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Boeing QRH Familiarization Handout for 737

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Goals and use of this document
The goals of this document are to provide a description of Non-Normal Checklist (NNC) features and describe their use in flight operations. It is divided into two sections: Section I provides background about the design of the non-normal checklists and describes the goals of checklist features. It contains a detailed description of the process for running non-normal checklists in flight operations and provides a brief overview of key features in the NNCs. Section II provides detailed examples of the structure of the Quick Reference Handbook (QRH), checklist features, formats and symbols as they appear in actual checklists in the QRH. Here you will find detailed descriptions of how the QRH and NNCs are used in flight operations, including roles and responsibilities of the Pilot Flying (PF) and Pilot Monitoring (PM). Use of this document If you are using the electronic version of this document you will find embedded links that enable you to navigate between sections. If you are using the paper version, these same sections are clearly labeled to aid navigation between pages. A full description of how to navigate between sections of this document is found on page 3. Note: In the event of a conflict, the procedures published in the Flight Crew Operations Manual or Flight Crew Training Manual take precedence over information presented in this document.

Goals and use of this document
Section I - Overview 1. Introduction

1

2 3 4

2. Overview of Symbols and Formatting
3. Non-Normal Checklist Process A. Fly the airplane; assess the situation B. Do memory items

Section II - Checklist Features and Examples C. Get the Checklist
D. Verify the Checklist
E. Do the Checklist

5 8 9 13 14

F. Complete the Checklist
G. Do the Deferred Items

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 1

Section I - Overview

1. Introduction
Boeing has recently introduced the latest version of the Quick Reference Handbook (QRH). This version is the latest in a series of revisions to the QRH format and is the result of extensive research and feedback from our customers. The goals of these revisions are to: • improve crew performance • reduce opportunities for crew error • improve crew coordination • reduce crew workload and stress. The QRH meets these goals by: • improving indexes to make checklists easier to locate • providing information to help crews verify they have located the correct checklist • making different types of information visually distinct • making decision choices easier to identify and navigate • making it easier for crews to keep place in the checklist • improving navigation within checklists and the QRH • identifying consequences of inoperative items caused by a non-normal situation • identifying changes to normal checklists caused by a non-normal situation • identifying potential consequences of critical steps before action is taken • confirming critical action steps. For those who have used the previous Boeing QRH, most of the technical information in the non-normal checklists has not changed. For most non-normal checklists, you will perform the same steps as in the previous QRH. The goal of this revision is to present those steps and any supporting information in a clear, easy-to-read format. Technical changes to the QRH are identified by a revision bar in the margin.

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 2

Section I - Overview

2. Overview of Symbols and Formatting
This version of the QRH uses a variety of symbols and formatting features. Examples of these symbols and features are provided below. Samples of these symbols and formatting features as they appear in actual checklists, along with detailed explanations about how to use them, are presented in Section II. Key symbols in the QRH Light symbol- Indicates the light(s) the crew can expect to see during the non-normal condition. Redirection - Indicates you should go to another step within a checklist, or go to another checklist in the QRH. Decision choice - A diamond symbol marks each choice in a decision step. Precaution - Shaded triangle with an exclamation point (!) comes before an action step to alert you to important information about the action you are about to take. Continued - Indicates that the current checklist is continued from the previous page. Appears at the top of the continuing page(s).

Warning! Warning - Double lines (red, if the checklist is printed in color) above and below any Warning in a checklist.

Caution! Caution - A single line (amber, if checklist is printed in color) above and below any Caution statements in a checklist.

End of checklist - Indicates all necessary checklist steps have been completed. Key formatting features in the QRH Shading highlights different types of information. Bold - font highlights key words. Task Header - Identifies where a section of related steps begins and ends. 1 Numbers identify first-level checklist steps.

Continued - Indicates that the current checklist has more steps on the next page. Appears at the bottom of the page.

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 3

Section I - Overview

3. Non-Normal Checklist Process
The process of using the Boeing QRH and the NNCs is designed to provide a basis for standardization. Regardless of which airplane model is being flown, the process for handling a non-normal situation should be the same. This process is shown in Figure 1 below. When a crewmember recognizes a non-normal situation, that crewmember calls it out clearly and precisely. The PF should continue to fly the airplane while the situation is assessed. (Step A in the process diagram below) At the direction of the pilot flying, both crewmembers do all memory items in their areas of responsibility without delay. (Step B in the process diagram below). The pilot flying calls for the checklist, by title, when the flight path is under control, the airplane is not in a critical phase of flight (such as takeoff or landing), and all memory items are complete. Upon completion of the memory items, the appropriate checklist is located and verified. (Steps C and D below). Once the checklist is located and verified, the pilot monitoring first verifies that each memory item has been done and the subsequent reference item actions are taken. (Steps E through G below). All actions must be coordinated under the captain's supervision and done in a deliberate, systematic manner. Flight path control must never be compromised. It is expected that all crews flying Boeing airplanes will be trained in the use of this process.

