BRIEFING DRUGS: A PARENTS GUIDE

THE NUMBERS1
So how many young people are actually using illegal drugs? These are the figures for 2003:

16-24 YEAR-OLDS
of 16–24 • 28%year year-olds had used drugs in the last of 16–24 • 18%month year-olds had used drugs in the last

11-15 YEAR-OLDS

of • 8%the 11 year olds had tried some kind of drug BUT IT’S IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER: in last year young people, illegal 15 • 38% oflast year olds had tried some kind of drug • For mostpart of normal life drug taking is not a in the year of 11-15 year olds took a Class A drug (such • 4%cocaine, Ecstasy, LSD, amphetamines or heroin) • Most young people who do try drugs do not continue using them as in the last year school pupils • 12% ofkind of drug in aged 11-15 had taken some the last month

DRUGS TODAY
Drugs come and go, falling in and out of popularity and use. Over the last 10 years in the UK, young people’s drug-taking habits have changed considerably. The most significant developments have been: Drug use trends: recent trends in drug use include; Amphetamine • the same at 1%use in the last year has remained between 2001 and 2002 amongst 11-15 year olds, with ecstasy use decreasing from 2% in 2001 to 1% in 2002 1 there was an increase • Amongst 16-24inyear oldsyear from 4% in 1994 in ecstasy use the last to 7% in 2002, whereas amphetamine use in the last year has fallen from 10% to 5%2 use: cocaine is no longer • Increased cocaineof 16-24 year olds have taken just for the rich. 8% cocaine at least once 2. The rise in cocaine’s popularity is down to:

Wider definitions: increasingly, alcohol, tobacco and over-the-counter drugs like Paracetamol are being included in media coverage of ‘drugs’. This causes young people to question the notion and definition of ‘illegal’ drugs.

Hypocrisy: with more and more people in the public eye admitting to past drug use, young people are beginning to feel that adults and authority figures are hypocritical when it comes to drugs.

• People regarding cocaine as ‘safer’ than ecstasy more • Cocaine being seen as adrug socially mature and acceptable • Cocaine being less and less associated with ‘hard’ and dangerous drugs like heroin • The introduction of cocaine to dance-club culture
MORE BRIEFING §

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

BRIEFING DRUGS: A PARENTS GUIDE
REASONS FOR STARTING
The main reasons young people start taking drugs include: The effects: the way drugs make them feel Peer influence: almost everyone who takes an illegal drug is introduced to it by someone they know. Many young people buy drugs from their friends Rebellion and risk: taking risks and kicking against authority can be a natural part of growing up. For some young people, the illegal nature of drugs can make them exciting and interesting Independence: taking drugs can be seen as an assertion of autonomy, an independent choice made free of parental control and authority

REASONS FOR STOPPING
The main reasons young people stop taking drugs include: Change and development: young people’s social lives can develop in ways that make drugs less appealing Leaving school/changing social circles: when young people move out of a particular social situation, their opportunities for taking drugs can be reduced Increased responsibilities: employment, or even parenthood, can steer young people away from drug taking Boredom, lack of novelty: once young people have taken drugs for a while, they can get used to and bored with the effects

Remember: most young people only dabble. Many never get beyond cannabis. Reasons for this include:

• Drugs such as cocaine and heroin can often be regarded as ‘out of bounds’, a step too far • Young people may be afraid of, or not interested in, drugs that alter their reality, like LSD • Young people often don’t want to take drugs that involve injecting • Most young people are aware of the dangers of addiction
PARENT POWER!
The trends and statistics can be scary, but parents can really make a difference. Research shows that parents have a massive influence on their children’s views and behaviour, and a crucial role to play in preventing problem drug use. Current research suggests that young people are more likely to delay or avoid drug taking when they talk openly with their parents. You can make a difference, you just need to know how. Ring FRANK on 0800 77 66 00 for free, confidential information and advice 24 hours a day, or log on to talktofrank.com

REFERENCES:
1 Statistics on young people and drug misuse: England, 2003. Department of Health.

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ADVICE BE FRANK WITH YOUR KIDS
PARENT POWER!
As a parent, you have a massive influence on your children’s views and behaviour, and a crucial role to play in preventing problem drug use. Current research suggests that young people are more likely to delay or avoid drug taking when they talk openly with their parents. Research also shows that, where young people do develop serious problems with drugs, the involvement and support of parents and families can make a big difference to the person’s health and their ability to deal with their drug habit.

TALKING DRUGS
Talking to a child about issues like drugs can strike right at the heart of being a good parent. If your child takes drugs it's your fault - right? Wrong. Young people take drugs for all sorts of reasons. And above all, it's their choice to take drugs. You can't make those choices for them. But you can keep the channels of communication open. Here's some FRANK advice to help you manage those tricky teenage conversations.

3. Get someone to help you
Having someone else in the room who your child likes and respects can stop the conversation escalating into a row or stand-off. You could ask a grandparent, friend or favourite uncle or aunt to be there for you. If you're unsure, talk to FRANK.

4. Avoid asking ‘Why?’
Why? Because it's the worst thing you can say to a child as it immediately puts them on the defensive. Also, they may not really know why they started taking drugs or are thinking about taking them. Gently ask questions beginning How, When, What, Where, as these will help the conversation flow and you won't simply get a Yes or No answer.

1. Talk to them when you're calm
A parent's natural reaction on finding out their child is using drugs is to panic. Don't talk to them while you're in a state. Walk away. Try and get calm and buy yourself some thinking time. Decide what you want to say in advance. This will help stop the conversation spiralling out of control.

