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OregOn Observer

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Thursday, May 23, 2013 Vol. 129, No. 46 Oregon, WI ConnectOregonWI.com $1
112 Janesville Street, Oregon, WI 53575
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No more
summer
break?
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
A l ocal el ement a-
ry school is studying
whether to shift to year-
round schooling as ear-
ly as 2014.
Staff from Nether-
wood Knoll Elementary
School got the green
light last week from the
Oregon School Board
to form a task force to
study the pros and cons
of moving to a bal-
anced calendar.
The potential shift
wouldnt add to the
roughly 180 days of
school for teachers and
kids but could do away
wi t h t he t radi t i onal
three-month summer
break, explained school
principal Dan Rikli.
Instead, the calendar
could include several
breaks of three weeks
or mor e. The goal
would be to combat
the summer slump,
in which many kids see
math or reading levels
drop during the long
summer vacation.
School st af f pr e-
sented data to the board
showing that scores on
reading tests between
spring and fall for 40
percent of Netherwood
students. In math, 44
percent of ki ds saw
scores drop.
Rikli said the school
is open-minded to the
change but will survey
parents and do more
research before making
a decision.
If the community
feels this is not for
them, were not going
to push the agenda,
Rikli told the board.
A t a s k f or c e of
20-25 members will
meet twice a month,
beginning in June, and
expects to make a rec-
ommendat i on t o t he
board in January 2014.
The group will include
staff, administrators,
parents, daycare pro-
viders, a school board
me mbe r a nd by
request from school
boar d member Rae
Vogeler a representa-
tive from the Oregon
teachers union.
In a memo t o t he
board, Rikli and other
Netherwood teachers
cited research showing
that year round school
can combat the summer
slump, particularly for
kids from low-income
families, and lead to
better attendance, fewer
disciplinary problems
and mor e posi t i ve
wellness conditions for
The potential change
wouldnt add to the roughly
180 days of school for
teachers and kids but could
do away with the traditional
3-month summer break,
Oregon School District
Knetherwood Knoll considers year-round school
Village of Oregon
Liquor rules set
after late change
existing Class a
licenses will be
grandfathered
Bill liviCk
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Village Board Monday
heard a second reading and
adopted a new ordinance curb-
ing alcohol sales in the village.
The ordinance was changed
slightly from a version the
board considered in April. At
a May 6 overview and public
forum on the ordinance, busi-
nessman Ted Wallace ques-
tioned a provision that would
have prohibited a Class A
license being granted to busi-
nesses located within 1,056
feet of another business hold-
ing the same license. Class A
licenses are reserved for busi-
nesses that sell alcohol to take
out, such as Wallaces Alpine
Liquors on North Main Street.
Wallace told the board that
provision would make his
business worthless if he had
to sell it.
It doesnt seem fair, he
said.
Trustee Jerry Bollig agreed
and said he would like the rule
amended. Other board mem-
bers also agreed, and after
some discussion changed the
policy to essentially grandfa-
ther existing businesses hold-
ing a Class A liquor license.
The board directed attorney
Matt Dregne to add language
to the provision stating, This
Village of Oregon
New village water plan looks for weaknesses
Board approves $41k
update
Bill liviCk
Unifed Newspaper Group
Th e Vi l l a g e Bo a r d
last week approved pub-
lic works director Mark
Belows proposal to hire an
engineer to evaluate the vil-
lages water system.
Det er mi ni ng t he l i f e
expectancy of municipal
wells is part of what goes
into the evaluation, Below
said. But the real benefit
of a study is it will show
where there are weaknesses
in the water system and
include recommendations
for future improvements.
He said there would be
two key parts to the study.
First there would be exten-
sive field work getting pres-
sure readings and flow lev-
els off fire hydrants.
The second part involves
creating a water system
model on computer.
That will tell us where
o u r p r o j e c t e d f u t u r e
demands are going to be,
Below explained. Itll ana-
lyze the distribution system
and look at water quality,
along with cost estimates
Turn to Water/Page 13
Turn to School/Page 7
A Lot of Trouble
Growing chorus opposes razing
historic home for more parking
Bill liviCk
Unifed Newspaper Group
Village officials are continu-
ing negotiations on a historic
home at the edge of downtown
Oregon in hopes of buying the
property and turning it into a
municipal parking lot.
But opposi t i on t o mov-
ing or demolishing one of the
villages oldest properties
known as the Ames Home
surfaced Monday when two
women spoke at a public hear-
ing against purchasing the
property at 146 S. Main St.,
currently the home of Deb
Bossingham and Steve New-
ton.
Pat Wilkening, a lifelong
area resident and descendant
of the Ames family, told the
Village Board she opposes the
plan.
Its an important part of
village history, Wilkening
said. If you move or demol-
ish homes like this, we lose the
ability to tell the story of Ore-
gon. It makes no sense.
Julia Meyers, a member of
the Historic Preservation Com-
mission and the Oregon Area
Historical Society, appeared
with Wilkening and seconded
her opinion:
If we take away the charm
of historic Oregon to build a
parking lot, that would be a
mistake, she said. I want
you to think if its important
to remove that home to build a
parking lot.
The womens statements
echo what downtown property
Graphics Courtesy Metro Creative
Turn to Historic/Page 2
Key points
No license can be granted
for any business where a pre-
scription medication is sold.
No business that sells gas-
oline may sell single servings
of fermented malt beverages.
No new, previously
non-existing business may
locate within .2 miles of other
businesses holding Class A
license.
Turn to Liquor/Page 5
Village of Oregon
2
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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owner and businesswoman
Bonnie Thiel and local his-
torian Melanie Woodworth
wrote in separate emails to
village officials.
Vi l l age admi ni st rat or
Mike Gracz acknowledged
there is a segment of the
community that does not
support the plan to replace
the building with a parking
lot. But since the public dis-
cussion over 146 S. Main
St. emerged a few weeks
ago, most downtown busi-
ness owners, the Chamber
of Commerce and the Vil-
lage Board have supported
the idea.
The board has twice vot-
ed unanimously in favor
of making an offer on the
property the most recent
at the May 13 meeting and
has talked about spending
as much as $400,000 to pur-
chase the property and build
a 50-stall parking lot.
Gracz sai d t he dol l ar
amount and number of stalls
is preliminary. The village
hasnt reached an agreement
with the property owners
and hasnt hired an engineer
to design a lot, he said.
Observer phone calls to
homeowner Bossingham
were not returned.
The concern over a lack
of downtown parking has
come to the fore with the
reopening of Senor Peppers
Mexican Restaurant a few
weeks ago and the antici-
pated opening of a new res-
taurant Masons on Main
this week.
But Bonnie and Jerry
Thiel, who own the build-
ings that will house Masons
on Main, are strong believ-
ers in preserving historic
homes and buildings. While
they recognize the need for
more parking downtown,
they dont support removing
the Ames Home to build a
new lot.
Addi t i onal par ki ng
gained by the destruction
of the site/trees would be
a shame, and I oppose this
type of progress, Bonnie
Thiel wrote in an email to
village officials.
Arlan Kay, an architect
who specializes in historic
restoration, is chair of the
villages Historic Preserva-
tion Commission. He hasnt
formed an opinion about the
villages plan for the Ames
Home, he told the Observer.
He said the issue came
up kind of fast at a com-
mission meeting several
weeks ago.
Were trying to get an
assessment of how historic
it is, he said of the home.
At the meeting, there was
concern that it came up kind
of quick.
Kay added hes not sure if
the location is the best place
for a parking lot.
They tend to be a little
bit of a barricade, and that
discourages pedestrian traf-
fic, he explained.
Gracz said he detected a
lack of support for the plan
when he mentioned it at the
commission meeting.
I did it as an FYI at a
Historic Preservation Com-
mission meeting, and some
commission members had
the same reaction about the
property that hes heard
from other preservationists.
Village President Steve
Staton said its clear the
village needs more park-
ing stalls downtown. He
responded cautiously to the
statements from Wilkening
and Meyers at the public
hearing Monday.
I think its fair to say it
was good information to
hear, he said. Downtown
parking has a lot of inter-
est and a lot of pros and
cons. Everybody agrees
its needed, but every place
you look, there are pros and
cons.
After discussing the mat-
ter in closed session Mon-
day, Staton said village staff
would be conferring with
the owners of 146 S. Main
St. on Tuesday.
For her part, Wilkening
said she understands that the
Village Board is trying to
do the best it can.
Still, she thinks there
must be some better things
that can happen for a park-
ing lot than taking down
some of the historic homes
in that area.
She said Oregons done
a good job of preserving its
historic areas and hopes the
village will continue that
policy.
Thats a historic neigh-
borhood, and I would hate
to see that house go, she
said. I know its been
neglected, and its lost a
lot of its charm, but there
might be an opportunity for
someone to restore it or fix
it up. I just hate to see this
happen, because once they
take one theyll start to take
more houses in that neigh-
borhood.
I know parking is a prob-
lem, she added. I under-
stand that, but Im for pre-
serving our history as much
as we can.
Historic: Local historians ask officials to think twice before razing a house for parking
Continued from page 1
Photo by Seth Jovaag
Local historians dont know exactly when the house at 146 S. Main St. was built, but most believe it was in the 1850s. The village is
attempting to buy the home and use the property for a future parking lot.
I know its been
neglected, and
its lost a lot of
its charm, but
there might be an
opportunity for
someone to restore
it or fix it up.
Bonnie Thiel, Oregon
business owner
Downtown parking
has a lot of interest
and a lot of pros
and cons. Every
body agrees its
needed, but every
place you look,
there are pros and
cons.
Steve Staton, Village
President
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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OHS students article gets
WNA honorable mention
Oregon High School junior Jackson Schneider recently
received an honorable mention from the Wisconsin News-
paper Association for an article he wrote for the school
newspaper in March.
Schneider, who wrote in the Paw Print about local
steps to improve school security in the wake of the San-
dy Hook school shooting last December, was honored in
the editorial category for large schools with more than
1,000 students.
Pettit receives
glowing review
But village Board
has concerns about
how the police
chief handles
complaints
Bill liviCk
Unifed Newspaper Group
Oregon pol i ce chi ef
Doug Pettit received a
g l o w i n g
j o b p e r -
f o r ma n c e
evaluation
in his 2011-
12 review.
Vi l l a g e
administra-
t o r Mi k e
Gracz eval-
uated Pet-
tits work in March. Based
on Graczs written com-
ments, Pettit would seem
to be an ideal employee
and police chief.
The onl y i t em t hat
raised a question about
Pettit came in a narra-
tive from the chiefs last
evaluation, when Gracz
wrote, As this evalua-
tion illustrates, Doug is
an excellent employee and
department head. Howev-
er, Doug and the Village
Board need to discuss an
ongoing issue regarding
the Boards perception of
how Doug handles com-
plaints and inquiries from
the public regarding the
Police Department.
Gracz wrote that Pettit
and the board should dis-
cuss developing an effec-
tive communication sys-
tem to communicate about
this type of item, but also
annual goals.
Gracz also suggested
that Pettit and the board
should discuss how to
establish a better work-
i ng r el at i onshi p. He
commented that the chief
has superior knowledge
of police activities and
continues to take on extra
work for the village.
He noted that Pettit is
constantly training and is
always looking to improve
his police and manage-
ment knowledge, and
that he takes on new duties
when t he j ob requi res
whether asked to or not.
Pettit was hired by the
village on Dec. 1, 1975.
He became chief of the
Oregon Police Depart-
ment on May 21, 1985.
His current annual salary
is $89,481.60, according
to village records.
Pettit
Officials signal approval for change to public street
Village of Oregon
Fiduciary plans to
build Raven Court
this year in bid to
spur development
Bill liviCk
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Village Board and
Planning Commission each
si gnal ed t hei r approval
recently for the owners of
the Legend at Bergamont
to change what had been
planned as a private street
into a public street.
Raven Court has not
yet been constructed, but
Craig Raddatz, vice presi-
dent of Fi duci ary Real
Estate Development, told
the board last week that his
company wants to build the
street this year in order to
open more lots for devel-
opment in the mid-level
price range.
The street would intersect
with Alpine Parkway on the
east and Carnoustie Way on
the west. A small segment
of Carnoustie Way will also
be converted to a public
street from where it meets
Augusta Drive on the north
to where it will eventually
intersect with Raven Way a
block south of Augusta.
A gat e mar ki ng t he
entrance of the gated sec-
tion of the development
at t he nort hern end of
Carnoustie Way will be
removed and relocated a
few hundred feet south, so
that Raven Court would not
be within the gated part of
the neighborhood. Another
gate would be added farther
east and just south of where
Carnoustie Way, which is a
U-shaped street, will inter-
sect Raven Court to the
east.
Car noust i e Way wi l l
remain private south of
Raven Court.
Publ i c Wor ks di r ec-
tor Mark Below did not
oppose the idea of making
the street public, although
he di d comment t o t he
Planning Commission that
with the winters the way
theyve been, the last thing
we need is another public
street.
Other than plowing and
salting and some future
maintenance, theres not
much to it, he added. Its
only a block-and-a-half
long.
Thats all private prop-
erty right now, so theres
some legal paperwork to
do, he added.
All the streets in the
Bergamont are out l ot s,
owned by Fiduciary. So it
would go from an outlot to
a public street.
With the winters
the way theyve
been, the last thing
we need is another
public street.
Mark Below, Public
Works Director
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May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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These remarks were delivered
to the Oregon School Board last
week. Throughout this commen-
tary, the word administration
refers to both the District Office
and the Oregon School Board:
A
fter last years referendum
was
defeated,
the administra-
tion went back
to work.
This time,
surveys were
studied, conver-
sations with staff
and commu-
nity scheduled,
schmoozing in
the various philanthropic clubs in
town, on the golf courses, etc. The
outcome was a new approach and a
doubled price tag for the Facilities
Master Plan.
Intense marketing began. It
convinced me that we have some
structural and maintenance prob-
lems that should be addressed. But
the price tag seemed disproportion-
ate to the previously voted down
referendum.
The new Master Plan seemed
like it was being pushed through
without detail or real public trans-
parency, a common practice with
this administration. Frankly, this
methodology leads to poor results
and bad feelings.
No offense, but the administra-
tion looked a little desperate and a
little foolish with its lack of detail
and transparency about the refer-
endum.
So the administration decided
to shelve the Facilities Master
Plan and blamed the union for this
decision, teachers as scapegoats, a
lousy, shameful practice.
More recently, there was a
nicely written plea by Courtney
Odorico in the May 2 issue of the
Oregon Observer for the referen-
dum to be a community concern
and to justify how important it is
for the district and students. It con-
cluded that a community task force
should be formed.
