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Contents

Ministerial Introduction Introduction Key Achievements How The MAPPA Operate Locally Case Examples Statistics Explained Sex Offender Treatment Programme Strategic Management Board Contacts

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Ministerial Introduction

by Baroness Scotland The work being undertaken to improve the safety of communities through the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) is vitally important and a priority for government. The annual reports for 2004/5 provide evidence of that active engagement. Violence and sexual abuse are unacceptable wherever they occur and it is evident that through MAPPA such offenders are identified and better managed than ever before. As the number of offenders within MAPPA continues to grow as expected there is clear evidence that the Responsible Authority, that is the local Police, Probation and the Prison Service, is addressing these additional demands by strengthening local partnerships, using new statutory powers to restrict the behaviour of offenders, returning offenders to custody where they breach their licence or order, and using the findings of research and inspection to strengthen national guidance and local practice. Although it is never possible completely to eliminate the risk posed by dangerous offenders, MAPPA is helping to ensure that fewer people are re-victimised. The active implementation of the Criminal Justice Act (2003) during the last year has clearly enhanced the ability of a number of agencies including health, social services and housing to work collaboratively with the Responsible Authority in assessing and managing those sexual and violent offenders in our communities who pose the highest risk of serious harm. For the continued success of MAPPA this collaboration together with the scrutiny of policy and practice must become the hallmark of these arrangements. Similarly MAPPA must integrate with other public protection mechanisms dealing with child abuse, domestic abuse and racial abuse. For me one of the most exciting developments in this arena in the last 12 months has been the appointment of lay advisers to assist the Responsible Authority in the oversight of the arrangements. As ordinary members of the public these lay advisers represent a diverse, able and committed group of people who are now helping the statutory agencies to oversee the work being undertaken through MAPPA and communicate with the public more effectively. Without a growing sense of public knowledge and confidence about this work much of the benefits of the public protection arrangements will be lost. I hope this annual report will be useful, informative and re-assuring to local communities. The agencies and individuals who have contributed to the achievement of MAPPA locally are to be commended.

Baroness Scotland Minister of State for Criminal Justice and Offender Management

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Introduction

The year 2004/05 has seen three major and positive developments in the work of the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA).

Firstly, the Prison Service has joined the Police and Probation Services as a lead member of the MAPPA. A second change has been in new legislation, contained within the Criminal Justice Act 2003, which has enabled other key agencies such as Social Services, Housing and Health Authorities to take on a duty to co-operate in the effective management of high risk offenders. Thirdly, the Gloucestershire MAPPA Strategic Board has recently appointed two lay advisers to give a view from the general public of its public protection work.

The MAPPA have ensured the successful management of nearly 400 offenders across the county. Good risk assessment and the co-operation of the Duty to Co-operate agencies has led to swift action or additional support to offenders to reduce the likelihood of re-offending. On the initiative of MAPPA staff, a total of 12 offenders were returned to prison for breaching their release requirements. In addition, the co-operation with and by colleague agencies has enhanced Gloucestershire’s ability to provide comprehensive public protection. A recent report from Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Probation on Offender Accommodation noted how well supervision plans for offenders were integrated with MAPPA plans to provide a high quality risk management service.

Of the several achievements of the MAPPA, this year, it is worth noting that no offender managed by the Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel (MAPPP) was charged with a serious sexual or violent offence. This is evidence, in itself, of the professional, collaborative and serious approach staff take to this vital work. As this report shows, the public can order confidence from the excellent and effective arrangements in Gloucestershire which heighten protection, lead to fewer victims and make the county a safer place.

Yvette Ball Chief Officer Gloucestershire Probation Area

Timothy Brain Chief Constable, Gloucestershire Constabulary

David Chalmers Governor HMP Gloucester

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Key Achievements

Arrangements to assess and manage the risks posed by sexual, violent and other offenders who may cause a risk of serious harm to the public are firmly in place within Gloucestershire. The success of these arrangements in minimising harm to the public and reducing re offending relies on a number of agencies actively working together. The Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000 placed a joint responsibility on the Probation and Police Service to risk assess and manage relevant offenders. This has now been enhanced by the Criminal Justice Act 2003 which brought about the following additions: a) The Prison Service has become a ‘responsible authority’ alongside the Police and Probation Service. b) A statutory duty to co-operate with the Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements on a number of agencies. c) The appointment of Lay Advisors to the Strategic Management Board.

