MULTI AGENCY PUBLIC PROTECTION ARRANGEMENTS

Cheshire Area

Annual Report 2004 – 2005
Upon request and where practicable, this document will be made available in alternative formats and languages, including large print and audiotape.

MAPPA Annual Report 2004/5 Version 5.4

Ministerial Foreword by Baroness Scotland The work being undertaken to improve the safety of communities through the MultiAgency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) is vitally important and a priority for government. The annual reports for 2004/5 provide evidence of that active engagement. Violence and sexual abuse are unacceptable wherever they occur and it is evident that through MAPPA such offenders are identified and better managed than ever before. As the number of offenders within MAPPA continues to grow as expected there is clear evidence that the Responsible Authority, that is the local police, probation and the Prison Service, is addressing these additional demands by strengthening local partnerships, using new statutory powers to restrict the behaviour of offenders, returning offenders to custody where they breach their licence or order, and using the findings of research and inspection to strengthen national guidance and local practice. Although it is never possible completely to eliminate the risk posed by dangerous offenders, MAPPA is helping to ensure that fewer people are re-victimised. The active implementation of the Criminal Justice Act (2003) during the last year has clearly enhanced the ability of a number of agencies including health, social services and housing to work collaboratively with the Responsible Authority in assessing and managing those sexual and violent offenders in our communities who pose the highest risk of serious harm. For the continued success of MAPPA this collaboration together with the scrutiny of policy and practice must become the hallmark of these arrangements. Similarly MAPPA must integrate with other public protection mechanisms dealing with child abuse, domestic abuse and racial abuse. For me one of the most exciting developments in this arena in the last 12 months has been the appointment of lay advisers to assist the Responsible Authority in the oversight of the arrangements. As ordinary members of the public these lay advisers represent a diverse, able and committed group of people who are now helping the statutory agencies to oversee the work being undertaken through MAPPA and communicate with the public more effectively. Without a growing sense of public knowledge and confidence about this work much of the benefits of the public protection arrangements will be lost. I hope this annual report will be useful, informative and re-assuring to local communities. The agencies and individuals who have contributed to the achievement of MAPPA locally are to be commended.

Baroness Scotland Minister of State for Criminal Justice and Offender Management

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THE ROLE OF THE PRISON SERVICE IN MAPPA -2004/5
One of the important ways in which the Criminal Justice Act (2003) strengthened the MAPPA was to make the Prison Service part of the Responsible Authority with police and probation in each of the 42 Areas in England and Wales. The Prison Service has been given this enhanced role in recognition of the important part it plays in protecting the public by keeping offenders in custody; helping them to address the causes of their offending behaviour; and by undertaking other work to assist their successful resettlement. As part of the Responsible Authority the Prison Service is now represented on each of the Strategic Management Boards (SMBs) in the 42 Areas. The Prison estate is configured differently from Police/Probation areas in that its establishments are contained within only 12 geographical areas and two functional areas – the High Security estate, and Contracted Prisons. For this reason arrangements for Prison Service representation on SMBs vary across the country, but each Prison Service Area Manager has entered into an agreement with the SMBs on how the Service will contribute both strategically and operationally to the MAPPA. The main focus of the Prison Service contribution is at an operational level. A number of measures have been put in place across the prison estate to ensure that this will be effective and result in: • • • • Prompt identification of MAPPA offenders so that their details can be used in sentence planning arrangements, including interventions to manage and reduce risk Regular monitoring of the behaviour of those assessed as presenting the highest risk, and sharing information with police and probation colleagues All relevant risk management information being provided to multi agency meetings which help plan an offender’s release At least three months notification to police and probation of the expected release dates of those offenders who have been referred to the multi-agency public protection panel (MAPPP), and at least six weeks notification of those being managed at level 2 risk meetings No changes to release dates or arrangements being made without prior consultation with police and probation

Playing an effective role in the multi agency risk management of MAPPA offenders requires good communication between criminal justice partners. The Prison Service has taken steps to ensure that there are dedicated points of contact for public protection at both Area level and in every prison establishment, and that these are published together with police and probation contacts to ensure better communication across the Responsible Authority. With the ever increasing MAPPA population, and proportion of those received into prison likely to grow with the introduction of the new public protection sentences, the inclusion of the Prison Service as part of the Responsible Authority will continue to be vital in protecting the public.

