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U.S. presses Pakistan for key answers
DETAILS ON BIN LADEN COMPOUND
Response could determine future of relationship
BY K AREN AND K ARIN

D E Y OUNG B RULLIARD

ASIF HASSAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Activists of Jamaat-ud-Dawa, once known as Lashkar-i-Taiba, chant during funeral prayers for Osama bin Laden in Karachi, Pakistan.

CORRECTING THE RECORD

White House says bin Laden was unarmed, had no human shield
BY AND

G REG M ILLER J OBY W ARRICK

The White House retreated Tuesday from its most provocative assertions about the operation to kill Osama bin Laden, acknowledging that the al-Qaeda leader was neither armed nor hiding behind a female “human shield” when U.S. commandos fatally shot him during a predawn raid. The disclosures put the Obama administration on the defensive about whether it had exaggerated elements of earlier accounts for propaganda gain. At the same time, additional details surfaced Tuesday that depict a mission launched amid far greater political and operational uncertainty than had been revealed. CIA Director Leon Panetta, who supervised the operation, said in interviews that U.S. intelligence agencies never had pho-

IN TODAY’S PAPER A boost for Obama: A new poll finds that the president’s approval ratings are up. A10 Shadowy neighbor: Residents of Abbottabad, Pakistan, find it hard to fathom that Osama bin Laden lived among them. A8 In the Loop: A new, or at least revised, counterterror calendar. A19 Ruth Marcus: Why we’re allowed a triumphant shout. A21

6
tographs or other proof that bin Laden was living at the compound in Pakistan that was targeted. Panetta told Time magazine that analysts were only 60 to 80 percent confident bin Laden would be found. “We never had direct evidence

WASHINGTONPOST.COM Get the latest updates, photo galleries and videos on the death of the al-Qaeda leader.

that he in fact had ever been there or was located there,” Panetta said in a separate interview with “PBS NewsHour.” “The reality was that we could have gone in there and not found bin Laden at all.” President Obama nevertheless

approved the operation, Panetta and other U.S. officials said, because there was little chance of obtaining more definitive intelligence on bin Laden’s location, which had amounted to a guessing game for the better part of 10 years. U.S. commandos carried out not only bin Laden’s body but also a cache of computers and other material found at the compound, “more than we were expecting to find,” said a U.S. intelligence official, who like others discussed operational details on the condition of anonymity. “There’s written material, pictures — there’s all kinds of stuff,” the official said. The material, portions of which appear to have been bin Laden’s personal property, were being shipped to CIA headquarters in Virginia for analysis. Some digital files were bin laden continued on A11

Obama administration officials here and in Islamabad demanded Tuesday that Pakistan quickly provide answers to specific questions about Osama bin Laden and his years-long residence in a bustling Pakistani city surrounded by military installations. In addition to detailed information about the bin Laden compound — who owned and built the structure and its security system — Pakistani officials were asked in meetings with U.S. military, intelligence and diplomatic interlocutors to provide names of witnesses who can testify about visitors to the compound. U.S. lawmakers have said it defied logic that bin Laden was able to hide in plain sight without some level of official Pakistani

knowledge or complicity. Some have suggested that $3 billion in annual U.S. military and economic assistance be reconsidered, while others joined with House Speaker John A. Boehner (ROhio), who said Tuesday that “this is no time to back away from Pakistan.” How Pakistan responds will determine the future of the longbrittle relationship between the two countries, as well as the endgame in the Afghanistan war, according to U.S. and Pakistani officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to talk candidly about what they called a pivotal moment. The stakes could not be higher. A final breach could put at risk administration hopes of continuing military progress against Afpakistan continued on A8

THE AFGHANISTAN WAR

U.S. sees chance to accelerate negotiations with Taliban
BY

R AJIV C HANDRASEKARAN

The Obama administration is seeking to use the killing of Osama bin Laden to accelerate a negotiated settlement with the Taliban and hasten the end of the Afghanistan war, according to U.S. officials involved in war policy. Administration officials think it could now be easier for the reclusive leader of the largest Taliban faction, Mohammad Omar, to break his group’s alliance with alQaeda, a key U.S. requirement for any peace deal. They also think that bin Laden’s death could make

peace talks a more palatable outcome for Americans and insulate President Obama from criticism that his administration would be negotiating with terrorists. “Bin Laden’s death is the beginning of the endgame in Afghanistan,” said a senior administration official who, like others interviewed for this article, spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal policy deliberations. “It changes everything.” Another senior official involved in Afghanistan policy said the killafghanistan continued on A12

Judge’s sexual orientation clouds gay marriage issue
Calif. ban struck down, its proponents turn to basic question of ethics
BY

A Caps collapse

S ANDHYA S OMASHEKHAR

Shortly after he retired, the federal judge who struck down California’s voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage acknowledged publicly what had been rumored for months: He is gay and in a long-term relationship with another man. Opponents of same-sex marriage seized on Vaughn Walker’s revelation and filed a motion last week to have his ruling on Proposition 8 vacated, arguing that he could benefit personally from his decision if he wanted to marry his partner. Although unusual, the effort could have legal merit, some experts say. If successful, it could mark the first time a judge has

been disqualified or rebuked for issues related to his sexual orientation. And it would be a setback for gay rights groups, which view his opinion on Proposition 8 as one of their most significant victories in the quest for equal rights for same-sex couples. While it is generally held that judges may not be removed because of their religion or minority status, experts say Proposition 8’s backers have come up with a novel strategy that reignites a complex, emotional debate. In the 1960s and ’70s, many questioned whether female or black judges could fairly decide cases of sex or race discrimination, said Stephen Gillers, a law professor at New York University who teaches legal ethics. “Appellate courts quickly and correctly held that a judge’s sex and race have no bearing on the ability to decide cases impartially,” he said. “Now we’re seeing the judge continued on A13

Montgomery council passes 5-cent bag tax
Officials hope that levy, which begins Jan. 1, will spur state to act, too
BY

M ICHAEL L ARIS

JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST

Alex Ovechkin bleeds from his nose as the Capitals take one on the chin in a 4-3 loss to Tampa Bay in Game 3 of their Eastern Conference semifinal series. By giving up two goals in 24 seconds to let a third-period lead slip away, Washington trails, 3-0, in the series. Story, D1.
INSIDE

The Montgomery County Council approved a 5-cent bag tax Tuesday that will go into effect Jan. 1, a move environmentalists hope will revive a stalled effort to pass a similar tax statewide. Montgomery politicians were inspired in part by the District’s bag tax, but they took the idea further by including nearly all retail establishments, not just those that sell food. The tax will apply to paper and plastic bags at thousands of merchants. Among the few exceptions are paper bags from restaurants and pharmacy bags holding prescription drugs. Officials say the tax will raise

about $1 million a year, some of which will fund free reusable bags for the poor and elderly. The money will also help fund cleanups of streams and rivers, although backers expect bag use — and tax receipts — to drop quickly. “I consider this to be a nudge, not a nuisance. This nudge has profound effects on our consciousness,” said council member Roger Berliner (D-Bethesda-Potomac), who cast one of the eight votes for the measure. Reducing the number of plastic bags that end up clogging waterways is the principal aim of the new tax. By taxing paper bags as well, officials are trying to keep shoppers from simply choosing paper instead. Nancy Floreen (D-At Large), the lone dissenter, called the tax a costly distraction when officials should be focused on maintaining basic services in a tough budget tax continued on A16

FOOD 1

Mom’s other kitchen
How four new mothers in the restaurant business balance their home lives and their work lives. E1
STYLE

POLITICS & THE NATION

Lawmakers seek more drilling
The memory of the oil spill is still fresh, but gas prices appear to be looming larger. A3
THE REGION

SPORTS 1

An MVP at 22

TURMOIL IN THE MIDDLE EAST

Renewal, and renewable power
A historic black church in the District gets its electricity from solar energy. B1
OPINIONS

The man with the . . .
. . . “next Stieg Larsson” reviews to live up to. Meet Jo Nesbo, best-selling crime novelist from Norway. C1

Jimmy Carter: Don’t fear the HamasFatah deal. A21

Derrick Rose of the Chicago Bulls supplants Wes Unseld as the youngest winner of the NBA honor. D3

LIBYA: A prosecutor for the International Criminal Court says there are “reasonable grounds” to charge Moammar Gaddafi’s security forces with war crimes. A6 SYRIA: Despite protests across the country, the capital, Damascus, remains relatively quiet. A6 YEMEN: The embattled president delays a meeting with a key mediator from a powerful alliance of neighboring gulf countries. A7

BUSINESS NEWS..............A15 CLASSIFIEDS.....................D8 COMICS ............................. C8

EDITORIALS/LETTERS ..... A20 FED PAGE.........................A19 GOING OUT GUIDE ............. C5

KIDSPOST........................C12 LOTTERIES.........................B3 MOVIES..............................C7

OBITUARIES.......................B6 TELEVISION ....................... C6 WORLD NEWS....................A4

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DAILY CODE

Details, B2

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CONTENT © 2011 The Washington Post Year 134, No. 150

Victory123 A2 Politics

& The Nation

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KLMNO Looking for a clean sweep
A3 A3

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Politics & Nation
Soaring prices alter energy debate a year after gulf spill Rise in sea levels may be faster than expected

The World
Iraq shaken by a wave of assassinations Tories win majority in Canada Prosecutor preparing Gaddafi case All quiet in Syria’s capital despite nationwide protests Residents find it hard to fathom Bin Laden lived among them Bin Laden T-shirts: Making a quick buck, the American way A4 A4 A6 A6 A8 A9

CORRECTIONS 
A May 3 Health and Science article about cervical cancer incorrectly said that seven in 10 cases of cervical cancer are caused by the human papillomavirus. Almost all cases are caused by HPV, but seven in 10 cases are caused by the types of HPV that the HPV vaccine protects against.  A May 2 A-section article about embassy attacks that followed a NATO airstrike in Tripoli, Libya, misidentified the son of Moammar Gaddafi who was killed in the airstrike. Saif al-Arab Gaddafi was killed, not Saif al-Islam Gaddafi.

The Washington Post is committed to correcting errors that appear in the newspaper. Those interested in contacting the paper for that purpose can: E-mail: corrections@washpost.com. Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be connected to the desk involved — National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports, Business or any of the weekly sections. The ombudsman, who acts as the readers’ representative, can be reached by calling 202-334-7582 or e-mailing ombudsman@washpost.com.
MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Philadelphia sanitation worker Buckey Henry, left, and other municipal workers hold a demonstration Tuesday at John F. Kennedy Plaza, which is also known as Love Park. Their aim is to negotiate a new contract with the city.

Bipartisan effort to control U.S. debt stalls
Senate’s Gang of Six hopeful that agreement can still be reached
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A bipartisan effort to rein in the national debt stalled Tuesday, as members of the Senate’s socalled Gang of Six signaled that an agreement is unlikely to come this week in time for the start of White House-led budget talks. The absence of a deal deprives policymakers of a bipartisan centerpiece that could smooth the way toward agreement in the contentious battle between Democrats and Republicans over the appropriate size and shape of government. Members of the Gang of Six said Tuesday that they are continuing to meet daily and that a deal is still possible. However, one of the six, Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.), left town abruptly Tuesday because of a family emergency, leaving lawmakers and the White House to begin negotiations over whether to allow the government’s debt to keep rising without a bipartisan starting point. Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner has said Congress must act by Aug. 2 to raise the legal limit on borrowing, currently set at $14.3 trillion, or risk the United States defaulting on its obligations. With the two parties far apart, work is proceeding on parallel tracks to forge an agreement on long-term deficit reduc-

tion, which many lawmakers on both sides say will be necessary to win their vote for a higher debt ceiling. In addition to the Gang of Six talks, Vice President Biden is set to begin a series of meetings Thursday with Democratic and GOP representatives from both chambers. Republicans have indicated that they will try to advance the budget plan drafted by House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and approved last month by House Republicans in those talks. That is increasing pressure on Senate Democrats to draft their own budget blueprint for fiscal 2012. On Tuesday, Senate Budget Chairman Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) said time was running out for the Gang of Six to produce an agreement that he had hoped would form the basis for the Senate’s 2012 spending plan. Instead, Conrad — a member of the band of three Democrats and three Republicans who have been meeting for months behind closed doors — said he would proceed alone as soon as next week to come up with a blueprint that would incorporate many of the bipartisan group’s goals. “I don’t know when or if they’ll reach a conclusion,” he said of the Gang of Six. “But I really can’t wait.” Conrad said his framework would seek to trim deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade through sharp cuts in spending and an overhaul of the tax code aimed at generating revenue. He said his proposal would not include changes to Social Security, a key element of the Gang of Six talks, and would make only mod-

est changes to other entitlement programs. Conrad denied that his decision to move forward reflected a lack of confidence in the Gang of Six process, which is widely viewed as the most promising avenue for bipartisan progress on the hardest issues facing lawmakers, such as tax and entitlement reform. “I am still very actively engaged in the Group of Six and very hopeful that we’ll produce a result,” he said, “but it may not be in time to be a part of the budget resolution.” It was unclear Tuesday whether Conrad’s move was intended to pressure the Gang of Six, who after meeting at least three times this week were said to be hung up on a number of sensitive details. Among them: how to design mechanisms that would force congressional committees to meet an array of spending and tax targets over the next two years. Conrad’s plan did not find quick favor in his own party, where many liberals are adamantly opposed to the Gang of Six approach, which they view as ceding too much ground to the Republican call for sharp cuts to the social safety net. After Conrad detailed his plan at a private luncheon of Senate Democrats and their independent allies, Sen. Bernard Sanders (I-Vt.), a Budget Committee member, raged that it would “balance the budget on the backs of the sick, the elderly and the poor, who are already hurting.” Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin (D-Md.), also a member of the budget panel, said he would favor

a plan based on the approach of “shared sacrifice” espoused by the Gang of Six and President Obama’s fiscal commission, but only if Republicans also signed on. Such a blueprint, Cardin said, would be unacceptable “as a starting point” for Democrats. Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (Nev.) cautioned lawmakers to withhold judgment on the Conrad proposal — or any other — until the debate is more fully engaged. “At this stage, they should all be very, very careful signing onto a piece of legislation until we know what the endgame is,” Reid told reporters. “There are a lot of things floating around here. . . . Let’s not be signing onto all this stuff until we really know where we’re headed.” Republican leaders, meanwhile, seemed dismissive of Conrad’s budget and the Gang of Six efforts, with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) turning attention toward the Biden talks. That effort, he said, “will, in my view, lead to some kind of conclusion.” Sen. Jeff Sessions (Ala.), the senior Republican on the Senate Budget Committee, echoed that position, encouraging the parties to stage an open debate rather than leaving such consequential decisions to the Gang of Six. “We do have some differences of view on deeply important issues, and I say let’s have it out,” Sessions told reporters. “The idea that there will just be harmony out of an agreement that would change the course of America probably is expecting too much.”
montgomeryl@washpost.com ruckerp@washpost.com

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The Obama administration is beginning another effort to change the nation’s immigration laws, despite little enthusiasm from Republicans in Congress. President Obama met for more than an hour Tuesday with members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, his third session on the issue at the White House in the past three weeks. White House aides promised a renewed push to try to persuade Congress and the American public to back Obama’s proposals, which would combine stronger enforcement of current immigration laws with the creation of a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants. “He is committed and will be leaning into this issue in a very serious and very vigorous way,” said Melody Barnes, Obama’s top domestic policy adviser. The new effort comes as Obama starts his 2012 reelection campaign needing to rebuild support among Latinos, many of whom view immigration reform as critical. Obama won two-thirds of the Hispanic vote in 2008, but some polls have shown that his approval ratings have dipped among this key electoral bloc. High turnout among Latinos could help Obama win in states such as Colorado and Florida, although White House officials emphasize that they have long sought to reform immigration laws and are not pushing the issue only because of the 2012 campaign.

Barnes said the White House, aware of the opposition from congressional Republicans, will seek to build a coalition outside Washington that includes business leaders, law enforcement figures and others. Immigration reform has not been a priority of the administration, at least compared with health-care reform and the economy. But last year, Obama did urge the passage of the so-called Dream Act, which would allow young people whose parents brought them to the United States illegally to gain citizenship eventually if they attended college or served in the military for at least two years. The bill passed in December in the then-Democratic-controlled House, but was blocked in the Senate by a 55-41 vote, with most Republicans and a few Democrats saying the measure would reward illegal behavior. Republicans, now in control of the House, have expressed little desire to back Obama’s push. “The speaker’s focused on creating jobs, cutting spending and lowering gas prices,” said Brendan Buck, a spokesman for House Speaker John A. Boehner (Ohio.). Latino activists and even some members of Congress have called for the adoption of a blanket policy that would not allow the deportations of any students who would qualify for the Dream Act. But Obama aides say that they instead want to reach an agreement with Congress.
baconp@washpost.com

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

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POLITICS & THE NATION
DIGEST

Soaring prices alter energy debate a year after gulf spill
A DRIVE FOR MORE DRILLING
Some say bills run risk of unraveling reforms
BY

J ULIET E ILPERIN

DAVID CARSON/ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

MISSOURI: An explosion lights up the sky Monday night as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers blows the

first of two holes in Birds Point levee in southeast Missouri to divert floodwaters from nearby Cairo, Ill.
ALABAMA

Some schools reopen after tornadoes
The roads leading to Pleasant Grove Middle School are lined with toppled trees. National Guard trucks are idled in the parking lot, and tables of bottled water and food rest on the concrete nearby, unmistakable reminders of the devastation wrought by the tornadoes. But inside the building, students who returned after a turbulent, heavy-hearted week away found something of a sanctuary, greeting each other with shrieks, bear hugs and giddy jubilation typically associated with the first day of school. Which, in a way, it was. “I was happy because I thought they had died,” seventhgrader Sandrea McAlpine, 12, said of some of her friends she hadn’t seen. “I talked to some of them, but I didn’t know if everyone was okay.” Schools across hard-hit Jefferson County reopened Tuesday, yet elsewhere, students were not going back to class, because their

buildings were either destroyed or badly damaged. Alabama state House Speaker Mike Hubbard (R) said schools were destroyed in at least six school systems, and Alabama legislators responded by passing a resolution promising to provide the money needed to rebuild the schools.
— Associated Press
ILLINOIS

could finish the question. Zagel had already ruled that the ousted governor’s lawyers could not try to suggest to jurors that prosecutors were hiding evidence by withholding hundreds of hours of recordings that, if played, would clear their client — an accusation Kaeseberg was clearly attempting to hint at.
— Associated Press
OHIO

Judge scolds lawyer at Blagojevich retrial
A federal judge wasted little time laying down the law Tuesday on the first day of witness testimony at the corruption retrial of former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich, scolding the defense more vigorously than he had at the first trial. The rebuke from a visibly annoyed Judge James Zagel came after defense attorney Lauren Kaeseberg repeatedly tried to ask the government’s first witness, FBI agent Dan Cain, how many hours of FBI wiretap recordings of Blagojevich existed. A prosecutor objected each time before she

Goodyear to replace its fleet of blimps
Goodyear Tire & Rubber will team up with another name rich in blimp history to replace its three U.S. airships with bigger, faster ones. The Akron-based company said Tuesday that it would work with German manufacturer ZLT Zeppelin Luftschifftechnik to build three new blimps, beginning in 2013. The airships will be built by Zeppelin and Goodyear teams at Goodyear’s airship hangar near Akron. The first new blimp will go into operation in 2014.
— Associated Press

Rise in sea levels may be faster than expected
BY

A LISTER D OYLE

oslo — Global sea levels will rise faster than expected this century, partly because of quickening climate change in the Arctic and a thaw of Greenland’s ice, an international report said Tuesday. The rise would add to threats to coasts from Bangladesh to Florida, low-lying Pacific islands and cities from London to Shanghai. It would also raise the cost of building tsunami barriers in Japan. Record temperatures in the Arctic will add to factors raising world sea levels by up to 5.2 feet by 2100, according to a report by the Oslo-based Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), which is backed by the eight-nation Arctic Council. “The past six years [until 2010] have been the warmest period ever recorded in the Arctic,” the report said. “In the future, global sea level is projected to rise by 0.9 metres [3 feet] to 1.6 metres [5.2 feet] by 2100 and the loss of ice from Arctic glaciers, ice caps and the Greenland ice sheet will make a substantial contribution,” it added. The rises were projected from 1990 levels. The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said in its last major study, in 2007, that world sea levels were likely to rise by 7 to 23 inches by 2100. Those numbers

did not include a possible acceleration of a thaw in polar regions. Foreign ministers from Arctic Council nations — the United States, Russia, Canada, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Norway and Iceland — are due to meet in Greenland on May 12. “The increase in annual average temperature since 1980 has been twice as high over the Arctic

as it has been over the rest of the world,” the report said. Temperatures were higher than at any time in the past 2,000 years, it added. The IPCC also said that it was at least 90 percent probable that human emissions of greenhouse gases, led by burning fossil fuels, were to blame for most warming in recent decades.
— Reuters

Just one year after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon killed 11 and triggered a massive oil spill, there’s little appetite among legislators for new safety regulations. Instead, a single concern is prompting a drive for more drilling: $4-a-gallon gas. Increased drilling won’t bring down the immediate cost U.S. consumers pay at the pump, but soaring fuel prices have transformed the U.S. energy debate, motivating the House this week to take up at least one of three bills that would ease the way for more energy exploration off both coasts and in the Gulf of Mexico. The first bill likely to hit the floor would revive canceled lease sales off Virginia and in the gulf. The administration’s point man for oil and gas drilling regulations, Michael Bromwich, sharply questioned the House bills and defended the cautious approach taken since the end of last year’s five-month moratorium. “There is a real risk that . . . we’re going to end up unraveling and undoing many of the reforms we’ve worked so hard to do over the last 10 months,” he said in an interview. “And that would be a tragedy.” House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who has shepherded three bills through his committee aimed at boosting oil and gas production in the gulf as well as off both coasts and the Arctic, said he is confident public pressure will provide the political momentum his legislation needs to make it into law. On Thursday at a roundtable with constituents in Yakima, Wash., farmers expressed concern about how the cost of fuel would affect their operations. “What will get the Senate to act is the rising price of gas at the pump,” Hastings said in a phone interview. “If my colleagues are hearing what I’m hearing in my district, clearly there has been a mood change.” The bills would overhaul the permitting process to make it faster, which in some cases means jettisoning the more exacting reviews put in place after the BP spill. One measure would require the interior secretary to act on a permit to drill within 30 days; if no decision is made after a maximum of 60 days, the permit would be granted. It also

would restart within 30 days gulf permits that were approved last year before the spill. Eleven exploration wells that were suspended in the gulf have been given permission to drill again, according to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement. While the measure would require the interior secretary to conduct a safety review of permit applications, it would use the environmental analyses from before the explosion — which have since come under criticism as inadequate. Another bill would expand drilling by establishing the first national production goal as part of Interior’s five-year offshore leasing plan; it would include lease sales in the areas containing the greatest-known oil and gas reserves. American Petroleum Institute president Jack Gerard, whose group represents major U.S. oil companies, said the bills are “a direct outcome and consequence of the political and economic reality we face.” “What you’re hearing from the public is overwhelming support for the production of American energy by Americans and for Americans,” Gerard said. But Democrats and environmentalists say that in a global marketplace, such moves have far less impact on prices than unrest in Libya and other geopolitical factors. “We have limited capacity to affect the price of gas, despite what you might hear people bloviating on the Hill or elsewhere,” said Deron Lovaas, transportation policy director at the Natural Resources Defense Council, an advocacy group. “We’re shackled to a global oil market.” Rep. Edward J. Markey (DMass.) said Democrats will question why companies have yet to produce oil and gas on the majority of the 75 million acres where they hold federal leases. “I don’t think a bill would pass the Senate and be signed by the president that puts a clock on reviewing the safety and environmental issues for permitting operations in the Gulf of Mexico,” said Markey, who held a news conference on the issue last week at a gas station in his district. The permitting process had already begun to ease, however. Production in the gulf dropped significantly after BP and other companies suspended their operations there: In December, the region was producing 1.58 million barrels a day, according to the Energy Information Administration, compared with 1.7 million barrels in December 2009. But BOEMRE has now issued 51 shallow-water permits and deepwater permits for a dozen unique wells in the gulf. The administration plans to

hold lease sales in the central and western gulf by the middle of next year. It has extended nine different leases affected by the moratorium and is considering others on a case-by-case basis. While those in the industry such as Jim Noe, executive director of the Shallow Water Energy Security Coalition, want faster permit approvals, he said he’s been encouraged by “the tone of late between industry and the regulators.” “Particularly with the run-up in gas prices, there is a lot of pent-up demand for drilling,” he said, adding, “The industry feels better today about the future of drilling in the Gulf of Mexico than any other time than in the last year.” While Hastings’ bills are likely to pass the House, it remains unclear how they will fare in the Senate. Democrats there continue to negotiate over how to raise the oil spill liability cap of $75 million per incident without jeopardizing the viability of independent oil and gas producers, while Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) is preparing to introduce legislation that would include new safety requirements for the industry. The Senate may also vote to eliminate some tax breaks for oil companies in light of their record profits this year, an idea that both House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) and House Budget Committee Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) have tentatively embraced. Robert Dillon, a spokesman for Bingaman’s GOP counterpart on the committee, Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), said his boss is looking for “a balanced approach” on the issue. “We’re definitely in favor of increasing safety so we can drill safely,” Dillon said. “But then, let’s drill.” William K. Reilly, who cochaired the presidential commission on the BP disaster, said he still held out hope that Congress would adopt some of the safety proposals the commission had offered in its final report in January. “We need to keep some perspective on how Congress operates,” Reilly said. “It does not turn on a dime. I’m not yet ready to say I’m discouraged by the failure of Congress to respond.”
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THE WORLD
Iraq shaken by a wave of assassinations
Scores of officials have been slain in recent months, many by gunmen using silencers
BY

Tories win majority in Canada
Conservatives make gains among immigrants; leaders of liberals, separatists resign
BY

A ARON C . D AVIS

baghdad — The assassins strike quietly,
often just after dark, as Iraq’s political and military leaders speed home surrounded by armed guards. The dead in April alone included generals, police commanders, a deputy minister and the head of Iraq’s tax agency. The wounded included a member of parliament, a judge and the head of the national theater, survivors of attacks on their motorcades. Among 50 targeted killings last month, most were carried out by gunmen using silenced weapons, according to Iraq’s Interior Ministry, which oversees the country’s police forces. Assassinations are not an entirely new feature of Iraq’s political landscape. But a stealthy string of killings that began last month has given them new prominence, shaking Iraqis’ confidence in their government’s ability to protect them and raising questions about the country’s security just months before the last U.S. troops are scheduled to withdraw. In recent days, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and members of parliament have felt compelled to address the killings repeatedly in public, vowing all-out efforts to stop them. But the killings have continued with at least 14 more dead from gun attacks and targeted bombings, mostly against police officials, in the first three days of May. Late Tuesday, a car bomb killed at least 15 people and wounded more than 30 in a Shiite neighborhood in Baghdad. Iraqi intelligence officials and U.S. military officers say the killings are being waged from both ends of Iraq’s religious and political spectrum, as part of renewed jockeying for power in advance of the American pullout. According to Iraqi officials, Sunni extremists, including the insurgent group al-Qaeda in Iraq and former members of Saddam Hussein’s Baath Party, who still consider Iraq’s elected government illegitimate, are behind most of the recent slayings. But they say Shiite Muslim militias, some with close ties to Iran, also appear to be conducting some of the killings to assert influence and settle scores. Ali al-Dabbagh, Iraq’s chief government spokesman, said there was no evidence that Shiite militias are behind the assassinations. But he acknowledged that the sheer number of killings of highplaced government officials has become a serious problem. “This is a new way of terrorism here in Iraq,” Dabbagh said. “This is a big threat for the whole process, the whole government.” Assassinations accounted for roughly 20 percent of about 251 violent deaths in Iraq last month. The death toll is orders of magnitude smaller than what Iraq endured during the height of the country’s sectarian bloodshed in 2006 and 2007, when more than 2,000 Iraqis died in violent attacks each month. Iraq’s overall homicide rate is now lower than in most American cities. Calling the tactic “sick,” Ad Melkert, the United Nations special representative in Iraq, said he alerted the Security Council last year to the increasing frequency of assassinations. Maj. Gen. Jeffrey S. Buchanan, the senior U.S. military spokesman in Iraq, said the country’s security forces recorded an average of 20 assassinations in recent months and just more than 30 in

B ERNARD S IMON

AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Iraqis carry the coffin of Mustafa Said Hamza, a colonel in the Interior Ministry, which oversees the country’s police forces, at his funeral in Baghdad last month. Hamza was assassinated by gunmen in the center of the capital.

AARON C. DAVIS/THE WASHINGTON POST

Traffic officer Alaa Abid Mohammad places a memorial picture of Maj. Makki Khalif at a spot along the Baghdad intersection where he was killed by gunmen.

