Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements Annual Report 2003-2004

SOUTH WALES POLICE HEDDLU DE CYMRU

NATIONAL PROBATION SERVICE
for England and Wales

Contents
Introduction by Sue Hall and Barbara Wilding National Perspective Achievements Local MAPPA Strategic Management Board Agency Views Frequently Asked Questions Statistics

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SOUTH WALES POLICE HEDDLU DE CYMRU

NATIONAL PROBATION SERVICE
for England and Wales

Introduction

Sue Hall

Barbara Wilding, QPM

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Chief Officer of South Wales Probation

Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) play a crucial role in helping to protect the public from potentially dangerous offenders in South Wales. The work is some of the most challenging we do, but it is also rewarding. MAPPA practice has continued to develop during 2003/4, as shown in this Annual Report. The report also testifies to the excellent partnership working which is essential if the risks posed by offenders are to be effectively managed.

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Chief Constable South Wales Police

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My commitment to making South Wales a safer, more secure and pleasant place in which all our communities can reside, work, visit and enjoy themselves without fear of crime is unequivocal. If we are to achieve this aim it is vital that persons who are identified as being a significant threat to the safety of the public are strictly monitored and controlled. This can only be achieved through committed partnership working. I am therefore delighted that Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements in the force area have made vast strides in recent years to ensure that all relevant partners are working towards the common aim of making our communities safer. This annual report illustrates the huge amount of good work being progressed and I believe it will reassure the public of our commitment to this area of our business. It also provides clear evidence of our determination to make South Wales known nationally and internationally as one of the safest areas in the United Kingdom.

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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements Annual Report 2003-2004

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National Perspective
Sexual and violent offences are dreadful crimes that deeply affect the lives of victims and their families and inspire fear in local communities. Their impact can be profound and long-lasting, leaving victims feeling unsafe even in their own homes. The Government regards tackling sexual and violent crimes as one its highest priorities. Having set up the MAPPA in 2001 – which provided for the first time a firm statutory basis for the work police and probation jointly undertake to protect the public from sexual and violent offenders - it has in the last year done a great deal to strengthen the MAPPA and the wider public protection framework. the duty to co-operate. The reform of the way in which child protection is organised, following the public inquiry into the tragic death of Victoria Climbie, will reinforce the importance of effective joint working between different agencies which the MAPPA has itself promoted. The introduction of an element of public scrutiny of this often complex and sensitive area of public protection through the appointment of two Lay Advisers in each Area, has been carefully and successfully trialed and evaluated. As Home Office Minister Paul Goggins said: “Lay Advisers will play a vital role…We are committed to giving them not only an insight into how this work is carried out but, more importantly, an opportunity to question what is being done and why.”

Strengthening the MAPPA
The national development of the MAPPA has concentrated on preparing to implement the MAPPA provisions of the Criminal Justice Act (2003). These provisions came into force on 5th April 2004 and help strengthen the MAPPA by: (i) making the Prison Service part of the ‘Responsible Authority’ with police and probation; (ii) formalising the involvement of other agencies which can make an important contribution to helping offenders not to reoffend - the Act imposes a ‘Duty to Co-operate’ with the Responsible Authorities upon: • • • • • • Local authority Housing, Education and Social Services Health Service bodies Jobcentres Plus Youth Offending Teams Registered Social Landlords which accommodate MAPPA offenders, and Electronic Monitoring providers

Other legislative measures
In addition to this work to strengthen the MAPPA, the Government has also begun to strengthen other statutory provisions, the most significant of which the Sexual Offences Act (2003) and the measures to introduce new sentences for ‘dangerous’ offenders which will keep them in custody until they no longer pose a serious risk to the public. The Sexual Offences Act overhauls the many antiquated sexual offences and plugs loopholes in the law. In updating sexual offences, it strengthens the law on rape and on sex offences against children. It introduces new offences of ‘sexual grooming’ and extends the protection from exploitation in prostitution or pornography to children up to the age of 18. For the first time, it will be an offence to buy sexual services from a child below this age, targeting those who abuse children in this way. The Sexual Offences Act also strengthens the sex offenders register, which has proved a valuable means by which the police can monitor convicted sex offenders within their area, and introduces new civil orders to help prevent further offences from being committed.