Excellent idea, but the problem
is that the administration is still
not really listening. Why? I do not
know. Maybe the administration
isnt listening because of personal
agendas, worries about legacy or
an inappropriate need to wield
power and control.
The administration needs to
wipe the sleep out of its eyes
and realize there have been sev-
eral wakeup calls that must be
answered. To date, they have been
quite blatantly ignored.
Some members of the admin-
istration need to understand that
many voters in this district do not
like that their childrens schools
are being run based on the contem-
porary business model.
What do we really want for our
local community schools? What
do we really want for our children?
Do we want to be a part of the edu-
cational industrial complex where
community members, students and
employees have little or no say in
this great social system called pub-
lic education?
The current administration needs
to align itself with the community.
The administration needs to be
more humanistic. The administra-
tion should not follow bad prac-
tices that put our schools in danger
of not being the best that they can
be, practices that really do not help
children become intelligent, think-
ing, caring and creative lifelong
learners.
Our schools in Oregon have
always been among the best. Our
children have many resources to
help them learn, but they are still
very dependent and need our tal-
ented and creative teachers and
support staff for their continued
quality education. Marginalizing
our teachers and staff and beating
them down is detrimental to our
childrens learning in so many
ways.
It seems teachers are the loyal
and loving dogs of society that
have been beaten down, but
because they have to eat, they con-
tinue to take the abuse. This prac-
tice needs to stop and stop now.
Educators strive to reach out to
our students and work with their
individual needs and concerns and
build those relationships necessary
to help students grow emotionally
and academically. Is the adminis-
tration paying attention and build-
ing positive relationships with
staff? Is the contemporary business
model an excuse for control and
autocratic top down management
style? Is this really the best prac-
tice?
The administration should not
follow the standard line of thinking
from pundits that are not qualified
to mandate educational policy. The
administration also must admit that
it is the problem that is keeping the
OSD from really moving forward.
The administration should start
by giving respect and dignity to
its employees. If you really have
heart, support your teachers and
staff, give them a livable wage
and decent benefits, eliminate the
fear and punishment philosophy
as a control method, conduct your-
selves with civility and decency,
then and only then will the people
of this community support a refer-
endum.
If any of you cannot see the big
picture, cannot be part of a more
positive change for OSD, or can-
not accept the challenge to work
for and together with employees
and a wide variety of community
members in a respectful manner,
then you should step down and
let another work for that positive
change.
The administration needs to
understand that the rejected refer-
endum a year ago was really a vote
of no confidence. No confidence
in planning, no confidence in set-
ting priorities and no confidence in
the fair and equitable treatment of
teachers and staff.
I am confident we can make
do with what we have until these
issues are addressed. Change is dif-
ficult but we can all work for the
common goal of educating future
generations.
The choice is yours you must
listen to the voters of this district,
again they have spoken loudly at
the polls.
I will not vote for this referen-
dum or any other until the adminis-
tration changes how they treat and
manage their employees, because
in the final analysis, people are
vastly more important than build-
ings. Have courage everyone to
change and change for the better.
Gwen Fabert Maitzen is a
retired teacher, artist and resident
of the Town of Oregon.
Put people first, then
worry about buildings
Fabert Maitzen
Community Voices
D
ane County is a nationally
recognized leader in biking,
with over 200 miles of trails,
premier events like the IronMan
competition, and numerous cycling
industries calling our region home.
I meet regularly
with residents,
cycling organiza-
tions, and cycling
businesses that
give me valuable
perspective on
how to increase
cycling safety,
and strengthen
this key recre-
ational and economic asset.
This year were continuing to
move forward on a number of key
recommendations from our com-
munity.
This spring, communities and
organizations will be able to apply to
fund projects such as signage, road
striping, bike trail crossing improve-
ments and lighting from the $25,000
included in my county budget to
enhance safety.
A number of trails will move for-
ward this year, adding to our exten-
sive network of on and off-road
trails for cyclists and pedestrians that
link our parks, natural spaces and
communities.
First we
will connect
the Mili-
tary Ridge
State Trail
to Brigham
County
Park. The
trail will be
a little over
one mile
long, paved
10 wide
and traverse
through some of the most scenic
areas of Dane County. Construction
will most likely begin sometime this
summer with completion anticipated
by July 2014.
Planning for phase one of the
Lower Yahara River Trail will
also be finalized, with construction
anticipated in 2014. This trail would
connect the Capital City Trail in
Madison to McFarland and eventu-
ally will extend to Stoughton.
The county continues to partner
with the City of Madison on the Ice
Age Junction North Trail, connect-
ing county highway PD to Raymond
Road in Madison and county high-
way M.
Development of a missing trail
link between the Glacial Drumlin
Trail and Capital City Trail that
could connect Madison all the way
to Milwaukee continues as well as
a county-wide trail signage project,
allowing cyclists to better navigate
across the county for day or week-
long cycling trips.
Our efforts are making this fun
and easy sport for families and peo-
ple of all ages safer and even easier
to get into. For more cycling info
and area maps, visit: countyofdane.
com/lwrd/parks/bicyclists.aspx
Joe Parisi is the Dane County
Executive.
Exciting things ahead for
cycling in Dane County
Parisi
Legislative opinion
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GARAGE SALE
Oregon - 430 Landover 1 block
N. Of Netherwood. 5/24 & 5/25
7:00 a.m. Multi-Family, Large household
Linens, bedding, weedwackers, patio teak
furniture,antique courthouse bench, captain chair,
frames and pictures, plant pots, sport equipment,
golf clubs, tools, ice shanty, trolling motor, pump
weed sprayer, toys, books, Christmas, clothes.
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
restriction shall not apply
to the issuance of a new
license where premises
have been operating and
open for business under the
same class of license within
the preceding 12 months.
Village administrator
Mike Gracz said the change
would allow somebody
to have a Class A license if
they were to move a prop-
erty or sell it.
Other key provisions of
the ordinance that remained
intact include restricting
licenses to businesses that
sell prescription medica-
tions and prohibiting the
sale of single servings of
fermented malt beverages
by businesses that also sell
gasoline.
The or di nance al so
requires that when serving
samples of alcohol, a serv-
er is required to check IDs
for anyone who appears to
be under the age of 30 and
tightens the guidelines on
server training.
We also made our appli-
cations for licenses much
more complete and thor-
ough, which sends the mes-
sage that you need to do
things right, said Village
President Steve Staton, who
has led the effort to tighten
regulations on alcohol sales
and consumption.
Last year t he board
passed a new social host
policy that applies to parents
and other adults. A similar
policy has since been adopt-
ed in other communities,
i nc l udi ng
St ought on
and Middle-
ton.
S t a t o n
said that in
c o n j u n c -
t i on wi t h
area schools
conducting
the Parents Who Host Lose
the Most campaign and the
social host ordinance, advo-
cates of tighter regulations
on alcohol sales and con-
sumption are making head-
way.
The long-term goal, Sta-
ton said, is to change the
states culture of alcohol,
which he said is too accept-
ing of alcohol consumption
as an everyday way of life.
He sai d i n order t o
accomplish the goal, com-
munities need to enact
stricter local policies, which
is how the statewide smok-
ing ban went into effect.
That started in isolated
places, and it spread, too,
he said.
LAKELAND SHRINE CLUBS
FAMOUS FISH BOIL
and Daughters of the Nile Bake Sale
Oregon Sportsmans Club
1726 Sandhill Road,Oregon
Directions:
1
2 mile south of Kopkes Greenhouse
Friday, May 31 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Serving boiled sh, carrots, potatoes, onions,
coleslaw, rolls, butter, and coffee or milk
Proceeds from this event are for the benet of the Lakeland Shrine Club.
Payments are not deductible as a charitable contribution.
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$10.00 Adults
$5.00 Children
10 years & under
2013 Bike Safety Rodeo
May 1st - Netherwood Knoll Elementary
May 8th - Brooklyn Elementary
May 21st - Prairie View Elementary
2nd - 4th Grades
All-Color Powder Coating
Architecture Network, Inc.
Bonsett-Veal Vision Source
Cousins Subs
Dane Recycling, LLC
DeBrouxs Diner
First Business Bank
Gorman & Co., Inc.
Habush Habush & Rottier S.C.
Drs. James & Enyart, Optometrists, S.C.
Kwik Trip
Mennenga Tax & Financial
Normandy Resources, LLC
North Star Resource Group-
Doug Weisenberger & Josh Evenson
Oregon Community Bank & Trust
Pacifc Cycle, Inc. (Schwinn &
Mongoose Bicyles)
State Bank of Cross Plains-Oregon
Stoehr Automotive Center
Trachte, Inc.
Union Bank & Trust, Co.- Brooklyn &
Oregon
Wisconsin Cheese Originals
Orgainized by Oregon Rotary
Sponsors of
The Oregon Bike Rodeo & Other
Community Projects
Thank You to our 2013 Sponsors!
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All Local And Homemade From Scratch!
6895 Paoli Rd., Paoli
(608) 845-3663
Open 7 days a week
8 a.m.-7 p.m.
UN284937
Ruegsegger Reuben Stuffed Sweet Peppers
Stuffed Hamburgers Stuffed Chicken Breasts
Eggs Benedict & Quiches Pies & More
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Oregon Area has 10
Memorial Day ceremonies
W
hile the Oregon
area has many
Memorial Day
celebrations, many people
carry on national traditions
on this day. Here are a few
traditions and their origins,
according to PBS.org.
Displaying the flag
On Memorial Day, the
U.S. flag should be dis-
played at half-staff until
noon. I n t he mor ni ng,
the flag should be raised
momentarily to the top,
then lowered to half-staff.
Americans can also honor
prisoners of war and those
missing in action by flying
the POW/MIA flag.
Visiting grave sites
Memorial Day was origi-
nally known as Decoration
Day because it was a time
to honor the nations dead
by decorating their graves
with flowers. Many Ameri-
cans make special flower
arrangements and deliver
them as a family to grave
sites of their loved ones and
ancestors.
Nat i onal Moment of
Remembrance: In accor-
dance with a congressional
resolution passed in 2000,
Americans pause wherever
they are at 3 p.m. local time
for a moment of silence to
remember and honor the
fallen.
Memorial Day Parades
The Me mor i a l Da y
parade is a time-honored
tradition in cities and towns
across Ameri ca, where
neighbors come together
to remember with pride
for those who sacrificed so
much for our country.
Memorial Day poppies
The tradition of red pop-
pies on Memorial Day was
inspired by the 1915 poem
In Flanders Fields by
John McCrea.
Seeing the poem and its
colorful illustration in a
magazine, Georgia teacher
and volunteer war worker
to Moina Michael made a
personal pledge to always
wear red silk poppies as an
emblem for keeping the
faith with all who died.
She also began a cam-
paign to make the poppy a
universal symbol of trib-
ute and support for veter-
ans. Through her efforts,
the idea was adopted in the
United States and spread to
England, France, Austra-
lia and more than 50 other
countries.
Source: pbs.org/memorialday
concert/meaning/traditions.html
Student a finalist to win writing contest
A Rome Corners Inter-
mediate School student is
a finalist in a super hero-
themed online writing con-
test.
Kat el yn Sol dat ke, a
sixth grader, was among a
handful of top finalists in
their super hero inspired
writing contest for fans in
grades 3-6. Finalists were
announced in May by Cap-
stone and DC Comics Fan
Family, the online hub for
DC Entertainment family-
friendly news and informa-
tion on DC Comics Super
Heroes.
The nationwide contest
Be a Super Hero. Read!
encouraged children to
write about a real hero in
their lives, describing the
human powers, such as
courage, kindness, or gen-
erosity, which make their
selected hero special.
Katelyn Soldatkes hero
i s Dr. VonBergen, her
heart surgeon.
To vote for and read her
story, visit CapstoneSuper-
Hero.com/Contest.html.
Voting runs through May
29.
Capstone Young Read-
ers will reveal the winning
entry on May 30 at Book
Expo America. The winner
will receive a VIP trip for
four to tour Warner Bros.
Animation Studios and
DC Entertainment Offices,
the home of Superman and
Batman, and other unique
prizes. The hero described
in the winning entry will
receive $2,500 to donate
to the charity of his or her
choice.
From remarkable fam-
ily members to incredible
educators and community
helpers, the heroes of the
stories we received were
described in touching and
heartfelt language. Our
contest gave children a
platform to reflect on and
articulate the super pow-
ers of a real-life hero, and
we learned so much about
these remarkable young
people through their writ-
ing. Its now up to their
peers to decide our win-
ner, said Ashley Ander-
sen Zant op, Capst one
Group Publisher and Gen-
eral Manager.
Memorial Day
The Oregon area will
have several Memorial Day
observations Monday, May
27. Ceremonies will be
conducted at the following
locations at the following
times.
Sponsors include The
Oregon-Brooklyn Memorial
VFW Post 10272 and
the Benjamin Johnson
American Legion Post 160
of Brooklyn.
8 a.m. Jug Prairie
Cemetery
8:15 a.m. German
Church Cemetery
8:45 a.m. Graves
Cemetery
9 a.m. Rutland Cemetery
9:30 a.m. Storytown
Cemetery
10 a.m. War Memorial
in Oregon
10:30 a.m. Prairie
Mound & St. Marys
Cemetery
10:45 a.m. Dunn
Cemetery
11:15 a.m. Brooklyn
Cemetery
12:45 a.m. Fitchburg
Wayside Memorial
Graphics courtesy of Metro Creative
Memorial Day traditions include flag flying, parades, grave site visits and symbolic poppy flowers.
Liquor: Last year, board passed social host
Continued from page 1
Kopkes to help Badger Honor Flight Saturday
Shoppers can help sup-
port Badger Honor Flight
this weekend by donating
to the cause at Kopkes
Greenhouse.
Badger Honor Flight is a
nonprofit organization cre-
ated to fly World War II,
Korean and terminally ill
veterans to Washington,
D.C., to view the monu-
ments erected to honor
their service.
The group has designat-
ed the Sunday of Memo-
rial Day weekend, May 26,
as the day to Buy a Plant
Help Send a Veteran to
Washington, D.C.
Badger Honor Flight will
provide volunteers to pro-
mote the program, hand
out fliers and receive dona-
tions.
A special program will
also be held at Kopkes at 4
p.m. There will be speakers
from Badger Honor Flight,
including some veterans
that have gone on the Hon-
or flight. The Oregon Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars will
present the colors, 21-gun
salute and taps.
