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Probation Circular
PC18/2007 – PSO LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME 2007-08
IMPLEMENTATION DATE: 22 June 2007 EXPIRY DATE: April 2009

TO: Chairs of Probation Boards, Chief Officers of Probation, Secretaries of Probation Boards CC: Board Treasurers, Regional Managers AUTHORISED BY: Paula Cairney, Head of Training and Development, Probation Area Co-ordination Unit ATTACHED: Annex A: Curriculum Annex B: Business Planning and Quality Assurance Annex C: Equality Impact Assessment Form Annex D: Resource Impact Assessment RELEVANT PREVIOUS PROBATION CIRCULARS PC41/2005, PC136/2001 CONTACT FOR ENQUIRIES mandy.pointon@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk or 020 7217 0791

PURPOSE
This PC provides details of the revised learning and development programme for PSOs and equivalent grades. Following on from work undertaken in the Role Boundaries project it was agreed that the curriculum and structure of the programme needed revising for 2007-08 to take into account changes in practice since 2005. Specific attention has been given to the production of workbooks and other materials to support the programmes. The circular has been discussed and agreed with NAPO and UNISON learning and development representatives.

ACTION
Chief Officers are asked to work with the Consortium Director to ensure that existing PSO programmes, and any new programmes, meet the criteria outlined in this circular. Consortium Directors are required to submit business plans covering proposed programmes for approval. These plans must be based on a learning needs analysis and should involve consultation with relevant trade unions. Consortium Directors will also manage the audit arrangements for programmes which will provide feedback to NOMS HQ.

SUMMARY
PSO learning and development programmes need to be revised to take into account developments in practice and the introduction of new qualifying training arrangements in 200809.

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Programme structure The PSO programme is divided into three stages: Stage 1: Stage 2: Stage 3: Stage 1: Passport into Practice – first step towards working with offenders Foundation Skills, Knowledge and Understanding Further Skills, Knowledge and Understanding (including Specialist posts)

Passport into Practice

1. In the PSO programmes a clear target is to ensure that newly appointed staff have been through a basic orientation to working with offenders before they are deployed in face-toface posts. With this in mind the Passport into Practice stage of programmes should be able to demonstrate how this immediate need will be met and signed off as completed by the line manager. Given operational demands it is recognised that it will not always be possible to coincide the availability of a training programme with the start of employment, therefore one of the workbooks (Induction) is designed to be used for selfdirected learning from the first day of appointment. Local induction procedures should also ensure that the main points in the Induction workbook are covered. This passport to practice stage should take place as the main activity of the first week or two weeks in the new post. Stage 2: Induction to Core Skills, Knowledge and Understanding

2. The induction to Core Skills stage of the PSO programme covers eight modules and should be delivered over the first three months in the new post. In some cases, where a participant requires specific skills in order to work in a specialist post, modules from Stage 3 may need to be included in the induction stage of the programme. Stage 3: posts) Further Skills, Knowledge and Understanding (including modules for specialist

3. The further skills stage of the PSO programme covers a wide range of modules (including modules for staff in specialist posts) and programmes should cover the modules most relevant to the specific staff being trained. This part of the programme should ideally be delivered as part of a continuous programme following on from the Induction to Core Skills, and the whole programme should be delivered within the first year in post. Target groups 4. The focus of the PSO Learning & Development programmes is to build the competence of this staff group to work with Tier 3 (OM Model) offenders. The learning needs analysis undertaken as preparation for the programme will identify staff who will benefit from the programme as well as identifying other potential sources of meeting needs, like, for example, the OM Transitional training (phase 3). 5. The workbooks which support learners on the PSO programmes may also be useful for the self-directed learning (as part of an appraisal commitment to learning and development, for example) of other PSOs who are unable to attend the formally delivered programme.

PC18/2007 PSO Learning & Development Programme 2007-08

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Assessment (of learners) arrangements 6. The curriculum includes options for the assessment of learners, as well as the usual learning outcomes and cross references to national occupational standards. Existing PSO programmes have been using a range of assessment techniques and in their business plans Consortium Directors need to indicate how learning will be assessed. The range of options includes workbooks, tests professional discussion and reflective account or journal. The concept of Observed Practice (which might be escalated to Assessed Practice) has also been included. All assessment arrangements should include how learning will be signed off by the line manager or other appropriate person. Curriculum (see Annex A) 7. A new curriculum has been drawn up for the PSO Learning & Development programme. It stays quite close to the previous curriculum as this has proved robust enough and also because there is no intention to radically alter existing good arrangements for PSO development. 8. The main work on the curriculum was undertaken as part of the Role Boundaries project of 2006 and the curriculum has been revised and refreshed in the light of changes in practice, in response to points made about training in HMiP reports, and in the light of significant and positive developments made in the implementation of the existing PSO programmes. 9. The curriculum incorporates some of the newer modules which have been developed for existing programmes as well as the basic elements of the Offender Management Transitional training. 10. As well as providing the module together with learning outcomes, the curriculum also identifies relevant learning materials and potential assessment techniques for the module. 11. Where appropriate each module has been cross-referenced with the new National Vocational Qualifications and with the Reducing Re-offending Pathways identified in policy and research. 12. The modules are based on notional learning hours of one day for each module. The workbooks do not have a specific notional learning time attached to them as their use can be tailored to the individual’s need. Modules have been designed for a flexible approach to delivery which allows for the notional learning hours to be delivered through different methods like taught sessions and self-directed learning using the workbooks. Support Materials 13. Many excellent support materials have been developed through the existing Consortiumdelivered PSO programmes and in issuing this probation circular this best practice has been brought together to create support materials which cover the many of the modules in the revised curriculum. These materials include workbooks which support each module and contain all the materials trainers will need to deliver a programme including participants’ workbooks and assessment materials. In the curriculum other existing materials (for example, the Risk of Harm CD Rom) have also been referenced or suggested together with how these can be acquired. Wherever possible the learning, teaching and assessment materials which support the PSO Learning & Development programme will be available through EPIC.

