What level of understanding of the need for lifestyle changes have they demonstrated? • What plans are there, and progress made, to withdraw from substance users? • Similarly concerning the take up of new activities? • What level of understanding does the participant have about the importance of employment and where to go for help? • How committed are they to fostering new pro-social friendships? • What level of understanding of healthy living has the participant demonstrated? • Similarly the importance of intimate relationships? • Does the participant know how to access help in the local community?

National Probation Directorate – CALM Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix C

National Probation Service CALM (Controlling Anger and Learning to Manage it) Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

CALM is a 24-session group programme. It is based on the premise that anger, while a natural emotion, becomes problematic when its frequency, duration and intensity are excessive and lead to aggressive behaviour. Based on social learning theory and using cognitive behavioural techniques, the programme addresses the following criminogenic needs: Anger/emotional control – impulsive, loses temper easily, poor emotional control, poor conflict resolution skills. Perspective taking – does not understand others’ views, misinterprets social situations, holds rigid dogmatic views. Social problem solving – lacks interpersonal skills, uses inappropriate strategies, unaware of consequences. Pro-violence/pro-offending attitudes and beliefs – holds attitudes supportive of criminal behaviour generally; has hostile and suspicious attitudes to others; lacks recognition of link between offending and own attitudes, emotions, beliefs and needs. During the programme, offenders learn to recognise the factors that trigger their anger and aggression; they learn to challenge the thinking that creates, sustains and escalates emotional arousal; they learn skills to reduce their levels of emotional arousal; they learn skills to resolve conflict; they learn to manage other negative emotions related to offending; and they plan how to deal with relapse. After two introductory sessions which aim to enhance motivation, the programme deals in turn with managing arousal (four sessions), thinking patterns (four sessions), assertiveness and communication (five sessions), other emotions (four sessions), and relapse prevention (five sessions).

National Probation Directorate – CALM Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix C

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
Managing arousal:
A)

Progress made

Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Thinking patterns:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – CALM Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix C

Assertiveness and communication:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Other emotions:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Relapse prevention:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – CALM Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix C

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – Cognitive Skills Booster Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix D

National Probation Service Cognitive Skills Booster Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

The Cognitive Skills Booster programme is suitable for offenders who have completed Enhanced Thinking Skills, Reasoning and Rehabilitation, Think First, or One-to-One (subject to suitability for groupwork). It enables offenders to apply the skills learned on these programmes to everyday life, especially to the difficult and problematic situations they encounter which in the past may have resulted in offending. The programme consists of up to 12 two-hour sessions run for groups of 8-10 participants. It targets the same range of cognitive deficits as the above programmes, but with a specific emphasis on problem solving and social skills and their use in dealing with current problems. Course participants have an opportunity to review all the areas and learning points from their original programme; however, much of the programme is devoted to active practising of the skills in which offenders are specifically challenged to apply the skills in complex, real life situations. The cognitive deficits that are addressed are as follows: 1. Interpersonal problem solving: using a logical approach to problem solving that exercises problem recognition, ability to generate alternatives, consequential thinking, means-ends reasoning, decision making and planning skills; this aims to reduce errors in information processing and optimise the use of pro-social solutions to problems. It includes step-by-step development and practice of various social skills which enable the participant to implement solutions, relate positively with other people and solve problems effectively. 2. Cognitive style: development of flexible thinking skills designed to reduce rigidity and improve ability to think in the abstract using exercises requiring creative treatment of ideas and lateral thinking. 3. Self-control: reducing impulsivity in thought and behaviour by encouraging a reflective thinking style, awareness of factors that affect thinking, consideration of consequences, use of long term planning skills and practical application of self-control strategies. 4. Social perspective taking: enhancing awareness, understanding and consideration of different points of view and reactions to reduce egocentricity. 5. Moral reasoning: practice and development of moral reasoning by exploring values and considering issues of fairness, equity and concern for others and their welfare; challenging inconsistencies between expressed values and behaviour. 6. Critical reasoning: encouraging self-critical and reflective thinking, recognising and challenging irrational beliefs, understanding how thinking is affected by emotions, past experience and other factors and how awareness of this can be addressed to improve thinking.