How to use this document The following pages illustrate and describe the checklist features that support the steps in the Non-Normal Checklist Process shown in Figure 1. The illustrations of QRH features also include discussions of how you will use these features when running a non-normal checklist on the flight deck. Electronic version of this document: If you are viewing this document electronically, you can click on the text of steps C through G in the process diagram and be linked directly to the description of the QRH features that support that step. Some of the steps in this process have more than one page of illustrations and descriptions. Paper version of this document: If you are using a paper copy of this document, note the letter and title associated with the step in the process diagram (Figure 1). For steps C through G , turn to the page(s) that match the letter and title of the desired step to see the description of the QRH features that support it. Some of the steps in this process have more than one page of illustrations and descriptions.

A
Fly the airplane; assess the situation

B
Do memory items

C
Get the checklist

D
Verify the checklist

E
Do the checklist

F
Complete the checklist

G
Do the deferred items

Figure 1. Non-Normal Checklist Process
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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 4

Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

C Get the Checklist (1 of 3)
Indexes. There are four (4) indexes available to use when searching for a checklist in the QRH. All indexes are located at the front of the QRH. Having all indexes in one location eliminates the need to search the QRH to find an index. Having all indexes at the front of the QRH also makes them more visible to you and reminds you of all the indexes available. When the PF calls for the checklist, the PM can use these indexes to search for the checklist. The four (4) indexes are: Quick Action Index (QAI), Lights index, Unannunciated index and Alphabetical index. The Quick Action Index is located on the front cover of the QRH (see below). The other three (3) indexes are located after the QAI and are clearly marked with individual tabs. The details of these indexes are presented on the next page. In all indexes, checklists that correspond to a light, an alert, or other indication will appear in UPPER CASE. Checklists that do not correspond to a light, alert or other indication appear in Upper and Lower Case.

Quick Action Index (QAI)
Lights

• The QAI is one of the methods the PM can use to find a checklist called for by the PF. • The QAI lists the titles of all checklists that have memory items and checklists that the crew needs to complete in a timely manner. • Checklists are listed alphabetically. • Some QAI titles are shown in a larger font size to make them easier to read under conditions where you may be wearing an oxygen mask or smoke goggles or under conditions of reduced visibility. • QAI checklists are also listed in all applicable indexes (Lights, Unannunciated, Alphabetical) and system section Tables of Contents.

Lights tab

Unannunciated Alphabetical

Unannunciated tab

Alphabetical tab

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 5

Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

C Get the Checklist (2 of 3)
Indexes. There are three (3) indexes located after the Quick Action Index: Lights, Unannunciated and Alphabetical. Each index has its own tab to make it easier to access (see tabs illustrated on previous page). The contents of these three indexes are described below. Checklists on the QAI are duplicated in these indexes in bold to make them easier to locate.

Lights index provides an alphabetical listing of all lights, alerts or other indications. This allows you to match the checklist directly to the light.

Unannunciated Checklists index lists all checklists not annunciated by a light, alert or other indication. Checklists are listed alphabetically. QAI checklists are highlighted in bold.

Alphabetical index combines the QAI, Lights, and Unannunciated indexes to list all checklists in the QRH in alphabetical order. This may be helpful to you when you are uncertain whether a checklist is Quick Action, has an associated Light or is Unannunciated, or when you know the checklist title you need.

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 6

Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

C Get the Checklist (3 of 3)
Table of Contents. In addition to the indexes at the front of the QRH, you may search for a checklist within the appropriate system section. Sections are indicated by tabs with a number from 0-15. Each section contains a Table of Contents (TOC) that lists all checklists in that section. The TOC is structured to help you find a checklist in a number of ways (see below). Checklists that are not associated with a specific system (for example, Ditching) are listed in Section 0, ‘Miscellaneous’.

QAI checklists. Checklists within a section that also appear on the Quick Action Index (QAI) are listed first in the section TOC. QAI checklists are listed alphabetically and appear in bold. Listing QAI checklists at the top of the TOC makes these time-critical items easier to locate when needed. It also makes them easier to identify for study purposes.