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Business Planning and Quality Assurance arrangements (Annex B) 14. Consortium Directors are required to submit, by July 31 2007, a Business Plan covering proposals for running the PSO Learning & Development programme in their region. This will involve a check of current arrangements to ensure they match up with proposals in this PC together with proposals for any adjustments required. It will also include a training needs analysis to identify which staff need the training as well as what other sources of training (e.g. OM Transitional Training Phase 3) might meet needs in ways which avoid duplication. 15. The introduction of NAPO’s Union Learning Fund representatives provides an opportunity for Consortium Directors to work together with the union to ensure these plans meet regional training needs and business plan returns can include reference to this. 16. Plans should also clarify the arrangements for the assessment of learners which will be used as part of the programme. 17. The programmes, once up and running, will be subject to quality assurance visits and audit checks based on data returns. Funding arrangements 18. The funding for the PSO Learning & Development programme is £800 per head up to a maximum of 1000 participants and will be allocated and administered through the existing Regional Consortia arrangements. The distribution of places will be according to the cash limit formula and regions have already been advised of their allocations. Funding will be released according to existing arrangements based on the returned Business Plans. 19. The available funding can be used either for the induction of new PSOs or for the training of existing PSOs who are moving into new roles or taking additional casework responsibilities. Where the learning needs analysis indicates a gap in the competence of existing casework staff, the clear priority must be to bridge this gap. A final word about the future qualifying training arrangements 20. Finally, this probation circular sets out the arrangements for PSO Learning & Development programmes for 2007-08 and in doing so seeks to bridge the gap between now and the introduction of the new qualifying training arrangements. The aim is to prepare staff for the style of learning which will be contained in the future arrangements. To this end, within the scope of the PSO learning project, work is simultaneously being undertaken on the design of Development and Progression Awards for PSOs which could well form the first building block of the new arrangements. This work will help to explore accreditation options for future PSO training. Development Awards 21. Development Awards provide a framework for a cluster of NVQ units to be put together to create an award. It is recognised that probation staff, primarily PSO grade, who have contact with offenders, can experience difficulty in finding a broad enough range of work to evidence a full Level 3 NVQ. Work is in progress with Skills for Justice and City and Guilds to develop groups of five units with direct links to the specific roles many PSOs are currently performing. The aim is for these awards to be certificated by City and Guilds and be part of the National Qualifications Framework. The project team

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anticipate these awards will be finalised by November for implementation at the end of the year. Progression Awards 22. Progression Awards provide underpinning knowledge, in a structured format, for the practical roles undertaken by staff working with offenders. These awards complement the practical assessment process necessary for an NVQ and ensure individuals can operate with knowledge and understanding of the actions they are performing. 23. Work is underway with City and Guilds to develop these awards and to synchronise the delivery with the introduction of the ‘Development Awards’. 24. The work on these awards should facilitate the process of accrediting current learning and practice in ways which will be supported by the accreditation of prior learning arrangements which will be part of the new arrangements.

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ANNEX A PC18/2007 – PSO LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME 2007-08.

CURRICULUM FOR THE PSO LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME.

STAGE 1 of the PSO L&D PROGRAMME – PASSPORT INTO PRACTICE: FIRST STEP TOWARDS WORKING WITH OFFENDERS Passport into Practice is specifically aimed at new staff and is part of their first experience of working in the organisation and is intended to ensure that they are properly introduced to how the risk of serious harm is assessed and managed by the organisation and to the importance of working as a member of a public protection agency. No new member of staff should be allocated work involving direct contact with offenders until their Passport into Practice has been signed off by their line manager. MODULE Passport into Practice LEARNING OUTCOMES
a. Understand the importance to your practice and to the organisation of the assessment and management of risk of serious harm. Understand the importance of interagency working in relation to working with offenders to protect the public. • • •

DELIVERY OPTIONS
Supervision Formal induction programme Workbook with support support (from manager). • with

ASSESSMENT OPTIONS
Sign off by line manager

References

b.

STAGE 2 of the PSO L&D PROGRAMME – FOUNDATION SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE & UNDERSTANDING These modules form a foundation programme for PSOs and equivalent grades of staff, providing a basic understanding of role, organisation and working in the community and criminal justice environment. It is recommended that these modules are covered within the first three months in post. Each module is equivalent to one day in notional learning time. The modules will also provide some general knowledge and understanding for a number of the Level 3 NVQ units, and where there is a direct link this has been indicated in the Reference column. In anticipation of the new qualification framework for practitioners it is recommended that participants in the programme are encouraged to compile a portfolio of evidence of their learning.

MODULE

LEARNING OUTCOMES

DELIVERY OPTIONS

ASSESSMENT OPTIONS

References

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2.1 Induction to local Area

c.

d. e.

f.

2.2 Orientation to CJ system

a.

b. c.

d.

e.

2.3 Offender management

a.

b.

c.

Describe the components of probation practice in the Area in the full range of settings Explain the organisational structures in your Area. Identify your Area’s key policies and procedures, including Health & Safety, HR etc Describe how your role fits into the organisational structure. Demonstrate an understanding of the range of agencies which form the community justice and criminal justice system Identify the key purposes of the agencies within the CJ system. Identify and understand the aims of the National Probation Service/NOMS and understand how it relates to the wider CJ system and your role. Explain the relationship between legislation, policy development and national standards Demonstrate an understanding of how principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice apply within the CJ system. Understand and apply the key stages required to assess and manage offenders effectively according to criminogenic needs and assessed level of risk. Understand the key offender management components for community and custodial sentences together with the relevant national standards. Understand and apply the core skills required to assess and manage offenders effectively according to

• • • • • • • • • •

Observation visits Shadowing Own research Meetings with Area staff Supervision Mentor Formal induction programme Induction pack Training event [ =available as support material] Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) (from

• • • • •

Oral or written test Professional discussion Written account Learning log Reflective account or journal

NVQ:AE1

• • • •

Professional discussion Assignment Oral or written test Reflective account or journal

• •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) (from

• • • •

Exercises Shadow case Reflective account or journal Professional discussion

NVQ:EA1/EB1

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d.

e.

f.

2.4 Legal Framework

a. b.

c. d.

2.5 Working Diversity

a.

with
b. c.

criminogenic needs and assessed risk Identify the key partners of NOMS and explain what each can contribute to the provision of offender management services. Contribute towards the selection and sequencing of interventions, and effectively refer offenders to appropriate resources. Apply principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice in offender management. Identify the relevant legislation for probation practice. Understand the sentencing principles and provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 Describe the implications of legislation for your practice Describe the implications of legislation for anti-discriminatory practice. Explore how making assumptions, stereotyping, labelling and prejudice affects different groups and individuals. Identify the effect of equality and inequality on people’s lives. Explain what working with diversity means for you when working with colleagues and offenders

• • •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Own research [EPIC etc] (from

• • •

Oral or written test Professional discussion Reflective account or journal

Training event • Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) • Professional discussion

(from

• • • • •

Observation of practice Simulation Work products Reflective account or journal Professional discussion

NVQ:AA1

2.6 Introduction to Communication Skills

a.