National Probation Directorate – Cognitive Skills Booster Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix D

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
A)

Progress made

Interpersonal problem solving:
Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Social skills:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – Cognitive Skills Booster Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix D

Cognitive style:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Self control:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Social perspective taking:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Moral reasoning: ability to develop and explain reasons for different value-laden decisions
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – Cognitive Skills Booster Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix D

Critical Reasoning: comprehension and use of skills involved in reflective and self-critical thinking
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Application of skills in challenges: comprehension and use of skills, ability to use combination of skills to resolve complex problems, appreciation of applicability of skills to real life
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

National Probation Directorate – Cognitive Skills Booster Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix D

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – Drink Impaired Drivers Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix E

National Probation Service Drink Impaired Drivers Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name PNC no. Date Course completed or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

The Drink Impaired Drivers programme consists of 14 group-based sessions. The programme combines cognitivebehavioural and educational approaches and is based upon the idea that offenders’ lack of knowledge about alcohol and safe driving, poor problem-solving skills and thinking deficits result in drink-drive offences. By adopting such an approach, thinking and problem-solving skills are improved and knowledge about alcohol and safe driving is increased. The programme focuses on individuals’ specific offences, how they will cope with disqualification and planning for the future. It addresses six key treatment targets - each associated with offending - through a number of carefully constructed exercises. The treatment targets which the programme addresses are: 1 Effective Planning: the model proposes that a drink-drive offence will occur due to a lack of planning, exacerbated by a number of factors influencing the offender who may fail to think through the consequences of a situation and to plan adequately in advance. It is not suggested that there may be no planning, but that plans to avoid drink-driving are not effective. The programme aims to develop effective planning skills to address this deficit. Knowledge of Alcohol: the literature on drink-driving offenders in general suggests that they lack an awareness of the effects of alcohol and the length of time alcohol remains in the system, as well as knowledge about the link between drinking and driving behaviour, including driving safely, legal alcohol limits and safe (healthy) drinking. This lack of knowledge hinders their ability to make informed choices about the consequences of their behaviour, not only within the context of the law, but also in terms of how it will affect their general driving ability. The programme aims to increase their knowledge of the effects of alcohol and its effects on driving. Attitudes to Drink-Driving: drink-drive offenders often hold anti-social attitudes about drink-driving which may lead them to offend. The programme aims to promote pro-social attitudes in relation to drink-driving which challenge previously held justifications and rationalisations. Ability to Generate Alternatives: This is linked to poor forward planning and consideration of consequences. These are considered to be types of problem-solving deficits. The drink-drive offender may not even consider an alternative to drink-driving. The programme develops the skill of generating alternatives and provides an opportunity for offenders to practise the new skills acquired. Emotional Recognition and Control: drink-drivers may lack the ability to recognise and control their emotions. This is linked to poor decision-making, particularly in circumstances when offenders are in an

2

3

4

5

National Probation Directorate – Drink Impaired Drivers Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix E

emotionally charged state: they fail to recognise this and the effect it has on their decision-making. The programme teaches offenders how to recognise their emotions and how to control them. 6 Decision-Making Skills: this target addresses decisions regarding ceasing drinking, controlling drinking, and decision-making linked to the treatment target of effective planning.

