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IMPROVING THE SOCIO LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN INDIA ISSUES ASPIRATIONS MINORITIES COMMISSIONS WOMEN’S COMMISSIONS

PUBLISHED BY PUBLISHING YEAR

Multiple Action Research Group (MARG) 205-206, Shahpurjat, New Delhi-110049 Tel: 91-11-26496925/7483 Fax: 91-11-26495371 Website: www.ngo-marg.org 2013

ISBN 978-81-87377-26-9

Contents
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS  INTRODUCTION  THE SOCIO LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN INDIA: ISSUES AND ASPIRATIONS  ISSUES  ASPIRATIONS  EXPLORING INSTITUTIONAL LINKAGES: MINORITIES COMMISSIONS, WOMEN’S COMMISSIONS, MUSLIM WOMEN’S PERSPECTIVES  MINORITIES COMMISSIONS  WOMEN’S COMMISSIONS  MUSLIM WOMEN’S PERSPECTIVES  SUGGESTED AREAS FOR FUTURE ACTION  ANNEXURES  QUESTIONNAIRE  AGENDAS FOR STATE CONSULTATIONS  PHOTOGRAPHS  i iii 1 2 2 6 8 8 9 11 15 16 16 17 19

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
MARG is grateful to the Bharatiya Muslim Mahila Andolan (BMMA) and Muslim Youths Forum Against Communalism, Terrorism and Sedition (MY-FACTS) for facilitating the state level consultations in Maharashtra and Assam on the ‘Socio Legal Status Of Muslim Women In India’. Thanks are particularly due to Noorjehan Safia Niaz and Toiba Sultana. We thank the various officials of the National Commission for Minorities, National Commission for Women, Assam State Commission for Minorities, Maharashtra State Commission for Minorities, Assam State Commission for Women and Maharashtra State Commission for Women. Wajahat Habibullah (Chairperson, National Commission for Minorities), Abdul Muhib Majumdar(Chairperson Assam State Commission for Minorities), Esther Kar, Samina Shafiq and Allen Brooks were particularly helpful. This publication would not have been possible without the support of the British High Commission. Finally, thanks are due to the entire MARG team for their dedication and hard work. MARG

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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
BMMA DV IGMSY MCD MGNREGA MSDP MHRD BHARATIYA MUSLIM MAHILA ANDOLAN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INDIRA GANDHI MATRITVA SAHYOG YOJANA MINORITY CONCENTRATION DISTRICTS MAHATMA GANDHI NATIONAL RURAL EMPLOYMENT GUARANTEE ACT MULTI-SECTORAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME MINISTRY OF HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

MY-FACTS MUSLIM YOUTHS FORUM AGAINST COMMUNALISM, TERRORISM AND SEDITION NCM NCM ACT NCW NHRC NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR MINORITIES NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR MINORITIES ACT, 1992 NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR WOMEN NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

SSH SCHEME SHORT STAY HOME FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS SCHEME

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INTRODUCTION
Muslim women as a group are among the most marginalized sections of Indian society. This is despite a fairly robust legal framework which guarantees the rights of minorities and women in India. An important way for Muslim women to overcome their exclusion is for them to come together and assert their rights by giving voice to their aspirations. It was in this context that two state consultations were held in Assam and Maharashtra in an effort to create a platform for Muslim women and other interested stakeholders. Lack of access to education and entitlements, difficulties arising from child marriage, domestic violence, triple talaq and polygamy were cited as problems in both the states. These consultations also explored solutions to the various problems. The role of State and National Commissions for Minorities and Women was also discussed. One of the problems in this area is the near complete lack of awareness among Muslim women on these Commissions. Another area of concern is that neither the Women’s Commissions nor the Minorities Commissions have a particular focus on Muslim women. Disaggregated data on the work done by these Commissions vis-à-vis Muslim women is not easily available. This report brings together the various issues and aspirations of Muslim women in India, particularly in Assam and Maharashtra. The purpose of this report is to build linkages between Muslim women and the Commissions named above. It looks at the structure and functioning of these Commissions in the hope that this knowledge will strengthen Muslim women in their search for justice and empowerment. It is also hoped that the Commissions will consider the issues mentioned in this report and make a special focus on these concerns of Muslim women.