Identify the key components of effective communication b. Explain the barriers to effective communication and how these can be minimised c. Describe how to maintain personal and professional boundaries in working relationships Understand how to plan, prepare, undertake and record interviews

• •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach)

(from

• • • • •

Observation of practice Simulation Work products Reflective account or journal Professional discussion

NVQ: AB1

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2.7 An introduction to risk of harm or of reoffending

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

2.8 Maintain and develop your own knowledge, skills and competence

a.

b.

c.

d. e.

Understand the current definitions of risk, and risk management and public protection procedures, and the importance of a victim perspective. Understand the dynamic nature of risk and the need to continuously review assessments according to criminogenic need. Understand the methods for identifying, predicting and managing risk within agency policies and procedures Understand the link between good practice, risk assessment and public protection Begin to identify the relevance of these concepts for your own roles and responsibilities and understand when and how to refer to others Apply principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice in assessing risk. Describe the organisation’s responsibility to manage your learning and development Demonstrate the ability to take appropriate responsibility for own development and learning Demonstrate the ability to take feedback constructively to inform own change and development Understand the purpose of supervision and appraisals Understand the need for supervision and appraisal and how to prepare for them

• • • • • •

Training event Case Study Professional discussion Workbook with support (from manager, mentor, coach) Shadowing De Montfort University / NPD “Risk” CDRom

• • •

Oral or written test Reflective account or journal Professional discussion

NVQ: GC4

• • •

Professional discussion Supervision Own research

• • •

Professional discussion Reflective account or journal Supervision notes

NVQ: AE 1

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STAGE 3 of the PSO L&D PROGRAMME – FURTHER SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE & UNDERSTANDING The modules in Stage 3 build on the foundations laid in Stage 2. In order to build competence to work with Tier 3 offenders it is likely that some staff, especially new entrants, will need to complete the entire range of modules; other staff, however, will have existing skills from current and previous experience and therefore may only need to undertake those modules which meet their specific skills gaps. In the case of staff new to post and who need to attend the whole programme it is recommended that the programme is completed within the first 12 months in post. MODULE 3.1 Risk assessment LEARNING OUTCOMES a. State the key principles of risk management and understand and apply the key strategies. b. Understand the key interventions for effective risk management. c. Understand how to work with other agencies with special reference to work related to child protection, domestic abuse, arson and mental health. d. Understand the implications of risk decisions. e. Understand the potential sources of errors in risk decision making, including methodological, human and systematic. f. Understand how practitioners can help to reduce the incidence of failures in risk assessment and management. a. Understand the principles and methods of cognitive behavioural work and how it can be applied to understanding and changing offending behaviour. b. Understand the findings of research as it relates to the development of programmes in general, DELIVERY OPTIONS
• • • Training event Workbook with support (from manager, mentor, coach) De Montfort University / NPD “Risk” CDRom • • • •

ASSESSMENT OPTIONS
Professional discussion Reflective account or journal De Montfort University / NPD “Risk” CDRom self-assessment Practice evidence

Reference
NVQ: GC4/GC7

3.2 Effective Practice

• • • • •

Training event Workbook with support (from manager, mentor, coach) Own research Observation of practice Accredited Programme Core Skills (for Tutors)

• • •

Professional discussion Reflective account or journal Assessment of Core Skills for Tutor

NVQ: EC1 Reducing Reoffending Pathway 7: Attitudes, Thinking & Behaviour

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c.

d.

3.3 Inter-agency Working

a. b.

c.

d. e.

3.4 Diversity

a. b.

c.

programme integrity, targeting, dosage, group size and level of staff competence. Understand the key components of effective practice, including criminogenic needs, risk assessment and community based interventions. Demonstrate an understanding of how principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice should be applied in relation to effective practice work. Explain the principles and benefits of interagency working. Develop and maintain effective interagency relationships and channels of communication. Identify and manage factors which help and hinder effective joint working. Explain how risk is managed across agencies. Apply principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practise in interagency work. Understand how values and ethics impact upon work in the CJ sector. Identify the ways in which discrimination and oppression are built into society and organisation. Have explored the legislative framework surrounding diversity and equality

• • •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Visits to Court etc

(from

• • • •

Professional discussion Reflective account or journal Practice evidence Witness statement

NVQ: AD1

• • •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Own research

(from

• • •

Professional discussion Reflective account or journal Practice evidence

NVQ: AA1

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3.5 Team work

d. Have an overview of the various power positions and understand how this impacts on day to day work practises. e. Understand how micro-messages can impact on offenders, victims and the workforce. f. Practise skills for effectively working with diversity in day to day work. a. Understand how to contribute to effective team practice. b. Understand how to contribute to the development of others in the work team. c. Understand how to develop oneself in one’s own work role. a. Maintain an anti- discriminatory stance in working in a team.
a. Understand the importance of ensuring that offenders know sentence requirements, their responsibilities under national standards and the consequences of non compliance. Understand relevant national standards and, where appropriate, apply actions that need to be taken in response to non compliance. Understand how to promote and support compliance in offender management. Identify good practice in working within professional boundaries Apply principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice when considering or undertaking any aspect of enforcement.

• • •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Supervision

(from

• • •

Professional discussion Reflective account or journal Practice evidence

NVQ: AC1

3.6 Enforcement and Compliance

• • •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Supervision

(from

• • •

Professional discussion Reflective account or journal Practice evidence

NVQ: EB1

b.

c.

d. e.

3.7

a. Integrate oral and written

Pro-social modelling Training event

Professional discussion

NVQ:

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Communication Skills & Pro-Social Modelling

3.8 Motivational Interviewing

3.9 Writing Skills

communication skills into practice. b. Understand the use and value of contracting c. Understand the use and value of role clarification. d. Understand the use and value of creating a boundaried, professional relationship e. Identify problem solving in a prosocial context. f. Explain what working with diversity means in the context of communicating with others. a. Understand the key principles of motivational interviewing b. Understand the significance of being able to encourage and motivate offenders to 1) consider the effects of their behaviour on others 2) think through options 3) own and be responsible for their decisions 4) see the need to change their behaviour. c. Demonstrate an ability to encourage and motivate individuals to change d. Identify good practice in working with professional boundaries e. Apply principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice when using motivational skills a. Understand the key good practice principles in the planning, compilation and presentation of reports.

