WEST MIDLANDS

Multi Agency Public Protection Panel
Annual Report of the Chief Constable of West Midlands Police and Chief Officer of Probation West Midlands 2002

Managing the risk posed by sexual, violent and other potentially dangerous offenders

Building Safer Communities -

Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

CONTENTS

Page Foreword Introduction Summary of roles and responsibilities Education Services Health Services Housing Authorities and Accommodation Providers Probation West Midlands Prison Service Social Services West Midlands Police Youth Offending Service Managing risk – Outline of arrangements made Monitoring progress – Strategic management arrangements Protecting the vulnerable – Disclosure and raising public awareness Responsibilities to victims Statistical information Glossary Further Information 3 5 6 6 6 7 8 9 10 10 12 14

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20 23 25 26 28

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FOREWORD

We are pleased to present the first annual report on the work of the Multi Agency Public Protection Panels (MAPPPs) in the West Midlands. MAPPPs are forums consisting of representatives from police, probation and other key agencies, focusing on the assessment and management of high risk sexual and violent offenders. Agencies share available information in order to agree and implement risk management plans designed to protect the public and help offenders to reintegrate back into society The publication of this report is of great significance. It is a symbol of accountability and openness regarding the management of violent, sexual and dangerous offenders, a group that understandably causes the public great concern. This document explains how we work together to protect the public. It also describes the contribution of each agency involved in the MAPPP process, particularly the key role of the police and probation in managing the risk posed by these offenders in order to protect the most vulnerable members of society. Detailed risk assessments and the close and careful management of violent and sexual offenders are vital if these individuals are to live in the community. This can only be achieved by the close collaboration of those responsible for housing, monitoring and treating these offenders and protecting the public from serious harm. Since the creation of the first MAPPPs in this area in 1997, we have gained greater understanding and insight into the work we do and the responsibilities we share. Police and probation officers, and health, housing, education and social work professionals now work together more closely than ever before. With the establishment of the MAPPPs network, decisions taken by agencies working with violent and sexual offenders are shared, not made in isolation. Local police and probation officers have effective lines of communication with each other and colleagues in other agencies in a true example of joint working. In this report you will find a summary of the roles and responsibilities held by relevant agencies and a description of how they are discharged. At present, MAPPP meetings are not open to the general public, although plans for some community representation in the public protection process are currently under discussion. The issue of disclosure is a contentious one. MAPPPs are required to decide what, if any, information is provided to individuals or local communities about particular offenders. The powers we have regarding disclosure, and the factors we take into consideration, are set out in this report. We also provide some case examples where we have used our powers of disclosure to enhance community safety.

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FOREWORD

We are pleased to present the first annual report on the work of the Multi Agency Public Protection Panels (MAPPPs) in the West Midlands. MAPPPs are forums consisting of representatives from police, probation and other key agencies, focusing on the assessment and management of high risk sexual and violent offenders. Agencies share available information in order to agree and implement risk management plans designed to protect the public and help offenders to reintegrate back into society The publication of this report is of great significance. It is a symbol of accountability and openness regarding the management of violent, sexual and dangerous offenders, a group that understandably causes the public great concern. This document explains how we work together to protect the public. It also describes the contribution of each agency involved in the MAPPP process, particularly the key role of the police and probation in managing the risk posed by these offenders in order to protect the most vulnerable members of society. Detailed risk assessments and the close and careful management of violent and sexual offenders are vital if these individuals are to live in the community. This can only be achieved by the close collaboration of those responsible for housing, monitoring and treating these offenders and protecting the public from serious harm. Since the creation of the first MAPPPs in this area in 1997, we have gained greater understanding and insight into the work we do and the responsibilities we share. Police and probation officers, and health, housing, education and social work professionals now work together more closely than ever before. With the establishment of the MAPPPs network, decisions taken by agencies working with violent and sexual offenders are shared, not made in isolation. Local police and probation officers have effective lines of communication with each other and colleagues in other agencies in a true example of joint working. In this report you will find a summary of the roles and responsibilities held by relevant agencies and a description of how they are discharged. At present, MAPPP meetings are not open to the general public, although plans for some community representation in the public protection process are currently under discussion. The issue of disclosure is a contentious one. MAPPPs are required to decide what, if any, information is provided to individuals or local communities about particular offenders. The powers we have regarding disclosure, and the factors we take into consideration, are set out in this report. We also provide some case examples where we have used our powers of disclosure to enhance community safety.

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INTRODUCTION

The Criminal Justice and Court Service Act 2000 introduced a statutory duty on the police and probation to make joint arrangements for the assessment and management of the risk posed by sexual, violent and other potentially dangerous offenders who may cause serious harm to the public. This is the first annual report detailing the Multi Agency Public Protection Panel (MAPPP) arrangements within the West Midlands. Protecting the public is of paramount importance and all agencies have been working together for a number of years within the West Midlands to manage the risk posed by violent and sexual offenders. The Sex Offenders Act 1997 became a milestone in inter-agency working, with the police and probation taking responsibility for the assessment and management of registered sex offenders. Building on those arrangements over the intervening years has led to the development of multi agency protocols agreed by police, probation, health, education, housing, social services, local authorities, prison service and fire service for the assessment and management of sexual, violent and other dangerous offenders. This document will provide further details of the arrangements in the West Midlands and give contact points for any additional enquiries, including agencies other than the police and probation.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