(iii) The appointment by the Home Secretary of two members of the public (‘Lay Advisers’) in each Area to assist in monitoring the effectiveness of the MAPPA. Work on the duty to co-operate has been taken forward by two separate and complementary initiatives. First, in many areas the duty to cooperate formalises what has already begun to be established as good practice. The statutory basis of the duty will help ensure a more consistent engagement of all these agencies across England and Wales. Secondly, the relevant Central Government Departments and the Welsh Assembly have been involved in developing the Guidance which the Home Secretary issued on

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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements Annual Report 2003-2004

National Perspective
The focus on Victims
In addition to all this work to tackle offenders, the Government has rightly placed much greater emphasis upon meeting the needs of victims. The Victims of sexual offending are identified as a priority group within the National Victims and Witnesses Strategy. This strategy which was published in July 2003, aims to improve support and protection for victims and witnesses by: • reducing the adverse effects of crime on victims and witnesses, and preventing secondary victimisation; encouraging more victims and witnesses to come forward; and by offering more options to victims and witnesses, including alternatives to attendance at court. These initiatives will help toward another key Government target, that of improving public confidence in the criminal justice system. The Government is underpinning this work in its Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Bill which is currently going through Parliament. It will create a new independent post of Commissioner for Victims and Witnesses to be a champion/voice for all victims of crime and a new statutory Victims’ Code of Practice (to be implemented in April 2005) which will build on the existing Victims’ Charter and set out specific responsibilities that each criminal justice service agency and Victim Support must provide to victims.

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Achievements
Within the South Wales Area partner agencies are committed to multi-agency collaboration for the benefit of the community. South Wales can be justifiable proud of key achievements in Public Protection during the last year. Many examples exist of good cooperation between agencies, some examples of these are given here. The ‘Joint Agency Strategic Framework for the Assessment and Management of Potentially Dangerous Offenders within the South Wales Police Area’ is the document which guides the work of MAPPA in South Wales. Launched in December 2002 this year was the first in which the document operated across the agencies and has been therefore, a year of consolidation. Through the development and launch of the Strategic Framework South Wales MAPPA has already moved towards the ‘Duty to Cooperate’ that is outlined in the Criminal Justice Act 2003. We are confident that the inclusive approach adopted at the outset will further enhance working relationships between agencies and partnership working to protect the public. Seeing Public Protection as a whole is a new development in the work of the South Wales MAPPA. The Public Protection Partnership monitors the four arms of Public Protection: • • • • Child protection Adult protection Domestic violence Potentially dangerous offenders MARACs are held on a regular basis, at least once a month, depending on the number of cases to be considered. Where Police Officers attend reports of domestic abuse they find out as much information as possible to help in establishing the risk posed to any vulnerable people in the household including children. By applying a risk assessment tool specialist Domestic Abuse Coordinators can establish a level of risk. There are four levels and, if a very high level of risk is determined, then the case will be discussed within a Domestic Abuse MARAC. On licence from prison for an unrelated offence Graham was reporting regularly to his supervising Probation Officer and seemed to be progressing well. However, the supervising Probation Officer attended a domestic violence MARAC meeting and learned that Graham was, in fact, physically abusing his partner. The decision of the MARAC was to institute recall proceedings and Graham was returned to custody. In addition the MARAC put in motion a plan of support for Graham’s partner and family. In simple terms, key partners from a number of agencies including Police, Probation, Health, Social Services, Housing and voluntary organisations, meet to share known information about the family. The process has been recognised nationally as good practice and is seen as essential in safeguarding the welfare of vulnerable adults and children. Domestic Abuse MARACs were developed and introduced because of lessons learned from previous cases where vulnerable people, most commonly women and children, have been seriously harmed or killed. The aim of the Domestic Abuse MARAC is to protect vulnerable people by making sure that all the key agencies share information to gain an understanding of the nature of the risk and work together with the family to prevent further tragedies. Domestic Abuse Homicide Reviews are a pioneering initiative in South Wales which look at tragedies that have happened in order to learn

A huge range of agencies signed up to the Framework, including:
South Wales Police South Wales Probation Area Bridgend County Borough Council City and County of Swansea Council City and County of Cardiff Council Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council Rhondda Cynon Taff County Borough Council Vale of Glamorgan Council Bro Morgannwyg NHS Trust Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust North Glamorgan NHS Trust Pontypridd and Rhondda NHS Trust Swansea NHS Trust Velindre NHS Trust HMP and YOI Parc HMP Cardiff HMP Swansea HMP Usk Welsh Federation of Housing Associations 19 local Housing Associations Llanarth Court Psychiatric Hospital HM Customs and Excise South Wales Forensic Psychiatric Service, Caswell Clinic

