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INDIAN MARKET RESEARCH BUREAU (IMRB) COMPANY PROFILE

1.1 About Indian Market Research Bureau(IMRB) International
Established in 1971, IMRB International is a pioneer in market research. A member of the Kantar Group, WPP's information, insight and consulting division. IMRB's footprint extends across 11 countries - India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Dubai, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Singapore, Malaysia, Korea and London. With over 1200 full time staff, IMRB provides high quality conceptualisation, strategic thinking, execution and interpretation skills. IMRB International is the only research company in India that offers a wide range of research based services to its clients. IMRB International's specialised areas includes consumer market research both quantitative and qualitative, industrial market research, business to business market research, social and rural market research, media research, retail research, and consumer panels. Abacus Field Abacus Field handles the field operations for all the business divisions in IMRB. Abacus Field has a network of 15 regional offices spread across the country that gives IMRB the capability to run pan India research projects smoothly & effectively. An example of the magnitude of Abacus Field operations can be gauged from the following:
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On any given day about 5000 freelancers work for Abacus Field Tele Call Centre has 262 seats, is located in Delhi, Bangalore and Mumbai, and does 1,04, 000 interviews per month. Household Panel - 89,800 household visited every month 8000 projects handled in one year 8.8 lac mandays of interviewing in one year 37 lac interviews done in one year

Abacus Field is consistently striving to exceed client expectations, through high quality work, integrity, innovativeness and building a culture which promotes professional and personal growth opportunities. Abacus Field is headed by Nikhil Rawal, Sr Vice President
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IMRB International's Divisions IMRB International has been offering for over 35 years, both general as well as specialist research services to clients in India and overseas. IMRB International operates out of its five full service offices in Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata, Chennai and Bangalore and is supported by 15 other regional centers for collection of survey information. IMRB International had eight specialist units:       

Probe Qualitative Research (PQR) Media & Panel Group CSMM: Partners in Managing Stakeholding Relationships BIRD: Research Consultancy for B2B and Technology Markets eTechnology Group@ IMRB Social and Rural Research Institute (SRI) IMRB MindTech Systems: Software development house Abacus Market Analytics: Data Processing House of the World

Probe Qualitative Research (PQR): Probe Qualitative Research is one of India's leading qualitative research groups and has executives specially trained in India and overseas in qualitative research methods. Drawing on learning from ethnography, psychology and anthropology, PQR has created an array of validated tool-kits for product innovation, communication and brand development. Media and Panel Group of IMRB International is a pioneer in the field of media research in India. The Group also runs one of the world’s largest household panels, with over 70,000 households in urban and rural india, chronicling changing consumption habits across the country. CSMM: Partners in Managing Stakeholder Relationship Is an independent, specialist unit of IMRB International and the exclusive member of the Walker Global Network (WGN) for the Indian subcontinent. As a specialist unit of IMRB International, CSMM provides the widest field coverage with five full service offices and 15 field offices in Delhi, Calcutta, Mumbai, Chennai, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Cochin, Pune, Patna, Ahmedabad, Guwahati, Bhubaneswar, Lucknow, Indore & Ludhiana. CSMM services clients in India and neighboring countries (Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Nepal) and this diverse network has made CSMM the leading provider of stakeholder products and services in South Asia. In addition through its associates, AMRB, headquarters in Dubai and operating through out the Middle East and North Africa, provides Walker proprietor Tools throughout the region.
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BIRD: Research-based Consultancy for B2B and Technology markets is a Research based consultancy arm – B2B and technology markets. Operating out of four locations in India, viz., Mumbai, New Delhi, Bangalore & Chennai, BIRD has been advising clients from India and across the globe since the last 35 years.

eTechnology Group @ IMRB As technology evolves and creates new opportunities, barriers to progress continue to arise. Some problems are technical, economic or policy-related, while the hardest combine all three aspects in any country. It is the continuous link with the industry and constant monitoring that has given us capabilities of understanding the movement of technologies markets. The eTechnology Group@IMRB constantly monitors technology trends in IT, Internet, Telecom and Convergence Space helping Indian and International companies alike. It also has a partnership with Yankee Group USA to representing the Indian market. Social and Rural Research Institute (SRI) specializes in social research and in conducting research on emerging rural markets. It has staff with special expertise in conducting Knowledge, Attitudes & Practice (KAP), Studies on health and sanitation, water, environment and other fields, in India as well as internationally.

IMRB MindTech Systems - Software development House: A client servicing oriented specialized software unit of Media & Panel, Mumbai facilitating solutions to critical business questions. MindTech Systems has been providing business solutions since 2000 and has thus acquired an extensive expertise in Market Research applications. Having based ourselves on the features demanded by large no. of companies, we have created innovative, user-friendly applications. Our solutions help clients to convert marketing research knowledge into actions.

Abacus Market Analytics: Data Processing House to the Established in 2001, Abacus Market Analytics unit offers a wide range of services to all the research units in IMRB. These include data processing, charting, statistical analysis, database management & updation, software development & testing. Abacus Data Processing (DP), a part of Abacus Market analytics, offers similar service to international clients. DP’s Clients include Millword Brown across Asia Pacific, Africa and Australasia, Kantar Operations in UK, BMRB International in UK, AMRB in the Middle East and N Africa, RI in Asia Pacific & the Brand Survey Company in S Africa.

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In the days ahead, the key business development areas identified include:
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Advanced analytics Advanced statistical services Modeling and trend analyses Database creation and management Data mining Scripting Data interpretation and reporting

Abacus Market Analytics is headed by Sunil Bakshi, Sr. Vice President.

Milestones & Strengths of IMRB Milestones
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India’s first TV rating system India’s first Radio Audience Measurement system India’s first IT and Internet studies endorsed by industry associations India’s first and largest Household Panel Instrumental in setting up of Market Research Society of India (MRSI) in 1988 Creation of Social Economic Classification (SEC) system, by Ashutosh Sinha from the Marketing Sciences Group, & used by all MR companies in India Path breaking book on employee loyalty “The Tao of Loyalty” by Ajit Rao of CSMM (Customer Satisfaction Measurement & Management) Agency of the year award, instituted in 2006 at MRSI, for two consecutive years , 2006 & 2007 Presenting cutting edge research for several years at international forums including ESOMAR and won awards

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Strengths         Senior most researchers in the industry Specialists with industry/sector knowledge International toolkit in specialized businesses Strategic Marketing Consultancy Largest field network for custom research Array of Syndicated databases Industry tracking & environmental scan Multi-country research capability IMRB Footprints in India 5 .

In the rapidly changing business environment of today organizations are constantly striving to adapt to changing customer needs. Research report writing & Charting Marketing technology & research software services 6 . Abacus Market Analytics is a leading provider of marketing analytics. certified ISO 9001:2000 company Founded in 1998. Service Lines Abacus market analytics has six business divisions which work synergistically to support the data. They assist client s through the entire analytics and research value chain assisting them in find the right solution to cater to their marketing / strategy needs.1.V. research and reporting requirements of its clients. There is an acute need to make sense of this data that is available with clients.2 ABACUS RESEARCH – Profile A KEMA Quality B. as a specialist unit of IMRB International. which provides advanced CRM and survey analytics solutions to its clients across the globe. There’s no dearth of data whether it’s transactional data or data gathered about customer from secondary and / or primary research. That is where Abacus market analytics help’s its clients. Abacus solutions are geared to enhance the marketing efficacy of client marketing programs and are custom built based on client requirements. The six lines of business include: Survey programming services Data processing & analysis Data mining and predictive analytics Commenting.