SUMMARY OF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Introduction An awareness and appreciation of the roles of others is essential for effective collaboration. This section outlines the main roles and responsibilities of the key statutory agencies involved in the MAPPP process in the West Midlands. Education Services Schools and colleges create and maintain a safe environment for children and young people. Through their day-to-day contact with pupils and direct work with families, education staff have a crucial role to play in noticing indicators of possible abuse or neglect and in referring concerns to the appropriate agency, normally the social services department. The curriculum can also play a preventative role in developing awareness and resilience and in preparing children and young people for their future responsibilities as adults, parents and citizens. Throughout the West Midlands, education services are actively involved in protecting children through their work with Area Child Protection Committees (ACPC) and MAPPPs. Each local education authority (LEA) has designated officers who are responsible for child protection issues. The officers attend MAPPPs providing vital information about juvenile offenders’ behaviour and the impact of treatment and intervention on the child’s care. They assist in the development of the ‘Risk Management Plan’, focused on protecting children and addressing offending behaviour. In support of local MAPPPs there is also the West Midlands strategic MAPPP which has representatives from all of the key statutory agencies involved in combating child abuse and managing the risk posed by sexual, violent and dangerous offenders. Education is represented at both regional and local authority level. Health Services The National Health Service (NHS) has a strong history of working within the ACPC structure to provide appropriate care and support to children and families. More recently, the NHS has developed working practices with strategic MAPPPs within the West Midlands, where it plays a key role in supporting the care and treatment of mentally disordered offenders and others with similar needs. Due to the universal nature of health services (from primary care to very specialist care) many professionals can be involved in the treatment and support of child, adolescent and adult offenders. Their contribution to the effective monitoring and risk assessment process is through: q Recognising the signs and symptoms of abuse and taking appropriate action. q Contributing to MAPPP processes by sharing information as part of the risk management process.
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q Participating in child protection conferences providing support for individuals at risk of harm and self-harm. q Providing assessment and treatment services to individuals displaying inappropriate sexual behaviour and support for parents, partners and carers of abusers. q Providing care and treatment in a range of secure accommodation for people requiring low, medium and high security psychiatric care. q Working with prison service colleagues to provide high quality health care to prisoners. The NHS West Midlands takes the overall strategic lead for health on interagency working to manage the risk posed by sexual and violent offenders who also have a serious mental health problem. The NHS is represented at the strategic MAPPP, ensuring appropriate health service involvement in the work of the local MAPPPs. They ensure the strategic forum receives appropriate advice on primary, secondary and mental health issues. Housing Authorities and Accommodation Providers Local authority housing departments have an important part to play in the management of the risk posed by dangerous offenders. The seven authorities in the West Midlands are represented on each of the 21 MAPPPs in the area. By virtue of their involvement in MAPPPs, housing managers are able to advise on the provision of appropriate accommodation for sexual and violent offenders, taking into account such factors as the location of past victims, the whereabouts of known associates of the offender and any relevant patterns in his/her offending. When offenders are placed in local authority housing, the housing managers are often able to provide vital information to MAPPPs on any concerns that may arise, for example in relation to an offender’s lifestyle, contacts or behaviour. The seven local authority housing departments are in the process of signing up to a protocol, negotiated jointly with West Midlands Police and Probation West Midlands, on the accommodation of sex offenders. The protocol explicitly recognises the importance of accommodation as a key element in protecting the public from the risks posed by sex offenders and provides a framework for an informed, consistent approach to the safe resettlement of sex offenders in suitable accommodation. There is an increasingly important role for voluntary sector accommodation providers in the public protection system. Twelve local housing associations are part-funded by probation to provide structured, supported accommodation for ex-offenders and those at risk of committing crime. This sometimes involves finding suitable accommodation for sexual and violent offenders, often as a second stage move after release from prison and a period of time in a probation hostel. A number of these providers have used probation grants to appoint public protection officers whose task is to monitor and assist the rehabilitation of offenders placed in supported accommodation. The work of the public protection officers is overseen by MAPPPs and the officers regularly report to MAPPPs on the progress of offenders with whom they are in contact.
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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

SUMMARY OF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Probation West Midlands Within Probation West Midlands offenders are managed according to the risk they present to the community. The most serious offenders are supervised by specialist public protection teams (PPTs). Each PPT is managed by a senior probation officer and staffed by officers possessing particular skills in the assessment and management of offenders who pose a significant risk to the public. Workloads within PPTs are carefully controlled to ensure officers have the time and space to supervise effectively the most worrying offenders. For offenders sent to prison, PPT officers play a key role in planning and preparation toward their eventual discharge back into the community. This includes making contributions to prison service sentence planning processes and recommendations about an offender’s suitability for early release on home detention curfew or parole licence. Preparations for release involve ensuring that the offender’s accommodation plans are appropriate, liaising with other key agencies and giving consideration to the needs and concerns of known victims. For offenders in the community, either on court orders or following discharge from prison, contact levels are high, frequently exceeding the national standards requirements. As well as individual contact with PPT probation officers, many high-risk offenders are required to attend specialised group programmes designed to reduce the risk of further offending. These programmes are long, intense and very demanding for those taking part. Probation West Midlands currently delivers specialist programmes for sex offenders and domestic violence perpetrators. The West Midlands Sex Offender Programme has received national recognition for its proven track record in reducing offending. The Domestic Violence Programme is currently subject of a rigorous research project being conducted at Birmingham University. Offenders who fail to co-operate with any aspect of their supervision are subject to nationally prescribed enforcement procedures. Those who breach the terms of their community orders will be returned to court for re-sentencing. Those on licence from prison will be liable to immediate recall. PPT officers liaise closely with the police, local courts, prison service and the Home Office Sentence Enforcement Unit to ensure high risk offenders who breach the conditions of their supervision are dealt with promptly and firmly. Decisions about which offenders should be supervised by PPTs are made using standardised assessment tools. These tools gauge both the likelihood of re-offending and the risk of harm the offender poses to the public. Offenders assessed as high or very high risk of harm will automatically be referred to PPTs, as will some assessed as medium