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FOREWORD
MULTI AGENCY PUBLIC PROTECTION ARRANGEMENTS ANNUAL REPORT 2004/2005 This is the fourth Annual Report in respect of the Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) that are in place in Cheshire, Halton and Warrington. This report reflects the increasingly close co-operation between the Police, Probation and Prison Services, as the Responsible Authority for MAPPA, and those other agencies who have a duty to co-operate with us to protect the public from offenders who commit sexual and violent offences. The report details the requirements on the Responsible Authority to manage those offenders who have completed their prison sentences and therefore must be released back into the community. The resettlement of such offenders, some of whom still pose a significant risk of re-offending, can only be safely achieved by all agencies working together. The work of MAPPA in bringing the resources of a range of agencies together to supervise dangerous offenders in the community cannot be separated from our responsibilities to protect and support vulnerable victims of serious crime. Not only do we have specific responsibilities to those who have already been victimised but the way we carry out the joint assessment and supervision of dangerous offenders is always focused on how we can prevent individuals becoming the future victims of serious sexual and violent crime. In this report, there are anonymous case examples that illustrate how our agencies, through the MAPPA arrangements, work together. We believe they provide examples of the growing evidence we have that joint working can and does provide significant added protection to our communities in Cheshire, Halton and Warrington. Statistics show that Cheshire, Halton and Warrington remain some of the safest places in England and Wales, in respect of serious crime, but we are not complacent. Recently two lay advisors have been appointed to assist in the overview of the management of dangerous offenders in the community and in this report they provide detail of how they have contributed so far. This report covers a year in which there has been significant consolidation in the way we work together locally. Additionally, we ensure that through linking with agencies on a regional level, the local MAPPA arrangements can draw on wider resources and expertise to manage dangerous offenders. It is our intention to continue to dedicate staff and resources to support victims and to ensure the safe management of those offenders who come under MAPPA. As the Responsible Authority, we will also continue to engage the assistance of those agencies best placed to help us with this task.

Steve Collett Chief Officer National Probation Service Cheshire

Ian Lockwood Assistant Director Prison Service

Peter Fahy Chief Constable Cheshire

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MULTI AGENCY PUBLIC PROTECTION ARRANGEMENTS (MAPPA) BACKGROUND
Since the implementation of the Sex Offenders Act 1997 there has been an increased level of co-operation between several agencies – the key ones being Police, Probation, Prison and Social Services. This Act ensured the registration of Sex Offenders and their effective risk management through regular meetings involving key agencies. Given that the housing of these offenders was often a key element to effective risk management, Housing Departments also played an important role by working closely with the key agencies to identify suitable housing. The success of this co-operative working and the need to ensure the protection of the public from other violent offenders resulted in the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) which are embedded within Section 67(6) of the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000. The MAPPA were introduced in April 2001 and the Responsible Authority – those responsible for its effective implementation and evaluation – are the Police, Probation and Prison Services. How Did MAPPA Develop? • Phase 1 (April 2001 – Autumn 2002): the setting up of the MAPPA, which because they built upon the inter-agency cooperation that the Sex Offender Act (1997) prompted, began prior to their formal inception in April 2001; Phase 2 (Autumn 2002 – January 2004): distilling the learning from the first year’s operation and the first annual reports, preparing and implementing the Guidance; Phase 3 (January 2004 – Annual Reports 2005): preparing and then implementing the ‘duty to co-operate’ and ‘Lay Adviser’ provisions contained in the Criminal Justice Bill “The desirable outcome of MAPPA is effective risk management. However this should not be understood as ‘zero risk’ as this position can never be achieved… Risk management should be understood as harm reduction either through the reduction of the likelihood of a risk occurring or the reduction of its impact should it occur.” Professor Hazel Kemshall Where Are We Now? MAPPA is a three-tier risk management process. • High risk offenders are managed by a single agency and risk management plans agreed and implemented within the single agency – LEVEL 1
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High risk offenders whose risk management is dependent upon the active participation of other agencies, who can be managed locally and whose risk is not imminent will be managed through the Local Risk Management Meetings – LEVEL 2 ‘The Critical Few’ those high risk offenders who pose a likelihood of imminent harm, whose management requires greater resources than can be obtained locally or who, because of media interest need to be managed in such a way as only very senior members of agencies involved in the management of the risk make the necessary decisions – LEVEL 3