There is a need to find innovative ways to improve recruitment. The information technology and outsourcing sectors. And one such aspect that we are witnessing the recruitment process which has also been affected as a result of the ongoing recession. manufacturing (63 percent). It is even predicted that companies will demand greater accountability from recruitment agencies and focus on improving their recruitment. financial services and insurance (57 percent). Most Indian companies have decided not to resort to any more job cuts even as they have put a cap on fresh hiring and staff incentives with a curb on outstation travel for executives." the consultancy said quoting the survey. LITERATURE SURVEY Off late much hype is created about the recession and the impact it has created in the various and industries. known for aggressive hiring in the past. have become more conservative with 84 percent stating that there will be no more recruitments. "Other sectors that have put a freeze are fast-moving consumer goods (70 percent). 7 . The world is changing very quickly to combat recession and it’s about time we translate our thinking into action or else we will be late. In view of these industries. More than 75 percent of the respondents in the survey by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) said they were reviewing their recruitment strategy to manage costs. The base idea is not to wait and find ways to weather the storm but to take proactive measures to tide the wave. Apart from adapting to new plans. the numbers have dropped drastically for the biggies and the recruitment agencies are battling for survival. At the start of the recessionary period many companies adopted the policy of job cuts. says a survey released.2. the impact of recession is such that it has made the organizations in the sectors to adapt to new plans. A majority of them had also imposed a freeze on fresh hiring. The employees were given pink slip the moment their company felt them to be below par performers. Recruitment industry is going through a tough time at this moment. The main reason being the companies who are hiring have recently made drastic cuts in their recruiting budget and are in the process of streamlining their side of the story. and banking. the companies are trying to revise their strategy in every aspect of the company’s resources as well. Recruitment agencies / staffing companies who are agile in their operation and can quickly adapt to the changing environment will emerge victorious at the end of this recessionary period.

The crisis in the financial sector has automatically affected Indian IT firms. The recruitment was well-placed earlier when the growth rate was 30 pc in the IT sector. Employers are uncertain about the extent. though 43 percent said they have opted for selective hiring. He was speaking at the sidelines of a function in the Institute of Social and Economic Change (ISEC). The banking. But in the long-run the sector will do well. What has also come as a relief was that 84 percent respondents had shied away from employee layoffs as a way of controlling costs. over one-third of Indian companies said they have frozen salary increments for the coming year and were reducing bonus or variable pays. with expansion plans being put on hold and respondents admitting they were not averse to layoffs if other actions proved insufficient. Retail is another sector that has been badly hit by the slowdown. smaller firms with employee strength of less than 100 are focusing on selective hiring for critical positions only. The IT industry grew rapidly on the back of high global economy growth. duration and depth of the economic slowdown and the timing of a recovery. with more than half of the respondents saying they were focusing on freezing recruitment. Though the software export attained a growth of $40 bn in FY 2008." Ramamurthy added. the Vice-Chairman of Infosys Technologies said that the global economic meltdown has affected hiring in India's IT industry. While delivering a lecture on 'India at the Crossroads: the Choices Before us' he said that the IT industry is facing severe crisis and no prediction can be made how long the economic slowdown will continue. they are being cautious about spending and making investments. The need for technology the world over has not reduced and India too is a large consumer of the technology.about 21 percent . financial services and insurance sector is among the worst hit. 8 . "The IT sector is not seeing job buoyancy now compared to earlier years due to global economic slowdown. "Therefore. and this caution is reflected in the way they plan to manage human resources. "Most companies in India are gearing up for tough times but are avoiding knee-jerk reactions. the economic slowdown has reduced the growth to 20 pc.Also." PwC India's Sankar Ramamurthy said. Nandan Nilekani. Mr. Moreover. A smaller number of companies ." said Nilekani.in the financial services sector have also admitted to considering layoffs.

Many reasons are attributed towards this effect right from the demographics to the education of a candidate. The questionnaire deals with various factors and aspects which enables us to identify the respondent’s views regarding the recruitment processes in this recession period. Accordingly a questionnaire has been developed keeping in view the customer requirements for whom the study is made.The country needs to create as many as 270 million jobs by 2035 to reap the benefits of the demographic change. Today if a company is asked as to what issues are high on their priority list these days and most will invariably say “attracting and retaining qualified workers” is one of them.     Review HR costs and productivity Examine scope to cut indirect costs which have nil or low impact on productivity Stop recruitments unless for new activities or those which can be classified as critical Combine tasks and redefine job responsibilities The basis for this research study is also based some of the aspects as mentioned above. 9 . The potential of the youth needs to be harnessed to accelerate the economic growth rate. One of the methods to administer the effect of recession on the organizations to critically evaluate the human resource costs. traditional recruiting and retention strategies just don’t seem to be as effective as they once were. It could be done in the following ways. This project mainly aims to study the various aspects of the recruitment process and also to identify the most sought career options. In today’s highly competitive labor market. India has a large number of young people and jobs need to be created by integrating our economy with the global economy.

Recruiting officers of organizations.. the employer segment and the placement committee representative segment. Arts.1.1 Sampling Procedure There are 3 target groups for this study is as follows:  3. HR Heads of organizations: The HR Managers or Executives of the organizations who are involved in the recruitments. Post Graduate (Males. 3. from colleges/universities. Arts. Owners of organizations: The owners of the organization who are involved in the recruitment process for their organizations. 10 . 3. Science etc. Commerce.1 Students 1. Science etc. the sample requirements were being specified by the client.  3. from colleges/universities. Females / Any stream): The students who are pursuing their graduation in education stream viz.2 Employers 1.  3. Accordingly the sample size was decided and a structured questionnaire was designed and pretested as per the client’s requirements. Commerce.3 Placement Committee Representatives of a College The placement committee members of the college who would be involved with the organizations that would try to recruit candidates from their college. 2. 2.1. etc: The placement agencies if any who on behalf of certain organization would conduct the recruitments for the respective organization.. The research survey conducted is based on purposive sampling. Females / Any stream): The students who are pursuing their post graduation in education stream viz. representing the organization’s corporate goals and policies during the recruitment processes.3.1. QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN AND SAMPLING METHOD In view of the objective of the project. The sample was being divided among three target groups namely the student segment. Graduate (Males.

Com. The data for this segmented would be collected by visiting the placement representatives either in their college or at a convenient location as suggested by these respondents. MBA.Com.g.2. The interviews will be conducted with students at each college and will administer a structured questionnaire. Sl.2 Methodology The methodology for conducting the survey in each of these segments is being explained as below  3.3 Methodology for Placement Committee Representative Segment: Interviews will follow a Purposive Sampling method. etc). No.1 Methodology for Students Segment: Interviews will follow a Purposive Sampling method. B. M. thereby interviewing respondents at various colleges and universities.2.The inputs from such target groups would thus be helpful to analyze the aspects of the project as mentioned earlier.) 100 100 10 3. 11 . general graduation/post graduation like BA. selection criteria of respondents will be provided to the research representatives. The sample size of all these three segments is as indicated in the table below. MA. engineering. These colleges could be of any type of colleges (for e.1: Sample size of the three Target Groups Sample Size (No. A prior appointment on telephone and then interview respondents at their office or any other place as suggested by the respondent.2 Methodology for Employers Segment: Interviews will follow a Purposive Sampling method. medical.2. Databases will be supplied by client and in cases where data bases are not available. 1 2 3 Target Group Student Segment Employer Segment Placement Committee Representative Table 3. vocational studies.  3.  3.

The questions in this section pertain to perception of the effect of recession on the recruitments scenario from the perspective of each of these target groups. The showcard indicates the answer options to the questions. It also consists of the demographic details of each of the respondent. for both the student segment and the employer segment a detailed analysis would be performed in view of the sample size requirement of these segments. printed in a bigger font. While for the placement committee representatives.3. The screening questionnaire enables us to identify whether the concerned respondent is eligible for the interview or not. These questions would give an indication as to how much impact these recession has implied to the recruitment. a descriptive analysis would be performed since the sample size requirement is small. thee different questionnaires were developed in order to conduct the research study.     Section I – General Section II – Off Beat Jobs Section III – Temping (Hiring on Temporary Basis) Section IV – Gender Related (details related towards situation of women in the professional life as the focus) 3. The showcard is developed for each of the segment. referring to which they would be able to answer the questions with ease.In the sample size as indicated in the table above. Also it aims to identify the various sectors that each of the respondents is interested to pursue a career or rather to hire a candidate in the case of the employers view. the main questionnaire deals with the actual parameters of the research study. 12 .3 Questionnaire Design In view of three target groups as indicated earlier. The questionnaire is printed in both English as well as in the local language Telugu for better understanding of the respondent. 3.1 Section I – General The General Section involves identifying the current scenario of the recession effects concerned with the placements from the perspective of the three target groups viz. students. The main questionnaire is further divided into sub sections as listed below. Each questionnaire possesses a screening questionnaire and a main questionnaire. a showcard was also developed to aid the respondents in answering the questions while conducting the survey. employers and the placement committee representatives. The questionnaire for each of these segments is enclosed in the annexure part of the report. Further to the screening questionnaire. In the process of interviewing each of the respondents.