a) Prison Service
The focus of the MAPPA is on the management of offenders in the community. However a significant number of offenders who fall within the arrangements will have served a custodial sentence and it is critical to the effectiveness of these arrangements that the process of assessment and management begins prior to the offenders release into the community. The Prison Service therefore has a key role to play in identifying relevant offenders, providing information to inform risk assessment, identifying and providing offence focused interventions, liaising with colleagues in the community and contributing to the release arrangements that ‘fit’ with risk management plans drawn up for community supervision. Frequently prisoners will be held in Prison establishments geographically a long distance from the area to which they will be released. Prison staff are therefore the contact with the offender who needs to be involved in the process and aware of the restrictions and expectations that will be placed on them when released, usually on license, into the community. Locally arrangements are in place for offenders to be returned to a Prison establishment in their home area to facilitate their return into the community. The governor of the local prison is a member of the Strategic Management Board (SMB) and a senior prison representative is a member of the Multi-agency Public Protection Panel (MAPPP) which considers those offenders assessed as posing a very high risk of serious harm.

b) Duty to co-operate
The Criminal Justice Act 2003 requires the following agencies to co-operate with the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA): Youth Offending Service, Job Centre Plus, Local Housing Authorities, Registered Social Landlords, Health Bodies, Electronic Monitoring Providers, Social Services and Local Education Authorities. The purpose of the duty to co-operate is to help strengthen the MAPPA as the effectiveness of the arrangements relies on more than purely a criminal justice response. For example, suitable accommodation is critical to offender management, social services involvement is essential where there are child protection issues, mental health services involvement where an offender has psychiatric problems. Locally a protocol with the relevant agencies was agreed when the original MAPPA came into force. This is now being supported by the required ‘Memorandum of Understanding’ which details a contact point in each of the agencies who provide both general and specific advice to inform risk assessment. It defines how the agency will work with others to assist in the management of identified risks. Active involvement by these agencies is demonstrated locally by their attendance at Risk Management meetings convened on offenders who were assessed as presenting a risk of serious harm.

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c) The appointment of Lay Advisors
Regional Collaboration The Criminal Justice Act 2003 requires two Lay Advisors to be appointed in each area who will operate as full members of the local Strategic Management Board. Their value is as informed observers and they can ask questions which the professionals closely involved in the work would not necessarily think of asking. The Lay Advisors will bring their understanding and perspective of the Area. However their role is not to report back to or brief the community unless as part of a local communication exercise. Locally, two Lay Members have been appointed who will be attending national training events for Lay Advisors as well as becoming familiar with local arrangements through visits and briefings. There are three main reasons for developing regional approaches to protecting the public. Firstly, offenders who represent a risk to the public do not always stay in one place and the risks can be more effectively managed across borders if there is a common approach. Secondly, efficiency gains can be made by collaborating on the development of policy and practice. Finally, a wider range of best practice can be disseminated effectively. In the South West we have a Regional Public Protection Steering Group with representatives from all five MAPPA areas. The Steering Group is overseeing a regional action plan which addresses a range of issues including: • better co-ordinated management of dangerous offenders • improved risk assessment and management • co-ordinated implementation of new policy • learning lessons from case reviews • co-ordinated training and development

One of the appointed Lay Advisor writes: “This Spring I have been appointed as one of the two MAPPA Lay Advisors. Presently, I work full time as a Deputy Headteacher in a school in Gloucestershire and my experience of a Lay Advisor position thus far centres around the role of School Governors which is an enriching and challenging model. I hope that as a Lay Advisor I can bring a similar objective and inquiring approach to this role. I am looking forward to the training weekends which will allow me to be more informed about public protection organisation. When this position was advertised the advert read “this is your chance to contribute to the overall direction of the county’s public protection arrangements”. I hope that this aspiration can be realised and that Lay Advisers can make a real contribution to strategies that keep Gloucestershire safe.”

