INFORMATION, ADVICE AND GUIDANCE (IAG) ARRANGEMENTS

PURPOSE
Guidance for probation areas about the new arrangements for the provision of Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) services for offenders in the community on employment, training and education opportunities.

Probation Circular
REFERENCE NO: 29/2004 ISSUE DATE: 26 May 2004 IMPLEMENTATION DATE: 1 August 2004 EXPIRY DATE: 1 August 2009 TO: Chairs of Probation Boards Chief Officers of Probation Secretaries of Probation Boards CC: Board Treasurers Regional Managers AUTHORISED BY: Martin Copsey Head of Community Reintegration ATTACHED: The National Policy Framework and Action Plan Coherent Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) Services for Adults

ACTION
For probation area senior management teams to ensure they influence local Learning and Skills Council IAG strategies and to review funding arrangements for IAG services if purchased in-house or though partnership arrangements.

SUMMARY
Local Learning and Skills Councils are changing the arrangements for the provision of Information, Advice and Guidance services. From the 1st August 2004 the services will be targeted at those people who have not achieved a Level 2 qualification. Local LSCs are expected to produce a strategic plan having consulted with stakeholders including Probation Areas. Wales is not included in the new arrangements, where responsibility for IAG sits with Careers Wales.

RELEVANT PREVIOUS PROBATION CIRCULARS
None

CONTACT FOR ENQUIRIES
Len Cheston Community Reintegration Unit Tel: 020 7217 8448 E-mail: len.cheston@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

National Probation Directorate
Horseferry House, Dean Ryle Street, London, SW1P 2AW General Enquiries: 020 7217 0659 Fax: 020 7217 0660

Enforcement, rehabilitation and public protection

1. 1.1.

Introduction This circular is to inform areas about the new arrangements for Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) services funded by local Learning and Skills Councils in England that will be implemented from 1 August 2004. IAG services have a pivotal role to play in the development of the Government’s Skills Strategy. IAG services should promote the benefits of learning, help individuals recognise their barriers to learning, and support them in making realistic and well informed learning and career choices. What are the changes? The Local LSCs will put in place a local Strategic Board for IAG that will produce a 3-year vision and strategy for the local delivery of IAG services. Local Probation Areas are included in the list of key strategic partners. Core IAG services will provide free access to information to all adults aged 20 and over. There is no upper age limit. Priority target groups for the provision of face to face advice services will be determined at a local and national level to meet LSC strategic objectives in line with government skills strategy and policies. The initial focus will be on supporting adults without a Level 2 qualification and providing support for adults yet to achieve Level 3 skills in areas of sectoral or regional skill priority. Resources should be allocated to enable a comprehensive service to be offered to all individuals below Level 2 and not be targeted at those just below Level 2. All LSC funded IAG providers will need to achieve accreditation against the matrix Standard quality framework. LSC funded learning providers will be encouraged to achieve accreditation against matrix by March 2005. The matrix Standard is a national quality standard for organisations delivering IAG services for learning and work. It is maintained and promoted by the Employment NTO. Its purpose is to identify the essential features of successful delivery of any information advice and guidance service, regardless of context or sector and to provide key indicators by which organisations can measure their current activities. It will, therefore, help organisations “raise their game” where necessary and help them to keep high standards as well as continuously improve their service Implications for the National Probation Service Areas need to ensure that they contribute to the strategic vision and local delivery plan for IAG services in their areas. The prioritisation of people without Level 2 qualifications should mean that the services provided will be beneficial to offenders supervised by the National Probation Service. Areas need to ensure that the local delivery plans take into account the specific problems that offenders face, in particular ensuring that offence disclosure issues are dealt with by IAG providers. There is a further risk that the attrition rates of offenders attending interventions do not assist other partner agencies to meet performance targets. Areas are asked to work in partnership with IAG providers to develop effective joint arrangements to support offenders, to assist the achievement of providers performance targets. Some areas, already involved in the provision of IAG services, will need to review their provision in the light of these changes. National work on IAG for offenders The DfES, Offenders’ Learning and Skills Unit (OLSU), have been asked by ministers to develop a coherent IAG service for all offenders both in prison and the community by autumn 2004. The NPD is a member of the steering group looking at the overlap between IAG services and Prison/Probation work. Areas were recently asked to respond to a questionnaire on the local provision of IAG services. 2

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PC29/2004 - Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) Arrangements

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The project should report in June 2004, with implications for areas explored in autumn 2004. Wales The arrangements outlined above are only applicable in England.

6. 6.1.

Key documents The following publications are attached to this circular: • • Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults -The National Policy Framework and Action Plan Coherent Information, Advice and Guidance Services for Adults

PC29/2004 - Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) Arrangements

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Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults
The National Policy Framework and Action Plan

A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

FOREWORD BY IVAN LEWIS

Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) services have a pivotal role to play in delivering the Skills Strategy. They promote the benefits of learning, help individuals to address and overcome the barriers to learning, and support them in making realistic and well informed choices. IAG will play a key part in Government policy to offer individuals an entitlement to learning to secure a first full level 2 qualification. It is a key feature of the Employer Training Pilots, which we are continuing to develop. The National Employment Panel review on aligning skills training and labour market support activities, is identifying IAG as an important area for joint working between the Learning and Skills Council and Jobcentre Plus. We are committed to high standards of delivery in all public services. We believe that users of IAG services are entitled to a high standard of delivery wherever and however they access IAG services. The Government wants all providers of publicly funded IAG services to adults to demonstrate their commitment to high standards of delivery, by achieving accreditation against the matrix Standard. It is vital to our future prosperity that everyone should have access to information which is up-to-date, easy to understand and which addresses the wide range of questions and concerns people have about engaging in learning and skills development. Some people will need advice to help them overcome their barriers to learning. The Government cannot achieve this alone. Some adults get careers advice through their employers. There are many private career consultancy firms providing guidance commercially, and we welcome the work of the private sector to make available IAG services for those people who can afford to pay for them. The Government’s efforts and investment of public funds should focus on those who need the most help, and who are least able to pay for it. We believe that IAG services are central to achieving our goal of supporting people to achieve the qualifications necessary for basic employability, and for progression to further learning.

Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults

This document contains a National Policy Framework for IAG services, which defines at a national level the information and advice services which adults should be entitled to expect and the standards to which those services should be delivered. We have also included an Action Plan which sets out how we will deliver consistent, high quality and accessible IAG services for adults. Our task does not end there. By 2010 we want IAG to be an integral and valued part of adult learning. That will require an ongoing programme of reform to raise quality and effectiveness. We will be working with key stakeholders such as the LSC and UfI/learndirect to make this a reality. I am grateful to all those who have worked so hard to raise the profile and standard of IAG services over the last few years, and who have contributed to shaping the future of IAG services for adults.