• •

Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Professional discussion

(from

• •

Reflective account or journal Practice evidence

AB1 / EC7 Reducing Reoffending Pathway 7: Attitudes, Thinking & Behaviour

Motivational Interviewing event

• • •

Professional discussion Reflective account or journal Practice evidence

NVQ: AB1 EC7 Reducing Reoffending Pathway 7: Attitudes, Thinking & Behaviour

• • •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Own practice

(from

• •

Practice evidence Supervision

NVQ: EA 2 EA3

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b. Understand the information required for particular types of reports. c. Develop the interviewing skills to elicit this information. d. Demonstrate the skills required to identify the need for a further risk assessment and understand how to refer to the appropriate person e. Recognise and rehearse report writing skills. f. To consider ADP issues in relation to completing reports and records. 3.10 OASys for new users – effective recording
a. b. c. d. e. Demonstrate an understanding of the Offender Assessment System Be able to complete an OASys assessment consistent with the manual Be able to complete a Risk Assessment Plan Be able to complete a Sentence Plan Demonstrate an understanding of the Review and Termination Process Communicate with individuals who are distressed, anxious, angry or in denial. Handle disagreements constructively, recognizing and managing the impact of an incident on self and others. Understand the different levels and causes of conflict. Assess potentially difficult situations and contribute towards identifying strategies to reduce risk. Apply principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice in handling difficult situations.

Supervision

• • •

Training event Shadowing OASys training pack

• • •

Countersigned OASys Reflective account or journal Practice evidence

NVQ: GC4/ EA1

3.11 Handling difficult situations

a. b.

• • • • •

c. d.

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Role plays Observed practice Supervision

(from

• • • • •

Practice evidence Simulations Professional discussion Reflective account or journal Supervision

NVQ: GC7

e.

Reducing Reoffending Pathway 7: Attitudes, Thinking & Behaviour

3.12 Substance Misuse

a. Demonstrate awareness of their own individual and society’s attitudes to substance misuse

• • •

Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Visit partnership agencies

(from

• • •

Practice evidence Professional discussion Reflective account or journal

NVQ: GE1 Reducing Re-

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b. Demonstrate an understanding of the effects of drugs and alcohol use on the individual, their family and society c. Demonstrate an understanding of the factors which may contribute to and may indicate use d. Demonstrate an understanding of specific orders and different types of treatment options available. e. Explain diversity issues in relation to working with substance misuse 3.13 Mental Health
a. b. Explain the myths and stereo types associated with mental disorder Recognise and respond to behaviours which indicate a mental health issue and the potential of risk to self and others Identify the relevant professionals who are able to undertake mental health assessments Outline the range of services available to mentally disordered offenders Apply principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice in working with mentally disordered offenders. Demonstrate an awareness of the impact of crime on victims an survivors Understand the reasoning and development of the probation services work with victims Understand the roles and function of the Victim Liaison Officer role

• •

Own research Input from specialist

offending Pathway4: Drugs and Alcohol

• • • • •

c.

Training Event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Visits to partnership agency Own research Input from specialist

(from

• • •

Practice evidence Professional discussion Reflective account or journal

Reducing Reoffending Pathway3: Mental and Physical Health

d. e.

3.14 Victim Awareness and contact

a. b.

• • • • •

c. d. e.

Training Event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach) Visits to partnership agency Own research Input from specialist

(from

• • •

Practice evidence Professional discussion Reflective account or journal

Develop victim empathy work with offenders Consider diversity issues in relation to victim awareness activities

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3.15 Safeguarding children

a. b. c. d.

e. f. g.

3.16 Introduction to Working with Sex Offenders

a.

b.

c.

d.

Recognise what constitutes child abuse and how to identify it. Identify relevant legislation Locate their local child protection procedures and be guided by them Recognise the need for a coordinated and consistent response to CP concerns Identify where they could seek advice and support for themselves Recognise the importance of the role they play in the protection of children Consider diversity issues in relation to safeguarding children Demonstrate a beginning understanding of the basics of sexual offending and the characteristics of these offenders, including an awareness of trigger factors and risk indicators. Demonstrate an understanding of a range local policies and procedures and risk assessment tools and how they should be incorporated into working practises to manage and reduce risk Demonstrate an understanding of the role of specific interventions and a range of good practice principles and techniques in managing or reducing risk in this work Understand how workers can both positively and negatively contribute to the assessment and management of sex offenders and explain your own role and its boundaries within this process. Demonstrate a beginning understanding of domestic violence and

• • • •

Training event NSPCC training materials Handbook Own research

• • •

Practice evidence Professional discussion Reflective account or journal

NVQ: GC2 AD1 Reducing Reoffending Pathway 6: Children and Families of Offenders

Training event

• • •

Practice evidence Professional discussion Reflective account or journal

NVQ: GC2 AD1 Reducing Reoffending Pathway 6: Children and Families of Offenders

3.17 Introduction to

b.

Training event

• •

Practice evidence Professional discussion

NVQ: GC2

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Domestic Violence
c.

d.

e.

the implications for practice including an awareness of trigger factors and risk indicators. Demonstrate an understanding of a range local policies and procedures and risk assessment tools and how they should be incorporated into working practises to manage and reduce risk Demonstrate an understanding of the role of specific interventions and a range of good practice principles and techniques in managing or reducing risk in this work Understand how workers can both positively and negatively contribute to the assessment and management of perpetrators of domestic violence and explain your own role and its boundaries within this process • • Training event Workbook with support manager, mentor, coach)

Reflective account or journal

AD1 Reducing Reoffending Pathway 6: Children and Families of Offenders

3.18 Resettlement

a. Understand the current situation of prisoners and those recently released from prison b. Understand the work of the resettlement PSO c. Understand the process of completing an HDC d. Understand the conditions of release on licence e. Understand the recall process f. Understand the process of oral hearings.

(from

• • •

Practice evidence Professional discussion Reflective account or journal

NVQ: F13 Reducing Reoffending Pathway 1: Accommodation Pathway 2: ETE Pathway 5: Finance, Benefits and Debt

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PSO L&D PROGRAMME – ADDITONAL STAGE 3 MODULES FOR SPECIALIST POSTS This section contains modules (with Learning Outcomes only) which might be useful as part of a programme for staff in specialist posts. PSO - IN COURTS MODULE Courts 1 Prosecution Training
LEARNING OUTCOMES Understanding of the legislation and national and local guidelines in relation to breach prosecution Understand court etiquette and the roles of prosecutor and defence Understand the process for those who present a high risk of serious harm to others Have the confidence to prosecute a breach within the court arena Understand the key good practice principles in the planning, compilation and presentation of FDRs. Understand the information required for particular types of reports, including issues of risk and criminogenic need. Develop the interviewing skills to elicit this information. Understand and use the OASys Risk of Harm screening Demonstrate the skills required to identify the need for a further risk assessment and understand how to refer to the appropriate person Recognise and rehearse FDR completing skills. Understand why it is important to ensure that individuals understand sentence requirements, their responsibilities and the consequences of non-compliance

a.

b. c.

d.