“This is a new way of terrorism here in Iraq. This is a big threat for the whole process, the whole government.”
— Ali al-Dabbagh, Iraq’s chief government spokesman

March. Buchanan said that was more than the United States would classify strictly as assassinations but called the trend “worthy of concern” even before April’s spike more than doubled the recent average. The intensity of the recent assassinations has attracted lurid coverage in the Arabic-language media, with haunting details of the previous night’s attacks recounted each morning in television and newspaper reports across the country. Iraqi intelligence officials say the killers include gunmen who have stalked Iraqi bureaucrats with semiautomatic weapons muzzled with silencers. Others have been masked men on motorbikes who slap magnetic “sticky bombs” on motorcades carrying political and military elite. In response, some police officers said they have refused to drive their state-run pickup trucks, shunning any vehicles with Iraqi government markings as “caskets.” Iraq’s intelligence agencies have acquired scores of beat-up taxis for agents and

high-ranking officials so they can disguise themselves on their way to and from work. To cut off potential escape routes, security forces have erected new roadblocks and checkpoints in recent days, contributing to traffic gridlock. “It’s a new, blind kind of insurgency,” said Ahmen Riyad, 25, a police officer who was directing traffic this week at an intersection adorned with makeshift memorials to three assassinated police officers. In recent congressional testimony, State Department officials have described Iraq as “relatively stable” as the roughly 50,000 U.S. troops still in the country begin to prepare for departure. A front group for al-Qaeda in Iraq recently asserted responsibility for most of the killings in recent months. In a posting on an extremist Web site, the Islamic State of Iraq listed the names of 62 government employees and security workers it said it had killed, including 22 assassinated with silenced weapons. In an interview deep inside one of Iraq’s police compounds, Maj. Gen. Hussein Kamal, the domestic intelligence chief, said the government has information suggesting that remnants of the country’s Baathist regime might have returned to Iraq in recent months from Syria. But he said Sunni insurgents are not the only force behind the recent killings. Kamal said Shiite extremist groups, most notably Asaib Ahl al-Haq, which has ties to Iran, seem to be behind some of the killings, targeting anyone perceived as against them, he said. Marisa Cochrane Sullivan, an expert on Shiite extremist groups in Iraq and the deputy director of the Institute for the Study of War in Washington, said she thinks the increase in assassinations has less to do with Iraq’s neighbors attempting to compound turmoil in the Middle East than jockeying for superiority for when U.S. forces leave. “It’s a very uncertain time, and groups are trying to work now to influence in their favor.”
davisa@washpost.com Special correspondent Aziz Alwan contributed to this report.

toronto — Canadians will face an unusually polarized political landscape for at least the next four years after one of the most stunning election outcomes in their country’s 144-year-old history. The new Parliament will be dominated by the Conservatives, led by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who in elections Monday turned their five-year-old minority government into a solid majority. Expanding on their base in western Canada, the Tories captured a wide swath of seats in and around Toronto, according to preliminary results released early Tuesday. They made deep inroads into increasingly influential immigrant communities, especially those of Chinese and South Asians. But the biggest shocks were on the opposition side. The Liberals, long considered Canada’s natural governing party for their unerring ability to straddle the political center, won only 34 of 308 parliamentary seats. Their leader, Michael Ignatieff, resigned Tuesday. The official opposition will be the leftleaning New Democratic Party, which almost tripled its representation to 102 seats. The NDP not only took seats from the Liberals but also virtually wiped out the Bloc Quebecois, the voice of Frenchspeaking Quebec separatists in Ottawa for two decades. The Bloc plummeted from 47 seats to four. Its long-serving leader, Gilles Duceppe, announced his resignation as the results came in late Monday. Quebecers are generally more liberal on social and economic issues than their English-speaking compatriots, making them receptive to the NDP’s interventionist platform. Even so, Antonia Maioni, director of the Institute for the Study of Canada at McGill University in Montreal, described the NDP’s gains in the province as a “complete protest vote” against all the other federalist and sovereigntist parties. “This was a sweep in many senses — a sweep of seats and a sweep of cleaning house,” she said. The separatist movement remains strongly represented at the provincial level by the Parti Quebecois, which has recently run ahead of the ruling Liberals in opinion polls. A provincial election will be held next year. Canada’s business community welcomed the Tory win and the setback for the separatists. Michael Gregory, a senior economist at BMO Capital Markets, said, “A majority government does provide a little more flexibility for policies that have been attractive to investors.” Harper said the new government’s top priority is to reintroduce a businessfriendly budget that the opposition parties had threatened to defeat before the election. It includes the final stage of a five-year plan to cut the corporate tax rate from 21 percent to 15 percent. In resigning as party leader, Ignatieff said he planned to return to teaching. But he insisted: “Canada really needs a party of the center. The surest guarantee . . . is four years of Conservative government and four years of NDP opposition.”
— Financial Times

DIGEST
ISRAEL

Netanyahu urges Abbas to call off unity accord
Israel’s prime minister has made a last-minute appeal to the Palestinian Authority president to cancel an impending unity deal with the Hamas militant group. The deal would deliver “a hard blow to the peace process,” Binyamin Netanyahu said Tuesday. Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas’s Fatah faction is scheduled to sign the reconciliation deal with Hamas on Wednesday in Cairo, where 15 smaller Palestinian factions, including Islamist militant groups, signed it Tuesday ahead of the formal ceremony. Hamas and Fatah have led rival governments in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip for four years. With peace efforts frozen, Abbas is focusing on internal Palestinian issues. Netanyahu said Abbas’s alliance with Hamas would make it all but impossible to resume talks. Netanyahu delivered his appeal to international Mideast envoy Tony Blair.
— Associated Press
WEST BANK

school building in Howarra village, included broken windows, blackened walls and charred carpets. “This is part of a series of aggressions by settlers in the area,” Gov. Jibreen al-Bakri said. “We have warned in the past and we warn again that settlers want to drag the area into a cycle of violence.” An Israeli police spokesman said the incident was being investigated. Unlike in previous cases, no Hebrew graffiti were left at the site.
— Reuters
SOUTHEAST ASIA

WEST BANK

SUDAN

12 killed in clash in key central region
A northern Sudanese army convoy entered the contested border region of Abyei and clashed with southern police, killing 12 people, the region’s chief administrator, a southerner, said Tuesday. A northern minister accused the police of starting the fighting and said the troops were just joining an internationally agreed-on joint north-south force in the area. Analysts say Abyei is one of the likeliest places for conflict to ignite in the countdown to the secession of southern Sudan, expected in July.
— Reuters
MENAHEM KAHANA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Cambodia takes border fight to U.N.
Cambodia has asked the United Nations’ highest court to order Thailand to withdraw troops and halt military activity around a temple at the center of a decades-old border dispute that has flared into deadly military clashes. Fighting in recent weeks in the area around the Preah Vihear temple has left 16 soldiers and one Thai civilian dead. In a request filed April 28 and made available Tuesday on the court’s Web site, Cambodia asked the International Court of Justice in The Hague to respond urgently “because of the gravity of the situation.” The dispute has stirred nationalist sentiment on both sides. But analysts say domestic politics may also be fueling the conflict, especially in Thailand, where the military that staged a coup in 2006 could be flexing its muscles before elections that are due this summer.
— Associated Press Jewish settlers pray at the Tomb of Joseph in the Palestinian city of Nablus after illegally entering the site. Israeli police arrested dozens after they refused to leave.
IRAQ

Car bomb near cafe kills 16 in Baghdad
A car bomb tore through a cafe packed with young men watching a football match Tuesday in Baghdad, killing at least 16 people, officials said. It was the first major attack since U.S. commandos killed al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. No one asserted responsibility for the attack, which occurred in a Shiite enclave in a mainly Sunni neighborhood, but it bore the hallmarks of the terrorist network’s chapter in Iraq.

Settlers accused of burning mosque
Palestinians in the occupied West Bank accused Jewish settlers of torching a mosque at a village school near the city of Nablus on Tuesday. The damage to the mosque, inside a

Al-Qaeda operatives have vowed revenge for bin Laden’s death on Sunday in a city not far from the Pakistani capital, Islamabad. Iraqi security officials said Monday that they were increasing security amid fears that insurgents would try to strike immediately in the wake of bin Laden’s death as a way to show that they are still a potent force. The attack occurred in a Shiite area of the former insurgent stronghold of Dora, in southwestern Baghdad. A food vendor near the cafe was among the 16 killed, and 37 people were injured.
— Associated Press

Honduras drops all charges against ex-president: A court in Honduras has dismissed the two remaining charges against former president Manuel Zelaya, removing a key obstacle to his return to the country. The decision Monday could also smooth the way for the country’s return to the Organization of American States, which expelled Honduras after the June 2009 coup that ousted Zelaya. 5 men detained near British nuclear plant: Five men have been arrested under anti-terrorism laws near a nuclear-waste-processing plant in northwestern England, police said. Cumbria Constabulary said the men were detained near the Sellafield plant Monday after officers stopped a car. All the detainees are from London and in their 20s.
— From news services

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Prosecutor preparing Gaddafi case
BY

C OLUM L YNCH

There are “reasonable grounds” to charge Moammar Gaddafi’s security forces with having committed war crimes and crimes against humanity during their crackdown on Libyan protesters, according to the chief prosecutor for the International Criminal Court. The prosecutor, Argentine lawyer Luis Moreno-Ocampo, has said in a report to the U.N. Security Council that his investigators have established preliminary but “credible” estimates that at least 500 to 700 civilians have been shot to death by government forces. Moreno-Ocampo said he intends in the next few weeks to submit his first application for arrest warrants against officials “most responsible for crimes against humanity” in Libya since Feb. 15. The abuses, he noted, are ongoing. The prosecutor’s report also raises concern that anti-government mobs or armed opposition forces may have engaged in “the unlawful arrest, mistreatment and killings of sub-Saharan Africans perceived to be mercenaries.” In anticipation of the report’s official release Wednesday, Libya’s Deputy Foreign Minister Khaled Kaim said Moreno-Ocampo’s case was based on “unverified information or video footages reproduced or Photoshopped by some amateur photographers.” He said his government had hosted a factfinding mission from the U.N. Human Rights Council and was prepared to host a follow-up visit. The Security Council voted unanimously in late February to authorize the court to conduct an investigation into alleged excesses by Gaddafi’s troops, who launched a brutal crackdown on protesters demanding democratic reforms. It is the second time since the court’s inception that the council has voted to trigger such a probe. In 2005, the council backed a probe into alleged war crimes in Darfur attributed to the Sudanese government. The court has since issued an arrest warrant for President Omar Hassan al-Bashir on a charge of genocide, but Sudan has refused to surrender him. Under the terms of the Rome Statute, the treaty that established the court, Libya should be given the chance to investigate allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity on its own. But the report says that government initiatives — including the forming of a panel of inquiry by one of Gaddafi’s sons, Saif al-Islam Gaddafi — have been inadequate. The report raises the prospect that Gaddafi and members of his family and inner circle could be charged with war crimes. “The shooting at peaceful protestors was systematic, following the same modus operandi in multiple locations and executed through Security Forces,” the report says. “The persecution appears to be also systematic and implemented in different cities. War crimes are apparently committed as a matter of policy.” The death toll in Libya has been hard to determine because of widely divergent estimates. As of March 15, Gaddafi estimated that 150 to 200 people had died, half of them members of government security forces. The rebels’ Transitional National Council says that as many as 10,000 people have died and that more than 50,000 have been injured, the report says.
lynchc@washpost.com Correspondent Simon Denyer in Tripoli contributed to this report.

SAEED KHAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Armed Libyan tribesmen take part in a rally in Benghazi’s Revolution Square to show their solidarity with the uprising against Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi.

Libyan rebels ask global donors for $3 billion
Loans needed to pay salaries and provide food, leaders say
BY P ORTIA W ALKER AND M ARY B ETH S HERIDAN

benghazi, libya — Libya’s rebel government said Tuesday that it is asking international donors for up to $3 billion in loans, warning that without the cash infusion it will be unable to pay the salaries of civil servants and provide food and medicine to civilians. Rebel leaders have urged countries that froze Libyan assets to shift that money to them, but diplomats say there are legal obstacles to such a move. A senior U.S. official said the coalition wants to provide financial support to the rebels, but hasn’t committed to a precise amount and is trying to figure out how to do so legally. Top diplomats from around the world, including Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, are scheduled to discuss ways to meet the financial needs of the rebels at a meeting in Rome on Thursday. After more than two months of fighting, the economy in the eastern portion of the country has been badly battered. While most of the country’s oil comes from the east, forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi have disrupted production, denying the rebels a potential lifeline. The effective partitioning of the country interrupted pay for the majority of workers here, who are employed in the public sector and were paid from Tripoli before the fighting began. Until now, rebels had, for the most part, managed to keep those salaries coming. But, they warned, money is running out. Ali Tarhouni, the rebels’ interim finance minister, told reporters in the de facto capital of the rebel-held east that the Benghazi

SAEED KHAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Standing on and around a car that exploded in Benghazi, not far from the rebel headquarters, Libyans shout slogans against Gaddafi. Doctors at a nearby hospital said two people were injured in the blast.

government has only enough to carry it through “three weeks, at the most four weeks.” “I need about $2 to $3 billion, and we are hoping to get most or all of this,” he said, adding that he expects the United States, France, Italy and Qatar to grant loans backed by frozen Libyan assets. Those funds could arrive in seven to 10 days, he said, and would be enough to fund the rebel government for three or four months. The senior U.S. official, who was not authorized to speak on the record and so talked on the condition of anonymity, said it was unclear how the Libyan rebels had come up with the figure of $2 billion to $3 billion. “I think we have to wait and see what the breakdown is, or how and why they’re asking for that particular figure” before deciding if it’s an accurate reflection of their needs, he said.

The official said that “there’s a whole gamut of options people are looking at” to provide financial assistance without violating U.N. sanctions or their countries’ own laws. It was not yet clear whether one mechanism would be chosen when the United States and other allies in the Libya Contact Group meet Thursday, he said. The rebels’ proposal that they receive frozen assets belonging to Gaddafi and his government presents legal hurdles for some countries, especially those, like the United States, that haven’t recognized the Transitional National Council, the self-appointed rebel authority, as Libya’s new government. In recognition of those obstacles, some European diplomats have floated the idea of creating a trust fund for the rebels, which would be repaid once a new Libyan government is established and oil revenues are flowing again.

The U.S Treasury has frozen more than $30 billion in Libyan assets since economic sanctions were imposed. U.S. officials say they could shift that money to the rebels if President Obama issued an executive order or if Congress passed legislation directing the president to make the funds available to the transitional government. Beyond getting the legalities right, American officials want to make sure there is a structure in place to ensure that the money is well-used. So far, Kuwait has announced a contribution of $180 million to the transitional government. The Obama administration has pledged to provide $25 million in non-lethal supplies to the rebels, such as uniforms, radios and body armor. Jake Sullivan, a senior State Department official, said at a

Washington briefing last week that the U.S. government hopes the Rome meeting will enable the international community “to ensure that we have coordination of all the different countries’ contributions” to the rebel government. The appeal for new lines of credit came after two days of meetings held by the Transitional National Council, which was working to finalize the membership of a new executive body that will attend the Rome conference. The rebel body took over administration of Benghazi, Libya’s second-largest city, in late February and now administers the eastern part of country. A car bomb was detonated in central Benghazi, near the rebels’ seafront headquarters, just after 10 p.m. Tuesday, the first such explosion since fighting began in February. With a speedy victory over Gaddafi looking increasingly unlikely, the rebels are preparing for what could turn into an extended stalemate. In addition to supporting the rebel army, the transitional government is providing essentials to the civilian population. Shops in Benghazi are wellstocked, and shopkeepers say they are able to get supplies through the country’s eastern border with Egypt. But many here have withdrawn their money from banks and converted it to other currencies, leaving the region short of cash and worsening the already difficult economic situation. Oil production dropped significantly after Gaddafi’s forces attacked installations in the desert. Exports from Libya have slowed to a virtual standstill since the conflict began, but Qatar says it facilitated the sale of 1 million barrels of oil — valued at about $120 million — for the rebels in April.
sheridanm@washpost.com Walker is a special correspondent. Sheridan reported from Washington.

All quiet in Syria’s capital despite nationwide protests
BY

T HE W ASHINGTON P OST

damascus, syria — Even as protests spread across Syria, the capital has mostly remained quiet. Anti-government demonstrations have erupted in all corners of the country in the past six weeks, meeting a fierce government crackdown along the way. But though people in Damascus watch the events with concern, most doubt that the scenes being broadcast on television from across the country will be repeated here. About 500 people marched in the Midan area of the capital Friday and reportedly shouted pro-freedom slogans. But for the most part in Damascus, the heart of the Sunni business class, residents say they have too much to lose to join in. Damascus is wealthier than other parts of the country, with property prices in several areas of the capital rivaling those in big

European and American cities. Traditionally, the major families in Damascus that make up the bulk of the city’s economy have looked down on country folk, sentiments that predate the formation of the state, when tribal norms prevailed. A woman from Abbasiyeen Square in northern Damascus said that two weeks ago, protesters from the restive town of Douma came “to our doors and asked us to take to the streets.” “No one did because we are too scared to lose what we have. This is civil war,” she added. Like others interviewed for this article, she spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals. Security forces took control of the coastal town of Baniyas on Tuesday, the Reuters news service reported, and the human rights group Insan said that it had verified nearly 3,000 arrests across the country since the uprising began but that the actual number

could exceed 8,000. One Christian girl in the capital said the anti-government demonstrations were the product of a foreign plot, a common view among the country’s Christian community but also a reflection of the scale of division between urban and rural Syrians. “I went home to my village in Bsier [south of Damascus] for Easter. We didn’t see anything,” she said. “The army is there to protect the people. They waved us through checkpoints and said hello.” Ghaith, a suit-maker in the shopping area of Shaalan in the city center, said: “Everyone wants

change, but it takes time. If someone comes into my shop and asks for a suit to be made, and when I don’t have it right away, he then breaks up my shop. Is this reasonable? Things take time in Syria.” The sense of fear that descended on the city several weeks ago when rumors spread from other parts of the country that Syria was in revolt has today evolved into an uneasiness. Most people are going about their daily lives. Cafes are filling up, and more cars are on the streets. But business is down, and primary and high schools recently announced that they would close at noon because fewer students are attending

“We are too scared to lose what we have. This is civil war.”
— a resident of Damascus

class. A man who owns a company that imports cars and other goods from Jordan and Lebanon said he is running out of money to pay his employees. Many residents were also unsettled by news last week that more than 200 members of the Baath Party had resigned in protest of the shooting of demonstrators. Damascus has been the scene of the largest pro-regime demonstrations in the country, and many here seem to share a feeling that the broader population remains loyal to the government. But the city’s residents increasingly find themselves caught in the crossfire of a media war, unsure of whom to believe. State newspapers publish images of security personnel and soldiers killed by “unknown armed gangs.” The state-run Syrian Arab News Agency has reported that it uncovered “distortion campaigns against Syria” led by

al-Jazeera, al-Arabiya and the BBC. The pro-government news organization said that “such campaigns, however, are never [going] to weaken the Syrians nor to shake their strong convictions or morale.” On Friday afternoon, hackers took control of the Web site of Tishreen, a state-owned newspaper, and broadcast revolutionary music on the Web site of the Syrian parliament. One woman said there is no middle ground in this situation. “There is either pro- or anti-government supporters, and, of course, most people in Damascus are with the president,” she said. “There is very little logical argument taking place.” After the protest here Friday, many questioned why anyone in Damascus would take to the streets. “I have friends in Douma, and they are telling me they have no bread, they have nothing to eat. We do not want things to arrive to this here, for freedom or not,” said Ruba, a pharmacist.
foreign@washpost.com

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Some doctors and nurses in Bahrain will be tried for helping protesters
A SSOCIATED P RESS

manama, bahrain — Several doctors and nurses who treated injured anti-government protesters during the months of unrest in Bahrain will be tried in a military court on charges of acting against the state, the justice minister said Tuesday. Khaled bin Ali al-Khalifa said the charges against 23 doctors and 24 nurses include participating in attempts to topple the island’s Sunni monarchy and taking part in illegal rallies. The announcement is the latest in the Sunni rulers’ relentless pursuit of Shiite opposition supporters after weeks of street marches demanding greater freedoms, equal rights and an elected government in Bahrain. During the unrest, medical staff repeatedly said they were under professional duty to treat all and strongly rejected claims by authorities that helping anti-government protesters was akin to supporting their cause. Separately, two former parliament members representing the country’s main Shiite party, al-Wefaq, were arrested, according to a senior party leader, Abdul-Jalil Khalil. Al-Wefaq has been the leading political backer of Bahrain’s upris-

ing, which was inspired by revolts in Tunisia and Egypt earlier this year. Bahrain’s Sunni rulers declared martial law on March 15 to crush Shiites demonstrating for greater rights and freedoms. Hundreds of protesters, opposition leaders, human rights activists and lawyers have been detained since emergency rule was im-

posed. Dozens of doctors, nurses and other medical workers have also been arrested. State Department spokesman Mark Toner said that targeting opposition politicians was not necessarily the best way for the government to address the current situation. “There’s no security solution to resolve the challeng-

es that Bahrain faces. We call on Bahrain to respect the detainees’ rights to due process,” he said, adding that he was unaware of charges being filed against medical professionals. At a news conference on Tuesday, the justice minister read the charges against the 23 doctors and the 24 nurses, which also include

“promoting efforts to bring down the government” and “harming the public by spreading false news.” International rights groups say Bahrain is targeting medical professionals who treated injured demonstrators at the Salmaniya medical center. The military took over the state-run hospital in

March, and doctors and patients said soldiers and police had conducted interrogations and detentions inside the complex. At least 30 people have died since the protests in Bahrain began in mid-February. Among the dead are four opposition supporters who died in custody, including a blogger.

Sale
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Yemen’s embattled president calls off mediator
BY

A HMED A L- H AJ

sanaa, yemen — Yemen’s president asked a key mediator from a powerful alliance of neighboring Persian Gulf countries to indefinitely delay his visit, said two of his associates Tuesday, in the latest blow to efforts to resolve the country’s crisis. President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s move was a political slap to attempts by Yemen’s neighbors to resolve nearly three months of anti-government unrest in this impoverished Arab country. The two senior officials said Saleh sent a formal letter to Abdullatif bin Rashid al-Zayani, generalsecretary of the Gulf Cooperation Council, requesting the delay. The visit was pushed back “to an indefinite date,” according to one of his associates. The letter was sent Monday, just as Zayani was expecting to meet with Saleh to ask him to resign as part of the GCC’s initiative to resolve the crisis, they said on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. It was the second time Saleh spurned a meeting with Zayani, suggesting that the Yemeni president hopes to buy time at the expense of maintaining good relations with the alliance of his oilrich neighbors. The council comprises the wealthy gulf states of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and the smaller nations of Oman and Bahrain. GCC officials were not immediately available for comment. Saleh initially agreed to the terms of the initiative, which called on him to step down within 30 days and for a national unity government to run the country until elections are held. The proposals also gave Saleh immunity from prosecution. Opposition parties, though not the protesters themselves, had agreed to the deal. Saleh’s associates said the president was hoping to pressure the council to change the wording on the initiative that would allow him to sign the deal as the head of his ruling party — and not as president. Yemen’s opposition parties see it as an attempt by Saleh, a political survivor in power for the last 32 years, to stay on as president while only leaving his post as ruling party head. “He isn’t serious in meeting his commitments,” said opposition spokesman Mohammed Basnadwa. Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators have been clamoring for Saleh to step down, inspired by the mass protests unleashing through the Middle East. The country has over the years been wracked by rampant corruption, a weak central government, a Shiite rebellion in the north, a secessionist movement in the south and one of the most active branches of al-Qaeda lurking in the remote hinterlands.
— Associated Press

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THE DEATH OF OSAMA BIN LADEN

U.S. officials seek answers from Pakistan on bin Laden’s hideout
pakistan from A1 ghan Taliban insurgents and bringing reconcilable insurgent leaders, lodged in Pakistani sanctuaries, to the negotiating table this year. It could make the CIA’s drone missile strikes against insurgent targets in Pakistan, conducted with tacit Pakistani cooperation and some intelligence assistance, much more difficult. But the moment of crisis was also seen by some administration officials as an unprecedented opportunity to solidify the relationship, assuming wholehearted Pakistani cooperation. “At this point, it’s very important that Pakistan demonstrate its commitment to work with America in the war on terror,” one U.S. official said. After weeks of tight focus on the operation itself, the White House will hold high-level national security meetings this week on how to leverage the post-raid situation to gain more, rather than less, cooperation. Two days after helicopterborne U.S. Navy SEALs took bin Laden’s life in a surprise raid, Pakistan seems unsure how to position itself. Reeling from domestic criticism over an American operation on its soil and international suspicion that it is harboring terrorists, the Islamabad government expressed “deep concern” Tuesday over what it called an “unauthorized unilateral action,” but also took credit for helping to locate the terrorist leader. A Foreign Ministry statement said Pakistan’s spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence directorate (ISI), had kept the compound “under sharp focus” since construction got underway in 2003. But one intelligence official said that although it was searched in pursuit of an al-Qaeda operative that year, nothing was found and it was never scrutinized again. The statement said that Pakistan had begun sharing intelligence with the United States on the area as early as 2009 and that the CIA had used those leads to reach bin Laden. The administration has acknowledged unspecified Pakistani intelligence cooperation that helped narrow the search. But as administration officials continued to provide details of the raid Tuesday, CIA Director Leon Panetta said that Pakistan was kept in the dark throughout the planning and the operation itself for fear word of the mission would leak. “It was decided that any effort to work with the Pakistanis could jeopardize the mission,” Panetta told Time magazine. “They might alert the targets.” In a series of morning television interviews, White House counterterrorism adviser John O. Brennan said Pakistani officials were trying to determine “whether there were individuals within the Pakistani government or military intelligence services who were knowledgeable” of bin Laden’s whereabouts. For now, Washington has accepted what appeared to be “genuine surprise” at bin Laden’s presence expressed by top Pakistani officials, including President Asif Ali Zardari; the country’s military chief, Gen. Ashfaq Kayani; and Lt. Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha, the head of the ISI, one U.S. official said. Each of the three met privately

AAMIR QURESHI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Pakistani security forces stand outside the hideout of al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in the garrison town of Abbottabad, north of Islamabad.

FAISAL MAHMOOD/REUTERS

A policeman keeps watch outside the main gates of the hideout in Abbottabad. Obama administration officials are seeking information from Pakistani officials about who built and owned the compound.

in Islamabad on Monday with Marc Grossman, the administration’s special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, but offered little information, officials said. In public Tuesday, Grossman praised Pakistan’s determination, along with that of Afghanistan, “to curb terrorism.” He called bin Laden’s death an “important and a

joint success of three states.” U.S. intelligence has for years been amassing evidence of Pakistan’s complicity with the Afghan Taliban, while remaining uncertain how high it went within military and intelligence structures. Since the bin Laden raid, officials have said that wealthy individuals who shared al-Qaeda’s extreme Is-

lamist and anti-American views and supported his movement, along with sympathetic elements of retired and possibly active-duty military and intelligence officials, likely knew that someone important lived in the compound. “The key question is just the due diligence,” Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.), in an interview, said of

Pakistan’s military and intelligence services. “What was done? How could they not know? Who knew what? . . . Did nobody have some questions about who the hell was living behind those walls?” “They’ve got to get right at this, and sit down pretty soon there and figure it out, because there are people in Congress and others who won’t care about the details here,” said Kerry, chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee and a key player in past administration attempts to form a genuine partnership with Pakistan. Boehner, who visited Pakistan last month, said the White House needs to have an “eyeballs-to-eyeballs” conversation about what the two sides expect of each other,” even as he said that the relationship with Pakistan “is critical to breaking the back of al-Qaeda and the rest of them.” Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), who chairs the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, said she will meet Wednesday with Panetta and Vice Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of the Joint Special Operations Command, to review the Pakistan factor. But while “we need to find out” what the Pakistanis knew, she said, the administration and Congress must tread carefully. Boehner cautioned that an effort now to cut aid to Pakistan would be “premature,” and Feinstein questioned whether it was “wise to do so” in light of the need to keep Pakistan in the U.S. tent. In

recent months, Pakistan has reached out to China, Saudi Arabia and others. In a visit last month to Kabul, Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani, Kayani and Pasha suggested that Afghanistan reduce its ties with the United States and look more toward Beijing, Afghan officials said. U.S. officials, and some within the Pakistani government itself, think the crisis offers an opportunity for Islamabad’s civilian administration to assert more authority against the powerful military establishment. “It’s a chance for the civilians to exert some supremacy,” a senior official in Zardari’s government said, “to make it very clear that if the ISI and the military look very bad, they really need to eat humble pie.” The Obama administration, the Pakistani official said, “is saying they really want answers. They are also saying, ‘This is an opportunity — we don’t want to beat up on you. If you can cooperate right now, let’s enhance our partnership, and find opportunities for us to work closely on the endgame in Afghanistan. But stop playing games.’ ”
deyoungk@washpost.com brulliardk@washpost.com Brulliard reported from Islamabad and Abbottabad, Pakistan. Staff writers Paul Kane and Ellen Nakashima in Washington and special correspondent Shaiq Hussain in Islamabad contributed to this report.

Residents find it hard to fathom that al-Qaeda’s leader lived among them
BY

K ARIN B RULLIARD

abbottabad, pakistan — It is
easy to imagine how Osama bin Laden lived a peaceful, if sequestered, life in this city. Outside the high walls of his compound, chickens meander across neat fields of potatoes and mint. Forested hills line the horizon. And the neighbors, by their own admission, kept to themselves, figuring that the two brothers in the large house were simply rich men. The third man, neighbors said, never came outside. One day after Pakistan awoke to the news that Osama bin Laden had been killed in this garrison city, authorities allowed journalists to approach the exterior of the compound where he spent at least his final days. Police refused to open the metal gates. It was hardly a palace: The security walls were made of unpainted concrete and crude bricks. The white paint on the house was peeling. A large dirt yard, separate from the main structure and visible from the

roof of a nearby house, looked as though it was meant for livestock. A blue water container sat on the roof, and bars lined the windows. The scalloped metal awning on one third-story window hung askew, suggesting it might have been damaged the morning before, when a U.S. assault team swooped into the property. Mangled remnants of one helicopter — destroyed after what U.S. officials described as “mechanical failure” — lay in a field outside. Yet despite the placidity of the area, most neighbors seemed to agree on one thing: It was unfathomable that a terrorist of bin Laden’s stature could have lived in their midst — on property that is part of the military cantonment, not far from the border with Pakistan’s archenemy, India — without being detected by authorities. “He cannot,” said Sardar Mohammed Aslam, 65, whose property sits across a verdant field from the bin Laden house. “He would be noticed very easily.” The military and intelligence agencies are viewed as all-know-

ing in Pakistan, and monitoring is considered common. Pakistani officials have denied knowing bin Laden’s whereabouts, and they say that intelligence they supplied earlier helped U.S. forces carry out the mission. Residents said the military played little role in their day-today lives. The neighborhood in which bin Laden lived, Bilal Town, is a civilian development that lies inside the Abbottabad military cantonment, but it is not restricted or fenced. Neighbors said that it is overseen by a civilian-staffed board, a common arrangement in Pakistani military cities. Still, on the main road that provides the only access from the development to the city, occasional military patrols and identity checks are routine, residents said. Bin Laden, they conceded, could have avoided them if he never went out. Police do rounds in the neighborhood, but they typically only enter houses if suspicious activity is reported, residents said. By all accounts, early Monday was dramatic. Raja Kamran

AAMIR QURESHI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Pakistani boys collect debris from near the one-acre Abbottabad compound that was home to Osama bin Laden. A U.S. Black Hawk helicopter crashed during the raid that killed the al-Qaeda leader.