Kopkes is located at
1828 Sand Hill Road.
5'x10' $27 Month
10'x10' $38 Month
10'x15' $48 Month
10'x20' $58 Month
10'x25' $65 Month
At Cleary Building Corp.
190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI
(608) 845-9700
EMERALD INVESTMENTS
MINI SToRAgE
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Staton
We also made
our applications
for licenses much
more complete and
thorough, which
sends the message
that you need to do
things right.
Steve Staton, Village
President
6
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
845 Market St., Oregon
(608) 835-9030
www.communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
Weekly Life Groups
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Celebratory Worship
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger, Leah
Lonsbury
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 & 10:15 am Worship service at
the Oregon High School PAC
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLES UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
7 p.m., Al-Anon meet-
ing at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, Peoples United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Monday, May 27
Memorial Day
8 a.m., Union Bank & Trusts Grove Gallop, Lake
Leota Park, Evansville
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Horse show and parade,
Triple K Stables
10 a.m. Memorial program, Oregon Triangle Park
(more times at various locations - see page 5)
Tuesday, May 28
1 p.m., Brain class, Oregon Senior Center, 835-5801
Complimentary access for veterans, The Legend at
Bergamont, 835-6900
Thursday, May 30
9 a.m. 1 p.m., library closed for staff training
3-6 p.m., Food Pantry, Hefty Warehouses, at 1092
Union Road, #8, obfp.org
7 p.m., Anderson Park meeting, Town of Oregon
town hall
Monday, June 3
7 p.m., Oregon Straw Hat Players auditions for
Oliver, Oregon High School
5:30 p.m., Village of Oregon board, Village Hall
Tuesday, June 4
6:30 p.m., Delta Phi meeting, first Tuesday of the
month, various locations, 424-6485
7 p.m., Oregon Community Band concert, Waterman
Park
7 p.m., Oregon Straw Hat Players auditions for
Oliver, Oregon High School
Thursday, June 6
6:30 p.m., Optimist Club, Oregon Senior Center
6:30 p.m., Village of Oregon planning, Village Hall
7 p.m., Town of Oregon board, Town Hall
Saturday, June 8
9 a.m., Oregon Police Department K-9 run/walk,
Oregon Sports Arena, 100 N. Perry Parkway
Sunday, June 9
1 p.m. Graduation, Oregon High School
Community calendar
Thursday, May 23
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of May 20)
Friday, May 24
John Duggleby Music
@ Oregon Senior Center
Anniversary (of May 22)
Saturday, May 25
Oregon Summer Fest Parade
(of June12)
Sunday, May 26
Worship Service: Faith
Evangelical Lutheran Church
Monday, May 27
U.S. Army News Show
Tuesday, May 28
Movie: All the Kings Men
(1949)
Wednesday, May 29
Oregon Summer Fest Hilites
(of June11)
Thursday, May 30
Maintain Brain Health Talk
@ Oregon Senior Center (of
May 28)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, May 27
Memorial Day
Senior Center Closed
Tuesday, May 28
9:15 Movement & Balance
9:30 Bingo
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:00 Maintain Brain Health
1:15 Piano Class
2:15 Piano Class
Wednesday, May 29
9:00 CLUB
9:15 Zumba Gold
11:00 Facebook Timeline
Intermediate Computer
Class
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
Thursday, May 30
9:00 Pool Players
9:15 Movement & Balance
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
3:006:00 Food Pantry
Friday, May 31
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
1:00 Get Fit
Monday, May 27
Memorial Day
Senior Center Closed
Tuesday, May 28
Chicken Cacciatore, Egg
Noodles, Sugar Snap Peas,
Peach Half, Multi Grain
Bread, Cookie
VO-Soy Meat Sauce
Wednesday, May 29
Three Cheese Lasagna,
California Mix, Fruit Cup,
Multi Grain Bread
Thursday, May 30
Roast Pork w/Gravy,
Mashed Potatoes,
Harvard Beets, Strawberry
Shortcake, W.W. Bread
VO-Veggie Lasagna
SO-Veggie Sesame
Chicken Salad
Friday, May 31
BBQ Shredded Beef on
W.W. Bun, Potato Salad,
Carrot Coins, Fresh Fruit
Mix, Ice Cream Cup
VO-Soy Sloppy Joe
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, May 23
Oregon Elementary
Orchestra Concert (of May 21)
Friday, May 24
OHS Rugby vs St. Anthonys,
Milwaukee (of May 8)
Saturday, May 25
OHS Rugby vs Elkhorn (of
May 13)
Sunday, May 26
OHS Variety Show (of May
16)
Monday, May 27
OHS Girls Varsity Soccer vs
Waunakee (of May 17)
Tuesday, May 28
PVE Pioneer Day (of May
24)
Wednesday, May 29
OHS Girls Varsity Soccer vs
Madison West (of May 21)
Thursday, May 30
RCI Musical (of May 23)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings
Senior center
The Widows Mite
The gospels of Mark and Luke both tell the story of the poor
widow who gives two small copper coins to the temple treasury.
This would have been the rough equivalent of putting in two pen-
nies, but Jesus tells his disciples that she has actually given more
than all the others. They have given from their abundance while
she has given from what she had to live on. With income inequal-
ity growing in many countries we have a much larger number
of both impoverished and wealthy people and consequently a
hollowing out of the middle class. In the United States, the
U. S. Census Bureau reports that 15.9 per cent, 48.5 million
Americans, fell below the poverty line in 2011, while the Wall
Street Journal reports that the wealthiest 1% of Americans saw
their income increase by 275% over the last three decades. What
income growth there has been in the United States during the last
few years has been reaped mostly by the wealthiest of us. The
poor are indeed getting poorer, the rich are getting richer, and
more middle class folks are falling into poverty. It is certainly nice
when the wealthy share their riches, but when billionaires donate
a million dollars they are literally giving one thousandth of their
wealth away. When someone living below the poverty line, whose
net worth may be less than zero, gives a single dollar, they are
literally giving of their very life. How many of us, whether rich or
poor, can actually heed the call of the gospels to give of our sub-
stance, not just our abundance?
Truly I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all of
them; for they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out
of her poverty put in all the living that she had.
Luke 21:3-4
Grove Gallop
Join Union Bank & Trusts Grove
Gallop Memorial Day Fun Run to Bene-
fit the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foun-
dation.
The races are a 5K or 10K Run or a 1
mile Walk/Run Loop
The races starts at 8 a.m. Monday,
May 27, at Lake Leota Park in Evans-
ville.
Register online at active.com.
The Legend honors veterans
The Legend has announced that on
Tuesday, May 28, all active duty mili-
tary and veterans and their families will
be given complimentary access to select
facilities at The Legend Clubs.
Military families will receive free
golf, including cart, and complimentary
access to the The Legend at Bergamont
in Oregon.
To RSVP for The Legend at
Bergamont in Oregon, please call 835-
6900 or e-mail armedforcesday@
thelegendatbergamont.com.
For more information on The Legend,
please visit thelegendclubs.com.
Memorial Day Horse Show
The Oregon Horse Association will
host its Annual Memorial Day Horse
Show from 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Mon-
day, May 27, at Triple K Stables, 4721
Schneider Drive.
For details, visit oregonhorse
association.org.
Maintain Brain Health
Learn about how your brain works
and the latest tips on improving brain
health, whether you are 16, 60 or 96.
The class from the Alzheimers &
Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin, will
be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday May 28, at the
Oregon Senior Center.
This program features brain basics as
well as scientifically-rooted nutritional
and lifestyle advice, fun brain teasers
and materials to take home for further
exploration. Call 835-5801 to sign up
for this free presentation.
Friends of Anderson Park
The public is invited to the 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 30, meeting to dis-
cuss Anderson Farm Park plans. Rhea
Stangel-Maier, Dane County volun-
teer coordinator, will present at the
meeting of the Friends of Anderson
Park organization and discuss the cur-
rent status of park plans. Shell also
help develop 2013 activities.
Dane County plans are in the works
for a new county park to serve the
Villages of Oregon and Brooklyn
and the surrounding areas. The park
will be located on Union Road in the
Town of Oregon.
The meeting will be at the Town of
Oregon town hall.
Weve recently launched the option to
renew your newspaper subscription
electronically with our secure site at:
connectoregonwi.com
Easily
renew your
subscription
online!
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
Krantz Electric Inc.
2650 N. Nine Mound Road, Verona, WI 53593
(608) 845-9156 www.krantzelectricinc.com
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believed in giving back to the community through
local activities and donations
and now you can give back too!
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Community Bank & Trust, we will make
a donation of $50 to a local non-prot
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3 Locations in Oregon: 733 North Main Street 978 Park Street 101 South Alpine Parkway
608.835.3168 www.oregoncommunitybank.com
Who knew your bank could
make you feel this good?
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Photos by Life Touch Photography
An Evening
of Elegance
Oregon High School held
prom off campus for the first
time on Saturday, April 20.
Approximately 325 students,
accompanied by about 25
chaperone volunteers, came to
the dance at Sheraton Madison
Hotel on John Nolen Drive.
The theme of the night was
Hotel Royale An Evening of
Elegance.
Right, the 2013 King and Queen
are Ian Williams and Cosette
Sommers.
Far right, the members of
prom court showcasing their
elegance. (Bottom row, left
to right) Alec Onesti, Cosette
Sommers, Taylor Timmens,
Wesley Korpela, (second row,
left to right) Mac Tubridy,
Hanna Kaufman, Morgan
McKenna, Jack Krueger, (third
row, left to right) Jere Bauer,
Haley Davenport, Hannah Kane,
Luke Davis, (top row) Ian
Williams and Maddison Gits.
teachers.
Asked by the board if
Netherwood teachers are
supportive of the idea, Rik-
li answered, I would not
stand here if didnt have
(a) critical mass of teachers
supporting this.
Year-round school i s
relatively rare in Wiscon-
sin, but a state Depart-
ment of Public Instruction
spokesperson said the state
doesnt track how many
schools do it. Rikli said
he knows of only a dozen
to 15 schools that do it,
though its more wide-
spread in states like Minne-
sota and Colorado.
Th e s c h o o l b o a r d
broached t he t opi c si x
years ago in its Vision-
ing paper that questioned
whether the agrarian cal-
endar, designed to give
kids time off to work on
farms in summers, was out-
dated.
The task force is using
the term balanced calen-
dar because year round
school leads people to
t hi nk s t udent s woul d
exceed the normal 180 days
of instruction, Rikli said in
a separate interview.
According to the Nation-
al Education Association,
the most popular form of
year-round education is
the 45-15 plan, in which
students attend school for
45 days (nine weeks) and
then have 15 days, or three
weeks, of vacation, plus
the normal holidays off.
Calendars can also follow a
60-20 or 90-30 sched-
ule.
In year-round schools,
students can all follow the
same calendar or blocks of
students can attend school
at di fferent t i mes wi t h
different vacations, which
some districts do to combat
overcrowding, the associa-
tions website explains.
Critics of year-round
schooling often say it can
lead to scheduling head-
aches f or af t er - school
extracurricular programs
and for parents with kids
in schools with different
schedules.
School: No school days added to calendar
Continued from page 1
Police rePortS
April 16
9:30 a.m. Police investigat-
ed a report that an 18-year-
old man allegedly showed
nude photos of a 15-year-old
boy to two teenage girls in
Oregon. Oregon police listed
tentative charges of sexual
exploitation of a child and one
count of possessing child por-
nography, but those charges
had not been filed by the Dane
County District Attorneys
office as of early this week.
1 p.m. Police were called to
the 600 block of East Nether-
wood Street by a local woman
who claimed a 16-year-old
passenger in her car had done
heroin that afternoon and tried
to jump from the vehicle rath-
er than go to the hospital. The
teen was taken to a hospital.
--Seth Jovaag
8
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
www.oakwoodvillage.net/health-care
Just like the other health care professionals at Oakwood Village,
Larry believes in treating each of the people he serves as an
individual. For him, helping people isnt just a jobits a way to
make signicant differences in the lives of the people he serves,
as well as his own. Its also not just something he wants to do,
its something he feels he needs to do. And, to us, thats how a
health care professional should be.
Its your health. Its our calling.
Call either of our communities to learn more and be sure
to visit us online at www.oakwoodvillage.net/health-care.
Meet Larry,
a person who loves making others happy.
Assisted Living Memory Care Rehabilitation
(608) 230-4266 (608) 230-4646
6205 Mineral Point Road
Madison, WI 53705
5565 Tancho Drive
Madison, WI 53718 Find us on
Facebook.
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All Friends, Colleagues,
Past and Present
Students, and Parents
Thursday, May 30th
3:456:00 PM
Program at 4:45
Rome Corners Intermediate School
1111 S. Perry Parkway
You are invited to a Retirement Celebration at Rome Corners
Intermediate School to honor our Oregon School District
Retirees
Please come and wish them well.
Linda AltenburgDW
Chris AntonuzzoRCI
Daryl BoothRCI
Philayne ChoseDW
Judy DayOHS
Stan EddyRCI
Gwen Fabert MaitzenOHS/OASIS
Deanna FischerRCI
Mary GieseNKE
Carol GrayPVE
Barbara HoffmanOMS
Jerry JensenBus Contractor/Driver
Debbie JonesOHS
Bill Obmascher RCI
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Nelson nabs teaching
honor
Andr e w Ne l s on, a n
Oregon High School 2008
graduate, has completed his
Physics degree from Beloit
College and his student
teaching in Physics at Mad-
ison West High School.
He i s cur -
rently on a
l o n g - t e r m
sub assign-
ment at DC
Everest High
School.
N e l s o n
was recently
honored by
t he Bel oi t
College Edu-
cation and Youth Studies
department and received
t he Von Eschen-St eel e
Excellence in Education
and Teaching Award.
He also received the ETS
Recognition of Excellence
(ROE) Award for finishing
in the top 15 percent in the
nation on the Physics Praxis
II test.
Graduates
UW-Milwaukee Dec. 2012
Gina Rosaria Parisi, BS,
Bachelor of Science,
School of Education;
Patrick James Quast,
BS, Bachelor of Science,
Engineering & Applied
Science; Nicholas Daniel
Zamborini, BS, Bachelor
of Science, Helen Bader
School Soc Welfare.
Minnesota State summer/
fall
Bradley Weber, Bache-
lor of Science, Psychology.
Nelson
Academic honors
Photos by Julia Meyers
Ready, set,
pedal
The Brooklyn Elementary
bike rodeo earlier this
month helped kids get
ready for bike safety this
summer. Children like sec-
ond-grader Luke Bennett
(left) practice bike skills.