KEY MESSAGE
Only a VERY small proportion (1.7%) of the total number of MAPPA offenders are managed via Level 3, i.e. pose the most serious risk to the community.

The Duty to Co-operate The management of dangerous offenders requires a number of agencies to be involved in determining an effective risk management plan and so the following agencies now have a duty to co-operate with the MAPPA. • Local Authority Social Services • Primary Care Trusts, other NHS Trusts and Strategic Health Authorities • Jobcentres Plus • Youth Offending Teams • Registered Social Landlords which accommodate MAPPA offenders • Local Housing Authorities • Local Education Authorities • Electronic Monitoring providers Victims The purpose of MAPPA is to protect those who have already been victimised and to prevent, where possible, other persons becoming victims. To these ends and when appropriate, the views of victims are given to those involved in the risk management. This can ensure that appropriate licence conditions are imposed upon someone being released from prison, appropriate housing is offered to offenders and there is an understanding of other issues that should be considered within the risk management plan. MAPPA Structure – Management The Strategic Management Board (SMB) is responsible for overseeing the MAPPA in each area and its members are senior staff within the services who constitute the Responsible Authority as well as those agencies with a ‘Duty to Co-operate’ under the Act. In September 2004, two ‘Lay Advisers’ were appointed to the SMB. Their experiences are recounted elsewhere in this report.

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The following Agencies and Partnerships contribute to the Strategic Management Board for Cheshire: • Cheshire Constabulary ) • National Probation Service, Cheshire Area ) The Responsible Authority • Prison Service ) • Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Trust • Cheshire, Halton and Warrington Primary Care Trusts • Halton, Warrington and Cheshire Social Services Departments • Halton, Warrington and Cheshire Youth Offending Teams • Chief Housing Officers • Cheshire, Halton and Warrington Local Education Authorities • Cheshire Fire Service • 5 Boroughs Partnership NHS Trust • Lay Advisers The Board has the responsibility to oversee the management of dangerous violent and sex offenders in the community in Cheshire. The day to day management of this falls to the Responsible Authority, i.e. the Police, Probation and Prison Services. A full time Public Protection Manager and the MAPPA Co-ordinator, a post jointly funded by Police and Probation, help to ensure that the various levels of MAPPA function properly. In the past twelve months this co-operation has led to there being no serious incidents or further offences by offenders managed under MAPPA.

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SUMMARY OF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Joint Assessment The Police and Probation Services have a responsibility to make arrangements for the assessments of the risks posed by Registered Sex Offenders and all those persons who have been sentenced to 12 months or more for violent or sexual offences. The Police will use a structured assessment process that predicts the likelihood of further sexual offending for all male sex offenders who are over 18. This will inform them as to whether they need then to be managed by a Local Risk Management Meeting or can be managed by just themselves. The Probation Service also undertake assessments that not only predict likelihood of reoffending but also the problems that would need to be addressed to reduce this likelihood. There are also assessments for violent offenders and the Probation Service will, like the Police, decide which individuals should be managed through a Local Risk Management Meeting or solely by themselves. Those young offenders who are aged under 18 will be assessed primarily by the local Youth Offending Team with an added emphasis on their age. To date there is no specific assessment process used for female offenders and they are managed by the Probation Service. Joint Management High risk violent and sex offenders are dealt with by way of at least monthly Local Risk Management Meetings, chaired by the Police Divisional Crime Manager and local Probation Manager. The duty to co-operate stated within the Criminal Justice Act 2003 requires other partner agencies to attend as necessary. The most dangerous offenders are considered for management via the Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel. Those meetings are convened by the Probation Public Protection Manager, throughout the County, as and when they are required, and always involve the Police Crime Managers and at least one other partner agency manager whose active participation is required for the safe management of the dangerous person in the community.