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THE SOCIO LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN INDIA: ISSUES AND ASPIRATIONS
In an effort to create a platform for concerned stakeholders, two state level consultations were held in Guwahati and Mumbai. The consultation in Guwahati was organized in collaboration with the Muslim Youths Forum Against Communalism, Terrorism and Sedition (MY-FACTS) on March 9, 2013. The meeting in Mumbai was organized in collaboration with the Bharatiya Muslim Mahila Andolan (BMMA) on March 11, 2013. The consultations brought together activists, lawyers, students, media, government functionaries and religious leaders, nearly all being Muslim women. Around 150 people participated in the two consultations. Despite the economic and social differences between the states of Maharashtra and Assam, it was apparent that most of the core issues and concerns of Muslim women in the two states are strikingly similar.

ISSUES
Poverty, lack of development and denial of entitlements
In both Maharashtra and Assam the main problem cited was that of poverty and lack of development in the Muslim community. One participant said that while nearly 14% of India’s population is composed of Muslims, neither the governments nor the religious heads have rigorously advocated or fought for education and development in the community. Infrastructure is almost lacking, particularly in the char areas1 where many Muslims in Assam live. In these areas the land is washed away every season by the river Brahmaputra. The existence of people in these areas is precarious and entrenched in poverty. Even in cities like Guwahati, the poorer Muslims have to live high up in the hills, making accessibility a major issue. Commuting to work daily is difficult and time consuming. In most cases, women are unaware of the various government schemes for empowerment of minorities and women. Even in cases where people are aware of job cards or ration cards, they cannot avail of them because of rampant corruption. Many have no idea about the Right to Information Act and its uses. Sometimes local leaders do not allow the benefits to reach the community. Often it is they who demand huge sums of money which are beyond the means of these poor communities. Hence they remain deprived of the benefits.

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One of the peculiar features of the Brahmaputra river in Assam are the Chars (riverine silt islands)

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A Muslim woman working as a daily labourer in Assam. For a full day’s work, she and her child will get one meal.

In many cases, despite acute poverty, women are not allowed to work for a living. This is a consequence of extensive patriarchy. Most women help their male counterparts in the field, but their contribution is not valued in economic terms. In the urban context, husbands are mostly drivers, mechanics or local pan shop owners. Their wives stay back at home. These women actually have plenty of time for gainful employment, but because they are women they are not allowed to pursue these opportunities. Capacity building of these women so they can earn by working from home would make a lot of difference. Many Muslim women are mainly involved in the home based informal sector.

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Women help in the fields but their work is not valued in economic terms

The areas where they live are very interior places of the district or the city. There is a severe lack of both educational and medical facilities. Many villages in Dhubri district of Assam have no electricity, no schools and no hospitals. No health camp is held in these places. People have to cross the river to get medical assistance. Interestingly, most of them have mobile phones. But in order to charge their phones they have to cross the river, pay Rs.5 and get it charged over two days.

Education
In both states it is seen that the girls do not complete their studies because of poverty. They are confined to their homes for domestic chores and looking after younger siblings. In poorer areas there is an acute shortage of schools. One of the problems expressed was that some schools do not accommodate religious sentiments of minorities. Compelling Muslim children to sing bhajans prompts some parents to discontinue their children’s education in such schools. According to the Sachar Committee Report, only 3% of Muslim children in the school going age go to madrassas. Instead, many Muslim children are enrolled in Maktabs, which provide supplementary religious education in addition to enrolment in public schools.

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Literacy rates among Total (India) Muslims in India2 64.8%

Total (Muslim) 59.1%

Muslim male 67.6%

Muslim female 50.1%

“Girls in the Muslim community are dreaming of good career options despite being pressurized and prejudiced by society and their families.” (Participant in Mumbai meeting)

Marriage and personal laws
One of the problems faced by Muslim women across India is that of child marriage. Early marriages and early motherhood have adverse effects on the health of these young women. Many have children when they are still in their teens. The average age of marriage for a Muslim girl is 15.6 years. In rural India, it is 13.9 years3. Polygamy and easy divorce are also major problems. The cases of oral divorce have increased over the past two decades. On several occasions the police are not supportive of Muslim women especially in cases of domestic violence. Domestic violence is still seen as an internal family issue and are not addressed by the authorities. Hence violence continues. Multiple marriages leading to greater number of children is making the problem of poverty more acute. “Most of the Muslim women interviewed in the villages in Assam have 4-5 children with a gap of barely a year between children, which adversely affects the mother’s health.” (Researcher, Assam) Many women lose their husbands at a young age because their daily wage earner husbands put in hard physical labour beyond their strength and nutritional capacities. These women are disparagingly referred to as the ‘husbandless, homeless, landless’, and are vulnerable to exploitation.