Ivan Lewis Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Skills and Vocational Education

A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

CONTENTS

Introduction Part 1 National Policy Framework Access to Core IAG Services Information Core Information Services Advice Core Advice Services

1 3 5 6 6 8 8

Annex 1

Principles of Coherent IAG Service Delivery

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Part 2

Action Plan What is the reform of IAG for adults? How will we deliver the reform of IAG for adults? How will we communicate the reform to service users, practitioners and co-ordinators? When will the reform take place? How will we evaluate the impact of the reform of IAG for adults? What will be the key elements of the reform?

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Annex 2

Delivery Milestones

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A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

INTRODUCTION
1. The Government’s Skills Strategy 21st Century Skills – Realising Our Potential commits the DfES, working with the LSC and Ufi/learndirect, to define the range and quality of IAG services which adults should be entitled to expect. There is clear evidence that access to IAG increases the likelihood that individuals will enter learning, and that they will achieve a qualification from their study. That is why we are introducing, through this document, a statement of the quality and range of service that should be available in all areas for adults aged 20 and over to access comprehensive and up-to-date information about learning and work available free of charge. For adults without a level 2 qualification, we are also introducing a new priority to provide free, high quality advice which will support the introduction of the Level 2 Learning Entitlement. These are the core IAG services which will be available as a minimum throughout England. The LSC will consider whether to offer additional, or enhanced IAG services beyond the core IAG services. Regional Skills Partnerships will also review whether their region is getting the IAG services it needs. Regional Skills Partnerships bring together a number of key partners and stakeholders including Regional Development Agencies, Small Business Service, local Learning and Skills Councils, Jobcentre Plus and the Sector Skills Development Agency. Their role is to link the assessment of economic strategy and the skills, business support and labour market services needed to raise productivity. While the minimum entitlement to core IAG services will be the same nationally, there can and should be regional variation beyond that to meet regional priorities. The National Policy Framework and Action Plan are aimed at stakeholders, partner organisations and individuals with an interest in the delivery of IAG services for adults. Part 1 – the National Policy Framework, sets out a core information and advice service (subsequently referred to as the core IAG services) which should be available to all adults aged 20 and over. It sets out a clear and consistent level and standard of services which should be available in all areas. Part 2 – the Action Plan, sets out the actions to achieve the Government’s programme of reform for IAG. The table at Annex 2 summarises the key delivery milestones. The Learning and Skills Council (LSC) is responsible nationally for securing IAG services for adults outside Higher Education. That covers both the services provided by colleges and training providers as “embedded” parts of their service to students, and also the separate IAG partnerships in each area. The LSC will deliver the core IAG services through an integrated IAG service. The integrated IAG service will provide users with a clear point of access to IAG. It will bring together the work of the learndirect national advice service

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Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults

with the work of the local IAG partnerships. It will provide a range of high quality information and advice services available to all, but with a clear priority to focus on engaging and progressing in learning those people without a full level 2 qualification. The LSC will draw on good practice from the Employer Training Pilots in developing links between the integrated IAG service and employers. As part of the Employer Training Pilots, which are being extended from 12 to 18 LSC areas, the integrated IAG service will have a key role in raising employer and employee awareness of IAG and in supporting delivery of IAG in the workplace. 5. The LSC will co-ordinate IAG services embedded within colleges and other learning provision, with other forms of IAG such as those delivered by local IAG Partnerships. The co-ordination of these services is an essential part of securing a good local service, and the LSC will use its contracting, planning and funding powers to secure that co-ordination. The aim is to ensure seamless IAG support for the individual from pre-entry into learning through to completion and progression into further learning. The LSC will chair local strategic partnerships to ensure a more strategic approach to the planning and funding of adult IAG services. The local strategic partnerships will draw on the findings of Strategic Area Reviews, and will include representatives from Connexions and Jobcentre Plus. This National Policy Framework also takes account of the emerging findings of the review by the National Employment Panel on how to secure better alignment between skills training and labour market support activities. One of the areas for improvement identified in that review is co-ordination between Jobcentre Plus and the integrated IAG service, so that benefit claimants who need information and advice are referred effectively to the services that can help them. The review is considering the scope to improve collaboration between LSC and Jobcentre Plus in securing that effective joint support for benefit claimants.

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A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

PART 1 - NATIONAL POLICY FRAMEWORK
7. Members of the Reform of IAG Project Board, which includes representatives from DfES, DWP, Jobcentre Plus, UfI and LSC, have reached agreement that the policy set out in this framework:

meets the Skills Strategy White Paper commitment; and provides a satisfactory range of core IAG services which service users have a right to expect.

8.

The proposals have been developed following extensive consultation with the guidance sector and with IAG practitioners. In defining the core IAG service in a meaningful way for practitioners and the public, the following considerations have been taken into account: Principles The core IAG services have been developed on the Principles of Coherent IAG Service Delivery adopted by the National IAG Board which were endorsed at the IAG road-shows earlier this year (attached at Annex 1). In addition to these, providers have a responsibility to collect and act upon customer feedback, ensure that service users are aware of feedback mechanisms, and that any feedback they give will be welcomed and acted upon in seeking to improve services. Providers must also ensure effective application of data protection regulations. Access The core IAG services will provide access to information and advice for all adults aged 20 and over, with no upper age limit. Delivery Infrastructure There is currently a lack of consistency in the range of IAG services being delivered, depending on the geographical area. The core IAG services will build on existing good practice. However, we recognise that significant development work will be needed in some areas to bring them up to the required level. We recognise a need for differences in the balance between supported face-to-face and self-help services within the core IAG services available in some areas. For example, in rural or isolated areas there is likely to be more of a reliance on self-help and/or helpline information and therefore a greater need to develop users’ ability to access self-help.
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Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults

Quality The service user is entitled to expect that the IAG services they access will be quality assured through the matrix Standard and/or other appropriate quality frameworks. Government wants all DfES and LSC funded IAG providers accredited against the matrix Standard. IAG providers funded by the DfES or the LSC IAG Programme Fund are required to achieve accreditation by March 2004. We will actively encourage all other learning providers funded by the LSC to achieve accreditation against matrix by March 2005. The LSC Performance Review process should guarantee a consistent and high level of service to users. We will also work with the Adult Learning Inspectorate to review the quality of services as they are delivered to service users, as a basis for identifying and encouraging good practice. Competence of Staff As part of the “no wrong door” policy all frontline staff should be competent to identify the service users’ needs and to refer them to alternative practitioners or provision when necessary. Staff delivering the core IAG services must be competent to do so, in line with the matrix Standard. Capacity Findings from a recent capacity and competence review of IAG provision indicate that IAG Partnerships have achieved good coverage overall. However, there are concerns about levels of delivery to certain priority groups, particularly people with disabilities and refugee/asylum seekers and in some rural areas. Some Partnership providers also feel they have additional capacity to deliver but that this may be dependent on resources and availability of competent staff. We do not feel that the introduction of the core IAG services will require significant additional resource as the services included are already being delivered in the majority of areas. However, where there are concerns these will need to be addressed by the LSC to ensure they meet the minimum requirement.