KEY MESSAGE
This year there have been NO offenders managed under MAPPA who have been charged with further serious offences.

THE ROLE OF THE PRISON SERVICE IN MAPPA -2004/5 One of the important ways in which the Criminal Justice Act (2003) strengthened the MAPPA was to make the Prison Service part of the Responsible Authority with police and
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probation in each of the 42 Areas in England and Wales. The Prison Service has been given this enhanced role in recognition of the important part it plays in protecting the public by keeping offenders in custody; helping them to address the causes of their offending behaviour; and by undertaking other work to assist their successful resettlement. As part of the Responsible Authority the Prison Service is now represented on each of the Strategic Management Boards (SMBs) in the 42 Areas. The Prison estate is configured differently from Police/Probation areas in that its establishments are contained within only 12 geographical areas and two functional areas – the High Security estate, and Contracted Prisons. For this reason arrangements for Prison Service representation on SMBs vary across the country, but each Prison Service Area Manager has entered into an agreement with the SMBs on how the Service will contribute both strategically and operationally to the MAPPA. The main focus of the Prison Service contribution is at an operational level. A number of measures have been put in place across the prison estate to ensure that this will be effective and result in: • • • • Prompt identification of MAPPA offenders so that their details can be used in sentence planning arrangements, including interventions to manage and reduce risk Regular monitoring of the behaviour of those assessed as presenting the highest risk, and sharing information with police and probation colleagues All relevant risk management information being provided to multi agency meetings which help plan an offender’s release At least three months notification to police and probation of the expected release dates of those offenders who have been referred to the multi-agency public protection panel (MAPPP), and at least six weeks notification of those being managed at level 2 risk meetings No changes to release dates or arrangements being made without prior consultation with police and probation

Playing an effective role in the multi agency risk management of MAPPA offenders requires good communication between criminal justice partners. The Prison Service has taken steps to ensure that there are dedicated points of contact for public protection at both Area level and in every prison establishment, and that these are published together with police and probation contacts to ensure better communication across the Responsible Authority. With the ever increasing MAPPA population, and proportion of those received into prison likely to grow with the introduction of the new public protection sentences, the inclusion of the Prison Service as part of the Responsible Authority will continue to be vital in protecting the public.

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In the 2003/04 MAPPA Annual Report, Lay Advisers were mentioned as being part of the future. Now that we are into 2004/05, we can look at MAPPA from their point of view.

LAY ADVISER PERSPECTIVE
Two Lay Advisors were invited to join the Strategic Management Board (SMB) in September 2004. Having satisfied all the checks and supplied suitable references, we received letters from the Home Office confirming our appointments in January this year. It sounds a simple appointment but the selection process was both lengthy and rigorous. Not only did the application form demand detailed information, this was followed by psychometric and mental ability tests and finally an interview which included a case study on which we were asked to give our views – all to become a volunteer! However, now that we know a little bit more about MAPPA, we see the reason for the demanding criteria and for the selection process that was drawn up by the Home Office. Within days of our selection, we attended our first SMB meeting. Yes, it was a bit daunting but we both felt that even though not able to contribute much at that time, we were welcome and our questions and opinions would be valued. In November we attended a Lay Adviser weekend training event in Birmingham where we heard speakers from the Home Office, the Police and Probation Services and the Lucy Faithful Foundation. It was very informative; we learnt and discussed things about the preMAPPA days, the cycle of sexual abuse and work that is being done with abusers. It was nice to meet up with others who have gone through and taken on the same challenge. On a personal level, we were especially pleased to discover that we were the only Area where members had already attended an SMB meeting and had their mentors appointed. This made us feel that we were more prepared for the training and showed that the Cheshire Area was being proactive with their Lay Advisers. Since then we have attended a number of meetings – one at Styal Prison, which houses female offenders. After the meeting we were shown around the prison which was a most interesting experience and further contributed to our background knowledge. It is still early days and we continue to learn about our role. As informed non-professional Lay Advisers, we are quickly becoming aware of the complex and sensitive area that is the protection of the public. We accept that it is a responsible position and hope that in our capacity as Lay Advisers and by being critical but constructive, we will be able to ask the questions and make the comments that are on the lips of the average person in the community.