Courts 2 Fast Delivery Report Writing Skills

a.

b.

c. d. e.

f.

Courts 3 Processing Breach and enforcement

a.

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training

b. c.

d.

Courts 4 Court Presentation Skills.

a.

b.

c.

d. e.

Understand what actions need to be taken in response to non-compliance. Have an awareness of the relevant legislation and National Standards as they apply to enforcement Understand the roles of colleagues who are also involved in the enforcement process – Offender Managers, Court staff, Line Managers and Administrative staff Understand the required standard of documentation required for effective court practise Use verbal and non verbal communication skills to establish an effective court presence for the Probation Service. Demonstrate the skills required to collect information from individuals and other agencies. Understand when to seek advice and support from others. Apply principles of equality, valuing diversity and anti discriminatory practice in the court setting.

PSO - OFFENDER MANAGEMENT MODULE OM 1 The Sentence as a Project and the Brokerage Role in Offender Management LEARNING OUTCOMES
a. Understand and explain the key tasks of OM and the role of the Offender Manager in risk assessment, sentence planning and implementation Identify key techniques in project management Set and prioritise sentence planning objectives and broker the right resources needed to achieve the

b. c.

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d.

OM2 Team Working

a.

b.

c.

OM4 Understanding the boundaries of their own responsibilities and appropriate actions

d.

e.

f.

OM5 Identification Triggers of

a.

b.

sentence outcomes in individual cases Demonstrate a commitment to act in accordance with legislation, national standards and procedures. Be able to either participate or lead, as well as contribute effectively, as a member of a cross-agency, Offender Management Team Be able to identify and respond constructively to the demands of working in cross-agency Offender Management teams Demonstrate a commitment to act in accordance with legislation, national standards and procedures. Understand when to refer a case to the line manager or PO colleague where risk of harm is escalating, where unknown safeguarding children or domestic abuse issues arise or where risk of self-harm or suicide increases. Understand the limits of own role and role of interventions, partner agencies and other agencies with whom we work, for example children’s services Understand the boundaries in professional relationships with offenders for whom one has responsibility i.e.: what is appropriate for the offender manager to take responsibility for and what is the offender’s responsibility; how a professional relationship is different from a social relationship Understanding of dynamic risk factors and how to recognise changes in risk in individuals Awareness of how significant change in criminogenic factors with OASys impacts on levels of risk of harm to self

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c.

d.

and others and to risk of re-offending Awareness of significance of change in any of the factors associated with risk of harm in the risk analysis within OASys Understand basic cognitive behavioural processes and the link between triggers, their processing by an individual and the subsequent behaviour

PSO - APPROVED PREMISES MODULE Approved Premises 1 Principles of Risk Assessment and Risk Management in the context of Approved Premises LEARNING OUTCOMES
a. Understand the current definitions of risk and the procedures within risk management and the importance of a victim perspective in risk assessment and management. Understand the dynamic nature of risk and the need to continuously review assessments according to criminogenic need. Understand and contribute to methods for identifying, predicting and managing risk within agency policies and procedures. Understand the link between good practice, risk assessment and public protection. Apply principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and anti-discriminatory practice in assessing risk. The assessment and management of risk is central to the work of NOMS Increased awareness of the profile of victims in offence focussed practice. Recognise and manage the tensions

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

Approved Premises 2 Victim awareness and

a. b.

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risk of harm

c.

d.

Approved Premises 3 Interagency working in the management of risk

a.

b.

c.

and conflicts inherent in balancing the rights and needs of both victims and offenders through effective risk management. Recognise and deal with issues arising from the possibility that offenders have been victims themselves in one way or another. Delivered in conjunction with an area specialist victim contact worked Understand the importance of probation staff in establishing and maintaining working relationships with other agencies to enhance risk assessment and management of offenders. Examine their own practice, what helps and hinders good practice and to see interagency working from other parties point of view. Staff are informed about the MAPPA process and have an opportunity to take part in a MAPPA meeting even though this may not be part of their role. Child protection is covered in this module in relation to effective risk management only. Explain the myths and stereotypes associated with mental disorder and/or personality disorder Recognise and respond to signs and behaviours that may indicate the presence of mental ill health Apply the principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and delivering anti-discriminatory practice in dealing with mental health issues Explain the range of provision available, identifying key aspects of good practice in referral to specialist

Approved Premises 4 Mental health and risk of Harm

a.

b.

c.

d.

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agencies.

Approved Premises 5 Working with residents posing a significant risk of harm to others

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

g.

Approved Premises 6 Introduction to Suicide and Self-Harm

a. b. c.

Demonstrate an awareness of relevant risk assessment tools and processes (OASys, RM2K, SARA etc) and your contribution to these processes Demonstrate an understanding of how an individual’s background and life experiences can contribute to their behaviour and the risk they represent Demonstrate an awareness of trigger factors and risk indicators as they relate to particular offender groups (e.g. domestic abusers, child sex offenders etc) Demonstrate an understanding of the role of specific interventions in managing or reducing risk within an approved premises setting Demonstrate an awareness of how issues of gender and power issues can impact on the thinking and behaviour of individuals Demonstrate an awareness of how your own values, beliefs, experiences and behaviour can affect your work, and how you can best deal with those issues Apply the principles of promoting equality, valuing diversity and delivering anti-discriminatory practice in dealing with offenders posing a significant risk to others Identify potential triggers and warning signs Increased awareness of the risk factors and how to manage these Understand the range of support available and how to make appropriate referrals

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d.

Approved Premises 7 Effective team work and communication in the management of risk

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

Understand how to respond appropriately Understand the aim of your team in relation to the assessment and management of risk of harm and how you can contribute to effective teamwork. Understand your role in relation to risk assessment and management and how this fits in with other staff and management roles, both within and outside the Approved Premises. Be able to identify and understand the different forms and systems of communication that are important in assessing/managing risk of harm in the Approved Premises you work in. Understand potential barriers to effective communication, the dangers they can cause in managing risk and ways in which to overcome them. Understand the importance of building effective and appropriate working relationships with residents in order to more effectively assess and manage risk in Approved Premises. Understand the importance of applying principles of diversity and anti discriminatory practice in your approach to team work and communication in Approved Premises.