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A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

Access to Core IAG Services
10. Service users should be entitled to access the core IAG services through a combination of:

24 hour access to website to submit email requests; 24 hour access to answer-phone service to leave a request; freephone access to the integrated IAG service through a National Entry Point, available 8am – 10pm 7 days a week; centres for information available a minimum 5 days a week; appointments for advice available outside normal working hours wherever possible e.g. to meet the needs of shift workers; and outreach provision.

11. We also propose the following minimum response times to user requests:

24 hour response to requests for information. The response could take the form of a text message, phone call, email or face-to-face; where clients require signposting to alternative or further sources of IAG, this should be done within 24 hours of the original enquiry; if information has to be sought elsewhere the user should be advised of this within 3 working days; and appointments for advice should be available within 5 working days of the date of receipt of the original request.

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Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults

Information
12. “Information”, within the context of the IAG programme, means the provision of information on learning and work, without any discussion about the relative merits of the options through:

printed materials such as leaflets; audio-visual materials such as videos; computer software on CD-ROM or via the internet; and verbal information to the client on a face-to-face basis or through local or national help-line services such as learndirect and Worktrain.

Core Information Services
13. The core information services should consist of: A. Information about access to opportunities. This should include information on:

learning and work opportunities, including opportunities in Further Education, Higher Education, Adult and Community Learning, learndirect, other local learning providers; work placements; national and local job vacancies; voluntary opportunities; opportunities in self employment; learner incentives and entitlements (including the new Level 2 Entitlement proposed in the Skills Strategy and the new Adult Learner Grant, as they are rolled out nationally), including sources of financial support; local and regional work taster, work shadow and work experience possibilities; where to find local vacancy information including through Worktrain and Jobcentre Plus; self access database information (for example Occupations, Worktrain, learndirect) on jobs, training, qualifications; qualifications and equivalence in UK of qualifications gained overseas; and disability and employment issues – including where to get further support.

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A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

B.

Supporting information on:

national and local labour market information and intelligence. This should be in a format which is accessible to the user and provides the most up-to-date and accurate information on the labour market at national, regional and local level including local employer information and trends; and career, occupational, sector profiles.

C.

Enabling information on:

how to apply for a job (letters, internet, cold calling, phone calls), including filling in applications, CV completion, interview techniques and typical sector specific interview questions; aptitude profiles; and learning and career planning or management tools.

D.

Signposting information on:

what is and what is not available from the local LSC funded skills and training programmes; the Children’s Information Service, Surestart and how to access them; local, regional and national transport availability; benefits issues; how to access free services for learning and work including learndirect and, where appropriate, Jobcentre Plus; the Disability Discrimination Act and other relevant legislation; and availability of specialist support for clients around learning support, basic skills, disability.

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Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults

Advice
14. The provision of advice requires more interaction with the service user, usually on a one-to-one basis. It may require explanation of some of the information provided, how to access and use information, and a recognition of when more in-depth services may be required by the user.

Core Advice Services
15. Core advice services should include the following, as appropriate for the individual:

interpreting any information and taking into account personal circumstances; an individualised service tailored to users’ needs; personalised information including possible referral to in-depth services; helping users to use decision making tools; helping service users to link their personal interests and/or skills to their desired job/career requirements; identifying basic skills needs and referring those clients to sources of help in gaining basic skills in literacy, language and numeracy; meaningful interpretation of Labour Market Information and Intelligence; advice on the financial and other support available to adult learners, such as Level 2 Entitlement and the Adult Learning Grant as they are introduced nationally; basic advice around services available during redundancy including how to access them, whom to contact, and where to go; advice on job search methods (CV, interview skills, applications for support or referral to enhanced services); considering possible progression paths, personalising options; knowing what is and is not available and/or possible and discussing alternatives.

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A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

ANNEX 1
THE NATIONAL IAG BOARD
Information, advice and guidance services should promote the value of learning and be accessible to people, to provide them with the help they need to enter and progress in learning and work.

Principles of Coherent IAG Service Delivery
Accessible and Visible – IAG services should be recognised and trusted by clients, have convenient entry points from which clients may be signposted or referred to the services they need, and be open at times and in places which suit clients’ needs; Professional and Knowledgeable – IAG frontline staff should have the skills and knowledge to identify quickly and effectively the client’s needs. They should have the skills and knowledge either to address the client’s needs or to signpost or to refer them to suitable alternative provision; Effective Connections – Links between IAG services should be clear from the client’s perspective. Where necessary, clients should be supported in their transition between services; Availability, Quality and Delivery – IAG Services should be targeted at the needs of clients, and be informed by social and economic priorities at local, regional and national levels; Diversity – The range of IAG services should reflect the diversity of clients’ needs; Impartial – IAG services should support clients to make informed decisions about learning and work based on the client’s needs and circumstances; Responsive – IAG services should reflect clients’ present and future needs; Friendly and Welcoming – IAG services should encourage clients to engage successfully with the service; Enabling – IAG services should encourage and support clients to become lifelong learners by enabling them to access and use information to plan their careers, supporting clients to explore the implications for both learning and work in their future career plans; Awareness – Adults should be aware of the IAG services that are relevant to them, and have well informed expectations of those services.
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Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults

PART 2 - ACTION PLAN
What is the “reform of IAG for adults”?
16. In 21st Century Skills – Realising Our Potential the Government underlined the key role of high quality information and advice services in achieving the Skills Strategy, including the target to increase substantially the number of adults achieving their first full level 2 qualification. It outlined the following actions to improve the quality, consistency and visibility of IAG services to adults:

Integration of the learndirect national advice service with the work of the local IAG services, to support cross referral of clients to get the best advice. All funding for the learndirect national advice service and local IAG services to be channelled through the LSC, supporting consistent planning and monitoring of services nationally and locally; A clear definition of the range of services which adults should be entitled to expect, and the standards to which those services should be delivered. This will be supported by a clear national brand, national marketing and local LSC marketing so that users know what is available where they live; All LSC funded IAG providers to be accredited against the matrix Standard through which we will measure their quality and encourage improvements; and Improved availability of on-line labour market information, and training for IAG practitioners in helping clients to use labour market information to make decisions about learning and work.

How will we deliver the “reform of IAG for adults”?
17. We will develop an integrated IAG service for adults which will bring together the learndirect national advice service with the local IAG Partnerships. The LSC will ensure close links between the integrated IAG service and IAG services embedded within learning providers, through more active use of its functions in contracting, planning, funding and monitoring services, in order to ensure that services are fully coherent. The integrated IAG service will be visible and accessible to clients, and will deliver high quality services consistently across England. 18. The DfES, DWP, LSC, UfI/learndirect and Jobcentre Plus will work closely together to implement the reform programme.

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A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

How will we communicate the reform to service users, practitioners and co-ordinators?
19. Taking the National Policy Framework as its starting point, the LSC will develop and publish an IAG statement of service for users. This will explain the IAG services available to users, and the standards to which they will be delivered. The LSC will also develop a strategy for communicating the reform agenda to IAG practitioners and co-ordinators.

When will the reform take place?
20. The LSC will publish the IAG statement of service for users and have an integrated IAG service in place by 1 August 2004.