Dashed line. The end of the QAI checklists is indicated by a dashed line. All items above the dashed line are QAI checklists. Below the dashed line is a complete alphabetical listing of all checklists in the section. This includes checklists found on the QAI and those not found on the QAI.

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 7

Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

D Verify the Checklist
The Light symbol, checklist title, Condition statement and Objective statement help the PM verify that the correct checklist has been selected.
Light symbol. When the non-normal is accompanied by a light, the light symbol is shown. This allows the crew to match the light indication on the flight deck with the checklist. Checklist title. The PF calls for the checklist using the checklist title. The PM uses this title to locate the checklist using one of the indexes or the Table of Contents in a system section. Once the checklist is located, the PM reads the title aloud and verifies that the correct checklist has been selected. A box appears around the title of the checklist. When the checklist is annunciated by a light, alert or other indication, the checklist title is written in UPPER CASE. When the checklist is unannunciated, the title is shown in Upper and Lower Case. Condition statement. The Condition statement identifies the condition that requires the use of the checklist. Some Condition statements have been re-written to use simpler, clearer language. The PM reads as much of the Condition statement as is necessary to verify the correct checklist has been selected. The PF does not need to verbally read back this information but must acknowledge that the information was heard and understood. Objective statement. The Objective statement identifies the expected result or the goal of the checklist. This information also helps you verify you have selected the appropriate checklist for the non-normal situation. Not all checklists have Objective statements. In cases where the objective of the checklist is clear (for example, Engine Fire), an objective is not included. The PM reads as much of the Objective statement as is necessary to verify that the correct checklist has been selected. The PF does not need to verbally read back this information but must acknowledge that the information was heard and understood.

Shading. All the information used to verify that you have selected the correct checklist (Condition statement, Objective statement) is grouped together in a shaded box. Shading makes this information visually distinct from memory and action steps and easier to find later if necessary.
Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 8

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Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

E Do the Checklist (1 of 4)
Checklist steps. After the PF has called for the checklist, the PM has located the checklist, and verified it is appropriate for the non-normal situation, the PM reads aloud the checklist steps. This includes memory items and reference items. There are a number of features that support you as you do the checklist.

Memory steps. Memory steps are critical steps that are expected to be done prior to opening the QRH. Once the checklist is called for by the PF, the PM reads the memory steps aloud to verify each memory step was done. The PF only needs to respond to items that are not in agreement with the checklist. Memory steps must be reviewed before doing the reference steps. You should not assume all memory steps have been completed or were performed correctly without verifying the steps by reading the checklist. Memory steps are distinguished from reference steps by a dashed line. Items above the dashed line are memory steps. Items below the dashed line are reference steps. Step numbers. All first level checklist steps are at the left margin of the page and are numbered. Step numbers allow you to: - follow the hierarchy of steps, particularly when continuing a checklist across more than one page - keep place when reading the checklist - jump to a specific step when directed by the checklist This makes navigation within the checklist clear and easy. Step numbers are not required to be read aloud.

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 9

Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

E Do the Checklist (2 of 4)

Reference items. Reference items are non-memory actions to be done while reading the checklist. The PM reads each reference item aloud including the challenge, the response and any amplifying information. The PF does not need to repeat this information but must acknowledge it was heard and understood. Choose one. When one or more conditions are possible for a given step, all the possible conditions are listed and marked with diamond-shaped bullets (♦). Each bullet indicates one choice. All choices in a Choose One step are linked together with a vertical line. You must choose only one of the conditions–the one appropriate to the situation you are experiencing. The PM should read all choices marked by diamond bullets. Once the crew decides which choice best fits the situation, the PM reads all actions, responses and amplifying information under that condition. Notes. Notes are identified by the word Note in bold font. A shaded box also appears around the information contained in the note. This shading helps distinguish the Note from other steps. The PM should read all information in a Note. Continued symbol. When a checklist has additional steps that continue onto the next page, a checklist symbol appears at the bottom of the page. There may be white (blank) space between the last step on the page and the continued symbol. When checklist steps are continued from the previous page, a checklist continued symbol appears at the top of the page. This symbol repeats the title of the checklist followed by the word ‘continued’. Directional arrows (b) also appear on either side of the text.
RETURN TO DIAGRAM B C D E F G

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Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