PSO - ACCREDITED PROGRAMMES MODULE Accredited Programmes 1 LEARNING OUTCOMES
a. Understand the underlying theories and rationale of effective practice principles and offending behaviour programmes

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Responsivity Integrity:

with

b. c.

d. e.

f.

Accredited Programmes 2

a. b.

Treatment Style
c.

d.

Accredited Programmes 3

a.

b.

Facilitation Skills

c. d. e. f.

Understand and explain the purpose and rationale of all aspects of sessions. Demonstrate flexibility when responding to the needs of trainee facilitators while maintaining focus on key learning points and purpose. Monitors and assesses comprehension, learning skills and achievement of aims Deals responsibly with issues relating to culture and other forms of diversity, for example gender, sexuality, disability, religion, mental health, learning difficulties, language and literacy. Show sensitivity to the training environment and factors which may impact on participation. Relates to others in a warm, genuine, transparent and collaborative way. Demonstrates empathy, including listening reflectively, summarising, attempting to understand feelings of participants. Encourages, models and reinforces pro-social and respectful attitudes and behaviours. Uses motivational skills to encourage participation. Encourages a balanced and representative contribution from all participants. Is able to use a variety of methods to facilitate learning and development Communicates clearly, adapts pace and wording Demonstrates knowledge and is sensitive to group dynamics Models good co-trainer relationships Maintains boundaries and uses leadership skills to create a safe and

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Accredited Programmes 4 Planning Reviewing and

a. b. c. d.

Accredited Programmes 5 Openness to Learning / Giving feedback to others

a. b. c. d.

production environment Prepares for session delivery collaboratively with co-trainer Is well-prepared to deliver, including organising materials and equipment Develops effective session plans Reviews previous learning and the needs of participants to inform the planning process, including the delivery of feedback Takes responsibility for own learning and seeks ways to improve Demonstrates an openness to feedback Reflects on feedback and integrates into practice Provides constructive feedback to cofacilitators

PSO – UNPAID WORK MODULE Unpaid Work 1 Health and Safety LEARNING OUTCOMES
a. b. Ensure the proper use of any tools or equipment Ensure that the environment is safe and secure for self and others Understand and implement the necessary measures in relation to accidents in the workplace

Unpaid Work 2 Emergency first aid

a.

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ANNEX B

PC18/2007 – PSO LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME 2007-08. PSO BUSINESS PLANNING

PSO L&D PROGRAMME BUSINESS PLAN ……………………………..Consortium
1. Learning Needs analysis. A learning needs analysis will have to be conducted to ascertain how the PSO allowance is to be spent. Please detail below how this will be arranged. Area 1 2 3 4 5 Who will do this and how will this take place

2. Induction and Programme Arrangements
2a Please list below the induction arrangements for newly recruited PSOs. (i.e. ‘Passport to Practice’ or other arrangements) Area 1 2 3 4 5 Arrangements

Induction to Core Skills, Knowledge and Understanding 2b Please list below who will be delivering the components of this programme Area 1 2 3 4 5 Delivered by

Advanced Skills, Knowledge and Understanding 2c Please list below who will be delivering the components of this programme Area 1 2 3 4 5 Delivered by

2d If following a different programme please identify the programme, content and delivery method Area 1 2 3 4 5 2e If funding is to be used for building existing PSO/s skills in their current or new role please detail below Area 1 2 3 4 5 Training delivery, content and method Programme How does this match with PC

3. How many PSOs are undertaking the Offender Management Transitional Training (OMTT) Phase 3 Area 1 2 3 4 5 4. How many PSOs by area are you planning for the financial year? Area 1 2 3 4 Number Stage a b c d e or OM TT phase 3 Number Where delivered

5 5. Does each area have a system in place for monitoring the profile of this PSO group (eg age, ethnicity, gender) to which you have access? Area 1 2 3 4 5 System

6. If there is not a system in place to which you have access how do you plan to capture this data?

7. If other areas of PSO training have been identified, please detail those here and suggest how they could best be delivered.

8. Please describe below how you will gauge learner satisfaction of the programme.

9. Describe below how you will assess learning at the end of the programme and how this will be authenticated by line management

10. Describe below how you will evaluate the performance of the whole programme ensuring you capture: attendance; completions; area satisfaction; evidence of knowledge and understanding; use of observed practice and liaison with Union Learning Fund representatives.

Name of person completing the business plan………………………………. Date completed……………………………………………………………………..

Signature of Director……………………………………………Date……………

PROGRAMME TRACKING SHEET
…………………………………………..CONSORTIUM This tracking sheet is completed by the Regional Consortium for a group or an individual at the start and end of the programme.

Part 1
The following should be completed at the start of each Individual programme and a copy sent by E Mail to: Ingrid.wheeler@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Probation area on behalf of which this programme is taking place: Date programme started: Projected end date: Numbers expected to attend this programme ( enter name here or attach list) Signed………………………………………………………Date…………………… ----------“”------------

Part 2 (please ensure this is attached to part 1)
The following should be completed at the end of the programme above and an E Mail copy sent, within 4 weeks of the programme ending to: Ingrid.wheeler@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Date programme ended Actual number instructed to attend Please indicate the % of attendance by individual or group by Probation area to this programme. PROGRAMME EVALUATION

This should reflect your statement in sections 5 -10 of your business plan

Signed………………………………………………..Date…………………………..

Consortium Director…………………………………………….Date……………. Business Planning Document…….Notes on completion. Expand all the boxes to provide full information Area. Where this is requested enter the name of the Probation Area i.e. Derbyshire, Gwent etc 1 Learning needs analysis. Give the area and how they plan to undertake the learning needs analysis of their existing staff. If an area has recently undertaken this piece of work please use existing data 2a In arrangements box insert what arrangements the area is making for PSO induction . 2b Delivered by: Insert who is delivering the programme, i.e Consortium, Area, mixture of both 2c As above 2d If there are established arrangements which meet this PC please detail here 2e In this box detail how the learning needs of current staff are to be met, who will deliver the training and how this will be delivered. 3. Enter as headings 4. In the numbers column enter the projected number of PSOs expected to train in this financial year. In the delivery column enter the letter relating to the level of delivery (either one or a combination of abc and d) 5 and 6 System: Identify how this information is captured i.e. HR system, paper trail etc Should the Area system not be available to you detail how you will capture this data 7 An example of how this section can be used is to identify training needs for more experienced PSOs 8 Example would be Feedback Sheets, Reports, questionnaires etc 9 Assessment of learning could be through a quiz, reflective log, written piece of work etc 10 Information in this section can be provided in your own format or as an attachment. The business plan must be endorsed by the Consortium Director.