How will we evaluate the impact of the “reform of IAG for adults”?
21. We will develop a strategy to evaluate the impact of the reform of IAG for adults. We will seek a collaborative approach so that impact indicators and data collection requirements give us a reliable and robust basis for assessing the quality of services, while imposing minimum bureaucracy on providers. The approach needs to be coherent with arrangements for the Connexions Service and Jobcentre Plus. We will develop key performance indicators to address the impact of the reform of IAG on:
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public awareness of IAG services, particularly amongst the target group; availability of the range of IAG services to meet service users’ needs; quality of IAG services to meet service users’ needs, and particularly the satisfaction of users with the service they get; competence of front line staff to deliver IAG services; customer awareness of learning and work opportunities; impact of services in supporting entry into learning, completion of learning and progression from learning; and employers’ perceptions of publicly funded IAG.

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We will also work with the Adult Learning Inspectorate (ALI) to review the quality of services as delivered, so that we can identify and learn from best practice in supporting continuing improvement of services.

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Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults

What will be the key elements of the reform?
22.

A national entry point to the integrated IAG service, provided by learndirect, allowing users to access on-line and telephone information and advice. The national entry point will direct users to the most appropriate part of the service to meet their needs. “No wrong door” access to the integrated IAG service. Service users will be able to find out about the full range of on line, telephone and face-toface services available to them, irrespective of their initial point of contact. The LSC will ensure that frontline advisers in all parts of the service have the skills and information to identify the user’s needs, and to refer them in a consistent and appropriate way. There will be national agreements between the integrated IAG service, the Connexions Service and Jobcentre Plus to ensure effective client referral between these services. An overarching IAG identifier to link together the key deliverers of IAG services for adults. The identifier will be displayed by IAG Partnerships, learndirect, Jobcentre Plus and Worktrain. It will be supported by a strategy to raise user awareness and visibility of IAG services. Coherent service planning arrangements to focus on delivering a co-ordinated range of services to clients. The LSC will have lead responsibility for planning the integrated IAG service, but will work with UfI/learndirect as a strategic partner to co-ordinate the national and local elements of the service. In each local area, LSC will chair strategic partnerships to advise on local priorities and to ensure a co-ordinated approach between the services offered by the integrated IAG service, Jobcentre Plus and the Connexions service for young people. In doing so, the strategic partnerships should take account of the findings from Strategic Area Reviews and the priorities of Regional Skills Partnerships, and promote coherence between those services and the “embedded” services offered through colleges and training providers. Consistency in the range and quality of information and advice services available. The integrated IAG service will provide information and advice to meet the requirements of the National Policy Framework, including information about learning and work opportunities, information about financial and other support for learning, labour market information and career planning information/self-help materials. Advice services will be available, giving particular priority to those people without a first full level 2 qualification, to enable them to interpret the information, taking into account their personal circumstances.

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A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

Competence and qualifications frameworks for IAG practitioners. These will build on the findings of the review of qualifications and competences conducted for the DfES by the Guidance Council, and the review of occupational standards for IAG being conducted by the Employment National Training Organisation. This will also include the development of a strategy for the continuous professional development of IAG practitioners and managers. A National Resource Service to support innovative approaches to the delivery of IAG services. The service will be managed by the LSC and will be responsible for developing resource materials to support consistent and high quality IAG service delivery. A commitment for all LSC funded IAG providers to be accredited against the matrix Standard. This will include those providers funded by the LSC’s IAG programme fund. However, the Government wants all LSC funded IAG provision to be accredited against matrix including IAG services embedded within learning provision. We will actively encourage their achievement of accreditation against the matrix Standard by March 2005. In addition to matrix, the LSC will continue to quality assure the provision of IAG services through the performance review process and ALI through the Common Inspection Framework for Further Education colleges, Adult & Community Learning and Work Based Learning providers.

A requirement to collect evidence of the impact of IAG on participation and progression into learning and work, and to evaluate evidence of the impact of IAG on retention particularly for people without a level 2 qualification. Through the National IAG Board, we aim to have a collaborative approach to assessing the impact and value of IAG and are exploring with partners the potential for a single survey instrument. Working with the Department for Work and Pensions, Jobcentre Plus and LSC we will enhance the role of Worktrain as a medium for the dissemination of on-line Labour Market Information for advisers, with a direct link between Worktrain and the integrated IAG service. We will develop a guide and training resources for IAG advisers in the effective access and use of labour market information to help clients make well informed decisions.

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Information, Advice and Guidance for Adults

ANNEX 2 Delivery Milestones

Milestone Publication of IAG National Policy Framework Coherent service planning arrangements National Identifier for IAG – inc. IAG partnerships, learndirect, Jobcentre Plus and Worktrain National Brand for LSC funded local elements of integrated IAG service Strategy to measure impact of integrated IAG service Communications strategy for IAG practitioners and co-ordinators Accreditation against matrix achieved by IAG providers funded by the LSC’s IAG programme fund First review of IAG policy to take account of progressive implementation of Skills Strategy commitments (particularly development of the Level 2 Entitlement, Adult Learning Grant, development of Employer Training Pilots and Learning Communities) and the conclusions of the National Employment Panel review. Strategy to raise user awareness and visibility of the integrated IAG service LMI guide and training for IAG advisers Publication of IAG Statement of Service for service users National Resource Service

by when End December 2003 End December 2003

End February 2004

End March 2004

End March 2004

End March 2004

End March 2004

End March 2004

End April 2004 End April 2004

End July 2004 End July 2004

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A National Policy Framework and Action Plan

Develop and implement competence and qualifications frameworks (inc. CPD strategy) National Entry Point for integrated IAG service No Wrong Door access for integrated IAG service Availability of consistent range of information/ advice as outlined in National Policy Framework Integrated IAG service launched LSC funded learning providers encouraged to achieve accreditation against the matrix Standard Second review of IAG policy to take account of further implementation of Skills Strategy and National Employment Panel review

End July 2004 1 August 2004

1 August 2004

1 August 2004 1 August 2004

End March 2005

End March 2005

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Copies of this publication are available on the internet at www.lifelonglearning.co.uk/IAG © Crown copyright 2003 Produced by the Department for Education and Skills in conjunction with the Learning & Skills Council and Ufi. Extracts from this document may be reproduced for non-commercial education or training purposes on the condition that the source is acknowledged.