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Census of India 2001 Zoya Hasan, Ritu Menon, Unequal Citizens: A Study Of Muslim Women In India, Oxford University Press, 2004

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Communal violence
While there was no mention of communal clashes in the Maharashtra meeting, the matter was raised in Assam where communal clashes in recent months left around 80 dead and over 4 lakh displaced who were forced to live in makeshift camps. After the violence, there is immense fear in the minds of the people. Even in matters of relief and rehabilitation there is double discrimination. Not only are their camps in poorer conditions, the relief provided fails to consider the health and sanitation needs of women. “One woman was very reluctant to talk to me. She said that they no longer trust people. They always feel that someone has come to check their identity. She also added that the local leaders have told them not speak to any outsider. Only when she knew I am a Muslim, she felt a little relaxed” (Researcher, Assam).

Equal access to public spaces
An issue that was raised in both Maharashtra and Assam was that of restrictions on Muslim women in offering namaz. Many fears are instilled in Muslim women in the name of religion. This has limited their access even to durgahs in various places. Participation in non-Muslim festivals invites flak from some community members. Due to distortions and misinterpretations, Muslim women are denied their rightful share of public space. “We are made voiceless in the name of religion.......” “The truth is that Islam treats women equally, but the religion has been misinterpreted and distorted in recent times”. Participants in Assam “Even joining SHGs is being misconstrued as ‘haraam’.” Mumbai participant.

ASPIRATIONS
Economic Empowerment and Entitlements
Most aspirations revolve around economic empowerment and access to entitlements. As one participant in Mumbai put it, the Muslim community must shift from perceiving themselves as victims to becoming active citizens who demand their rights. It is their right as citizens of this country to avail of all schemes and benefits. Women have to be made aware of their rights and entitlements and provided support in accessing them. Unless they demand justice, they will not get it. Unless they are aware of their rights, they cannot demand justice as equal citizens. “The problem is not about availing this or that scheme. Even other communities have problems availing government schemes. The government has not even done justice to the Vidharba

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farmers who are committing suicide in large numbers. The problem is that the state does not have an inclusive approach towards the community.” Participant in Mumbai

Education
Participants expressed the need for access to good quality secular education for girls. Education should meet the standards prescribed in the Right to Free and Compulsory Education Act (RTE Act). For many children, due to the shortage of schools, madrassas are the only option. So they should be modernized, although they do not come within the purview of the RTE Act. For higher education, sufficient numbers of hostels for girls should be available.

Advocacy
It is important for Muslim women to get together and voice their concerns and advocate their rights. Concerned authorities (such as the Women’s Commissions and the Minorities Commissions) should encourage this space and voice for Muslim women in India. Meetings at regular intervals of all the important stakeholders will create a strong platform for discussion and also serve as a watchdog to look after implementation of Government policies and programmes. Links must also be built with the media to strengthen the voice and support base of Muslim women. Akin to the Sachar Committee, a high-powered committee should be set up to look specifically into the socio-legal status of Muslim women.

Marriage
There is need for spreading mass awareness among the community on the rights of women in personal matters. As of now, ignorance has led to a lot of women being exploited. There is need to strengthen women’s choice and agency in personal matters. Considering the disapproval in the Quran toward polygamy, there is a need to put an end to the practice of easy divorce and multiple marriages. Codification of Muslim personal law on the basis of the Quran can reduce the scope for misuse and misinterpretation.

Equal access to public spaces
Women were not denied entry to mosques in the time of the Prophet Mohammed, and this discrimination should not be allowed now. It will be necessary to engage with community members, clerics and leaders for this. This will be a long and difficult struggle, though a start has been made both in the matter of the Haji Ali Dargah in Mumbai and in other places too.