While each of the groups have their own Strategic Forum it has been of benefit to bring them together in order to avoid the often voiced criticism that agencies work in isolation. Liaison with the Welsh Assembly Government has been another element of work during the year in preparation for new legislation, particularly in connection with the Duty to Cooperate. Work is ongoing to ensure that arrangements for Wales mirror those for England while ensuring that our particular needs are taken into account. Domestic Abuse Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences were introduced in July 2003 and are unique to South Wales. The process is similar to the MARACs used to discuss Potentially Dangerous Offenders. Domestic Abuse

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Achievements
necessary lessons that will help to safeguard vulnerable people in the future. It is a sad fact that many victims of homicide were involved in an intimate or family relationship with their killer and it is often the case that many agencies involved in the MAPPA process will have information about the same family for a variety of reasons. When a multi-agency approach is adopted in these cases, and information is shared, there may be serious concerns raised about the welfare of the victims of abuse. The Strategic Management Board meets at least quarterly and gives lay advisers the opportunity to question and challenge the processes in place. In addition, our lay advisers have made visits to crucial teams and observed case conferences to see how the risk management activities are carried out in practice.

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Quote from Lay Adviser
I have been privileged during the year to attend a Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel as an observer. What impressed me most was the time given by all professionals to the management of an individual offender, the great detail covered and, perhaps most importantly, the extent of information exchange between the agencies, which enabled very detailed planning to be undertaken for the protection of the public. It is gratifying to know that the pilot scheme of which I have been a part will now be extended nationally and placed on a statutory basis. I look forward to being a Lay Adviser and helping to develop this important area of work.

While the Homicide Reviews are still in their early days, only one case has so far been thoroughly scrutinised, South Wales plans to undertake many more. The benefits from such reviews are that agencies will gain a better understanding of the dynamics of Domestic Abuse. It is only when the problems are identified that agencies can work together to respond to them. Lay Advisers were recruited for the first time during the year. South Wales was one of eight areas to pilot the participation of members of the public in the management of sex and violent offenders. Over the year they have taken the lead in the development of the Memorandum of Understanding for Lay Advisers and contributed to the evaluation of the role. Research indicates that this has been a successful project which will be rolled out to all Areas across England and Wales during the coming year. Our two advisers, John Dale and Mike Thomas, have worked enthusiastically with the statutory and voluntary partners to assist in the strategic management of those offenders who are dealt with through MAPPA. They have made a real contribution through their role as a “critical friend” as, with limited knowledge of how agencies work together in practice to manage these potentially dangerous offenders, they have asked questions that those closest to the process would not think to ask. This, of course, has been challenging for the agencies but has been extremely beneficial. Lay advisers sit on the South Wales MAPPA Strategic Management Board (SMB) which undertakes the formal review of the arrangements in place which are used to assess and manage the risks of these offenders.

John Dale

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Lay Adviser for South Wales MAPPA

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How MAPPA operates locally
It’s all about risk management
MAPPA uses two forms of inter-agency contact to manage the risks posed by an individual offender. • • Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC) Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel (MAPPP). Peter had been subject to the MAPPA process on several occasions as a result of his previous convictions which included sex and violent offences. He used a local swimming baths on a regular basis and, through the close liaison between Police, Probation, Health, Housing, Local Authority Sports and a Housing Association, it was discovered that he had been playing with children who were strangers to him and associating with another high risk offender. This information meant that an effective plan of monitoring and surveillance could be developed to ensure that the risk posed to the public, not only by Peter but also by his associate, could be put into place. John is a 53-year-old South Wales man with previous convictions for indecency with children and making child abuse movies both in the UK and abroad. He obviously posed a serious risk to children in South Wales. Through the multi-agency work of the MAPPA process relevant information has been shared with a number of agencies to help manage the risk John posed. This has been particularly complicated in John’s case as he travels a great deal and is known to have connections with other sex offenders. Agencies across Wales and the South West have worked together to make sure that his activity is consistently monitored and this has meant that John has not committed any further offences.