5. Don't get hung up on blame
Why have you done this to me? (Assumption: It's your fault). Who gave it to you? (Assumption: It's the dealer's fault.) Why don't the school do something? (Assumption: it's the school's fault). Blame isn't useful for anything. It won't even make you feel better. What's important is the future and where you go from here.

2. Knowledge is power
Lots of parents worry their children will know more than them. They won't know any more than what's on talktofrank.com. Read up on the facts. You don't need to know the cool slang, you just need to know how drugs can affect their health and welfare. And the truth is kids hear a lot of rubbish and don't always have all the answers themselves.

MORE ADVICE §

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ADVICE BE FRANK WITH YOUR KIDS
6. It's better to know the truth
There's no evidence to suggest that talking to a child about drugs will lead to them experimenting so don't be afraid to ask simple, direct questions. As you know, you can't expect children to accept what you say automatically so be prepared to share your views.

11. Older children
Starting secondary school is a difficult, vulnerable time for many kids, a time when friends can influence them heavily. As an adult your influence can also wane and your credibility diminish - so it's important you don't try to 'blag' or try to be 'cool' when discussing drugs. This could be a quick way of losing their trust, before you've even gained it.

7. Give the child space
Make the focus of the conversation your child and what they're going through. Really listen to what they're saying, paying particular attention to their feelings. And don't be afraid to ask them to clarify things - the more you understand, the easier it will be for both of you to move forward. If you have taken drugs think very carefully about telling your child about your experiences.

12. Take your time and be ready to listen
When chatting, be patient - you don't have to wrap things up in one conversation. Make sure you won't be interrupted (e.g. not when their favourite soap's on) and try to make your opening gambit as natural as possible (e.g. by picking up on a soap plotline or a piece of local news about drugs). If they broach the subject be ready to listen.

8. Assumptions can be dangerous
Children take drugs for different reasons. Try and get them to explain in their own words what's going on for them, and treat what they say seriously. It could be that they want to rebel, they're experimenting or that drugs are readily available - not necessarily that they're having problems at school, for example.

13. Remember the three Rs – reassure, reassure, reassure
If a child has a drug problem, it's important for them to know that you'll be there for them - from answering simple questions to helping them through difficult times. It's worth telling them that you trust them - but at the same time feel free to show disappointment if this trust's broken.

9. Set clear limits
This isn't all about what children think and feel. It's important that your children are aware of your views and house rules too. Ask yourself these questions: What do you approve / disapprove of? What is allowed in your home? Will you support them regardless of what they do? Be prepared to make a fuss and take action if these limits are broken.

14. Talk to FRANK – Ring FRANK on 0800 77 66 00 for free, confidential information and advice 24 hours a day, or log on to talktofrank.com

10. They're never too young for a chat
If a small child brings up the subject it's worth gently asking them what they know about 'drugs'. Tell them when they're ready to hear more to come and ask you and you'll tell them. And to tell you if anyone ever offers them drugs.

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ADVICE DRUG USE IN YOUR FAMILY
It can be a terrible shock to find out that someone in your family is using drugs – whether they are a child, brother or sister, or your partner. You may feel that there is nowhere to turn – and you may be worried about all sorts of consequences, from dealing with the law to worrying about how other people will react. This sheet may help you deal with some of the key questions which come up. Serious drug problems in the family can create incredible tension and distress. But throughout, it’s important to remember that family communication and support can make a real difference. You have a vital role to play, and there are people out there who can help.

HOW DO I KNOW IF A FAMILY MEMBER IS TAKING DRUGS?
There are no easy or obvious answers. You know your own family and may suspect that something is wrong. Sometimes it can be better to trust your instinct than go searching for telltale signs. Having said that, there are typical warning signs that you might want to keep in mind:

WHY ARE THEY TAKING DRUGS?
People take drugs for all kinds of reasons. Many people take drugs because of the effects - because of the way drugs make them feel. During early stages of drug taking, pleasure is a key factor. Beyond pleasure, for different people of different ages, there will be different reasons for taking drugs. Older family members (parents, partners, siblings) may take drugs because:

• ‘equipment’ found • Unusualsuch as burnt tin foil, lying around the house, empty aerosols,
home-made pipes, or syringes staying out • Mood-swings, aggression,of friends or late, secrecy, sudden change acquaintances, loss of interest in former activities (school, sport, work)

Money going missing on a regular basis, without any indication of what has been bought

of appetite, drowsiness, lack of concern • Losspersonal hygiene or appearance. for

• They find that drugs make them feel relaxed, sociable, energised • Drugs may be used commonly in their work or social environment • They may be curious and looking for something ‘new’ • They may be wanting to get away from financial something, such as pressures at work or
problems

• They may be seeking a release duringor during a particularly stressful or difficult time,
a period of change

It’s also important to remember that some of the above (especially the changes in behaviour) can occur without drugs playing any part. Someone might just be going through a difficult period – adolescence, for example, or a midlife crisis. Don’t let concern for your loved ones slide into suspicion. This can breed resentment and paranoia.

• They may be bored and looking for an escape or diversion
MORE ADVICE §

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ADVICE DRUG USE IN YOUR FAMILY
Young people, for instance, may take drugs because:

• • They find the ‘risk’ element of drug taking exciting • They are curious and hungry for new experiences influenced • They arefriends by the behaviour of their
They see drugs as a way of rebelling and asserting their independence Remember, there may be a number of reasons for a member of your family taking drugs, but selfreproach and blame on your part will not help improve the situation. It is far better that you try and understand the motivations at work and get to grips with the problem quickly. It will often have little or nothing to do with you. Blaming yourself for a family member’s drug taking isn’t going to help anyone – not them, and certainly not you.