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EXPLORING INSTITUTIONAL LINKAGES: MINORITIES COMMISSIONS, WOMEN’S COMMISSIONS, MUSLIM WOMEN’S PERSPECTIVES
MINORITIES COMMISSIONS
The National Commissions for Minorities (NCM) was established under the National Commission for Minorities Act, 1992 (NCM Act). Based in New Delhi, the NCM has been set up to safeguard the rights of minorities in India. State Commissions for Minorities have been set up at the state level through similar Acts passed by the states. The broad mandate of these Minorities Commissions is to safeguard the constitutional and legal rights of minorities. Under the NCM Act, the term ‘minorities’ is defined as per the Central Government notification of 1993. Under this, for the purpose of the NCM Act, minorities are listed as: ÐÐ Muslims ÐÐ Christians ÐÐ Sikhs ÐÐ Buddhists ÐÐ Zoroastrians (Parsis) The functions of the NCM include: ÐÐ Evaluating the progress of the development of minorities in India ÐÐ Monitoring the working of the safeguards provided in the constitution and other laws across the country ÐÐ Making recommendations for the effective implementation of safeguards for the protection of the interests of minorities ÐÐ Looking into specific complaints regarding deprivation of rights and safeguards of the minorities and taking up such matters with the appropriate authorities ÐÐ Undertaking studies on problems arising out of any discrimination against minorities and recommending measures for their removal ÐÐ Conducting studies, research and analysis on the issues relating to socio-economic and educational development of minorities ÐÐ Making reports to the central government on any matter relating to minorities, particularly difficulties faced by them ÐÐ Suggesting measures to be taken by the states for improving the lot of the minorities.

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When the NCM makes any recommendation for the effective implementation of safeguards for protecting the interest of minorities, the central government must place these recommendations before each house of Parliament, along with a report on action taken by it on these recommendations. If the central government refuses to accept these recommendations, it must provide the reasons why. When the NCM makes recommendations concerning any state, a similar action must be taken at the state level, and the recommendations along with action taken report placed before the state legislature. Every year the NCM prepares an Annual Report giving a full account of its activities and forward a copy to the central government. The central government must present this before each House of Parliament together with a memorandum of action taken on the recommendations made in this annual report. While performing certain functions (such as evaluating progress, monitoring the working of the laws, and looking into specific complaints) the NCM has the powers of a civil court with regard to the following:ÐÐ Summoning the attendance of any person from any part of India and examining him/her on oath ÐÐ Requiring the discovery and production of any document ÐÐ Receiving evidence on affidavits ÐÐ Requisitioning public records ÐÐ Appointing commissions to examine witnesses and documents The Commission consists of a Chairperson, a Vice Chairperson and 5 members who are nominated by the central government. They must be persons of eminence, ability and integrity from minority communities. The Chairperson and members hold office for three years.

WOMEN’S COMMISSIONS
The National Commission for Women (NCW) was set up under the National Commission for Women Act, 1990. While the NCW is based in New Delhi, State Commissions for Women have been set up at the state level with state laws with similar provisions. Set up to safeguard the rights and concerns of women in India, the NCW performs the following functions: ÐÐ Investigate and examine the safeguards available for women under the Constitution of India as well as in other laws, point out gaps and suggest remedies ÐÐ To make reports annually, and at other times as well if needed, on the working of these safeguards: such reports will contain recommendations for better implementation of safeguards ÐÐTake up cases of violation of rights of women with appropriate authorities. It can look into

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complaints on deprivation of rights of women, and non – implementation or violation of laws and policies aimed at the welfare and empowerment of women. ÐÐ Study specific problems arising out of discrimination and atrocities against women and suggest remedies ÐÐ Study reasons for impediments in advancement of women and to suggest ways to ensure due representation of women in all spheres ÐÐ Participate and advise in planning for socio-economic development of women ÐÐ Evaluate progress of development of women in all parts of the country ÐÐ Inspection of jails, remand homes, women’s institutions and other places where women are kept in custody, and suggest remedies where necessary ÐÐ Fund litigation involving a large number of women As in the case of the NCM, when the NCW makes any recommendation for the effective implementation of safeguards for protecting the interests of women, the central government must place these recommendations before each house of Parliament, along with a report on action taken by it on these recommendations. If the central government refuses to accept these recommendations, it must provide the reasons why. When the NCW makes recommendations concerning any state, a similar action must be taken at the state level, and the recommendations along with action taken report placed before the state legislature. Every year the NCW prepares an Annual Report giving a full account of its activities and forwards a copy to the central government. The central government must present this before each House of Parliament together with a memorandum of action taken on the recommendations made in this annual report. In matters involving the safeguards in the law and cases of deprivation of women’s rights, the NCW has the following powers: ÐÐ Summoning the attendance of any person from any part of India and examining him/her on oath ÐÐ Requiring the discovery and production of any document ÐÐ Receiving evidence on affidavits ÐÐ Requisitioning public records ÐÐ Appointing commissions to examine witnesses and documents The Women Commission consists of a Chairperson (as nominated by the central government, a person committed to the cause of women). Five Members are nominated by the central government from amongst persons of ability, integrity and standing who have had experience in law or legislation, trade unionism, management of an industry or organization committed to increasing the employment potential of women, women’s voluntary organisations (including women activists), administration, economic development, health, education or social welfare. While nominating members, the central government should nominate one from the Scheduled Castes and one from the Scheduled Tribes.