Here he has to ride his
bike on a straight line and
then stop within a painted
square. Right, Eve Garty
(second grade) is practic-
ing to ride around cones
and show that she knows
the hand signals.
Trig Star award
Three Oregon High School students were recently
awarded for their performance on the Trig Star con-
test that links higher-level mathematics to real-world
professions.
Ben Allen (far right) took first place on the exam
administered earlier this spring. He earned a plaque
and a $100 prize. Trevor Caldwell (second from left)
placed second and won $50, and Sam Horsnell (sec-
ond from right) finished third and earned $25.
The annual Trig Star contest is sponsored by the
National Society of Professional Surveyors (NSPS).
Its based on the practical application of trigonometry.
Joe Gruber, a surveyor with TranSmart Technologies
in Madison, presented the program at OHS for
the sixth straight year with math teacher Tracey
Rosemeyer (far left).
The award money was provided by the Wisconsin
Society of Land Surveyors and the groups Madison-
area chapter.
Photo submitted
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, May 23, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Behrend, Wilhelm lead Panthers
3 doubles team to conference title,
Oregons first since 1998
Jeremy JOnes
Sports editor
Brady Behrend and Jackson Wilhelm were
barely out of diapers the last time Oregon boys
tennis crowned a Badger Conference champion.
Saturday the duo did just that, becoming the
Panthers first champions since Mark Heller and
Tom Bandow back in 1998 at No. 2 doubles.
The top seed entering the tournament, Beh-
rend and Wilhelm fought off second-seeded Nick
Contezac and Austin Lacey 6-4, 6-0 in the cham-
pionship match.
I know its a big deal for Oregon, Behrend
said. Personally, it hasnt sunk in yet.
With both teams coming off tight three-set
matches earlier in the day, it was the top seeded
Wilhelm and Behrend that jumped out to a 3-0
lead.
Earlier in the week the Crusaders had taken the
same Oregon team into three sets.
We played a lot better today, Wilhelm said.
We got off to a good start today and knew that
we could finish.
Despite having the top seed, Wilhelm contin-
ued, we knew it wouldnt come easy.
The duo advanced on to the title match follow-
ing a 6-7 (5), 6-1, 6-2 victory over fourth-seeded
Mitch Ernst and Josh Cordell of Waunakee early
Saturday morning.
Behrend and Wilhelm (12-1) will once again
have their hands full at the Madison Memorial
subsectional meet on Tuesday.
Madison West, which swept all three doubles
flights at last weeks Big Eight Conference meet,
is expected to earn the top seed. Verona, which
just held off the Panthers earlier this season and
the Spartans, also expect to be tough at 3 doubles.
With both of us being lefties especially, it took
us some time to get everything to click, Behrend
said. If we play as well as we did in the champi-
onship match today, we should be alright.
Despite finished tied for third with Monroe (21
points) at conference, the Panthers retained sec-
ond place overall in the Badger South, finishing
with 8 points in the final standings. Edgewood,
which finished second overall at conference
behind Waunakee, 44-41, earns its fifth straight
conference title with 12 points in the final stand-
ings.
We didnt have our best tournament, but we
hung on to an overall second place in the Badger
South, OHS head coach Ben Conklin said. This
was largely in part to 3 doubles winning the con-
ference championship. They saved their best for
last.
Junior Alec Onesti played to his third seed
at No. 2 singles, defeating sixth-seeded Willy
Lemke of Fort Atkinson 6-0, 6-2 before drop-
ping a 6-2, 7-5 decision to second-seeded Billy
OBrien of Madison Edgewood. Onesti closed
out his tournament with a 6-2, 6-3 victory over
Monroe Groves Kevin Noriega in the third-place
match.
Panther junior No. 3 singles player Dakota
Tollakson was unable to bounce back to take
third place, dropping his first set 6-2 against Matt
Monahan of Monroe before a pulled calf muscle
forced him to retire with the match tied at 3-all in
Boys tennis
No. 3 dubs ace conference
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Brady Behrend (facing camera) celebrates a point with teammate Jackson Wilhelm at No. 3 doubles during
the Badger Conference championship match at Saturday inside Nielsen Tennis Stadium. Behrend and Wilhelm
became the first Panthers to earn a conference title for Oregon in 15 years, defeating Madison Edgewoods Nick
Contezac and Austin Lacey, 6-4, 6-0.
Track and field
Oregon
advances
off to
sectionals
Jeremy JOnes
Sports editor
Jawon Turner spri nt -
ed and jumped his way
through Monday evenings
WIAA Division 1 Verona
regional track and field
meet at Verona Area High
School.
Turner was one of four
Pant hers who advanced
i ndi vi dual l y t o Thur s-
days Divison 1 sectional
at Waterford High School.
He was also on two of the
three Oregon relays that
advanced.
The junior highligthed
his day by finishing run-
ner-up in the triple jump
(42 feet, 7 inches) with a
season-best for the sec-
ond straight week. Janes-
ville Craig sophomore Ian
Reinicke won the event
with a leap of 43-7 .
Oregon finished fourth
as a team with 82 points,
whi l e Janesvi l l e Cr ai g
(142), Verona (110. 66)
and Janesville Parker (94)
rounded out the top three
schools.
Turner j oi ned sopho-
mores Lucas Knipfer and
Brock Buckner and fresh-
man Lucas Mathews on the
4x100 relay, which sprinted
Boys golf
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Sophomore Carson Torhorst takes a tee shot on the 16th hole
Wednesday in the Badger South Conference Golf meet at the House
on the Rock Golf Resort. Torhorst finished second overall with a 75,
and he also earned No. 6 All-Badger South Conference honors.
Torhorst, ODonnell rise up at conference
AnthOny IOzzO
Assistant sports editor
Sophomore Carson Torhorst and
freshman Grant ODonnell may not
have a lot of postseason experience, but
it didnt show Wednesday in the Bad-
ger South Conference Golf meet at the
House on the Rock Golf Resort.
Torhorst (75), playing in his second
conference meet, and ODonnell (77),
making his tournament debut, finished
third and fourth overall, respectively.
That play, which helped Oregon
finish fourth overall in the meet with
a 337, coupled with the conference
dual season also earned both golfers a
spot on the All-Badger South Confer-
ence list. Torhorst was No. 6, while
ODonnell was No. 7.
For Torhorst, he said it meant a lot to
medal with Stoughtons Henry Klong-
land (76) and Madison Edgewoods
Johnny Decker (73).
I have gotten better as conference
has gone on. It showed today, Torhorst
said. I shot a 32 before this and then
came out today and shot a 35 and a 40.
It is just getting better as the year is
going on, and hopefully, it means some
good things in the progression of the
year.
Torhorst said he kept his composure
on the course, which features trees,
water and swirling winds, by staying
aggressive.
Whenever I did have a bad hole, I
just knew that there were a lot of bird-
ies out there, and whenever I needed to
make a birdie I knew that I could, he
said. I just didnt quite make as many
birdies as I would have liked on the
back.
That same aggressive approach was
what ODonnell used in his first confer-
ence meet.
Our team wasnt going to win it,
so I figured that I should just go out
there and shoot the best that I could,
ODonnell said. I knew that if I got
down on one hole, I could make it back
on the next couple.
Austin Busler and sophomore Collin
Bundy finished Oregons scoring with a
92 and a 93, respectively.
Madison Edgewood won the meet
with a 327, while Stoughton took sec-
ond (331).
Edgewood and Stoughton both fin-
ished with 10 1/2 points in the Badger
South to share the conference title.
Regionals
ODonnell said he felt no pressure
at the conference meet because no one
expects anything from a freshman.
He took the same approach Tuesday
at Pleasant View Golf Course for the
WIAA Division 1 Middleton regional,
and it paid off with a sectional berth.
ODonnell shot a 78, finishing sec-
ond among individual qualifiers, to
advance to play at 9 a.m. Tuesday, May
28, at River Run Golf Course.
I am honored to be representing
Oregon, ODonnell said. It should be
Turn to Tennis/Page 10
Turn to Golf/Page 11
Turn to Track/Page 10
If you go
What: WIAA Division 1
Waterford sectional
When: Monday, May 20.
Field events at 3:30 p.m.,
track at 4:15 p.m.
Where: Waterford High
School
10
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
to a runner-up finish in
44.35.
Racing these teams
for awhile we kind of
saw where our t i mes
stood, but then again the
competition was getting
tougher as we moved
on, said Turner, who
had never qualified for
sectionals before Mon-
day.
The same quar t et ,
with sophomore Josh
Sromovsky in place of
Mathews, advanced in
the 4x200 as well, fin-
ishing third in 1:31.12.
Josh has been hurt for
most of the season, and
it was really nice having
him back, Turner said.
We didnt have a lot of
time to practice together
between conference and
tonight, but handoffs
were right about where
they had been.
Sromvosky also con-
tinued in the pit, stretch-
ing the long jump tape to
21 for third place.
Junior Nick Kapusta
took third in the 400
(55.10), while freshman
Alex Duff matched the
finish in the 300 hurdles
(41.78).
Thrower Jack Maerz
advanced in both of his
events, finishing third
with a personal best by
five feet in the discus
(138-5) and taking third
in the shot put (46-5 ).
Sophomore John Her-
mus punched his ticket
for sectionals, taking
the final spot in the 110
hurdle race by finishing
fourth in 16.28.
Seni or Jeff Jaeggi ,
sophomores Ben Vogt
and Josh Christensen
and freshman Chris Cut-
ter took fourth in the
4x800 (8:27.25).
Fi e l d e v e n t s g e t
underway at 3:30 p.m.
Thursday at Waterford
with races following at
5 p.m.
Girl
Junior Val Jones cap-
tured a regional title
i n t he 800-met er run
(2: 24. 5) Monday and
helped a pair of relays
advance on to Thurs-
days sectional meet.
Coach thinks I have
a shot to medal in the
800 at state and I think
we have a shot in both
relays, Jones said. I
think we can do it this
year.
First the girls have to
finish in the top three at
sectionals on Thursday.
Weve just got to lay
everything out on the
track Thursday and we
should be fine, Jones
said.
Fellow junior Jamie
Wood continued to light
up the competition in the
400, racing to a regional
championship in 1:01.92
Jones and Wood also
led a quarter of Oregon
High School girls that
i ncl uded sophomor e
Maddi e LeBr un and
senior Danielle Stein-
berg to give the Pan-
thers their first regional
title of the evening by
just over two-tenths of
a second in the 4x800
relay with a season best
10:12.56.
The same group of
girls capped the evening
by f i ni shi ng r unner -
up in the 4x400 relay
(4:07.47).
Senior Lydia Russell
raced to third place in the
1600 in 5:44.03, while
fellow senior Brooke
Debroux finished third
in the two mile with a
time of 12:36.79.
Junior Ruby Carpenter
advanced on to section-
als in the 100 hurdles,
finishing third in 17.26.
Oregon finished sixth
out of eight teams with
71 points, while the host
Wildcats (134 1/2) held
off Stoughton (129) for
top honors.
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Track: Relays lead the way to boys and girls at regionals
Continued from page 9
the second set.
Oregons top singles player, junior Jack-
son Schneider, was unable to reach Satur-
day, dropping a 6-4, 5-7, 6-2 decision to
Patrick McKenna. Schneider, the fourth
seed at conference, had gotten the better
of the fifth-seeded McKenna the previous
week.
Third-seeded freshman Drew Christof-
ferson fell 0-6, 6-1, 6-4 to sixth-seeded
Gabe Rowley of Stoughton in his first
match at 4 singles.
Oregon was forced to make a last min-
ute substation at No. 1 doubles as Dan
Griffith stepped in to play with Brian
Johnson, falling 6-3, 6-0 against Madison
Edgewood.
Dan did an awesome job its tough
for him to be the 11th man, Conklin said.
Im seeing signs that hell have a starting
role next year.
The Panthers No. 2 doubles team also
bowed out in the first round as Alexander
Nasserjah and Adam Bessemer went down
6-0, 7-5 to Sauk Prairie.
Madison Memorial subsectional
Oregon was back at Nielsen Tennis
Stadium on Tuesday for the WIAA Mad-
ison Memorial subsectional meet where
Schneider and Onesti each advanced
through to sectionals.
Schneider improved to 13-5 at No. 1
singles, while Onesti upped his record to
16-5 at 2 singles.
The Panthers failed to get any of their
three doubles flights through to section-
als.
Oregon travels to Badger High School
in Lake Geneva at 8:30 a.m. on Thurs-
day for the WIAA sectional meet.
Madison West advanced all three of
its doubles flights, as well as, its No. 1,
3 and 4 singles players to sectionals, to
lead Verona in points, 22-18.
Tennis: Two advance
to sectionals
Continued from page 9
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Above, Oregon sophomore
Josh Sromovsky leapt to a
distance of 21 feet, inch
for third place in the long
jump at Mondays WIAA
Division 1 Verona regional
meet; (at right) Panther
4x200 relay members
Samantha Girard (left) and
Bailey Adkins embrace after
the team finished sixth over-
all in 1 minute, 53 seconds.
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
AnthOny IOzzO
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon High School
basebal l t eam earned a
No. 10 seed for the WIAA
Division 1 playoffs during
its seeding meeting last
weekend.
The Panthers will play
No. 7 Monona Grove at 5
p.m. Tuesday, May 28, at
Firemans Park in Cottage
Grove to start the playoffs.
We are a pretty good
e ve n ma t c hup, he a d
coach Kevin Connor said.
I think any team can win
it.
MG 2, Oregon 1 (8 inn)
The Panthers dropped
anot her one- r un game
last Thursday at Monona
Grove in a 2-1 loss in eight
innings.
Senior Simon Maurice
was 2-for-4 to lead Ore-
gons offense.
S o p h o mo r e Mi t c h
Weber picked up the loss.
He went 7 2/3 innings and
allowed an earned run on
seven hits. He struck out
one and walked two.
Oregon 3, Verona 2
The Panthers held on to
a 3-2 win against Verona
last Friday with a play at
the plate in the top of the
sixth.
Verona l ooked t o t i e
the game on a single by
freshman Ben Rortvedt.
Juni or John Moyni han
rounded third but a relay
from j uni or l eft fi el der
Jack Krueger t o j uni or
third baseman Logan Las-
ki to junior catcher Collin
Byron was quick enough
to get Moynihan and pre-
serve the lead.
Life is full of change.
Has your insurance kept up?
An outdated policy could mean costly
policy gaps or overlaps. To know for
sure, call me for a free, no-obligation
Personal Insurance Review.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office Madison, WI 53783
2006 002138 3/06
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
Life is full of change.