Khan, a community leader who lives along the main road, said he was awakened by helicopters — a sound never heard before at that hour — then a series of loud blasts. At first he thought India was attacking, he said. Upon reflection, Khan said

Tuesday, Abbottabad may have been a wise choice for a refuge. The military would never imagine bin Laden would hide next door to them, the United States could not target the city with drones, and the area is not known for religious radicalism, he said.

“The guy was hiding. He was not going out to get milk and potatoes,” Khan said. “The guy could find peace here.”
brulliardk@washpost.com Special correspondent Haq Nawaz Khan contributed to this report.

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Bin Laden T-shirts: Making a quick buck, the American way
BY

J USTIN J OUVENAL

The street vendor who usually sets up shop at the McPherson Square Metro station is more accustomed to selling Cherry Blossom Festival T-shirts than what he just got in, which he hopes will be just as popular: a T-shirt marking Osama bin Laden’s death. The $10 shirt features a fake newspaper page with a photo of bin Laden and the blaring headline: “Public Enemy #1 Is Dead.” Less than 48 hours after President Obama announced bin Laden’s killing, the outpouring of U.S. pride and patriotism around the death of the Sept. 11 mastermind has given way to a new — and equally American — impulse: trying to make a quick buck. CustomInk, a Northern Virginia T-shirt maker, has received more than a thousand inquiries about printing bin Laden Tshirts, company officials said. Zazzle and CafePress, Web sites which let users create and sell custom products online, have been flooded with T-shirts, bumper stickers, coffee mugs, trucker hats and key chains celebrating Obama, the Navy SEALs and the demise of bin Laden. “It Took Obama To Get Osama,” reads one T-shirt, on sale for $32 on Zazzle. A button for $2.45 blares “Voted Off the Planet” and has a picture of bin Laden with cross hairs superimposed over his head. Coffee drinkers can sip their morning joe with a “Happy NoSama Day” mug, selling for $15 on CafePress. And for those with a sweet tooth, Furin’s in Georgetown has baked cupcakes with simple messages including “Adios Bin Laden” and “Go SEALs!” John Schmidt, a senior vice president for CafePress, said his company has sold “a lot” of merchandise around bin Laden’s death but declined to give specific numbers. Scott Krugman, a spokesman for the National Retail Federation, said that his group is not tracking sales but that the outpouring can be compared with the 2001 terrorist attacks. “Shortly after 9/11, people were

thirsty for patriotic displays — that’s why so many flags were sold,” he said. “There’s a similar feeling now. That’s why you see such an appetite for these things.” At the McPherson Square Station, the appetite appeared small. The vendor, who only would identify himself as Butch, said he had sold only one T-shirt during

the morning rush Tuesday. He said he sold 11 Monday night. “It’s a slow grind out here. Osama can’t touch the Obama T-shirt,” Butch said, referring to shirts featuring the president, which have been one of his bestsellers. John Thomason, who was in town from Chicago, snapped a

photo of the bin Laden T-shirt as he walked past but said he would never buy one. “It is a collective good for the U.S. and the world that bin Laden is gone, but it’s not in my constitution to celebrate someone’s death,” Thomason said. Similarly, a manager with ABCTEES in Rockville, said that

it didn’t feel right to print bin Laden T-shirts and that he had declined a couple of requests. Some vendors in Washington said they wouldn’t sell them. Such feelings were hardly universal. Linda Augustine, a tourist from Syracuse, N.Y., said she would be happy to get her hands

on a bin Laden T-shirt. “I would probably buy it for my grandson,” she said. “We’ve waited 10 years for him to be caught.” Augustine’s grandson, Anthony Barker, chimed in, “I would probably use it for target practice.”
justin.jouvenal@wpost.com

Mother’s Day is May 8

Clinique Colour Open House Event

Panetta says photos of body will probably be released
BY

F ELICIA S ONMEZ

CIA Director Leon Panetta said Tuesday evening that he feels the Obama administration will ultimately release to the public the photographs of Osama bin Laden taken after the al-Qaeda leader was killed by U.S. forces at his compound in Pakistan but that “the White House makes that final decision.” “I mean, I think it will be,” Panetta said when asked whether he thought the photos would eventually be released. He added, however, “I don’t think you have to convince the world because of the DNA and all of the other proof that we have.” Panetta made the remarks to reporters after he left a closeddoor briefing in the Capitol Visitor Center during which he and other administration officials briefed senators on the mission in which bin Laden was killed. The White House has said it has not made a decision on whether to release the photos to the public. Officials have expressed concern that although the gruesome images might serve as proof of bin Laden’s death, they could also inflame tensions around the world. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) said earlier Tuesday that he thought any debate over releasing the photos was premature. “I don’t think we have to make that judgment yet, frankly,” Kerry said after Senate Democrats’ weekly caucus meeting. “I think that there’s a lot of evidence that there’s a pretty broad acceptance that he’s dead.” Kerry added that he hadn’t seen any of the bin Laden images but has received “very good descriptions of them.” Rep. Howard P. “Buck” McKeon (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said the White House should “probably not” release the photos.
sonmezf@washpost.com

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In poll, public’s opinion of Obama rises
Ratings on terrorism, Afghan war are up; no change on economy
BY D AN AND J ON

B ALZ C OHEN

The killing of Osama bin Laden has produced a decided boost in President Obama’s overall approval rating, along with even bigger gains in opinions of his handling of the war in Afghanistan and dealing with the threat of terrorism, according to a Washington Post-Pew Research Center poll. The survey, conducted Monday night, found no material change in the president’s already low ratings for his handling of the economy, still the No. 1 issue in

the eyes of most Americans. That suggests that a success on one front, even one as significant as the death of the man most responsible for the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, has not necessarily translated to other areas of Obama’s presidency. Bin Laden’s death provided an emotional release for most Americans. In the poll, 72 percent say they were “relieved” when they heard the news, 60 percent were “proud,” and 58 percent were “happy.” Just 16 percent say the news made them feel “afraid.” A sizable majority, 68 percent, say the death of bin Laden will contribute to the long-term security of the United States, roughly the same as said so about the capture of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. But few say it will make a major contribution, and an even larger majority say that,

despite bin Laden’s death, continued military action will be needed to deal with terrorist threats. The survey found a significant increase in the percentage of Americans who say they believe that the United States will be successful in the war in Afghanistan, up from 49 percent last December to 64 percent now. Almost half, 46 percent, say they are more confident because of the success in killing bin Laden, though about as many, 45 percent, say Sunday’s raid did not change their view. Still, there has been no significant change in attitudes about how long U.S. forces should remain in Afghanistan. Nearly half — 48 percent — say the troops should come home as soon as possible, virtually the same as the 50 percent who said so a month ago. The president’s overall approval rating jumped nine points compared with a Washington Post-ABC News poll last month and now stands at 56 percent. His disapproval fell from 50 percent to 38 percent. His overall standing now is at its highest point in more than a year and a half. Such boosts are common for presidents after major events, particularly a foreign policy success of this magnitude. The history of those shifts in public opinion suggests that Obama could enjoy higher levels of approval for a few months, absent any notable intervening events, before the trend begins to reverse itself. Broken down by party affiliation, Obama earns positive ratings from 85 percent of self-identified Democrats, 52 percent of independents and 16 percent of Republicans. Twenty-nine percent of all Americans say they strongly approve, while 24 percent say they strongly disapprove — a 13-point drop in strong disapproval since last month. The spikes in approval are far greater on two national security measures. Approval of Obama’s handling of the situation in Afghanistan leaped 16 points, to 60 percent, while his numbers on the handling of the threat of

terrorism jumped 13 points, to 69 percent. His rating on terrorism is now the highest of his presidency, while his Afghanistan approval rating is one of the highest. The economy continues to be a drag on Obama’s presidency, however. Despite the good feelings engendered by the death of bin Laden, the president’s economic approval ratings have not budged. In April, his approval rating on the economy was 42 percent positive and 57 percent negative. In the new Post-Pew survey, it is 40 percent positive, 55 percent negative. Obama draws positive marks on the issue from 63 percent of Democrats, but just 40 percent of independents and 11 percent of Republicans. The bin Laden death helped push the mood of the country in a more positive direction, but overall, Americans remain gloomy. Asked if they are satisfied or dissatisfied with the way things are going, 32 percent say they are satisfied, while 60 percent say dissatisfied. Two months ago, in a Pew poll, the findings were 22 percent satisfied, 73 percent dissatisfied. Most Americans are worried about the threat of terrorist attacks in retaliation for the killing of bin Laden. But nearly as many say they have confidence in the government’s ability to prevent such attacks. In the new survey, 61 percent say they have either a good amount or a great deal of confidence in the government to prevent future attacks, the highest percentage since the months after Sept. 11, 2001, and 17 points higher than the last time The Post asked the question, in September. The Post-Pew poll was conducted by conventional land-line and cellular telephone Monday evening and included interviews with 654 randomly selected adults. The margin of sampling error is plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.
balzd@washpost.com cohenj@washpost.com Polling manager Peyton M. Craighill contributed to this report.

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White House corrects details of raid on bin Laden’s compound
bin laden from A1 transmitted electronically. The backpedaling on the narrative of the operation created an awkward moment for the Obama administration in what has otherwise been an overwhelmingly positive week. Rep. Mike Rogers (RMich.), chairman of the House intelligence committee, chided the White House for appearing to exploit bin Laden’s demise. “I think we can get in trouble if people try to misuse this for political or propaganda gains,” Rogers said in a telephone interview. “I don’t think that’s going to be helpful at the end of the day.” White House spokesman Jay Carney attributed the missteps to the administration’s “great haste” in trying to share details even while operational updates were still pouring in. He and other officials stressed that the White House corrected the inaccuracies voluntarily as the quality of the information improved. Other officials attributed some of the confusion to conflicting information in field reports assembled by military officials still trying to document the details of a complex and chaotic operation that unfolded in 40 minutes in the Pakistani garrison city of Abbottabad. The account Carney presented differed in key respects from one that White House counterterrorism adviser John O. Brennan provided the previous day. Brennan spoke mockingly of bin Laden’s behavior, saying the al-Qaeda leader had cowered behind his wife in the lavish hideout before being shot in an intense exchange of gunfire. “He was engaged in a firefight with those that entered,” Brennan said, adding that bin Laden had been “hiding behind women who were put in front of him as a shield.” Brennan said it was unclear whether bin Laden had actually fired a weapon. “Whether or not he got off any rounds, I, quite frankly, don’t know,” he said. He also said it was possible that the woman in the line of fire, “presumed to be his wife,” may have been acting of her own will. Carney made major changes to the years.” Bin Laden’s wife, who identified the al-Qaeda leader’s body after the raid, has been treated for injuries and is in the custody of Pakistan’s intelligence service. A U.S. official said she told Pakistani authorities that bin Laden had lived in the complex, at least part of the time, since it was built in 2005. The official said that the United States’ request for access to the woman has been denied. The CIA became suspicious that the heavily fortified complex might house bin Laden after discovering that it was the residence of a courier with close ties to the alQaeda leader. U.S. spy satellites scrutinized the site for months but were unable to capture an image of bin Laden. At one point, Panetta told PBS, “we noticed an individual who was pacing in the courtyard who at least had some of the appearances” of the al-Qaeda chief. “But we were never able to verify that in fact it was him.” In early fall, the CIA called the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to help pinpoint the compound’s location. Using satellite images, information from sources and transcripts of intercepted phone calls, the NGA produced imagery analysis that described in detail the compound’s dimensions, its features and even the “pattern of life” behavior of its residents, a senior NGA analyst said. But even in the raid’s aftermath, confusion remains over the identities of some of the surviving occupants of the compound, which was home to a dozen or more women and children. U.S. officials think that at least two of the women were bin Laden’s wives and that he had fathered several of the children, but their names and ages were not immediately known. Bin Laden is believed to have taken at least four wives and fathered at least 11 children. Whether his family expanded further while in hiding in Pakistan was also not immediately clear.
millergreg@washpost.com warrickj@washpost.com Staff writers Ellen Nakashima and Craig Whitlock and staff researcher Julie Tate contributed to this report.

ASIF HASSAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES

tMembers of Jamaat-ud-Dawa, a militant Islamist group in Pakistan, offerMuslim funeral prayers for Osama bin Laden on a street in Karachi two days after the al-Qaeda leader was killed. The organizers declared bin Laden a martyr, police said.

that account, saying that bin Laden’s wife had “rushed the U.S. assaulter and was shot in the leg but not killed. Bin Laden was then shot and killed. He was not armed.” Carney and others defended the administration’s assertion that the team of 25 U.S. Navy SEALs and other operatives was prepared to take bin Laden alive. “He resisted the U.S. personnel,” Carney said. When pressed on how he did so without a weapon, Carney said that “resistance does not require a firearm.” Panetta said that the rules of engagement would have required U.S. forces to take bin Laden into custody if he had “thrown up his hands, surrendered and didn’t appear to be representing any kind of threat.”

But, he said, “I don’t think he had a lot of time to say anything,” adding that when the lead Navy SEAL reached the third-floor unit where bin Laden was located, “there were some threatening moves that were made . . . and that’s the reason they fired.” A U.S. official briefed on the raid said the first SEAL to confront bin Laden perceived a hostile intent. “He was not lying on the floor or trying to surrender,” the official said. “He was resisting.” Carney declined to elaborate on the nature of bin Laden’s resistance and referred reporters to the Defense Department. Pentagon spokesman Geoff Morrell said officials would not provide further details. U.S. officials briefed on the oper-

ation said the American forces faced enormous risks and encountered some obstacles for which they hadn’t prepared. One official said the stairway to bin Laden’s level was protected by barricades that were not envisioned in operational plans or included in the replicas on which the SEALs had trained. Rogers said U.S. forces had to contend with the possibility that bin Laden had rigged the building with explosives. “They didn’t know if he had his finger on a button,” the congressman said. “Think of all the things that are possible with someone who has killed 3,000 people.” Before encountering bin Laden, U.S. commandos fatally shot two of his protectors on the ground floor,

as well as a woman caught “in crossfire,” Carney said. Brennan had said earlier that the woman killed in the operation was thought to be bin Laden’s wife and had served as a shield. Brennan’s comments were part of a broader effort to portray the al-Qaeda leader as a cowardly figure at the culmination of a decade-long manhunt led by the CIA. “Here is bin Laden, who has been calling for these attacks, living in this million-dollar-plus compound, living in an area that is far removed from the front, hiding behind women who were put in front of him as a shield,” Brennan told reporters on Monday. “I think it really just speaks to just how false his narrative has been over

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Senior U.S. officials see a new opening to hasten the end of the Afghanistan war
afghanistan from A1 ing “presents an opportunity for reconciliation that didn’t exist before.” Those officials and others have engaged in urgent discussions and strategy sessions over the past two days about how to leverage the death into a spark that ignites peace talks. But actually bringing the various Taliban factions to the negotiating table remains a challenge. Omar’s shadowy organization, based in the Pakistani city of Quetta, does not have a political wing or officials who have been publicly identified as interlocutors. The Obama administration is also depending on deft maneuvering by Afghan President Hamid Karzai’s government, which is supposed to be leading the process, and the cooperation of the Pakistani government, whose intelligence service — long a patron of various Taliban groups — could easily interfere with peace overtures. “We know where we want to go, but getting there won’t be easy,” the second senior official said. “There’s a long and complicated path ahead.” Even so, bin Laden’s demise comes at what administration officials deem to be a propitious moment: A surge of U.S. military forces over the past year has pushed insurgents out of strategically important parts of southern Afghanistan, increasing the chances that top Taliban leaders may want to pursue negotiations. The daring helicopter-borne raid on bin Laden’s house by U.S. Special Operations forces further ups the ante, current and former officials said, by signaling to members of the Taliban’s high command that they are not guaranteed safety by living in parts of Pakistan beyond the typical reach of U.S. drones. Bin Laden had been living near the country’s military academy, in a city in the hills north of the capital, for six years. “It has a tremendous demonstration effect,” said Vali Nasr, who was a senior adviser to the State Department on Afghanistan and Pakistan until last month. “Mullah Omar has to be wondering when he’ll be picked up.” Nasr said bin Laden’s death “puts more pressure on the Taliban than all of the counterinsurgency [operations] we’ve been doing in Afghanistan.”

MUSADEQ SADEQ/ASSOCIATED PRESS

An Afghan police officer mans a checkpoint in Kabul, Afghanistan’s capital. U.S. officials say that with the death of al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, the Taliban has an opportunity to forswear its ties to the terrorist group, one of the conditions that Washington has set forth for a peace deal.

A unified strategy
Although a peace deal has long been the preferred outcome for civilian members of the president’s national security team, many of whom question the sustainability of recent military gains, skepticism from Pentagon officials and ground commanders held up a unified U.S. government strategy until this spring. In a February speech that elicited little attention because of events in the Middle East, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton articulated the outlines of the administration’s new approach. In a significant shift toward encouraging dia-

logue, she made clear that the Taliban no longer has to renounce violence, break with al-Qaeda or embrace the Afghan constitution as preconditions for talks; now those terms only have to be “necessary outcomes of any negotiation.” “Reconciling with an adversary that can be as brutal as the Taliban sounds distasteful, even unimaginable. And diplomacy would be easy if we only had to talk to our friends. But that is not how one makes peace,” Clinton said. Top military officials have expressed concern in internal discussions that calling for negotiations too soon could jeopardize hard-fought gains on the battlefield. They contend that their aggressive campaign is weakening the insurgency, and that if they are left to pursue their strategy without a significant reduction in troops, the Taliban will be forced into a weaker deal, getting no more than a minority role within a U.S.-friendly, democratic government.

But many of the president’s civilian national security advisers contend that the benefits of incremental gains do not merit the cost — in lives and dollars — of such a large military presence. They say negotiations are an essential part of a new war strategy that will allow Obama to announce a substantial reduction in U.S. forces starting this summer but still ensure that the Taliban will no longer rule the entire country. “How are we going to get there? We can get there by continuing to fight them. I don’t think that’s actually a strategy that is successful. Or we can get there by negotiating with them in such a way to allow a political settlement where they’re part of the government,” Anne-Marie Slaughter, who was the State Department’s director of policy planning until earlier this year, said at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Tuesday. Bin Laden’s death, she said, “creates a new opportunity to begin real negotia-

tions.” Another senior U.S. official involved in war policy said the example of a 12-man team of Navy SEALs descending into a walled compound and shooting the world’s most-wanted terrorist leader could help keep pressure on the Taliban even as Obama withdraws conventional military forces starting this summer. As another potential catalyst for talks, the administration is hoping to announce the completion of a strategic partnership agreement with the Afghan government that will endorse the long-term presence of a modest number of U.S. troops in the country to continue to train Afghan security forces and to conduct counterterrorism operations.

Peace talks a priority
After weeks of debate among civilian and military leaders, the National Security Council recently endorsed key elements of the State Department’s reconciliation

strategy. Starting peace talks has now become the top priority for Marc Grossman, who succeeded Richard C. Holbrooke as the U.S. government’s special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan. On Tuesday, Grossman met in Islamabad with Pakistan’s foreign secretary and Afghanistan’s deputy foreign minister. The three agreed to constitute a “core group for promoting and facilitating the process of reconciliation and peace in Afghanistan,” Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement. U.S. officials expressed hope on Tuesday that Pakistan’s failure to find bin Laden — or its possible complicity in sheltering him — could lead Islamabad to adopt a softer position on Afghan reconciliation. They think that Pakistani officials, who have interfered with peace efforts in the past, have an opportunity to play a more constructive role. “Our hope is that they are so embarrassed by this that they try to save face by trying to help their neighbor,” one U.S. official said. Pakistani officials have long seen a contradiction in Washington’s effort to target those with whom it wishes to negotiate, and they fear that the U.S. goal is an Afghan government more allied with India, Pakistan’s historical adversary. The Pakistani government believes that Taliban insurgents are the only card it has to play in the game for long-term strategic influence in the region. Although the Taliban has steadfastly refused to renounce al-Qaeda, U.S. officials think that bin Laden’s death gives Omar an opportunity to distance himself from the group without losing face in front of his followers, because his offer of protection, made more than 10 years ago, was given to bin Laden, not the entire terrorist network. “It’s not the two-ton gorilla in the middle of the reconciliation issue that it once was,” Nasr said. And with bin Laden out of the picture, talking to the Taliban could become less politically fraught for Obama. Talking to the Taliban, the second senior official said, “no longer looks like you’re weak on national security.” “The red lines have become a lot pinker,” Nasr said. “It’s now become a whole lot easier to sell a policy to end the war with negotiations to the American people.”
chandrasek@washpost.com Correspondent Joshua Partlow in Kabul and staff writer Karen DeYoung in Washington contributed to this report.

LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS

U.S. soldiers and contractors at Jalalabad airfield in Nangahar province. “Bin Laden’s death is the beginning of the endgame in Afghanistan,” one senior official said.

Bin Laden’s burial at sea sparks debate among Islamic leaders and scholars
BY

J EFF K AROUB

Osama bin Laden’s burial at sea by the U.S. government has spurred worldwide debate among Islamic leaders and scholars: Did officials follow Islamic tradition in handling the body before and during burial, as they contend? Experts’ responses vary as widely as the interpretations among followers of any faith. Some saw the burial as an appropriate option; others decried it as an unacceptable way to treat the body of a Muslim, regardless of his actions in life. Still, there are some basic customs and practices of Islamic burial commonly fol-

lowed, according to Muslim clerics who discussed them with the Associated Press:  The preference is always for bodies to be buried on land, but custom allows for sea burials if someone dies on a ship and there is no way to quickly get the body to land.  The body must be buried within 24 hours to honor the prophet Muhammad, and should not be cremated or embalmed.  In the grave, the head should be pointed toward the holy city of Mecca in preparation for Judgment Day.  Before burial, the body needs to be ritually washed from top to bottom and dried. The process is meant to honor

Allah. “Allah created the body and we have to respect the body as though the air and blood is still going through it — that’s the vessel that held the spirit of the human being,” said Abdullah Bey El-Amin, a Detroit imam and president of a company that provides funeral products and services.  After the washing, custom calls for the body to be wrapped in three pieces of cloth for men, five pieces for women.  The funeral service at a mosque or elsewhere should include a special burial prayer with four parts to glorify God, and reading of the first chapter of the Koran.

The bottom line is “we should not insult the body of any person when he is dead,” said Ahmad Sakr, president of the Foundation of Islamic Knowledge and director of the Islamic Education Center in Walnut, Calif. “There are rules and regulations for burial, whether he’s a practicing Muslim or a lazy Muslim,” Sakr said. President Obama said bin Laden’s remains had been handled in accordance with custom, which requires speedy burial, and the Pentagon later said the body was sunk in the waters of the northern Arabian Sea after adhering to traditional Islamic procedures — including washing

the body — aboard the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson. A U.S. official said the burial decision was made after concluding that it would have been difficult to find a country willing to accept bin Laden’s remains. There was also concern that a grave site could have become a rallying point for militants. Some prominent Muslim clerics in the Middle East have suggested that the burial at sea could be interpreted by some Muslims as an insult and might invite retribution.
— Associated Press

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Debate over gay judge’s impartiality could have a chilling effect
judge from A1 issue arise based on sexual identity because the idea of a gay judge is, for many, new.” As recently as 1998, an Asian American judge sanctioned two lawyers who asked that he be removed from a case in part because of his ethnicity. In Walker’s case, those challenging his ruling say they are not taking issue with his sexual orientation, nor do they contend that a gay person would be unfit to preside over the case. The issue, they say, is that Walker could directly benefit from his ruling and that he should have disclosed in court whether he intended to marry. To many others, no matter how nuanced the argument is, it amounts to one thing: an attempt to discredit a judge simply because he is gay. “Would they try this with another judge in a different class? If the issue is equal pay for equal work, does it mean that no woman could hear that case?” said Tom Chiola, a retired circuit judge and the first openly gay candidate elected to public office in Illinois. “Where does this line of argument end?” Some legal experts played down the likelihood that the challenge will succeed. “It’s pretty well understood that status-based motions to disqualify are not going to float,” said Charles Geyh, an Indiana University law school professor who is an expert on judicial ethics. But the debate, he said, could have a chilling effect on other gay judges who may be called upon to rule on same-sex marriage as the issue works its way through the courts. Already, more than a dozen lawsuits have been filed across the country challenging laws that limit the rights of gay couples to marry or qualify for benefits. At the same time, the number of openly gay judges has risen as the stigma fades and efforts continue to diversify the bench. Last month, Massachusetts Gov. Deval L. Patrick (D) nominated to the state’s high court a lesbian who legally married her partner. President Obama has nominated two openly gay men to the federal bench. Judges have become increasingly open about their sexuality, but many remain quiet because they view it as a distraction in the courtroom, said Larnzell Martin Jr., a circuit judge in Prince George’s County and an officer of the International Association of Lesbian and Gay Judges, which has more than 85 members. “There’s no judge, in my opinion, who does not [have] his own or her own biases or prejudices. We don’t judge in vacuums. We bring to the bench our experiences. We bring to the bench our sensitivity to certain things. We are allowed to have our leanings,” Martin said. “But we also bring to the bench a common training in the law.” It had long been rumored that Walker, who was nominated to the federal bench by President George H.W. Bush in 1989, was gay. ProtectMarriage.com, the group defending Proposition 8, did not raise the issue during the trial but said it felt compelled to do so after Walker acknowledged his orientation to a Reuters reporter this year. In the interview, Walker said he never considered recusing himself. Through a spokeswoman, Walker declined to comment this week. His ruling has been appealed, and the case is widely expected to be resolved by the U.S. Supreme Court. ProtectMarriage.com, in its court filing, argues that Walker had a responsibility to disclose his relationship before the trial. “It is important to emphasize at the outset that we are not suggesting that a gay or lesbian judge could not sit on this case,” the group’s attorneys said in their motion, which was submitted to the district court. “Rather, our submission is grounded in the fundamental principle, reiterated in the governing statute, that no judge ‘is permitted to try cases where he has an interest in the outcome.’ ” Arthur D. Hellman, a law professor at the University of Pittsburgh, called it a “very skillfully done document” because it ties in Walker’s own words from his ruling about marriage. “He himself has said how beneficial marriage is, and having said all that, wouldn’t a reasonable person think that he would want to?” Hellman said. But even those who say the argument has merit acknowledge that it may not be enough to persuade a judge to vacate Walker’s ruling. They say Proposition 8 proponents should have raised their concern earlier, when the rumors about Walker’s sexuality began to surface. And they point out that there is no evidence that Walker planned to marry his partner of 10 years. Still, the challenge may have planted doubt in the public’s mind about Walker’s impartiality, said Gillers, the New York University professor. “Unfortunately, Walker has muddied the waters and given the opponents of gay marriage the ability to undermine the credibility of his opinion,” he said. “That doesn’t mean the opinion becomes wrong, but it gives the proponents of Proposition 8 ammunition to cast doubt in the public debate.”
sandhya@washpost.com

Massey cited for violations at W.Va. mine
charleston, w.va. — Troubled coal producer Massey Energy has been cited for more than two dozen safety violations that could have caused a fire or explosion at one of its West Virginia mines, the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration said Tuesday. Inspectors found the violations at Massey subsidiary Inman Energy’s Randolph Mine in Boone County during a surprise inspection Friday, the agency said. MSHA started the inspections after 29 miners died in an explosion at Massey’s Upper Big Branch mine. The April 5, 2010, tragedy remains the target of criminal and civil investigations. Copies of the citations provided by MSHA show that inspectors found miners working without mandatory ventilation equipment for controlling explosive methane gas and coal dust. Inspectors also issued citations for allowing combustible materials to build up and running a mining machine with low water pressure to sprayers designed to prevent explosions. Richmond-based Massey said it has meted out unspecified discipline to several miners. “We will take all actions necessary to ensure that our operations comply with the letter of the law,” general counsel Shane Harvey said in a statement.
— Associated Press

HOW AN INVESTMENT IN A HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

IS REBUILDING AN ENTIRE COMMUNITY IN NEW ORLEANS

After one of New Orleans’ oldest public housing developments was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, we invested in rebuilding it from the ground up. Our Urban Investment Group partnered with an experienced developer, McCormack Baron Salazar, as well as former tenants, neighborhood organizations, and state and local housing agencies to enable families and businesses to return home. Today, Harmony Oaks is a community where neighbors can come together—on their new front porches, at the local community center or the nearest playground. See the story at goldmansachs.com/progress

Watch the story on your smartphone.

©2011 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved. Progress Is Everyone’s Business is a trademark of Goldman Sachs.