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Generally, the Chairperson and members have a term of 3 years.

MUSLIM WOMEN’S PERSPECTIVES
MY-FACTS conducted a survey in Assam to understand the perspectives of Muslim women from poorer sections with regard to the Minorities and Women’s Commissions. MY-FACTS conducted the survey in five districts of Assam. 125 women were interviewed, 25 from each district. The women were in the age group of 19 to 65 years. The districts selected were: Dhubri, Nagaon, Kokrajhar, Dibrugarh and Kamrup. They were asked about their awareness regarding NCM, NCW. Only 10 out of 125 women had heard of National Commission for Minorities while only 11 women out of 125 women said that they have heard about National Commission for Women. Only 12 out of 125 women heard about State Commission for Minorities, only 9 out of 125 women heard of State Commission for Women. Out of 125 women, only 5 women said that they have approached any of the Commissions. In villages, no one seems to know about these Commissions. Even in urban centers some women who claim to have heard about them, were not sure about their work. They were confusing the Women’s Commissions with Mahila Samitis.

Have you heard of National Commission for Minorities?

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Have you heard of National Commission for Women?

Have you heard of State Commission for Minorities?

Have you heard of State Commission for Women?

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Have you ever approached any of these Commissions?

A similar survey was conducted in Maharashtra by BMMA. Women from poorer sections in Behrampada, Navpada, Ghas Bazaar, Pipeline Indiranagar and Garib nagar of Mumbai were surveyed. Only 5 women out of 100 knew about the National Commission for Minorities Only 13 women out of 100 knew about the National Commission for Women Only 6 out of 100 women knew about the State Commission for Minorities Only 13 out of 100 women knew about the State Commission for Women

Have you ever approached any of these Commissions?

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Have you heard of National Commission for Women?

Have you heard of State Commission for Minorities?

Have you heard of State Commission for Women?

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SUGGESTED AREAS FOR FUTURE ACTION
Some findings emerge from the random studies and workshops held in the 2 states : The main concerns and aspirations of Muslim women in these areas are regarding: ÐÐ Poverty and related issues: employment, lack of development, poor access to entitlements, ÐÐ Education ÐÐ Early marriage, multiple marriage, easy divorce ÐÐ Communal violence ÐÐ Lack of equal access to public spaces As far as the Commissions are concerned, both the Minorities Commissions (concerned with safeguarding the rights of Muslims as minorities) and Women’s Commissions (concerned with safeguarding rights of women) have a key role to play vis a vis Muslim women. Unfortunately, with neither set of Commissions are Muslim women as a group a particular area of focus. In view of the double discrimination faced by Muslim women – as women, from traditional patriarchy; and as Muslims, subject to discrimination as minorities – it is necessary to view their issues with a dual lens. Some issues concerning Muslim women may not involve the dimension as members of a minority community (e.g. domestic violence). But even in the case of crimes against women, if the crime has been committed targeting women as members of a religious minority, again both areas are relevant. Thus, rape in a communal riot cannot be viewed solely from the gender lens. But for all issues affecting Muslim women as Muslims, it is not enough to see the matter purely as a minority issue – the gender element will be a necessary part as gender discrimination is implicit in every social construct. In this context it may be good for the Women’s and Minorities Commissions to work together on issues affecting the socio legal issues of Muslim women, or have within each Commission a specialist on socio legal issues of Muslim women. A key area for engagement is spreading awareness on rights and entitlements of Muslim women, and assisting them to access the benefit of beneficial schemes and other provisions in law. Muslim women and activists, particularly at the grassroots levels, are almost unaware of the potential of engaging with the Commissions. Many have not heard of the Commissions. This could be changed by: (i)  More proactive engagement of Commissions with these groups (ii) Holding more meetings with primary stakeholders (e.g. the meeting in Assam was the first of its kind, although Muslim women are present in significant numbers and face considerable oppression). While several steps have already been taken within various Commissions to bring Muslim women on the radar, what is required is a more robust engagement by all sections.
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ANNEXURES
QUESTIONNAIRE
BHC-MARG Study SOCIO-LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN INDIA RANDOM SURVEY OF 100 MUSLIM WOMEN FROM ECONOMICALLY WEAKER SECTION