The aims of both forums are the same: • To share information • To assess levels of risk and their implications • To consider implications for victims • To devise the individual management plan • To agree the implementation of management plan • To agree the monitoring and review process of the management plan In addition the MAPPP has two additional aims: • To consider or review the need to register the subject as a Potentially Dangerous Offender • To consider any issues relating to disclosure in the public domain There are two definitions in terms of the risk management and MAPPA processes which are essential to understand. They are: The critical few are those offenders who are managed under the MAPPP process. They are defined as those who: • Following a full risk assessment are considered to be at high or very high risk of causing serious harm • Present risks that can only be managed by a plan which requires close cooperation at a senior level because of its complexity or unusual resource requirements • May not be considered to be a very high risk but who, because of exceptional circumstances, are likely to be subject to a high level of media interest or public scrutiny and there is a need to ensure that public confidence is sustained. Violent and sexual offenders may be defined as those offenders who are defined under section 68 of the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000, particularly those in subsections (3) (4) (5), who are not required to register as sex offenders under the terms of the Sexual Offences Act 2003.

What is a MARAC?
A MARAC is a formal conference that is used to manage the risk assessment process of known Sex or Potentially Dangerous Offenders and consider any implications for victims. Minutes and agreed actions are detailed at each meeting and distributed to all attendees to ensure that those involved understand the contribution they are expected to make. MARAC meetings are held each month, or more often if required, and in addition to Police and Probation the following agencies are invited to attend: • • • • • Social Services Local Authority Housing Victim Liaison Officer Prison Service Youth Offending Team – if the offender is under 18.

Kyle is a 30-year-old South Wales man who had served a custodial sentence for indecency with children. On release Kyle was placed in a Probation Hostel where his activity could be closely monitored. This led to Probation staff sharing their concerns with Police colleagues as he had been maintaining associations with other sex offenders. The Police carried out an investigation and discovered that Kyle had made contact with a 12-year-old child. In addition he was found to be downloading child pornography through his use of an Internet café. Kyle was arrested and returned to custody, demonstrating that effective surveillance and sharing of information had contributed to the safety of the community.

Other agencies or individuals such as Health, HM Customs and Excise, Housing Associations, Psychiatric Nurses may also be invited to the meeting, depending on the circumstances of the offender. MARACs are usually the first step in the risk management process and can, in the case of the “critical few” lead to a MAPPP .

What is a MAPPP?
The MAPPP deals with the “critical few” – those offenders who need the highest level of multiagency collaboration.

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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements Annual Report 2003-2004

How MAPPA operates locally
Anthony had a number of previous convictions from motoring offences to abduction and indecent assault. Before his release from custody the MAPPP process was called into action and a plan developed to manage his risk. Meetings about Anthony were held on a regular basis to ensure that the intelligence flow between agencies remained open. This close liaison has improved the working practices of all the agencies involved and ensured that information about Anthony has been used appropriately to develop a greater understanding about him. This has been invaluable in monitoring him and has ensured that his risk to the public is minimised. A MAPPP is usually held following a referral from the MARAC but, in exceptional cases where the offender represents an exceptionally high risk to the public, a request for a MAPPP can be made by the senior Probation and Police Officers. As with the MARAC certain agencies will always be invited to attend a MAPPP These include: . • • • • • • • Social Services Local Authority Housing Victim Liaison Officer Supervising Probation Officer Police Public Protection Officer Prison Service Youth Offending Team – if the offender is under 18. Terry was subject to a Community Rehabilitation Order with a condition to attend the Reasoning and Rehabilitation (R&R) programme and a condition of residency at one of the hostels in South Wales. He was abused and bullied in his early years by a series of abusive foster parents and a bullying half brother. As an adult he wanted revenge for this abuse, which lead him to criminal behaviour. As a resident at Quay House Terry made significant progress. He worked with hostel staff, his keyworker and the Community Psychiatric Nurse (CPN) to address the pain and unhappiness that dominated his teenage years. The hostel’s supportive environment enabled Terry to understand this in a way that will help him to avoid offending in the future. Through the basic skills assessment he progressed to accredited English and Maths tuition. He also found full time employment through our partner Action for Jobs. During his residency, and through his attendance on an accredited offender behaviour programme, Terry developed new thinking skills and gained formal qualifications. He also gained and has sustained employment and learned the independent living skills he needed to move on and live the rest of his life.

In addition it may be appropriate, depending on the case, to invite other agencies or individuals, all of whom will have relevant information that will assist the MAPPA process. South Wales has developed a pro-forma to help senior staff to monitor the minutes taken during the course of a MAPPP meeting. This form helps to ensure consistency and appropriateness in terms of both the meetings and resultant action plans. The results from this are fed back to MAPPP managers to help us to achieve continuous improvement.