Tracking Sheet …………………. Notes on completion This form is in two parts. Part one at the start of each programme and part two at the end. One form should be sent for each Area in your Region. Part 1 If groups of learners are starting together one form can be sent with names attached. If an individual starts the programme the same form should be sent. Forms should be sent by E Mail at the start of the programme

Part 2 This is a continuation of part one and should be sent by E Mail within 4 week s of the end of the programme. The programme evaluation should accompany this document. Indicate by each area the % level of attendance: e.g. 12 sessions x 10 attendees (if all attended all sessions) = 120 12 sessions x (average) of 7 attendees = 84 Therefore the % level of attendance is 70%

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template
Annex C

A. INITIAL SCREENING 1. Title of function, policy or practice (including common practice) Is this a new policy under development or an existing one? Existing policy, contained in PC41/2005 PSO Induction & Development

2. Aims, purpose and outcomes of function, policy or practice What is the function, policy or practice addressing? What operational work or employment/HR activities are covered? What outcomes are expected?
Develop skills of PSO grades of staff to work competently with offenders up to and including Tier 3 of the OM Model.

3. Target groups Who is the policy aimed at? Which specific groups are likely to be affected by its implementation? This could be staff, service users, partners, contractors. For each equality target group, think about possible positive or negative impact, benefits or disadvantages, and if negative impact is this at a high medium or low level. Give reasons for your assessment. This could be existing knowledge or monitoring, national research, through talking to the groups concerned, etc. If there is possible negative impact a full impact assessment is needed. The high, medium or low impact will indicate level of priority to give the full assessment. Please use the table below to do this. Equality target group Positive impact – could benefit Negative impact - could disadvantage (High, medium, low) L Reason for assessment and explanation of possible impact Potentially positive impact Staff – improved learning 1

Women

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

opportunities and career development. Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Potentially negative impact .

Men

L

Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative:

Asian/Asian British people

L

Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D 2

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative: Black/Black British people L Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative: Chinese people or other groups L Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative: People of mixed race L Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development 3

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative: White people (including Irish people) L Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative: Travellers or Gypsies L Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative: Disabled people L Positive: Staff – improved learning 4

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative: Lesbians, gay men and bisexual people L Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative: Transgender people L Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative:

5

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

Older people over 60

Positive: L Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative:

Young people (17-25) and children

Positive: L Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative:

Faith groups L

Positive: Staff – improved learning opportunities and career development Diversity included as specific module in the L&D programme Service Users – improved services from more competent staff Negative:

4.

Further research/questions to answer

As a result of the above, indicate what questions might need to be answered in the full impact assessment and what additional research or evidence might be needed to do this.

6

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

Full impact assessment required. This is being commissioned externally and will run through into the operational life of the circular.

Initial screening done by: Name/position Mike Ashe Date 24 May 2007.

7

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

B. PLANNING A FULL IMPACT ASSESSMENT 1. Title of function, policy or practice (including common practice) Is this a new policy under development or an existing one?

2. Aims, purpose and outcomes of function, policy or practice What is the function, policy or practice addressing? What operational work or employment/HR activities are covered? What outcomes are expected?

3. Target groups Who is the policy aimed at? Which specific groups are likely to be affected by its implementation? Use the initial screening to summarise potential adverse impact on each group as identified above and the reasons given. What knowledge and information do you already have, what further research or evidence should be collected in the full impact assessment? √ √ √ √ √ √ Gender Race Disability Sexual orientation/transgender Age Faith

4. Impact assessment process Which staff will conduct the IA? (e.g. Board members, senior managers, policy leads, or a team of staff.)

8

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

Will you include external advice from community groups or individuals? . How will the IA be approved and integrated into senior management processes?

What is the role of the diversity manager?

5. Consultation Give details of any planned internal staff and external community consultation and engagement. Who will be consulted, how will it be done, when, what are the aims of the consultation, what will be done with the results? Are a diverse range of staff, service users and stakeholders consulted? How will be impact assessment process be publicised to give as many people as possible an opportunity to take part?

The Impact Assessment will be placed on EPIC, the probation service intranet.

C. CONDUCTING THE IMPACT ASSESSMENT 6. Q & A: Effect of function, policy or practice What questions were identified in the initial screening above?

9

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

What other aspects of the way this policy is, or might be, implemented, should be explored? Are there any points within the policy as it stands where the potential exists for negative impact on staff or service users or stakeholders across all groups?

Is there any existing evidence to show that adverse impact on any racial group has occurred previously in this area, if so what?

If not what evidence will you need to collect to assess the impact? (This might be monitoring, evidence from staff networks, evidence from service users, surveys, interviews, focus groups, wider consultation, research at national or area level on impact of similar policies or functions, etc.)

How can you be sure you have fully understood potential for adverse impact? Have relevant community members been engaged at all stages in identifying questions to ask, areas of concern?

What level of community consultation and engagement has taken place during the impact assessment? What were the results? Overall, how does the policy promote equality, eliminate discrimination and promote good relations?

7. Assessment of evidence and action on results 10

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

What conclusions can be drawn from the consultation and the evidence collection? Support the conclusions by reference to the outcomes of consultation and evidence collection. . Is there is a need to change amend or withdraw the policy or practice? In what ways will be policy promote good relations, promote equality and eliminate discrimination? Does it need amending to reflect this?

If so, what action is needed, , by when and who is responsible?

11

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

D. FOLLOW UP TO IMPACT ASSESSMENT 8. Monitoring and management How will the policy be monitored to measure the impact of it on the target groups? Are monitoring arrangements adequate to measure the impact of the policy in relation to on all groups? Race Gender Disability Sexual orientation/transgender Faith Age What management structures are in place to ensure effective implementation of the function, policy or practice? 9. Publishing the results How will you publish the results of the IA and any subsequent monitoring to measure progress? In what formats, aimed at which audiences? If the information accessible to those who need it? Publish on EPIC How will feedback be given to those involved in consultation?

10. Approval and review Who will give final approval of the impact assessment of the policy or function? How often will it be reviewed in future – by when and by whom?

12

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

The policy will be reviewed in line with the QA process and by the NOMS OM Team.