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risk. Probation West Midlands is in the process of implementing a new accredited national assessment tool known as OASys (Offender Assessment System). This should strengthen even further the reliability and consistency of the assessment process. Following the initial assessment, more specialised assessments are undertaken using tools specific to certain offender groups. For example, Risk Matrix 2000 is used for sex offenders and the Spousal Assault Risk Assessment tool (SARA) for domestic violence perpetrators. These more specialised assessments help to define what type of treatment and management is most likely to be effective in reducing the risks posed by individual offenders. Probation West Midlands is represented on the strategic MAPPP by an assistant chief officer and each of the 21 local MAPPPs by one of the PPT senior probation officers. This officer is responsible for bringing relevant information to the MAPPP, participating in discussions and decisions about individual cases and providing feedback to supervising officers. Probation also holds responsibility for ensuring that the views and concerns of victims are considered by MAPPPs. Where probation has concerns about a particularly dangerous offender, the PPT senior officer will convene a special meeting of the MAPPP to review the case. The MAPPP may decide to place the offender on the potentially dangerous offender (PDO) register. PDOs are subject to the most stringent oversight and monitoring of any group of offenders. Prison Service The prison service works closely with other agencies to identify any prisoner who may represent a risk to the public on release. Regular risk assessments take account of progress made during the sentence and inform decisions on sentence planning for individual prisoners, including sex offender treatment programmes. The assessment process will be greatly enhanced when ultimately the prison service adopts OASys, the new national assessment tool. The prison service is required to notify social services departments and probation of plans to release prisoners convicted of sexual and violent offences, and offences against children and young people so that appropriate action can be taken by agencies in the community to minimise any risk. At Her Majesty’s Prison Birmingham there is a close working relationship between the police, probation and social services in the planning, risk assessment and preparation for the release of offenders into the community. The prison service is engaged in the MAPPP process, through its close liaison with the Joint Public Protection Unit. This police and probation joint unit co-ordinates multi-agency intervention in managing the risk posed by potentially dangerous offenders who indicate an unwillingness to co-operate with statutory agencies on their release from prison.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

SUMMARY OF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
The prison service has recently been invited to become a member of the strategic MAPPP and a governor represents it from HMP Birmingham. Social Services A key objective for social services departments is to ensure that children and vulnerable adults are protected from significant harm. Social services are the lead agency and have a legal responsibility under the Children’s Act 1989 for the protection of children. Social services have a vast experience of working together within the ACPC structure. The purpose of MAPPPs is to effectively manage and monitor the risk posed by dangerous offenders and they are inextricably linked to the work of ACPCs. To reinforce the strategic link between the MAPPP and ACPC structures a number of senior managers from social services and other agencies are key members of both ACPC and the strategic MAPPP. At a local level each of the 21 MAPPPs has a designated representative from social services as a core member. Social services contribute to the effective monitoring and risk assessment process by: q Undertaking child protection investigations where they have reason to suspect that a child in their area is suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm. q Sharing vital information about offenders’ behaviour and potential victims within the MAPPP structure. q Managing the child protection register and conferences focused on providing support for children at risk of significant harm. q Providing assessment, treatment and therapeutic help to children displaying inappropriate sexual behaviour, as well as support for parents of abusers. q Undertaking an assessment of need and formulating a development plan for juvenile perpetrators to meet their needs and manage the risk they pose. q Ensuring specialist child protection and care officers report any change of circumstances where there is an increased likelihood of re-offending. West Midlands Police West Midlands Police are committed to building safer communities by working in partnership with key stakeholders to reduce crime and antisocial behaviour. Police and probation have joint responsibility for the management of sexual, violent and other dangerous offenders. In the West Midlands there has been a long history of inter-agency working and close co-operation between statutory organisations involved in supervision, monitoring, treatment and rehabilitation of offenders. In developing these arrangements a truly multi-agency approach has been implemented with all key agencies committed to the MAPPP structure. The MAPPP framework enables all agencies to contribute in the effective management of high risk offenders in our community.
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The West Midlands Police force area is divided into 21 geographic areas called operational command units (OCUs), each headed by a chief superintendent responsible directly to the chief constable for achieving performance targets set down in the local policing plan and delivering policing services locally focused on tackling issues of community concern. Community based policing is delivered through a sector model comprising teams of uniform police constables who take personal responsibility for local areas called ‘microbeats’. This enables officers to become custodians of the community, devoting time to tackle issues of local concern. Micro beat officers are able to gather evidence and intelligence on the activities of sexual, violent and dangerous offenders living within the community. These officers play a crucial role in the monitoring process, ensuring those convicted of sexual crimes comply with the sex offender registration requirements in notifying the police of any change in their personal details, place of residence or travel arrangements outside the United Kingdom. At OCU level the management of sexual and violent offenders is coordinated via the community safety bureau, a local centre of excellence on a wide range of specialist policing issues. The team of experts is tasked with building strong local partnerships to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour. A significant proportion of their activity is focused on public protection and the management of high-risk offenders. In this area of operation dedicated offender management officers have a specific responsibility for targeting specialist resources and activity at reducing the risk posed by sexual and high-risk offenders. The offender management officers work with offenders, monitoring their behaviour and enforcing the law, but providing support to enable offenders an opportunity to reintegrate back into society without fear of a vigilante attack. Each OCU has a dedicated MAPPP concentrating on local offenders within that community. The crime manager, an officer of the rank of detective chief inspector, chairs the local panel, with representatives from probation and other key agencies contributing to the development of a risk management plan for each offender based on the risk they present. The crime manager is able to commit specialist resources either overtly in a monitoring role, or, in high-risk cases when it is necessary and proportionate, to conduct covert operations and surveillance. In cases where there is a serious risk of harm to the public, the police actively seek to utilise Sex Offender Orders and third party disclosure to protect the public. The police and probation have established the JPPU, staffed by a team of police and probation personnel to act as custodian of the register for sex offenders and potentially dangerous offenders. The joint team has become a centre of excellence for the initial risk assessment of offenders and provides expert support and guidance to all agencies on the impact of treatment programmes, media strategy and accommodating the highest risk offenders. The JPPU has facilitated multi-agency training seminars throughout the year on the