As mentioned above. This section aims to identify whether or not the option of temping is feasible during the recession period.3. event management etc. These job profiles need follow any routine as in the case of a corporate job profile.Temping As the name suggests. radio jockey. In all the above sections so mentioned..3.3. the questionnaires for each of these respondents is being enclosed in the annexure part of the report for further references. They could either work as an apprentice or rather on certain time bound jobs till the duration of the job ends. 3.3 Section III . the questions are accordingly designed for three target group segments to identify their perspectives. are flexible with regard to the job responsibilities and aspects concerned. this section is answered by only the female respondents in the survey process. 3.4 Section IV – Gender Related This section focuses the thoughts of the various respondents with women as the prime focus in pursuing a career option. This section was developed to identify the various other alternatives that would be available to the candidates to pursue a career in the event if they could not achieve a corporate job.3. In the case of the student segment. In this section the views of each of the target group is taken into consideration to identify alternate job option that these respondents feel is viable to sustain. The responses so obtained would indicate why temping would or not be an aspired option during the recession times. temping refers to the process of working or hiring candidates on a temporary basis for certain job profiles. 13 .2 Section II – Off Beat Jobs Off Beat Jobs are the unconventional jobs profiles like disc jockey. But these perspectives are taken only from the student segments and the employer segment and not from the placement committee representatives since the views of the latter would be more in tandem with the student segment responses. These job profiles do not follow any trend. Whereas in the case of the other two segments every respondent is requested to answer this section.

1 : Gender Details Chart 4. We would now look into the findings of each of these segments accordingly. 57% of the respondents are females and 43% of the respondents in this segment are males.1 Student Segment The various findings in this segment are as listed below.1.1. 4. RESEARCH STUDY FINDINGS AND ANALYSIS Further to the interview process that was being conducted. 14 .  Gender Details Gender Male Female Count 43 57 Table 4.1 : Gender Details Distribution As shown above.4. the views of the various respondents from the three target groups are being tabulated and simultaneously a descriptive and factor analysis is performed to identify the results of the research study. The factor analysis is performed for two aspects each in the student segment and the employers segment while the descriptive analysis is performed for all the three segments.

1. 15 . Educational Background Count Education Background 23 Science 22 Commerce 8 Arts 3 Professional Course 12 Business Management Studies 14 Engineering 3 Technology 2 Mass Media 11 Medical Science 2 Fine Arts & Design Table 4.1. The major contribution came from Science and Commerce educational backgrounds.2: Details of the Educational Background Chart 4.2: Distribution of the Educational Background The pie chart above indicates the details of the respondents belonging to the various educational streams.

3: Recruitment Scenario in 2009 The above chart depicts the perception of the students about recruitment during recession in the current year of 2009. Of the 100 samples that were surveyed 78 respondents feel that they are worried about the recruitments happening in this year due to the impact of the existing recession. 16 . Recruitment Scenario in 2009 Count Recruitment Scenario in 2009 78 Students are worried 22 Students are not worried Table 4.1.1.3: Recruitment Scenario in 2009 Chart 4.

17 .4:Effect of Recession on the Industries/Sectors Chart 4.1.1.4 :Effect of Recession on the Industries/Sectors As seen above a majority of the student respondents are of the opinion that every sector in this scenario is affected and as a result it could be seen that recruitment scenario is also effected as per the earlier finding above. Effect of Recession on the Industries/Sectors Count Effect of Recession on the Industries/Sectors 64 Every Sector is affected 36 Only some sectors are affected Table 4.

1.5: Current Job scenario The above chat indicates as the aspects of a job in this present situation. And even if they happen to find a job. it would not be on par with their qualification also that job security and growth seem to be low. Among which the student respondents claim that it is tough getting a job in this situation.5: Current Job Scenario Count 73 52 47 44 58 49 Chart 4. Current Job Scenario Current Job Scenario Tough time getting a job Low job security No desired salary package No desired perks and benefits No on par job with the qualification Slow growth rate in the job Table 4.1. 18 .

 Preferred Industry Sectors Preferred Industry Sectors Advertising Animation Auto & Ancillary Aviation Banking Broadcasting Cinema Corporate Communications Designing Engineering Events Export & Import Services Financial Services Hotel Industry Human Resource Information Technology Insurance Journalism KPO Legal Services Logistics Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology Public Relations (NGO) Real Estate Retail Telecom Tourism Wellness Table 4.1.6:Preferred Industry Sectors Count 26 12 37 8 24 14 12 11 29 33 21 23 34 18 23 48 22 16 32 5 9 18 12 29 38 42 15 7 19 .

6: Preferred Industry Sectors Among the various preferred Industry sectors.1.Chart 4. Information Technology and Telecom industries are preferred most by the students. And subsequent to the retail and auto sectors 20 .

students want to work in the sectors for which they have a passion. 21 .1. Reasons for Industry Preference Reasons for Industry Preference Liking & passion Monetary Remuneration Perks & Fringe benefits Fast career growth Social Status Fulfill personal desires Job Security Family members in that Industry Table 4.1.7: Reasons for Industry Preference As seen in the above chart. benefited by good monetary remuneration and job security.7: Reasons for Industry Preference Count 76 73 43 56 49 39 62 53 Chart 4.

8: Cities with Better Job Options Mumbai. Delhi and Bangalore are the prime most preferred locations with better job opportunities with Chennai and Hyderabad being the next most preferred options. Cities with Better Job Options Cities with Better Job Options Mumbai Delhi Kolkata Chennai Bangalore Ahmedabad Guwahati Bhopal Baroda Hyderabad Indore Chandigarh Jaipur Lucknow Pune Table 4.8: Cities with Better Job Options Count 79 77 45 68 73 40 17 23 35 62 28 37 35 28 56 Chart 4.1.1. 22 .

1. Off Beat Jobs Off Beat Jobs Celebrity Management Disc Jockey (DJ) Computer Games Programmer Content Writer NGO Management Counseling Automobile Redesigning Event Management Astrophysics Language Interpreter Tours Management Pet Management & Training Wellness Management Special Effect Designer Tarot Card Reader/Astrology Body Art/Tattoo Wine Taster Radio Jockey (RJ) Mobile Phones Game Programmer Bartending Table 4.9: Off Beat Jobs Count 38 52 57 54 59 33 56 47 14 22 48 7 34 46 29 24 13 49 42 12 23 .

1.Chart 4. They claim that these of beat jobs could be a better source to earn income apart from the conventional jobs. 24 . Computer Games Programmer are more popular and the next being the disc jockey and auto redesigning being the popular.9: Off Beat Jobs When asked about the off beat jobs. the students opine that NGO management.

25 . Some of the possible reasons have been identified in the next aspect of the study. 59 students feel that they have preference towards venturing into off beat jobs which is a majority and remaining 41 students feel that it is not that good an option to be preferred. Preference towards Off Beat Jobs Preference towards Off Beat Jobs Yes No Table 4. The reasons for the same could be attributed to various influences.1.1.10: Preference towards Off Beat Jobs Count 59 41 Chart 4.10: Preference towards Off Beat Jobs Of the 100 respondents in this segment.

11: Reasons why Off Beat Jobs are Popular Chart 4. 56 A Part time option 58 Can Work from Home 45 Off Beat Jobs are Glamorous 47 High Snob Value 32 Social value 67 No specific job timings 56 Better avenues to earn 54 Better options to earn income 64 Fun at work 53 Fulfill their personal desires 52 Exhibit their passion Table 4.11: Reasons why Off Beat Jobs are Popular The predominant reasons in this off beat job being popular is attributed to the absence of specific timings and having fun at work as seen from the chart above. Talent etc. 26 .1. Reasons why Off Beat Jobs are Popular Count Reasons why Off Beat Jobs are popular 49 Exhibits Creativity.1.