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
Effective Planning:
A)

Progress made

Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Knowledge of Alcohol:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – Drink Impaired Drivers Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix E

Attitudes to Drink-Driving:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Ability to Generate Alternatives:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Emotional Recognition and Control:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – Drink Impaired Drivers Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix E

Decision-Making Skills:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – ETS Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix F

National Probation Service Enhanced Thinking Skills Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

The ETS programme consists of 20 group-based sessions. The programme is based on the idea that the ability to achieve pro-social goals is improved by addressing deficiencies in thinking skills. The programme does not focus on individuals’ specific offences but aims to target six cognitive deficits associated with offending through a number of carefully constructed exercises. The programme addresses the following aspects of thinking skills: 1. Interpersonal Problem Solving: using a logical approach to problem solving that includes problem recognition, the ability to think of alternatives, consequential thinking, means-ends reasoning, decision making and planning skills. This aims to reduce mistakes in thinking and optimise the use of pro-social solution to problems. It includes step by step development and practice of various social skills that enable the participant to implement solutions, relate positively with other people and solve problems effectively. 2. Cognitive Style: development of flexible thinking skills designed to reduce rigidity and improve ability to think in the abstract, using exercises requiring the creative treatment of ideas and lateral thinking. 3. Self–control: reducing impulsivity in thought and behaviour by encouraging a reflective thinking style, awareness of factors that affect thinking, consideration of consequences, use of long term planning skills and practical application of self-control strategies. 4. Social Perspective Taking: enhancing awareness, understanding and consideration of different points of view and reactions to reduce egocentricity. 5. Moral Reasoning: practice and development of moral reasoning by exploring values and considering issues of fairness, equity and concern for others and their welfare. 6. Critical Reasoning: encouraging self-critical and reflective thinking, recognising and challenging irrational beliefs, understanding how thinking is affected by emotions, past experience and other factors and how awareness of this can be addressed to improve thinking.

National Probation Directorate – ETS Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix F

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
A)

Progress made

Interpersonal problem solving:
Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Social skills:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – ETS Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix F

Cognitive style:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Self control:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Social perspective taking:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Moral reasoning: ability to develop and explain reasons for different value-laden decisions
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – ETS Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix F

Critical reasoning: comprehension and use of skills involved in reflective and self-critical thinking
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – IDAP Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix G

National Probation Service Accredited Integrated Domestic Abuse Programme Mid-way review/Post-Programme Report (delete as appropriate)
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed Or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary Men undertake a group work programme that normally lasts for between six and eight months. There are 27 sessions, usually delivered weekly. These are divided into 9 modules of three sessions per module. The modules address the following themes: • Non-violence • Non-threatening Behaviour • Respect • Support and Trust • Accountability and Honesty • Sexual Respect • Partnership • Responsible Parenting • Negotiation and Fairness Each module follows a three-session process, which includes: • Defining the theme and identifying beliefs and intents • Examining individual abusive behaviour and identifying and challenging beliefs and behaviour • Exploring and practising non-abusive and non-controlling behaviour (teaching skills and reinforcing attitude change) Methods used on the group work programme include showing short videos of actors portraying incidents of domestic violence. The offenders discuss the range of abusive attitudes and behaviours displayed and compare these to similar instances of their own behaviour. They are helped to see that their behaviour is intentional and carried out with the aim of reinforcing their perceived entitlement to power and control. They are asked to think about the effect that their behaviour has had on the women and on others, especially children. They are then required to think about alternative ways to behave and are taught non-controlling behaviours. Offenders work to an agreed action plan for changing their behaviour. If they do not comply with the programme, they are promptly taken back to court. This programme is delivered within the context of an infrastructure designed to promote the safety of women who are known victims and their children.

National Probation Directorate – IDAP Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix G

The treatment targets addressed are: 1. Distorted thinking - cognitive behavioural techniques are used to teach participants to analyse and