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The National Role of the Prison Service in MAPPA 2004 – 05
One of the most important ways in which the Criminal Justice Act (2003) strengthened the MAPPA was to make the Prison Service part of the Responsible Authority with police and probation in each of the 42 areas in England and Wales. The Prison Service has been given this enhanced role in recognition of the important part if plays in protecting the public by keeping offenders in custody; helping them to address the causes of their offending behaviour and by undertaking other work to assist their successful resettlement. As part of the Responsible Authority, the Prison Service is now represented on each of the Strategic Management Boards (SMBs) in the 42 areas. The Prison estate is configured differently from Police / Probation areas in that its establishments are contained within only 12 geographical areas and two functional areas – the High Security estate, and Contracted Prisons. For this reason arrangements for Prison Service representation on SMBs vary across the country, but each Prison Service Area Manager has entered into an agreement with the SMBs on how the service will contribute both strategically and operationally to the MAPPA. The main focus of the Prison Service contribution is at an operational level. A number of measures have been put in place across the prison estate to ensure that this will be effective and result in: • Prompt identification of MAPPA offenders so that their details can be used in sentence planning arrangements, including interventions to manage and reduce risk. • Regular monitoring of the behaviour of those assessed as presenting the highest risk, and sharing information with police and probation colleagues. • All relevant risk management information being provided to multi agency meetings which help plan an offender’s release • At least three months notification to police and probation of the expected release date of those offenders who have been referred to the multi agency public protection panel (MAPPP), and at least six weeks notification of those being managed at level 2 risk meetings. • No changes to release dates or arrangements being made without prior consultation with police and probation. Planning an effective role in the multi agency risk management of MAPPA offenders requires good communication between criminal justice partners. The Prison Service has taken steps to ensure that there are dedicated points of contact for public protection at both area level and in every prison establishment, and that these are published together with police / probation contacts to ensure better communication across the Responsible Authority. With the ever increasing MAPPA population, and proportion of those received into prison likely to grow with the introduction of the new public protection sentences, the inclusion of the Prison Service as part of the Responsible Authority will continue to be vital in protecting the public.

It is intended that this agenda for improving services will lead to strengthened protection of the public.

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How The MAPPA Operate Locally

Locally the MAPPA work by representatives of the relevant agencies coming together to share information, identify the risks posed, and putting together a plan designed to manage concerns and reduce the likelihood of re-offending.

Three categories of offender fall within the MAPPA • Category 1 • Category 2 • Category 3 sex offenders required to register. violent offenders who receive a prison sentence of 12 months or more and other sex offenders. other offenders assessed as posing a risk of serious harm.

The risks of physical and psychological harm considered are those presented to previous and potential future victims in the following categories:• The public • Children • Known adults / relatives • Staff • Other prisoners • and also risks to themselves of suicide / self harm

The assessment will detail:• Who is at risk • What is the nature of the risk • When is the risk likely to be greatest • What could trigger the behaviour

The Management Plan will describe actions to be taken by the different agencies to :• Protect past or potential victims • Involve offenders in looking at causes of offending and strategies to manage behaviour.

The plan will include details of licence conditions imposed on release from prison and actions to be taken if the risks posed are assessed as increase and / or the offender fails to comply with conditions imposed. This can lead to an immediate recall to prison.

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Multi-Agency Meeting arrangements
Areas are required to have in place arrangements for multi agency meetings referred to as Level 3 (Multi agency Public Protection Panel) and Level 2 (Local Risk Management Meetings). Level 3 (Multi agency Public Protection Panel) Those offenders assessed as posing the highest risk of serious harm will be considered at a Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel (Level 3) meeting. Agencies are represented at these meetings by senior managers, for example – Assistant Chief Officer (Probation), Head of Services (Social Services), Detective Chief Superintendent, and in Gloucestershire a Psychiatrist and Psychologist are also panel members. The role of the MAPPP is to :• Share information on those offenders referred to it • Decide upon the level of risk posed • Recommend the actions necessary to manage the risk including any contingencies • Monitor and ensure implementation of the agreed action plan • Review the level of risk and the action plan in light of changes in circumstances or behaviour • Consider and manage necessary resources.

Level 2 (Local Risk Management Meetings) Whilst the MAPPP deals with those offenders assessed as posing the highest risk of serious harm ‘the critical few’, similar arrangements exist to assess and manage other offenders who pose a lower risk of serious harm but do require multi-agency intervention. These meetings known as Local Risk Management Meetings (Level 2) involve those who have direct responsibility for the offender or who are involved in the day to day management. The risk assessment and management processes are consistent for both levels of meeting.

Victim Contact Critical to both levels of multi-agency meetings is the information provided by the Probation Service Victim Enquiry Officer. Victims, or the families of sexual and violent crime where the perpetrator has been imprisoned for 12 months or more, will have been offered contact and been provided with details concerning prison process and release arrangements. The victim’s views inform both the content of reports when release is being considered, and the license conditions put in place.