Date: ÐÐ Name of the Researcher(s) ÐÐ Interview location: ÐÐ Name of the Respondent: ÐÐ Age: ÐÐ Qualifications/Profession: 1. What are the 3 main problems facing Muslim women in India? 2. Are you aware of National Commission for Minorities? a. Yes b. No 3. Are you aware of Commission for women? a. Yes b. No 4. Are you aware of State Commission for Minorities? a. Yes b. No 5. Are you aware of State Commission for Women? a. Yes b. No National 6. Have you ever approached any of these Commissions? a. Yes b. No 7. If yes, how would you rate your experience? a. Very Good b. Good c. Average d. Poor 8. Do you have any suggestions for improving the functioning of these Commissions?

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AGENDAS FOR STATE CONSULTATIONS
ASSAM STATE LEVEL CONSULTATION ON ‘IMPROVING THE SOCIO-LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN INDIA’ TOPIC Welcome and Introduction Introduction to the Need Relevance of the Workshop SPEAKER Toiba Sultana and Anju Talukdar Toiba Sultana TIME 10.15 – 10.30 10.30 – 10.45 10.45 – 11.00 11:00-11:20 11.20 – 11.40 Anchor Toiba Sultana

Presentation on the survey done.

Lack of public space for Muslim Teresa Rahman Women. Social status of Muslim Women, Swabera Islam. Urban context. Women and Islam Women from displaced and conflict Johanna. prone areas. Role, Relevance and Response of Allen Brooks Minority Commission Role, Relevance and response of Shahnaaz Rahman Women Commission. OPEN DISCUSSION LUNCH Legal Status of Muslim Women. Baharun Saikia.

Sabrina Iqbal Sircar 11.40 – 12.00 12.00-12.20 12.20 – 12.40 12.40 – 1.00 1.00 – 1.30 2:30-2:50 Anju Talukdar

Suggestions and Recommendations Morigaon Mahila 2.50 – 4.30 from the participants Mehfil Nurul Islam Lashkar(Journalist) Lutfa Begum(Grassroot Worker) Hamida Khatoon (Grassroot worker), Luna Laila(Minority Commission) Gramya Puthibharal (Nawgaon) 15-20 students. Sharing of deliberations the summary of Member, Minority 4.30 – 5.00 Commission.

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MAHARASHTRA STATE LEVEL CONSULTATION ON ‘IMPROVING THE SOCIO-LEGAL STATUS OF MUSLIM WOMEN IN INDIA’
11 March 2013 Marshall Hall, J. N. Library, Kalina Campus, Mumbai University, Santacruz east, Mumbai TOPIC Welcome and Introduction SPEAKER TIME FACILITATOR

Noorjehan Safia Niaz 10.15 – 10.30 10.30 – 10.45 Noorjehan

Introduction to the Need and Anju Talukdar Relevance of the Workshop Constitutional Commissions Mandate

and Dr. Chandrakant Puri 10.45 – 11.00 11.00 – 11.20 11.20 – 11.40 11.40 – 12.00

Socio-Economic Issues of Muslim Prof. Farrukh Warris Women Legal Issues of Muslim Women Khatoon Shaikh Root Causes of Discrimination Zakia Soman faced by Muslim Women – National And International Perspective Role, Relevance and Response Javed Anand of Minority Commission towards Muslim women Role, Relevance and Response of Prof. Ritu Dewan Women’s Commission towards Muslim Women OPEN DISCUSSION LUNCH Suggestions Recommendations panel 1 Suggestions Recommendations panel 2 from and Ghazala Azad Nirja the Bhatnagar Nusrat Pathan Nabi Idrisi and Salimbhai Shaikh the Mallika Mistry Adv. Uraizee Maqbool Alam

12.00 – 12.20

12.20 – 12.40

12.40 – 1.00 2.00 – 3.00 Dr. Chandrakant Puri

3.00 – 4.00

from

OPENHOUSE Sharing of the summary of Anju Talukdar deliberations and vote of thanks

4.00 – 4.30 4.30 – 5.00

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PHOTOGRAPHS
A. ASSAM STATE LEVEL CONSULTATION MEETING HELD ON 8TH MARCH 2013 IN GUWAHATI

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B. MAHARASHTRA STATE LEVEL CONSULTATION MEETING HELD ON 11TH MARCH 2013 IN MUMBAI

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