Information, Advice and Guidance Services for Adults

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Coherent Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) Services for Adults

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Information, Advice and Guidance Services for Adults

Contents
paragraph

Foreword How to use this document Vision for IAG for Adults Customer Entitlement to IAG Services for Adults IAG and the Skills Strategy Other Links to the Skills Strategy The Contribution of IAG for Adults to LSC Objectives The Scope of the LSC IAG Strategy for Adults Seven Key Objectives for IAG for Adults The National Policy Framework Principles of Coherent IAG Service Delivery Access to core IAG services Delivering the LSC IAG Strategy for Adults The LSC Strategic Board for IAG Appendix 1: Action to Support the Seven Key Objectives Appendix 2: LSC Corporate Objectives and Key Tasks Appendix 3: Resources to Support the Delivery of the LSC IAG for Adults 1 5 8 11 15 16 19 24 33 35 46 52 53

Information, Advice and Guidance Services for Adults

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Foreword
The availability of high-quality local Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) services for learning and work is key to the success of national policies for learning and skills development. The number and range of adults involved in learning is planned to increase dramatically over the next few years, widening participation in learning and raising levels of achievement. To make informed choices, people need access to excellent-quality, comprehensive and impartial information and advice about local learning and work opportunities and their relevance to the labour market. The Skills Strategy 21st Century Skills – Realising our Potential (DfES 2003) recognises that high quality and easily accessible information, advice and guidance for adults has an important role to play in meeting the skills challenge. This document responds to the recommendations for improving IAG services contained within the White Paper and sets out the LSC’s strategy to deliver a nationally recognised high quality and better integrated IAG service for adults. The strategy provides a strategic planning framework for the LSC, working with key partners and stakeholders, to deliver a coherent and integrated IAG service for adults. It seeks to ensure that the contribution of IAG services for adults is clearly positioned within all LSC policy and programme areas to support meeting LSC objectives. Specifically the strategy: > sets out the vision for IAG for adults; > sets out the entitlement of adult customers to a range of IAG services; > makes explicit the contribution of IAG services for adults to the delivery of LSC policy and programme objectives; > describes the scope of the strategy; > identifies seven key objectives for the strategy; and > identifies how we will meet the seven objectives. We hope that this document will provide LSC staff, IAG providers and other key partners with a firm foundation on which to build excellent IAG services, so that people know what is available and where to go to get the skills qualifications and training that they need.

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How to use this document
For the LSC
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Partner organisations
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One of the key actions for the strategy is the establishment of a local Strategic Board for IAG that will produce a threeyear vision and strategy for delivery of IAG in their local area by 1 August 2004. It is intended that local LSCs will use this document to support the establishment of the Strategic Board and as a template for developing their vision and three year strategy for IAG for adults.
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Of course, many actions to deliver the LSC IAG strategy will also need to be taken at a national level and this document will be supported by an LSC action plan that will provide more detailed milestones timescales and responsibilities to be produced by 31 March 2004.

The success of the LSC strategy for IAG for adults depends on the strength of partnership working between organisations such as Jobcentre Plus, Connexions, Business Link and other key partners. This strategy provides, for many, an opportunity to build on existing positive relationships and good practice. We hope this document will effect a more strategic approach to the delivery of all IAG provision in the local area and encourage senior representatives from a range of organisations to become members of the Strategic Board for IAG where they actively contribute to the development of a three-year vision and strategy for IAG to the benefit of all our service users. For IAG Providers
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Detailed LSC Funding Guidance for the delivery of IAG services using LSC IAG funds will be published by 31 March 2004. IAG providers should use this strategy document to: > identify their contribution to delivery of the LSC IAG strategy; > ensure that services are delivered in line with the strategy; > consider their role and contribution to the vision and strategy of the Strategic Board for IAG in their area; and > support the production of their delivery plan for 2004/2005.

Information, Advice and Guidance Services for Adults

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Improve the participation and achievement of adults in learning and work by ensuring that excellent information, advice and guidance on skills, training and qualifications is at the heart of everything that we do

Vision for IAG for Adults
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Customer Entitlement to IAG Services for Adults
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The LSC strategy for information, advice and guidance for adults aims to improve the participation and achievement of adults in learning and at work by ensuring that excellent information, advice and guidance (IAG) on skills, training and qualifications is at the heart of everything we do.
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For individuals and employers, this means that, within available resources, all adults aged 20 and over, with no upper age limit, should have access to free, comprehensive and up to date information on learning and work opportunities.
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For the LSC this means: > a clear, coherent and consistent offer for service users that is clearly communicated to the public through national and local marketing; > visible and accessible services so that service users know how to gain entry to services; > coherence in delivery so that services are joined up from the service users perspective; > high quality wherever IAG is delivered to adults; and > providing clear evidence of impact and achievement.
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Free advice on how to interpret that information will also be available to priority target groups. This will include developing new approaches to IAG that will engage new service users and build demand for information and advice on learning opportunities.
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We will achieve this by making sure that the LSC fulfils its responsibility for coherent strategic planning and coordination of IAG services for adults and has an effective plan for the purchase and delivery of IAG services to adults across all its funding and programme responsibilities.

Priority target groups will be determined at national and local level to meet LSC strategic objectives in line with wider government policy, including those identified in 21st Century Skills – Realising our Potential. We will focus on supporting adults without a Level 2 qualification and providing support for adults to achieve Level 3 skills in areas of sectoral or regional skill priority.

Footnote: A full Level 2 refers to any qualification equivalent to five GCSEs at A*-C or a National Vocational Qualification at Level 2. A full Level 3 refers to a standard equivalent to two A levels or a National Vocational Qualification at Level 3.

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Information, Advice and Guidance and the Skills Strategy – 21st Century Skills – Realising our Potential
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21st Century Skills – Realising our Potential also specifies the importance of enhancing information, advice and guidance services in prisons, offering advice on skills and jobs.
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The Government Skills Strategy 21st Century Skills – Realising our Potential (DfES 2003) recognises the important role information, advice and guidance has in helping people to understand the opportunities and support available to them.
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Employers, employees and advisers, including an expanded and strengthened network of Union Learning Representatives, will also benefit from the reforms in improving information, advice and guidance for adult learners.

The Skills Strategy gives four objectives for the reform of information, advice and guidance for adults and this LSC strategy for IAG responds to the need to implement these reforms. These are to: > integrate the learndirect national advice service with the work of the local IAG services for adults. In future, all funding for the Ufi/learndirect national advice service and local services will be channelled through the LSC, supporting consistent planning and monitoring of services nationally and locally; > define the range of IAG services which adults should be entitled to expect and the standards to which those services should be delivered. This will be supported with a clear national brand, and national and local LSC marketing service users, so that users know what is available where they live; > ensure that all LSC-funded IAG providers are accredited against the ‘matrix’ standard for IAG services through which we measure their quality and encourage improvement; and > work with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to: – draw together the labour market information that employers and individuals require to make choices about learning and work; – encourage Jobcentre Plus staff to consider the role that learning and training could play in helping inactive benefit claimants prepare to return to the labour market, including referral to further information, advice and guidance on learning.

Other Links to the Skills Strategy
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The LSC strategy for information, advice and guidance services for adults will also contribute to the delivery of other key actions contained in the skills strategy such as the: > introduction of an entitlement to free learning for all those studying for their first full Level 2 qualification; > provision of targeted support for higher level skills in priority areas to meet sectoral and regional needs; > introduction of an adult learning grant for some learners; > reform of financial support for adults and the need to provide information to promote and advise on this; > development of support for basic ICT skills through UK on line centres, including an on line skills diagnostic tool; > opportunities for progression in lifelong learning and particularly ’first steps’ learning to build confidence for those with low skills; > development of learning communities and encouragement for individuals, families and employers to see themselves as members of a learning community; > better information for employers, particularly about the quality of training; and > closer working between Jobcentre Plus and the LSC to provide a better service for individuals and employers.