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

SUMMARY OF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
effective management of sexual and violent offenders within the community. The unit provides a link to the Home Office Dangerous Offender Unit, which can provide advice and support on the management of the highest risk offenders. The JPPU is one of the first of its kind in the country and is being recognised nationally as best practice. West Midlands Police also has a specialist team of detectives from the Crime Support Department who support OCUs; their terms of reference are to target covert operations on the minority of very highrisk predatory paedophiles in the West Midlands. This team of detectives regularly conduct joint operations with the National Crime Squad and other law enforcement agencies throughout the country. They are supported by the force’s specialist Hi-Tech Crime Unit which is able to undertake covert investigations into child abuse and paedophile activity on the Internet. The police also provide crime prevention advice for internet users, particularly parents and young children, on the West Midlands Police website. West Midlands Police take a holistic approach to the management of sex offenders, adopting a fully-integrated partnership approach in this challenging and emotive area of policing. Youth Offending Service The Youth Offending Service is responsible for the direct delivery of services to young offenders, their families and victims. This includes undertaking risk assessments of all young people who offend. The youth offending workers’ assessment identifies: q The general risk to the public q What further work is required to prevent further offending q The impact of interventions on re-offending. The Youth Offending Service prepares all Pre-Sentence Reports (PSRs) on young people appearing before the courts. The PSR has an important role in providing courts with information and advice on the risk to the public and on possible sentencing options to reduce that risk. The service also supervises all community sentences and postcustodial licences. The new intensive supervision and surveillance programmes for persistent young offenders enable young people to be targeted more effectively and information to be shared locally between the Youth Offending Service and the police. Some areas of the West Midlands have a dedicated specialist service for young people who sexually abuse others. In these areas the young person receives an input from this service and the youth offending team. In areas where there is not a specialist service, the youth offending team has a contract with a specialist consultant to oversee any offending behaviour work.

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Where a young person has been charged with, or warned for, any offence of a sexual or violent nature against a child, young person or vulnerable adult where there are ongoing serious concerns about the safety of others, a referral is made to the local social services children and families team. The Youth Offending Service is represented at the strategic and local MAPPPs sharing information on those young people who are registered as Schedule 1 Offenders (persons convicted of offences against children or young people) and helping the development of policy aimed at preventing violent and sexual crime occurring in the first instance.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