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DOW 12,807.51 UP 0.15, 0.001%

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ECONOMY & BUSINESS
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10-YEAR TREASURY UP $2.80 PER $1,000, 3.25% YIELD

CURRENCIES $1 = 81.01 YEN; EURO = $1.483

DIGEST
PORTUGAL

Deal reached for $116 billion in bailout aid
Portugal reached an agreement with officials preparing its European Union-led bailout that will provide as much as $116 billion in aid and allow more time to reduce the country’s budget deficit. The three-year plan set goals for a budget deficit of 5.9 percent of gross domestic product this year, 4.5 percent in 2012 and 3 percent in 2013, Prime Minister Jose Socrates said in Lisbon on Tuesday. The government in March targeted a deficit of 4.6 percent this year, 3 percent in 2012 and 2 percent in 2013. “The government was able to obtain a good agreement,” Socrates said. “Naturally there are no programs of financial assistance that are not demanding and that do not imply a lot of work.” Portugal in April became the
CHRIS RATCLIFFE/BLOOMBERG NEWS

third euro-zone country to request E.U. aid, after Greece and Ireland. Portugal has already raised taxes and is implementing the deepest spending cuts in more than three decades as it tries to narrow its budget gap and curb debt. Socrates said the agreed-upon plan does not involve more cuts in public-sector wages or in the minimum wage. State workers will not be fired and the government will not sell shares in state-owned savings bank Caixa Geral de Depositos SA as part of the agreement, he said. Consultations with Portuguese political parties will now follow, Socrates said. He did not provide details on the interest rate that Portugal will be charged for its aid plan.
— Bloomberg News

U.S. efforts to speed the economic recovery could transform currency’s slow decline into a precipitous fall
BY

The dollar, at risk

EARNINGS

Lower sales, higher costs hurt Molson Coors
Molson Coors Brewing’s firstquarter earnings fell 21 percent, largely because of softer beer sales and higher costs for ingredients and fuel. This is typically the weakest quarter for the brewer. But Molson Coors also suffered by comparison with the previous year, which included a sales boost from the Vancouver Olympics. The company reported a profit of $82.9 million, or 44 cents per share, in the quarter ended March 26. That is down from $104.6 million, or 56 cents per share, last year. Revenue rose 4 percent, to $690.4 million. Molson Coors, like most brewers, is struggling with weaker beer sales as consumers cope with unemployment and a tough economy. It is particularly pronounced for Molson Coors, whose core customers, men under 28, are seeing particularly high unemployment. The company’s total worldwide beer volume fell 1.5 percent from the previous year. The problems from softer sales are compounded by higher fuel, freight and ingredient costs that are challenging the profitability of nearly all consumer product companies.
— Associated Press

N EIL I RWIN

T

he U.S. government has pulled out all the stops to try to get the economy back on track after the Great Recession: It is running a huge budget deficit, the financial sector has been bailed out, and the Federal Reserve is keeping interest rates ultra-low. But the efforts to get the economy going again create risks of their own. One of the biggest is that the value of the dollar could decline in ways that are abrupt and disruptive. The dollar has already been drifting gradually downward as a result of large U.S. trade and budget deficits and the growing economic might of the rest of the world. It is down 36 percent against six other major currencies over the past decade — and was down even more before the 2008 financial crisis prompted fearful investors to plow money into dollars. The downward trend is likely to continue as the other economies continue to catch up with the United States. The risk now is that large U.S. budget deficits, a lack of political consensus over how to reduce them and the Fed’s lowinterest-rate policies will transform the slow decline into a precipitous fall. “There is an ongoing, very gradual diversification away from the dollar,” Barry Eichengreen, an economist at the University of California at Berkeley and author of “Exorbitant Privilege,” said about the unique role of the dollar in the world economy. “That movement could be very significantly hastened if foreigners grow concerned about deficits as far as the eye can see and the pressure the Fed will feel not to normalize the level of interest rates, resulting in inflation.” At the moment, the dollar and U.S. Treasury securities are trading at prices that reflect investor confidence in the future of the greenback. The dollar is still the preferred currency for a vast array of transactions, even many that take place outside the United States and don’t involve Americans. Nations around the world put their rainy-day savings, known as reserves, into dollars, and investors pour money into U.S. Treasury bonds whenever the economic outlook becomes unnerving.

BILL SIKES/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Molson Coors Brewing Co.'s net income fell 21 percent in the first quarter.

But that arrangement might not last.

Foreign competition
The euro has already emerged as a competitor. The currency is in use across 17 European economies that together are roughly equal to that of the United States. Despite recent financial crises in several of those countries, the euro has rallied 15 percent against the dollar since mid-January, in part because the European Central Bank has been more willing to raise interest rates than the Fed. China’s currency could emerge as a global rival to the dollar if Chinese officials accelerate their recent moves to ease control over how the yuan is used and allow its value to better reflect market forces. The prospects for the Japanese yen look less promising, especially because Japan’s debt is even larger than that of the United States relative to the size of its economy. “You can view the dollar in isolation and work yourself up into a lather that this is really a dismal outlook, with the intractable U.S. budget problems and a sense that in the long run the only way out will be inflation,” said Desmond Lachman, a resident fellow at the

American Enterprise Institute. “But you have to look at what’s happening in Europe and what’s happening in Japan, and ask yourself against what is the dollar really going to be depreciating.” History is full of examples of countries where large budget deficits eventually led investors to lose faith, causing the currency to tumble. The Asian financial crisis, which rocked the likes of Thailand, Singapore and South Korea in the late 1990s, is one recent example. If global investors suddenly lost confidence in the value of the dollar, they would demand higher interest rates to lend money to the U.S. government. That could make it more expensive for the government to continue financing its debts, aggravating the budget crisis further. Carmen Reinhart, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics who studies financial crises, said a rapid decline in the dollar is not likely. But she noted that the meltdown of global financial markets in 2008 would also have seemed unlikely two years earlier. “The improbable does happen,” she said.

Reinhart warned that treating the prospect of a dollar collapse as unlikely could actually help it happen. If elected officials don’t develop a plan for bringing down budget deficits over time, for example, it could make a rapid loss of confidence in the dollar more likely. Ask the British. Just a century ago, the pound was the dominant currency used for global trade and London the financial capital of the world. But over just a decade, from 1914 to 1924, the dollar supplanted the pound as the leading global currency as the British took on massive debts to pay for waging World War I, and the United States created the Federal Reserve and with it a more stable banking system. Eichengreen has studied this pivotal decade and highlights its lessons for today. “There’s not going to be a massive flight away from the dollar all at once, because there’s nowhere to flee to,” he said. “But this ongoing process of moving away from the dollar will be accelerated by doubts about whether U.S. policy is being conducted in a responsible way.”
irwinn@washpost.com

LEGAL

BP fined $25 million for Alaska pipeline spill
BP’s subsidiary in Alaska will pay a $25 million civil penalty under a settlement announced Tuesday that comes five years after more than 200,000 gallons of crude oil spilled from company pipelines on the North Slope. The penalty is the largest perbarrel civil penalty assessed, exceeding the statutory maximum because the settlement resolves other claims, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The settlement also calls for BP Exploration Alaska to install a system-wide pipeline integrity management program.  Honda expands recall: Honda expanded an earlier recall of Honda and Acura vehicles over replacement air bags that could
ALSO IN BUSINESS

“This penalty should serve as a wake-up call to all pipeline operators that they will be held accountable for the safety of their operations,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Ignacia S. Moreno said. U.S. Attorney for Alaska Karen Loeffler said BP Alaska admitted that it cut corners and failed to adequately maintain its pipelines. BP Alaska spokesman Steve Rinehart in e-mails acknowledged the settlement terms, including an independent contractor to monitor operations at the vast Prudhoe Bay field.
— Associated Press

deploy with too much pressure, causing injuries or fatalities. The recall adds 833,000 vehicles for the model years 2001 to 2003.
— Reuters

Post Tech
CECILIA KANG

Excerpt from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-tech

Order from S.C. Supreme Court may slow foreclosures
Lawyers must certify borrowers have had chance to modify loans
BY

Sprint turns to states to block AT&T merger
Sprint Nextel is taking its battle against AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile to the states, starting with a request for the West Virginia Public Service Commission to investigate and block the deal. In a filing Monday with the state commission, Sprint Nextel said the agency has a mandate to ensure that mergers don’t harm the public. “Clearly the interest of the public in this state will be adversely affected by the proposed merger because it is anticompetitive and will hurt consumers by raising prices, restricting innovation and limiting choices of wireless providers,” Sprint said in its filing. Sprint, the nation’s third-largest wireless carrier, based on the number of subscribers, has emerged as the most vocal opponent of the $39 billion deal. It says 80 percent of all wireless consumers will hold AT&T or Verizon Wireless plans, creating a duopoly in the market. A Sprint spokesman said the company will probably file similar petitions in other states where AT&T is required to gain approval for the transfer of T-Mobile licenses. It will be a difficult battle at the state level. AT&T has many more employees than Sprint that lobby state utilities commissioners, observers said. And it is still early in the merger process. The Federal Communications Commission started its review of the merger only three weeks ago. The Justice Department is collecting information from AT&T, T-Mobile and competitors to look into possible antitrust implications of the transaction.

D INA E L B OGHDADY

The Supreme Court of South Carolina on Tuesday ordered lenders not to proceed with foreclosures in the state until they can demonstrate that they have given troubled homeowners a meaningful opportunity to modify their loans. Chief Justice Jean H. Toal, who issued the order, said in an interview that the action stems from frustration with lenders that are regularly negotiating loan modifications with borrow-

ers while simultaneously pressing ahead to foreclose on those borrowers. This “dual track” process has created “a grand mess” in the court system, Toal said. Judges in the state say that foreclosure lawyers who appear before them are often unaware that the borrowers they are trying to evict are negotiating loan modifications, and the confusion creates unnecessary delays and burdens for the courts, Toal said. The dual track process has surfaced as a key problem across the nation, and several large lenders say they are working to eliminate the practice. In South Carolina, many judges attributed the problem to a breakdown in communication between lenders and the lawyers they hire to represent them in foreclosure

cases, Toal said. “It occurred to me that you’ve got to make the lenders have some sort of interaction with their own attorneys,” she said. “The attorneys are the ones that need to step in and be involved in the matter, and the lender has to empower them.” To that end, the court order requires foreclosure lawyers to certify that a troubled borrower was given an opportunity to modify his or her loan. This applies to foreclosure actions pending on or after Monday. If a loan modification is denied, the borrower must be informed in writing and given a chance to respond, the court order says. Lenders and their attorneys can be sanctioned for not complying with the order.

Consumer advocates said similar systems are in place in New York and Connecticut. Ira Rheingold, executive director of the National Association of Consumer Advocates, said he expects the order to cut back on foreclosures in the state. “The order puts the onus on the lender’s attorney,” Rheingold said. “What [the chief justice] has seen is a broken system where the attorneys don’t even talk to their clients. Foreclosures will in fact stop because no attorneys can certify the things that the court is asking them to certify.” The South Carolina Supreme Court had issued a similar order in May 2009, but it applied only to loans eligible for the federal government’s key foreclosure prevention program.
dina@washpost.com

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U.S. alleges fraud at Deutsche Bank
Civil suit over mortgage lending seeks $1 billion
BY

J IA L YNN Y ANG

U.S. prosecutors filed a civil suit Tuesday against Deutsche Bank, saying it repeatedly lied to the government and used shoddy lending standards that cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars. The government’s fraud allegations come as regulators and prosecutors face pressure to hold banks responsible for actions that led to the financial crisis. The suit, which seeks $1 billion in damages, says that Deutsche Bank lied about the quality of its lending practices in order to get access to the government’s massive mortgage insurance program. Between 1999 and 2009, the bank’s subsidiary, MortgageIT, got backing from the Federal Housing Administration for more than 39,000 loans worth more

than $5 billion. In exchange, the firm was required to ensure that its lending met federal standards. But, prosecutors say, the bankers “never held up their end of the bargain.” “Borrower after borrower defaulted — often within just months of closing — because those loans were doomed to fail,” Preet Bharara, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, said at a news conference. As of February, the government had paid more than $386 million in insurance claims and other costs for loans approved by the bank that went bad. The complaint says the government expects to pay hundreds of millions of dollars more to cover bad loans underwritten by the bank. Deutsche Bank responded saying that “close to 90 percent” of the activity covered in the complaint happened before it acquired MortgageIT in 2007. At the time, MortgageIT had been an approved FHA lender for nearly a decade, the bank said in a statement. “We believe the claims against MortgageIT and Deutsche Bank

are unreasonable and unfair, and we intend to defend against the action vigorously,” Deutsche Bank said. The complaint paints a picture of a bank taking short cuts. When an outside auditor found serious problems at MortgageIT, the concerns were “literally stuffed in a closet and left unread and unopened,” the complaint said. MortagageIT also failed to closely watch its own lending practices. At one point it reassigned its lone staff member in charge of auditing FHA-insured loans to churn out more mortgages, the complaint alleges. When the government found evidence the bank was violating requirements to check for the quality of the mortgages, MortgageIT promised to fix the problems and then did nothing. The banks also repeatedly claimed eligibility for FHA loans that did not meet government rules, prosecutors said. “While they promised to select qualified mortgages to be insured, they repeatedly abused that public trust by brushing aside the rules, lying about the

quality of their underwriting operation, and passing on the costs of the inevitable hundreds of millions of dollars of defaults to the government,” said Bharara, whose office is also pursuing a major insider-trading ring. “It wasn’t their problem anymore. The government held all the risks and, ultimately, was left holding the bag.” The bank was also singled out in a report released last month by a U.S. Senate panel that investigated the causes of the financial crisis. That inquiry charged Deutsche Bank and Goldman Sachs with selling complex financial products filled with loans that traders at the banks viewed as being worthless. “As alleged, MortgageIT and Deutsche Bank ignored every type of red flag and breached every duty of due diligence before underwriting thousands of federally insured mortgages,” Bharara said. “While the homes the defendants issued loans for may have been built on solid ground, the defendants’ lending practices were built on quicksand.”
yangjl@washpost.com

STEVEN PEARLSTEIN

Mission impossible: Getting to ‘yes’ on the budget
es, Mr. and Mrs. America, with the budget battle raging and the government about to max out its credit card, the members of Congress have returned to the Capitol, and anticipation is in the air. Will Vice President Biden hammer out a budget deal with bipartisan representatives before the debt ceiling is reached? Will Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner give the negotiators more time by juggling the cash flow until after the Labor Day recess (which follows the Memorial Day recess and the all-important July 4 recess)? Will the Senate’s bipartisan “Gang of Six” produce its longawaited long-term budget blueprint to bring the deficit under control? I don’t know about you, but the prospect of an endless summer of budget posturing and brinksmanship is probably more than I can take. Can’t we just hand this whole thing over to the Navy SEALs? Imagine it: The unmarked choppers flying in low over the Mall. The guys in black rapelling down the Capitol dome. Members of the budget committees rounded up from their chambers, and from their hideaways, dragged into Statuary Hall and subjected to “intense interrogation techniques.” President Obama and the National Economic Council watching it all in real time from the White House Situation Room. And then, in less time than it takes the Senate clerk to complete a quorum call, the politicians crack and agree to a budget compromise. Geronimo, baby. The “intelligence” work for this operation has already been done, most recently by the bipartisan deficit commission. Given the political and economic realities, it’s pretty clear how it’s going to play out: Federal spending will decline to 22 percent of GDP at full employment. That reflects the historical average of 20.6 percent, plus an increase to reflect the demographic reality of an aging population. To get there, the burden will be evenly split between revenue increases and tax cuts in the early years, shifting gradually to three dollars of spending cuts (including reduced interest payments) for every dollar of revenue increases as long-term entitlement spending is contained. On expenditures, investment spending will be budgeted separately and rise even as consumption spending falls. Discretionary spending cuts will be split evenly between domestic and national security. Social Security will be returned to long-term actuarial balance through a combination of progressive reductions to the cost-of-living formula, increases in the cap on income subject to the payroll tax and very gradual increases in the retirement age. Medicare and Medicaid spending will be capped at a growth rate of GDP plus 1 percent per year per average beneficiary. Cuts would take effect automatically if Congress fails to act. On taxes, the top marginal earned rate of 35 percent will be left in place, but limits on deductions will increase revenue from taxpayers who itemize. The

Y

JANUARY 2010 PHOTO BY BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST

D’Artanyon Yarborough carried his groceries from a D.C. store without a bag after a tax was imposed. The tax partly inspired Montgomery.

Montgomery tax will apply to paper as well as plastic bags
tax from A1 climate. “It’s just another regressive tax that creates its own set of administrative costs.. . . We are adding to the cost borne by our most vulnerable populations,” Floreen said. The District’s bag tax, which went into effect in January 2010, is generally viewed as an environmental success, if not necessarily a fiscal one. Use of plastic bags dropped so quickly and so greatly that the revenue from the tax was far lower than projected, city officials said. In Virginia, local taxes have to be authorized by the General Assembly. So Arlington County, one of the jurisdictions where there is strong support for a bag tax, has had to turn to Richmond. But in a state averse to taxes, this year’s proposal from Arlington, like the ones before it, went nowhere. Montgomery County Executive Isiah Leggett (D) said he first thought of the idea several years ago but waited for action on the state level. When he concluded that those efforts were stuck, he proposed the local tax in March. “Once they’ve seen that it is in place, once they’ve seen it working, then it may become a basis for a more positive action” in the General Assembly, Leggett said. That view was shared by Sen. Jamie B. Raskin, who, along with Del. Alfred C. Carr Jr., a fellow Montgomery Democrat, pushed statewide bag tax proposals. “A lot of state laws get passed when we prove that something works at the local level,” Raskin said, adding that momentum fell apart under industry pressure in Annapolis. “We ran into a big lobbying [push] in the last two weeks of the session. We had built up big support, including from the president of the Senate,” Raskin said. “The chemical industry invested a lot of money at the end of the session to stop it. . . . It worked. The environmental forces will be back next year, and the momentum is on our side.” But Carr said he’s not sure whether Montgomery’s action “will help or hurt” in rural, conservative areas of the state, where legislators balked at passing “anything that looks or smells like a tax.” Fear of a backlash cost the bill the support of Republicans — and some Democrats, Carr said. “You also had some Democrats buying into the industry’s argument that this would be a tax and not good for families,” Carr said. “I don’t think they give a whole lot of heed to what goes on in Montgomery County anyway for something like that.” Carr said anti-bag-tax ads on Baltimore radio stations sapped support in the state’s biggest urban area. Mark Daniels, the vice president in charge of environmental policy for bagmaker Hilex Poly, said Montgomery officials “obviously were not informed with regard to the environmental attributes of plastic bags.” His company uses recycled bags to make many of their new ones, he said, and people reuse bags to carry their lunches, pick up after dogs or to line their bathroom trash cans. “The legislators in Maryland understood the facts a lot more than the folks” in Montgomery, Daniels said. In the District, the tax has been highly effective, said D.C. Council member Tommy Wells, who consulted with Montgomery officials and testified for the county’s tax. City officials say they have been told by major supermarkets that bag use is down by more than 60 percent. Montgomery, Wells (D-Ward 6) said in a statement, “took a smart approach, built the political will, and worked with a coalition of businesses and environmental leaders to achieve today’s success.” Walking in Rockville with a plastic bag, Gina Parr, a marketing director, said she’s following her children’s lead and trying to be greener. But, she said, “we have enough taxes. We’re overtaxed here. It’s nickel-and-diming.” “I think people can be responsible. . . . My kids are more environmentally aware. I’m learning, too,” she said. Still, “my husband hasn’t had a raise in two years. . . . We haven’t gotten raises. Yet they keep wanting more.” But Julia Lee, who does marketing for a nonprofit group and lives in Silver Spring, said she supports the tax and is partial to reusables. “I always use my little bags,” she said. “It’s better for the environment. It does put the consumer to work a little bit. . . . But I think, in the end, that’s where everybody’s moving anyway.”
larism@washpost.com

Give her the moon and stars.

corporate rate will be reduced to 25 percent, and then only for profit earned in the United States, but elimination of deductions and loopholes will raise more money for the government, not less. Revenue from a modest new carbon tax, along with existing fuel taxes, will finance public infrastructure spending through an independent infrastructure bank. If you locked 100 Americans in a room with a team of technical budget experts and told them they couldn’t leave until 60 of them could agree on a budget plan, this is what would emerge. Not because it is necessarily anyone’s ideal plan but because it is least objectionable to the largest number of people. It represents the political center of gravity. Here’s the important thing to understand about the politicians who refuse to accept such a compromise: No matter what they say, they really care more about cutting taxes (in the case of Republicans) or protecting spending (in the case of Democrats) than they do about fixing the deficit. Their fantasy is that if they hold out just a little bit longer, if they recite their poll-tested talking points just a few more times, if they can raise just a bit more money to buy an even bigger legislative majority in the next election, they can finally win. And because both sides cling to this unachievable fantasy and have their entire political reason for being tied up with it, there is no instinct for compromise. You can forget about the Biden talks — certainly almost everyone else has. From the people appointed to participate, you can tell the process is meant to fail. The Republicans, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Senate Whip Jon Kyl, are some of the party’s most partisan and ideological attack dogs. Jim Clyburn, the assistant House Democratic whip, is a cutout for Nancy Pelosi, who has made it plain that Social Security is not a problem and should not even be part of the discussion. Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid’s choices are Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus and Appropriations Committee Chairman Daniel Inouye, who have demonstrated on more than one occasion that they care more about protecting their own legislative prerogatives than about taming the budget deficit. At this point, the only real hope for a comprehensive deal is with the Gang of Six — Democrats Mark Warner, Richard Durbin and Kent Conrad, and Republicans Saxby Chambliss, Tom Coburn and Mike Crapo. These six understand that neither side is going to “win” this battle and that having a good budget plan is more important than holding out for a perfect one that never materializes. Now, however, this courageous gang is under tremendous pressure from party leaders, colleagues and special interests to abandon its heretical collaboration and compromise. There are last-minute snags, the timetable has been pushed back, and there are whispers of possible defections. Time to send in the SEALs.
pearlstein@washpost.com

Giant Food reaches deal with Teamsters
BY

D ANIELLE D OUGLAS

Moon and Star Pendant with Pavé and Shimmer Diamond from $599
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Workers at a Giant Food warehouse in Maryland ratified an agreement with the operator that eliminates nearly half of the staff, ending months of contentious negotiations in which the union feared that the site would be shuttered. Teamsters Local 730, which represents 430 workers at the dry-groceries warehouse in Jessup, accepted a 40 percent reduction in staff, with the assurance that employees would be offered jobs in other parts of the company or buyouts. The vote was 241 to 19. “You can never be happy when you have to make concessions, but with this we made the best of a bad situation,” said Ritchie Brooks, president of Teamsters Local 730. The area’s largest supermarket chain agreed in April to have Jessup Logistics, an affiliate of C&S Wholesale Grocers, assume

operations of its dry-groceries warehouse in Jessup. The operator began meeting with the union in March to negotiate the contract that was set to expire May 14. Days after the sides began negotiating, Brooks said, officials from Jessup Logistics gave verbal notice that the plant would close, leading to protests at more than 16 Giant locations throughout the Washington area. At one point, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters rallied outside the Hyatt Regency in the District, where the Food Marketing Institute held its annual policy meeting, attended by C&S. More than 200 labor activists gathered, including some of the 1,000 A&P supermarket workers from New Jersey who lost their jobs when C&S closed their distribution centers in February. Under the new contract, only a fraction of the work will be shipped out. Workers will pay 25 percent of their health insurance; previously they contributed

nothing to cover health care. They also agreed to a $3-an-hour pay cut. C&S did not respond to calls seeking comment. Giant is offering displaced workers driver training, with preferential hiring rights, and bonuses to employees in the produce warehouse who retire to free up positions, according to Giant spokesman Jamie Miller. The grocer is also leasing the facility to Jessup Logistics for less than 50 percent of the market cost to stem further layoffs. All told, Giant is saving the operator $3 million to $5 million, depending on buyouts and voluntary retirements. In separate negotiations, Giant came to a four-year agreement with Local 730, along with Teamsters Local 639 representing drivers, for its produce warehouse in Jessup. The company agreed not to outsource the plant for three years, putting to rest one of the union’s biggest concerns.
douglasd@washpost.com

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Fight over consumer bureau is about to enter next phase
House panel is set to vote on GOP bills that would limit authority
BY B RADY D ENNIS AND Y LAN Q . M UI
JOSHUA LOTT/REUTERS

GM’s Chevrolet Cruze compact sedan has set a record for sales since its introduction last year.

GM thinks compact, beats estimates
U.S. automaker’s sales climb 26 percent behind fuel-efficient cars
BY

C RAIG T RUDELL

General Motors’ U.S. deliveries rose more than analysts estimated as increasing demand for fuelefficient models pushed the industry’s annual sales rate above 13 million for the third straight month. GM’s U.S. sales climbed 26 percent to 232,538 vehicles from 183,997 a year earlier, the Detroitbased automaker said Tuesday in a statement. The gain topped the 14 percent increase estimated on average by seven analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. Ford Motor said its sales rose 13 percent to 189,778, and Toyota deliveries increased 1.3 percent to 159,540. The U.S. auto sales rate in April was 13.2 million on a seasonally adjusted annualized basis. GM’s Chevrolet Cruze compact car set a record for sales since its introduction last year, and Ford’s Fiesta subcompact exceeded 9,000 deliveries for a second consecutive month. “Gas prices are the story,” said Michelle Krebs, an analyst for Edmunds.com. “It looks like $4 a gallon is the magic number to shift consumer behavior.” Confidence among U.S. consumers rose more than forecast in April, signaling that six straight months of job growth are helping Americans endure the highest fuel prices in almost three years. The average U.S.

price of regular unleaded gasoline was $3.97 a gallon Tuesday, more than a dollar higher than a year ago, according to AAA. The price peaked at $4.11 in July 2008. “This is a sort of vote of confidence for the recovery,” said John Canally, an economist and investment strategist at Boston-based LPL Financial Corp. The rate for light-vehicle sales was 13.1 million in March and 13.4 million in February, according to Autodata Corp. Ford’s 13 percent gain trailed the average estimate of seven analysts surveyed by Bloomberg for a 14 percent increase. Sales of the Focus compact car rose 22 percent to 17,265. F-Series pickup sales rose 11 percent. Nissan, which reported a 12 percent sales gain, won a contract Tuesday to supply New York’s fleet of yellow taxi cabs. U.S. sales gained 9.8 percent at Honda. The increase in deliveries at Toyota, whose position as the

world’s largest automaker is being challenged by GM, trailed the 1.4 percent average estimate of four analysts. Toyota’s Lexus, the top-selling luxury brand in the United States for the past 11 years, trails Bayerische Motoren Werke AG’s namesake BMW brand and Daimler AG’s Mercedes-Benz by more than 6,000 vehicles through four months this year. Mark Templin, head of U.S. Lexus sales, last month said the brand doesn’t expect to retain its volume lead in the U.S. this year because of supply disruptions following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. All but one Lexus model is made only in Japan. “We haven’t felt the biggest brunt yet of not having enough cars in inventory due to Japan’s problems,” said Jesse Toprak, vice president of industry trends at TrueCar.com. “In May, we’re going to start seeing this become more of an issue, and in June it’s going to become a severe handicap for the industry.” Hyundai, South Korea’s largest automaker, said sales in April rose 40 percent from a year ago to 61,754 vehicles. Kia Motors, Hyundai’s affiliate, reported a 57 percent U.S. sales increase. Combined, the Seoul-based corporate partners sold a record 108,828 cars and light trucks last month. Chrysler Group said sales rose 22 percent to 117,225 vehicles. The results topped the 18 percent average of five analysts’ estimates, as deliveries of the Grand Cherokee sport-utility vehicle more than doubled.
— Bloomberg News

The political tug of war over the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau will enter another round Wednesday, when House Republicans forge ahead with legislation aimed at curbing the fledgling watchdog’s powers even before it officially opens its doors in July. The House Financial Services Committee is scheduled to vote on a trio of GOP-backed bills, each of which encapsulates arguments that have lingered since Congress created the consumer regulator last year. One bill, sponsored by the committee’s chairman, Rep. Spencer Bachus (R-Ala.), would replace the bureau’s independent director position with a five-member commission. Bachus and other Republicans have insisted that the current structure will give too much power to a single individual. President Obama has yet to nominate a permanent director for the bureau. But Harvard law Professor Elizabeth Warren — a favorite of consumer advocates but disliked by many Republicans and financial industry officials — has headed the creation of the agency since the fall and is considered a leading candidate. “If George Washington came back today, or Abraham Lincoln, or if Warren Buffett signed up, I wouldn’t give that person total discretion,” Bachus said in a recent speech, arguing that his efforts had little to do with Warren but with the power of her current position. Another bill, sponsored by Rep. Sean P. Duffy (R-Wis.), would make it easier for fellow regulators to veto rules written by the bureau. Members of the Financial Stability Oversight Council need a two-thirds majority to overrule the bureau. The new rule would alter that to a majority vote.

DANIEL ACKER/BLOOMBERG NEWS

Elizabeth Warren, who has headed the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is battling Republican criticism of it.

The third bill on tap would prevent the bureau from exercising the full extent of its powers until a permanent director is in place — a scenario that could be slow in coming because of the glacial pace of many Senate confirmations. Warren has remained on the offensive in the face of the continued Republican criticism. She has crisscrossed the country, from Capitol Hill to military installations and late-night talk shows, defending the need for a federal agency dedicated solely to protecting ordinary consumers. Last week, she took her message to “The Daily Show” with Jon Stewart, where she argued that the debate over the structure of the consumer bureau should have ended last summer when Congress passed its financial overhaul legislation, known as the Dodd-Frank Act. She warned that the bills under consideration by the House committee would “stick a knife in the ribs” of the new bureau. Warren reiterated that argument Tuesday afternoon. “Many in Congress have made clear their intention to defund, delay, and defang the consumer agency before it can help one family,” she said in a statement. “These bills are about preventing the CFPB from operating effectively — a dangerous game to play

in light of recent lessons in the marketplace and how quickly financial threats to consumers emerge.” She got an assist from a slew of advocacy groups, which once again rushed to the bureau’s defense. The GOP-sponsored measures “are not about reasonable congressional oversight,” Ed Mierzwinski, consumer program director for U.S. PIRG, said on a call with reporters. “They are an attack on consumer protection.” Republicans insist otherwise. From the beginning, they have criticized the new bureau — and much of the Dodd-Frank Act — as little more than an unnecessary government overreach that would increase costs on banks and small businesses and constrict access to credit for average Americans. Even if the bills up for review clear the Republican-led House, the likelihood they ever would become law remains slim. Sen. Tim Johnson (D-S.D.), chairman of the Banking Committee, has shown no inclination to roll back key provisions of the landmark legislation. And any such bill also would have to get past a potential veto from President Obama, who made the consumer bureau a central part of his efforts to overhaul financial regulation.
dennisb@washpost.com muiy@washpost.com

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Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

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THE FED PAGE
AL KAMEN
In the Loop

Debate over military health-care premiums
BY

L ISA R EIN

NATIONAL COUNTERTERRORISM CENTER

Osama “Usama Bin Ladin” bin Laden’s days are up, and the National Counterterrorism Center’s online calendar has made that official.

Not a death certificate, but almost as good

T

he Navy SEALs’ killing of Osama bin Laden has required the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) to give its excellent 2011 Counterterrorism Calendar and weekly planner a little update. Loop Fans may recall that the highly prized calendar — only about 40,000 are printed — is generally given out as a counterterrorism resource guide to folks in the biz. Ever since the calendar began a few years after 9/11, bin Laden has been Public Enemy No. 1, listed first among the most wanted, with a $25 million bounty on his head, matched only by the reward for deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri, who now climbs to the top of the heap. The online calendar has been updated, quite tastefully, to reflect the news. On bin Laden’s page, his picture has the word “KILLED” gracefully stamped on it, and his “Status: Fugitive” has been changed to “Deceased.” On the same page, where it said that he “is wanted,” it now says he was “killed by U.S. forces.” The calendar has significant events in the war on terror noted for each day. So on the page for May 1, the NCTC inserted the following: “Pakistan: Usama Bin Ladin, leader of al-Qa’ida and responsible for 11 September attacks in the United States, killed by US forces in Abbottabad and buried at sea; US President says ‘Justice has been done.’ ” Please revise your hard copy accordingly and then you’re all up to date — for the moment.

authorities on the location of two leaders of the Abu Sayyaf Group of Filipino terrorists. Clinton, citing the “importance of confidentiality” to the program, told reporters Monday she couldn’t comment on whether anyone might be getting a chunk of cash. But White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters Tuesday that tips came from multiple sources. So it seems unlikely any reward will be given.