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Case Example i

The offender was referred to the Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel (Level 3) by the Probation Service prior to his release from prison. Agencies represented at meeting – Police, Probation, Social Services, Housing, Prison, Psychiatrist, Psychologist and Manager of Approved Premises (Hostel). The Victim Enquiry Officer provided a written report. Background • Convicted of offences of indecent assaults and unlawful sexual intercourse on teenage girls. • History of domestic abuse and concern he will attempt to contact his own children. • Began prison based sex offender treatment programme but refused to continue. High level of minimisation of details of offences. • Allegations of sexual assaults on young boys and also extended family members. • Threats of harm made to his ex wife who sought divorce during current prison sentence and her new partner. • Intends having contact with other convicted sex offenders on release. • Stated refusal to abide by supervision requirements on release and intent to contact his children. Risk Assessment • Very high risk of further sexual assaults / psychological harm on young girls and young boys. • Very high risk of physical and psychological harm to ex wife and her new partner. • Very high risk of harm to his own children of sexual and psychological harm. Risk Management Plan • To be released to Approved Premises (Probation managed out of county hostel) and be subject to hostel rules, curfew and tagging arrangements. • License conditions to include no contact with victims, ex wife and children. • Geographical exclusion from parts of Gloucestershire. • To attend community based Sex Offender Treatment Programme. • To attend appointments with supervising Probation Officer. • To register with the police as a sex offender and abide by requirements. • Regular visits by the police to be made to his address. • Potential contact with other known perpetrators to be monitored. • Social Services to have on-going contact with ex wife and children. • Victim enquiry officer to liaise with and advise victims of arrangements. Outcome • Released to Approved Premises. • Registered with police as required. • Complied with supervision requirements and license restrictions. • Concerns arose with regard to a relationship with a vulnerable young women. • There were ongoing concerns regarding contact with adult family members, possible contact with their children. • He formed a close relationship with another man convicted of sex offence. • The offender was regularly reviewed by the MAPPP ensuring all relevant agencies were aware of the concerns and appropriate action taken. Current position The offender was charged with further sexual offence committed prior to those for which he was originally sentenced. He is currently remanded in custody awaiting sentence. A risk management plan is in place should he be released.

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Case Example ii

The offender was referred to a Local Risk Management Meeting (Level 2) by the Probation Service prior to his release from prison. Agencies represented Probation, Police, Social Services, Victim Enquiry Officer. Written information provided by prison based Probation Officer.

Background • Convicted of violent offences against his ex partner. • Previous offences of violence against most recent and other ex partners and harassment offence. • Violence witnessed by children of ex partner. • Family had been subject of Social Services assessment and children’s names placed on Child Protection Register. • Threats made directly to children at point of his arrest. • Serious alcohol problem. • Ex partner and children very anxious with regard to his release from prison. Risk Assessment • High risk of serious physical and psychological harm to his ex partner (and previous partners). • High risk of serious harm to ex partner’s children. • High risk of serious harm to any future partner’s children. Risk Management Plan • To be released to specialist accommodation and treatment facility out of Gloucestershire license conditions. ◊ To live where directed and not to move without approval. ◊ To be subject to curfew from 10.00 pm – 7 a.m. ◊ To address alcohol problem and enter into treatment. ◊ To attend Domestic Violence programme. ◊ No contact with ex partner or children. ◊ Geographical exclusion from part of Gloucestershire.

• Victim Enquiry Officer to advise victim of arrangements. • Police Domestic Violence Officer to visit and advise on safety measures available. • Social Services to maintain contact with ex partner and children. • Case to be transferred out of county and new probation officer to have weekly contact and liaise with accommodation and treatment facility in order to monitor behaviour. Outcome • Released to specialist facility out of county. • Entered into treatment. • No attempt to contact ex-partner or children. • Complied with all requirements. Current Position Remains on license he has moved on from treatment facility to supported accommodation in the same area where he successfully completed full treatment programme. Attending Domestic Violence Programme, concerns that he has formed a new relationship with a woman who has been a victim previously of domestic violence. Close monitoring is ongoing by the relevant MAPPA agencies and no further incidents of domestic abuse have been reported. Continue to be managed at Level 2 and remain assessed as high risk to future partners / children.

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Case Example iii

The offender was referred to the MAPPP by the Police. Agencies represented at MAPPP, Police, Probation, Social Services, Prison, Housing and Psychologist and Psychiatrist.