1. 27 . Aversion towards Off Beat Jobs Aversion towards Off Beat Jobs Family interests Concerns of Work Culture Low Job Security No fixed routine Social Status Unfit for women sometimes Table 4.12: Aversion towards Off Beat Jobs Count 58 36 49 32 53 63 Chart 4.1.12: Aversion towards Off Beat Jobs The prime attributes for possessing an aversion towards these off beat job is being attributed to the family interests which tend to influence their decisions along with social status concerns and this type of profile being unfit for women.

28 . Here also there are certain attributes which try to influence the respondents whether to choose or not a free lance job option.1. The pie chart above indicates a very close choice of whether to be in favour or not. Free Lance Job Option Free Lance Job Options Yes No Table 4.13: Free Lance Job Option Considering the option of working on a free lance basis. Some of these attributes have been identified in the next aspect of the study.13: Free Lance Job Option Count 52 48 Chart 4.1. 52 respondents are in favour while the remaining 48 are not in favour of working on a free lance basis.

29 . followed by convenient work timings.14: Reasons for opting Free Lance Jobs Chart 4. the prime reason for opting a free lance job is that an individual could work for more than one employer. job comfort and absence of the conventional job routine in case of a regular job. Reasons for opting a Free Lance Jobs Count Reasons for opting Free Lance Jobs 68 Convenient timings 56 Better Family Responsibilities 64 No Conventional Job routine 54 Saves Traveling time 63 Job comfort 72 Work for more than one employer Table 4.1.14: Reasons for opting Free Lance Jobs As seen in the above bar chart.1.

72 of who feel it is not a convenient option and remaining 28 feel its better off to work even on a temporary basis.15: Working on a Temporary Basis Chart 4. Working on a Temporary Basis Count Working on a Temporary Basis 28 Yes 72 No Table 4. 30 . The same has been dealt in the following aspect of the study. There are certain reasons which are in favour and others which are not in favour of opting a temporary working option which is also known as temping.15: Working on a Temporary Basis From the above chart.1.1. it can be deduced that a majority of respondents don’t wish to work on a temporary basis.

1. followed by an urge to gain some wok experience and industry preference in which they would like to work.1. 31 . Reasons favoring Temping Reasons favoring Temping Long Term Commitments Industry Preferences People's Willingness Organization Policies A path to find a permanent job Experience Table 4.16: Reasons favoring Temping The predominant reason for taking up a temporary job is that it could lead a way for them to find a permanent job.16: Reasons favoring Temping Count 32 58 52 34 65 62 Chart 4.

1. and also would possess a less social status in opting for a temporary job.17: Reasons not favoring Temping Count 64 53 58 35 39 68 Table 4. 32 . perks etc. perks & benefits Don't fit into long tem plans of the organization No commitments No Career opportunity Table 4.1. Reasons not favoring Temping Reasons not favoring Temping Low job security Social Status Low salaries. the student respondents claim that temping does not lead to any career opportunity and at the same time they have low job security. low salaries.17: Reasons not favoring Temping Among reasons not favoring the temping.

18: Opinion on Working Women Among various opinions. Opinion on Working Women Opinion on Working Women Provide better life to their children A support to the spouse Confident about themselves Better managers than males Respected in the society Take decisions in the family Increase in the household income Table 4. 33 . the respondents view that a working women is more capable to take decisions in her family.1.1. Apart from these it is also considered that she could be confident in herself and could be better managers.18: Opinion on Working Women Count 42 34 46 46 23 52 54 Chart 4. complimented by the fact that she also supports the household income.

19 : Problems faced by Women Employees The main problems as claimed by the respondents are that it s tough for women employees to handle both work life and family life.19: Problems faced by Women Employees Chart 4. Problems faced by Women Employees Count Problems faced by Women Employees Families don't understand the importance of working 37 women 32 Chances of Sexual harassment at workplace 23 Gender discrimination 21 Certain communities don't respect women employees 43 Tough to manage both home & office work at same time 34 Sometimes males don't want to work under women bosses Table 4.1. And that the families don’t understand the importance of working women. 34 .1.

469 00:00:00.035K) bytes 35 . Factor Analysis – Facilities for Women employees in an Organization A factor analysis is being performed to analyze the parameters involved while choosing a job option by the student respondent. Factor Analysis Notes Output Created Comments Input Active Dataset Filter Weight Split File N of Rows in Working Data File Missing Value Handling Definition of Missing MISSING=EXCLUDE: User-defined missing values are treated as missing.438 7204 (7. Syntax FACTOR /VARIABLES A B C D E F G /MISSING LISTWISE /ANALYSIS A B C D E F G /PRINT INITIAL CORRELATION DET KMO REPR EXTRACTION ROTATION /PLOT EIGEN /CRITERIA MINEIGEN(1) ITERATE(25) /EXTRACTION PC /CRITERIA ITERATE(25) /ROTATION VARIMAX /METHOD=CORRELATION. DataSet1 <none> <none> <none> 55 17-May-2009 19:47:56 Resources Processor Time Elapsed Time Maximum Memory Required 00:00:00. Accordingly their choices are recorded on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being an option with which they completely agree and 1 being an option with which they completely disagree. Cases Used LISTWISE: Statistics are based on cases with no missing values for any variable used.

041 G -.037 -.136 .000 -.335 1.256 E .086 -.000 -.041 1.000 The above correlation matrix indicates as to how each of these factors are correlated to each other by indicating the correlation coefficients between one variable and every other variable.507 which is greater than 0.000 .045 1.019 -.453 21 .045 -.094 -.5 which indicates that the sampling adequacy is satisfactory.488 1.086 1.058 -.034 F -.134 -.054 .236 -.170 a D .270 -.000 .054 -.250 .156 .000 .156 B -.037 . Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. .091 -.136 .335 -.000 .058 C -.236 .270 -.134 -. Chi-Square Df Sig.427 . The values of these coefficients are relatively higher and lower as seen from the above matrix indicating that variables are moderately correlated to each other.170 -.507 36.033 . Determinant = .019 -.019 The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin(KMO) value is 0.427 1. 36 . KMO and Bartlett's Test Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.094 -.033 -.250 -.Correlation Matrix A Correlation A B C D E F G a.034 .091 1.256 -.

204 10.000 1.521 15.061 7.643 1.000 1.112 20.734 .436 1.512 .579 .930 92.758 1.613 14.758 1.000 1.613 Cumulative % 25.112 45.245 Total 1.481 7. For eg.857 Cumulative % 23. Total Variance Explained Extraction Sums of Squared Com pone nt 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total 1.494 . 77.465 44.449 85.991 100.093 Loadings % of Variance 25.009 Cumulative % 25.521 15.000 Total 1.180 Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings % of Variance 23. The Communalities table above indicates the variance in the factors (variables) that has been accounted for by the extracted factor.245 75.112 20.000 1.772 .465 1.388 61.731 . 37 .465 20.5% of the variance in A which corresponds to Flexible work timings is being taken into consideration.633 61.633 61.093 .000 Extraction .365 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.000 1.491 Initial Eigenvalues % of Variance 25.112 45.Communalities Initial A B C D E F G 1.994 .923 16.436 1.553 .000 1.245 xtraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.775 .

994 .436 1.930 92.093 .093 Loadings % of Variance 25.112 45.388 61.180 Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings % of Variance 23.061 Cumulative % 25.521 15.245 Total 1.465 20.449 85.465 44.112 20.633 61.758 1.643 1.923 16.112 20.521 15.245 75.465 1.734 .Total Variance Explained Extraction Sums of Squared Com pone nt 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total 1.436 1.481 7.112 45. 38 .633 61.991 Total 1.613 14.613 Cumulative % 25.245 The Total Variance shows eigen values which represent coverage of critical factors with first factor being important.494 Initial Eigenvalues % of Variance 25.758 1.857 Cumulative % 23.204 10.

39 .