Mixed reactions
Former vice president Dick Cheney told ABC News on Monday that Obama “deserves credit” for getting bin Laden, but warned it would be “a tragedy” to spend so much time “patting ourselves on the back” that a new attack goes undetected. So the Obama team should avoid goofy things like landings on an aircraft carrier and “Mission Accomplished” signs. Meanwhile, the wackadoodle Mahmoud Ahmadinejad crowd in Iran, the Taliban and others in the region reacted to news of bin Laden’s demise with the usual goofiness, saying the U.S. claims were a fabrication and demanding to see pictures of the dead terrorist and his birth certificate. (Okay, we made up that last part.) Speaking of birth certificates, the best line of April may have gotten lost in all the coverage of the White House correspondents dinner Saturday night. The media

focused on President Obama’s and “Saturday Night Live” comedian Seth Meyers’s relentless mocking of business mogul, TV celebrity and birther champion Donald Trump. Obama’s and Meyers’s jokes were hilarious but, remember, they were written beforehand and practiced. In contrast, a quip by House Speaker John Boehner (ROhio), reported by our colleague Dan Zak, was spontaneous. Before dinner began, Boehner was asked what he made of an intense conversation a few feet away from him between Trump and Newt Gingrich. “Crazy, and crazier,” he said.

Elite Navy SEAL Sniper” with coauthor Stephen Templin. Wasdin was a member of that team in Somalia, which is the same team that went in after bin Laden on Sunday. The book is climbing the top 10 on the Amazon bestseller list. It won’t even be for sale until May 24.
kamena@washpost.com Follow In the Loop on Twitter: @AlKamenWP.

A House panel plans Wednesday to prohibit any increase in health-care premiums for working-age military retirees, thwarting — again — a push by the Pentagon to hold down costs by raising fees as soon as Oct. 1. But the long debate over the military health program known as Tricare is likely to continue for months as Congress wrangles over whether to risk offending one of Washington’s most powerful constituencies to address the military’s exploding health costs. The personnel panel of the Armed Services Committee also plans to approve a 1.6 percent raise for service members that would take effect Jan. 1, the same increase in the Obama administration’s defense budget for next year. The Defense Department also would be required to reduce its growing military health costs by consolidating medical commands in the armed services. Also scheduled for passage Wednesday is a congressional review of the cost of having contractors provide medical treatment for the military, another potential path to saving money. The proposal by Rep. Joe Wilson (R-S.C.), chairman of the personnel panel, would block any fee increases for retired service members who are still working, continuing a prohibition passed by Congress in recent years. Tricare premiums have not changed in 16 years, but the costs of the health-care plan are exploding, projected to hit $65 billion in five years. The higher fees the Pentagon has proposed for the program’s popular HMO are part of a Pentagon effort to slash personnel costs by $7 billion. When the Pentagon unveiled its budget in February, it asked 586,000 military retirees to pay $520 a year for family coverage, up from $460. The increase was more modest than Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates had pro-

posed in three previous years. All were dead on arrival in Congress, opposed by service groups who said low health-care costs were a reward for service members’ sacrifices. Wilson and his counterpart in the Senate, James Webb (D-Va.), vowed to oppose any fee increase this year, reflecting the view of many service groups. The Senate Armed Services Committee is not expected to take up the defense budget until June. But Wednesday’s House vote still needs to clear that chamber’s full Armed Services Committee, which is scheduled to vote on the defense budget on May 11. Rep. Howard P. “Buck” McKeon (R-Calif.), the committee chairman, supports the administration’s plan. “There has not been a [Tricare] increase since 1994,” McKeon spokesman Josh Holly said. “He does not want to see a dramatic increase in rates. But he also believes now might be the time for a modest increase.” “We still think the Tricare issue is up in the air,” said Mike Hayden, deputy government relations chief for the Military Officers Association of America, among the most influential service members groups. “Our biggest concern right now is the conflicting information we’re getting.” The officers association testified at Capitol Hill hearings this spring that it would accept a modest fee increase, but it wants to tie future increases to the cost of inflation, traditionally about 3 percent. The Pentagon has proposed tying future increases to growth in health costs, closer to 6 percent.
reinl@washpost.com

The Federal Worker
A show of support
Some big names praise federal employees at a town hall event, part of Public Service Recognition Week. Federal Diary, B4

Speaking of the calendar
Timing is everything. The intense media focus on bin Laden’s demise has overwhelmed others trying to get a bit of attention for their own agendas. On the bad-timing front, the State Department issued a statement Monday from Clinton saying that “on behalf of President Obama and the people of the United States, I am delighted to send best wishes to the people of Poland as you celebrate the 220th anniversary of the first Polish constitution . . . which granted groundbreaking liberties to the people of Poland.” On the good, if not excellent, side of the timing front, retired Navy SEAL Howard Wasdin, badly injured in the horrific 1993 firefight in Somalia, has written “SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an

want to know how to eat well?
Watch what these experts (and many others) have to say LIVE on washingtonpostlive.com:

Gary Hirshberg Chairman, President, and CE-Yo of Stonyfield Farm

Eric Schlosser Author of "Fast Food Nation"

Time to pay up?
As for the bounty, there’s been much chatter about whether someone — maybe the detainee who provided the key clue, the nickname of bin Laden’s courier and most trusted aide — might be eligible for the reward. Some folks argue that you can’t reward someone who forced you to torture him for the information. Others may say that’s all the more reason to give him a few bucks for the tip that eventually led to the discovery of bin Laden’s mansion in Abbottabad, seemingly under the protection of the Pakistanis. The person who’ll decide who, if anyone, is paid is Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. She and her predecessors certainly haven’t been stingy with the cash under the Rewards for Justice Program, which was set up in the mid-1980s and is run by the State Department. Since then, the program has paid more than $100 million to more than 60 people for their information. It paid $2 million to one person who gave up the location of 1993 World Trade Center bomber Ramzi Yousef, now doing life in prison. In 2003 a whopping $30 million went to someone who dropped a dime on how to find Saddam Hussein’s sadistic playboy sons Uday and Qusay. Eighteen days after the tip, the duo were history. And in 2007 $10 million went to Filipino informants who tipped

WhoRuns Gov
WWW.WHORUNSGOV.COM

Excerpts from The Washington Post’s government site

Senate foreign relations aide Jonah Blank
Jonah Blank, an anthropologist by training, was the first one granted access to the Daudi Bohras, a community of about 1 million Indian Muslims centered in Mumbai. One of the questions he tried to answer for his 2001 book, “Mullahs on the Mainframe: Islam and Modernity Among the Daudi Bohras,” was whether Muslim extremists and modernity could peacefully coexist. Blank is still addressing those questions as a top aide to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee while the United States presides over difficult wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. After more than a decade as a journalist specializing in Asian issues, Blank landed on Capitol Hill in 1999 for what was supposed to be a one-year assignment. He has been there since, expanding his portfolio to include other world hot spots. “I didn’t necessarily think I would want to stay in government for more than a year. Eleven-anda-half years later, you never can predict how things turn out,” said Blank, who has degrees from Yale and Harvard. Blank has had only two bosses while on the Hill, both powerful Democrats: now-Vice President Biden, who recruited him to the job, and Sen. John F. Kerry (DMass.), the current committee chairman. Blank’s proudest legislative achievements include the KerryLugar 2009 Pakistan aid package; the U.S.-India 2008 civilian nuclear deal; and the 2002 Afghan Freedom Support Act, which authorized millions of dollars in reconstruction aid for the beleaguered country after the U.S.-led invasion, which followed the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Blank’s first trip to Afghanistan was in 2002, soon after the invasion. “I was amazed at the extent of the task ahead of us,” he said. Regarding the U.S. Special Operations forces who killed al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, all Blank would say was, “I’m in favor.”
Sen. Jon Tester (D-Montana) Susan Crocket Vice President, Senior Technology Officer, Health and Nutrition, General Mills

Wednesday, May 4, 9 a.m.
The Future of Food Conference

ADVANCING THE CONVERSATION.

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In His Own Words
“The decision about how much or how little modernity to accept is one for Muslims themselves to make,” Blank said during an interview with the University of Chicago Press when his book was published.

Follow the conversation on Twitter by following @thepostlive and using #eatwell

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ABCDE
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER EDITORIALS

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

d letters@washpost.com
Enraptured by the royals
Regarding the April 30 front-page article “That second kiss sealed it”: Okay, I admit it. I watched the royal wedding. I propped open my weary yes and saw it all, despite the real world beckoning. I was drawn into it, half of me remembering my own wedding and half the 3-yearold whose mother read her all the fairy tales, so certain that I, too, would marry a prince. (I did!) At work that morning I chose to share my wedding watching with the colleague most likely to have viewed the event — a young British woman planning her own wedding. But she had not seen it. That was the case with others I met, so finally I kept my thoughts about the wedding to myself. But we need fairy tales. Without them, where is the hope for a happy ending? The human spirit needs that hope despite the disappointments of life. The royals, too, have disappointed us, but William and Kate, we are counting on you to keep this never-ending human need fresh and alive. Long live the happiness of the duke and duchess of Cambridge. Not only for themselves but for all of us. Sharon Maybarduk, Reston  What a pleasure to see a million people from all walks of life rejoicing and happily enjoying each other’s company in the streets of London. That’s a far cry from the angry mob scenes one is usually exposed to on the news. May the new duke and duchess of Cambridge continue to inspire such a spirit. I wish them great joy in their marriage. Betty Sekhri, Kensington

Open questions on a fatal accident
After a Metrobus kills a man, consequences are put on hold.

O

N THE EVENING of Sept. 26, 2008, as Barack Obama and John McCain held their first presidential debate, a Metrobus plowed into a taxi at a D.C. intersection near the Federal Reserve. Inside the smashed taxi, which had to be cut open using special equipment, a visiting business executive, Bartlett M. Tabor, lay dying in front of his wife, who was also badly hurt, and their two small children. The bus spun into a fountain in frontoftheFed,badlydamagingit.Therewereplentyof witnesses. The bus operator was Ronald W. Taylor, a rookie driver who had been on the job scarcely six months and had previous scrapes with the law. Metro officials said Mr. Taylor had run a red light and was at fault in the accident. He was fired two weeks later after a review. Then, amazingly, all action against Mr. Taylor ground to a halt. One D.C. police detective assigned to the case got sick; another let it sit on his desk, ignored, for months. For more than two and a half years, prosecutors were silent. A labor relations arbitrator even ordered that Mr. Taylor be reinstated. Last summer, he was back at work — although not as a bus driver. And there he remained

until a couple of weeks ago, when he was indicted for negligenthomicide.Hehasbeensuspended—withpay. How could Mr. Taylor, having killed a man after allegedlyblowingthrougharedlight,havebeenrehired by Metro? The details of the case cast doubts on the policies and actions of Metro, whose initial review appears to have been cursory; of the transit workers’ union, which pushed for Mr. Taylor’s reinstatement despite the severity of the accident; and of the D.C. police department, which, unconscionably, let the case drop. Here’s what’s clear: No one was looking out for the public — not police and prosecutors, not Metro and not the transit union. Ordinarily, a suspect in a fatal accident is indicted within two or three months. But because the police department was asleep at the switch, neither bringing the case to resolution nor producing the bulk of the evidence it gathered, Metro and the transit union were left to their own resources. And those resources were lacking. Metro believed Mr. Taylor was at fault and even paid millions of dollars to settle a civil lawsuit brought by the Taborfamily,butitmayhavebeenhamstrungbyalabor

agreement that bars the transit system from using any evidence against an employee if it’s gathered more than 20 days after an accident. That provision is designed to protect workers, not the public. And it probably contributed to the weak case Metro presented to the arbitratorwhooverturneditsdecisiontofireMr.Taylor. Metro officials also had an apparent conflict of interest: They did not want to reinstate Mr. Taylor, but they risked weakening their defense in the lawsuit brought by the Tabor family if they presented strong evidence against Mr. Taylor in arbitration. And what about the transit workers’ union? Union officials say they carefully review evidence before taking legal action to reinstate a fired employee who’s been involved in an accident. But in this case, the union apparently took it on faith that Mr. Taylor had done nothing wrong. And no one produced timely evidence to the contrary. It wasn’t until Mr. Taylor was indicted and appeared in Superior Court late last month that a judge finally revoked his D.C. driver’s license and ordered him not to drive. Now, at last, there is a chance to correct the disservice done in this case, both to the Tabor family and to the public.

Mr. McDonnell’s missed chance
Regarding the April 29 Metro article “Redistricting deal in Virginia”: Serving the public good in redistricting would have put Gov. Robert F. McDonnell (R) in the history books. Instead, he chose to serve his political party. Self-interest ruled when the General Assembly gerrymandered its new districts and when the governor announced he would approve them. Virginia, we were so close. Mr. McDonnell had an opportunity, better alternative maps and popular support. But the governor couldn’t resist the temptation that befalls so many average politicians — helping themselves first. He promised more on the campaign trail than he delivered. He set higher standards for his own Redistricting Commission than, in the end, he set for himself. Brian R. Cannon, Williamsburg The writer is a co-founder of Virginia21, which is part of the Virginia Redistricting Coalition. He was also a member of the College of William & Mary Law School team that competed in the student redistricting contest.

Targeting Mr. Gaddafi
NATO denies it is trying to kill the dictator — but it may need to.

TOM TOLES

C

ONTRAST THE clarity of the U.S. strike on Osama bin Laden with an event about 24 hours earlier: Several missiles or guided bombs hit a Tripolivilla,killing—accordingtotheregime— one of Moammar Gaddafi’s sons and three of his grandchildren and narrowly missing the dictator and his wife. The bin Laden strike was proudly announced by President Obama, but the NATO alliance refused to say which country’s forces attacked the Gaddafi home. Killing or capturing al-Qaeda’s leader had been declared U.S. policy for a decade. But the United States and its allies deny they are trying to kill Mr. Gaddafi. For the record, we think targeting Mr. Gaddafi and his sons — if that is what is really going on — is as legitimate as striking al-Qaeda. The Libyan leader presidesovermilitaryunitsthatareintentionallytargeting civilians, using weapons ranging from sniper rifles to artillery and rockets. Thousands of civilians have been killed, and more are dying every day. InthebeseigedportcityofMisurata,reliefshipshave been unable even to evacuate the wounded, much less the more than 1,000 foreign migrants, including women and children, camped in the port. The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court said Tuesday that there are “reasonable grounds” to charge the regime with war crimes and crimes against humanity. Moreover,targetingMr.Gaddafimaybethequickest way — and maybe the only way— to stop his carnage. The dictator has refused to step down or call off his forces,manyofwhichareforeignmercenariesledbyhis sons. Though an opposition government has been coalescing in the eastern city of Benghazi, its military forces appear to be nowhere near ready to capture the Gaddafi-controlled West. That leaves NATO stuck in a military intervention of indefinite duration while the civilians it wants to protect continue to die. It’s not very surprising, then, that twice in less than a

Home of the brave civilians
As a 25-year Foreign Service civilian who watched numerous colleagues die violently while serving America, and as one who chose to serve every tour in dangerous hardship postings, I thank you for recognizing our service by printing Terry Newell’s April 30 op-ed “Honor all fallen federal heroes.” With no military training, no weapons and no secure bases, civilians who represent the United States in Iraq, Afghanistan and around the Middle East are at far greater risk than most soldiers day to day. I have been there and lived in that environment. It has always been a terrible situation, and Americans have such a distorted view of “cowardly” civilians and “heroic” soldiers. The truth is much different. Thank you for speaking up for us who are as brave and patriotic as most soldiers but get little thanks from our fellow citizens. Charles Kestenbaum, Vienna

week, NATO airstrikes demolished buildings associatedwithMr.Gaddafi.OnApril25,twomissilesstruckthe complexwherehelives,destroyingofficesandalibrary. Not just the dictator’s spokesmen but Russian officials are calling these assassination attempts. Yet U.S. and NATOspokesmeninsistthestrikesaremerelyaimedat “command and control” structures. The Canadian commander of the operation insisted in one briefing that the bombing was “not about individuals” and “not about regime change.” Suchdubiousassertionsarethelogicalproductofan

operation being conducted by an unwieldy coalition under U.N. auspices. Apart from the muddled message they send to Libyans and the world, they reflect the deeper mismatch between NATO’s actual aim — to overturn the Gaddafi regime — and the means so far devotedtoit.Sen.JohnMcCain(R-Ariz.)mayhavedone the Obama administration a favor last Sunday when he spelled out a mission that actually makes sense. “We should be taking out his command and control,” Mr. McCain said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” “And if he is killed or injured because of that, that’s fine.”

The danger of cutting Afghan aid
The April 29 front-page article “U.S. military frets over delays in 3 key Afghan aid programs” rightly drew attention to civilian power as a critical element for success in Afghanistan. In fact, it quoted a senior military officer who said “our flank is exposed” without programs to promote good governance and job creation. As one who has witnessed this reality personally, I couldn’t agree more. The article also pointed to challenges we face in the difficult task of executing development programs, such as those of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), in the middle of a war. When our soldiers’ lives are at risk, failure is not an option. We must ensure that these programs succeed. Some of the challenges the article laid out are budgetary. The budget uncertainty and recent cuts by Congress hinder our development experts in the field. Without the proper resources and ability to plan, we cannot expect programs to be effective. Yet some of the challenges are institutional. Like any agency, USAID must continually improve its efficiency and effectiveness. The good news is that reforms are underway to this end. The thoughtful response to this article is to continue to invest in programs our military is depending on for the success of a critical national security mission. James M. Loy, Washington The writer is co-chairman of the National Security Advisory Council of the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition and a former commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard  Wow. Another Post article on how the civilians at USAID are not carrying their weight in the counterinsurgency in Afghanistan. A senior military officer is quoted as saying the U.S. military “can’t depend on” the civilians. Whether this particular shot at the civilians is warranted or not, it’s time to focus on the underlying reason our fighting forces feel inadequately supported: There are a thousand Defense Department personnel for every one USAID employee around the world. Administrations and Congresses controlled by both parties allow this preposterous imbalance in capability to continue. This particular Congress has gone one better, deeply cutting USAID and State Department funding despite warnings from Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and uniformed commanders that inadequate civilian capacity means more American soldiers deployed and, regrettably, more dead and wounded. Our nation’s flank is, indeed, exposed. Until we start seriously investing in preventing hopelessness and its spawn, fanaticism, our soldiers will continue to pay the price. James Kunder, Alexandria The writer, a former acting deputy administrator at USAID, is senior resident fellow with the German Marshall Fund of the United States.

Drunk on black liquor
Corporate welfare, IRS style

I

T WOULD BE hard to imagine a purer case of corporate welfare than the tax credit that paper manufacturers reaped in 2009 for powering their plants with a liquid industrial byproduct known as “black liquor.” There was no need for any subsidy: Paper mills had been recycling the substance for decades. But in 2007, Congress enacted a 50-centsper-gallon “alternative fuel mixture” tax credit to encourage new industrial liquid fuels from biomass. And the paper mills saw a chance for easy money: They asked the Internal Revenue Service if black liquor, mixed with diesel, qualified; the IRS said yes. Result: Since the credit was “refundable,” paper companies reaped billions of dollars from the federal government in 2009. International Paper alone received about $2.1 billion. Congress closed the loophole effective Dec. 31, 2009, using the projected savings to pay for health-care reform. Now it turns out that paper companies are still exploiting the tax code to make money from black liquor. The convoluted story begins on June 28, 2010, when IRS lawyers issued an opinion permitting paper

manufacturers to retroactively claim a different benefit for the black liquor they burned in 2009: the cellulosic biofuels credit. To be sure, companies choosing to switch to the cellulosic credit would have to give back the money they got from the alternative fuel mixture credit (with interest). But for some companies, that may be profitable, since the cellulosic credit is $1.01 per gallon — twice as much as the alternative fuel mixture credit. Furthermore, companies can “carry forward” the 2009 cellulosic credit to offset future tax bills well into this decade. AsThePost’sStevenMufsonreported,severalfirms have claimed a total of hundreds of millions of dollars worth of extra tax benefits in this manner. For its part, International Paper is still weighing the costs and benefits of converting its $2.1 billion alternative fuel mixture credits into cellulosic credits. It did book a $40 million cellulosic credit for 64 million gallons of black liquor that were not eligible for the alternative fuel mixture credit, according to its 2010 annual report. This is ridiculous. Yes, the tax code is full of conflict-

ing and ambiguous provisions, and IRS lawyers must interpret them as best they can, with an eye toward avoidinglitigation.Wedonotdoubtthattheydidsoin this case: Their memorandum argues that black liquor meets the chemical criteria of cellulosic biofuel and that denying companies a credit for burning it would have been inconsistent with the IRS’s treatment of other similar fuels. But Congress clearly intended to end tax credits for black liquor, which served no energy policy purposes and increased the federal debt to boot. This is just common sense. The IRS’s hypertechnical interpretation thwarts Congress’s purpose, possibly expanding andperpetuatingawasteofmoneythatthelegislation sought to end. The IRS should have interpreted the statutes in light of Congress’s manifest goal — and dared the paper companies to sue for their corporate welfare in open court if they disagreed. Alas,thetaxpayershavenostandingtofilealawsuit of their own. Someone else — higher-ups at the IRS, the Treasury secretary or Congress — must fix this error, and fast.

LOCAL OPINIONS

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Anti-biking attitudes put District riders at risk
According to the May 2 editorial “Sharing the streets,” bicycle ridership in the District increased 80 percent from 2007 to 2011. At the same time, congestion and attendant driver aggressiveness have become even worse. If cyclists are “welcome,” as the editorial claimed, where is the network of dedicated, protected bike lanes cyclists have the right to expect? The indignation against bikers who manipulate their way through the huge parking lot into which our city’s streets have been converted is sheer envy on the part of frustrated motorists who would dearly like to do the same. The other day, a woman in an SUV got behind us on Connecticut Avenue and began insistently beeping. When you are on two wheels and are being threatened by two tons of steel, it is more than a little intimidating. It was a beautiful day in front of the zoo, and the foot traffic on the sidewalk was such that even pedestrians had difficulty getting through. We asked the woman why she was beeping. Her response: “You were in the street.” When we asked where she expected us to ride, she drove off. At that same spot last year a young man in a panel truck shouted obscenities and threatened to run one of us over for biking in front of him. We suggest that the editorial writer who penned this piece be required to commute to work on a bicycle for a while. This sort of “let them eat cake” pontificating is outrageous. Mayor Vincent C. Gray, are you listening? Richard Robin, Washington John Glad, Washington

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011
HAROLD MEYERSON

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Obama flips the 2012 deck T

What Pax bin Ladenis? P
resident Obama, in the afterglow of his Osama bin Laden triumph, pleaded with congressional leaders at a dinner Monday night to preserve the warm courage of national unity. “It is my fervent hope that we can harness some of that unity and some of that pride to confront the many challenges that we still face,” he said. Right. Good luck with that, sir. Thirteen hours later, Republicans answered Obama’s plea for bonhomie — with broadsides. “The command-and-control paranoia that we see in this administration is antithetical to everything that we understand about freedom in our country,” Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) declared on the Senate floor as the chamber began its first legislative day after a two-week vacation. “Individual responsibility and individual freedom and free markets and free enterprise: They’re attacking it on every front.” House leaders emerged from their caucus meeting Tuesday morning with a similar response to the whole unity thing. Rep. Jeb Hensarling (Tex.), chairman of the Republican caucus, reported his finding that the recession and slow recovery are “attributable to the president and the previous Congress.” The Pax bin Ladenis is over before it really began. The first hours after the killing of al-Qaeda’s leader brought speculation about a new era of national purpose, like the one following the Sept. 11 attacks. It is a sign of how dysfunctional our politics have become that lawmakers are too preoccupied with their opponents to celebrate the demise of their common enemy. Senate Democrats made clear that, after passing a ceremonial resolution about bin Laden’s end, they would return to skirmishing over oil company subsidies and judicial nominees. House Republicans signaled that they would proceed with divisive legislation on oil drilling, abortion and undoing health-care reform. House GOP leaders decided against a resolution congratulating the U.S. military, citing a party rule against such resolutions. (Never mind that they have broken the rule before.) Republican presidential contenders, meanwhile, are proceeding with Thursday’s debate, which a spokesman for candidate Tim Pawlenty told The Post’s Chris Cillizza is an “opportunity to make the case against President Obama.” What lull there was in partisan sniping lasted about half a day. At 12:44 Monday afternoon, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi’s office issued a news release titled

he death of Osama bin Laden — and the success of President Obama’s roll-the-dice decision to deploy troops to get him — may change the landscape of American politics in one surprising particular. When Obama runs for reelection in 2012, he’ll probably be strong where his Democratic predecessors have been weak — and weak where they were strong. By now it’s clear that whatever domestic political advantage Republicans sought to gain from accusing Democrats of being “soft on terror” — much as previous generations of Republicans occasionally made hay by accusing Democrats of being soft on communism — has been spent. In the 2006 congressional elections, voters punished Republicans for badly waging a war in Iraq that the GOP had tried to justify as an extension of that war against terrorism. Now, Obama has done what George W. Bush failed to do: bring bin Laden to justice. Obama has also kept his promise to end the combat participation of American forces in Iraq. What he will do next in Afghanistan is anybody’s guess, but if he withdraws a sizable number of troops — from a war whose goal grows murkier with each passing day — he’ll do so with substantial public support. Republican hawks will surely criticize that decision, but the odds are close to zilch that GOP presidential hopefuls will run on a platform of continuing the Afghan war — especially since Obama has taken out Osama. Take Obama’s success in killing bin Laden, add to it Bush’s decision to wage a hugely expensive and unnecessary war in Iraq, and what emerges is indeed a somewhat altered political terrain. The Republican advantage in times of heightened national security concerns — a prominent feature of both Cold War America and America in the postSept. 11 era — has been substantially neutralized. (Not, of course, for the Republican right, for whom Democrats, Obama very much included, are weak on defense because they’re Democrats. If the facts get in their way, counterfacts have to be invented, as they were in the Swiftboating of John Kerry.) But if Obama has neutralized the Republicans’ traditional advantage in foreign and military policy, he also largely forfeited the Democrats’ traditional advantage in domestic economic policy. Unless Obama plans some changes in economic policy as swift and surprising as the bin Laden raid, Democrats will go into the 2012 election with an economy that shows few signs of recovery and with equally few proposals to make it better. They will be opposing Republican plans that would make the economy radically worse by imposing unsupportable health-care costs on seniors and slashing public-sector investments. But the election will be more a referendum on Obama’s stewardship of the economy than it will be on Republicans’ economic nuttiness or Obama’s national security achievements (unless, of course, America falls victim to another terrorist assault). In the early months of his presidency, Obama and his economic advisers failed to gauge the extent to which homeowner debt would cripple the construction industry and overall purchasing, as well as the extent to which the globalization of America’s major corporations and their markets would dictate that their hiring, when it resumed, would happen more overseas than at home. Even if the president had assessed these trends more accurately, it’s not clear he could have persuaded Congress to enact a public works program large and effective enough to take up the slack created by the domestic private sector’s failure to expand. But unless the president is willing to climb this hill now — at least by making the case for, say, a public infrastructure bank and for strategic public investments on a much larger scale than he has thus far — he goes into the election with no real plan to help the economy. He’ll have a significant record of achievement, including a close-touniversal health-care law and a new generation of regulations on our otherwise out-of-control banks. For their part, Republicans are still busy cooking up bad ideas he can run against. That, plus his national security bona fides and a secondrate Republican opponent, may be enough to secure him a second term. But unless Obama becomes as bold on the economy as he was in hunting down bin Laden, his campaign may not resemble Democratic campaigns of yore. Strong on defense. Not much to say on the economy. Obama (or is that McCain?) for president.
meyersonh@washpost.com

MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

A Palestinian vendor in Gaza City displays a poster of Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh, left, and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas last week.

A partnership that could bring Mideast peace
BY JIMMY CARTER

T

his is a decisive moment. Under the auspices of the Egyptian government, Palestine’s two major political movements — FatahandHamas—aresigningareconciliation agreement on Wednesday that will permit both to contest elections for the presidency and legislature within a year. If the United States and the international community support this effort, they can help Palestinian democracy and establishthebasisforaunifiedPalestinianstate in the West Bank and Gaza that can make a secure peace with Israel. If they remain aloof or undermine the agreement, the situation in the occupied Palestinian territory may deteriorate with a new round of violence against Israel. Support for the interim government is critical, and the United States needs to take the lead. This accord should be viewed as a Palestinian contribution to the “Arab awakening,” as well as a deep wish to heal internal divisions. Both sides understand that their goal of an independent Palestinian state cannot be achievediftheyremaindivided.Theagreement also signals the growing importance of an emerging Egyptian democracy. Acting as an honest broker, the interim Egyptian government coaxed both sides to agreement by merging the October 2009 Cairo Accord that Fatah signed with additions that respond to Hamas’s reservations. The accord commits both sides to consensus appointments of an election commission and electoral court. I have observed three elections in the Palestinian territory, and these institutions have already administered elections that all international observers found to be free, fair, honest and free of violence. The two parties also pledge to appoint a unity government of technocrats — i.e., neither Fatah nor Hamas. Security will be overseen by a committee set up by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen), and Egypt will assist. Why should the United States and the international community support the agreement? First, it respects Palestinian rights and democracy. In 2006, Hamas won the legislative election, but the “Quartet” — the United States, the European Union, the United Nations and Russia — rejected it and withheld aid, and the unity

government collapsed. Competition between the two factions turned vicious, and each side has arrested the other’s activists. Instead of exacerbating differences between the two parties, the international community should help them resolve disagreements through electoral and legislative processes. Second, with international support, the accord could lead to a durable cease-fire. Israel and the United States are concerned that Hamas could use a unity government to launch attacks against Israel. I have visited the Israeli border town of Sderot and share their concern. I urged Hamas’s leaders to stop launching rockets, and they attempted to negotiate a lasting mutual cease-fire. The United States and other Quartet members should assist Hamas and Israel’s search for a cease-fire. Third, the accord could be a vehicle to press for a final peace agreement for two states. Abu Mazen will be able to negotiate on behalf of all Palestinians. And with Quartet support, a unity government can negotiate with Israel an exchange of prisoners for the captured Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit and a settlement freeze. In my talks with Hamas leader Khaled Meshal, he said Hamas would accept a two-state agreement that is approved in a Palestinian referendum. Such an agreement could provide mutual recognition — Israel would recognize an independent Palestinian state and Palestine would recognize Israel. In other words, an agreement will include Hamas’s recognition of Israel. Suspicions of Hamas stem from its charter, which calls for Israel’s destruction. I find the charter repugnant. Yet it is worth remembering that Israel negotiated the Oslo Accords with the Palestine Liberation Organization while its charter had similar provisions. It took five more years before the PLO Charter was altered. Many Israelis say that as long as the Palestinians are divided, there is no partner for peace. But at the same time, they refuse to accept a unity government. In Cairo this week, the Palestinians are choosing unity. It is a fragile unity, but the Quartet should work with them to make it secure and peaceful enough to jump-start final-status negotiations with Israel.
The writer was the 39th president of the United States. He founded the not-for-profit Carter Center, which seeks to advance peace and health worldwide.