The role of Probation hostels
Probation hostels in Cardiff and Swansea have an important roleto play in the management of potentially dangerous offenders in the community. The hostels house more than 50 residents between them. Many of these are accommodated at the hostel as a condition of their licence following release from prison, although residents may also be on bail or probation. The hostel runs to strict rules and offers a structured environment for offenders.

There are a number of activities that residents can undertake during their residency. There is a focus on developing their basic skills and helping them to improve their personal circumstances through, for example, better money management. Activities concentrate on developing the selfesteem and victim understanding of offenders and ensure that they are safely reintegrated into the community. At the hostel in Cardiff there is an ongoing bicycle project, which takes in old bikes, repairs them and donates them either to Romania or local

Mark had a major alcohol problem and was subject to an Automatic Conditional Release (ACR) licence after serving 21 months for the theft of £700 from an elderly woman. He had been homeless for much of his adult life and been banned from most bed and breakfasts and voluntary hostels for violent and abusive behaviour towards staff. He was admitted to Mandeville House on the strict condition that if he should consume alcohol on or off the premises, his place would be withdrawn immediately. Mark responded well to these strict boundaries and benefited from the support offered to him through his keyworker. He also worked hard to improve his literacy in readiness for his move from the hostel and, through work undertaken with the accommodation partnership, secured suitable supported accommodation.

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How MAPPA operates locally
childrens’ charities. Both hostels also offer financial and practical support for local charity events. In addition both hostels run regular information days on a range of subjects including, drugs, alcohol, accommodation, race awareness and independent living skills. All these activities are designed to reduce the offender’s risk of reoffending and help to protect the public. Dealing with an area the size of South Wales these are essential parts of the process as there are seven local authority areas and seven police divisions meaning that it would be easy for a breakdown in communication to occur. This has been an invaluable investment for Police and Probation and will, following some revision to the role, continue in the future.

Approved premises offer an enhanced level of supervision by:
• • • Imposing a night-time curfew Providing 24 hour staffing Undertaking ongoing assessment of attitudes and behaviour Ensuring ongoing prosocial modelling Providing a programme of regular supervision, support and monitoring Surveillance and ongoing police liaison Reinforcing compliance with bail or licence conditions Encouraging attendance on, and supporting learning gained through accredited programmes Maintaining contact with supervising staff in the Probation field teams

Victims – a new focus
In April 2003 South Wales Probation established a specialist Victims Unit, staffed by officers who have no involvement with offenders. The Probation Service has a statutory obligation to make contact with the victims of violent or sexual crime where the offender has been sentenced to 12 months or more in custody. The role of the Unit is to provide information to the victim to ensure that they are kept informed about the offender as he or she progresses through the different stages of the sentence. Victim Liaison Officers provide information to the victim on a range of issues relevant to them including: • • • • Details of the sentence How decisions are made about release from prison Safeguards that exist after the offender is released Other sources of support, especially victim support schemes.

Working in partnership – joint-funded post
As the Responsible Authorities during this year Police and Probation have continued to work together closely. One of the examples of this has been the creation of a joint-funded post to ensure there is one point of access to the MAPPA process. This key administration post has provided consistency to the South Wales MAPPA by ensuring that all Panels and Conferences are organised and appropriate venues booked, that the layout and recording of minutes is consistent and that the resultant action plans are distributed to all relevant agencies. Sue was the victim of a violent attack by her partner, who was initially sentenced to six years, although this was reduced to five years on appeal. The reduced sentence was supported by Sue at the time and she continued to support the offender during the early stages of the sentence although there were some concerns about the safety of a child from this relationship. The Victim Liaison team contacted Sue and attended six Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) and four Multi-Agency Public Protection Panels (MAPPPs) to represent her situation,views and concerns. In addition to this involvement the Victim Liaison Officer (VLO) undertook further liaison with a range of agencies including Social Services and the Public Protection, Domestic Violence and Crime Prevention units of South Wales Police to discuss the particular situation of this case. Eventually Sue decided to end her relationship with the offender and worked closely with the VLO and Social Services to ensure the safety of her child and gain continued information about the progress of the offender through his sentence.