343 -.606 .096 -.329 2 .001 -.512 a G -.144 .178 .035 -.357 .579 a -.274 -.063 -.162 .136 .314 .229 -.026 .731 a E .023 .096 .158 .091 .049 Component Matrix Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.077 .404 -.103 .493 .003 -.076 .136 .103 -.719 .183 .505 3 -.121 .357 -. 3 components extracted.183 .404 -.157 .299 .775 -.008 .248 -.008 .058 -.282 .063 .380 .095 .128 -.023 -.343 .128 .103 -.173 -.227 .282 -.092 .663 -.018 -.107 -.088 A B C D E F G .493 -.022 -.427 -.229 .121 -.248 -.270 .274 40 .314 .091 -.797 .606 .Component 1 A B C D E F G . Reproduced Correlations A Reproduced Correlation A B C D E F G Residual b B a C -.351 -.553 a F -.158 .173 .365 a .279 .103 -.017 -.003 . a.299 -.088 .427 -.433 .058 .001 -.270 .178 .092 .369 .022 .035 .718 -.095 -.245 .227 -.026 .818 .316 -.569 -.144 .264 .059 .017 .351 .772 a D -.076 -.157 .

05.Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. Reproduced communalities b.724 -. a.157 -.028 .315 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.609 .061 -. a.291 a 3 -. Similarly with the other two factors also where C is explained more in factor 2 and variable F is explained more in facto 3.287 .062 .453 .039 -. Rotation converged in 5 iterations. In factor 1. variable D & E (Transportation service & Less Out of Station travelling for women) is explained more.008 -.612 .071 -. Rotated Component Matrix Component 1 A B C D E F G . Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization. Residuals are computed between observed and reproduced correlations. In this case it consists of three factors because the other factors lie below the Eigen value 1as seen in the scree plot diagram The rotated component matrix indicates the loading of each variable in the three extracted factors. 41 .832 .032 -.851 .0%) nonredundant residuals with absolute values greater than 0. There are 16 (76.083 .370 -.425 2 -.874 . The Scree Plot also indicates the number of factors to be retained.

437 00:00:00. Factor Analysis – Factors considered while choosing a Job Option Note: For Factor Analysis each of the factors (variables) are indicated by alphabets A.414K) bytes 42 .438 5544 (5. The key for the same is as enclosed in the annexure part of the report.B..C etc. DataSet1 <none> <none> <none> 103 17-May-2009 19:45:23 Resources Processor Time Elapsed Time Maximum Memory Required 00:00:00. Cases Used LISTWISE: Statistics are based on cases with no missing values for any variable used. Factor Analysis Notes Output Created Comments Input Active Dataset Filter Weight Split File N of Rows in Working Data File Missing Value Handling Definition of Missing MISSING=EXCLUDE: User-defined missing values are treated as missing. to ease out in naming the same in the SPSS data view. Syntax FACTOR /VARIABLES A B C D E F /MISSING LISTWISE /ANALYSIS A B C D E F /PRINT INITIAL CORRELATION DET KMO REPR EXTRACTION ROTATION /PLOT EIGEN /CRITERIA MINEIGEN(1) ITERATE(25) /EXTRACTION PC /CRITERIA ITERATE(25) /ROTATION VARIMAX /METHOD=CORRELATION.

Correlation Matrix A Correlation A B C D E F a.958 1.811 .914 .905 .000 .959 .958 C a D . The values of these coefficients are higher as seen from the above matrix which implies that each of these factors are highly correlated to each other.965 . Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx.000 .000 .000 The above correlation matrix indicates as to how each of these factors are correlated to each other by indicating the correlation coefficients between one variable and every other variable. Determinant = 4.958 .905 1.924 1.000 .958 .959 .941 .981 .981 E .12E-007 1. .914 .000 .5 which indicates that the sampling adequacy is satisfactory.941 .924 .978 B .822 1.879 1.978 . Chi-Square Df Sig.822 .458E3 15 .929 1.840 .965 .981 .811 .929 F .879 which is greater than 0.981 .840 .000 The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin(KMO) value is 0. 43 . KMO and Bartlett's Test Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.

835 . For eg.Initial A B C D E F 1.757 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.278 .325 .5% of the variance in A which corresponds to organization job profile is being taken into consideration.000 1.000 Extraction Sums of Squared Loadings Total 5.034 .945 . The Communalities table above indicates the variance in the factors (variables) that has been accounted for by the extracted factor. In this case there is only one factor as seen in the above table.020 .031 .219 Cumulative % 93. 94. The Total Variance table above shows Eigen Values which represent the extent of coverage of critical factors included in the factor analysis.628 .385 98.000 Extraction .959 Communality Matrix Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.979 .956 .948 99.563 .509 .456 99. Total Variance Explained Compon ent 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total 5.000 1. 44 .013 Initial Eigenvalues % of Variance 93.757 98.625 .000 1.000 1.757 4.781 100.625 % of Variance 93.757 Cumulative % 93.000 1.951 .

975 .The Scree Plot helps us to decide on the number of factors that has to be retained. Component Matrix a Component 1 A B C D E F .979 45 .978 .989 . In the above case it is only since from value 2 onwards the graph begins to even out which is not considered.914 .972 .

951 a .953 .026 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.002 -.904 . The component matrix indicates the loading of each variable in the extracted factors.078 .055 .004 .891 .030 -.950 .011 -.904 .078 .956 a F .955 -.023 -.0%) nonredundant residuals with absolute values greater than 0.959 a .969 -.05.953 .889 .006 -. There are 3 (20. 1 components extracted.5.Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.071 .034 -.034 .029 A B C D E F -.967 .026 .965 . Reproduced Correlations A Reproduced Correlation A B C D E F Residual b B .945 a C .950 .967 .955 .894 .025 -.962 .894 .030 -.029 .023 -.889 .835 a E .962 . a. 46 .948 .025 .001 -.055 -.965 .957 . Residuals are computed between observed and reproduced correlations.891 .002 -.049 -.952 .049 -. a.952 .895 -. In the above case all the six variables are being contributed by the factor since their values are all greater than 0.895 .004 -.011 -.979 a D . Reproduced communalities b.001 .957 .948 .006 .969 .071 .

4.2 Employers Segment The various findings for the employer segment are as listed below.  Impact of Recession on Recruitments
Impact of Recession on Recruitments Yes No Count 86 14

Table 4.2.1: Impact of Recession on Recruitments

Chart 4.2.1: Impact of Recession on Recruitments As seen from the employers’ perspective, 90% of the respondents are of the view that their recruitment process is affected by the ongoing recession period.

47

Employment Levels affected due to Recession
Employment Levels affected due to Recession Lower Level Middle Level Higher Level Count 80 65 36

Table 4.2.2: Employment Levels affected due to Recession

Chart 4.2.2: Employment Levels affected due to Recession

As seen from the above chart, the effect of recession on recruitments is the highest at the lower level of employment, relatively lower at the middle level and it is least affected at the higher level of employment.

48

Duration of the Recession
Duration of the Recession Till March 2009 Till June 2009 Till September 2009 Till December 2009 Till 2010 Beyond 2010 Count 0 16 18 25 37 4

Table 4.2.3: Duration of the Recession

Chart 4.2.3: Duration of the Recession

Most of the respondents in this segment claim that the recession would last till the end of 2010 as a result of which they would experience a slow rate of recruitment process till this period.

49

Sources for Recruitments
Sources for Recruitments Placement agencies Newspapers, Journals Websites Direct Resumes from Candidates Campus Recruitment Referrals Count 67 56 48 52 80 78

Table 4.2.4: Sources for Recruitments

Chart 4.2.4: Sources for Recruitments As depicted in the above chart, the main sources for recruitments as per the respondents appear to be through campus placement, referrals and placement agencies.

50

5: Hiring on Temporary Basis From the perspective of an employer. 66 out of 100 respondents agree to the aspect of hiring candidates on temporary basis. 51 . there could be certain deciding parameters on which the employers are favorable to hiring candidates on temporary basis.5: Hiring on Temporary Basis Chart 4.2. most of the respondents are in favor of hiring candidates on temporary basis. In case also. The same is being discussed in the next aspect of our study. Hiring on Temporary Basis Hiring on Temporary Basis Agree Disagree Count 66 34 Table 4.2.