Has your insurance kept up?
An outdated policy could mean costly
policy gaps or overlaps. To know for
sure, call me for a free, no-obligation
Personal Insurance Review.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office Madison, WI 53783
2006 002138 3/06
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
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For Incoming 2013-2014 Grades 5 through 8
There will be 2 Camp offerings this summer:
Skilled Offensive and Defensive Position Camp
Offensive and Defensive Linemen Camp
Five 1 hour Sessions beginning June 16 through July 21
Held on Late Sunday Afternoons and Evenings
Get a jump on the upcoming season and an opportunity
to learn specic fundamental skills for your position
All proceeds will benet Oregon Youth Football
For more information or to register please visit the
Oregon Youth Football Website at
www.oregonyouthfootball.com
or call John Jicha at 608-835-6952
2nd Annual Oregon
Youth Football Summer Camps
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4th of July
Advertising deAdlines
Deadline for the
July 3, 2013
Great Dane Shopping News:
Wednesday, June 26 ~ 3pm
(Classified ad deadline will be
Noon on Thursday, June 27)
Deadline for the July 4, 2013
Oregon Observer,
Stoughton Courier Hub
Verona Press:
Friday, June 28 ~ noon
Our offices will be closed
Thursday, July 4, 2013
125 N. Main St.
Oregon, WI 53575
835-6677
135 W. Main St.
Stoughton, WI 53589
873-6671
133 Enterprise Dr.
Verona, WI 53593
845-9559
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Oregons Juan Cardenas and Payton Raeck tackle a Kettle Moraine High School rugby player Mon-
day with teammates Nick Miller and JJ Rogers in support.
Rugby club battles to earn two victories
The Oregon High School rugby club
defeated St. Anthonys in Milwaukee on
May 8 by a score of 42-12. Team co-cap-
tain J.J. Rogers scored the first try with a
short break around the outside.
The next try was scored by Juan Carde-
nas who jumped on the ball after a hard
tackle by Rogers against their winger. Pey-
ton Raeck scored twice more before half
with Juan Cardenas making three of four
conversions. Giving the OHS Ruggers a
26-5 lead at half.
The second half was dominated by the
running of team co-captain Mat Sampson
who went on to score four trys, giving
Oregon it first win of the season.
The ruby club won a hard match against
Elkhorns B Side 3-0 on Monday. The
match was a very physical one, with Ore-
gon having their backs to the try line many
times. With 15 seconds before halftime
Juan Cardenas scored a penalty kick at the
25-meter line.
Oregon went on to hold Elkhorn out of
the try line securing its win.
The OHS rugby club is 2-3 this season
with its last game at home against Wauke-
sha West on Wednesday, May 22. Game
time is 5 p.m. at the Oregon Middle School
football field.
Rugby
Baseball
fun.
With high winds, the course definite-
ly wasnt easy, especially the back nine,
which was the Lake 9 course.
But ODonnell fought through with a 37.
I just tried to keep the ball back in my
stance to keep it low and out of the wind,
he said. I was really worried about losing
my hat, though, because it was blowing
pretty bad. It definitely helped not having
a lot of pressure. It feels good to make it
through as a freshman.
Torhorst, who also had high hopes of
moving on, didnt have the same luck on
the final nine holes.
Torhorst shot a 47 on the back nine to fin-
ish with an 85 to close out the 2013 season.
Oregon shot a 336 as a team with Bundy
and freshman Brandon Michek finishing
the scoring with an 84 and 89, respectively.
Madison Memorial (312), Verona (319),
Middleton (320) and Stoughton (325) all
advanced. Sauk Prairies RJ Budd (75),
Waunakees Max Murphy (78) and Madi-
son Wests Lake Larson (79) advanced as
individuals.
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Freshman Grant ODonnell (right) walks from the 16th tee Wednesday at the Badger South
Conference Golf meet. ODonnell shot a 77 to earn the seventh spot on the all-conference team.
Golf: ODonnell advances to sectionals
Continued from page 9
Oregon earns 10 seed for playoffs
Turn to Baseball/Page 12
Panthers see season end at Waterford
Jeremy JOnes
Sports editor
Oregon was a decided
underdog as the 14th seed
t ravel i ng t o Wat erford
Tuesday for the first round
of t he WIAA regi onal
against the third-seeded
Wolverines.
Unable to string together
hits and find the gaps for
most of the season, the Pan-
thers offense struggle con-
tinued once again in a 10-0,
five inning loss.
Waterford, which jumped
out to a five-run lead in the
first, improved to 15-4 on
the year with the win, while
Oregon finished its season
1-15.
It was the final game
for seniors Hailey Morey,
Alyssa Damon, Sara Wend-
landt and Lexi Nelson, who
was injured for the entire
season.
Head coach Mike Der-
rick said in his 18 years at
Oregon he cant remem-
ber a stranger season with
weather, injuries and a
squirrel with babies that
forced visiting Stoughton to
sit outside the dugout.
All of the girls showed
a lot of character to keep
fighting all season, he
said.I couldnt be more
proud of them all.
MG 5, Oregon 1
The Panthers pounded out
sevens hits in a 5-1 loss last
Thursday at home against
Badger South Conference
rival Monona Grove.
Morey went the distance
striking out four, while
allowing four earned runs
on seven hits. Morey helped
her cause, going 3-for-4 at
the plate, while Mackenzie
Kressin (2-for-3) also col-
lected two hits.
Kelsey Stinson struck out
14 for the Silver Eagles.
If you go
What: WIAA Division
1 regional quarterfinal
against No. 7 Monona
Grove
When: 5 p.m. Tuesday
Where: Firemans Park
in Cottage Grove
Softball
12
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
CARING DENTISTRY
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
General and
Cosmetic Dentistry,
Crowns, Bridges,
Implants, Veneers
Tooth Colored Fillings,
Whitening, Emergencies
New Patients Always Welcome
Mueller Dental Clinic
978 Park Street
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-0900
www.muellerdental.com
Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for 15 Years!
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NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling
Customers:
www.pellitteri.com
(608) 257-4285
Residents normally serviced the week of
May 27th-May 31st will be serviced one
day later than their normal pickup day.
City of Fitchburg City of Middleton
DSI/Veridian/HOAs Town of Dunn
Town of Pleasant Springs Town of Verona
Village of Belleville Village of Brooklyn
Village of Oregon Village of Shorewood Hills
Village of Waunakee
HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY!
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Call today to place your order.
Custom Cakes made from
scratch & decorated to order.
Fresh Baked bread, buns,
pastries, cookies, etc.
Everything for your
party needs!
No additives or preservatives.
608-455-1909
109 Hotel Street, Brooklyn, WI
www.steinyjosbakery.com
Monday 6 a.m.-1 p.m, Tue.-Fri. 6 a.m.-3 p.m.,
Sat. 7 a.m.-1 p.m., Sun. 7 a.m.-12 p.m.
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STEEL CO.
New Used Surplus
A Division of Anich
Lumber Co., Inc.
414 3rd Street
Palmyra
MULTI-METAL DISTRIBUTION CTR
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@ 43c SQ. FT. & UP
FABRICATION &
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Stock Book 262-495-4453
fax 262-495-4100
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www.palsteel.net
FS197326
Come on in...the door is open!
Steam Train Rides, Cruise Night, County Fair
and More in Northwest Illinois
Request a FREE 2013 FREEPORT/STEPHENSON
COUNTY, IL Visitors Guide
Call 800-369-2955 or email stephcvb@aeroinc.net
Name________________________________________________________
Address______________________________________________________
City, State, Zip_________________________________________________
Mail to: Freeport/Stephenson County CVB, 4596 U.S. Rt. 20 East, Freeport, IL 61032
www.stephenson-county-il.org
Photo submitted
Vipers win Janesville soccer tournament
The U12 boys Oregon Vipers team won the Janesville soccer tournament. Players (pictured, from left)
are: Brooks Corliss, Ethan Luebbers, Logan Winklepleck and Zach Kapalczynski; (back) head coach
Jenniffer Madson, Ryan Lewandowski, Zach Schultz, Riley Rogowski, Casey Garton, Zach Madson,
Christian Markquart, Jake Fountain and assistant coach Jeff Garton.
Photo submitted
Local gymnast glows gold
Lexi Karls recently won the all-around champion at the State Xcel Gymnastics meet, Gold Division,
held in Franklin.
Karls also placed first on vault with a 9.60, first on floor exercise with a 9.55, first on uneven bars
(9.50) and third on balance beam with a 9.0.
She has been doing competitive gymnastics for four years. She lives in Oregon, and currently com-
petes for Gymfinity Gymnastics in Fitchburg.
Oregon scored all three
runs in the third inning.
Kruger scored on a wild
pitch, and junior Pierce
Peterson and senior Simon
Maur i ce s cor ed on a
throwing error.
Verona came back with
two runs in the fourth.
Senior Derek Witte dou-
bl ed and scored on an
error, and sophomore Con-
nor Volker knocked in a
run on an RBI groundout.
Seni or Zach Ragel s
pi cked up t he wi n for
Oregon. He went 5 2/3
innings and allowed one
earned run on two hits.
He walked six and struck
out four. Seni or Adam
Brauns finished the game.
He allowed no runs on two
hits in 1 1/3 innings. He
walked one and struck out
one.
F r e s h ma n Ke a t o n
Knueppel went 3 2/ 3
innings and picked up the
loss, allowing an earned
run on one hit. He struck
out three and walked four.
Oregon 9, Edgewood 5
Oregon hosted Madison
Edgewood Tuesday and
came back from a five-run
deficit to win 9-5.
Oregon scored four runs
in the fifth and five more
in the sixth.
The Panthers grabbed
the lead in the fifth mostly
on errors and walks, but
Maurice knocked in a two-
run triple to highlight the
inning.
In the fifth, junior Jere
Bauer picked up a two-run
single, while Peterson and
Maurice added RBIs.
Junior Logan Laski start-
ed and allowed four earned
runs on five hits. He struck
out two and walked one.
Fellow junior Ross Gal-
loway came in and shut
down the Crusaders to pick
up the win. He allowed
no runs on four hits and
struck out one.
Any time you can beat
Edgewood, it is a big win,
Connor said. Laski didnt
have his best stuff tonight,
like he usually does, but
Ross came in like he was
supposed to and settled
everything down.
Baseball: Panthers knock off Edgewood
Continued from page 11
Girls soccer
Oregon shuts down defending state champ
Senior forward Annie Zavoral picked up
two goals Tuesday as the host Panthers defeat-
ed defending Division 1 state champion Madi-
son West 2-0 in a non-conference game.
Senior forward Lauren Hughes had an assist
on the first goal in the 44th minute. The second
goal was a penalty kick.
Senior goalie Britt Peckham picked up four
saves.
The Panthers close the regular season at
home 7 p.m. Thursday against Sun Prairie. The
sectional seeds will be announced later this
week.
Waunakee 3, Oregon 0
Oregon hosted Waunakee last Friday and
fell 3-0.
Abby Pandow, Samantha Kliminski and
Emily Mouille all scored for the Warriors.
Senior goalie Britt Peckham finished with five
saves, while Waunakees Rachel Griffiths had
three.
Sport shorts
Youth Flag Rugby
Registration is open for
Youth Flag Rugby until June
1. Click on the forms tab at
madisonunitedrugby.org for
registration and waiver forms.
Practices (in Oregon) are
twice a week, starting the
week of June 10. Four games
will be played June 29, July
13, 20 and 27.
This is a co-ed, non-contact
sport for kids going into sixth,
seventh and eighth grades. All
three age levels combined to
form teams. Game locations
are: Goodman Park, Tenney
Park, Middleton and Cottage
Grove.
The cost is $75, which
includes rugby shorts and
a T-shirt. Contact Richard
Bergemann at 608-630-0129.
Girls lacrosse
Oregon girls lacrosse took
on top-ranked Waunakee, at
home on Tuesday, May 14
and lost 11-9 in overtime.
Junior attacker Katie Glov-
er shot in the tying score in the
last minute of the game.
Along with Glovers goal
and two assists, sophomore
Kenzie Torpy scored four
goals, while junior midfielder
Hannah Kane added three and
sophomore Kayla Whip had
one.
Sophomore goalie Tasha
Martin had 20 saves.
Play continued in Oregon
on Thursday against Middle-
ton in a 12-9 loss.
Torpy led the scoring with
a hat trick, while Kane and
sophomore midfielder Kari
Bertler each added two goals.
Sophomore Hunter Klus
and Glover each shot in one.
Glover and Kane were each
credited with one assist.
Senior defender Brooke
Crossen had one intercep-
tion and forced one turnover,
while defender sophomore
Joanna Beach also forced a
turnover. Martin had 10 saves.
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
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ARMED FORCES DAY AT
THE LEGEND AT BERGAMONT
On Tuesday, May 28th, were celebrating our armed
forces. All active duty military and veterans are
invited to join us for complimentary golf including
carts and pool access!
Tee times are available starting at 7am
and the pool will be open 12pm-8pm.
Call us at 608-835-6900 or e-mail us at
armedforcesday@thelegendatbergamont.com for
tee times and to RSVP for access to our waterpark!
Thank you for your service!
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EARLY DEADLINES
Due to the Memorial Day holiday,
the display ad deadline for the May 29, 2013
Great Dane Shopping News
will be Wednesday, May 22 at 3 p.m.
Classified ad deadline will be Thursday, May 23 at Noon
Deadlines for the May 30, 2013
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub and Verona Press
will be Friday, May 24 at Noon
In observance of the holiday,
our offices will be closed Monday, May 27.
Kenneth Sampson
Ken Sampson passed
away on Sunday, May 19,
2013, from complications
associated with Alzheim-
ers disease.
He is preceded in death
by his parents, Raymond
and Iva Sampson. He is
survived by his beloved
wife, Judy; as well as chil-
dren, Mike (Missy), Dan
(Melanie) and Jenny Schi-
avo (Jim). He is sorely
missed by his six grand-
children, Max, Jacob, Matt,
Maggie, Nicole and Saskia;
sister-in-law, Sandra Moore
(John); cousin, Molly; and
numerous friends.
Ken grew up in Morenci,
Mich., the only child of
Raymond and Iva. He put
himself through Hillsdale
Col l ege and Mi chi gan
State University, graduat-
ing with a degree in Dairy
Science. He married Judy
Lockage soon after gradua-
tion, and they started their
life together in Moorhead,
Mi nn. They event ual l y
found their way to Green
Bay, where they raised their
children, with a brief inter-
lude in Utah.