Other examples of actions taken to protect potential victims and reduce risk of offending
• New partner advised of offender’s previous sexual convictions against children of which she was unaware. • Employer advised of previous sexual convictions. • Local Headteacher advised of potential risk of contact by children with local convicted sex offender. • Church advised of convicted sex offender attending family services. • Voluntary agency advised of convicted sex offender seeking work. When any disclosure is undertaken this is done with great care and adherence to the relevant regulations. The receiver of the information is advised on how to deal with the information provided. In some instances the offender will be given the opportunity to disclose themselves. Then it will be confirmed by the responsible agency and assistance offered in managing the situation if required.

Background • Arrested for offence of trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence. • Two previous convictions for indecent assault on children. Risk Assessment • Very high risk of further sexual assaults on children both known to him and stranger victims. Risk Management Plan • Emergency Sex Offender Prevention Order (SOPO) requested and obtained at initial court appearance for immediate public protection. Prohibitions included in the SOPO ◊ Not to be in the company of children under the age of 17. ◊ Not to allow children under the age of 17 to visit or enter any address at which he resides. ◊ Not to allow children under the age of 17 to be carried in his motor vehicle. ◊ Not to loiter within a radius of 100 metres of educational establishment. ◊ Not to cold call on any residential establishment. • Offender remanded in custody. • Psychologist report requested. • Report to be prepared for Crown Court by Probation Service. • Officer from Public Protection Team recommending period of imprisonment. Outcome • Sentenced to 8 years imprisonment and Sex Offender Prevention Order endorsed. • Will undertake Sex Offender Treatment Programme in custody.

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Statistics explained

The following statistical information details MAPPA activity within Gloucestershire for the reporting period: 1st APRIL 2004 - 31st MARCH 2005

1. Category 1 (Sex Offenders required to register)
i) The number of Registered Sex Offenders (RSOs) living in your Area on 31st March 2005. ia) The number of RSOs per 100,000 head of population. ii) The number of sex offenders having a registration requirement who were either cautioned or convicted for breaches of the requirement, between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005. a) b) c) a) b) c) a) b) 284 50 5 9 2 9 0 0 0 0 0

iii) The number of (a) Sexual Offences Prevention Orders (SOPOs) applied for (b) interim SOPOs granted and (c) full SOPOs imposed by the courts in your Area between 1st May 2004 and 31st March 2005. iv) The number of (a) Notification Orders applied for (b) interim Notification Orders granted and (c) full Notification Orders imposed by the courts in your Area between 1st May 2004 and 31st March 2005. v) The number of Foreign Travel Orders (a) applied for and (b) imposed by the courts in your Area between 1st May 2004 & 31st March 2005.

Statistics Explained There are 284 registered sex offenders living in Gloucestershire. The number of registered sex offenders living in Gloucestershire has increased. This number will increase year on year as any sex offender who receives a period of imprisonment of 30 months or more is required to register for life. Additionally the new 2003 Sexual Offences Act introduced new offences which require registration. Increased activity to identify those committing sexual offences on the internet accounts for a significant proportion of registrations in this reporting year. Five offenders required to register have breached requirements this reporting year. Registration requirements include registering any change of address within three days and notifying if travelling abroad for three days or more. The monitoring arrangements that are in place are designed through regular contact with offenders to establish a working relationship that reduces the likelihood of non-compliance. Again this year we have impressively high levels of compliance. Whenever concerns are raised with regard to behaviour or increased risk of re-offending, action is immediately taken in conjunction with the relevant MAPPA agencies. Of the five offenders who breached reporting requirements this year, three received custodial sentences. continued overleaf

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Sex Offender Prevention Orders Nine Sex Offender Prevention Orders have been successfully obtained this year. Sex Offender Prevention Orders (SOPOs) are a very significant tool in the management of sex offenders. The police can apply for an order if there is sufficient information regarding behaviour of a sexual nature. An Order can also be imposed when an offender is convicted of a sexual offence at the point of sentence in court. Orders can be made for life. Below are examples of prohibitions that have been placed in orders obtained in Gloucestershire in the past year.

a) Accommodation Not to reside in any household with a child or young person under the age of 17 years. b) Activities Not to take photographs with any imagecapturing device of any child under the age of 18 years. c) Articles Having in his possession any photograph of a child under the age of 16 years, unless it is with the permission of that child’s parent or guardian.

d) Children Not to be in the company of children under the age of 17 years old, unless both the defendant and the child or children are both within the line of sight and range of hearing of the child or children’s parents or legal guardians. e) Employment Seeking or undertaking any employment whether for payment or otherwise which is likely at some time to allow him unsupervised access to a child under the age of 16 years. f) Establishment Stopping within 10 metres of any school (primary or secondary) or school grounds or college or college grounds or bus stops at school times, namely between 7.00 and 9.30am and between 3.00 pm and 6 pm.