2. 52 . a majority of them claim that hiring on temporary basis helps them in project based works to complete their deadlines. Reasons for Hiring on Temporary Basis These following options are asked only to those respondents who preferred to hiring candidates on temporary basis Reasons for Hiring on Temporary Basis Incurs Less Overheads Lay off can be Easy for Temps Helps a lot for works based on Project Basis Yes 38 46 52 No 28 20 14 Table 4.2. And the next reason is that they could be laid off easily when there is not much a scope for them in their organization.6: Reasons for Hiring on Temporary Basis Chart 4.6: Reasons for Hiring on Temporary Basis Of the respondents who were in favor of hiring on temporary basis.

Off Beat Jobs Celebrity Management Disc Jockey (DJ) Computer Games Programmer Content Writer NGO Management Counseling Automobile Redesigning Event Management Astrophysics Language Interpreter Tours Management Pet Management & Traning Wellness Management Special Effect Designer Tarot Card Reader/Astrology Body Art/Tattoo Wine Taster Radio Jockey (RJ) Mobile Phones Game Programmer Bartending Count 42 68 78 23 33 12 42 55 15 9 18 6 8 74 5 4 9 46 52 27 Table 4. Off Beat Jobs The employers in this case are asked as to how many such off beat jobs are they aware of as in which of these did they feel is more popular.7: Off Beat Jobs 53 .2.

54 .2.Chart 4. They also felt that these could be the better of profiles among the non conventional jobs where by a candidate could try and venture into making a part time job.7: Off Beat Jobs The most popular off beat jobs that the employers feel are computer games programmer and the special effects designer followed by disc jockey.

2. Status of Women Employees Status of Woman Employees No Problem in Hiring Married Woman Prefer Only Single Woman No Such Preference Count 30 6 64 Table 4.8:Status of Woman Employees Chart 4. 55 .8:Status of Woman Employees Most of the employers are of the view that they don’t have any such preference about hiring either a woman employee being married or single.2.

2. 56 .9: Women as Bosses As indicated in the above chart. On the other hand they disagree to the point that women don’t want to work under women bosses and also that company doesn’t promote women to higher positions within the organization. a majority of the respondents do agree that women make good bosses. Women as Bosses Women as Bosses Make Good Bosses Men don't work under Women Bosses Women don't work under Women Bosses Company doesn't promote Women to higher positions Agree 63 54 32 48 Disagree 37 46 68 52 Table 4. Marginally they agree that men don’t want to work under women bosses.9: Women as Bosses Table 4.2.

087 .161 .093 .142 .257 .320 .084 E .325 .087 .023 .417 .454 .082 D .385 .130 .034 .198 I .094 K .231 .420 .231 .334 .138 .270 .007 .363 .264 .198 .192 .117 .007 .176 .000 The KMO value is 0.023 .363 .402 . Factor Analysis – Preferred Characteristics of Candidates while Recruiting Factor Analysis KMO and Bartlett's Test Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.255 .346 .358 .274 .420 .220 .000 B .202 .089 .097 .358 . 57 .310 .023 .043 .082 .096 .264 .161 .175 .176 .084 .023 .051 .093 .051 .034 L .192 .000 .102 .041 .094 . Also the Correlation matrix indicating the correlation coefficients which indicate correlation between each of them.500 .476 .096 .370 .274 .5 which indicates that the sampling adequacy is satisfactory.216 .334 .255 .394 .202 .225 .454 .402 .000 Correlation Matrix A Sig.320 .454 .000 J .002 .270 G .394 .220 .325 .476 .170 .225 .454 .216 .487 .170 .454 .088 .117 C .185 .089 .097 . Chi-Square df Sig.500 .500 .055 .578 which is greater than 0.094 .041 .094 .002 F .680 66 .138 .043 .130 .310 .365 . Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx.370 .500 .102 .385 .091 .175 .055 .091 .365 .487 .417 . .088 .142 .346 .000 .185 .000 H .257 . (1-tailed) A B C D E F G H I J K L .578 132.454 .

263 10.602 12.967 .314 12.686 1.131 69.197 10.000 1.524 76. 1.852 26.472 52.000 1.822 14.468 Cumulative % 13.835 .Communalities Initial A B C D E F G H I J K L Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.055 6.478 82.773 .621 93.750 .720 .822 14.700 4.469 14.422 Cumulative % Total 14.469 1.131 .361 9.469 1.668 .478 52.000 Extraction .000 1.047 1.662 29.921 88.833 Cumulative % Total Loadings % of Variance 14.686 1.517 41.954 6.000 1.822 1.243 1.422 8.764 .588 .779 29.455 58 .352 .472 1.443 5.426 .752 41.000 1.684 .490 38.424 1.635 .627 Total Variance Explained Extraction Sums of Squared Initial Eigenvalues % of Component Total 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1.679 .424 1.000 1.256 Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings % of Variance 13.779 1.361 9.047 1.000 1.243 61.263 10.000 1.001 61.505 .464 61.580 Variance 14.000 1.639 12.852 12.752 1.660 .602 12.000 1.822 1.805 51.000 1.

11 12 . The Communalties table indicates the extent to which the variance in the variables has been accounted for by the extracted factors.361 3.000 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. 59 .538 3.425 . predominant being K & H (Clears the aptitude test & Active in extra curricular activities).008 96.992 100. The total variance matrix indicates Eigen values representing the extent of coverage of critical factors included in the factor analysis.

266 .549 .083 -.000 -.046 .135 -.159 .519 .052 .078 .291 -.188 .654 .530 .182 3 .Component Matrix a Component 1 A B C D E F G H I J K L .219 -.169 .608 -.735 -.328 .620 -.220 -.254 -.844 .108 .007 -.447 .095 .362 .186 -.747 .180 -.103 .328 -.186 -.119 .097 -.282 5 .312 .219 -.056 -.348 .177 .223 -.683 .067 .794 .033 -.142 -.185 .115 -.167 a 60 .275 .155 -.092 .051 .578 .462 -.065 -.244 -.545 .110 .102 -.024 4 -.214 -.372 .060 .032 . Rotated Component Matrix Component 1 A B C D E F G H I J K L .394 .024 -.010 .320 .145 .004 .110 -.232 .184 .609 .165 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.132 -.235 .060 .093 -.795 .012 .293 -. a.242 .820 .077 .752 2 -.108 -.131 4 -.156 .686 2 .463 -.226 .150 .490 .428 .005 .381 .686 . 5 components extracted.182 -.252 -.281 -.216 .162 .798 .704 -.141 -.718 .168 3 .127 -.084 .108 .068 5 -.208 .235 .213 -.106 .

Rotation converged in 8 iterations.5 are not preferable. The concept is same with respect to the Component Matrix as well. a. The loading values less than 0. 61 . Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. The Rotated Component Matrix indicates the loadings of the variables in each of the 5 extracted factors.