Ken worked his whole
career in the cheese indus-
try, working his way up to
vice president of numerous
cheese companies in Wis-
consin. He sat on the Board
of Directors of the United
Way of both, Green Bay
and Monroe. Prior to and
after retirement, Ken also
helped Judy out with her
Christmas store businesses.
His passions in life includ-
ed the Green Bay Packers
and downhill skiing, as well
as playing with his grand-
children and watching them
grow.
He often mentioned that
it was a good thing that he
met Judy before he learned
to ski; otherwise he would
have lived the life of a ski
bum. Heaven is one long
powder run, Papa Ken, and
the lift never shuts down.
Funeral services will be
held at Gunderson Oregon
Funeral Home, 1150 Park
St., Oregon, at 11:30 a.m.
on Saturday, May 25. Visi-
tation will be held at the
funeral home from 5 p.m.
until 7 p.m. on Friday, May
24, and also from 10:30
a.m. until the time of ser-
vice on Saturday.
The family will host a
light lunch immediately fol-
lowing the memorial ser-
vice. The family has asked
that any memorial dona-
tions be made to the Wis-
consin Alzheimers Disease
Research Center School
of Medicine and Public
Health in Memory of Ken
Sampson, Wisconsin Foun-
dation, US Bank Lockbox
PO Box 78807 Milwaukee,
WI 53278-0807. Online
condolences may be made
at gundersonfh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care, 1150 Park St.
835-3515
Charles C.J. Norwell
Charles John CJ Nor-
well, age 30, passed away
unexpectedly at home on
Saturday, May 18, 2013.
He was born in Madison
on Feb. 24, 1983, to parents
John Norwell and Nancy
Meyer. He graduated from
Madison Memorial High
School in 2001 and com-
pleted a Bachelors degree
from UW Milwaukee in
Art and Graphic Design
in 2006. CJ also took the
paralegal post baccalaureate
program at Madison Col-
lege. CJ was very active in
sports and played hockey
for the Madison West Fly-
ers and football at Madison
Memorial High School.
He loved traveling and
especially enjoyed family
vacations to Florida, Dis-
neyworld and Hawaii. CJ
was passionate about fish-
ing and loved to converse
about fishing and the best
spots for hours. He was
also avid about movies and
loved action movies such as
Indiana Jones.
CJ was also a history buff
and was especially knowl-
edgeable about World War
II history. CJ is survived
by hi s l ovi ng par ent s,
John (Mary) Norwell of
Oregon and Nancy (Bruce
Brownell) Meyer of Fitch-
burg. He is also survived
by his brother, William
(Brittany) Norwell of Ore-
gon; a step-sister, Rebecca
(Bryant) Welch of North
Carolina; aunts and uncles,
Gal e (Mi ke) Rundl e of
Janesville, Duncan (Judy)
Norwell of Huron, Ohio;
cousins, Bryan Rundle of
Janesville, Justin Rundle
of Madi son, Chr i st i na
(Shayne) Fischer of Ohio,
Douglas (Cathy LeValle)
Norwell of Ohio, Patrick
(Karyn) Norwell of Ohio,
and Cat her i ne ( Just i n)
Cutcher of Ohio. He was
preceded in death by his
grandparent s, John and
Wilma Meyer of Madison
and Charles Chick and
Evelyn Norwell of Ashland.
A memorial service will
be held at Peoples United
Methodist Church, 103 N.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon,
at 3 p.m. on Thursday, May
23, 2013.
Visitation will be held at
the church from 7 p.m. until
8:30 p.m. on Wednesday,
May 22, and also from 2
p.m. until the time of ser-
vice on Thursday.
I f desi r ed, memor i al
donations may be given to
the Meyer Family Scholar-
ship at Madison Area Tech-
nical College- Foundation,
1701 Wright St., Madison,
WI 53704 or Peopl es
Methodist Church, 103 N.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon,
WI 53575. Online con-
dolences may be made at
gundersonfh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care, 1150 Park St.
835-3515
Kenneth Sampson Charles Norwell
Obituaries
estimates for repairs. And
there will be a general
report on the entire sys-
tem.
To get a comprehen-
si ve underst andi ng of
the villages water sys-
tem and needs, engineers
would look at pumping
records for the last five or
six years and determine
future pumping projec-
tions, Below said.
Theyll also look at
the wells and the status of
the water levels in them
how theyve increased or
dropped over the years,
he said.
Below said there are
many four-i nch wat er
mains in use, which are
substandard by todays
standards. The evalua-
tion would locate those
mains and likely recom-
mend upgrading them to
eight inches, he said.
The engi neers wi l l
look at that and also at fire
flows, pressures, improve-
ments we should make
with water lines stuff
like that, he said.
Below has wanted to
hire a firm to evaluate and
update the water system
master plan for the past
few years. He had intend-
ed to have the work done
last summer, but with the
severe drought, he didnt
think it would be a good
t i me t o undert ake t he
project.
St at i c wat er l evel s
dropped five or six feet
last summer due to the
lack of rain recharging the
water table, Below said.
With the drought we
had last year, the static
wat er l evel s (of aqui-
fers beneath the village)
were dropping, he told
the Observer. Then I
thought, wed better get
this done sooner rather
than later.
The village has three
active wells. The study
Below plans to have done
will give a projection of
when the village would
need to drill a new well.
Officials have already
located a site on the vil-
lages west side for that
well. Village administra-
tor Mike Gracz told the
Public Works committee
the village has been col-
lecting impact fees from
developers to pay for a
new well.
But its hard to know
how soon the well will be
needed.
Thats determined by
population projections
and which way the village
is going to develop in the
future, as well as future
water demand, Below
said. There are lots of
factors that determine
that.
He recommended hir-
ing the engineering firm
Ruekert & Mielke Inc. to
conduct the study because
its engineers have worked
on village water matters in
the past and have records
on file.
This study is going to
tell us if we need to take
a well out of service or
drill it another 100 feet to
keep us out of potential
trouble, Below said at
the January public works
meeting.
Water: Considering engineers for projects
Continued from page 1
Historic photo
Photo courtesy of Oregon Area Historical
Society
1920s
A group of young folks in 1924
hang out at McGill house on
Washington Street.
Seated is (front) Helen Fincher
and Marion Criddle, (back) Don
McGill, Clement Criddle, Jim
Cusick and Harvey Fincher.
14
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
970 Horses
AQHA COLTS: black 3yo stud broke; 1-2
year olds: Bay, Roan, Buckskin, Cow-
bred & few mares 815-291-9394
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 Livestock
FOR SALE: Blue Face breeding stock,
fall born rams, ewe lambs, ram lambs,
feeders, Romadale/CVM crosses. 608-
527-5311
980 MacHinery & tooLs
JOHN DEERE 3950 Forage Harvestor,
hydraulic tongue, electric controls, 1000
RPM. 7ft hay head, 2 row corn head, very
good condition. 608-558-5240
990 FarM: service
& MercHandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
340 autos
2002 HONDA Civic SI Hatchback (ep3)
2.0 liter K20 V-Tec. Lowered, 18" wheels,
low profile tires, silver/aluminum color.
Many performance and appearance
modifications, nice car, good condition.
Less than 200 miles on recently replaced
5-speed tranny, new clutch & flywheel,
rebuilt CV axles, new ball joints and
sway bar links. Excellent heater and A/C,
Alpine stereo/cd/mp3 jack, etc. Asking
$7,500 OBO. Call 608-575-5984.
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck or Boat to
Heritage for the Blind. Free 3-day Vaca-
tion. Tax deductible. Free towing. All
paperwork taken care of. 888-439-5224
(wcan)
ENJOY SUMMER in your own convert-
ible 1994 Chrysler LeBaron GLC. Excel-
lent mechanical condition. 91,000 miles,
one owner car, stored winters. $5,000.
328-2714
342 Boats & accessories
$9995+ FSD for a new boat or pontoon
pkg-both w/lots of standard features!
New 16' pontoon w/furniture & 25HP or
new 16' boat, locator, trailer & 25HP.
Your Choice $9995+FSD. American
Marine & Motorsports Shawano-
866-955-2628 www.americanmarina.
com (wcan)
BOAT WORLD Over 700 New and Used
Pontoons, Fishing Boats, Deck Boats,
Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye boats, Cudd-
ys, Cruisers up to 33 feet and Outboards
@ Guaranteed Best Price! Crownline
Axis Malibu Triton Alumacraft Mirrorcraft
Misty Harbor & more! American Marine
& Motorsports Super Center Shawano-
where dreams come true 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & Lift Head-
quarters! New & Used. We do it all.
Delivery/Assembly/Install & Removals.
American Marine & Motorsports, Scha-
wano = SAVE 866-955-2628 (wcan)
350 MotorcycLes
BUYING CYCLES Nonrunners ok! Wis-
consin Cycle Salvage 920-722-1283
parts@cyclesalvage.net (wcan)
355 recreationaL veHicLes
ATVS SCOOTERS & GO KARTS, YOUTH
ATVs & SCOOTERS (80mpg) @ $49/MO.
SPORT & 4x4 ATVs @ $69/MO. AMERI-
CAN MARINE & MOTORSPORTS,
SHAWANO=SAVE=866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com. (wcan)
360 traiLers
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
390 auto: Wanted to Buy
WANTED: Autos, heavy trucks,
equipment and scrap iron.
Steve's Recycling. Hollandale, WI.
608-574-2350 (cell)
508 cHiLd care & nurseries
BROWN DEER Family Daycare Stough-
ton/Pleasant-Springs Licensed Child-
care. Openings available. 22 yrs exp.
- Quiet acre lot. Best area summer trip
program. Location-Experience-Referenc-
es. Indoor Slide- Competitive Rates. 873-
0711 www.browndeerdaycare.com
HIGH SCHOOL Student Available for
summer child care. Oregon Area Expe-
rienced, certified, reliable. cindyhomeof-
fice@gmail.com
OPENINGS FOR child care infants to
school age welcome.Stoughton area
Meals included. Fun learning environ-
ment. 20+ years experience with excel-
lent references. Debbie 608-877-1711
STATE LICENSED Family Childcare
provider has an opening. 18 years of
early childcare experience and educa-
tion. Excellent references. Check me out
at Lisa's Little Ones Childcare in Oregon.
608-445-5194
516 cLeaning services
KEDLEY CLEANING
For all your cleaning needs.
Great rates! Excellent references.
608-695-1191
REASONABLE HOUSE CLEANING
available. Monthly, bi-weekly, weekly,
one time only. Great Rates, References,
Honest & Trustworthy, Reliable. Call Jas-
mine 906-4969
532 Fencing
CRIST FENCING FREE ESTIMATES.
Residential, commercial, farm, horse.
608-574-1993 www.cristfencing.com
548 HoMe iMproveMent
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
DECK STAINING & Power Washing.
Fast and efficient. Washing and/or
painting of fences, sheds, houses.
608-669-7879
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
Interior-Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

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554 Landscaping, LaWn,
tree & garden Work
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing, trimming,
rototilling ,etc. 608-235-4389
LAWNCARE MAINTENANCE and land-
scaping. Lawn mowing and cleanup,
organic fertilization and weed control pro-
grams. Tree and shrub planting, edging,
shredded bark application, etc. Also tree
pruning and cutting. Serving Belleville/
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Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
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DUNN - $174,900. Sherry Lessing, (608) 212-1555, Michael Lessing, (608)
212-1556. MLS# 1657329.
TOWN OF MONTROSE - $35,500. Elaine Holpin, (608) 278-4180.
MLS# 1660776.
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MLS# 1665437.
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RUTLAND - $194,000. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324. MLS# 1682997.
OREGON - $219,000. Sharon O. Christensen, (608) 843-9185. MLS#
1682991.
OREGON - $235,900. John Norwell, (608) 698-5246. MLS# 1666649.
FITCHBURG - $299,000. Sharon O. Christensen, (608) 843-9185.
MLS# 1671705.
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(608) 278-4199. MLS# 1675027.
OREGON - $434,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1679825.
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TOWN OF DUNN/STOUGHTON - $149,900. Charlie Fuller, (608) 469-
1355, Julie Larson, (608) 661-5466. MLS# 1666962.
OREGON - $179,900. Jennie W. Post, (608) 276-5206. MLS# 1670761.
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Hanewicz, (608) 212-5064. MLS# 1681685.
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VERONA - $389,000. Sarah Deischer, (608) 206-1519, Melissa Hanewicz,
(608) 212-5064. MLS# 1675046.
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(608)278-4166. MLS# 1675358.
VERONA - MVP $420,000 - $440,000. Barb Dawson, (608) 575-3290.
MLS# 1671411.
OREGON - $550,000. Brendan McGrath, (608) 219-3675. MLS# 1650808.
OREGON - MVP $700,000 - $800,000. Laurie Howard, (608) 469-6710.
MLS# 1674715.
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Driveways
Floors
Patios
Sidewalks
Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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MLS#1682275
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NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON REQUEST FOR
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT,
AT 350 BRAUN ROAD,
OREGON WISCONSIN
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, June 6, 2013, in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin, to
consider the application of Trachte As-
sociates, LLC, for the property located
at 350 Braun Road, for a conditional
use permit regarding General Industrial
pursuant to Section 17.105(5)(b), and
17.206(9)(b) of the Village Code to allow
for modular building assembly.
Parcel #: 165/0509-021-1300-1
Lot 1 CSM 12402
The property is presently zoned GI,
General Industrial
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
Peggy Haag
Village Clerk
Published: May 16 and 23, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON REQUEST FOR
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT,
AT 214 SPRING STREET,
OREGON WISCONSIN
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, June 6, 2013, in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin,
to consider the application of Oregon
Bowl, LLC for the property located at
214 Spring Street, for a conditional use
permit permitting regarding Central Busi-
ness pursuant to Section 17.105(4)(c),
17.206(4)(i), and 17.206(9)(b) of the Vil-
lage Code to allow for outdoor recreation/
entertainment.
Parcel #: 165/0509-122-0475-2 Lot 15
Block 6 Village of Oregon Original Plat
Parcel #: 165/0509-122-0724-0 Outlot
124 Village of Oregon Assessors Plat
The property is presently zoned CB,
Central Business
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
Peggy Haag
Village Clerk
Published: May 16 and 23, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
ORDINANCE NO. 13-05
VILLAGE OF OREGON
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND
SECTION 12.05, RELATING
TO THE SALE OF ALCOHOL
BEVERAGES
The Village Board of the Village of
Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin, or-
dains as follows:
1. Section 12.05 is amended as
shown on Attachment A.
2. This ordinance shall take effect
upon passage and publication.