“Head in the Sand: GOP Continue to Defend Budget to End Medicare As We Know It.” But that was just testing the water before Tuesday’s return to full-on partisanship. House Democrats were up first with a news conference accusing Republicans of a desire to throw old people into the streets. “The GOP is proposing an end to Medicare as we know it!” warned Rep. Kathy Castor (Fla.). She piled adverbs atop adjectives — “very radical path . . . very cynical . . . draconian, drastic cuts” — before vowing: “They have a fight on their hands.” An hour later, Republican leaders answered with a rival news conference, blaming Democrats for everything from the debt to gasoline prices. “The president,” House Majority Leader Eric Cantor said, “would like us to just go ahead and increase the nation’s credit limit without making any changes. . . . And if it’s necessary for us to tell the president that is dead on arrival in the House, I believe that we can do that.” Standing with Cantor, Rep. Marsha Blackburn (Tenn.) even allowed herself to get worked up over luminescence. “Democrat energy solutions have basically been a lot like those newfangled curlicue light bulbs,” she complained, calling the doggone things “too expensive.” With that promising prelude, it was time for the two chambers to be called to order, or, in this case, disorder. Harry Reid, the Senate majority leader, began with a complaint that every time he tries to move small-business legislation, “another Republican raises their head.” DeMint followed a few minutes later by stating his heartfelt belief that “the administration, I believe, is acting like thugs that you might see in a Third World country trying to bully and intimidate.” Before long, bicameral barbs were flying. “The Tea Party Republican Majority has voted to end Medicare and to cut taxes for the richest Americans,” Rep. George Miller (DCalif.) said on the House floor. On the Senate floor, John Cornyn (R-Tex.) vowed to fight one of Obama’s judicial nominees “with every tool at our disposal.” “Slush fund!” “Abomination!” “Demagoguery!” Insults and accusations ricocheted. When Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) came to the press gallery late in the day to complain about the Democrats’ yet-to-bereleased budget, he was asked what had become of the “spirit of unity.” “I don’t think there’s anything wrong with having it out,” Sessions replied: “I say, let’s have it out!”
danamilbank@washpost.com

RUTH MARCUS

Give this deal a chance
BY

Triumph, in full bloom T
he morning after we got Osama bin Laden, I woke up with a powerful urge to plant my garden. The plural pronoun “we” reflects a deliberate choice. As a journalist, I am temperamentally unsuited to thinking of myself as the member of any team. Or, it may be, the causality works in the opposite direction: I was drawn to journalism because of an inborn sense of outsider-ness. Either way, that emotion ended on Sept. 11. Al-Qaeda attacked us. And when we got him, my immediate reaction was one of grim exuberance. Grim because of the scars he left behind — on grieving families, on the altered Manhattan landscape, on the national psyche. My younger daughter, 4 at the time, asked me in the scary days afterward what the news used to be about before it was only about terrorism. We lay in her bed and listened to the fighter jets circling over Washington. The innocence of childhood never lasts, but bin Laden, and this is the least of his sins, took our children’s prematurely. They know a capricious world of terrorist attacks, anthrax in envelopes and snipers shooting random strangers. It turns out, thankfully, that the news is no longer only about terrorism, but they will always remember: It could be, again, in an instant. They live in a world of “not if, but when.” Hence my exuberance. You can question the tastefulness of fistpumping celebrations that seem more appropriate to clinching a soccer championship than nabbing a terrorist. But for young people who grew up with the omnipresent specter of terrorism, I cannot begrudge them the vuvuzela. There was some high-fiving in my house. The world “is a better place because of the death of Osama bin Laden,” President Obama said Monday. This is a statement that is simultaneously undeniable and arresting. The president did not say the world was better off because bin Laden was taken out of operation, but because of his death. White House officials said they would have been perfectly happy to take bin Laden alive if that opportunity had presented itself, but they also appeared perfectly happy that the trigger was pulled.

ROBERT MALLEY

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he impact on the Israeli-Palestinian peace process is the most debated aspect of the “unity” deal between the two principal Palestinian movements, Fatah and Hamas, but it is almost certainly the least significant. So far, U.S. reactions to the unexpected agreement have been predictably negative, with Washington warning against forming a reconciled government with an unreformed Hamas. In so doing, it appears to view this deal through the obsolete prism of a moribund peace process and a frozen conflict between a moderate and militant axis. Instead, it should assess the agreement against the backdrop of a fast-changing Middle East. Twice before the world has sought to prevent the Islamists from governing — after Hamas won the 2006 legislative elections and, a year later, when it formed a coalition with Fatah. Twice, the world made a mess of things. The balance sheet is unequivocal: Hamas remains entrenched in Gaza; Fatah is no stronger; and, without elections or genuine pluralistic political life, democratic institutions in the Palestinian territories have rusted. The most persuasive case against unity has been that it would dash prospects for IsraeliPalestinian negotiations. Even then, this was never a particularly convincing argument. For it was hard to imagine a fractured national movement reaching a peace agreement, let alone implementing and sustaining it. Palestinian reconciliation was more likely a prerequisite than an obstacle to peace. But now? The peace process is lifeless. Israeli and Palestinian negotiators have not met in months. Palestinians, convinced that they will get nothing from Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and little from the United States, are focused on getting the U.N. General Assembly to endorse their call for statehood. In this context, Netanyahu’s insistence that Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas choose between peace with Israel or peace with Hamas is the emptiest of threats. What’s most intriguing about the unity deal is the regional environment in which it is taking place. The parties did not suddenly overcome mutual distrust. Rather, both are feeling the aftershocks of the momentous changes sweeping the Middle East. For Abbas, the fall of Hosni Mubarak’s regime in Egypt represents the loss of a key ally and the collapse of the “moderate” axis to which he belonged. A unity deal — popular among Palestinians — could shore up Fatah and the Palestinian president’s domestic and regional standing at a time when their main selling point (a negotiated

peace with Israel) lies in tatters. For Hamas, Mubarak’s fall likewise was decisive. An Egyptian government more in tune with public opinion coupled with a more powerful Muslim Brotherhood — Hamas’s parent organization — augurs a far warmer bilateral relationship. Growing unrest in Syria is another factor. The embattled Syrian regime, having offered safe harbor to Hamas’s leadership for a decade, wants to collect the rent — through overt signs of loyalty and support. Hamas has officially backed the regime but tepidly, out of reluctance to alienate its power base of Palestinian refugees and conservative Sunnis in Syria and beyond. Hamas calculates that even without immediate regime change, the Syrian regime inevitably will be transformed, its brutal crackdown having eroded much of its domestic credibility and regional influence. Tilting toward Cairo, a more important actor in the long run and more legitimate among Hamas’s constituency, was the safer bet. Accepting the Egyptian-brokered deal was a first step. For political and legal reasons, the Obama administration cannot embrace a unity government. But Washington should at least refrain from reflexively viewing such a body as a setback and seeking to undo it. Instead, it should keep an open mind and ask hard questions about what the deal says about the region: Beyond discomfort at Cairo’s improved relations with Hamas, is it not in America’s interest to see an influential Egypt critical of Israel yet committed to its peace accord; whose relationship with the United States is strong but not servile, and whose stances are more consistent with domestic and regional opinion? Might this not weaken Iran, which benefited from using Mubarak’s regime as a foil, and whose regional weight will deflate with the rise of a credible Arab counter-model? How would attempts to torpedo the agreement affect relations with this new Egypt — and, more broadly, with a newly assertive Arab public? Is Washington better off if Hamas feels compelled to drift from Tehran and Damascus toward Cairo? If the Muslim Brotherhood plays a more central role in Egypt, how might it influence Hamas? How might U.S. engagement with the Brotherhood influence that influence? There are many implications to the unity deal. If we persist in viewing the new politics of the Middle East within the paradigm of old, we risk overlooking the most interesting ones.
The writer is Middle East and North Africa program director at the International Crisis Group and was special assistant to the president for Arab-Israeli affairs from 1998 to 2001.

Me, too. I am glad that Osama is dead — and I am somewhat sheepish about experiencing this joy. This is an age-old ambivalence. It is embedded in human nature and the inescapable tension between the natural impulse for revenge and the laudable desire to rise above it. Jews just finished celebrating Passover, retelling the story of how God parted the Red Sea to let the people of Israel pass and then caused the waters to close again, drowning the pursuing Egyptian army. The Talmud teaches that when the angels began to sing in praise, God silenced them, saying, “My handiwork is drowning in the sea, and you want to sing?” Yet Moses and the Israelites broke into song after the crossing, praising God — and apparently drawing no rebuke — for casting Pharaoh’s chariots and captains into the sea. Humans are not angels. And even angels, it seems, succumb to the desire for vengeance. Which brings me to the garden. I am an inconstant gardener. I tend to buy more than I plant, and plant more than I tend. My eyes are bigger than my compost pile. But thinking of bin Laden compelled a drive to the nursery to revel in the beauty that exists alongside evil — God’s better handiwork, if you will. Every year, I go for a different palette. Last year, I tried a vibrant, showy mix of orange marigolds and royal purple petunias on the front porch. This year seemed to call for something more muted and soothing — whites and lavenders and a sprinkling of yellow. I piled my cart with lavender and white impatiens for the front beds, frothy alyssum for the walkway, a potful of optimistic-looking gerbera daisies for the steps. Some of last year’s perennials managed to survive my negligence. What I thought was a weed turns out to be glorious purple salvia, surrounded by the clusters of white candytuft I had forgotten were there. Today, I’ll put in the new arrivals. A proud yellow poppy will be my silent reminder of Afghanistan. And a showy white peony, with its wedding dress layers of petals, will stand testament to the fact that a world capable of producing an evil like bin Laden also contains instances of such improbable splendor.
ruthmarcus@washpost.com

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Competition is everything.
Competition is the steady hand at our back, pushing us to faster, better, smarter, simpler, lighter, thinner, cooler.

Competition is the fraternal twin of innovation.
And innovation led us to offer America’s first 4G phone, first unlimited 4G plan, first all-digital voice network, first nationwide 3G network, and first 4G network from a national carrier.
All of which, somewhat ironically, led our competition to follow.

Competition is American. Competition plays fair.

Competition keeps us all from returning to a Ma Bell–like, sorry-but-you-have-no-choice past.
Competition is the father of rapid progress and better value.
Competition inspires us to think about the future, which inspires us to think about the world, which inspires us to think about the planet, which inspired us to become the greenest company among wireless carriers.

Competition has many friends, but its very best is the consumer.
Competition has many believers, and we are among them.
Competition brings out our best, and gives it to you.

Coverage is not available everywhere. The Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 277 million people. The Sprint 3G Network reaches over 272 million people. The Sprint 4G Network reaches over 70 markets and counting, on select devices. Green Claim: Based on Newsweek Green Rankings, which are based on environmental impact, green policies and performance, and reputation survey scores as of October 18, 2010. See sprint.com for details. ©2011 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners.

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The 48-hour filmmaker Obituaries Moshe Landau was an Israeli jurist who presided over the 1961 trial of a ranking Gestapo officer in Nazi Germany. B7
See one of the local entries in this unusual contest that gives moviemakers just two days to finish a project.

Blocking tuition breaks
Opponents of legislation that allows illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition set out to obtain signatures to put a referendum on the ballot. B5

A Rapture watch?
In case you’ve missed it, May 21 is the end of the world (or the beginning of the end of the world). Take action accordingly. Our readers have plenty of suggestions. B2

Montgomery immigration enforcement launch is set
Controversial federal program to go into effect in county in September
BY M ICHAEL L ARIS AND S HANKAR V EDANTAM

At Deal, a dance fest with the first lady

Loudoun deaths leave a puzzle
Man apparently shot wife, himself; some say she might have been ill
BY

Montgomery officials are getting a civics lesson in the power of the federal government: A controversial federal immigration enforcement program will launch in the county this fall, whether local officials like it or not. In a terse letter, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official told Montgomery’s corrections director that the program, called Secure Communities, is coming soon. As part of the program, fingerprint data from local law enforcement are sent to federal immigration officials. “This letter is to notify you that the activation date for Montgomery County is scheduled for Tuesday, September 27, 2011,” the three-sentence letter said. Montgomery already sends information to ICE about people arrested on charges of violent or gun crimes, regardless of whether they are immigrants. It also regularly sends a list of foreign-born inmates to immigration officials. County officials are concerned that the new program’s broader net will draw in many upstanding individuals or those who have made minor mistakes. In Prince George’s County, for example, a large majority of undocumented immigrants deported via the program were not criminals. Advocates say they are concerned that some victims of domestic violence might stop calling immigration continued on B5

C AITLIN G IBSON

PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST

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irst lady Michelle Obama took her “Let’s Move” campaign against childhood obesity to Alice Deal Middle School in Northwest Washington on Tuesday. Above, a group of Deal students performs a choreographed dance routine to the Beyonce song “Move Your Body.” At left, Obama joins students and teachers in moving and grooving to the music.

D.C. to test new Metro ID card for students
BY

L ORI A RATANI

Metro and the District Department of Transportation plan to launch a pilot program this month that will replace paper student transit passes with electronic identification cards, similar to the SmarTrip fare card. The DC One Card contains a chip with ID information that can be used to track usage or restrict students from using the subsidized passes during nonschool hours. But DOT spokesman John Lisle said the agency does not intend to use the cards for those purposes — unless directed to do so by Metro officials. About 500 students at the School Without Walls in Northwest Washington will be the first to use the DC One Card as a transit pass. Officials said the second phase of the pilot will include some summer school students. If the program is successful, it will expand to include more D.C. middle and high school students in the fall. The idea of using the cards to restrict transit access was floated in February during a Metro board meeting as a possible way of curtailing crime committed by young people. Serious crime on the Metro hit a five-year high in 2010, and Metro Transit Police have said that the growth is partially attributable to snatchand-grab robberies committed by youth. There have also been concerns about fights among young people cards continued on B6

Solar power amid a higher power
First black church in D.C. to install panels hopes to lead by example and fuel renewable energy awareness
BY

D ARRYL F EARS

historic black church that has sat on the same corner in LeDroit Park for 99 years has become the first African American church in the District to rely on renewable solar energy for electrical power. Florida Avenue Baptist’s installation of 44 solar panels was hailed at a ribbon-cutting Tuesday by Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson and other government officials as a breakthrough in the black community, where the clean-energy divide mirrors its well-known high-tech digital divide with the white community. “This is an important first,” said Jackson, whose agency recently started a faith-based initiative to increase clean-energy awareness among religious groups. “They’re saying: We’re going to take the lead in helping African American homes to become energy efficient.” The church’s pastor, the Rev. Earl D. Trent Jr., said the panels’ installation, by a North Carolinabased company in March, was important not only because the church will save money on its $3,000 monthly electric bill from Pepco but also because it will reduce “dirty” coal-fired energy and enable him to establish a “green ministry” that could awaken churchgoers who know

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MATT MCCLAIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

little to nothing about clean energy and its benefits. African Americans tend to live in older, less energy-efficient homes equipped with older appliances and, therefore, have higher energy bills. According to “Energy Democracy,” a 2010 report by the Center for Social Inclusion, African Americans spent an average of $1,439 on electric bills in 2008, more than what Latino and Asian Americans spent, and significantly higher than what white Americans paid. “We want to be a model for green energy,” Trent said in an earlier interview. “I’ve gotten calls from pastors who want to find out how they can do this,” he added, raising his hope that the renewable-energy divide can be bridged. African American churches have historically led social change in black communities, raising awareness of civil rights in the past and now, possibly, environmental justice, Trent said. Helping to lower coal-energy production, even marginally, at power plants is a symbolic step in a nation where, he said, many black people live near such plants and their smokestacks. “African Americans have more sources of pollution in their neighborhoods than others,” solar continued on B6

Just before 6 a.m. Tuesday, as residents in his quiet Loudoun County neighborhood were beginning to stir, 64-year-old Larry E. Perry called 911 and reported a shooting. After he hung up the phone, Perry, a devoted husband, father and grandfather, walked outside near the garage and shot himself, authorities said. Inside the home, his longtime wife, Mercedes “Kaye” Perry, 61, was already dead. Loudoun sheriff ’s spokesman Kraig Troxell said investigators think the murder-suicide was sparked by financial concerns and Kaye Perry’s “serious health issues,” but Troxell did not elaborate. The couple’s three grown daughters, friends and neighbors were left reeling by the seemingly inexplicable, sudden act of violence. “Our parents were kind and loving people and utterly and unfailingly devoted to their children and grandchild,” the Perrys’ daughters said Tuesday in a statement. “We are struggling to understand what happened early this morning and there is still much that is unclear. What is not unclear is our unconditional love for our parents. The family is struggling to come to terms with the loss we suffered.” Troxell said deputies arrived at the home, in the 800 block of South Birch Street in Sterling Park, minutes after the 911 call. Kaye Perry’s elderly mother, who also lived at the house, was inside and unharmed, Troxell said. Robert Samuel, 89, a longtime neighbor, said he learned of the tragedy when he came downstairs Tuesday morning and found police cars lining the quiet suburban street and yellow police tape surrounding the Perrys’ white, two-story house. Samuel said he has lived next door to Larry and Kaye Perry for more than 25 years and saw them often. He described them as kind, friendly neighbors. “Not long ago, the last time I saw Kaye, she said, ‘I’m going to have you over to eat,’ ” he said. “I couldn’t tell anything was wrong. Something happens like this, it’s just a tragedy.” Samuel said the couple’s daughters live nearby and visited frequently. The Perrys also had a young granddaughter, he said, nodding toward a plastic child’s swing that hung from a branch of a large tree in the tidy front yard. Samuel said he thought Kaye Perry had some health problems but did not know any details. couple continued on B6

COURTLAND MILLOY
Courtland Milloy is away. His column will resume when he returns.

High-level praise for federal employees
As part of Public Service Recognition Week, agency heads speak at a town hall. Federal Diary, B4

Florida Avenue Baptist Church, led by the Rev. Earl D. Trent Jr., has installed 44 solar panels. He aims to educate about green living.

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Talk to us. Talk to newsmakers. Talk to each other. Join the conversation at postlocal.com

POSTLOCAL

Farm’s noble efforts win royal attention
During 3-day U.S. visit, Prince Charles tours LeDroit Park’s Common Good, thrilling neighbors and joking with kids
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he crowd began to gather around 4 p.m. Tuesday. Garden lovers, neighbors, medical students and staff workers from nearby Howard University Hospital, and loyal royal watchers surrounded the wooden fence at the Common Good City Farm in LeDroit Park to get a prime spot for glance of Prince Charles of Wales and a rumored visit by President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama. About an hour later, the prince arrived at Common Good with a police escort and was greeted by Mayor Vincent C. Gray (D) and D.C. Council member Jim Graham (D-Ward 1). The prince — traveling four days after son Prince William married Kate Middleton in a royal wedding that drew tens of millions of viewers worldwide — wowed the crowd as he went to the fence on washingtonpost.com and shook hands Food conference with fans. “He looks distinPrince Charles will be guished,” said Lottie among Wednesday’s Seward, 75, who has speakers. See the event at lived in the neighwashingtonpost.com/live, borhood for 47 starting at 9 a.m. years. She excitedly arrived at the farm expecting to see Obama — who was not part of the visit — but she said she would take a prince. “I saw him on TV, but I wouldn’t mind seeing him face to face,” she said. “It’s amazing they’re coming to the neighborhood.” Earlier this year, British Embassy representatives had conducted a walk-through of Common Good — dubbed the only urban farm in the District — but didn’t reveal that the prince would take a tour until two weeks ago. Prince Charles, who champions sustainable agriculture, is on a threeday U.S. visit that will include meeting with the president on Wednesday after delivering a speech at “The Future of Food” conference at George Washington University, hosted by Washington Post Live. “I had to keep it a secret,” said Pertula George, the farm’s executive director. George said she and the prince discussed obesity during the visit and how thankful she was for his visit because it would boost the farm’s visibility. “He said, ‘I’m glad, too, and that’s why I’m here,’ ” George said. Prince Charles spent much of his time speaking with children at the farm. Of a group of them, he asked: “What are you doing with those apples?” They were cutting them up for a salad, George

JOHN KELLY'S WASHINGTON

End of the world: good news/bad news

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JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Prince Charles, who champions sustainable agriculture, receives flowers from Nicole Pendergast, 7, at Common Good City Farm in LeDroit Park. “He looks distinguished,” one longtime resident said.

recalled they said. Prince Charles responded that the task must be difficult because they were using plastic knives. In June, the V Street NW farm will expand to begin selling some of its fruit and other produce to low-income residents who will be able to use WIC and EBT cards to purchase goods, George said. Common Good also is an education center, where

residents learn how to grow their own food and eat healthy. Still, the farm is hoping for a visit from local royalty. The first lady is known for her “Let’s Move” program, which promotes healthy eating and exercise. “Maybe now she’ll come,” George said.
stewartn@washpost.com

Embracing Va. SEALs who brought down bin Laden
Virginia Beach wants to honor the secretive Navy unit, but anonymity presents a challenge
BY A NNYS S HIN AND A NNIE G OWEN

When Virginia Beach Mayor Will Sessoms learned that a Navy SEAL unit based just outside his city had taken out Osama bin Laden, his first thought was to honor it. The only problem, however, was he had no idea who the SEALs were, or how to find them. The unit that carried out the daring raid on bin Laden’s compound in Pakistan on Sunday afternoon is renowned for its secrecy. But while such discretion is a prerequisite for covert operations, it raises practical hurdles for a mayor who is used to the cheering crowds that welcome home aircraft carriers to the naval base in Norfolk. “This community is extremely proud. I’d like to come up with a way to have a city celebration of some kind. If we can,” said Sessoms (R), whose initial thought was to include the SEALs in the city’s Patriotic Festival in June. “But it’s challenging.” Other Virginia politicians overlooked such details, satisfied with the knowledge that the men involved in bin Laden’s death had a connection to the Old Dominion state. Former Republican senator and current candidate George Allen (R) tweeted: “As Virginians were hit at the Pentagon on 9-11 & USS Cole, it is appropriate that a VA-based SEAL Team brought justice directly to #Osama.” The Naval Special Warfare Development Group — long known as SEAL Team Six — was formed in 1980 after failed attempts to rescue U.S. hostages from Iran. The elite counterterrorism unit deploys from a tiny military facility in Dam Neck, just outside Virginia Beach. There are six other groups within special warfare, based elsewhere, and a total of 2,300 active-duty SEAL officers. What makes SEALs special is the grueling training they endure. About 200 candidates are in each Basic Underwater Demolition school class. By the end, about 30 to 35 men remain. Many drop out after “Hell Week,” when they must train around the clock for six straight days. And once they become SEALs, the training never

ends, former SEALs said. The men who took out bin Laden spent weeks rehearsing the raid on a replica of the compound, as well as rehearsing different potential scenarios — including taking bin Laden alive. The relentless regimen creates an intense bond among the men that is critical to success in combat. Former SEAL commander Mark Divine said the experience is so unique that it can make it harder to relate to someone who doesn’t spend their days jumping out of planes or swimming two miles in frigid waters in total darkness. SEALs also work in small, close-knit groups, and because they can’t openly discuss much of their work, they tend to stick together even when they are off duty. Virginia Beach denizens refer to them as “team guys.” “You don’t hardly know they are there unless they are your neighbor,” Sessoms said. The burden their work places on families is also unique, Sessoms said. Members’ wives and children “don’t know when they are leaving and where they are when they are gone and when they are coming home. It’s all quiet and hidden.” SEAL families have a support group, the Virginia Beach-based Navy SEAL Foundation, which has seen its donations surge since bin Laden’s death. Director of development David Guernsey said that the foundation received $6,000 in donations on Monday alone and that many online donations came with notes attached that thanked the SEALs for their service. Discerning locals know how to spot a SEAL, especially when they venture out among channelsurfing civilians. “You can kind of tell. They’re extremely fit. They all kind of dress in a similar way, wear the same type of sunglasses and Tevas,” Divine said. “You can start to notice these guys by the way they carry themselves.” They are a “high testosterone group,” said Alden Mills, who was an active-duty SEAL from 1991 to 1998. The ethos is captured by slogans such as “failure is not an option” and “pain is weakness leaving the body.” Mills summed up the reaction to bin Laden’s death among his former SEAL buddies: “Hooyah!” “That’s SEAL speak for ‘fired up,’ ” he said. “The next feeling as someone who used to be there was ‘Wish I could have been there, too.’ ”
gowena@washpost.com shina@washpost.com Staff writer Christian Davenport contributed to this report.

READER COMMENTS Readers responded to the news that a Navy SEAL unit based in Virginia Beach was responsible for killing Osama bin Laden. Virginia Beach Mayor Mayor Will Sessoms wants to honor them — but the unit is renowned for its secrecy.

Some secrets are best kept that way
WeThePeopleofVirginia: Name a main street or highway in the region after them. Call it “SEAL Team Six Way.” djah:These guys are the cream of a superb crop. Like many others, I have a habit of thanking soldiers I see in airports. Each time I am blown away by their poise, intelligence and commitment. OldUncleTom: I don’t need to see these guys, or know their names, to thank them for the things they do in service to America. wandap667: I also want to send a very big thanks and God Bless to the SEAL team and all of our military men and women out there. And to their families that love and support them. Hooah!!! One very happy former new Yorker that calls Virginia home now. PowerpeaceMaster: This is an awesome day for the USA and an equally awesome day for Virginia. tahuaya: Virginia Beach Mayor Will Sessoms needs to rethink his initial reaction about a public celebration for the SEALs who performed this operation. All these men need is public identification so that they, their families and homes can be attacked in retaliation. ahashburn: The mayor should just have a banner erected that says “Thank you SEALs” and leave it at that. sjcsando: Superheroes keep their identities secret for a reason.

n case you missed Monday’s column: The world will end on May 21, 2011. At least, that’s what a Christian group claims in e-mails that have been spamming me and countless others, and in ads on the backs of Metro buses. The “news” prompted reader Edward Jones of Springfield to compose the perfect Post headline for May 22: “World ends: Traffic backed up for hours.” Wait a minute: How can there be a May 22? Well, you see, May 21 just starts a five-month process which concludes Oct. 21, when the lights go out for good. Wrote Angelica Braestrup: “The friends who have birthdays in the latter third of October are torn between gratitude they will not age another year and sorrow that they will not age.” In my column I wondered how we should spend our last days. That reminded Pikesville’s Patrick Lackey of the Cuban missile crisis, when a nuclear bloodbath seemed a distinct possibility. He experienced it as a college sophomore. “I had used up all of my allowable absences from phys ed,” Patrick wrote. “Should I skip again, even though doing so meant I would flunk the course if the world didn’t end? That day I did the optimistic thing and attended phys ed. Dripping sweat, I scanned the skies for incoming missiles.” Patrick says he’s become more of a procrastinator since then. Incidentally, his definition of a procrastinator: “Someone who is selective about what he does next.” Chevy Chase’s Noell Sottile writes that in her house they’ve been aware for some time that the Rapture is predicted for May 21: “That day is the day of our oldest child’s college graduation and we sure hope the world doesn’t crack open right in the middle of the ceremony!” Stephanie Smilay from Takoma Park said she’s turning her May 21 housewarming into an End of the World Party. She writes: “Since there’s no particular indication of the time of the Rapture, I am hoping it will occur midparty, which will leave those of us left behind talking for days.” Chantilly’s Tommy Bush has a suggestion for testing the resolve of adherents of the 5/21/2011 belief: “Maybe you should offer to buy their house and other assets for a dollar. After all, they won’t need the money and their heirs won’t need the assets.” Others thought this was nothing to joke about — not because the world will end, but because of what some believers might do if it doesn’t. “If people are worried that we’re going to start blowing up things or something like that, no,” said Tom Evans, board member of Family Stations, the Christian group responsible for the e-mails and the bus ads. When I talked to him on the phone, Tom sounded pretty convinced that their math is right. But, really, Tom, what if — and I know it would be a big disappointment — the sun rises on May 22? What if on that Sunday morning the birds sing, people head to IHOP, people go to church or stay home to mow the lawn? What then? Said Tom: “Asking the question would be like asking Noah a couple of weeks before the Flood, ‘Hey, Noah, what are you going to do with that big boat after the Flood happens?’ Noah was just doing what God told him to do. People mocked it. What’s sad is that only eight people survived the Flood.” Won’t I look silly if the world really does end on May 21? I suppose looking silly will be the least of my problems.