MANAGING RISK – OUTLINE OF ARRANGEMENTS MADE
In addition to the day-to-day work of individual organisations outlined earlier in this report, the West Midlands has developed multi-agency arrangements for the management of sexual, violent and other dangerous offenders. Best practice has been adopted within the national framework of MAPPPs. The MAPPP structure enables all agencies to work together sharing vital information, planning and implementing effective intervention to protect the public, yet providing an opportunity for offenders to reintegrate back into society without fear of retribution or reprisal. The multi-agency approach recognises the positive impact that treatment programmes, proactive law enforcement, monitoring and working with offenders can have on reducing crime rates. All offenders managed under these arrangements are subject to regular ongoing risk assessment and monitoring by law enforcement agencies. In the West Midlands a two-tiered approach enables the best use of multi-agency resources by differentiating between the vast majority of lower risk offenders and those perpetrators who pose the highest risk to society. The 21 police OCUs across the force area all have a dedicated MAPPP concentrating on local offenders within that community. A police chief inspector chairs the local panels, with representatives from probation and other key agencies. Information shared within the meetings is confidential to the agencies represented and should only be used for the protection of the public. The MAPPP meetings held each month enable agencies to review progress on the agreed management plans. Across the region there have been over 150 MAPPP meetings already this year. By focusing on the highest risk offenders, resources and action can be targeted at preventing crime and ultimately protecting the vulnerable. The categories of cases that are reviewed at MAPPPs are detailed below: q Sex offenders assessed as high or very high risk. q Potentially dangerous offenders. q Dangerous persons suffering from a severe personality disorder. q Unusual resource allocation or the involvement of other agencies not usually involved in the MAPPP process. q Serious community concern or media implications. q De-registration of Schedule 1 offenders under the Children and Young Persons Act. Those offenders considered lower risk are also subject of regular review, monitoring and risk assessment. The police liaise with key agencies within the MAPPP structure who share information about changes in offenders’ behaviour or circumstances that may indicate an increased risk of reoffending. Where any agency expresses concern, or there is an identified increase in risk, the case is referred to the MAPPP.

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The role of MAPPP q Share information and decide upon the level of risk posed by the offender. q Recommend the action necessary, including contingencies as part of a risk management plan. q Monitor and ensure implementation of the agreed risk management plan. q Review the level of risk and the risk management plan in light of changes in circumstances or behaviour. q Deploy and manage necessary multi-agency resources. q Consider the need for notifying the community through the third party disclosure process. q Allay community fear by developing of a media strategy where appropriate. q Consider de-registration of potentially dangerous offenders when there is no longer a continuing risk of serious harm. q Consider the appropriateness of prohibitions within a Sex Offender Order to minimise risk in cases of serious harm. Representation on MAPPP The following is a list of core representatives who form MAPPPs. Police Detective chief inspector (chair), child protection officer, offender management officer from the community safety bureau, secretarial support and minute taker Probation Senior probation officers from the public protection team or case manager where appropriate. Social Services Child protection co-ordinator, principle officer, child protection case worker, team manager where appropriate Housing Dept/ Housing Housing Associations Local housing manager Health Case manager from the Mental Health Service where appropriate There may be occasions when, at the discretion of the chairperson, a specific professional from an agency will be invited to contribute their knowledge of a particular offender, e.g education, prison service, youth offending team caseworker.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

MANAGING RISK – OUTLINE OF ARRANGEMENTS MADE
Sexual and violent crime in context During the year, West Midlands Police recorded 372,257 crimes. Sexually-related crime accounts for 0.8 per cent of overall crime. There were 3,082 sexual offences recorded during 2001/2002. The detection rate was 50 per cent for this category of crime. During 2001/2002 there were 11,399 cases of wounding recorded and 70.1 per cent were detected. Most child victims are not abused by strangers but by someone they know, often a member of the family, a friend or a neighbour. Many children are abused by older children or adolescents; some of these young people have themselves been abused. Risk assessment The effective management of offenders within the community requires a robust system of information sharing and risk assessment. Within the West Midlands the police, probation and prison service utilise the Risk Matrix 2000 assessment tool to accurately and consistently assess the danger posed by an offender. The Risk Matrix 2000 assessment tool identifies those male adult offenders most likely to re-offend, categorising the risk as very high, high, medium or low. This initial assessment provides a baseline for practitioners and managers to work together in the monitoring and risk assessment process. The Risk Matrix 2000 model takes into account an offender’s criminal lifestyle and sexually deviant behaviour in assessing long-term risk. Nationally work is being undertaken to develop a model for assessing the risk posed by juvenile and female offenders. The following charts show numbers of registered sex offenders within the West Midlands, by age, gender and risk, as at 31 March 2002. Three hundred and ninety one (24 per cent) are currently serving a custodial sentence. One hundred and six juveniles (seven per cent) are on the sex offenders register. Only 12 (one per cent) of the registered sex offenders are female. The majority of sex offenders are male, 75 per cent are either low or medium risk. The 21 local MAPPPs target specialist resources on those offenders who pose the highest risk to society. Sixty three (six per cent) are considered to pose a very high risk. Every offender is subject to a detailed risk management plan aimed at protecting the public and preventing re-offending.

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MANAGING RISK – OUTLINE OF ARRANGEMENTS MADE
WEST MIDLANDS REGISTERED SEX OFFENDERS The total number of resgistered sex offenders is 1,583 Pie chart to show sex offenders by age group and gender

Serving custodial sentence - 24% Male - 68%
Juveniles - 7% Female - 1%

Serving custodial sentence (391) Female (12) Male (1,074)

Juvenile (106)
Bar chart to show male sex offenders by risk Low 35%, Medium 40%, High 19%, Very High 6%