The foregoing ordinance was ad-
opted by the Village Board of the Village
of Oregon at a meeting held on May 20,
2013.
APPROVED:
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
Peggy Haag, Village Clerk
Published: May 23, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
MINUTES OF THE REGULAR
MEETING OF THE SCHOOL
BOARD OF THE OREGON
SCHOOL DISTRICT HELD ON
APRIL 22, 2013
The regular meeting of the School
Board of the Oregon School District was
called to order by Dr. Busler, Superin-
tendent, at 5:04 PM in the Oregon High
School LMC in the Village of Oregon,
Dane County, Wisconsin. Upon roll call,
the following board members were pres-
ent: Mr. Wayne Mixdorf, Mr. Lee Chris-
tensen, Mr. Dan Krause, Mr. Jeff Ramin,
Ms. Rae Vogeler, and Ms. Courtney
Odorico. The following board members
were absent: Mr. Steve Zach. Administra-
tors present: Dr. Brian Busler, Mr. Andy
Weiland, Dr. Anita Koehler, Mrs. Candace
Weidensee, Ms. Heather Sveom, Mr. Dan
Rikli, Dr. Leslie Bergstrom, Mr. Jon Tan-
ner, Ms. Jina Jonen, Ms. Kelly Meyers,
Mrs. Shannon Anderson and Ms. Kerri
Modjeski,
Proof in the form of a certifcate by
the Oregon Observer of communications
and public notice given to the public and
the Oregon Observer and a certifcate
of posting as required by Section 19.84
Wisconsin Statutes as to the holding of
this meeting was presented by Dr. Busler.
Mr. Zach arrived at 5:06 p.m.
Ms. Odorico moved and Mr. Mixdorf
seconded the motion to proceed with
the meeting according to the agenda as
posted. Motion passed 7-0.
A. Oregon High School Visit
1. OHS Presentation and Dialogue
2. OHS Tour
B. REORGANIZATION
Board Members Oath of Offce
Election of Offcers
a. President: Mr. Mixdorf moved and
Mr. Christensen seconded the motion
to nominate Ms. Courtney Odorico for
President. Mr. Zach further moved and
Mr. Ramin seconded the motion to close
the nominations and to cast a unanimous
ballot for Ms. Courtney Odorico for Presi-
dent. Motion passed by unanimous voice
vote.
b. Treasurer: Mr. Zach moved and
Mr. Ramin seconded the motion to nomi-
nate Mr. Lee Christensen for Treasurer.
Mr. Zach further moved and Mr. Ramin
seconded the motion to close the nomi-
nations and to cast a unanimous ballot
for Mr. Lee Christensen for Treasurer.
Motion passed by unanimous voice vote.
c. Clerk: Mr. Zach moved and Mr.
Mixdorf seconded motion to nominate
Mr. Jeff Ramin for Clerk. Mr. Zach further
moved and Mr. Christensen seconded
the motion to close the nominations and
to cast unanimous ballot for Mr. Jeff Ra-
min for Clerk. Motion passed by unani-
mous vote.
d. Vice President: Mr. Christensen
moved and Mr. Zach seconded the mo-
tion to nominate Mr. Wayne Mixdorf as
Vice President. Mr. Zach further moved
and Mr. Christensen seconded the mo-
tion to close the nominations and to cast
unanimous ballot for Mr. Wayne Mixdorf
for Vice President. Motion passed by
unanimous voice vote.
Board Committee Re-organization:
Ms. Odorico announced the committees
as follows:
Human Assets Committee: Steve
Zach, Chair, Wayne Mixdorf, Jeff Ramin
Physical Assets Committee: Wayne
Mixdorf, Chair, Lee Christensen, Dan
Krause
Financial Assets Committee: Lee
Christensen, Chair, Dan Krause, Court-
ney Odorico
Policy Committee: Jeff Ramin,
Chair, Rae Vogeler, Steve Zach, Courtney
Odorico
C. CONSENT CALENDAR:
Mr. Christensen moved and Mr. Ra-
min seconded the motion to approve the
following items on the Consent Calendar.
1. Approve minutes of the April 8,
2013 meeting;
2. Approve vouchers in the amount
of $987,244.35;
3. Treasurers Report for March 31,
2013;
4. Staff Resignations of Judy Fard
OMS .7 and Mebbie Landsness at OHS;
5. Staff Assignments none;
6. Field Trip Requests none;
7. Acceptance of Donations: Jason
and Jennifer Yelk - $100 for Orches-
tra and an anonymous donation in the
amount of $1,750 for the Personalized
Learning Plan;
8. Open Enrollment Exception Appli-
cations none;
Motion passed 7-0;
D. COMMUNICATION FROM PUB-
LIC: Various students and parents
addressed concerns to the Board re-
garding Administrations decision on the
Cheerleading coach position.
E. ACTION ITEMS:
1. Offcial Designations:
a. Newspaper: Mr. Christensen
moved and Mr. Krause seconded the
motion to adopt Resolution 2013-03 to
designate the Oregon Observer to be the
offcial district newspaper. In a roll call
vote, the following members voted yes:
Mr. Christensen, Mr. Krause, Mr. Mixdorf,
Mr. Zach, Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Ramin and Ms.
Odorico. Motion passed 7-0.
b. Resolution regarding Investment
of District Funds; Mr. Christensen moved
and Mr. Zach seconded the motion to
adopt Resolution Number 2013-01 Reso-
lution Regarding Investment of District
Funds. In a roll call vote, the following
members voted yes: Mr. Christensen, Mr.
Zach, Mr. Mixdorf, Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Ra-
min, Mr. Krause, and Ms. Odorico. Motion
passed 7-0.
c. Resolution Depositories; Mr.
Christensen moved and Mr. Ramin sec-
onded the motion to adopt Resolution
Number 2013-02 Depositories for District
Funds. In a roll call vote, the following
members voted yes: Mr. Christensen, Mr.
Ramin, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Zach, Ms. Vogel-
er, Mr. Krause and Ms. Odorico. Motion
passed 7-0.
2. Appointment of Representatives
a. CESA#2: Mr. Dan Krause has
agreed to be the CESA 2 Representative.
b. Village Park Board: Mr. Andy Wei-
land was appointed as Village Park Board
representative.
c. WASB Delegate: Ms. Rae Vogeler
will be the WASB delegate.
Mr. Zach has volunteered to be the
Boards Parliamentarian.
3. From Physical Assets Committee:
a. 2013-2014 Capital Project Plan:
On behalf of PAC, Mr. Mixdorf moved
the District designate up to $500,000 for
2013-2014 capital project list with an ad-
ditional $100,000 undesignated for capi-
tal projects to be reviewed and approved
by the PAC. In a roll call vote, the follow-
ing members voted yes: Mr. Mixdorf, Mr.
Zach, Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Krause,
Mr. Christensen and Ms. Odorico. Motion
passed 7-0.
b. Technology Infra-Structure: Mr.
Mixdorf on behalf of PACs recommenda-
tion moves that the District commit fund
balance for a 5 year 0% fnancing plan for
a total of not to exceed $600,000 for the
purchase of Technology infrastructure.
In a roll call vote, the following members
voted yes: Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Zach, Ms. Vo-
geler, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Krause, Mr. Chris-
tensen and Ms. Odorico. Motion passed
7-0.
4. CESA 5 Contract: Mr. Krause
moved and Mr. Mixdorf seconded the
motion to approve the CESA 5 con-
tract for Infnite Campus software sup-
port, Silver Level Value Added Support in
the amount of $5,100. In a roll call vote,
the following members voted yes: Mr.
Krause, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Zach, Ms. Vo-
geler, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Krause, Mr. Chris-
tensen, and Ms. Odorico. Motion passed
7-0.
5. From Policy Committee:
a. 174 Board Governance: Mr. Zach
on behalf of the Policy Committee, moved
to approve 174 Board Governance policy.
Ms. Vogeler moved an amendment to the
motion and Mr. Krause seconded the
amended motion to have 174.02.3 read: If
a committee member misses three mutu-
ally agreed upon consecutive meetings,
the Board President has the authority
to remove that Board member from the
committee and appoint a new member.
In a roll call vote the following members
voted yes: Ms. Vogeler and Mr. Krause.
The following members voted no: Mr.
Mixdorf, Mr. Zach, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Chris-
tensen and Mr. Zach. Motion failed 2-6.
Mr. Krause further moved and Mr. Zach
seconded the amendment to Mr. Zachs
original motion that 174.02.3 to read: The
board president may remove a member
from a committee if that member is not
cooperating with the work of that com-
mittee and appoint a new committee
member. In a roll call vote on the amend-
ment motion the following members
voted yes: Mr. Krause, Mr. Zach, Mr. Mix-
dorf, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Christensen and Ms.
Odorico. The following member voted
no: Ms. Vogeler. Motion passed 6-1. In a
roll call vote to Mr. Zachs original motion
on behalf of the committee to approve
Policy 174, the following members voted
yes: Mr. Zach, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Ramin, Mr.
Krause, Mr. Christensen and Ms. Odori-
co. The following member voted no: Ms.
Vogeler. Motion passed 6-1.
b. 440 Student Internet Access and
Electronic Communications: Mr. Zach on
behalf of the Policy Committee moved
to approve 440 Student Internet Access
and Electronic Communications. After
a lengthy discussion, Mr. Zach further
moved to table Policy 440 and 771 and
referred back to the Policy Committee
meeting for further review. Motion ap-
proved by unanimous voice vote.
c. 771 Electronic Communications:
This policy was tabled and referred back
to Policy Committee in a motion made
on 5b.
6. Continuation of Girls Hockey Co-
op and Fee Issuance: Mr. Zach moved
and Mr. Mixdorf seconded the motion
to approve the continuance of the Girls
Hockey Co-op l and issuance of hockey
fees directly to our student athletes.
F. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Student
Achievement no items
G. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Other Top-
ics no items
H. INFORMATION ITEMS:
1. Health Insurance Committee Up-
date: Mr. Weiland and Ms. Jonen
shared information from the Health
Insurance Committee.
I. CLOSING:
1. Future Agenda was established.
2. Check Out
At 9:30 p.m. a short break was taken
and the Board moved to the conference
room in the LMC.
J. EXECUTIVE SESSION ITEMS:
1. Personnel Matter: Discussion
held.
2. Negotiations: Discussion held.
Consideration of Adjourning to
Closed Session on Item J.1 & 2 as Provid-
ed under Wisconsin Statutes 19.85 (1) (c)
& (e). Mr. Mixdorf moved and Mr. Ramin
seconded the motion to move into closed
session to discuss Items J1 & J2. In a roll
call vote, the following members voted
yes: Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Zach, Ms.
Vogeler, Mr. Krause, Mr. Christensen and
Ms. Odorico. Motion passed 7-0. Closed
session began at 9:45 p.m.
K. ADJOURNMENT:
Mr. Christensen moved and Mr.
Zach seconded the motion to adjourn the
meeting. Motion passed 7-0. Meeting ad-
journed at 10:52 p.m.
Mr. Jeff Ramin, Clerk
Oregon School District
Published: May 23, 2013
WNAXLP
Legals
May 23, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
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SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
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Ag Lime Spreading
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5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
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560 proFessionaL services
BOOKKEEPING SERVICES: Accounts
Payable & Receivables
For your small business. Call now!
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608-712-6286
MY COMPUTER WORKS! Computer
problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer issues, Bad Internet Connections
- Fix It Now! Professional, US Based
Technicians. $25 off service. Call for
Immediate Help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
576 speciaL services
ALONE? EMERGENCIES Happen.
Get Help with one button push! $29.95/
month. Free equipment. Free set-up.
Protection for you or a loved one. Call
LifeWatch USA
800-642-0549 (wcan)
FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED! Are you
a 2-parent family over age 25 with 1
stay-at-home parent able to work with
youth 10-17 years of age?
Call 866-776-3760 or
CommunityCareResources.com/now-
recruiting. (wcan)
586 tv, vcr &
eLectronics repair
SAVE ON Cable TV-Internet-Digital
Phone- Satellite. You've Got A Choice!
Options from ALL major service provid-
ers. Call us to learn more! 888-714-5772
(wcan)
590 Wanted: services
NEED HOST Parents for German/Swiss
High School Students, for all or part of
2013-14 school year. Reflections Int'l
608-583-2412 www.
reflectionsinternational.org (wcan)
143 notices
START WITH ROTARY and good things
happen. Locate the nearest club at www.
rotary.org. This message provided by
PaperChain and your local community
paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 pLaces to go
GUN SHOW May 24-26. Eagle River
Wi ICE Arena. Friday 3-8, Saturday 9-5,
Sunday 9-3. Admission $6. 14 & under
free. Drawings/hourly door prizes. 608-
752-6677 bobandrocco.com (wcan)
GUN SHOW May 31-June 2. Final
Approach Banquet Hall, Sheboygan
Falls, WI Friday 3-8:30. Saturday 9-5.
Sunday 9-3. Large selection of guns and
ammo. Conceal & Carry available at the
show. Info: 563-608-4401 (wcan)
HOLIDAY FLEA MARKET. Massive!
May 25-26 Saturday-Sunday. Shawano
Fairgrounds. 7am-4pm. Zurko. 715-526-
9769 (wcan)
163 training scHooLs
AIRLINE CAREERS: become an Avia-
tion Maintenance Tech. FFA approved
training. Financial aid if qualified. Hous-
ing available. Job placement assistance.
Call AIM 888-242-3193 (wcan)
203 Business opportunities
NEW SCIENTIFIC Discovery offers
health & wealth business opportunities.
Free informational report. 800-901-7163
(24hr msg) 800-621-2065 (live) www.
truage.com/1010 (wcan)
606 articLes For saLe
CLOSED WOOD Working Shop. All
is for Sale. Power tools, Hand tools,
supplies. William Argue
N8431 Marty Rd, New Glarus.
9:00 to 4:00 May 24-25.
618 BuiLding suppLies:
tooLs & Fixtures
STEEL BUILDINGS: 4ONLY 20X20,
30X40, 40X54, 50X104. Must move Now!
Selling for Balance Owed! Free Delivery!
1-800-411-5869 x171 (wcan)
636 coMputers & accessories
APPLE IPOD NANO, 1GB almost new,
mint condition. $35.
608-556-0426
648 Food & drink
100% GUARANTEED Omaha Steaks
- Save 69% on the Grilling Collection.