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They also ensure that the victim’s voice is heard and understood at case conferences and when offenders are applying for parole or other forms of release on licence. This can result in additional conditions included in the offender’s licence to better protect the victim, for example a condition not to contact the victim or a restriction preventing them from visiting the victim’s home area. Of course Victim Liaison Officers cannot become involved in the support needs of the victim although close links with Victim Support are maintained to ensure that a referral can be easily made. However, this resource of dedicated staff, working exclusively with victims, does help to ensure that Probation is doing everything it can to support those people in local communities, who have been affected by the most serious crimes.

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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements Annual Report 2003-2004

Strategic Management Board
The South Wales Multi-Agency Public Protection Strategic Board was established during 2002 and is chaired by the Assistant Chief Constable (Crime) and attended by, among others, the two Lay Advisers. The Board has now changed its name to ensure clarity and will now be known as the Public Protection Partnership. The remit of the Board is extremely wide as it seeks to provide a strategic overview of the four areas of Public Protection: • Child Protection • Adult Protection • Domestic Abuse • MAPPA Within this strategic framework there was a need, identified through the development of MAPPA and Home Office Guidance, for a distinct Strategic Management Board which would focus solely on the work of MAPPA. During 2003 the South Wales MAPPA Strategic Management Board was established, chaired by the Assistant Chief Officer Probation (Public Protection). The key partner agencies who are signatories to the Joint Framework for the Management of Potentially Dangerous Offender within the South Wales Area are represented on the Strategic Management Board. The Board meets quarterly and has, so far met on three occasions. The membership and terms of reference are currently under review by the constituent partner agencies. Within the South Wales Area there is continuing close collaboration between senior representatives from the key partner agencies across the public protection remit. In terms of Child Protection there is regular attendance from each Local Authority’s Child Protection Coordinators and their seniors at MAPPP and MARAC meetings as well as at MAPPA training events. Each of the Area Child Protection Committees within the South Wales Area regularly considers the MAPPA process as part of their ‘overseeing’ role to ensure effective multi-agency working. Both the Public Protection Partnership and the MAPPA Strategic Management Board have representatives as part of their membership. Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) also take part in MAPPP and MARAC meetings where the offender is under the age of 18. The YOTs are represented on the MAPPA Strategic Management Board by one of the managers. Representatives from Adult Protection also take part in MAPPP and MARAC meetings as appropriate. The Area Adult Protection Committees consider the MAPPA process as part of the role and are represented on both the Public Protection Partnership and the MAPPA Strategic Management Board. Domestic Abuse Coordinators are also heavily involved in the process, especially in terms of the new MARACs that deal specifically with domestic abuse cases. The involvement of all these people from a range of agencies and organisations means that there is a growing body of practitioners who have an acute knowledge and understanding of the MAPPA process and this will continue to extend during 2004 with the inclusion of Community Safety Partnerships.

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A view from the agencies

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Ann Banks
Social Services based in Swansea. I have found the MAPPP process to be very inclusive with appropriate representation from a wide range of agencies. Relevant information is shared in a sensitive manner and professionals are clear about issues of confidentiality.

Dr Tegwyn Williams

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Consultant Clinical Psychiatrist, Caswell Clinic. Following the local NHS Trusts signing up to the Strategic Framework, there were some initial anxieties from clinicians with regard to the issues of medical confidentiality and information sharing. These issues were addressed by a series of meetings with clinicians in all Trusts within the South Wales Police area, attended by both medical and police representatives. These meetings have gone a long way to reducing the anxieties concerning confidentiality and resulted in a closer working relationship between all the agencies with benefits to both patient care and public safety.

MAPPP meetings allow for detailed debate of issues and all views are given due consideration with the resultant decision making process being evidence-based and transparent. Although MAPPP meetings are primarily concerned with the management of the critical few offenders I have no doubt that they are also a vital part of the system which protects children.

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Mal Gay

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Youth Offending Team Manager for Bridgend County Borough Council.

Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) supervise young offenders between the ages of 10 and 17, the vast majority of whom would not normally be deemed ‘dangerous’. However, there are individual cases which do cause major concern and the seven YOTs within the South Wales Area, as members of the Strategic Management Board, have been able to ensure a fast and effective referral into the MAPPA process.

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Ray Dennier
Housing Officer, Cardiff City Council. We are currently faced with some significant challenges such as a greater emphasis on dealing with Anti-Social Behaviour, exercising the Right to Exclude and meeting the increasing needs of homeless offenders in Wales. We are helped greatly in meeting these challenges by working with other agencies, and one of the biggest challenges that we are working on together is to find suitable accommodation and support funding for the resettlement of dangerous offenders in the community.