WHERE CAN I GO FOR HELP?
Although you may feel alone, rest assured you’re not. There are many other people experiencing the same things as you, and there are support services there to help. Self Help Groups, Counselling Services and Drug Services provide information, support and advice, whatever stage someone is at. Depending on specific needs, Drug Services can provide or signpost people to the following services for drug users: groups • Support etc and day programmes, drop-in sessions • Methadone programmes • Counselling • Advice on housing, benefits, education and training • Prescription • Complimentary therapies such as acupuncture • Help with withdrawal or detox But you need to be realistic. These services won’t be able to do everything, and they certainly won’t be able to provide a ‘miracle cure’ or immediate answer to your problem. Treatment is available, but there is likely to be a waiting list. Increasingly, people are doing supported ‘detox’ programmes at home. Research shows that family support can make a real difference to the success of home detox. You will also often find that local services target users and not carers. You may need to look further for resources specifically aimed at you and your needs. But it is important that you do so: if you are to be of any help to a family member experiencing drug problems, you need to help yourself.

Adfam, the charity which works to raise awareness of the needs of the families of drug users, produces helpful booklets for the parents, partners, siblings, children and friends of drug users. You can visit their website - www.adfam.org.uk – for further information, and a searchable database of local services. And you can always talk to FRANK. Ring 0800 77 66 00, or log on to talktofrank.com.

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ADVICE BE FRANK WITH YOUR MATES
It's never easy telling someone you know that you don't like the way they're going about things. It's even harder when it's your best mate, boyfriend or girlfriend. But there are ways to broach what might feel like the mother of all difficult conversations. 1. Decide what you want to say
Before you say anything, figure out what your problem is with what they're doing – and what it is you want them to do. You might be unhappy about your friend or partner's choices, but there's no formula that can be applied to make someone stop using drugs. If you let them know how you feel, you might find there's room for a bit of compromise. But ultimately if you can't accept their choices, it comes down to whether you want to continue the friendship/relationship or not.

4. Focus on them - not the drugs
The speed, coke, heroin isn't doing anything to you. They are. How does their behaviour affect you? Are they unreliable? Is it their mood swings? Are you always paying for everything? What are the things that can happen if they continue doing what they're doing? And how does that create problems for you?

5. Stick by them
Don't turn your back on them. Listen to them and how they say they feel. Talk to them about their health and well being. Suggest what they might do but don't go on about it. If they want, offer to go with them if they go for help.

2. Talk to them when you're calm
It's really easy to have a row, shout at each other and make threats. But you won't get past how you're feeling if you're emotional. Get calm and talk through the issues. What's the problem? What do you want them to do? What do they need from you?

3. Avoid asking 'Why?'
Why? Because it puts people on the defensive. And, they might not know why they do five pills / have risky sex / owe the dealer money they haven't got. Ask questions beginning How, When, What, Where. It'll get the conversation moving and you won't simply get a Yes or No answer.

6. Talk to FRANK Ring FRANK on 0800 77 66 00 for free, confidential information and advice 24 hours a day, or log on to talktofrank.com

TRUE STORIES §

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ADVICE TRUE STORIES
WHEN IT’S YOUR PARTNER:
SUE AND DILESH
"I was so sick of talking about what seemed to be the same old things. I thought I was being very clear about what I saw were the problems - why does he get so stoned all the time? Why was he never at home? Why did he have no consideration for my feelings? It wasn't until I was talking to somebody and I was asked how Dil's behaviour was really affecting me that I realised how long it had been since we'd actually talked to each other about what the problems really were.

I sobbed my heart out for a good 15 minutes and told the counsellor that I was so tired of the whole situation that I guess I'd given up on Dil and just used to shout at him for being such a waster and then he'd get really defensive and storm off. When I finally managed to talk calmly with Dil he said that he knew deep down his drug use wasn't making things any better but that there were other issues we really needed to talk about and sort out."

WHEN IT’S YOUR MATE:
GARY AND MICHAEL
"Whenever I tried to talk to Michael about his drug use he would say that he had it under control, that it wasn't a problem and then walk away. The counsellor asked me to talk though how our conversations would go and I realised that all I ever seemed to focus on was the drugs use, not how I was affected by it or why Michael might be doing it.

I decided to try and change the way I talked about our situations. Michael told me about feeling depressed because he was unemployed and bored and how the drugs had become a way to pass the time and make himself feel better. I realised that I'd been banging on about him getting help for his drug use when perhaps what he needed more was help to make his life more satisfying. He said he also felt ashamed that I was earning all the money for us to live on which made him angry with me. I was fed up with him always being out of it so we never seemed to have any decent time together and I guess I also felt frustrated that I couldn't see how I could help him and was probably taking that frustration out on him. Once we were able to really talk about the problems we were facing it was so much easier to sort them out."

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ADVICE WHEN YOUR PARENTS HAVE A DRUG PROBLEM
Coping in a family where a parent or carer has a problem with drugs can feel very lonely. You don’t want to tell anyone. You’re afraid what people will think – and afraid of trouble with the police or social services. But if you’re in this situation, you’re not alone. Over a quarter of a million young people have one or more parents with a serious drug problem. Almost a million have a parent who has problems with alcohol. Which means that there ARE people out there who can understand how you feel – and organisations that can give you help and support.