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

M O N I T O R I N G P R O G R E S S – S T R AT E G I C MANAGEMENT ARRANGEMENTS
Two years ago the West Midlands strategic MAPPP was established to develop, support and evaluate the effectiveness of the joint arrangements for the assessment and management of the risk posed by sexual, violent and dangerous offenders in the West Midlands. A detective superintendent from West Midlands Police chairs the strategic forum and the vice chair is an assistant chief officer from Probation West Midlands. Senior managers from education, local authority housing, social services, police, health, probation, youth offending service and sex offender treatment programme providers are represented at this strategic forum. The members have concentrated on the development of the multi-agency policy and procedures aimed at continuously improving the MAPPP structure. The strategic MAPPP members meet bi-monthly, ensuring there is effective communication between all agencies within the MAPPP structure. The strategic committee promotes best practice and receives feedback on areas for policy development from the local MAPPPs. The strategic committee has recently established three sub committees: 1) Quality assurance, audit and serious case review This committee is responsible for undertaking formal reviews of serious cases, identifying where improvements are required within individual agencies or multi-agency working. The committee is responsible for ensuring standards are set, best practice is carried out and processes within the MAPPP structure are audited to ensure all agencies work effectively in managing the risk posed by sexual and violent offenders. 2) Policy and procedure This committee is responsible for the development, implementation and monitoring of multi-agency policy and procedures. 3) Training, development and marketing This committee is responsible for the provision of a training and marketing strategy. The committee is tasked with delivering regular high quality multi-agency training to managers and practitioners involved in the management, risk assessment, treatment and accommodation of sexual and violent offenders. The strategic MAPPP will commission, receive and approve annual reports from each of the sub-committees. The strategic MAPPP will produce and monitor performance against an annual business plan. A survey has been commissioned by the strategic MAPPP of all MAPPP members to identify areas for further development in the multiagency arrangements. The survey findings identified a number of areas for improvement in the management of the meetings and the communication process. These issues have been addressed and a further survey will be conducted in due course to further improve the MAPPP system.
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M O N I T O R I N G P R O G R E S S – S T R AT E G I C MANAGEMENT ARRANGEMENTS

Multi-agency training programme A multi-agency training programme has been in place for a number of years. The main focus has been on raising awareness and understanding of each agency’s contribution in the public protection process. Regular training seminars are held during the year with delegates from all agencies involved in the MAPPP process. Some of the topics covered at the training events are detailed below: q Information sharing and third party disclosure q Applying for a Sex Offender Order q Assessing the risk of re-offending (Risk Matrix 2000 assessment model) q Impact of sex offender treatment programmes q Accommodating high risk offenders q Role of the Home Office Dangerous Offenders Unit Each of the training events and workshops is subject to evaluation. Delegates’ feedback helps to shape and influence future training events.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

DISCLOSURE AND COMMUNITY N O T I F I C AT I O N
Information shared within the MAPPP meetings is confidential to the agencies represented and should only be used as agreed for the protection of the public. In law there is a general assumption that information about an individual should not be disclosed. This recognises the detrimental impact disclosure may have on a convicted person trying to lead a normal life. Protecting the public is of paramount importance and the police have a common law duty to prevent and detect crime and a corresponding power to disclose the information where necessary to protect the public. In the West Midlands the circumstances of each case are considered carefully and an assessment is undertaken to identify the risk posed by the individual, the vulnerability of those who may be at risk and the impact of disclosure on the offender. Although the decision to disclose is the responsibility of the police and decisions are sanctioned at assistant chief constable level, a consultation process takes place with all key relevant agencies. Throughout the year West Midlands Police regularly exercised its duty to disclose information about convicted sex offenders in order to protect the public from serious harm. Detailed below are a number of examples where it was appropriate, proportionate and necessary to disclose relevant information. Case Study One A sex offender who targeted children was prohibited by the courts from visiting public swimming baths. Leisure centre managers were provided with a photograph and details of the offender, together with an action plan should the offender attempt to gain access to the premises. Case Study Two Through working with offenders the police are able to identify when an offender is replicating their previous offending behaviour or creating opportunities and situations that provides them access to potential victims. On a number of occasions the police have dentified child sex offenders who have sought inappropriate employment or charity work, which would bring them into unsupervised contact with young children. Where offenders have sought inappropriate employment that would bring them into unsupervised contact with children they are challenged by the police about their behaviour and the consequences of their inappropriate conduct. In the vast majority of cases offenders co-operate, negating the need to disclose. However, on a number of occasions it has been necessary to notify senior managers of commercial, public and voluntary organisations. On one such occasion an offender sought employment as a driver for a company who provided a taxi service for children with learning difficulties. It was clear from the offender’s previous convictions that these children would be potentially at risk.
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DISCLOSURE AND COMMUNITY N O T I F I C AT I O N
The company acted on the information to ensure that the offender was prevented from any future involvement in this area of their business. Case Study Three A paedophile was responsible for a catalogue of offences against children to whom he gained access through his involvement with religious groups. On release from prison he began to make contact with religious groups, paying particular attention to children. West Midlands Police successfully obtained a Sex Offender Order to prohibit inappropriate contact with children. The offender travelled extensively throughout the Midlands and the sheer number and diversity of religious groups across the Midlands made it an impossible task to directly notify all spiritual leaders of the risks that he posed to children. A decision was made to hold a press conference releasing details of the case to the media, to raise public awareness and enable religious communities, parents and children to take appropriate action and notify the police of any inappropriate contact made by the offender. This was an exceptional case requiring a detailed contingency plan to relocate the offender and provide them with appropriate support and protection from vigilante attack. West Midlands Police are conscious of human rights legislation, but are prepared to utilise the power to disclose information to individuals, groups or the wider community when we believe it is necessary to prevent a crime and to protect the vulnerable. The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) conducted a review of the impact of community notification in the United States of America, commonly known as Megan’s Law. The research found no evidence to indicate that blanket community notification reduces offending against children. The police recognise the argument for public notification; however, experience has shown that some sex offenders who have been effectively managed in the community would disappear, fearing retribution and reprisals if their details were made public. Driving offenders underground makes it more difficult to monitor them and reduces public protection. The police understand parents’ concerns and are actively involved in programmes designed to raise public awareness of how sex offenders operate and the signs and symptoms of sexual abuse. West Midlands Police are actively involved in the Stop It Now! initiative, which promotes greater public understanding and responsibility on everyone to take action. It challenges abusers or those thinking about abusing a child to seek help now. Stop It Now! is supported by an alliance involving all the key children’s charities and representatives from the government and statutory agencies.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