E Do the Checklist (3 of 4)
If statements. Some steps require you to make a decision about a single condition. You must use your judgment to decide if that condition applies or does not apply. If the condition applies, take the action described. If the condition does not apply, do not take the action described. These conditional statements are highlighted by the word “If” in bold. Confirm. The word “Confirm” is added to checklist items when both crewmembers must verbally agree before action is taken. The PM reads the challenge, the word “Confirm” and the response. The PF must verbally confirm the checklist item. This assures that both crewmembers are aware of the action before it is taken. This helps prevent incorrect actions and supports the situation awareness of both crewmembers. Action is taken by the PF or PM based on each crewmember’s area of responsibility. After moving the control, the crewmember taking the action also states the checklist response. Redirection. A double-arrow symbol (►►) followed by the words ‘Go to’ indicates that you are being redirected to a different step within the current checklist or to a different checklist in the QRH. If you are redirected to another step within the same checklist, the step number is provided. If you are redirected to a different checklist, the title and page number of the new checklist are provided. Precaution symbol. A shaded triangle containing an exclamation point ( ! ) alerts you to important information you must consider before taking an action. This triangle appears between the step number and the challenge. The information you must consider is contained in a shaded box attached to the shaded triangle. The PM reads this information aloud before reading the challenge and response.
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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 11

Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

E Do the Checklist (4 of 4)
Inoperative Items table. A shaded Inoperative Items table identifies items that are inoperative due to the non-normal situation. The PM reads “Note: Inoperative Items” aloud before reading the list of individual items. Inoperative item. The name of each inoperative item appears in bold to make it easier to identify. The PM reads aloud each inoperative item. The PF does not need to repeat this information but must acknowledge that the information was heard and understood. Consequences. Below each inoperative item is the effect that item has on airplane systems, airplane operations or flight planning. Consequences are read aloud by the PM. The PF does not need to repeat this information but must acknowledge that the information was heard and understood. Solid line. A solid line separates each inoperative item in the inoperative items table. This helps distinguish each inoperative item from the others and makes clear the consequences that belong to each item.

Timing words. Some steps must be performed in accordance with specified time requirements. These time requirements are highlighted in bold.

Do not accomplish. Some steps identify checklists a crew should not accomplish. Any direction to not accomplish an action is highlighted in bold. This alerts you to the difference and reinforces that the following action should not be performed.

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Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

F Complete the Checklist
Checklist complete. When you have completed all of the required steps in a non-normal checklist, the checklist is complete. This is indicated by the checklist complete symbol (■ ■ ■ ■). When reaching a checklist complete symbol the PM states: “___(checklist title)___CHECKLIST COMPLETE”.

The checklist complete symbol can appear in more than one place:

At the end of the checklist. The checklist complete symbol will appear at the end of every checklist. In a checklist step. The checklist complete symbol can appear in the body of a checklist. This occurs only when the checklist divides into two or more paths. Each path can have a checklist complete symbol at its end. Do not continue the NNC after a checklist complete symbol.

Checklist Complete Except Deferred Items. When a non-normal checklist is complete except for deferred items, this statement appears in bold as the final step before the Deferred Items section. The PM says “Checklist Complete Except Deferred Items”.

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 13

Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

G Do the Deferred Items (1 of 2)
The Deferred Items section identifies steps to be done later in the flight and includes the Descent, Approach and Landing normal checklists. When included, these deferred Descent, Approach, and Landing checklists replace the normal checklists. Deferred Items may also include any additional items, procedures or information needed to configure the airplane for landing as a result of the non-normal situation. Deferred Items header. A grey line with the words “Deferred Items” marks the beginning of the Deferred Items section. This makes it easier for the PM to locate the deferred items or to return to the deferred items later in flight. Normal checklist titles. The titles of normal checklists included in the Deferred Items section appear in bold to clearly identify where each checklist begins. Normal checklists are included in the Deferred Items section when:
• • any response in the Descent, Approach or Landing checklist has changed due to the non-normal situation; OR when any deferred items occur after the Descent Checklist. This eliminates the need to switch between Normal and Non-Normal Checklists.

The PM states the title of the normal checklist (for example, “Landing Checklist”) before reading the checklist steps.

Changed responses. Any normal checklist response changed by the non-normal condition appears in bold. This highlights the change and makes it easier for the PM to identify and verbalize.

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Section II – Checklist Features and Examples

G Do the Deferred Items (2 of 2)

Task headers. In addition to Normal Checklists there may be additional items that need to be accomplished as a result of the non-normal situation. These items may be grouped under task headers in bold (for example, “Flap extension”). The PM reads the task header aloud followed by all items under that task header.

Additional Information. The Additional Information header provides a standard location for information that is helpful to know but is not required to do the checklist. For this reason the Additional Information section is located after the checklist complete symbol. This allows operators the flexibility to include operationally relevant information not directly related to checklist steps.

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Familiarization Handout for 737 February 2008 Page 15