HOW DOES IT FEEL?
In June 2003, a report called ‘Hidden Harm’ was published about the situation of children whose parents or carers have serious problems with drugs. In the report, young people spoke out about how they felt they, or their family life, was affected by their parents’ drug use: routine in • Not having a propermealtimes the bedtimes house for things like and having • Not food money in the house for things like violence, the police, • Being afraid of to their parents or to or what might happen the family • Having problems at school because they couldn’t concentrate • Being glad to go to school because it was calm and safe school • Missingbrothersto look after their parents or and sisters young have to keep their parents’ • Feeling like they and covering up what was drug use secret, going on

The Six C’s
The National Association for Children of Alcoholics uses these six ‘C’s for young people whose parents have problems with alcohol. They apply just as much if your parents have problems with drugs: I didn't CAUSE it I can't CONTROL it I can't CURE it I can take CARE of myself I can COMMUNICATE my feelings I can make healthy CHOICES

• Feeling hurt, rejected, sad, angry and ashamed • Feeling isolated and alone
MORE ADVICE §

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ADVICE
WHEN YOUR PARENTS HAVE A DRUG PROBLEM
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
When your parents have problems with drugs or alcohol, it can feel like looking after their needs is the priority. But it’s really important to keep a strong focus on your own needs and take care of yourself too. Here are some things that it’s important to remember: It’s not your fault – drug or drink • problems are their your parents’You are NOT responsibility. to blame You can’t control it – create your • parents’ problem withyou didn’tdrink – and you drugs or can’t make it stop. You can tell your parents how it makes you feel, and encourage them if they want to stop. But in the end the choice is theirs Be • Butpatient – over time, people CAN change. of sometimes they have to go through a lot ups and downs along the way. It’s sad to see someone go back to drugs or drink if they have been off it for a while – but it doesn’t mean they won’t get there in the end important to • Take time out – it’s reallyyou enjoy. Youtake time have a for yourself, and do stuff right to have fun and feel good about yourself. This isn’t being selfish – parents often feel guilty about their drug use and how it affects you, so seeing you have fun can actually help them feelings not • Talk about it – talking about yourit's about istaking about betraying other people care of yourself. Keep communicating with your parents and let them know how you feel. And if you can’t talk to them, and things are bad at home, it’s really important that you tell another adult – like a teacher, a relative, or a youth worker. You can also contact any of the organisations listed below. They won’t judge you, but they will listen and offer support and advice. Talking to people who will take you seriously really can make it easier to cope

It doesn’t help to cover things up – it’s understandable that you may want to protect your mum, dad or family, but if there’s something wrong, pretending things are OK won’t help. It’s important that people face up to the reality of what’s happening – and that includes the person who has the drug or drink problem

Your feelings are normal – if you live with • someone who has a problem with drink or drugs, it’s normal to have very powerful and conflicting feelings – like anger, fear, love, hatred, loyalty, shame. You can love your parent, but hate what they do and the effect it can have. The feelings can be confusing and upsetting - but it doesn’t mean they are not OK

• Get some help – get in touch with one of the organisations listed below. They won’t judge
you, but they will listen and be able to give you support and advice. Talking to people who will take you seriously really can make it easier to cope
CONNEXIONS Confidential advice, support and information by phone, text, email, webchat for everyone aged between 13 and 19, on issues from families to health, jobs and relationships. Tel: 080 800 13 2 19 Text: 077664 13 2 19 Web: www.connexions-direct.com FRANK Free, confidential advice 24 hours a day for anyone concerned or affected by drugs. Tel: 0800 77 66 00 Web: talktofrank.com Email: frank@talktofrank.com YOUNG CARERS Part of the Children’s Society, they try to raise awareness of the issues facing young people who have to look after a parent or family member. Website has a link to find young carers projects in local areas. Web: www.childrenssociety.org.uk/youngcarers

HELP AND ADVICE
ADFAM A range of publications to support families affected by drugs and alcohol including a publication for professionals who may come into contact with children whom they know (or suspect) have drug-using parents.‘Journeys – when parents take drugs’ is also accompanied by a mini leaflet for 11-15 year olds. Tel: 020 7928 8898 Web: www.adfam.org.uk ALATEEN Support and local groups for teenagers who have been affected by someone else’s drinking - usually a parent. Website has information, plus books and pamphlets you can order. Tel: 020 7403 0888 (helpline open 24 hours) Web: www.alanonuk.org.uk/alateen.php CHILDLINE Confidential 24-hour helpline for children or young people in any kind of trouble or danger. Tel: 0800 11 11 (helpline open 24 hours) Web: www.childline.org.uk

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ACTIVITY FLASH CARDS FOR PARENTS
Why do it? Group or individual activity What you’ll need Discussion-starter for parents to help open up and explore attitudes, knowledge and awareness about young people and drugs Group A clear wallspace Sticky tack Marker pens Large sheets of paper How long will it take? 30 minutes

This activity is designed to help kickstart discussion and debate, and draw out the range of attitudes and knowledge among groups of parents and carers about drugs and young people. You could use it at the beginning of an event as an icebreaker, or towards the end as a way of enabling the audience to participate and perhaps get to know each other in small groups.