Those offenders subject to Sex Offender Prevention orders are required to register with the police and are subject to monitoring arrangements. If an order is breached the offender is arrested and can be returned to court. The maximum sentence for breaching an order is 5 years imprisonment. In this reporting year one offender has been charged with breaching requirements of sex offender order and received a custodial sentence.

2. Category 2 (violent offenders sentenced to a period of imprisonment of 12 months or more and sex offenders not required to register).
vi) The number of violent and other (V&O) sexual offenders (as defined by Section 327 (3), (4) and (5) of the Criminal Justice Act (2003)) living in your Area between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005 Statistics Explained 86 offenders in the community fall into this category having been released from custody and subject to supervision in the area. 86

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3. Category 3 (other offenders assessed as posing a high risk of serious harm).

vii) The number of ‘other offenders’(OthO) (as defined by Section 325 (2)(b) of the Criminal Justice Act (2003)) between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005. Statistics Explained

24

In this category there are 24 offenders who have been assessed as posing a high risk of serious harm but have not been convicted of sexual offences nor received a prison sentence of 12 months or more for a violent offence. Some of these offenders have a history of sexual or violent behaviour which has not resulted in prosecution. An increasing number of offenders assessed in this category have been convicted of offences of domestic abuse. In these cases multi-agency meetings are convened which includes voluntary agencies working with victims of abuse where risk assessments and risk management plans are formulated focusing on victim safety. These meetings include voluntary agencies working with victims of abuse. Partners, ex-partners and children witnessing domestic violence will be identified as being at high risk of serious harm both physically and psychologically and arrangements are put in place to enhance their protection.

4. Offenders managed at Level 3 (MAPPP).
(viii) Identify how many MAPPA offenders in each of the three Categories have been managed through the MAPPP (level 3) and through local inter-agency risk management (level 2) between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005: (1) Registered Sex Offenders (2) Violent and Other (3) Other Offenders (ix) Of the cases managed at levels 3 or 2 (i.e. (viii)) between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005 how many, whilst managed at that level: (a) Were returned to custody for a breach of licence? (b) Were returned to custody for a breach of a restraining order or sexual offences prevention order? (c) Were charged with a serious sexual or violent offence?

Level RSO V&O OthO

3 9 6 4

2 22 34 20

Level

3 4 0 0

2 8 1 1

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5. Offenders managed at the Multi-Agency Public Protection Panel (Level 3)
Offenders assessed as posing a high risk of serious harm and present risks that need to be managed by a plan which requires close co-operation at a senior level due to the complexity of the case or unusual resource commitment. In total 19 offenders have been managed by the MAPPP. Of these 14 have been offenders referred this reporting year, five were MAPPP registered in 2003 / 04 and continue to be overseen by panel members.

Offenders managed at Local Risk Management Meetings (Level 2). Offenders managed at Local Risk Management Meetings (Level 2) are those offenders where there are concerns regarding the risk they pose and their management require the involvement of more than one agency. Within Gloucestershire colleagues from Police, Probation and Social Services (at a minimum) meet weekly to assess, review and devise risk management plans on relevant offenders. Arrangements within Gloucestershire, and therefore included in this number, are local risk meetings convened prior to the release from custody of violent, sex or other offenders assessed as posing a high risk of serious harm. The Prison Service plays a significant role here in identifying relevant offenders and contributing to risk assessment and management plans. Immediate action is taken if an offender fails to co-operate or the risk of serious harm is assessed as escalating. During 2004 / 05 four offenders managed at Level 3, and eight managed at Level 2 were returned to custody for breaching license requirements on release from imprisonment. No offender managed by the MAPPP or Level 2 was charged with a serious sexual or violent offence during this reporting year.

Challenging offending behaviour and reducing the risk. Whilst prohibitions and restricted conditions are essential to the management of offenders, so is the engagement of the offender in the risk management plan, and undertaking work to address offending behaviour in order to reduce the risk of further offending.