DISCLOSURE AND COMMUNITY N O T I F I C AT I O N
A local project is being developed in four local authority areas in the Black Country, involving partnerships with all agencies involved in the protection of children, including the police, probation, social services, health and housing. The project complements the work of MAPPPs and will focus on a media campaign to raise awareness of child sexual abuse and how communities and families can protect children.

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RESPONSIBILITIES TO VICTIMS

Section 69 of the Criminal Justice and Court Service Act 2000 places a statutory duty on the probation service to contact victims and ask if they wish to be consulted about the release arrangements for violent and sexual offenders sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment or more. Within Probation West Midlands, work with victims is co-ordinated and delivered by a dedicated Victim Liaison Unit (VLU). With offices located in Birmingham, Coventry and Wolverhampton, the unit is managed by a full time senior probation officer and staffed by 10 victim liaison officers. The unit has been in operation since 1999, although the service has been engaged in supporting victims at a local level since the early 1980s and has developed high levels of skill and expertise in working with victims of crime. By virtue of its contacts with victims the unit plays a significant role in the work of probation officers responsible for supervising sex and violent offenders. Unit officers contribute regularly to key decisions about release from prison and arrangements for supervision in the community. When an offender receives a prison sentence of 12 months or more for sexual or violent offences, a unit officer will seek to make contact with the victim(s). This will be offered on an entirely voluntary basis as it is for the victim to decide if he or she wishes to have contact with the probation service. If contact is established, the VLO will offer to keep the victims informed of relevant developments during the offender’s sentence. Victims will be offered the opportunity to comment on any special conditions that should apply to an offender’s release (for example, to stay away from certain areas or not to contact the victim or his/her family). Once release plans have been finalised, the victim will be informed of the approximate date of release and of any special conditions that will be included in the offender’s licence. The case remains open until the end of the licence period, during which time the victim will be kept informed of any significant developments. At present the VLU deals with about 2,000 referrals each year. The unit has well-developed links with other key agencies, including Victim Support, the police, social services departments and other local organisations working with victims. A protocol has been agreed to ensure that victim’s concerns are properly represented and considered within the MAPPP system. The protocol provides VLU officers with direct access to local MAPPP meetings, so they can inform those meetings of the views of the victims of those offenders being reviewed by the MAPPP. Involvement in MAPPPs also enables the VLO to keep victims properly informed about key decisions in the management and supervision of offenders. The VLU is currently developing a Restorative Justice Programme for implementation later this year. This nine-stage programme will provide the opportunity for communication between victims and offenders, under very controlled conditions, provided the victim wishes to participate. The aim of the programme is for offenders to make amends to the victim in some way appropriate to the victim’s needs and wishes. For example, an apology can sometimes ease at least some of the emotional impact suffered by victims of serious crime. The programme will be very carefully managed. Offenders must show they are genuinely motivated by a desire to ease the pain of their victims.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

RESPONSIBILITIES TO VICTIMS
At all times the nature and extent of any contact between victim and offender will be subject to the wishes and needs of the victim. Victim Support is the national charity for people affected by crime. It is an independent organisation, offering a free and confidential service, whether or not a crime has been reported. Trained staff and volunteers at local branches offer information and support to victims, witnesses, their families and friends. Victim Support also provides a witness service, based in every criminal court in England and Wales, to offer assistance before, during and after a trial. The Victim Support help line – 0845 30 30 900 – offers information, support and details of local services and other relevant organisations.

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S TAT I S T I C A L I N F O R M AT I O N

Table 1 shows offenders that fall within MAPPP arrangements

Number of Offenders 1192

i) The number of Registered Sex Offenders (RSOs) in the community on 31/03/02 (s68 (2) Criminal Jusctice & Criminal Services Act 2000) The number of RSOs per 100,000 population ii) The number of sex offenders cautioned/convicted for breaches of registration requirenment 01/04/01 - 31/03/02 iii) The number of Sex Offender Orders 01/04/01 - 31/03/02 a) total applied for b) granted c) not granted d) applications still in progress iv) The total number of violent offenders and other sex offenders 01/04/01 - 31/03/02 (s68 (3)(4) & (5) CJ&CS Act 2000) The number of other offenders 01/04/01 - 31/03/02 (s67 (2) (b) CJ&CS Act 2000)