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John May
Area Manager for the Prison Service. I am looking forward to the Prison Service becoming the third Responsible Authority in MAPPA along with the Police and Probation from April 2004. This will build on the already excellent working relationships we have which ensures that offenders leaving prison are managed appropriately in the community.

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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements Annual Report 2003-2004

Frequently asked questions
These people should be locked up for life, why are they released from prison?
Few people, however terrible their crime, can be imprisoned indefinitely. Prison sentences are laid down in law and, at the end of the sentence most offenders will be released back into the community.

Why aren’t they tagged?
They are. But only for as long as there is a legal power to do so, for example the length of a prison licence. Once this has expired agencies continue to work together to monitor offenders by conventional methods.

Why aren’t the public told where they live?
Police and Probation have a great influence on where offenders may or may not live. They are aware of the particular dangers posed by each individual and will not allow them to reside in a location that increases their risk of re-offending. For instance, close proximity to schools, childrens’ playgrounds or their previous victims. Extensive research will go into the housing of an offender and will include consultation with other agencies such as housing and education authorities, always with the aim of assessing and reducing risk. Public knowledge of the location of these offenders would drive them underground. It is safer for everyone concerned if their location is known only to the responsible agencies.

Why have they got to live near me?
Re-integration into communities is known to be the most effective way of managing offenders. With careful monitoring most offenders present little risk.

Are my children at risk?
All parents should make their children aware of “stranger danger” to ensure that they have the information they need to stay safe. High risk offenders are monitored frequently and can have conditions imposed on them which prevent them from having contact with children or frequenting areas where children play as appropriate.

Where can I go to look at the Sex Offender Register?
The Sex Offender Register is a confidential document that is used by partner agencies to assist with the management of offenders and is not available to the public.

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Statistical information
All statistics cover the period 1 April 2003 – 31 March 2004 unless stated otherwise.

Category 1 – Registered Sex Offenders (RSOs)
Number of RSOs in South Wales on 31 March 2004 Number of RSOs per 100,000 population Number of RSOs who were either cautioned or convicted for breaches of registration Number of full Sex Offender Orders • applied for • imposed by the Courts Number of interim Sex Offender Orders • applied for • imposed by the Courts

No. of offenders 606 50 16 3 3 1 1

Category 2 – Violent Offenders and other Sexual Offenders
Number of Violent and other Sexual Offenders1 living in South Wales 430 South Wales Police Police Headquarters Bridgend CF31 3SU

Category 3 – other offenders
Number of other offenders2 living in South Wales 18 Number of Restraining Orders imposed on any MAPPA offender by the Courts in South Wales 0

Geoff Cooper
Head of CID

MAPPP cases
How many MAPPA offenders have been managed through the MAPPP • RSOs • Violent and other Sexual Offenders • Other offenders Of those cases managed by the MAPPP how many: • Were returned to custody for breach of licence • Were returned to custody for breach of a Restraining or Sex Offender Order • Were charged with a serious sexual or violent offence
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Dale Ponting
26 39 0 0 0 1 Head of Public Protection Bureau

As defined by Section 68 (3) (4) and (5) of the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000 As defined by Section 67 (2) (b) of the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000

Note on the statistics
South Wales has seen an increase in the number of Sex Offenders this year. However this increase is in line with the 16% that was anticipated by the Home Office and reflects the effectiveness of the process. As offenders are released on licence they are registered and this enables the relevant action plans to be developed to ensure that any risk posed by the offender can be robustly managed. The number of offenders in Category 2 and Category 3 reflects only those currently living in the community and does not, as in previous years, include those in custody. This is the reason for the significant decrease in this number. The increase in the number of offenders dealt with under the MAPPA process reflects the heightened awareness of all agencies, Police, Probation and Partnerships concerning Public Protection. It also reinforces the value placed on the Multi-Agency process. The one offender who was charged with a further serious offence while subject to the MAPPP process made a threat to kill while a resident at one of the hostels run by Probation. He was removed immediately and, while he was charged with this offence, did not go onto commit any further offence. The Multi-Agency work was robust enough to act before any further harm could be done.

NATIONAL PROBATION SERVICE
for England and Wales
National Probation Service South Wales Probation Area Tremains House Tremains Road CF31 1TZ

Phil Jones
Director of Operations

Janet Chaplin
Assistant Chief Officer
Designed and Printed by South Wales Police Print Department Telephone: 01656 869264

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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements Annual Report 2003-2004