Leanne

Christine

KEY MESSAGE
More agencies, including Lay Advisers, are co-operating fully thus ensuring that there are robust risk management plans in force for the most dangerous offenders in our communities.

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MANAGEMENT OF POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS OFFENDERS
KEY MESSAGE
Through the MAPPA, potentially dangerous offenders are being assessed and robustly managed in the community. The following highlights these activities and are followed by some case studies. Down Your Way Every month, in every District of Cheshire, Halton and Warrington, Police, Probation and Social Services meet together to ensure that the most dangerous of the offenders in the area are effectively managed. When it is needed, other agencies, such as housing or mental health services are invited to contribute to managing the risks. Senior representatives of each agency are provided with a risk management plan drawn up by Probation. Decisions are then made about how to protect known victims and potential victims – decisions such as, where the person should be allowed to live, what conditions there should be on his/her licence (if s/he has just come out of prison) or should s/he be excluded from certain areas of a community? It may be that a decision is made for the Police to carry out surveillance or it may be that the Panel needs to ensure that mental health services are available to the offender. The Probation Service tell the Group what they intend to do in terms of trying to ‘educate’ the offender so as to reduce his/her risk to others. The Probation Service also makes it clear what steps they will take about recalling – sending someone back – to prison. When it comes to sex offenders the Police, in liaison with Social Services in particular and Probation, will give very serious consideration to who in the community needs to know about this particular individual. Mind you, we have to remember that most sex offenders are not predatory so that the risks they present are, for the most part, very small and can be contained. But where there is knowledge that an individual has already stated that s/he does not intend to stop offending or where they have limited abilities to manage a new lifestyle, consideration is given to the level of other ‘external’ controls to be imposed – and this is where certain other agencies being aware might be of benefit to the community as a whole. A recommendation to disclose any information to a member of the public is normally made at a multi-agency meeting, with the agreement of all the agencies represented. This recommendation is then taken to an Assistant Chief Constable in the Cheshire Constabulary and the Assistant Chief Officer (Risk) at the Probation Service, who will make the final decision about what information can be disclosed and to whom. Once the decision to disclose is made, Press Liaison Officers are consulted to ensure that the disclosure is carried out in a way best suited to achieving the aims of public protection without causing undue alarm.