critically evaluate their thinking and to change the premises, assumptions and attitudes that underlie abusesupportive patterns. Cognitive restructuring is addressed through critical thinking discussions and through creating cognitive dissonance and empathy by means of the victim vignettes. 2. Emotional mismanagement - IDAP targets emotional awareness, the appraisals that lead to participants’ arousal, and coping/emotional management skills. Participants learn how to monitor their feelings and recognise the cues signalling when they are losing their temper or when they are particularly likely to respond violently (e.g. when they are drunk, hung over, tired, sick, stressed). They then learn to recognise how their beliefs and self talk contribute to this process and how to apply control techniques such as positive self-talk and cognitive reframing. Throughout this process they learn to control their behaviour by controlling their arousal level. The same techniques are used to monitor and manage other strong emotions related to relationship violence such as jealousy and anxiety. 3. Skills deficits - participants address deficits in a range of skills (cognitive, coping, non-controlling behaviours) required to deal with strong emotions and conflict and to forge healthier non-violent relationship patterns. Critical thinking skills are taught to help participants explore, evaluate and challenge their attitudes and beliefs. Social skills of assertive behaviour, negotiation and conflict resolution, communicating thoughts and feelings are taught to participants throughout the programme. 4. Problems with self-regulation - includes the teaching of techniques and skills to enable participants to stop and think before acting and to anticipate stressful events, then develop a plan for addressing them. IDAP helps participants to identify those factors that have contributed to their abusive behaviour patterns. Participants are encouraged to identify, and utilise, their internal resources (the critical thinking and coping skills they have developed during the programme), as well as identified external resources (network of support) that they can draw on when confronted with risky situations. 5. Lack of motivation to change - participants are encouraged in the development of a positive attitude about the benefits of change and a sense of optimism about the possibility of change. They are assisted to address change through personal action plans giving specific steps towards change, which are realistic and achievable. 6. Risk factors not directly targeted by the programme - awareness of the role of substance misuse,

rather than the treatment of it, is an aim of IDAP. Participants who are assessed as having substance abuse as a factor in their offending are encouraged to think about the validity of their explanations of offending that blame substance misuse for their abusive behaviour. Participants are encouraged to think critically about how substance abuse has featured in high risk situations for them, which may include an exploration of why they have decided to engage in substance misuse in a given situation. At the end of his last groupwork session (after his fourth or ninth module) the facilitators should give the offender three worksheets to complete: Understanding Violence as a means of control Strategies for Non-controlling behaviour Identifying and handling Risk situations

National Probation Directorate – IDAP Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix G

These appear in the Case Manager Manual (Appendix 16) and Amendments to National Management Manual (Appendix 4C). The offender should bring these for discussion at the Review, together with his Action Plan. At the review the worksheets and Action Plan should be amended, if appropriate, following discussion. Areas for further work will be clear. Progress and remaining work should be highlighted and listed in the form of objectives that the case manager can incorporate easily in the review of the supervision plan.

National Probation Directorate – IDAP Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix G

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
Distorted thinking:
A)

Progress made

Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Emotional mismanagement
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – IDAP Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix G

Skills deficits
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Problems in self regulation
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Lack of motivation to change:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Awareness of the role of substance misuse
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – IDAP Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix G

Section 4 Areas for further improvement (from “Action Potential risky situations (from worksheet “Identifying and Handling Risk Situations”) Plan”)

Section 5 Suggestions for further work, including any modules that should be repeated. (These will be discussed at the programme review meeting; the resulting objectives are to be copied to the document entitled “Objectives to be incorporated in the review of the supervision plan” (see Case Manager Manual, Appendix 16).)
Programme related Offending related

National Probation Directorate – IDAP Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix G

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – One-to-One Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix H

National Probation Service One-to-One Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed Or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

The programme is designed to work as a problem-solving intervention that addresses the individual’s offending behaviour. Pre-test measures are integrated into the assessment sessions of the programme, both for use in the body of the programme and to be repeated as post-tests in the last session. Besides problem-solving, self-management, social skills (social interaction), values education and attitude change (perspective taking), and coping skills are all taught in later sessions.