Final approval by ______________________________________ (name) Date of completed IA and approval _________________________

13

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

RACE EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT Ten key points to ensure a good impact assessment The ten steps below are practical suggestions about how to approach the impact assessment process in general to ensure that it is thorough and fully evidenced. These notes supplement the more detailed guidance in the Home Office Impact Assessment template, to which probation areas should refer for more information if required, as well as the CRE guidance on impact assessment. 1. Establish the local baseline in your area – this will help with all impact assessments Who are your service users? Who are your staff? Who are your partner organisations and those to whom you contract services? What do you know about these groups in relation to racial and cultural background, age, faith, gender, etc? Do you have enough knowledge and information about these diverse groups to be able to assess the impact of your policies and practices on each of them? What sort of information might you need to show that you can give detailed consideration to the possible impact? If you don’t have it, how can you get it? What do you know about your local community and sources of advice and expertise that you could tap into? How can you find out? What could be available in your area or at national level, to strengthen local community sources and their capacity to help with the impact assessment process? Area there any race equality issues in your area which should be taken into account? For example have there been any employment tribunal cases alleging racial discrimination, or complaints from service users or community groups? What well know community concerns are there beyond the probation service – for example any known concerns about policing, or poor community relations – these external factors can affect how the Probation Service delivers its services. 2. Clarify who is responsible for conducting impact assessments Will all impact assessments be done by one person, for example, the diversity manager? Or will relevant policy and operational managers carry them up with advice from the diversity manager? How will the assessment be communicated and actioned by senior management? How will the outcome form part of regular performance and management review 14

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

processes? Are responsibility and deadlines clearly assigned and are there enough resources available for those responsible to do them properly? Will impact assessment training be provided for all those responsible for impact assessments? 3. Set up a process for internal consultation – and use it before you start Given the composition of your staff, who needs to be consulted internally about the impact of policy and practice? Is there already a system in place for consultation? If so how effective is it? And if not can something be put in place before the impact assessment process begins? Can staff associations and support groups help? Use the internal consultation process to help identify potential problems, adverse impact or areas which the impact assessment might need to probe. This framework can be used for all policies and functions. 4. Set up a process for external consultation – and use it before you start What is the best way for you to involve local communities, faith groups etc? What sort of support from you might they need in order to take this on effectively (resources, access, methods of communicating, frequency of consultation and so on)? Are any existing consultation methods working well and do they include the right people? If not, set up a strong and effective system of regular consultation with local communities. Some organisations have set up an independent advisory group specifically to assist with impact assessment, by reviewing priorities for assessment, conduct of the assessment, conclusions, and bringing a challenging and fresh perspective which can be very helpful. Once a good process is in place, consult before you begin the impact assessment to help to identify potential problems, adverse impact or areas which you need to explore.

15

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

5.

Decide what questions need to be asked about the policy, function or practice. Remember that policies can be unwritten – custom and practice – as well as formal written policies. What and who does the policy or function affect? How much do you already know about the way it works: has there been any ethnic monitoring in the past, any staff or service users surveys, audit reports or other information? Are there any identified concerns? Use this and the consultation process above to think through any potential adverse impact of each area: what are the danger points where unfair treatment might occur? How much discretion is involved, and how is this discretion supervised and by whom? How is use of discretion recorded? What management oversight and supervision is in place for the policy or function? What are the gaps in your knowledge of the impact of this policy or practice and how can you fill them?

6.

Collect the evidence Evidence can be from a variety of sources: ethnic monitoring where it is in place, of staff and service users, is one source. You can also carry out surveys or interviews and focus groups specifically to gather evidence for the impact assessment, and collect further evidence from the consultation methods set up earlier in the process. There might have been inspectorate reports, or pieces of local research on a topic. Staff associations and networks may have evidence as may partners and service users. In the impact assessment you need to describe what the various sources of evidence were; how it was obtained, from whom and what were the key issues (concerns or successes) which the evidence suggests. It is not enough to state that no adverse impact has been identified: the assessment must make clear the basis for that statement: the how, who, what and when of arriving at that assessment.

7.

Act on the results According to what the impact assessment concludes, ensure action is taken to amend the policy or function or even produce a new policy or

16

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

procedure, and that responsibility and a timetable for action is clearly assigned and implementation is monitored. 8. Set up and use an effective ethnic monitoring system. If the policy or function concerned has not been subject to ethnic monitoring in the past, and has a potential for adverse impact, you need to ensure ethnic monitoring systems are in place. All new policies and functions will also require an ethnic monitoring process to demonstrate year on year that there is no discrimination and that the policy promotes good race relations. Make sure your local ethnic monitoring system can provide the answers to your own local questions (not just provide data for NPD statistics!) and reflects what you know about your service users and your staff. Make sure that everyone involved knows why they are monitoring and how to do it. As well as outcomes in terms of statistics ensure you cover the use of discretion at key decision making points: how is it used, who by, who oversees the outcomes. Can you be sure discretion is always been exercised fairly and can you prove that? Provide training for the staff that will collect and analyse the ethnic monitoring information. 9. Publish the results All race equality impact assessments should be made available to service users and staff, perhaps using the Area web site. Feedback and results should also be given to everyone, internally and externally, who was consulted. Publication promotes openness and accountability and encourages further dialogue and debate. Make sure the published results are in a range of accessible formats to meet the diverse range of access requirements. 10. Keep asking the questions! If the ethnic monitoring and consultation is effective, the review process should become part of the routine performance and management processes so that the impact of policy and practice can be continuously reviewed. Think about additional ways to check for impact and gather evidence as time goes by: annual service users and staff surveys, for example. Use local independent external contacts (for example local universities) to 17

NPS Race Equality Impact Assessment template

conduct small scale research projects to validate the ethnic monitoring results. Impact assessment is an evolving and continuous process. Policy and practice changes and so do people and knowledge and understanding of race and diversity. Setting up a strong system as suggested above will mean the impact assessment process becomes mainstreamed, and can be used as a basis for impact assessment of other diversity strands such as gender, disability, sexual orientation, faith and belief, and age.

18

Annex D

Resource Impact of PC18/2007

Funding totalling £800.000 has been identified to deliver training to 1000 PSOs, which equates to £800 per PSO. Additional investment is currently made by the majority of areas from local area budgets. It is clear that several areas, which have previously under-invested in this area will have to commit more resource to PSO training to meet the requirements of the PC. The remaining areas which already provide PSO training above the minimum standard will continue to do so and their investment of funds and staff time represent a significant resource for the programme. The issue of this PC will require areas that do not currently meet the standard to divert training funding from other initiatives. Research indicates that areas spend on average £65K per year of area budgets on training initiatives that are not mandated by NOMS. The Unions are currently in formal dispute with employers on the issue of PSO training investment. The proposed curriculum and arrangements have been negotiated with them. Failure to issue the PC will cause an escalation of the dispute and may lead to industrial action that would undermine the performance of Probation Areas.