And there’s an ‘R’ in ‘tornado’
On Tuesday, I lamented my inability to remember the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning. Can’t the National Weather Service come up with different terms, I wondered. Not necessary, wrote several readers, who offered mnemonic devices to help me remember. “’WaRning’ has an R in it,” wrote Potomac’s Lois Montbertrand, “and indicates a Real threat or sighting. ‘Watch’ is just a caution. No R, no Reality. At least not yet.” Alexandria’s Kathy Hoke had the same idea, with a difference: “’Warning’ has an ‘R’ in it, which tells me something (tornado, thunderstorm, etc.) has actually been seen on Radar. Works for me!” Finally, here’s a suggestion from Sue HandsRenwick of Ashburn: “The way I was taught to explain it by the American Red Cross is to remember that the word ‘warning’ has an R in it so it’s time to Run to safety.” So, are we under a Rapture warning or a Rapture watch?
kellyj@washpost.com

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Here’s looking at you, Dad
Susan Ford Bales and Steven Ford, two of former president Gerald R. Ford’s children, gaze up at a statue of their father, which was unveiled in the Capitol Rotunda on Tuesday. Both House Speaker John A. Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid delivered remarks as they dedicated the statue for Ford, who died in 2006. “Now the gentleman from Michigan has come home,” Boehner said.
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Suitland man pleads guilty in robbery
A 43-year-old Suitland man admitted Tuesday that he stole $5,000 during the robbery of a bank last year in Northwest Washington. Kevin Dupree pleaded guilty to one count of bank robbery and is scheduled to be sentenced Aug. 2 by U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton. Dupree admitted that he entered the PNC Bank in the 1400 block of P Street NW on Dec. 16, handed a teller a note announcing a hold-up and lifted his shirt to reveal a gun in his waistband. The teller handed over the cash, and Dupree fled. He was arrested the next day; authorities think he had used a toy gun, prosecutors said.
— Del Quentin Wilber

Duck family moves near White House
The mallard that set up resi-

dence in the courtyard of the National Geographic Society for herself and her ducklings apparently decided it was time to move. After spending three weeks at the M Street NW building, the mother packed up her four ducklings and relocated to Lafayette Square on H Street, between 15th and 17th streets NW. “We don’t know exactly why they went, just that the pool they occupy now is a lot bigger than ours, and of course has a White House view,” said Barbara Moffet, communications director for the society. National Geographic employees had been taking care of the ducks. After Sunday’s announcement that Osama bin Laden had been killed — and the spontaneous celebration that erupted outside the White House — Moffet went down to Lafayette Square on Monday to check on the ducks. All five were still there, on a much calmer day.
— Larissa Roso

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Pr. George’s municipalities hold elections
railroad since he was 19 and was known for his jovial disposition and funny stories.
— Katherine Shaver

MARC conductor dies of heart attack
A conductor on MARC’s Brunswick Line died Tuesday after a heart attack on a Union Station platform shortly after Train 849 pulled into the District during the morning commute, MARC officials said. Eric Wolf, who worked for CSX Transportation and its predecessor companies for 38 years, had the heart attack amid passengers on the platform about 8:30 a.m., a MARC spokesman said. Unlike Metro riders, many commuter rail passengers ride the same train daily for years, making them well-acquainted with train employees and fellow passengers. Dave Johnson, MARC’s chief customer communications officer, wrote in an e-mail to passengers that Wolf had worked on the

Brentwood and Edmonston pick new mayors
BY

lowed her to tap into the town’s budget to pay her $7,000 telephone bill.

Ward 1’s Jack Sims was unopposed, and in Ward 2, Eddie L. Martin was unopposed.

Cheverly
Incumbent Laila Riazi received 95 votes to Preston White’s 16 for the Ward 1 council seat. Mary Jane Coolen won the Ward 2 race with 120 votes, followed by Rachel Audi, 70, John LeGloahec, 76, and John Dotson, 1. Roswell Eldridge was the only candidate on the ballot for the Ward 3 seat. He got 45 votes. In Ward 4, David Thorp won with 91 votes. Fred Price Jr. got 14, and Steven Johnson received one. In Ward 6, Carolyn Cook received 49 votes to defeat Velinda Mays, who got 25 votes.

Edmonston
Robert Kerns got 94 votes, defeating Elizabeth McCauley, with 29, to become mayor. Kerns replaces Mayor Adam Ortiz.

Illegal rockfish net is found in the bay
Maryland Natural Resources Police said another illegal rockfish net was found in the Chesapeake Bay. Recreational fishermen found the net Sunday near a buoy midway between Tilghman Island and North Beach. The net is the latest of a number found in the bay this year. A Natural Resources police spokesman says the net was so weighed down with fish that it could not be hauled aboard a patrol boat that responded to the scene. He said a larger vessel will be sent to the site.
— Associated Press

H AMIL R . H ARRIS

received 236. The Ward 1 council seat went to Carolyn Smallwood with 127 votes; James Hearing had 92 and Marshall Peeks, 80. In Ward 2, Elaine Carter had 48 votes and Margaret Dade, 43. In Ward 3, Jennifer Jenkins won with 116, besting Judy C. Diggs’s 51 votes.

The towns of Brentwood and Edmonston have new mayors and the city of New Carrollton will have new council members after voters in 10 small Prince George’s municipalities went to the polls Monday night.

Fairmount Heights
Willie Thompson Martin outlasted a crowded field to become mayor with 88 votes. Others in the race included Patricia Waiters with 62 votes, Jacqueline WoodDodson with 37, Ukkundo Oohwaka collecting 24 and Nancy Dixon Saxon at 22. The three seats on the Town Council went to the three top vote-getters: Kevin Downing, 129; Harry Saunders, 114; and Aaron Wilson, 121. The other candidates were Nathaniel Mines Jr., who received 94, R. Dean Cooks, 89, and Madeline Richardson, 88.

Morningside
Two of the four council seats were up for grabs in the close race. The top two vote-getters were Kevin Kline, with 45, and James Ealey, with 43. The others in the race included Sheila Scott, who had 41 votes, and Todd Mullins, who received 28.

Brentwood
Community activist Roger E. Rudder beat a late write-in challenge by former mayor Betty Jean Schmiedigen to become the new mayor. Rudder received 168 votes. Two incumbents and two newcomers won seats on the Town Council. The winners are Ada E. Brooks, 148 votes; Anecka Harrison, 149; Regina Morlan, 157; and Nina Marie Young, 149. Former mayor Xzavier Montgomery-Wright withdrew her reelection bid just before a candidates’ forum, where she was expected to be questioned about obtaining a debit card that al-

New Carrollton
The top three candidates who won seats on the City Council were Lisa Fenton, 243 votes, James Wildoner, 271, and James Garrett, 254. Richard Bechtold received 233.

Cottage City
Two seats on the five-member commission were up for grabs. In Ward 1, incumbent Aileen McChesney was unopposed with 90 votes. In the at-large race, Richard Cote — appointed after his predecessor resigned — lost to challenger Demetrius Givens 85 to 53.

Glenarden
In the mayoral race, incumbent Gail Parker Carter received 214 votes to Donjuan Williams’s 204. In the at-large council race, Maxine Phifer got 245 votes to slip past Celestine E. Wilson, who

North Brentwood
Mayor Petrella Robinson was reelected without opposition. In addition, council member Aaron Baynes was reelected.
harrish@washpost.com

VIRGINIA

Public broadcasting funds cut in budget
Gov. Robert F. McDonnell signed amendments to the state’s two-year, $78 billion budget Monday but reduced taxpayer funding for public broadcasting, his office announced Tuesday. McDonnell (R) made one lineitem veto, reducing by $424,001 the funding for educational programming for public radio and TV stations in fiscal 2012. The Democratic-led Senate had agreed to reduce station grants by 50 percent in a compromise with the Republican-controlled House of Delegates.
— Anita Kumar and Rosalind S. Helderman

District Heights
Two of the four commission seats were in contention, but

THE DISTRICT

N.Y. Avenue less congested despite construction
BY

A SHLEY H ALSEY III

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Call it New York Avenue Spring, the silent rebellion against roadwork tyranny. After a month of flashing signs warning that bridge reconstruction would choke congested traffic to a virtual standstill, after The Washington Post and other media outlets spread the word that gridlock was in the offing, drivers have rebelled against dictatorship by the orange cone and Jersey barrier. They have taken to the streets — the District’s other streets — and many commuters say driving New York Avenue is better than it has ever been despite work that narrows six lanes of traffic to four. “This morning’s commute was fantastic once again,” Jeff Lancaster, who commutes daily from Annapolis, said Tuesday. “The last week and a half have been the best commutes in over 11 years. Obviously, everyone is taking another route, and I hate to let out this big

secret.” That a rebellion was underway probably first surfaced in tweets from the highway, but anyone sitting at home could watch realtime traffic cameras, which showed gaping holes in traffic that usually was bumper to bumper. Before the construction began at 5 p.m. on a Monday, the average speed in the seven-tenths of a mile stretch that includes the bridge was 21 mph, according to data from INRIX, a company that provides real-time traffic information used by navigation applications. On Monday of this week, the average at that hour was 33 mph. If that were shown on a live

traffic map, 21 mph would be colored yellow, but 33 mph would show as green. The bailout route of choice — Rhode Island Avenue — has taken on a very different color, too. It’s rarely clear sailing in the best of times because blocking the box seems de rigueur at the tortured intersection where Rhode Island meets Florida Avenue and a bunch of other streets that crunch together badly. That can cause backups that grow to several blocks. Now, it’s worse. “It appeared immediately to us on our map that it looks like most drivers are taking Rhode Island Avenue to route around that section of New York Avenue,” said

Jim Bak of INRIX. At 5 p.m. Monday, traffic that typically would have been rolling at 21 mph was crawling at 16 mph. Bak said it will all shake out. “We often see DDOT advanced warnings heeded by drivers en masse,” he said, referring to the D.C. Department of Transportation. “Then, after several days, drivers realize that the street they were told to avoid isn’t as bad as was predicted. Then, some drivers return while others continue to stay away until construction is completed.” It this case, that will be two years.
halseya@washpost.com

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

THE FEDERAL WORKER
On Leadership: The Federal Coach

6 Excerpt from views.washingtonpost.com/leadership/fedcoach
The nonprofit Partnership for Public Service and The Washington Post’s On Leadership site produce the Federal Coach, hosted by Tom Fox, director of the partnership’s Center for Government Leadership. The goal is to “engage, inspire and learn from you, the federal worker, whether you are a new hire, a contractor or a manager at the highest level.”

A week’s celebration of public service
There is no better time than this week, the congressionally designated Public Service Recognition Week, to spread a message of praise, re-energize the workforce and perhaps even issue a challenge to forge ahead to make government work better on behalf of the American people. It is critically important for you as a federal leader to let your employees know that they are valued and that their work is important. Some leaders have recently spoken out, although their words have not always received the kind of attention they deserve. President Obama, for example, wrote a memo to federal workers last month after the budget deal kept the government functioning, thanking them for their patience and professionalism during a very trying time. “You do your jobs without complaint or much recognition. But it is men and women like you who help make America all it is, by responding to the needs of our people, and keeping our country safe and secure,” Obama wrote. Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, praised Defense Department civilian employees last week during a leadership forum — comments that are well worth repeating. “We wouldn’t be anywhere without the great civil service workforce that we have,” Mullen said, adding that their “dedication and patriotism equals that of those of us in uniform.” Other federal leaders also praised their employees. National Weather Service Director Jack Hayes said: “National Weather Service employees are the epitome of not just good government, but great government. These men and women are dedicated to protecting lives and property around the clock — even when threatened by extreme conditions themselves.” Peace Corps Director Aaron S. Williams noted that “Peace Corps staff in the U.S. and overseas contribute their skills, creativity, enthusiasm and commitment to service in a meaningful way both at home and abroad.” Some leaders are going beyond kind words. At the Department of Veterans Affairs, Secretary Eric K. Shinseki, Deputy Secretary W. Scott Gould and other senior officials around the country shook hands with employees as they came to work Monday, a simple but very nice gesture. Also kicking off the week was a speakers event that was broadcast live throughout the VA, and “Thank an Employee Day” is scheduled for Thursday. The Small Business Administration kicked off PSRW at an ice cream social hosted by Administrator Karen G. Mills, Deputy Administrator Marie C. Johns and Chief of Staff Ana M. Ma. The ice cream social, they said, was a “sweet” way to thank the staff for all the hard work they do on behalf of the nation’s small businesses. The SBA also planned to select an Employee of the Day each day this week. The Federal Labor Relations Authority will be holding a number of appreciation events in-

PHOTOS BY SUSAN BIDDLE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

James Gatz, who works for the Administration for Children and Families at the Department of Health and Human Services, asks a question at a town hall event. The program at the Ronald Reagan Building in D.C. was part of the annual Public Service Recognition Week.

Big names come together to support federal employees
zones. “Their sacrifice is just as dear” as the sacrifices by those in the military, Berry said. With facts such as these, federal workers have something “to fight back with,” he added. Berry said there should be a way to honor civilian employees who die on duty, something like the Purple Heart for members of the armed services. “We need to be thinking about how we can best honor them,” he said. The focus on federal employees continues on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, when the Senate’s federal workforce subcommittee, chaired by Sen. Daniel K. Akaka (D-Hawaii), holds a hearing on “Inspiring Students to Federal Service.” On the agenda is the executive order designed to facilitate the recruitment and hiring of students that President Obama signed in December. Several of the town hall speakers lamented comments by politicians that undercut federal employees. Most of those remarks have come from congressional Republicans, but one of the speakers Tuesday, LaHood, is a former Republican congressman, and he strongly backed federal workers and the president’s support for them. “I despise that,” LaHood said of attacks on employees. The “easiest thing” for a politician to do, he added, is to take potshots at government workers. Though going after government workers is easy, politicians love to be seen praising veterans. They should know, as Berry pointed out, that 30 percent of the government’s new hires last year were vets. Furthermore, hiring of vets increased by 2,000 last year compared with the year before, even as overall hiring dropped by 11,000; and 25 percent of civil servants are veterans. “As politicians are making cheap potshots, they also are attacking veterans,” Berry said. LaHood made it clear that he is not in the cheap-shot crowd. “I have the highest respect for people who work in government,” he said. “They aren’t doing it for the money. They are doing it because they are making a difference in peoples’ lives.”
federaldiary@washpost.com

JOE DAVIDSON Federal Diary

P

ublic employees have had to play a lot of defense lately. At the state level, conservative governors and legislatures have made a pinata of employee unions. In Washington, federal workers have seen a stream of proposals to freeze their pay and cut their retirement. On Tuesday, it was time to play offense, and a high-powered team took the field. Five top-level Obama administration officials gathered to praise federal employees and mark the annual Public Service Recognition Week during a town hall program, held in a building named for a man known for his put-downs of government. Showing their appreciation were Secretaries Kathleen Sebelius of Health and Human Services, Shaun Donovan of Housing and Urban Development, and Ray LaHood of Transportation; General Services Administration head Martha Johnson; and John Berry, director of the Office of Personnel Management. One big take-away from the meeting for Max Stier, president and chief executive of the Partnership for Public Service, which organizes the annual recognition week, was the importance of having agencies’ top leadership focus on talent issues. “If we don’t have leadership in government investing in the workforce, nothing else will succeed,” Stier said. (The Washington Post has a contentsharing relationship with the Partnership for Public Service.) The town hall was one of a number of events and proclamations happening around the country this week. Missing this year, because of the budget crunch, are the booths and displays that federal agencies have often set up on the National Mall. The rotunda of the Ronald Reagan Building turned out to be a fine setting for a capacity crowd of federal workers who heard the officials praise their lot. In addition, the partnership released a letter from more than a dozen administration officials demonstrating their appreciation for government employees. The program began with a video from first lady Michelle Obama, whose concern for federal workers has been demonstrated by her visits to more than 20 agencies and bases since her husband took office. “Folks like you devote your lives, and sometimes risk your lives, to serve this country, often with little fanfare or recognition,” Obama said on the video. “Your work is vital, and it’s worthy of the passion that you show.” While praise like that is important, it was the facts and figures offered by the OPM’s Berry that presented a picture too often missed.

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius spoke at the event, along with four other top administration officials.

cluding a Public Service Recognition Reception with Barbara Mahone, the FLRA chairman in the mid-1980s. Mahone was to speak to employees about how her experiences as a public servant shaped her more than 30-year executive leadership career in the private sector. FLRA Chairman Carol Waller Pope, who has served the authority as a public servant for more than 30 years, noted that “PSRW provides an opportunity to acknowledge all FLRA employees — managers and staff alike — who are deeply committed to the FLRA’s mission and rebuilding efforts, and to whom the FLRA can credit its recent extraordinary improvements in agencywide performance and employee morale.” The State Department will also be showing appreciation for its employees during the week, including holding its annual homecoming for civil and foreign service retirees on Friday. And at Federal Executive Boards from Boston to Atlanta to Seattle, there will be awards ceremonies and other events to honor and recognize federal employees. These are just some examples of ways leaders are choosing to say thank you, ideas that should be expanded more fully across the government during PSRW and throughout the year to motivate workers, and to let them know that their hard work is appreciated. Twelve Cabinet secretaries and two agency leaders signed an open letter, sending a positive message that better reflects reality than some of the headlines we read each day. “This week serves as a time to honor public servants — many of them our friends and neighbors — and to reflect on the benefits they provide the American people, such as disease prevention, public safety and security, education, transportation, veterans’ care and much more,” they said. “Each and every day, we have the pleasure of witnessing firsthand the remarkable accomplishments performed by public servants at all levels of government. We are proud to serve with you and thank you for all you do,” they said. As federal managers, it is important that you, too, spread this message. How is your agency celebrating Public Service Recognition Week? What are you doing to thank and recognize your employees during this week? Share your stories by e-mailing me at fedcoach@ourpublicservice.org. Also, check for my interview with the director of the Office of Personnel Management, John Berry, at the On Leadership forum online.
Visit On Leadership at views.washingtonpost.com/leadership/ fedcoach. There are three weekly installments: Mondays: “Getting Ahead” — advice on “leading up.” Wednesdays: “View From the Top Floor” — interviews with federal leaders. Fridays: Answering questions about navigating the federal workforce terrain.

PUBLIC SERVICE RECOGNITION WEEK.ORG

Consider these tidbits:  The size of the workforce is smaller today than when Lyndon Johnson was president, yet there are about 110 million more Americans now. 

In the past 10 years, 100,000 federal civil servants have served in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Since 1992, 2,965 federal civil servants have been killed while on duty, including 24 in war

The Federal Page
Turn the page on Osama
The National Counterterrorism Center can’t update all the nifty calendars it gave out, but the online version now reflects the demise of Public Enemy No. 1. In the Loop, A19

washingtonpost.com

Obama offers thanks to government workers
This year’s budget cuts forced the cancellation of a series of events May 1-7 on the Mall for National Public Service Recognition Week, an annual reminder of the work performed by the nation’s local, state and federal government employees. The White House is finding other ways to thank the rank and file, including the release of a video by first lady Michelle Obama.
D To see the video message, go to washingtonpost.com/ federaleye.

Q.

Health-care battle

The Pentagon wants to see a modest increase in health-care premiums for working-age military retirees, but a House panel plans to prohibit any hikes. A19

How would you rate security in your workplace? Is there more to be done about security at federal buildings in the wake of Osama bin Laden’s killing?

Cooling down hot spots

As a top aide to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Jonah Blank addresses tough questions about peaceful coexistence in Asia. A19 

Please e-mail your answer to federalworker@washpost.com and include your full name, home town and the agency for which you work. We might include your response in Friday’s Washington Post. When answers are particularly sensitive, we will consider a respondent’s request to withhold full identification.

NF407 2x.75

Printed using recycled fiber.

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

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Md. teacher gets an ‘A’ from Obama
The 2011 National Teacher of the Year didn’t have to travel very far for her meeting with President Obama at the White House. Michelle Shearer teaches AP chemistry at Urbana High School in Ijamsville. She previously taught the first-ever AP chemistry class at the Maryland School for the Deaf. She was honored during a ceremony in the Rose Garden.
CHARLES DHARAPAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS

MARYLAND

Opponents of tuition bill seek public vote
Delegates aim to block legislation giving breaks to illegal immigrants
BY

A NN E . M ARIMOW

Federal ICE program set for Montgomery
immigration from B1 police for help because they fear it will lead to their deportation. At a rally outside the County Council building in Rockville on Tuesday, Florinda Lorenzo, an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala, described being arrested and jailed a year ago for selling phone cards from her home in Langley Park. Now she faces deportation and will voluntarily leave her three young children, all U.S.-born, with their father and move back to Guatemala to apply to immigrate legally. “I just don’t want to go. I want to stay with my kids right here,” she said. The District is not participating in the program but will eventually do so, local and federal officials said. Arlington is part of the program — over the vigorous objections of local leaders who thought that their participation was voluntary. But local officials, including those in Montgomery, have learned that federal law trumps local preferences on immigration matters. The ICE letter was written April 26, the same day council member Nancy Navarro (D-Eastern County) proposed a resolution saying the council “opposes implementation of the Secure Communities initiative in Montgomery County.” By Tuesday, after scrambling to figure out where the county and council stood legally and politically, council members unanimously passed a radically overhauled version of Navarro’s resolution. The council, it declared, “encourages our public safety officials to work closely with ICE to ensure that the Secure Communities program is implemented consistent with its stated purpose and goals.” “The resolution itself changed 180 degrees,” said council member George L. Leventhal (D-At Large). Still, Navarro said, it’s important for the council to be on record with its deep misgivings. “They’re saying, ‘We’re coming,’ ” Navarro said of immigration officials, adding it’s important for the council’s message to be heard as well. According to the resolution, the federal program, “as currently administered, will create division in our community, promote a culture of fear, and dismantle the trust that our police officers have worked to establish in many immigrant communities.” ICE defends the program, which it said helped deport 72,445 undocumented immigrants with criminal backgrounds from October 2008 through March. Of those, 26,473 were found guilty of crimes as serious as murder, rape and the sexual abuse of children. The program, which began in the George W. Bush administration and was greatly expanded by the Obama administration, sends the fingerprints of suspects picked up by local police to immigration officials. The fingerprint is checked against a national database of undocumented immigrants, and if there is a match showing that the person in custody is in the country illegally, federal officials ask the local police department to detain the suspect for an immigration check. When the program was activated in any given area, ICE spokeswoman Barbara Gonzalez said, it tended to first identify “lower-level criminals as they are first to complete their criminal sentence and come into ICE custody.” But over time, she said the program usually identified an increasing number of undocumented immigrants with links to violent crimes and a decreasing number who had committed less-serious crimes. After conducting their own investigations, immigration officials sometimes place detainees into deportation proceedings. Officials have said that the program prioritizes the removal of violent and dangerous criminals but that they are also required by law to remove non-criminal undocumented immigrants who come to their notice via the program, if sufficient detention and removal resources exist. County Executive Isiah Leggett (D) said the county’s own notification system has worked well. “Unless there are some changes, it will supersede our local program,” Leggett said. While the county plans to continue expressing its disappointment and trying to work with federal officials, he said, “I’m not sure we will have any success on that. They’ve got a national program in place, and they’re just imposing it, whether you agree or not.” Leggett spoke by phone from a White House meeting of county officials from across the country discussing local concerns, immigration enforcement among them. He said the homeland security secretary acknowledged shortcomings in the way the government has communicated to locals about the federal effort. “Janet Napolitano got up and said they miscommunicated to a lot to people in counties about Secure Communities,” Leggett said.
larism@washpost.com vedantams@washpost.com

Opponents of legislation designed to give college tuition breaks to illegal immigrants in Maryland say they are on track to collect the thousands of signatures needed to try to overturn the measure, which passed the General Assembly last month. Del. Neil C. Parrott (R-Washington) and Del. Pat McDonough (R-Baltimore County) are leading the effort to give voters a say in whether to uphold the bill. Parrott said volunteers in most of Maryland’s counties are gathering signatures and spreading the word at grocery stores and community events that “our tax dollars are going to fund illegal aliens.” He added: “Now is not the time to be spending money on what is an unlawful program.” Sen. Victor Ramirez, the Prince George’s Democrat who sponsored the legislation, said immigrant advocates and other proponents of the measure will mobilize to educate voters and ensure that the signatures gathered are valid. He called Parrott’s message “misleading” and said the legislation would not give immigrant students a free ride. “It gives kids the opportunity to go to college and be treated like all other Maryland high school graduates,” Ramirez said. Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) has said he will sign the bill that would allow illegal immigrants who have graduated from Maryland high schools to pay in-state tuition at the state’s colleges and universities. Students would have to provide proof that their parents or guardians are taxpayers and would have to begin their courses at a community college. Those who earn an associate’s degree could transfer to a four-year institution at the lower in-state tuition rate.

Maryland would join at least 10 states that provide similar benefits to undocumented immigrants. But other states have moved in the opposite direction, including Virginia, where some lawmakers have tried to block illegal immigrants from enrolling in state colleges. Putting a referendum on the ballot in Maryland is a difficult task. Although many groups have tried in recent years, the last statewide measure to qualify was in 1991, according to the State Board of Elections. Voters

“Now is not the time to be spending money on what is an unlawful program.”
Del. Neil C. Parrott (RWashington), who is leading an effort to overturn legislation that gives illegal immigrants tuition breaks at Maryland’s colleges and universities

in that election upheld less-restrictive abortion laws. Opponents of the in-state tuition bill have until May 31 to turn in one-third of the required 55,700 signatures, or about 18,600 names. The final batch must be turned in by June 30. Parrott said the group — Mdpetitions.org — has been encouraged by public support for its effort and hopes to turn in more than 36,000 signatures by the first deadline to ensure that the names can withstand anticipated legal challenges from supporters of the bill.
reyese@washpost.com

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

OBITUARIES

Residents across region hand in prescription drugs
Hundreds of pounds of pills collected as part of Take-Back Initiative
BY

Charles F. Reichmuth
FOOD SERVICE DIRECTOR Charles F. Reichmuth, 79, director of food services for the National Geographic Society in Washington from 1963 until his retirement in 1993, died April 14 at a hospital in Lafayette, Ind. He had esophageal cancer. Mr. Reichmuth joined the National Geographic Society after a few years working at the Golden Ox Restaurant in Washington. He oversaw the operations of the society’s staff restaurants and private dining rooms. From 1971 to 1981, he and his first wife owned and operated the Old South Mountain Inn in the Washington County, Md., community of Boonsboro. Charles Felix Reichmuth was born in Basel, Switzerland, and graduated in the early 1950s from the Ecole hoteliere de Lausanne, a hospitality management school. He worked aboard a Holland America Line cruise ship before settling in the United States. He then served in the U.S. Army for a few years and became a U.S. citizen. He moved to Rensselaer, Ind., from Alexandria in 2001. His memberships included the Epicurean Club of Washington and the Alfalfa Club social organization in the District. His first marriage, to Dorothea Reichmuth, ended in divorce. A son from that marriage, Peter Reichmuth, died in 2008. Survivors include his wife of seven years, Patricia Coons Reichmuth of Rensselaer; a son from his first marriage, Charles F. “Chuck” Reichmuth of Daytona Beach, Fla.; three stepchildren, Richard Coons of San Antonio, Lori O’Connor of Bentonville, Ark., and Caroline Coons of Lexington, Va.; a sister; and four grandchildren.
— Adam Bernstein

M ARTIN W EIL

Hundreds of pounds of unused and unwanted prescription drugs and other pills were collected in jurisdictions around the Washington area over the weekend as part of a program designed to protect health, deter crime and, to some degree, preserve the environment. Law enforcement agencies collected the medications as part of

the federal Drug Enforcement Administration’s second annual Prescription Drug Take-Back Initiative. At the University of Maryland, the pharmaceutical collection point received 27 pounds of unwanted medications, officials said. In Alexandria, the police department and sheriff ’s office collected 193 pounds of potentially dangerous expired unused and undesired prescription drugs on Saturday for destruction, according to a statement from the police. In the town of Vienna, police said they collected and safely disposed 235 pounds of medications that were expired or no

longer needed. In Loudoun County, law enforcement agencies collected more than 250 pounds of drugs. In a statement, Loudoun authorities said unused medicines are often thrown away or flushed down toilets, describing the procedures as potential safety and health hazards. By disposing of unwanted medications safely, “we can help keep our water supply clean and our families safe,” the University of Maryland’s Public Safety Department said. The practice of flushing drugs has aroused environmental concerns in recent years as well as provoked controversy.

The Web site of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation addresses the issue in a series of questions and answers. “In the past, we were told it was best to dispose of medications by flushing them,” one question reads. “What has changed?” In response, the Web site says: “There is a new awareness about the potential harmful effects of medications on fish and other aquatic life.” The Web site adds that the New York agency “recommends that no drugs be flushed.” In an explanation of the rise in concern about flushing drugs, the site said advances in technol-

ogy have made it possible to test for low levels of pharmaceuticals in water. “Once they were found in wastewater, researchers realized it was likely that some drugs had been reaching our waters for as long as people have been manufacturing and taking them,” the site says. The site also says that when humans take prescription drugs, they pass through the body and enter the wastewater. The levels of some drugs in wastewater could be reduced through sewage treatment, it says, but “others apparently are not.”
weilm@washpost.com

Friends surprised by deaths of couple
couple from B1 “Sometimes she didn’t seem quite right, but I didn’t know what was wrong or how bad it might be,” he said. Ray Bowes, owner of the Shirlington Texaco service station in Arlington County, said he knew Larry Perry for more than 20 years as an employee and a friend. He described Perry, who worked at the station for 24 years as a bookkeeper and service manager, as reliable and hardworking. “The employees liked him, the customers liked him,” Bowes said. “Larry was a good guy, there was no question about that.” Bowes said the Perry family was close and that he often saw Kaye and their daughters around the station. The two families socialized over the years, he said, and the Perrys’ oldest daughter worked at the service station as a bookkeeper for a short time. He recalled that Kaye Perry had frequently suffered from crippling migraines, though he said he didn’t know the details of her health problems. “Going back over the years, she used to have severe headaches, to the point that she would be in bed for days,” Bowes said. Bowes said that Larry Perry left the service station about 12 years ago but that they kept in touch. They last spoke several months ago. “He was very upbeat,” Bowes said. “I knew that Kaye was sick, I knew his mother-in-law was staying there, but Larry was the type of person who did not complain. He did what he had to do — he did not back away from anything. “I asked him how Kaye was doing,” Bowes recalled, “and his only comment was that she has her good days and her bad days.” Bowes said he was stunned by the circumstances of their deaths. “I’m just shocked that he would do this,” he said. “It had to be something more than what I know. He just wasn’t that kind of person. . . . They’re a good family. They’re good people.”
gibsonc@washpost.com Staff researcher Magda Jean-Louis contributed to this report.