The programme is structured into three stages: Assessment - four sessions (1–4) plus a Review and Goal Setting session (5); Skill training – Six sessions (6–11) plus a Review and Goal Setting session (12); Applications – Seven sessions (13–19) plus a final session devoted to post-tests (20).
The cognitive deficits addressed are: 1. Problem Solving: using a logical approach to problem solving that includes problem recognition, the ability to think of alternatives, consequential thinking, means-ends reasoning, decision making and planning skills, this aims to reduce mistakes in thinking and optimise the use of pro-social solutions to problems. It includes step-by-step development and practice of various social skills that enable the participant to implement solutions, relate positively with other people and solve problems effectively. Self Management: reducing impulsivity in thought and behaviour by encouraging a reflective thinking style, awareness of factors that affect thinking, consideration of consequences, use of long term planning skills and practical application of self-control strategies.

2.

National Probation Directorate – One-to-One Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix H

3.

Social interaction: social skills problems, e.g. resisting peer pressure, are addressed through coaching, modelling and rehearsal to improve performance. Guided, purposeful discussion about relevant issues and problems is one of the main activities of this programme. Perspective Taking: enhancing awareness, understanding, and consideration of different points of view and reactions to reduce egocentricity. Values and moral reasoning are closely related to empathy - the ability to put oneself in the shoes of others and to understand how they might perceive and react to specific situations. Coping Skills: participants are taught to cope with their problems more successfully through the development of coping plans using positive self talk, stress management, relaxation techniques and accessing other resources etc.

4.

5.

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
Problem Solving:
A)

Progress made

Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – One-to-One Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix H

Self Management:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Social Interaction:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Perspective Taking:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Coping Skills:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – One-to-One Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix H

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – R&R Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix I

National Probation Service Reasoning and Rehabilitation Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed Or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

The R & R programme consists of 38 group-based sessions. The programme is based on the idea that the ability to achieve pro-social goals is improved by addressing deficiencies in thinking skills. The programme does not focus on individuals’ specific offences but aims to target six cognitive deficits associated with offending through a number of carefully constructed exercises. The programme addresses the following aspects of thinking skills: 1. Interpersonal Problem Solving: using a logical approach to problem solving that includes problem recognition, the ability to think of alternatives, consequential thinking, means-ends reasoning, decision making and planning skills, this aims to reduce mistakes in thinking and optimise the use of pro-social solutions to problems. It includes step by step development and practice of various social skills that enable the participant to implement solutions, relate positively with other people and solve problems effectively. 2. Cognitive Style: development of flexible thinking skills designed to reduce rigidity and improve an ability to think in the abstract, using exercises that require creative treatment of ideas and lateral thinking. 3. Self–control: reducing impulsivity in thought and behaviour by encouraging a reflective thinking style, awareness of factors that affect thinking, consideration of consequences, use of long term planning skills and practical application of self-control strategies. 4. Social Perspective Taking: enhancing awareness, understanding and consideration of different points of view and reactions to reduce egocentricity. 5. Moral Reasoning: practice and development of moral reasoning by exploring values and considering issues of fairness, equity and concern for others and their welfare. 6. Critical Reasoning: encouraging self-critical and reflective thinking, recognising and challenging irrational beliefs, understanding how thinking is affected by emotions, past experience and other factors and how awareness of this can be addressed to improve thinking.

National Probation Directorate – R&R Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix I

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
A)

Progress made

Interpersonal problem solving
Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Social skills:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – R&R Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix I

Cognitive style
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Self control
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Social perspective taking
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Moral reasoning
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – R&R Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix I

Critical reasoning:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – Think First Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix J

National Probation Service Think First Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

