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Drawing, a creative process

Francis D.K. Ching 1990

326 pages.Introduction to Architectural Presentation Graphics Anthony W. 1998. Griffin & Victor Alvarez-Brunicardi Prentice Hall.6 Two-Point Perspectives . Notes Ch.

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hence: . Any part of an object that "touches" the picture plane will be to scale.Picture Plane (image plane)   Imaginary transparent plane onto which the object is being projected.

Plan Angle (azimuth)   Angle between the floor plan and picture plan. Station Point (Camera Station)  If the station point is too close to the picture plane. They must always originate from the Station Point. Ground Line . It should be located so as to intersect with some point of interest on the building.o o It is always to one's advantage to locate the picture plane such that is passes through a corner of the object being drawn. upon which are plotted points. Opening angle usually varies between 30 and 60 degrees. Direct Line of Vision (principal line)   Imaginary line from the Station Point to the Picture plane (perpendicularly). use the "cone of vision". 3D cone: not only width and depth. It can be plotted above or below the actual perspective view. the perspective view becomes overly "distorted". Sight Rays   Used to project points from the plan to the picture plane and then down to the perspective. from which all vertical heights can be measured. but also height of the object of interest should fall within this cone. viewed from above (aerial viewpoint). Cone of Vision    Station Point as vertex. to prevent this. This angle determines the emphasis put on each primary sides of the object. Gives you a true height-line. Most of the object of interest should be within the cone to avoid distortions. Plan View (Floor Plane)   This is a floor plane drawn to scale.

True-Height Line   Occurs whenever a part of the object touches the picture plane. The height of the horizon line corresponds to the eye-level height of the observer.  Intersection of the Ground Plane and the Picture Plane. . A perpendicular is then projected from the picture plane down to the Ground Line. All vertical measurements are taken from the Ground Line. The location of the horizon line determines whether you will be looking down or up to the object being drawn. True-Height Lines can be located at any point in the perspective view simply by projecting a point from the plan to the picture plane (central projection w/r to the Station Point). Horizon Line    Line formed by the intersection of the Horizon Plane and the Picture Plane.

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8 Alternate Perspective-Plotting Methods Perspective Charts    Use a pre-defined perspective grid and a vertical unit scale (that scale can always be re-adjusted through multiples).7 One-Point Perspectives   Plan Angle is always parallel to the picture plane. Most commercially available charts come in: o 3 plan angle configurations: 30°/60°. Each chart is identified with an angle value representing the plan position of the object in relation to the picture plane. Objects that touches and are parallel to the picture plane are drawn in a simple orthographic view.  bird's eye view (large height) .Ch. Ch. o 3 view types:  normal (distance of 5 to 6 feet between the Horizon and Ground Lines)  intermediate (taken from a height of 10 to 15 feet for producing 2nd-floor views). 45° & 0° (the latter corresponds to a 1PtP).

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Photographic Perspective    Uses photos or videos of existing buildings. in the photo..) to provide accurate scale info. Use a measuring device (tape. 1998-2003 . . Additions and/or renovations can be drawn using VPs within the photograph. Page created & maintained by Frederic Leymarie.. rope.