The Brief If working in small groups, each group will need a volunteer facilitator and a cut-up copy of the flashcards overleaf. For a large group, either make a big set of flash cards on sheets of paper or simply write up the words as you go along. New words to add to the list could be put forward by the group. Ask the group to quickly debate each word or flash card, not censoring their views and putting forward the first response that comes into their heads. Write up the responses or ask the groups to do so. If time allows, as a contrast you could select certain words and ask the group to suggest what the response of young people might be to those words. Display the responses and see whether you – or the group – can draw out key themes. Any themes which emerge could provide a useful framework for ongoing discussion.

Other Suggested Activities Ask the group to remember three words that struck a chord with them and take them away to think about. The cards can also be used to start discussions with their family at home. Perhaps one of the group could write a short piece for your newsletter on the exercise and how it made them think differently about drugs and young people. Remember, if they want more information and advice, they can always call FRANK.

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ACTIVITY FLASH CARD FOR PARENTS
FEARS EMBARRASSED EXPERIMENT THE MEDIA FAMILY COMMUNICATION ALCOHOL HARMLESS MATES RESPONSIBILITIES SHAME NORMAL SMOKING HEROIN FUN ECSTASY ILLEGAL LIMITS DANGER SIGNS RISKS HEALTHY

ACTIVITY PROBLEM PAGE
Why do it? Group or individual activity What you’ll need To start people thinking about parents, young people and drugs Group Copies of the Problem Page overleaf Copies of the FRANK Briefing and FRANK Advice sheets for parents If possible, access to talktofrank.com (or to basic drug information materials) Pens and paper How long will it take? 45 minutes

This activity is designed for use with either parents and carers or with young people. It’s designed to get them thinking about the role of parents when it comes to drugs, how young people’s views differ from those of parents, and how young people and parents can communicate constructively about drugs issues.

The Brief: Divide the group into small working groups of three or four. If you are working with parents and young people together, decide whether you want each group to contain a mixture, or whether you want to separate them into different groups (i.e. whether you want negotiation, dialogue – and possible confrontation! – between parents and young people to take place within or outside the small groups; this may depend on whether you have extra facilitators available). Give each group a cut up copy of the problems in the Problem Page (you could also ask them to make up short imaginary problem letters to FRANK from parents and young people and write them down). Ask them to imagine that they are FRANK, and have the job of giving a reply to the letter writer. Using the materials available, ask them to investigate, agree and make notes of their reply – and of the key points of dialogue that come up in the group as they go about the task on a separate sheet. When they have finished the task, bring the group/s together for discussion. Ask them to share and compare their replies with the rest of the group, and to talk through how easy or difficult they found it to answer the problem. Finally, ask them to talk about the issues and discussions that took place as they carried out the task, addressing issues such as:

• What has it made them think about the role of parents in helping young people understand and deal with drugs? • What challenges do parents face? • How do young people’s and parents’ attitudes differ? • What kind of support do young people need? • And what kind of support do parents need? • Will it change their views in future?
0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ACTIVITY PROBLEM PAGE
Dear FRANK, to ly started going ghter has recent s the My 16 year-old dau She often return on the weekends. m looking clubs regularly ears into her roo ernoon and disapp next aft t several of her appy. I know tha exhausted and unh e started that she may hav take Ecstasy and friends to approach the y unsure of how lf’ until herself. I’m ver ’t really ‘herse Some weeks she isn again. subject. le thing starts and then the who some days later, thought we always ut sex and I’ve e. We have talked abo Now I’m not so sur of communication. have good levels r Concerned, Cheste

Worried, Wolverha mpton

Please help me. My Dad found an Ecstas y pill in my room last week and ha s been going mad ever since. He say won’t let me go ou s he t again til I promis e never to touch drugs. He seems to any think I am going to ruin my life, but the fact is I have only taken E’s on ce before, and ha good experience d a and felt quite rea dy for it as I dropp with good mates ed it who looked after me. I don’t know to convince my Da how d that I’m not in danger – even tho know there are ris ugh I ks, the truth is I am likely to take again at some point E’s . Funny thing is, I never drink or sm and don’t want to oke – and my Dad does both. He doesn’t seem to get the po int. I am 15, and think I am quite mature. I don’t wa nt to deceive my Dad, so I wish we could talk about it.

Dear FRANK, 

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

Dear FRANK,

and I want to know and 13 year-old boys, I am a mother of 11 newspapers, I know ut drugs. Reading the what to tell them abo ke sure they have the m soon. I want to ma they will confront the twice. What can I I want them to think right information, and ling them too much? tell them without tel Anxious, Andover

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

ACTIVITY DRUGS QUIZ FOR PARENTS
QUESTIONS
1 What should you do if you find out that a young person in your care has taken drugs? A Place them under citizen’s arrest and call the Police or an Ambulance B Stay calm, gather some information and then start a dialogue C Have a stiff drink, smoke a fag and hope they ‘grow out of it’ Where do young people most often acquire recreational drugs? A From dealers on street corners and in clubs B From the internet C From friends, family and people they know At what age are children ready to talk about drugs? A Whenever it feels right or as soon as they bring the subject up B As soon as they can pronounce the words “Jimi Hendrix” C 11 years and upwards What’s the going price for a tab of ecstasy? A Between 50p and £1 B Between £3 and £8 C Between £10 and £15 What do the 3 R’s stand for when talking to young people about drugs? A Reassure, Reassure, Reassure B Remonstrate, Remonstrate, Remonstrate C Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Which of the following groups of objects might indicate that someone is using drugs? A Scissors, sticky tape, magnifying glass, cotton B Tin foil, tiny bits of clear food wrap, sugar lumps, shredded cigarettes C Cocktail sticks, gravel, scratch cards, boiled sweets 7 What does heroin look like? A Brownish white to brown powder B Yellow crystals C Horse dung How is ecstasy classified by law: A As a Class B drug B As a Class C drug C As a Class A drug Who or what on earth is ‘Percy’? A Slang term for a cider and heroin cocktail B Slang term for a drug dealer C Slang term for cocaine