The Think First programme consists of 22 group-based sessions. The programme is based on the premise that the ability to acquire, develop and apply a series of problem-solving and associated skills will enable offenders to manage difficulties in their lives and to avoid future re-offending. The programme focuses upon factors influencing offence behaviour such as problem-solving, self-management, social interaction, values and the individuals’ specific offences. The areas addressed are as follows: 1. Problem Solving: using a range of cognitive training exercises, this is designed to teach a number of thinking skills. The skills include problem awareness, problem definition, information gathering, distinguishing facts from opinions, alternative-solution thinking, formulating means-ends steps, consequential thinking, selection and decision-making on courses of action and perspective-taking. 2. Self-management: this focuses upon cognitive self-instructions in the management of behaviour. The aim is to improve individuals’ control over aspects of their feelings and behaviour which are causing difficulties for themselves and others. Problem-solving training is used as a basis for introducing offenders to the possibility of enhancing skills of self-management, especially where ineffective self-management is an obstacle to solving other problems. 3. Social Interaction Training: the programme is designed to teach participants how to deal with interpersonal encounters in an effective and socially acceptable way and to illustrate the role of problem-solving in social interaction difficulties which they have experienced. 4. Values education: some offences are a product of specific beliefs or attitudes which are conducive to certain forms of anti-social behaviour. Some individuals may also hold more deeply embedded views or thinking patterns which reflect a disregard for the needs of others. These issues can be approached through moral reasoning training aimed at a broad spectrum of thinking patterns, or specific attitude change methods which have been used in relation to several types of offences.

National Probation Directorate – Think First Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix J

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
Problem Solving:

Progress made

A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Self Management:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – Think First Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix J

Social Interaction Training:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Values Education:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

National Probation Directorate – Think First Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix J

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature

National Probation Directorate – Women’s Offending Behaviour Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix K

National Probation Service Women’s Offending Behaviour Accredited Programme Post-Programme Report
Offender’s Name

PNC no. Date Course completed or course identifier Probation area & venue

Tutors
Section 1 Programme Summary

The Women’s Offending Behaviour Programme is a 31-session groupwork programme, focusing on building a set of “protective” factors in women’s lives in order to counteract the impact of any future anti-social influences by: • • • Encouraging personal responsibility and enhancing motivation (self-determination) for change; Expanding pro-social connections and helping women develop healthier personal relationships; Focusing on personal skills enhancement, development and maintenance in the key areas of: • • • • • • Communication and assertiveness Relaxation skills and stress management Identifying, expressing and managing emotions Addressing negative self-talk Problem-solving skills and decision-making skills Coping with financial strain and stresses of daily living

It is highly motivational. Phase one focuses on moving from pre-contemplation to contemplation in the phases of change Phase two focuses on progressing women through the phases of change through contemplation towards action Phase three focuses on action taking and preparing for maintenance

National Probation Directorate – Women’s Offending Behaviour Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix K

Post-programme: • • The Case Manager works with the woman to build on her personal action plan - developed during the programme - to support maintenance, resist lapse, and set objectives for the ongoing supervision plan. Where appropriate, the woman will be allocated a mentor to support her in accessing resources to aid achievement of targets.

Section 2

Attendance and participation
Total number of programme sessions Number of catch up sessions attended Average score for level of understanding

Number of sessions attended Number of catch up sessions offered Average score for Level of engagement Comments:

Section 3
A)

Progress made

Encouraging personal responsibility and enhancing motivation to change ( self-determination):
Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Developing pro-social connections and healthier personal relationships:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

National Probation Directorate – Women’s Offending Behaviour Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix K

Communication and assertiveness:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Relaxation skills and stress management:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Identifying, expressing and managing emotions:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Addressing negative self-talk:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

National Probation Directorate – Women’s Offending Behaviour Post-Programme Report November 03 C) Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Appendix K

Problem-solving and decision-making:
A) Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B)

Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Coping with financial strain and stresses of daily living:
A) ….Comprehension of learning points and recognition of their value

B) ….Performance in skill practice

C)

Evidence of use of the skill outside of the session

Section 4 Areas for further improvement

Potential risky situations

National Probation Directorate – Women’s Offending Behaviour Post-Programme Report November 03

Appendix K

Section 5
Programme related

Suggestions for further work
Offending related

Section 6

Participant’s comments
Totally Partly Not at all

How far do you agree with the report and its comments (please circle)

What further work do you think you need to undertake in order to avoid future offending?

Participant’s signature

Date

Case Manager Name Treatment Manager Name Signature Signature