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Agencies have been meeting together for some eight years now and there is an increasing trust and understanding being developed such that a risk management plan is something that is easily accepted and worked toward. Information about dangerous people tends to come first from Probation and Police but Social Services, Housing and Youth Offending Teams have also identified people who they believe need a more pro-active plan to manage the risk. At this moment in time, Local Risk Management Meetings can only look at how dangerous people who have a criminal conviction can be managed. This means that those people who have a serious mental illness or personality disorder and have, therefore, been managed through health services rather than the courts are, at the moment, excluded. What About the Victims? Upon notification that an offender is being considered for MAPPA, the Victim Liaison Coordinator will discuss the case with their colleagues. Where appropriate, the Victim Liaison Co-ordinator will meet with the victim/family. At this meeting it will be established if the information the victim/family have previously provided in relation to risk is still relevant and also obtain further up-to-date information that will form the basis for a comprehensive report outlining the current views/concerns and a risk assessment. Clarification of what information should be provided to the victim/family is agreed and this information is provided either in a face to face meeting or by telephone at the earliest opportunity. The method of contact is considered carefully to ensure that the victim/family are informed in the most appropriate manner and that any further questions can be answered. Feedback from the victim/families has been positive and they have welcomed the ongoing contact and support. Regular contact ensures that the victim/family is kept updated and they appreciate the opportunity to maintain an involvement and to receive information. From experience the contact and openness in providing information helps the victim/family in what are usually very traumatic times. The contacts can be summed up by the comments from one lady who wrote: “I appreciate your efforts to keep me informed and safeguard me in the future. It is enormously reassuring that the matter is still cared for beyond the trial and conviction. And it is very supportive to know that there is someone other than friends and family, someone ‘official’ who hasn’t forgotten about it either”. A Mother’s Story my daughter told me what Joe had done I was devastated. He went to “ Whenand my daughter were relieved, but then we realised he would come out andprison, and me that’s when my daughter started being afraid again, actually I was too. But these people came to see us and told us that they were here to tell us what was going on with Joe’s time in prison. Me and my daughter told them we were afraid about what happens when he gets out. They asked us exactly what bothered us and suggested that there were things they could do to help.
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When I thought about it, and talked to my daughter, we realised that what we wanted was not to have to ever see him again. So we talked about this and these people from Victim Liaison told us that they would let Joe’s Probation Officer know as they would be able to put conditions into something called a licence for when Joe was released. That made us feel better. We were told that we could then let people know, the Police or Probation, if he was seen by us somewhere where he shouldn’t be. We were still worried but felt that someone was thinking about us. In a situation like this what will have been looked at are ‘exclusion’ areas. For example Joe may have been excluded from visiting several streets in the area where his victim lives. As she is a child this may also involve excluding him from areas around her school or where she goes regularly, maybe a Youth Club or similar. When these issues are brought to the Probation Officer involved, they will pass on the concerns to the Local Risk Management Meeting and it is here that decisions will be made about conditions on licences for those released from prison. Mary Tells Us Her Story

Me and John had been having problems for years. I never could do right for him. It was my fault, well that’s what he said, when he hit me. He was a good father and provided well for us so I didn’t worry about his hitting me. It wasn’t too bad, and I didn’t have to go to hospital that often. But then, about a year ago he started on the children, that was it for me. Mary called the Police, not because her partner hit her and caused her to need several stitches in her face, but because he had started to threaten her 12 year old son. John was sentenced to a 2 year Community Rehabilitation Order with a condition he attend the Community Domestic Violence Programme.

John went to Court Jane came to see me, she is a “ After that John would be on this group and that she and Women’s Safety Worker. She told me the Domestic Violence Police would be paying close attention to John’s behaviour and would be asking me what I thought and stuff. Suddenly I realised that I wasn’t the only woman that these things had been happening to and that there are people, not just Refuges, where you can get help and stuff. John is doing OK on the group, he didn’t like it at the start, he didn’t like being told that it was wrong the way he behaved, but we are beginning to talk to each other now. There are rows and he gets annoyed but he doesn’t hit me now. He has also realised how bad things could have been if he had hurt ‘our Gary’. It feels really good to know that there are people out there who will listen to me, and even ask me what I think and stuff. I am also told that there are meetings from time to time where people talk about how John is getting on, someone has always asked me too. I feel I am getting some control back in my life.