8

2

9

3

10 What is the drug Ketamine also used for? A Cleaning toilets B Anaesthetising horses C Making fireworks 11 What is a ‘come down’? A The uncomfortable experience which follows the ‘high’ of a drug B A spiked drink C A free sample of a drug given out by dealer to create addiction 12 What is the possible outcome of mixing Viagra with ‘poppers’? A An erection lasting for several days, followed by a headache B Sudden cravings, an immediate addiction lasting months C A heart attack 13 What is a ‘Speedball’? A A drugs party held in someone’s car B Magic mushrooms mixed into a caffeine drink C A mixture of cocaine and heroin

4

5

6

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ACTIVITY DRUGS QUIZ FOR PARENTS
14 What should a young person do if arrested or questioned by the Police? A Not say a word until it suits them B Give their name and address and make a decision about having a solicitor C Run like the wind 15 How many UK households are affected by alcoholism? A 500,000 B 2 million C No-one really knows 16 Which of the following is good advice for someone who’s addicted to drugs or alcohol? A Have one big ‘final binge’ and then turn your back on it all B Don’t discuss it with the rest of the family, it will distress them C Confide in someone you trust 17 Which of the following is it not illegal for a person under 16 to use? A Cigarettes B Poppers (Amyl nitrite) C Solvents 18 When will cannabis become a legal drug? A It has been since 1965 B It became legal in January 2004 C There are no plans for it to be legal 19 Which of the following is contained in cigarettes? A Polonium: a radioactive component B Arsenic: a killer poison C Acetone: found in nail varnish 20 What is Rohypnol ? A A powerful sedative sometimes used to spike drinks B A trance-like state caused by taking LSD C A new excercise fad 21 What does absinthe do? A Make the heart grow fonder B Cause drunkenness with mild narcoticlike effects C Cause hair loss and gout

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ACTIVITY DRUGS QUIZ FOR PARENTS
ANSWERS
1-B
You may find you have a better dialogue if you GENTLY ask How?, When?, What?, Where? type questions, rather than Why?. Often people don’t really know why they started taking drugs and it can put them on the defensive, rather than open up a conversation.

2-C
Although people often purchase drugs from dealers, most small scale purchases of recreational substances take place within a peer group, with one person going to visit an established dealer.

3-A
As with sex education, it’s important to deal with young people on an individual basis, telling them as much as you think they need to know, try to stay aware of current trends and slang so that you can answer basic questions.

4-B
A tab of ecstasy costs between £3 and £8, depending on the type you buy and where you live. 4% of 16-25 year olds have taken ecstasy in the last 3 months.

5-A
The most important thing for young people to understand is that you are available, that you care and that you are willing to listen without exploding!

6-B
Also look out for: spoons discoloured from heating, pill boxes, syringes or needles, cigarette papers, lighters, cigarette ends made of card, butane gas canisters, pipes, small stickers or transfers, small bottles.

7-A
In small doses, heroin gives users a profound sense of warmth and well-being . In large doses, heroin can lead to drowsiness. In excessive doses, heroin can result in overdose or coma, with fatal consequences.

8-C
Ecstasy is classified as a Class A drug.

9-C
‘Percy’, or cocaine, is also known as charlie, C, snow, and toot.

10 - B
Since Ketamine numbs the body, users often feel removed from their reality and may run the risk of seriously injuring themselves without realising it.

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ACTIVITY DRUGS QUIZ FOR PARENTS
ANSWERS
11 - A
It is probably more comfortable and safer to allow the effects of any drug to wear off without masking it with another. It is suggested to chill out in a comfortable place, and eat a balanced meal as soon as your appetite returns. Meanwhile keep sipping water, or vitamin C loaded orange juice.

12 - C
Mixing any drugs can have unexpected side effects as every human body responds differently. As well as having the Mother of all headaches, poppers sometimes leave a rash around the mouth too.

13 - C
Mixing cocaine and heroin can be a dangerous combination.

14 - B
By giving your name and address you will not lose any of your rights, and the police will be able to supply you with a list of independent solicitors who you can talk to on the phone or they will visit.

15 - B
Technically, alcohol is a depressant, which means it slows down your body’s responses in many different ways, which is why speech can become slurred, vision blurred and balance impaired.

16 - C
Once you have confided in someone you trust, you are much closer to getting a grip on how you are being affected by drugs or alcohol. Whether you chat to a mate, family member or seek professional counselling sessions, by breaking the silence you are breaking denial and more likely to reach an honest & open perspective.

17 - A, B & C
However, while it is NOT illegal for young people to use them, shopkeepers and sales outlets cannot legally sell them to young people, although each substance has a different age limit.

18 - C
Cannabis was reclassified as a Class C drug in January 2004, however it is still illegal.

19 - A, B, & C
Cigarettes can contain up to 4,000 different chemicals. Each chemical alone can be harmful to the body, and when combined create a toxic cocktail which slowly degrades the body and its systems.

20 - A
Rohypnol is an inexpensive drug, intended to treat sleep disorders. It dissolves quickly in drinks, leaving no odour or taste, and causes blackouts.