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Sex Offender Treatment Programme

The Programme is designed to help offenders change their sexually abusive behaviour. • Research shows that unless offenders are able to change the values and attitudes that influenced their behaviour they remain at risk of offending against a past, current or new victim. • Sex Offender Treatment programmes do not offer a ‘cure’ for sexual offending. The aim is to motivate and equip offenders with the skills for self control over their behaviour. • The programme therefore has the overall aim to reduce the risk of further sexual offending. • All programme staff have been specifically trained for this area of work. • The programme has a policy of limited confidentiality and all group members are requested to treat personal information about other group members as strictly confidential. However, group members are made aware that there may be occasions when programme staff may be required to share information with relevant agencies should there be a recurrence of sexual offending or identified potential risk.

Programme Structure – made up of separate, but linked, modules
Pre-group work is undertaken on an individual basis with a case manager and includes an assessment that will determine suitability for the programme and will be used for evaluation purposes.

Foundation block A full time two week period from 9.30 am – 4.45 pm Monday to Friday. This is an intensive period of work at the start of a programme that is helpful in breaking down denial. It also helps the group become cohesive which has been shown to enhance treatment success. Victim Empathy Block Two sessions per week for four weeks. Offenders are educated about the effect of sexual abuse and are encouraged to perceive the abuse from the victim’s point of view. Meetings All group members will have regular contact with their case manager throughout the programme and these can be increased in frequency should a particular need arise that cannot be addressed in group time.

Life Skills Block Two sessions per week for ten weeks. Each session is two hours. The overall aim of this module is to address the factors have contributed to an individual’s offending Group members are helped to develop an awareness of what these factors may be for them and to consider and plan what changes they need to make to overcome their particular problem. Relapse Prevention Block One session per week for six months. Each session is two hours. This module offers group members the opportunity to consolidate what they have learned on previous modules and begin to demonstrate their learning by practicing new skills in and outside the group.

What happens in a Group? The group work programme works with adult male sexual offenders from all backgrounds and differing ages who have committed a range of sexual offences. Some of the men may be on a community based sentence or on license after serving a period in prison. There are two programme staff running the programme modules. The groups encourage group members to think and talk about their sexual behaviour and rehearse new skills and circumstances as well as listening to others. There are individual and group exercises together with video material and the opportunity to role play to deal with problems.

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Strategic Management Board

The Strategic Management Board has a critical role in overseeing the Public Protection Arrangements within the county of Gloucestershire. The Board members are the; • Chief Officer of the National Probation Service, Gloucestershire • Assistant Chief Officer Probation Service Gloucestershire • Assistant Chief Constable • Detective Chief Superintendent • Governor HM Prison Gloucester • Area Manager Victim Support • Head of Youth Offending Service • Executive Manager, Gloucester City Council • Head of Service, Children and Families • and now additionally two Lay Advisors The Board agrees a business plan for the year which is reviewed at each meeting. The plan includes monitoring arrangements, such as inspections of work. It identifies key actions to be achieved such as this year the appointment of two Lay Advisors and the duty to co-operate arrangements. Members of the Board will also represent their own individual agencies in other key public protection forums such as the Area Child Protection Committee, the Criminal Justice Board and Crime and Disorder Partnerships. This ensures that the MAPPA are incorporated into their activities ensuring linkage and joined up thinking thus strengthening Public Protection Arrangements.

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Contacts

Contact details for all victim support local offices are shown below:Cheltenham 01242 577476 Cotswold 01285 658350 Forest of Dean 01594 810190 Gloucester 01452 506450 Stroud 01453 751488 Tewkesbury 01684 850448 Crown Court Witness Service 01452 411724 Magistrates Court Witness Service 01452 525281

This report provides details of the arrangements made in Gloucestershire. If you would like to make additional enquiries please contact:Kate Reynolds MAPPA Manager Public Protection Unit Gloucestershire Constabulary Holland House Lansdown Road Cheltenham Glos. GL51 6QH Tel: 01242 276049 / 276723 Chief Constable Gloucestershire Constabulary Holland House Lansdown Road Cheltenham Glos. GL51 6QH Tel: 0845 0901234 Chief Officer Gloucestershire Probation Area Bewick House 1 Denmark Road Gloucester GL1 3HW Tel: 01452 426250

Glossary
MAPPA Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements MAPPP Multi Agency Public Protection Panel SMB Strategic Management Board SOPO Sex Offender Prevention Order

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