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The primary purpose of MAPPA is to protect the public from potentially serious offenders. Here we look at how Cheshire County Council is involved. Vulnerable Adults There are many complex and difficult situations faced by social workers in their day to day work and these include supporting vulnerable adults in our community. MAPPA provides a greater degree of confidence and support when working with vulnerable adults who are exposed to risk from a potentially serious offender. The protection of adults under these circumstances requires the highest level of multi-agency working; involving the sharing of information in confidence and a framework for decision making which is sound, robust and defensible. The County Council, and the same goes for our local authority partners in Warrington and Halton, has always recognised the value of MAPPA, well before the duty to co-operate came into being. This duty does serve however to put our contribution to risk assessment, risk management and the commitment of resources to ensuring a successful outcome, on a much clearer statutory footing. Over the next 12 months, we will be working as a Strategic Management Board to promote more thoroughly the work of MAPPA to staff working in all agencies with a duty to cooperate. A high-level agency commitment will now be translated into a much more comprehensive understanding of the work of MAPPA by staff working with vulnerable adults. To this end a comprehensive training programme for those staff who are most involved in the support of vulnerable adults at risk from potentially serious offenders will be introduced. Prisons Play their Part in Public Protection Every prison is required to involve themselves fully with MAPPA and the following is how Thorn Cross Youth Offenders Institute (YOI) have incorporated these arrangements into their day to day activities. Thorn Cross YOI has sought to develop its public protection arrangements and key members of staff have received dedicated training both on site and with other agencies at Cheshire Police Headquarters in Winsford. As Thorn Cross YOI is an open establishment where trainees, depending on where they are in their sentence and progress, could be released on licence for town visits, home leave and employment placements to facilitate resettlement. Trainees serving 12 months or more for a violent offence are assessed for the risk they pose not only in the establishment but also in the community. Contact is therefore made with the Police and Probation Services to ascertain and verify their risk. Thorn Cross mainly has low level (Level One) trainees and a very small number of medium level (Level Two) trainees at any one time. A Public Protection Panel, consisting of prison staff from a number of departments, meets in Thorn Cross on a monthly basis to look at managing MAPPA trainees in the establishment and working to reduce the risk they pose.

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The following are examples of MAPPA in action. Recall to Prison Mr. X was a prisoner serving a five and a half year sentence for Indecent Assault and was due for release in August 2004. The Police Liaison Officer in the prison identified Mr. X as High Risk and three months prior to release, his case was assessed and discussed at our local Public Protection Panel meeting. The Public Protection Unit at the prison produced a profile of Mr. X, to inform discussion at the meeting. Recommendations were made to ensure that licence conditions, including the stipulation that Mr. X was not to have contact with any known paedophiles, were included in the licence after release. A copy of the profile and recommendations were sent to both the Police and supervising Probation Area. A short time after Mr. X’s release, a prison officer was routinely checking the incoming mail for another prisoner, Mr. Y, when he noticed that one letter was from Mr. X and included an address for future correspondence. This information was passed to the Police Liaison Officer and it was established that this address was that of Mr. X’s daughter. A risk management meeting was convened to examine the evidence and to check if this constituted a breach of Mr. X’s licence conditions. The decision of the meeting was that it did as he ‘breached’ the condition ‘not to have contact with any knkown paedophiles’. Mr. X was subsequently recalled to prison in September 2004.

KEY MESSAGE
In total 64 or 6.3% of offenders have been returned to prison for breaching the requirements of their licences

Andrew’s Story Andrew was sentenced to four and a half years imprisonment for a serious assault. His offence was alcohol related and occurred after he had drunk 10 - 12 pints of lager. Andrew carried out a serious assault on a male nurse who had been walking home behind the group he was with; words were exchanged resulting in Andrew bringing the injured party to the ground in a sustained attack. Witnesses were allegedly threatened and Andrew moved the victim into bushes. Within the Prison it was agreed that Andrew posed a significant risk to the community. This assessment was based on the fact that he had committed a violent offence against a 14 year old when he was about 15 – thus making him a Schedule 1 Offender, the level of violence he had used in his offending and his inability to recall his offences because of the high levels of alcohol he had consumed. There were also some concerns about the high level of media interest in this young man and the local antipathy toward him. These were considerations that all played their part in how he was to be managed within the prison and how he was to be ‘prepared’ for release.