21 - B
The herb with a spicy, bitter taste that gives absinthe its unique kick is called ‘wormwood’, it contains thujones, chemicals that act on the same brain receptors as cannabis.

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ACTIVITY DRUGS CROSSWORD FOR PARENTS
Why do it? Group or individual activity What you’ll need For fun, to test knowledge, and to start people thinking Individual Copies of the crossword Pens How long will it take? 45 minutes

The Brief:
Solve the clues and complete the crossword.

Other suggested activities:

• Try to get the local newspaper or the newsletter of a major local employer to reproduce the crossword. petrol • See if local–schools, companies, FRANKstations or video shops will distribute photocopies of the crossword and also this issue’s Quiz for Parents. • Use the blank template to design a crossword with new clues and answers.
1 1 6 2 1 1 1 1 3 1 4 1 1 8 1 1 1 9 1 1 5

A L C O H O L M B A B B B
7

A W A R E N E
1

S
1 1

S B
10

S
1 1 1

B B B B B B B C B B T
1 1

P U F
1 1

F
1

B A D A P
1 1 1 12 13

B G R A S
1 1 1 1 14 1 1

S

H B
11 1

F
1

B B B B B B R B B B B T
1

T
1

B R B A
1

E N E R G Y B
1 15

B U B B
1 1

S
1 1

P A C E S
1 1

T
1 1 1

B
16 1 22

I
1

B

L
1 1

B H O U S
1 17 1 19 1 1 1 25 1

E B A B B B
1 18 1 1

A B N B U B B B B
1 1

T

F
1 1

B Y B T
1 1

S S

M B E Y E B
1 1 1

F A B B B K E I
1 1 1 1

B B
1 1 1

I
20 1 1 1 1 1

B B B B B B C O K E B G B B B U C B B B B U B B B R
1 1 1 23 1 1 27 1 1 1 24

N A R C O T
26

E B U B B B B O B B
1 1 1 1 1 32 1 1

F
1

R A N K B E
1 1 1 29 1 1 1 1 1 1 28 1

B H L
26 30 1

B B P B B B G B B D B B B B I
1

B H E R O
1

N B B E B A D F A M B
31

B E
1

S
1

B B
1

L
1

B P M A B B B B B O B B 0 B R O H Y P N O L
1 1 1 1 1 1

B
33

L

B B B

L

U P P E R S

B

T

B B B B B B B D B

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

ACTIVITY
1 2 3 4 5

T
1

T
1 1 1 1 7

T
1 1

T
1 8 1 1 1 9 1 1

T
1 1

DOWN
B B
1

B
6

B B B B T
1 1 1 1 1 1 12

B B B B B B B T
1 1 1 1 13

T
1

B G
1 1 1 14 1 1

B
10

B
11

B B B B B B G B
1 15

B B B B B B
1

B R
1

T
1 1

T
1

B
1

T
1

B
1 1

B
1

B H
1 1

B
1

B
1

B B
1 1

B
1 16

B
1

B B
17 1 19

B
1 1

B B
18 1 1

B
1 1 1 1 1

B
1 20 1

T
1 1 1 22

B
1

T T
1

B B B K B
1 1 1 23 1 1

B B B B B B B B B
1 1 1 29 1 1 1 1 1

B B B B B B T
1

T
1 1 1 1 24 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 31 1 1 1

B B B B B B B B
1

B
1 1 26

B B
25 1 1 1 1 32

F
1 28

B H
26 27

B B T B B
1

T

B B B G B B B B B
1

B B B B B
1

B
1

T
30

B A
1

1. _ Sulphate. Also known as speed (11) 2. A common kick-start for the morning (8) 3. The Beatles sang about Lucy (3) 5. The agony and the dance drug (7) 8. Believe in others (5) 10. Tell your kids it’ll be all right (8) 12. This solvent causes sticky situations (4) 13. You’re smoking over 4000 chemicals in this stuff (7) 14. Good advice can …… your children (9) 22. see 15 across 24. These can be bitter things to swallow (5) 25. Slang word for drugs (4) 26. If you need this talk to Frank (4) 27. Lots of the second vowel (2) 29. This can swing from happy to sad (4) 31. Container for weed (3)

B
1

T

T B
1 1

B B B B B T
1 1 1 1 1 1

B B

B
33

B B B
1

B B

T

B B B B B B B

ACROSS
1. We often forget this is a drug (7) 4. It’s good to know what’s going on around you (9) 6. Stoned dragon who lived by the sea (4) 7. Change to suit a situation (5) 9. Cows eat the green stuff (5) 11. Food and drugs can give you this to keep you going (6) 14. We all need a personal bit of this (5) 15. 22 down. Domestic regulations (5, 5). 16. The pupils here can change size (3) 17. Organisation for people to talk about their loved ones and drugs (2) 18. Slang name for a horse tranquiliser becoming popular on the dance scene (3) 19. Charlie’s drink (4) 20. Drugs in US police shows (8) 23. 0800 77 66 00 (5). 26. This drug isn’t the leading lady in a movie. (6) 28. National organisation providing drugs and alcohol advice for families (5) 30. Same as 27 down. (2) 31. Ecstasy-like drug but stronger (3) 32. The date rape drug (7) 33. Top bit of your shoe - makes you feel high (6)

HOW DID YOU DO?
Over 30 correct
You are well informed about drugs. Share your knowledge with your family and friends. Remember to keep the channels of communication open so your child feels they can trust you and chat openly to you. And if there’s anything else you need to find out, talk to FRANK: call free on 0800 77 66 00 for confidential information and advice, 24 hours a day, or visit the website, talktofrank.com