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The Contribution of IAG for Adults to LSC Objectives
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High quality information, advice and guidance makes a number of key contributions to meeting the vision, mission, aims, objectives, and targets of the LSC as set out in the LSC corporate plan. Contributions include:
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For individuals and employers: > encouraging and raising participation by placing individual learners at the heart of the system. Service user centred approaches are central to high quality IAG practice; > motivating service users and providing the necessary encouragement and support to enable them to attain personal goals and qualifications. Motivation, encouragement and support are integral to the IAG process; > helping service users identify and develop their skills and potential, find and retain satisfying work, and contribute to improvements in national competitiveness; > helping service users appreciate the wider advantages of learning in respect of their own lives, including personal enrichment and the widening of individual horizons; > Improving service users’ chances of success by ensuring the right qualifications are undertaken at the right level; > providing access to IAG for employed service users to meet the identified skills needs of their employers; > encouraging a culture of career development skills and allowing service users to take more responsibility for their own learning and skills; > informing service users and groups about the effects of labour market change and helping them to relate this information to their own situation, including their personal learning objectives; and > promoting equality of opportunity and improved access to provision by making information widely available and targeting those service users who may need more help to access appropriate learning opportunities.

Research into the impact of IAG services conducted Autumn 2003 showed: > Seventy six per cent of adults surveyed engaged in learning. > Forty three per cent of unemployed adults surveyed moved into work. > Forty three per cent of adults with no qualifications and 39 per cent of adults with a Level 1 qualification undertook some form of learning as a result of receiving IAG services. The Impact of Adult Information and Advice Services – Milburn, Trinnaman, La Court, Autumn 2003.

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For the LSC and other strategic partners: > gaining better information from potential service users to identify learner demand for provision and using this information to shape the pattern of future learning opportunities; > stimulating a greater demand for learning among current non-service users by aligning demand more closely to provision; > making a contribution to the LSC’s task of gathering evidence that the attainment of the right knowledge and skills leads to employment, progression and personal fulfilment; > using the intelligence gathered by IAG advisers to support effective planning for provision and remove barriers; and > improving retention and achievement and reducing inefficiency costs or wasted opportunities arising from wrong decisions.

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Scope of the IAG Strategy for Adults

Strategic Partners
Local Strategic Partnerships

HE

DfES

Integrated IAG
Local Authorities Adult and Community Learning IAG Programme Funding Connexions Others Jobcentre Plus

LSC IAG funding
LID

Work Based Learning

Customer

LSC Quality Management

ABSSU

Workforce Development Learning Partnerships

Co-financing IAG Projects

Further Education

Department for Trade and Industry

National Advice Line Skills for Life

Ufi

Industry including Business Link/SBS Department for Work and Pensions (Work Train)

Home Office

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The Scope of the LSC IAG Strategy for Adults
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The LSC strategy for IAG for adults places the service user at the heart of the strategy with a range of support available from both LSC-funded and other externally funded IAG services.
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Some of the actions needed to deliver the LSC IAG strategy for adults will focus specifically on the use of IAG programme funds to ensure delivery of the core service entitlement and to drive up quality, for example through local tendering arrangements, to a national specification and through the matrix quality standard.
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Other actions will be driven through the broader remit of the LSC to integrate and quality assure IAG throughout all of its provision. For example, through the outcomes of Strategic Area Reviews, Performance Review and the Adult Learning Inspectorate (ALI) Common Inspection Framework for further education, adult and community learning and work based learning providers.
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The LSC also works with a range of other strategic partners that deliver information advice and guidance services for learning and work. To ensure a coherent and integrated service from a service user’s perspective, the IAG strategy for adults includes LSC actions to support strategic partnership arrangements with these key organisations.
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In annex 1 of this document we examine in more detail some of the actions we need to take at each of these levels to deliver the LSC strategy for IAG.

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Seven Key Objectives for Information Advice and Guidance for Adults
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Objective Five Improve advice services that help the service user interpret and use the information they have been given.
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We have identified seven key objectives for delivery of a successful LSC IAG strategy for adults. These are to:
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Objective Six Raise the quality and effectiveness of IAG services to adults.
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Objective One Ensure that excellent information and advice on learning and work is an integral part of all LSC-funded provision.
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Objective Seven Measure the impact of IAG services for adults on meeting LSC and Skills Strategy objectives.
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Objective Two Develop a flexible IAG infrastructure that meets the needs of the learning and skills agenda at national and local level.
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In annex 1 we examine in more detail how we will meet each of these objectives.

Objective Three Achieve an integrated IAG service to ensure ’joined up’ provision from a service user’s perspective.
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Objective Four Ensure that all information on learning opportunities, LMI and funding support is up to date, accurate, comprehensive and quality assured and is made widely available to potential service users.

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The National Policy Framework
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The LSC has worked with the DfES to agree a National Policy Framework and Action Plan for Information Advice and Guidance for Adults (DfES December 2003).
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Effective Connections – Links between IAG services should be clear from the client’s perspective. Where necessary, clients should be supported in their transition between services.
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The National Policy Framework establishes a minimum core IAG service that customers should have a right to expect from the 1st August 2004. The Framework includes: > a set of principles of coherent service delivery; and > minimum standards of access to the core IAG service.

Availability, Quality and Delivery – IAG services should be targeted at the needs of clients and be informed by social and economic priorities at local, regional and national levels.
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Diversity – The range of IAG services should reflect the diversity of clients’ needs.

Principles of Coherent IAG Service Delivery
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The following principles have been developed and accepted by the National IAG Board which includes representatives from the LSC, DfES, higher education, ABBSU, Connexions, DWP and Ufi/learndirect.
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Impartial – IAG services should support clients to make informed decisions about learning and work based on the client’s needs and circumstances.
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Responsive – IAG services should reflect clients’ present and future needs.
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Accessible and Visible – IAG services should be recognised and trusted by clients, have convenient entry points from which clients may be signposted or referred to the services they need, and be open at times and in places which suit clients’ needs.
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Friendly and Welcoming – IAG services should encourage clients to engage successfully with the service.
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Professional and Knowledgeable – IAG frontline staff should have the skills and knowledge to identify quickly and effectively the client’s needs. They should have the skills and knowledge either to address the client’s needs or signpost or to refer them to suitable alternative provision.

Enabling – IAG services should encourage and support clients to become lifelong learners by enabling them to access and use information to plan their careers, supporting clients to explore the implications for both learning and work in their future career plans.
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Awareness – Adults should be aware of the IAG services that are relevant to them, and have well informed expectations of those services.
Footnote: These principles are taken from the National IAG Board and the term client is used rather than service user.