009 .097 .009 .000 .008 .029 .189 -.048 .147 1.012 -.188 .097 -.000 .059 -.073 .185 -.083 .137 1.067 -.018 .398 -.150 E -.031 .086 -.398 .359 -.185 .065 .059 -.084 .036 1.074 1.059 .212 .232 . The Correlation matrix indicates the correlation coefficients which implies the correlation between each of them.036 B C D .359 1.086 .398 1.398 1.000 -.182 .012 -.036 -.161 -.084 .000 .066 .000 a. Determinant = .096 -.065 .185 .021 -.103 .398 .036 -.012 .000 -.086 I J -.076 -.000 -.234 .164 .232 -.196 .000 -.161 -.069 -.182 .103 .067 .125 .049 -.043 L M N O .067 .398 -.096 1.014 .097 .222 .049 1.021 -. 62 .000 .064 .048 .047 .018 -.156 .045 .000 -.000 .167 .049 1.150 -.021 .190 .083 1.085 .012 -.164 .398 G -.000 .222 -.059 1.222 -.086 .112 -.036 -.042 -.212 -.398 .114 -.013 -.018 -.086 .034 .035 .147 .126 .069 -.000 . This matrix is not positive definite.222 -.185 -.009 .021 -.065 .116 .096 .074 .081 .000 .318 -.383 .234 .059 P -.073 .044 -.018 -.133 .076 .088 -.065 -.090 -.b I J K L M N O P Correlation A 1.003 .163 .000 b.116 .000 .042 .085 .044 .097 .214 1.125 .049 -.003 .057 .014 -.150 -.034 -.188 .035 -.087 -.318 .043 -.000 .036 .083 .090 .057 .061 .090 K -.125 -.134 .061 .126 .000 -.000 .017 .000 .214 .084 -.013 .045 -.066 -.383 1.083 .137 .090 -.000 -.114 -.035 -.179 -.018 .008 .035 -.164 .061 .231 .163 .057 -.231 1.057 .069 -.087 -.081 .067 .040 .017 .112 .069 .050 .043 -.096 1.190 -.057 .057 -.043 -.164 F .048 .161 .134 .018 .036 -.064 .156 -.066 -.050 .048 1.196 -.167 .066 .084 .029 .040 -.103 .179 -.000 H -.061 .125 -.047 -.036 .189 -.000 .066 -.150 -.059 1. Factor Analysis – Qualities of Women Employees Factor Analysis Correlation Matrix A B C D E F G H a.088 .009 .031 -.196 -.103 .161 .066 .133 .196 .086 1.

000 1.959 .512 .000 1. 63 .688 .000 1.000 1.892 .000 1.741 .000 1.000 1.705 .000 1.940 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.940 .000 1.462 .000 1.000 1.699 .Communalities Initial A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P 1.529 .527 .000 1.959 .646 .658 .000 Extraction .000 1.000 1.631 .000 1.

000 1.000 1.000 1.000 Extraction .631 .699 .646 .000 1. predominant being F & M (Women Employees Don’t Hop jobs & they treat profession as only a job and not as a career).512 .462 .527 .892 .000 1.000 1.000 1.959 .000 1.940 The Communalties table indicates the extent to which the variance in the variables has been accounted for by the extracted factors.000 1.000 1.741 .658 .705 .529 .Communalities Initial A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P 1.000 1.000 1.000 1. 64 .000 1.940 .959 .000 1.688 .

369E-15 100.477 .756 .592 97.654 9.483 55.969 6.876 .020 1.459 12.487 87.556 9. 65 .214 94.544 58.738 1.904 64.511 6.705 50.804 1.689 50.424 -9.810 1. The total variance matrix indicates Eigen values representing the extent of coverage of critical factors included in the factor analysis.225 1.640 .214 91.834 .225 1.830 46.625 10.072 7. with the first factor being important.053 .451 58.276 82.645E-17 Cumulative % Total Loadings % of Variance 18.321 1.511 6.984 2.727 4.118 31.035 10.109 -2.904 6.625 10.543E17 16 -3.576 100.579 5.540 .202 65.738 1.931 Cumulative % 13.084 2.000 18.000 100.953 2.274 36.654 9.084 2.105 71.507 65.451 1.953 31.579 Cumulative % Total Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings % of Variance 13.459 2.105 1.790E16 Variance 18.202 1.459 2.086 41.239 13.810 1.804 1.321 1.Total Variance Explained Extraction Sums of Squared Initial Eigenvalues % of Component 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Total 2.072 7.388 -1.020 41.904 6.053 77.653 9.472 5.705 1.378 2.421 8.873 71.000 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.459 12.000 3.435 71.239 26.804 18.211 4.

250 .473 -.364 .302 4 -.170 .041 .020 .245 -.821 2 .152 -.516 -.Component Matrix a Component 1 A B C D E F G .210 -.068 .792 .149 -.545 .123 5 .131 .137 -.258 3 -.342 .206 -.393 .179 -.133 .174 .152 .061 .076 66 .182 6 .080 -.028 -.142 .492 .511 .154 .271 -.028 .512 -.243 -.231 7 .407 .261 .825 .012 .406 .256 .171 .130 .

734 .044 -.515 -.056 -.302 -.016 .013 -.144 .821 -.157 .024 -.379 -.056 -.067 4 -.221 .069 -.026 -.124 .249 .092 .061 .258 .097 -.174 -.017 -.016 -.282 .150 .279 .289 .715 .069 .017 -.088 .078 .038 .044 -.187 .512 -.151 -.063 -.255 -.034 -.034 -.716 .054 .269 -.044 .198 .023 .057 .046 .036 .027 -.050 .047 -.829 -.149 -.308 .049 .054 .044 6 -.272 .136 .140 -.305 .058 -.008 -.044 .061 .074 -.H I J K L M N O P -.076 .070 -.064 .175 -. a.391 .067 .087 .044 -.016 .108 -.214 .218 .137 .392 .139 .040 .393 -.218 .628 . 7 components extracted.665 .182 .045 .022 .243 .948 .136 .258 .185 .642 .081 .088 .818 -.151 -.486 .060 -.067 -.131 -.001 -.076 -.021 .031 .054 67 .937 .040 .591 -.374 -.218 .123 -.057 -.825 .010 -.449 -.170 .135 -.290 .651 .054 .089 -.139 7 .104 -.054 .224 -.006 -.000 -.013 -.451 .641 -.199 -.137 .072 -.140 .238 .658 .912 .133 . Rotated Component Matrix Component 1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P .477 .007 -.292 -.076 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.039 .062 .106 .016 .260 .364 .101 -.119 -.054 -.145 .375 -.912 3 .585 -.231 .785 -.119 a 5 -.137 -.170 .046 -.158 -.255 2 -.948 -.136 -.174 .204 -.

374 -.258 .249 .174 -.016 .119 -.022 .272 .139 .214 .054 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.175 -.715 .104 -.034 -.185 .060 -.044 .013 -.221 .044 -. The concept is same with respect to the Component Matrix as well. a.044 .912 .021 .108 -.136 .010 -.088 .076 .054 .076 -.151 -.057 .016 .047 -.054 .056 -.046 -.151 -.064 .067 -.170 .040 .074 -.641 -.054 -.008 -. 68 .937 .144 .078 .198 .289 .062 .785 -.451 .157 . The Rotated Component Matrix indicates the loadings of the variables in each of the 7 extracted factors.087 .050 .585 -.040 .067 .199 -. The loading values less than 0.829 -.124 .260 .039 .224 -.818 -.013 -.067 4 -.016 -.255 2 -.218 .658 .912 3 . Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.092 .174 .036 .734 .218 . Rotation converged in 10 iterations.279 .255 -.187 .089 -.292 -.449 -.948 .023 .477 .031 .054 .379 -.5 are not preferable.063 -.139 7 .058 -.016 .070 -.665 .017 -.948 -.024 -.119 a 5 -.069 -.046 .Rotated Component Matrix Component 1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P .097 -.088 .034 -.044 6 -.017 -.069 .204 -.049 .

3 Placement Committee Representative  Number of companies recruiting this year No.3.4.1: No. of companies recruiting this year in our college The above chart clearly indicates that the number of companies recruiting this year in the colleges has decreased owing to the impact of recession in the current year. 69 .1: No. of companies recruiting this year in our college Chart 4. of companies recruiting this year in the college Less this year More this year Same as last year Count 8 0 2 Table 4.3.

2: Industries/Sectors visiting the college 70 . Industries/Sectors visiting the college Sectors/Industries Visiting the College Advertising Animation Auto & Ancillary Aviation Banking Broadcasting Cinema Corporate Communications Designing Engineering Events Export & Import Services Financial Services Hotel Industry Human Resource Information Technology Insurance Journalism KPO Legal Services Logistics Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology Public Relations (NGO) Real Estate Retail Telecom Tourism Wellness Count 2 1 3 0 3 0 0 2 4 7 1 0 5 3 4 8 3 0 7 0 3 3 0 2 3 6 0 2 Table 4.3.

Telecom.Chart 4.2: Industries/Sectors visiting the college The major industries that visit the colleges are from the IT. KPO and engineering Sectors as seen n the chat above.3. 71 .