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A comprehensive Sentence Plan was devised which addressed all the issues and this involved the participation of his Probation Officer, hostel staff (for when he was released), outside employer (work placement), Social Services and his parents. When he was released he was placed in a hostel and managed via the Local Risk Management Meeting. He had a condition on his licence not to approach his victim and also to continue to address his alcohol abuse. At the Local Risk Management Meeting it was agreed that if Andrew abided by his licence conditions and gave no cause for concern, as well as being allowed to return to live with his parents he would be managed by the Probation Service alone.

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Statistical Information KEY MESSAGE
Percentage of Registered Sex Offenders Living in Cheshire, Halton and Warrington on 31st March 2005

99.95

0.05 RSOs Non-RSOs

In reality the number of registered sex offenders in Cheshire, Halton and Warrington is extremely small

Levels at which MAPPA offenders are managed (1 April 2004 - 31 March 2005)
17 362 634
Level 3 Level 2 Level 1

Offenders managed under MAPPA (1 April 2004 - 31 March 2005)

KEY MESSAGE
171 474 368
Sex Violence Others

The increase in the number of ‘other’ offenders is due to the inclusion of those who have been made subject to a condition of attendance on the Community Domestic Violence Programme

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MAPPA Annual Report 2004/5 Version 5.4 Statistical Information 1. i. Category 1 MAPPA Offenders: Registered Sex Offenders (RSO) The number of RSOs living in your Area on 31st March 2005 (a) The number of RSOs per 100,000 head of population ii. The number of sex offenders having a registration requirement who were either cautioned or convicted for breaches of the requirement, between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005 The number of (a) Sexual Offences Prevention Orders (SOPOs) applied for (b) interim SOPOs granted and (c) full SOPOs imposed by the Courts in your Area between 1st May 2004 and 31st March 2005 The number of (a) Notification Orders applied for (b) interim Notification Orders granted and (d) full Notification Orders imposed by the Courts in your Area between 1st May 2004 and 31st March 2005 The number of Foreign Travel Orders (a) applied for and (b) imposed by the Courts in your Area between 1st May 2004 and 31st March 2005 Category 2 MAPPA Offenders: Violent Offenders and Other Sexual Offenders (V&OS) The number of violent and other sexual offenders (as defined by Section 327 (3), (4) and (5) of the Criminal Justice Act (2003)) living in your Area between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005 Category 3 MAPPA offenders: Other Offenders (OthO) 171 368 474 48 7 (a) 13 (b) 5 (c) 9 (a) 2 (b) 2 (c) 2 (a) 0 (b) 0 No. of Offenders

iii.

iv.

v.

2. vi.

3.

vii. The number of "other offenders" (as defined by Section 325 (2)(b) of the Criminal Justice Act (2003)) between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005 4. Offenders managed through Level 3 (MAPPP) & Level 2 (local inter-agency management)

Level 3 viii. Identify how many MAPPA offenders in each of the three Categories (i.e. (1) – RSOs, (2) – V & O and (3) RSO – OthO above) have been managed through the MAPPP (Level 3) and through local inter-agency risk management (Level 2) between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005 ix. Of the cases managed at Levels 3 or 2 (i.e. (viii)) between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005 how many, whilst managed at that level: Level 3 (a) were returned to custody for a breach of licence? (b) were returned to custody for breach of a restraining order or sex offender order or sexual offences prevention order (c) were charged with a serious sexual or violent offence (a) (b) (c) 5 0 0 RSO V&O OthO 6 6 5

Level 2 207 38 117

Level 2 59 7 0

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MAPPA Annual Report 2004/5 Version 5.4

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION YOU CAN CONTACT CHESHIRE POLICE H.Q 0845 458 6379 PROBATION H.Q 01244 394500 H.M. PRISON SERVICE 01257 248600 You can also find copies of this Annual Report on the Probation Web Site:

www.cheshireprobation.org.uk
or on the Police Web Site:

www.cheshire.police.uk

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