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Service users are entitled to access a core information and advice service

Access to Core IAG Services
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The National Policy Framework requires that service users should be entitled to access the core services through a combination of: > 24 hour access to website to submit e-mail requests; > 24 hour access to an answer-phone service to leave a request; > free phone access to the integrated IAG service through a National Entry Point, available 8am – 10pm seven days a week; > centres for information available a minimum of five days a week; > appointments for advice available outside normal working hours wherever possible, for example to meet the needs of shift workers; and > outreach provision.
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The National Policy Framework proposes the following minimum response times to user requests: > 24 hour response to requests for information. The response could take the form of a text message, phone call, email or face-to-face; > where service users require signposting to alternative or further sources of IAG, this should be done within 24 hours of the original enquiry; > if information has to be sought elsewhere, the service user should be advised of this within three working days; and > appointments for advice should be available within five working days of the date of receipt of the original request.
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The balance between supported face-to-face and self-help services will vary depending on the nature of the area and service user group.
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It is not expected that every IAG provider will meet all the minimum standards but arrangements for the delivery of IAG services in each LSC area will ensure that all service users have access to this range and level of service.
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As part of the ‘no wrong door’ approach, all staff should be competent to identify service users’ needs and refer them to appropriate provision to meet their needs.

The National Policy Framework also specifies the minimum content of the core information and advice service to ensure national consistency of services available to service users. Further details of the minimum core information and advice service can be found in the National Policy Framework and Action Plan for information, advice and guidance for adults (DfES 2003).

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The successful delivery of the LSC strategy will depend on a clear commitment to work across LSC divisions to gain greater internal coherence... recognising that IAG ‘language’ is not universally understood and may not always be helpful

Delivering the LSC IAG Strategy for Adults
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The LSC Strategic Board for IAG
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The successful delivery of the LSC strategy will depend on a clear commitment to: > work across LSC divisions to gain greater internal coherence of IAG provision recognising that IAG ‘language’ is not universally understood and may not always be helpful; > in particular, work closely with colleagues who are responsible for delivering the widening adult participation agenda and workforce development strategy, ensuring we are reaching non service users as well as learners; > ensure that high quality IAG is integrated effectively across all LSC-funded programmes including further education, work based learning and LSC-funded adult and community learning; > establish a more explicit entitlement for IAG in learning to be made available to all learners (and potential learners) and expect all providers to be clear about how this will be delivered through the plans they present to the LSC; > ensure the capacity and competence of LSC IAG-funded providers to deliver high quality IAG services through shared good practice and models for staff development that include continuous professional development; > work with the Connexions Service to ensure the effective transition of young people from Connexions services to IAG services for adults at the appropriate age; and > work with partners to ensure coherence with non LSCfunded IAG provision, including those managed by other government departments such as the Department for Work and Pensions, in particular Jobcentre Plus.

To deliver the LSC IAG strategy for adults, the LSC will chair a local Strategic Board for IAG convened by the LSC at local level. These will include senior representatives from Connexions, Jobcentre Plus, Business Link and other senior partners, such as higher education, and ensure a more strategic approach to: > producing a three-year vision and strategy for IAG in the local area; > delivering the seven key objectives of the LSC IAG strategy for adults; > planning and ensuring the delivery of coherent local IAG services in line with the National Policy Framework for IAG; > ensure services are clearly focused on the delivery of skills strategy and LSC objectives and provide added value that benefits the service user; > targeting of local priority groups while ensuring the universal entitlement is met; > contributing to and drawing on findings of LSC Strategic Area Reviews as they relate to IAG; > the effective integration of IAG in all LSC-funded provision including IAG programme funds, IAG delivered through further education, adult and community learning, work based learning and workforce development. This should also include Local Intervention and Devlopment Fund (LID) and ESF co-financing, including locally funded guidance provision; and > working with key stakeholders and partners including Business Link and higher education institutions to ensure integrated ‘joined up’ services in their local area.
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The LSC Strategic Board for IAG may be formed as a separate group to manage IAG or become the responsibility of an already existing strategic partnership, so long as the group is convened and chaired by the LSC.

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Appendix 1: Actions to Support the Seven Key Objectives
Objective One Ensure that excellent information and advice on learning and work is an integral part of all LSC-funded provision We will achieve this by: Defining what excellent and integral IAG for adults looks like for all learners and potential learners throughout all LSC-funded provision. Working with national policy leads, local LSCs and partners to: > map IAG for adults across all LSC programme areas; > identify strategies, policies, the role of IAG and effective practice; and > pilot differing approaches to the integration of excellent IAG for adults through demonstration projects. Establishing common processes for the collection of data relating to IAG across ESF and LID-funded IAG provision. Ensuring that the purpose of IAG and the systems needed to deliver it are clearly defined and set out in the LSC Funding Guidance. Ensuring that IAG for adults is evidenced in local LSC Strategic Plans to support working towards Strategic Area Reviews in 2005. Establishing clear links to learner support funding and learner entitlements, such as the Adult Learner Grant and Level 2 entitlement. Ensuring all LSC IAG funded providers deliver to common standards of service for IAG services as specified in the action plan of the DfES National Policy Framework for IAG. Agreeing a set of actions to ensure learners in further education, adult and community learning and work based learning are supported by high quality IAG services. Identifying where LSC-funded IAG services should target support for adults aiming for Level 3 qualifications in collaboration with Sector Skills Councils and Regional Skills Partnerships. Developing an effective internal communications strategy for the LSC for IAG for adults.

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Objective Two Develop a flexible IAG infrastructure that meets the needs of the learning and skills agenda at national and local level We will achieve this by: Putting in place high level Strategic Boards for IAG, convened and chaired by the local LSC. Strategic Boards for IAG will be responsible for strategic planning for IAG services in their area and will include at the local level Connexions, Jobcentre Plus, Business Link representatives and other senior partners, such as higher education. Ensuring that services are clearly focused on the delivery of the Skills Strategy, LSC objectives and supports the agendas of our key stakeholders while providing added value that benefits the service user through local Strategic Boards at a local level. Building ’no wrong door’ approaches so that users are directed to the full range of IAG provision, whatever their needs. Procuring services through a national specification for IAG to ensure consistent IAG services to service users, including delivery of the core IAG service as specified in the National Policy Framework. Moving to three-year funding for IAG programme fund contracts in line with LSC policy for contracting. Defining the role of IAG within workforce development. Ensuring the objectives of the Workforce Development Strategy, as it relates to IAG, are implemented, including work with Union Learning Representatives, Employer Training Pilots and Sector Skills Councils. Building the capacity of local IAG services to support workforce development. Identifying and building effective working relationships with appropriate intermediaries, such as Business Link and Sector Skills Councils at local and national level. Producing a publication on Working Together with Business Link as part of a series of good practice guides. Working with colleagues to implement actions for IAG for adults in the LSC’s Widening Adult Participation Strategy. Working effectively with partners in the voluntary and community sector as IAG and learning providers and as source of specialist expertise.