15–29
You know some facts about drugs but it might help to find out more. Knowing a bit more will help you feel confident in talking to your child about drugs. All you need to know is how drugs might affect your child’s health and welfare. Call FRANK free on 0800 77 66 00 for confidential information and advice, 24 hours a day, or visit the website, talktofrank.com

Less than 15
Many parents are concerned about drugs but know very little about them. Being able to talk to your child about drugs could help them in a big way. Arm yourself with some basic facts. Call FRANK free on 0800 77 66 00 for confidential information and advice, 24 hours a day, or visit the website, talktofrank.com

0800 77 66 00 talktofrank.com

FREE CONFIDENTIAL DRUGS INFORMATION AND ADVICE 24HRS A DAY

MORE
TITLE & DESCRIPTION FRANK display kit Starter pack of resources to help you spread the word about FRANK, containing: 100 each of FRANK for young people leaflets, FRANK for parents leaflets, and FRANK with your mates credit cards and FRANK generic postcards; 20 sheets of FRANK stickers; 200 FRANK business cards and 2 FRANK A3 posters. FRANK Pubs and Clubs kit A kit containing a selection of ambient media resources for use in pubs, bars and clubs. FRANK Facts and Activities A set of factsheets covering a variety of drugs along with activities with a drug theme including games, a quiz and a crossword for use with young people. PRODUCT CODE QUANTITY MAXIMUM ORDER

31598

No limit

40095

10

40535

10

FRANK Easy to Read Drug Pack A pack for people with learning difficulties or low literacy levels covering legal and illegal drugs, the law, . basic first aid, drugs and sex and fact sheets. To order copies call 08702 414 680 and quote code ERDP FRANK for young people leaflet Leaflet encouraging young people to get in touch with FRANK. FRANK for parents leaflet Leaflet encouraging parents to discuss drugs with their children and to call FRANK for help and advice. Drugs – What the law says leaflet What the law says and what it means. Talk About Cannabis leaflet Testimonials from young people who have tried cannabis. FRANK parents’ guide to drugs and alcohol Information about drugs and the law, plus practical advice on understanding and talking to children at different key ages. The Score - facts about drugs Leaflet aimed at 14-16 year olds. 31588 No limit

31589 34102 40533

No limit 500 500

28251 20850

200 200 No limit

FRANK with your mates credit card Credit card sized resource for young people to hand to their mates.... 31590 FRANK business card Credit card sized resource highlighting how to get in touch with FRANK, with blank reverse for extra or local information.

Additional languages can be downloaded online at www.drugs.gov.uk/campaign/languages
English version Arabic version Somali version Gujurati version Bengali version Punjabi version Urdu version Chinese version FRANK poster (A3 size) Highlighting the different ways to get in touch with FRANK. FRANK poster (A2 size) Highlighting the different ways to get in touch with FRANK. FRANK poster (A2 size) Slogan: Coke, E’s, heroin. FRANK sorts me out with all of them. 31591 31938 31940 31941 31943 31944 31946 31948 31592 31593 32481 No limit 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 50 20 50

CONTINUED OVER §

MORE

TITLE & DESCRIPTION FRANK poster (A3 size) Slogan: Coke, E’s, heroin. FRANK sorts me out with all of them. FRANK poster (A2 size) Slogan: When my mate offered me drugs FRANK told me what to do. FRANK poster (A3 size) Slogan: When my sister wanted to do drugs, I introduced her to FRANK. FRANK postcards: A series of postcards with drugs messages. Hi (generic message) The world’s got a coke problem (cocaine message) Smokin’ (heroin message) Skin up (cannabis message) I love rock (crack message) Hard on (cocaine message) Been there, done that (generic message) Take me (class A message) FRANK Action Update Series of themed packs with ideas, background briefing, resources, activities and tip sheets for communications and awareness work in tandem with FRANK. Summer: feel the heat! Holidays, festivals, summer clubbing, off to college. We are Family Dealing with drugs issues in the family. Understanding Diversity Special reference edition on communicating with diverse audiences. Party Safe – Party Sound! Excess during the party season. Cannabis Reclassification. Drugs – the deal for students Focusing on drugs and other lifestyle issues at college and university. Produced in association with NUS. Happy 1st Birthday FRANK! A round-up and celebration of the first year of campaign activities, statistics and a look ahead to year 2. Understanding Crack Cocaine Special reference edition focusing on crack cocaine. FRANK at Work Drugs and alcohol misuse in the workplace. NAME ORGANISATION ADDRESS

PRODUCT CODE 32482 33871

QUANTITY

MAXIMUM ORDER 50 50

32483

50

31594 31649 31650 31651 31652 31653 31654 31655

No limit No limit No limit No limit No limit No limit No limit No limit

40096 33057

10 10

33534 33861 40534

10 10 30

40012

10

40142 40280 40683

10 10 30

POSTCODE

TO ORDER RESOURCES PLEASE FILL IN AND FAX THIS FORM TO NHS RESPONSELINE ON 01623 724 524 Alternatively you can place your order by phone, mail or email: TEL: 08701 555 455 EMAIL: doh@prolog.uk.com MAIL: Department of Health, PO Box 777, London SE1 6XH For drug information leaflets in foreign languages please order from www.drugs.gov.uk/campaign/languages or call 08702 414 680 and quote code BMECOMSTKT