44

33

10 7 1 2 3414

101

The table below provides information on the new costs as a result of the implementation of the Criminal Justice and Court Service Act 2000. Probation £’000 Staff costs Other costs Total £63,000 £63,000 Police £’000 £95,000 £4,000 £99,000 Total

£58,000 £4,000 £162,000

Notes: 1. Costs are those addional costs which have arisen as a result of the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000, sections 67 and 68. They should not include any costs which were already being met by the relevant authorities. 2. Costs should be produced on the same accounting basis as appropriate authorities annual accounts (but not for consistency, staff who do not have a contract of employment should be included under other). 3. This table is not subject to audit. 4. Overheads should be included where they are an additional cost, rather that a transferred cost. The above costs do not take into account each agencies contribution in staff time and resources in support of the existing strategic and 21 local MAPPPs fora. Inter-agency arrangements for the management of sex offenders and potentially dangerous offenders have been across the West Midlands for a number of years.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

GLOSSARY
Area Child Protection Committee (ACPC) A multi-agency forum that develops policies and procedures in respect of child protection, provides advice on the conduct of cases and oversees inter-agency training. There is an ACPC in each local authority area. Community Rehabilitation Order (formerly Probation Order) A court order which places offenders under the supervision of the probation service for a period of time between six months and three years. The order may contain one or more additional requirements, including residence at a specified address, participation in a group programme or treatment for a particular problem. The purposes of the order are to protect the public, to reduce the likelihood of offending and to rehabilitate the offender. Community Sex Offender Groupwork Programme A group programme for convicted male sex offenders assessed as posing a high risk of harm to the public. The programme was developed by Probation West Midlands and has been delivered locally for the last 10 years. Following a successful evaluation which demonstrated the programme’s success in reducing offending, it has been accredited for national use. The full version of the programme involves offenders in 280 hours of group work, supported by individual supervision with their probation officers. Dangerous Offenders Unit (DOU) A dedicated unit within the National Probation Directorate. The DOU has oversight of the MAPPP system at a national level, as well as a number of other responsibilities connected to the management of high risk and dangerous offenders. Dangerous People with Severe Personality Disorder (DPSPD) People who exhibit recognised clinical symptoms which, coupled with other problems such as substance abuse, mental illness or social difficulties, can mean they pose a significant risk of serious harm to others. Home Office A government department responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, including the work of the police, probation and prison services. Joint Public Protection Unit (JPPU) A unit where police and probation work together, providing a centre of excellence in the assessment of high risk offenders. Personnel have an in-depth knowledge and expertise and are able to offer advice, support and guidance to MAPPPs on the management of violent and sexual offenders. Microbeat A ‘microbeat’ is a small area within a police beat or sector which can be a street, a number of streets, a particular building, such as a temple, a block of flats or a shopping area for which a named officer has responsibility
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GLOSSARY
Multi Agency Public Protection Panel (MAPPP) A forum consisting of representatives from police, probation and other key agencies, focusing on the assessment and management of high risk sexual, violent and other potentially dangerous offenders. Agencies share available information in order to agree and implement risk management plans designed to protect the public and help offenders to reintegrate back into society. Operational Command Unit (OCU) A unit of West Midlands Police responsible for a particular geographic area, ensuring policing services are delivered locally. West Midlands Police is divided into 21 OCUs, each with a local dedicated MAPPP. Potentially Dangerous Offender (PDO) An offender identified and assessed by a MAPPP as posing an active threat of serious physical or psychological harm to the public. Registered Sex Offender A person who, as defined under Schedule 1 of the Sex Offender Act 1997, is required to register with the police for a specified period of time, depending on the nature of the offence(s) and the sentence imposed by the court. Restraining Order An order which can be imposed by a crown court or youth court when sentencing a sex offender to 12 months or more in custody. The effect of the order is to place certain restrictions on the offender’s behaviour and activities during sentence and following release from prison, in order to protect named individuals or the public at large from serious harm. Risk Matrix 2000 A risk assessment tool used by police and probation to determine the level of risk posed by adult male violent and sexual offenders. Sex Offender Order An order that courts can impose, on application by the police, to restrict the behaviour and activities of sex offenders with the intention of reducing the risk of further offending. Recommendations for Sex Offender Orders are often made by MAPPP. Offenders made subject to such an order are placed on the Sex Offenders Register for a minimum of five years. Schedule 1 Offender A person convicted of offences against children or young people. Victim Liaison Unit (VLU) A dedicated unit within Probation West Midlands responsible for contact and communication with victims of violent and sexual crime.

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Multi Agency Public Partnership Panel Annual Report 2002

F U R T H E R I N F O R M AT I O N

This report has been produced by West Midlands Police and Probation West Midlands in conjunction with members of the West Midlands Multi Agency Public Protection panel.

Joint Public Protection Unit West Midlands Police Lloyd House Colmore Circus Queensway Birmingham B4 6NQ 0121 609 6954

West Midlands Police Chief Constable Po Box 52 Lloyd House Colmore Circus Queensway Birmingham B4 6NQ 0845 113 5000 mailmaster@west-midlands.police.uk www.west-midlands.police.uk

Probation West Midlands Chief Officer Probation West Midlands 1 Victoria Square Birmingham B1 1BD 0121 626 5000 www.westmidlands-probation.gov.uk

Victim Support Help Line 0845 303 0900

8547

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