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Order today. 1-888-676-2750 Use Code:
45102DJW www.OmahaSteaks.com/
gcoffer83 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
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+ plus s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 888-479-6008 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
652 garage saLes
EVANSVILLE- 11125 W Gibbs Lake
Rd. Follow green/yellow signs. 5/22-5/25,
6:30am-5:30pm Tools, furniture, plants,
Packer items, miscellaneous
STOUGHTON- 1839 Jackson 5/23-5/25
Thurs 4pm-? Fri-Sat 8am-4pm
STOUGHTON- 2149 Colladay Point Dr
5/24, 8:30am-6pm. 5/25, 8:30am-2pm.
Clothing (Excellent Condition/Brand
Names). Girls 2T-12, Women's and
Men's M-XL. Furniture, antiques, tons
of Books, Toys, Tools, Housewares and
much more! Details on Craigslist.
STOUGHTON- 3066 Shadyside Dr, One
Day Only Sale. 5/23, 2pm-7pm. Hun-
dreds of items, including Name Brand
Children's, Women's & Men's clothing.
Like new household items, pictures, toys,
books & much more!
STOUGHTON- 800 Truman Rd Garage
Sale/Estate Sale. 5/23-5/24 8am-7pm,
5/25 8am-noon. MANY TOOLS. Closing
work shop. Planer, router, Shop Smith,
mower, name brand lady clothes. Pfaltz
craft, dishes, teenage items, DSI
664 LaWn & garden
3'-12' EVERGREEN & Shade Trees.
Pick up or Delivery! Planting Available!
DETLOR TREE FARMS 715-335-4444
(wcan)
666 MedicaL & HeaLtH suppLies
ATTENTION JOINT & Muscle Pain Suf-
ferers: Clinically proven all-natural sup-
plement helps reduce pain & enhance
mobility. To try HydrAflexin Risk Free for
90 days. Call 888-550-4066 (wcan)
ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFER-
ERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP
Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus
FREE Home Delivery! Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection! 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL ALERT FOR SENIORS - 24/7
monitoring. Free Equipment. Free ship-
ping. Nationwide Services. $29.95/month
Call Medical Guardian today. 877-863-
6622 (wcan)
668 MusicaL instruMents
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
676 pLants & FLoWers
HOSTA SALE COOKSVILLE (intersec-
tion of hwy 138 & 59). 11921 W Hwy 59
May 23-27 9am-5pm. Locally grown &
potted. Many varieties, low prices for the
novice and collector
PLANT SALE OFF TOWER DR. Will be
June 8th-9th.
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion! Prices starting at
just $19.99. Plus take 20% off your order
over $29! Go to www.Proflowers.com/
ActNow or call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
688 sporting goods
& recreationaL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
and Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 eLectronics
DISH NETWORK STARTING at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where available)
SAVE! Ask about SAME DAY installa-
tion! Call 888-719-6981(wcan)
HIGHSPEED INTERNET EVERY-
WHERE By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up). Start-
ing at $49.95/mo. Call Now & Go Fast!
888-709-3348 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for
12 mo's) Options from ALL major service
providers. Call Aceller today to learn
more! 866-458-1545 (wcan)
696 Wanted to Buy
TOP PRICES Paid. Any kind of Scrap
Metal. Cars, Batteries, Farm Equipment,
Free Appliance Pick Up. Property
Cleanouts. Honest.
Fully Insured. U Call We Haul.
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks. We sell
used parts. Monday through Friday 8 am
- 5:30 pm. Newville
Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59,
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 rentaLs
1 BEDROOM apartments available in
Verona for persons 62+ and/or hand-
icapped/disabled. Rent starts a $443
and includes major appliances, off street
parking, water and sewer, garbage pick-
up and SNOW REMOVAL. Call 888-237-
5710 for more details. This institution is
an Equal Housing Opportunity provider
and employer.
2 BEDROOM 1 1/2 bath laundry includ-
ed. Large yard. $650/mo 2 bedroom 1
bath, 1st floor. Fenced yard. $650/mo.
608-628-9569
BROOKLYN BEAUTIFUL Modern upper
1 bedroom apartment in quiet neighbor-
hood. Stove, refrigerator, W/D includ-
ed. $525. per month plus $525.secu-
rity deposit. Utilities not included. 1 year
lease. No pets. No smoking. If interested
call 608-669-2460
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $650/month. 608-219-
6677
STOUGHTON- 105 West ST. 2
bedroom, appliances, water, heat,
A/C, ceiling fan, on site laundry.
Well kept and maintained. On site
manager. Next to Park. $725 per
month. 608-238-3815
STOUGHTON 2-BEDROOM All
Appliances, Including Washer/Dryer,
Detached Garage, No Pets, Non-
Smoking. $695/mo. Lease Required.
608-835-8806
STOUGHTON 3 Bedroom Duplex in
quiet neighborhood near Fox Prairie
School. $850 Month +Utilities. Water/
Sewer Included.
608-843-7098
STOUGHTON-LARGE 2-BDRM unit
in quiet, owner managed 10 unit. All
appliances, C/A, gas heat. Close to
shopping, off street parking, large yard.
Laundry. $665/month. Water included,
elec/gas extra. Approx. 850 sq ft.
Available June 1. Call
608-772-0234
STOUGHTON- N/W LOCATION 2 BR
Duplex. Single Car Garage. Very, Very
nice. Great Neighborhood. Please No
Pets/Smoking, Available June 1. 608-
743-0092
STOUGHTON TOWNHOUSE
2-Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, All Appliances
Including W/D, FF Laundry, Basement,
Attached Garage. $875/Month. No Pets.
No Smoking. 835-8806
VERONA 1 BEDROOM Upper small
apartment. Off Street parking. Heat,
water, sewer, stove, refrigerator and
electric included. No Pets. 1yr. lease.
$500/month plus deposit.
608-575-2607
VERONA DUPLEX- Small, 1-bedroom,
office and 1car garage. Walking dis-
tance to groceries/restaurants/biketrail.
Available 7/01/13 $685/mo. Diiscount for
mowing. 608-225-0158
720 apartMents
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location,
on-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call
Kelly at 608-255-7100 or visit www.ste-
vebrownapts.com/oregon
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
750 storage spaces For rent
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Units in all sizes
5x10 thru 10x30
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10'x5', 10'x10', 10x15', 10x20, 10'x30'
24/7 access, security lit. Short/long term
leases. Call Jim:
608-334-1191 or fax 608-845-7165
760 MoBiLe HoMes
WE PAY CASH for your used Mobile
Home. Home Source One. Text or
call today 920-889-7440 or Barbara.
Schauf@assetdevelopment.com (wcan)
801 oFFice space For rent
BEST LOCATION in Stoughton. Retail
space for rent. 211 E Main 4,000+ sq
ft. Beautifully renovated. Available Now
$1900/mo.Call Connie 608- 271-0101
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
805 coMMerciaL &
industriaL Lots
VERONA INDUSTRIAL Park 2600 sq ft.
shop, warehouse, office space. Available
NOW. 845-7630
820 Misc. investMent
property For saLe
FOR SALE 70 ACRE FARM near
Albany. 26 tillable and 44 timber.
Updated farmhouse. Very secluded.
Must see to appreciate beauty and
potential. 608-329-5033.
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 700 wooded
acres. CFR tax. Will divide. Terms avail-
able. Asking $800 per acre. 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
FOR SALE BY Owner: Near Copper
Harbor, MI. 400 wooded acres. Mon-
treal River runs through land. CFR tax.
Will divide. Terms available. Asking
$350,000. 715-478-2085 (wcan)
845 Houses For saLe
EDGERTON- 2 BEDROOM Ranch in the
country; plus 2 acres, on main highway.
1 Full Bath, 1/2 bath with laundry on 1st
floor. All Appliances, AC, 2 car attached
garage, newer roof and furnace-many
updates. 608-322-2835
870 residentiaL Lots
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895

402 HeLp Wanted, generaL
FULL TIME Laborer for concrete
foundation work. Must have DL.
Experienced preferred.
Call between 8:30am-11:30am
608-695-2191
NOW HIRING Event Specialists. Con-
duct in-store product demonstrations to
generate excitement & brand aware-
ness. Weekends reqd. Email Dennis.
Bernstein@inmarketingservices.com or
714-780-3025 (wcan)
RESIDENTIAL CLEANER needed to
work 2 to 3 days per week. $8.50 per
hour. Days only . Experience helpful.
Non smoker 835-0339
SUMMER HELP WANTED. OLD
STAGE VEGETABLE GARDENS. Is
looking for energetic, self-motivated,
hard working individuals to join our
team. Sales Persons must be at
least 18 with clean driving record.
Vegetable Pickers (mostly sweet
corn) must be at least 14. Enjoy fresh
air, sunshine and free produce. Work
starts mid July. Call Tom Eugster at
608-279-2855
444 construction,
trades & autoMotive
ASPHALT PAVING CREW Madison
Asphalt Contractor has openings for
skilled paver operator,roller, lute man and
laborer.CDL Drivers and Plant Yard/Load-
er man. Call 608-274-4932 for Details.
447 proFessionaL
OTR TEAM and SOLO DRIVERS
* Above Average Mileage Pay
*Teams Avg 6000 Miles per Week*
*Solos Avg 2500-3500/wk*
* Flexible Home Time
* 100% No Touch/Drop&Hook
* Full Benefit Pkg CDL/A
* 12 Months Exp. Preferred
1-888-545-9351 Ext. 13
Jackson WI
www.doublejtransport.com (wcan)
453 voLunteer Wanted
PEER SUPPORT of Dane County
connects older adults with volunteers to
provide needed support through friendly
home visits. We need volunteers who
have an interest in helping to keep older
adults in their own homes by providing
emotional support to promote wellness and
reduce social isolation. This is a flexible
opportunity for adults 55+ in their own
community. Mental health or social work
experience is helpful but not necessary. Do
you like to clean and organize? Would you
like to put a smile on the face of Middleton
Outreach Ministry clients when they
see a clean building each day? Help us
clean the food pantry and organize the
food shelves after hours Tues or Thurs
from 2:30-4:30 pm, weekly or every other
week. Two volunteers needed each shift,
so sign up now with a friend! United Way
2-1-1 is seeking new volunteers to become
Information and Referral Specialists. If you
are looking for an opportunity to learn more
about community resources and would
like to assist people in finding ways to get
and give help, United Way 2-1-1 may be
the place for you! Our volunteers staff our
telephone lines, answering questions about
resources available in the service area.
Call the Volunteer Center at 246-4380
or visit
www.volunteeryourtime.org
for more information or to learn about other
volunteer opportunities.
PRODUCT SPECIALIST
Carnes Company, a leading manufacturer of
commercial HVAC equipment seeks a Product
Specialist for multiple product lines. Job duties
include technical support to sales reps and
end-users, work with internal departments on
all aspects of the assigned product lines, and
assist the Product Line Managers as needed.
Qualifcations include great customer service
skills, great written and verbal skills, and the
ability to handle multiple tasks. Mechanical
aptitude or HVAC experience desired but not
required. Associates Degree or higher is desired.
Send cover letter, resum and
salary history to:
Carnes Company/Human Resources
P.O. Box 930040
Verona, WI 53593-0040
or email Human Resources at HR@carnes.com
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Gorman & Company, Inc. in Oregon, Wisconsin is looking
for a back-up Receptionist to answer phones and manage
the front desk on an on-call basis to provide back-up
phone coverage for our Receptionist. This could include
providing coverage every day for lunch, as well as provid-
ing coverage for unplanned absences and vacations.
Responsibilities include:
1. Receives telephone calls and assists with placement of
calls.
2. Receives visitors, answers general questions, and directs
individuals to the appropriate person.
3. Accepts offce packages.
4. May perform miscellaneous clerical duties, including
opening and sorting company mail.
Qualifcations:
1. High School diploma or equivalent.
2. One or more years of similar experience.
3. Familiar with Microsoft Offce products, various offce
machines, and telephone systems.
On-Call Receptionist

Offce hours are Monday - Friday,
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Please apply on-
line at www.jobsinmadison.com.
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Attention College Students
and 2013 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at
www.summeropenings.com

Web Designer
Are you a skilled web designer? Does working in an
ever changing, fast-paced environment excite you? Are
you a self-motivated person with creative ideas? If you
answered yes to all three of these questions, you might
be the TH Medias next Web Designer.
This Web Designer position is located in Dubuque,
IA. Responsibilities include developing, testing, and
auditing of THonline, other TH Media websites, and
our mobile site. In addition, this person should also
be skilled in print design, provide a high level of timely
and accurate customer service, and stay abreast of the
latest trends as it relates to web development.
To be considered for this position, you must have
a two-year college degree in a related feld (or the
equivalent in experience) and one to three years
experience with Web site creation, design and online
publishing. Additionally, experience with content
management systems is a plus.
For consideration, apply online at
www.wcinet.com/career.cfm.
TH Media, a division of Woodward Communications,
is an Equal Opportunity Employer
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Kopkes Koupon
$
2 off
Any Hanging Basket
Valid 5/22/13-5/27/13
Limit one koupon per Kustomer per day.
Kopkes Koupon
Patio Planters or
Patio Tubs
$
2 off
Valid 5/22/13-5/27/13
Limit one koupon per Kustomer per day.
Kopkes Koupon
Perennials
50

off
Valid 5/22/13-5/27/13
Limit one koupon per Kustomer per day.
Limit 6. $3.00 total. Starting at $1.99.
Memorial Day Planters
Come Early for Best Selection!
Quality Bloomers at Reasonable Prices
Visit Wisconsins Premier Grower of Quality Bedding Plants & Hanging Baskets
.
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CTY. M
Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugsters
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on Sun-
rise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left on
Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Nether-
wood Road. Turn left and go into Oregon past
Walgreens to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn right
and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left at
Netherwood Rd. into Oregon past Walgreens
to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
#
VISIT THE STOUGHTON AREA FARMERS MARKET
ON FRIDAY MORNINGS IN FRONT OF DOLLAR GENERAL
RECYCLE YOUR POTS & CONTAINERS AT OUR FARM LOCATION.
SUPPORT LOCAL AGRICULTURE! SHOP OUTSIDE THE BOX STORE.
1828 Sandhill Rd.
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-7569
Hours:
Mon-Fri 8:30 am-7:30 pm;
Sat 8:30 am-5 pm;
Sun 9 am-4 pm
Were open Monday, May 27
9 am to 5 pm
www.kopkesgreenhouse.com
KOPKES HONOR
FLIGHT BENEFIT &
MEMORIAL SERVICE
Sunday, May 26 4:00 p.m.
Memorial Service
10% OFF All Purchases
will be donated to
the honor flight.
16 - The Oregon Observer - May 23, 2013