 Reasons for deciding on a sector Reasons for deciding a Sector/Industry Safe even during recession Better growth opportunity Overseas opportunity New sectors Upcoming sectors Offer good remuneration.3: Reasons for deciding a Sector/Industry Chart 4. Predominantly they prefer a sector which is safe even n the event of a recession complimented with a good wok culture. Sectors in which friends.3: Reasons for deciding a Sector/Industry The distribution of preferences of the respondents is as shown in the above chart. teachers etc. families are working Yes 10 8 6 5 6 7 9 6 7 5 8 4 No 0 2 4 5 4 3 1 4 3 5 2 6 Table 4.. 72 .3.3. perks etc… Good work culture Fulfillment of personal desires High aspiration Value Based on the Aptitude Suggestions from friends.

73 . of Students placed this year 100% 50%-99% 25%-49% Less than 25% Count 2 4 3 1 Table 4.4. of students to be placed this year It can be seen that the number of students to be placed are more predominant in the range of 25% to 99% indicating that the colleges also have a tough chance of getting their students placed. of students to be placed this year Chart 4.4.4: Expected no.4: Expected no. Expected number of students to be placed this year Expected No.

5: Cities with Better Job Options 74 .4. Cities with better Job Options Cities With Better Job Options Mumbai Delhi Kolkata Chennai Bangalore Ahmedabad Guwahati Bhopal Baroda Hyderabad Indore Chandigarh Jaipur Lucknow Pune Count 10 9 5 7 8 5 1 3 4 7 5 4 3 3 6 Table 4.

4.Chart 4. Mumbai is preferred as the best destination for job options.5 : Cities with Better Job Options Even in the case of this segment also. 75 . followed by Delhi and Bangalore.

6: Sources for Information on Current Employment The best option as per this segment would be through the internet and company websites and also through their alumni sources. Sources for Information on Current Employment Sources for Information on Current Employment Through Peers Newspapers & Magazines Through their Alumni Consult with the head hunters Through Internet/Company Websites Through Televisions Through HR Department of organizations Agree 5 6 7 6 8 6 7 Disagree 5 4 3 4 2 4 3 Table 4.4. The above chart shows as to how many are in favor and how many are not in favor of these sources for information gathering about companies.6: Sources for Information on Current Employment Chart 4. 76 .4.

4.7: Off Beat Jobs 77 . Off Beat Jobs Off Beat Jobs Celebrity Management Disc Jockey (DJ) Computer Games Programmer Content Writer NGO Management Counseling Automobile Redesigning Event Management Astrophysics Language Interpreter Tours Management Pet Management & Training Wellness Management Special Effect Designer Tarot Card Reader/Astrology Body Art/Tattoo Wine Taster Radio Jockey (RJ) Mobile Phones Game Programmer Bartending Count 4 7 5 2 2 1 5 3 2 1 1 1 3 6 1 3 2 6 5 3 Table 4.

78 . it shows that computer games programmer as a good option to explore into.4.Chart 4. As per this chart.7: Off Beat Jobs The above chart depicts as to the off beat jobs that this segment believes to be popular and such of these off beat jobs a viable option to venture into.

4. 7 out of 10 respondents prefer to work on free lance basis given an option.8: Preference to Work from Home on Free Lance Basis Chart 4.8: Preference to Work from Home on Free Lance Basis As per the above pie chart. 79 . Preference to work from home on Free Lance Basis Preference to Work from Home on Free Lance Count Basis Yes 7 No 3 Table 4.4.

9: Preference of Women in Off Beat Jobs Count 6 1 3 4 4 3 0 5 1 4 5 4 5 2 3 2 1 5 2 0 80 . Preference of Women in Off Beat Jobs Preference of Women in Off Beat Jobs Celebrity Management Disc Jockey (DJ) Computer Games Programmer Content Writer NGO Management Counseling Automobile Redesigning Event Management Astrophysics Language Interpreter Tours Management Pet Management & Training Wellness Management Special Effect Designer Tarot Card Reader/Astrology Body Art/Tattoo Wine Taster Radio Jockey (RJ) Mobile Phones Game Programmer Bartending Table 4.4.

Chart 4. 81 .9: Preference of Women in Off Beat Jobs As seen in the above chart. event management and tours management.4. respondents are of the opinion that women can best fit into being a celebrity management followed by options of radio jockey.

they would be skeptical about their thoughts. a factor analysis was also performed using the SPSS to identify the key factors. 82 . This as a result would lead to inapt data being captured in the survey process. As far as the research study is concerned t has certain limitations as well. Accordingly a few suggestions have been implied. The limitations of the study and further suggestions to improve the trends of the recruitment have been discussed below. there is always a hope to revive the regular trends of recruitment processes. But nevertheless about the research study.1 Limitations of the Study One of the prime limitations of this project study is that. Sometimes it so happens that the respondent is unable to get a clarity on the question that s being asked and hence thee could be a possibility of misperception. 5. Also in certain cases. since the respondent’s feedback and values are being exposed to the media in the project. subsequent to which inappropriate data would be obtained. All these findings have proved that indeed recession has had its effect on the current recruitment trends in the various industries. Hence the same could be reflected in the data that is being collected as the respondent might not reveal the complete ideas and thoughts in the questionnaires. CONCLUSION The various findings and data of this research study have been tabulated and depicted through the charts.5. This problem would be mainly attributed in the process of conducting the interview with the employer segment since they happen to represent the organization on the whole and so they are concerned about their organization’s values and corporate values. Subsequent to the same. the respondent would not have the appropriate time to spend in the interview process due to which there could be a possibility of falsifying their views to save their time.

it's wise to look at ways they can share both knowledge and resources. During tougher times recruiters need to be smart and get themselves deeper into the fit gap process and ensure win . During the boom there were a lot of open positions and even more candidates available so the match making activity was comparatively easy and largely govern by the good sentiments in the market. Following which a few suggestions have been identified which are as listed below.2 Suggestions Further to the analysis and findings from this research study we could as well suggest a few thoughts as to how to improve the recruitments in this scenario. An organization must consider its cost per hire.5.win situation for the client and the candidate Revising the recruiting targets: A different situation means a different focus for those     involved in recruiting and it's important that those signing off budgets and checking progress are aware of this. time to hire and retention rates to determine how they can display that they are having positive results despite the general downturn in business. 83 .  Closely monitoring the way each industry is changing in current times and the way companies within the industries are changing their hiring strategy Look out for companies who are brave and would consider recession as the right time to recruit good quality talent at the right price.  Combine resources: If a company owns a large business that generally manages hiring needs on a local level. Lean from such of these companies to improve the recruitment strategy If an individual tries to enhance his/her capabilities and talents. It may be the case that one location struggling while the another is thriving and is in need of help with their recruitment campaigns. then he/she would be a better option for the recruiters to consider Training the recruiters in the organizations to be tactically smart and agile in their actions.

com/Content/Mar42009/avenues20090303121841.com – Dated May 8.BIBLIOGRAPHY Primary Data  Through structured questionnaire for each of the segments as enclosed in the annexure Secondary Data  Websites http://www.mid-day. 2009 http://forums. “Marketing Research “.com/item.financialexpress.imrbint.Dated: May 8.html Dated: April 16.htmDated: May 2.oneindia. An Applied Orientation (May 14.asp .elinfonet.com/news/entrylevel-recruitment-in-it-bpo-sectors-to-registerflat-growth/295839/ .aspx?654153 .uk/hr/hr-best-practices/recruiting-hiring-advice/acquiring-jobcandidates/. 2009 http://news. 638-663 84 . 2009 http://www.outlookindia.Dated: April 24.in/2009/02/17/recession-has-hit-it-hiring-india.deccanherald.net/group-discussion-topics/54132-effect-recessionindia.co. 2009 http://hiring.html Dated: May 6.aspx – Dated: April 12.Dated: April 8. 2009 http://www.com/blog/index/wiki/Current_Trends_Influencing_Recruitment_and_R etention_Efforts/ . 2009).sureshkumar. 2009 http://news.com/news/layoff-recession-india-inc-job-cut-hiring.Dated: May 7.monster. 2009 www. 2009 http://www. Factor Analysis: Pg. 2009  Books Naresh K Malhotra.