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Objective Three Achieve an integrated IAG service to ensure ‘joined up’ provision from a service user perspective We will achieve this by: Working with Ufi/learndirect to integrate the learndirect national advice service with the work of the local IAG services for adults, including responsibility for the contract for learndirect telephone helpline and advice service. Working with Ufi/learndirect to implement the IAG National Policy Framework, including actions to achieve the Government’s programme of reform for IAG. Agreeing a clear national LSC IAG brand to sit alongside a national overarching identifier and national marketing strategy for IAG. Putting in place local LSC marketing for IAG for adults, so that users know what is available where they live and produce a Statement of Service for customers. Ensuring the continued development of IAG services that are joined up from the perspective of the service user, in conjunction with other organisations, including Connexions, Jobcentre Plus, higher education careers services and Business Link.

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Objective Four To ensure that all information on learning opportunities, LMI and funding support is up to date, accurate, comprehensive and quality assured and is made widely available to potential service users We will achieve this by: Implementing the minimum standards for information services in conjunction with Ufi/learndirect across all LSC IAG-funded providers. Ensuring, with other LSC colleagues, that the continuing requirement for all LSC-funded learning providers to provide information on learning opportunities to the national system is met. Contributing to setting in place robust systems for the collection of nationally consistent information on learning supply, including learning that is not funded by the LSC. Ensuring, with other LSC colleagues, that data collected on learning opportunities, LMI and funding support is ‘fit for purpose’ and allows for gaps in learning provision to be identified at local level. Defining the role of local IAG services in identifying gaps in IAG services, learning provision and funding support. Ensuring that systems are in place for IAG services to contribute effectively to the identification of unmet needs and capture feedback on gaps in provision and learner demand. Ensuring access to information, including LMI and funding support, is made widely available to service users through a range of media. Working with Jobcentre Plus to effectively share LMI and ensure all IAG providers and Jobcentre Plus staff have a good understanding of each other’s services.

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Objective Five To improve advice services that help the service user interpret and use the information they have been given We will achieve this by: Reviewing the outcomes of the enhanced services ‘pilots’ to decide future delivery of targeted in-depth services. Ensuring all advice and guidance services funded through LID and ESF co-financing are integrated and quality assured. Implement the minimum standards for the delivery of advice services. Ensuring resources for advice are targeted towards individuals with qualifications below Level 2. Working with the DfES, the Home Office and other government departments to support the enhancement of IAG services for offenders in prisons and the community at national and local level. Working with appropriate learning providers to focus LSC IAG funded support for adults aiming for Level 3 qualifications in areas of sectoral or regional skill priority. Working with DWP and Jobcentre Plus to support service users in considering learning and training opportunities and improving referral between IAG services and Jobcentre Plus.

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Objective Six To raise the quality and effectiveness of IAG services for adults We will achieve this by: Drawing on the outcomes of LSC Strategic Area Reviews (StARs) that relate to IAG for adults, to raise the quality and effectiveness of IAG services. Requiring all LSC-funded IAG providers, funded from IAG programme funds, to have achieved the ‘matrix’ standard to measure their quality and encourage improvement. Reviewing the outcomes of inspections of IAG provision in further education colleges, adult and community learning and work based learning and work with the Adult Learning Inspectorate to take forward actions arising from this review. Requiring all LSC IAG providers funded through LID and ESF co-financing to be accredited to matrix. Actively encouraging all LSC funded IAG provision, not currently directly funded from IAG funded programmes, including further education colleges, work based learning and adult and community learning, to be accredited to matrix. Ensuring the Performance Review process for all LSC-funded providers takes account of the contribution of IAG for adults to the quality of the adult learner experience. Ensuring the competence and capacity of staff to deliver high quality IAG services across all LSC IAG-funded provision. Underpinning the skills and knowledge of LSC IAG-funded staff with good schemes for continuing professional development in the sector. Ensuring that robust systems for measuring customer satisfaction with IAG services are an integral part of continuous quality improvement of IAG. Establishing mechanisms to support learning from experience and sharing of good practice relating to IAG. Working with partners, including DWP/Jobcentre Plus and other government agencies to ensure that LMI is defined and understood, and IAG practitioners are trained in the use of LMI. Working with partners including DWP/Jobcentre Plus and other government agencies to ensure that LMI is shared, utilised and available to employers, IAG providers and individuals. Establishing a national resource service for IAG to develop resource materials that will support innovative approaches to the delivery of IAG and consistency in the quality of service.

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Objective Seven Measure the impact of IAG services for adults on meeting LSC and Skills Strategy objectives We will achieve this by: Establishing meaningful baseline data and improve data capture techniques and service user record systems for IAG. Establishing effective impact measures for IAG against LSC objectives. Using information on learner demand to help shape the pattern of future learning opportunities at a local level. Implementing effective impact measures for IAG against LSC objectives. Continuing to evaluate the impact of IAG on delivering LSC objectives. Ensuring LSC Strategic Area Reviews (StARs) are undertaken with full consideration of the implications for IAG services.

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Appendix 2: LSC Corporate Objectives and Key Tasks
The LSC mission is to raise participation and attainment through high quality education and training which puts learners first. Our vision is that, by 2010, young people and adults will have knowledge and productive skills matching the best in the world. The Secretary of State has asked the Learning and Skills Council: > to raise participation and achievement by young people; > to increase demand for learning by adults and equalise opportunities through better access to learning; > to raise skills levels for national competitiveness; > to improve the quality of education and training delivery; and > to improve effectiveness and efficiency. Key targets for the LSC are to: > extend participation in education, learning and training; > increase the engagement of employers in workforce development; > raise the achievement of young people; > raise the achievement of adults; and > raise the quality of education and training customer satisfaction. The LSC must also demonstrate that individual learners are placed at the heart of the system and this requirement is set out for local LSC participation strategies.

Remit Letter
The Remit Letter from the Secretary of State in 2000 asks the LSC to ‘further develop coherent IAG services for adults’. Paragraph 48 of the remit letter sets out what is expected of the LSC in relation to IAG services. ‘High-quality information, advice and guidance (IAG) will be essential if people – especially non-learners – are to be drawn into learning, and helped to ensure that they make the right choices about learning. And beyond that, every learner, in whatever form of provision, should have access to readily available, impartial and high-quality IAG about learning and work.’

Appendix 3: Resources to Support the Delivery of the LSC IAG Strategy for Adults
> LSC Funding Guidance 2004/2005 > Information Advice and Guidance for Adults – The National Policy Framework and Action Plan (DfES December 2003) > Working Together with Higher Education (September 2003) > Working Together with Connexions (March 2003) > Quality Development Fund Projects: (2002-2003) – improving working arrangements with key national agencies; – developing the employer and trades union agenda; – the role of intermediary agencies in promoting information advice and guidance in the workplace; – national staff development model for LSC staff, IAG staff and partnership staff; – development of a national technologically-based management information system. > Skills for Life Resources Pack (May 2003) > The Impact of Adult Information and Advice Services Survey (Milburn, Trinnaman, La Court – for LSC 2003) > DfES Professional Development Guides (2002)

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© LSC January 2004 Published by the Learning and Skills Council. Extracts from this publication may be reproduced for non-commercial, educational or training purposes on condition that the source is acknowledged and the findings are not misrepresented. This publication is available in an electronic form on the Council’s website: www.lsc.gov.uk Reference MISC/AA000/0942/04