William ‘Ed’ Hardman
TRADE GROUP PRESIDENT William E. “Ed” Hardman, 92, president and chief operating officer of the National Tooling and Machining Association in Washington from 1966 until he retired in 1986, died April 19 at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis of sepsis. In 1964, Mr. Hardman joined the association as training director. Earlier in his career, he was a training supervisor at the aircraft-engine manufacturer Pratt and Whitney and a training director for typewriter manufacturer Olivetti-Underwood, both in Connecticut. During his career, he wrote technical books and articles. In retirement, he self-published three novels under the name Ed Hardman. William Edward Hardman was born in East Orange, N.J., and was a Navy veteran of World War II. He received a bachelor’s degree in English in 1953 from the University of Connecticut. He was a Bowie resident from 1964 until he moved to Annapolis in 2008. Mr. Hardman served on an Internal Revenue Service smallbusiness advisory committee during the Ford administration and the National Advisory Council on Vocational Education under President Reagan. He was a past board member of the International Special Tooling and Machining Association. In 1986, the National Tooling and Machining Association established the William E. Hardman Award for excellence in training. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Yolanda Biancalani Hardman of Annapolis; four children, Dean Hardman of Stevensville, Neil Hardman of Millersville, Lee Hardman of Oldwick, N.J., and Bret Hardman of Davidsonville; six grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.
— Lauren Wiseman

MATT MCCLAIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

People gather on Florida Avenue Baptist Church’s roof for a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The solar panels should save the church $450 a month.

Power of renewal at black D.C. church
solar from B1 Jackson said, standing on the roof of the church near Howard University Hospital as the sun beat down. “We have mercury, neurotoxins building up in our bodies . . . mothers pass it to children. We have . . . developmental disorders. All that comes back to this,” she said, pointing to the row of solar panels. “I think it’s an extraordinary thing,” said Vernice Miller-Travis, vice chair of the Maryland Commission on Environmental Justice and Sustainable Communities. “For me, this is a big story, even if it’s just one church. You know how black churches are. If one pastor does it, the others have to do it because they don’t want to be outdone.” When ministers inquire about getting panels, they’ll learn that they’ll have to spend green to go green. At Florida Avenue Baptist, which has 500 members, the cost was $60,000. With prayer, and 12 members of the flock who were willing to invest money in exchange for Solar Renewable Energy Certificates, the cost was overcome. The certificates are a kind of energy credit that companies such as power plants buy to sidestep government regulations and penalties for producing too much pollution. The idea to go solar came to Trent through Gilbert Campbell III, a co-owner of Volt Energy, a North Carolina clean-energy company with an office in Washington. Campbell, a Howard University graduate who met Trent years earlier through his father, a pastor, had a proposition. “I want to share with you the benefits of the church looking at solar,” Campbell recalled saying in December. “You have an opportunity to educate younger students in the church,” he said. “There’s a value associated with that.” Volt Energy helped Florida Avenue Baptist set up a business, allowing it to make the investment and receive the certificates. The investors recouped $18,000 within 60 days from a federal tax credit that for-profit entities receive for making investments in renewable technology. Volt Energy also customized a curriculum for the church, teaching energy efficiency, recycling, and the how-tos of using energyefficient light bulbs and reading energy bills to children. Last week, Pepco turned on the power generated by the panels. The church is expected to save 15 percent, about $450, on its monthly bill, Campbell said. More money will probably be saved after an energy audit of the church and the installation of energy-efficient doors, windows and light fixtures, he said. The church plans to eventually install a monitor outside the sanctuary so that its members can see the amount of energy being produced and the money being saved, Trent said. “They’re excited,” he said. “They can’t wait to see.”
fearsd@washpost.com

“We want to be a model for green energy. I’ve gotten calls from pastors who want to find out how they can do this.”
— The Rev. Earl D. Trent Jr., pastor at Florida Avenue Baptist Church.

Program to test electronic Metro ID cards for D.C. student use
cards from B1 who use the system. The District already has a curfew law in place for people younger than 17 that varies by time of year and day of the week. Tommy Wells, who is both a Metro board member and a D.C. council member, said the electronic cards will allow officials to ensure that the cards are used for their intended purpose: helping students get to and from school. He said he’s open to the possibility of using them to ensure students don’t act out or cause trouble while using the system. “Using these cards is not a right; it’s a privilege,” he said. “If a student abuses the privilege by being unruly [while riding Metro], the card can be shut down so the student doesn’t have the option of a subsidized fare.” Current student transit passes allow students to travel on Metro’s trains and buses for about half the cost of a regular fare. The District pays the difference. Aaron Overman, deputy associate director at the District Department of Transportation, said the cards will make it easier for students to replace lost transit passes. Currently, if a student loses a transit pass, he also loses whatever money is on the card. Overman added that the switch to electronic cards will allow the District to reduce paperwork and will probably save money in the future. A current version of the DC One Card already can be used by adults and children to access some city services and facilities.
aratanil@washpost.com

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

About 500 students in the District will switch from the current ransit card, left, to the new DC One Card, right, for Metro access.

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MOSHE LANDAU, 99

RONALD D. ASMUS, 53

Israeli jurist presided over trial of Nazi officer Eichmann Foreign policy analyst was advocate of spreading NATO into the former Soviet bloc
BY

A DAM B ERNSTEIN

Moshe Landau, an Israeli Supreme Court jurist who presided over the 1961 trial of Adolf Eichmann, a key architect of Nazi Germany’s plan to exterminate the Jews, died May 1 in Jerusalem after a heart attack. He was 99. Although the Eichmann trial boosted him to international attention, Mr. Landau had already developed a reputation in Israel for a meticulous approach to the law within a strong moral framework. In the late 1950s, he upheld the conviction of Israeli army and border policemen convicted of killing dozens of Arabs who had reportedly not been aware of a curfew imposed during the Sinai crisis. In a preview of what would be Eichmann’s defense, the accused said they were simply acting on orders from the highest authorities. “A soldier, too, must have a conscience,” Mr. Landau said from the bench. As chief of the three-judge Eichmann tribunal, Mr. Landau was credited with developing a powerful template for genocide trials in years to come. By allowing victims of the Holocaust to testify about atrocities they witnessed, Mr. Landau made the “human face” of genocide a far more prominent part of the hearings than they had been during the Nuremberg tribunals of the Nazi elite in the late 1940s, said Deborah E. Lipstadt, a Holocaust scholar at Atlanta’s Emory University who has written extensively about the Eichmann trial. The judge navigated the delicate line between allowing emotional testimony by victims and keeping the proceedings grounded in relevant facts and questions about Eichmann’s specific responsibilities and actions. Eichmann, a ranking Gestapo officer, helped implement Hitler’s “Final Solution” to annihilate the Jews by orchestrating their murder, torture and deportation. Although Eichmann’s guilt was not much in doubt, the trial in Jerusalem faced a number of initial obstacles. Foremost was a question of the tribunal’s legitimacy. Eichmann had vanished from Germany at the end of World War II, and his wife attempted to have him declared dead as early as 1947. He remained the focus of a manhunt, leading to his kidnapping off a street in Buenos Aires in May 1960 by the Mossad, the Israeli intelligence organization. The abduction prompted a diplomatic and legal uproar — newspaper editorials, including one in The Washington Post, lambasted Israel’s “jungle law” approach and questioned the right of Israel to hold trials for crimes committed in Germany and Austria. In other words, if Israel wasn’t even a state when the crimes were committed, why did it have the right to judge Eichmann?

BY

E MMA B ROWN

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL

Moshe Landau is seated in the center of the judges’ panel during the 1961 trial of Adolf Eichmann, a Gestapo officer in Nazi Germany. Next to Landau are Benjamin Halevi, left, and Yitzhak Raveh.

Mr. Landau and the tribunal’s two other jurists said the court had jurisdiction over Eichmann because the state of Israel represented all Jews. “To argue that there is no connection,” they wrote, “is like cutting away a tree root and branch and saying to its trunk: I have not hurt you.” Mr. Landau was aware of the scrutiny the tribunal faced. Hundreds of reporters convened on Jerusalem, and the proceedings

“I must point out I have a feeling I am being roasted until the rump steak is well done.”
Adolf Eichmann, during his 1961 trial presided over by Mr. Landau

gripped the world from April to August 1961. Lipstadt said the most “electric” parts of the hearings concerned the judge “riding herd” on the chief prosecutor, Gideon Hausner, for presenting searing testimony about Nazi atrocities that was not always pertinent to the Eichmann case. “I know it is difficult to cut short such testimony,” Mr. Landau told Hausner after hearing about Nazi brutality in the Jewish ghettos of Poland. “But it is your duty, sir, to brief the witness, to

explain to him that all external elements must be removed that do not pertain to this trial, in order not to place the court once again — and this is not the first time — in this situation.” The judge also lost patience with Eichmann’s tendency to ramble when asked direct questions and the defendant’s refusal to speak about an incriminating document. “You will continue to answer questions until I tell you to discontinue,” the judge said. “Yes, your honor,” said Eichmann. “But I must point out I have a feeling I am being roasted until the rump steak is well done.” Mr. Landau helped craft the tribunal’s 100,000-word judgment that was issued in December 1961. “This block of ice,” the judges wrote, “this block of marble . . . closed his ears to the voice of his conscience, as was demanded of him by the regime to which he was wholeheartedly devoted, and to which he had sold himself body and soul. Thus he sank from one depth to another, until, in the implementation of the ‘final solution,’ he reached the nether hell.” Several months later, Eichmann was executed by hanging. Moshe Landau was born April 29, 1912, in Danzig, Germany, which is now Gdansk, Poland. He settled in the British mandate of Palestine in the early 1930s after graduating from the University of London law school. A 1961 New York Times profile of Mr. Landau reported that he was married and had three daughters, but survivors could not be confirmed. In 1940, Mr. Landau was

named a magistrate in Haifa. He was promoted to the Supreme Court in 1953 and served until 1982, the last two years as president. After the Eichmann trial, Mr. Landau remained one of his country’s most prominent jurists. He served on blue-ribbon panels, many involving state security. As a member of the Agranat commission, he investigated Israel’s lapse in military preparedness for the 1973 Arab-Israeli war, in which the country managed a narrow victory against a surprise attack by Egypt and Syria. The 1974 report cleared Prime Minister Golda Meir and Defense Minister Moshe Dayan of any responsibility for intelligence failures and instead blamed top military officials. Government critics likened the report to a whitewash, and Meir resigned amid the resulting public furor. Many years later, Mr. Landau headed a judicial commission that investigated the Shin Bet security service for physically abusing detainees to the point of death and then lying about it in court. The commission released a report in 1987 that permitted “moderate physical pressure” in cases involving recalcitrant suspects when a terrorist threat was deemed imminent. The government adopted the findings, which human rights groups condemned as essentially legitimizing torture. In 1999, the Israeli Supreme Court outlawed the controversial interrogation methods. Mr. Landau was a recipient of the Israel Prize, the country’s highest civilian honor.
bernsteina@washpost.com

YVETTE VICKERS, 82

B-movie actress featured in ‘Attack of the 50 Foot Woman,’ ‘Giant Leeches’
BY

Ronald D. Asmus, a foreign policy analyst and former deputy assistant secretary of state who argued successfully for expanding NATO into Eastern Europe after the Cold War, died April 30 at 53. He died of cancer at a hospital in Brussels, where he was serving as a senior official with the German Marshall Fund of the United States, a public policy institute devoted to transatlantic issues. NATO had origins in the Cold War as an alliance against the looming threat of Joseph Stalin’s Soviet Union. But with the collapse of communist states in the early 1990s, debate raged in foreign policy circles over how NATO should engage the former Soviet satellite countries in Central and Eastern Europe. Dr. Asmus, then an analyst at the Rand Corp. think tank, said he thought NATO should embrace those countries as new members. Extending NATO’s security arrangements to the east would help stabilize young democracies, he reasoned, and bolster the chances for peace. In 1993, he and two Rand colleagues, F. Stephen Larrabee and Richard L. Kugler, put forth their pro-expansion argument in what became an influential article in Foreign Affairs magazine. “Nationalism and ethnic conflict have already led to two world wars in Europe,” the authors wrote. “Whether Europe unravels for a third time this century depends on if the West summons the political will and strategic vision to address the causes of potential instability and conflict before it is too late.” The article was a sensation among Europe’s foreign policy establishment and helped kickstart the policy fight in America. Those who disagreed with Dr. Asmus — including the eminent diplomat and historian George F. Kennan — said expanding NATO would serve only to push the Cold War’s stark borders farther east, raising Russia’s ire and offering no measurable security improvement. “I think it’s fair to say that there were more people against it than were for it,” said Strobe Talbott, deputy secretary of state at the time and now president of the Brookings Institution. “What most of the arguments came down to was the Russians didn’t like it, which was true — they didn’t like it and don’t like it to this day.” The Foreign Affairs article helped convince Talbott to bring Dr. Asmus into the State Department as a lead adviser on NATO enlargement. Dr. Asmus held that position from 1997 until 2000. Pro-expansionists won over a wide range of allies, including President Bill Clinton and Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), who made NATO enlargement part of his 1994 Contract with America. Soon the prevailing view, Talbott said, was that “we couldn’t give Russia a veto over the right of what were now independent countries to join the alliance.” In 1998, the U.S. Senate voted 80-19 to ratify a treaty allowing Poland, Hungary and the Czech

GERMAN MARSHALL FUND OF THE UNITED STATES

Dr. Asmus was a former deputy assistant secretary of state.

Republic to become part of NATO. In 2004, NATO was enlarged again with the addition of a wave of Baltic and Eastern European countries including Slovakia, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Albania and Croatia joined in 2009. Dr. Asmus, who directly assisted many of those countries with their negotiations over NATO membership, was recognized with awards from the U.S. State Department and from European governments. According to Daniel Fried, a senior U.S. diplomat who was ambassador to Poland in the late 1990s, Dr. Asmus helped provide the intellectual underpinnings for an effort that began under Clinton and continued under George W. Bush — “a bipartisan endeavor,” Fried wrote in an e-mail, “that started as an isolated, unpopular idea, ended up as U.S. and NATO policy, and is seen today as so successful that few can remember that it was once considered controversial.” Ronald Dietrich Asmus was born June 29, 1957, in Milwaukee to immigrants from Germany. While attending the University of Wisconsin at Madison, he traveled to Berlin, which was then divided into the communist-controlled east and democratic west. “The reality — complete with barbed wire, armed towers manned by soldiers with guard dogs and orders to shoot to kill — was a pivotal experience that changed my life and future career path,” Dr. Asmus wrote in his insider’s chronicle of NATO’s expansion, “Opening NATO’s Door” (2002). “Simply put, it horrified me.” At Wisconsin, he switched his major from engineering to history and international relations. He later received a master’s degree and a doctorate in European studies at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. Dr. Asmus joined the German Marshall Fund in 2002 as a senior transatlantic fellow in Washington. He later became executive director of the fund’s Brussels office and in 2010 published “A Little War That Shook the World,” a book about Russia’s 2008 invasion of Georgia. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Wilkinson, and their son Erik, both of Brussels; his mother, Christine Schroeder Wittke of Raleigh, N.C.; and two brothers.
browne@washpost.com

V ALERIE J . N ELSON

Yvette Vickers, an actress best known as the femme fatale in two late 1950s cult horror films, “Attack of the 50 Foot Woman” and “Attack of the Giant Leeches,” was found dead April 27 at her home in Los Angeles. She was 82. The body’s mummified state suggests that she could have been dead for close to a year, police said. Residents on the street in Los Angeles’s Benedict Canyon neighborhood said they had not seen Ms. Vickers since last summer, said actress Susan Savage, a neighbor who discovered the body. An autopsy will be conducted to determine the cause of death, but police say foul play is not suspected. When Savage noticed that Ms. Vickers’s mailbox was filled with old letters, she pushed open a barricaded gate to reach the house and found the body in a room with a space heater still on. The “bright, intelligent” Vickers had become “paranoid” in recent years and thought she was being stalked, said Boyd Magers, editor and publisher of Western Clippings, a western-film publication. He often accompanied her to film festivals. A voluptuous blonde, Ms.

Vickers was a Playboy Playmate of the Month in 1959 and “proved to have the perfect look for 1950s drive-in films, along with episodic television,” film historian Alan K. Rode told the Los Angeles Times in an e-mail. The low-budget “Attack of the 50 Foot Woman” (1958) gave Ms. Vickers her first leading film role. She plays the town floozy who has an affair with a married man. But neither lover survives to the end credits, thanks to the fury of a scorned wife who turns into a 50-foot-tall hellion after a close encounter with an alien. It is “one of the best bad movies ever made,” the Times said in 1993, a “Grade-A turkey” with cheesy special effects and inept direction. Ms. Vickers followed it with “Attack of the Giant Leeches” (1959), in which she portrayed a promiscuous wife who is done in by the creatures of the film’s title. “I did want to play other kinds of parts and to go on into bigger pictures,” she was quoted as saying in the 2006 book “Science Fiction Stars and Horror Heroes,” “but these things just eluded me.” The daughter of jazz musicians, she was born Yvette Vedder on Aug. 26, 1928, in Kansas City, Mo. She attended the University of California at Los Angeles. She was married and di-

Jen-ming Pang
ANALYST Jen-ming Pang, 70, a systems analyst from 1989 to 2000 at what is now the Government Accountability Office, died April 11 at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Falls Church of complications from a stroke. From the late 1950s until 1989, he was an accountant and partner at what became BDO Seidman, a consulting firm in Washington. A native of Nanking, China, Mr. Pang moved to the Washington region in the late 1950s and had been an Annandale resident since 1980. He was an accounting graduate from the old Benjamin Frank-

lin University in Washington and received a bachelor’s degree in accounting from George Washington University in 1959. In 1998, he received the Government Accountability Office’s Meritorious Service Award. His first wife, Annie Chang Pang, died in 1960 after two years of marriage. Survivors include his wife of 43 years, Shelva Davis Pang of Annandale; a daughter from his first marriage, Wei P. Kain of Parker, Colo.; two sons from his second marriage, Andrew W. Pang of Arlington and Daniel W. Pang of Manassas; three brothers; six sisters; seven grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.
— Lauren Wiseman

EDWARD GAMER/LOS ANGELES TIMES

Yvette Vickers, a 1950s actress, was found dead in her Los Angeles home April 27. Police say she could have been dead for close to a year.

vorced at least twice. Survivors could not be immediately confirmed. Her first film role was as a giggling girl in 1950’s “Sunset Boulevard.” In 1957, she appeared in the James Cagney-directed “Short Cut to Hell” and turned toward B movies after it flopped.

“Her performances would have been fine in much, much bigger pictures,” said Tom Weaver, a science-fiction film aficionado who became her friend. “She gave her all in rock-bottom B movies.”
— Los Angeles Times

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DEATH NOTICE DEATH NOTICE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

OBITUARIES WILLIAM O. TAYLOR II, 78

DEATH NOTICE

CLARK

HARE
On Thursday, April 28, 2011 of Bladensburg, MD. Beloved daughter of Ginger Robinson and David Hare, Sr.; loving sister of Brianna Scott and David Hare, Jr. Also survived by her maternal grandparents, Vivian Newman and Ronald Robinson; paternal grandparent, Johnny Hare, Sr.; a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral Service 10 a.m., Friday, May 6, 2011 at Mt. Ennon Baptist Church, 9832 Piscataway Rd., Clinton, MD. Interment Resurrection Cemetery, Clinton, MD. Arrangements by STRICKLAND FUNERAL SERVICES. www.stricklandfuneralservices.com

MANION
On Tuesday, May 3, 2011 of Springfield, VA. Beloved wife of John E. Manion; mother of Sharon L. Brown (Jerry), John E. Manion, Jr., Matthew N. Manion, Georgiana Ball (Kevin) and Joseph B. Manion (Paula); cousin of Margaret and Charles Brooks; grandmother of seven. Relatives and friends may call at Jefferson Funeral Chapel, 5755 Castlewellan Dr. Alexandria, VA on Thursday, May 5 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 pm. Mass of Christian Burial at St. Bernadette Catholic Church, 7600 Old Keene Mill Rd. Springfield, VA on Friday at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon www.parkinsonsresources.org or the Parkinson Foundation of the National Capital Area www.parkinsonfoundation.org.

Fourth-generation Boston Globe publisher
BY

R USSELL C ONTRERAS

Former Boston Globe publisher William O. Taylor II, who was the fourth in his family to serve as the newspaper’s publisher and then negotiated its sale to the New York Times Co., died May 1 at his home in Boston. He was 78 and had brain cancer. Mr. Taylor, who joined the Globe in the 1960s as a production assistant, served as publisher for 19 years. He succeeded his father, grandfather and great-grandfather in that role. A Harvard College graduate, William Osgood Taylor II served two years in the Army before joining the Globe. He held a number of

jobs at the newspaper, including reporting and positions in classified advertising and promotion, before becoming publisher. He oversaw the newspaper as it won nine Pulitzer Prizes. In 1993, Mr. Taylor helped negotiate a $1.1 billion sale of the Globe to the company that owns the Times and more than a dozen other newspapers. At the time, the Globe trusts were controlled by the Taylor family and the descendants of Eben Jordan, one of six Boston businessmen who invested a total of $150,000 to launch the Globe in 1872. It was the largest sale in newspaper history and ended family control at one of the last major

William B. Dale
IMF OFFICIAL William B. Dale, 87, a onetime Treasury official who spent more than 20 years as a top official of the International Monetary Fund, died April 16 at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. He had melanoma. Mr. Dale joined the Treasury Department in 1948 as a specialist in international finance. He was attached to the U.S. Embassy in Brussels, where he worked on the Marshall Plan. From 1952 to 1955, he was at the U.S. Embassy in Beirut, where he designed financial programs for the Middle East. He worked at the Stanford Research Institute in Washington, now SRI International, from 1955 to 1961, when he was assigned to a presidential task force and later to the Commerce Department. In 1962, President John F. Kennedy appointed him to an executive position with the IMF, an organization that promotes global financial stability and cooperation. In 1974, Mr. Dale became deputy managing director, the IMF’s second-highest position. He retired in 1984 and served on corporate boards as a consultant on international finance. William Brown Dale was born in Detroit and was a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he was a member of the track team. He served in the Navy during World War II. He received a master’s degree in 1947 from the Fletcher School of international affairs at Tufts University in Medford, Mass., and did additional work toward a doctorate. Mr. Dale lived in Chevy Chase and was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Cosmos Club. He was president of the Fletcher School’s class of 1947 alumni group. His wife of 51 years, Deborah Parry Dale, died in 1997. Survivors include his wife of 11 years, the Rev. Joy I. Ogden Dale of Chevy Chase; five children from his first marriage, William P. Dale of Davidsonville, Susan D. Westerman of Winter Haven, Fla., Christopher Dale of Durham, N.C., Judith Dale of Arlington County and Katherine Dale of Avondale, Va.; three stepchildren, David Ogden of College Park, Neil R.P. Ogden of Silver Spring and Sally Ogden Chakiris of San Diego; 22 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.
— Matt Schudel

neering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959. He received the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive in 1994 and the Presidential Rank Award of Distinguished Executive in 2001 and 2007. Survivors include his wife of 57 years, Rosina Squillace Altwegg of Alexandria; a daughter, Shauna Alonge of Arlington; and two grandchildren.
— Lauren Wiseman

independent newspapers in the nation. Mr. Taylor stepped down as publisher four years later. The Globe’s editor at the time of the sale, Matt Storin, said Mr. Taylor never interfered in the newsroom while he was publisher. “He was as good a publisher as an editor could ever imagine having,” Storin said. “He gave you the financial support, the emotional support and let you do your job, and then stood as a buffer against the community when people called to complain.” After retiring, Mr. Taylor helped create the Taylor Family Award for Fairness in Newspapers. He raised $450,000 to endow an annual prize of $10,000. Survivors include his wife, the former Sally Coxe; three sons; several siblings; and four grandchildren.
— Associated Press

On May 1, 2011 of Charlotte Hall, MD. Loving husband of Kay Bussink Clark; devoted father of Edward (Teresa), Bernadette Clerkin (Patrick), Thomas Jr. (Lynn), Kevin (Cheryl) and Brian; Grandfather of Cassie, Maggie, Alyce, Derek, Michael, Nick, Matthew, Andrew, Nicole, Tommy, Eddie and Jessica; and 1 greatgrandchild, Keith. Also, survived by a brotherin-law, many sisters-in-law and numerous nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by his brothers; Edward, James, Bernard, Robert and sister Cecelia Clark. The family will receive friends for a Life Celebration on Thursday, May 5, 2011 from 3 to 5 and 6 to 9 p.m. at the Brinsfield-Echols Funeral Home, 30195 Three Notch Rd., Charlotte Hall, MD. A Mass of Christian Burial will take place on Friday, May 6, 2011 at St. Mary’s Church, Landover Hills, MD at 9 a.m. Interment will follow at Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD at 11 a.m. Donations may be made to the American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA or the Multiple Sclerosis Foundation, 10946 Beaver Dam Rd., Hunt Valley, MD 21030.

THOMAS D. CLARK, SR. "Donny"

MADISON ANN HARE (Age 4)

MARY P. MANION

HARTMAN
Roy R. Hartman of New Hampshire and Metropolitan, Maryland died April 30,2011. Enjoyed a long term career in the banking industry. Active Member of Antique Automobile Club of America and the Model T Ford Club International where he served both clubs as a master judge. Past officer of the Southern Maryland Chapter of the Bank Administration Institute and member of Boy Scouts of America and Member of its Honor Camping SocietyOrder of the Arrow. His passionate interest was Vintage Steam Locomotives. Survived by his wife, two sons, and two grandchildren. service info Arrangements by Fournier-Hale Funeral Home, No Woodstock, NH.

ROY R. HARTMAN

MARKS
On Saturday, April 30, 2011; at her home in Springfield, VA; beloved wife of Edward Marshall Marks. Devoted mother of David (Kristin) Marks and Daniel (Sarah) Marks. Loving grandmother of four. also survived by four sisters and two brothers. Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, May 7 at 4 p.m. at Ravensworth Baptist Church, 5100 Ravensworth Rd., Annandale, VA. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Bethany House, 6121 Lincolnia Rd., Suite 303, Alexandria, VA 22312.

USIN ANN MARKS

COMER
Of Culpeper, VA formerly of Sterling, VA passed away Saturday, April 30, 2011 at Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA. Raymond was born September 19, 1943 in Richlands, VA son of the late Stafford M. and Nettie B. (Lark) Comer. He was a member of the N.R.A. Survivors include his loving wife Brenda J. Comer; three children, Angie O’Mara and husband Terry of Ashburn, VA, Cindy McKenzie and husband Matt of Culpeper, VA and Jennifer Comer of Leesburg, VA; one sister, Louise Stevens of Gate City, VA; one brother, William Comer of Cleveland, VA and three grandchildren, Brittany Granier, Collin Granier and Aidan O’Mara. The family will receive friends from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, May 5, 2011 at Pierce Funeral Home, 9609 Center St. Manassas where funeral services will be held 2 p.m. Friday, May 6, 2011. Entombment will follow at Stonewall Memory Gardens, Manassas, VA. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 501 St Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105-1942. Condolences may be sent to www.piercefh.com

RAYMOND FARLEY COMER (Age 67)

HICKMAN
Members of Ruth Chapter #8, OES (PHA) are hereby notified of the passing of Sister Mary P. Hickman. Wake Thursday, May 5, 10 a.m. at Stewart Funeral Home, 4001 Benning Rd., N.E., funeral services to follow at 11 a.m. Chapter members are requested to assemble at 10:15 a.m. to perform OES Services. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date. Cynthia A. Brothers, WM Harold Wilder, PP, Secy

MARY P. HICKMAN

McAULIFFE

IN MEMORIAM

ADKINS

HOLMES

DAGGS
On April 29, 2011. Son of the late James and Virginia Starks and the late Willie Daggs. He is survived by his children, Steven Daggs, Donna Daggs, Nina Covington and Anita Smith; eight grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Viewing on May 6, 2011 from 10 a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at Trinidad Baptist Church, 1611 Benning Rd., NE. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.

Claire G. Williams
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR Claire G. Williams, who worked for 20 years as the director of volunteer services and activities at the Northern Virginia Mental Health Institute, died March 20 at Inova Fairfax Hospital of mitral valve disease, a heart condition. She was 82. Mrs. Williams retired in the early 1990s from the mental health institute, a care facility for patients with acute mental health needs. She was a member and past president of the institute’s advisory council, a nonprofit fundraising and support organization, and was the chair of the Mental Health Committee of the Diocese of Virginia. Claire Goheen was born in Grosse Pointe, Mich., and grew up in Washington. After graduating from Anacostia High School in 1947, she attended Wilson Teachers College in Washington, where she met a fellow student who became her husband, John H. Williams. She graduated from Wilson in 1951. Mrs. Williams was a member of St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church in Falls Church and later of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Annandale. She volunteered in the Offender’s Aid and Restoration program in Fairfax in the late 1960s and early 1970s and was a Girl Scout troop leader. She received recognition for her work from local and national organizations, including an award from a local United Way chapter for increasing public understanding of mental illness. Her son, John Williams, died in 1986. Survivors include her husband of 60 years, of Springfield; two daughters, Wendy Williams of Annandale and Nancy Schneider of Clifton; and three grandchildren.
— Emma Brown

ALBERT GARRIS DAGGS "JR" "Junie Cat"

On Saturday, April 30, 2011 of Potomac, MD. Beloved husband for 49 years of Gail Copenhaver McAuliffe; father of James Stephen McAuliffe, III, Robin McAuliffe Minturn, Thomas Joseph McAuliffe and Fiona McAuliffe Redmon; grandfather of Erin, Morgan and Taylor McAuliffe, Brittany, Benjamin, James (Mac) and Brooke Minturn, Hazel and Rosie Redmon. Jim was born in Washington, D.C., a resident of Montgomery County his entire life. He attended Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School, Montgomery College and the Washington College of Law at American University. In addition to serving in the U.S. Army, Jim was an Assistant State’s Attorney for Montgomery County, an elected member of both the House of Delegates and State Senate of Maryland and a Judge both on the District Court and on the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland Friends will be received at PUMPHREY’S BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE FUNERAL HOME, 7557 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD on Wednesday, May 4 from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church, Falls and Dunster Roads, Rockville, MD on Thursday, May 5, 2011 at 11 a.m. Interment St. Gabriel’s Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his name to The Montgomery County Family Justice Center, Inc.; mail to MCFJC Foundation, P.O. Box 10692, Rockville, MD 20849 or online www.mcfjcfoundation.org Pease view and sign family guestbook at www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com

JAMES STEPHEN McAULIFFE, JR. (Age 80)

You are forever in our hearts and minds. We Miss and Love You, Sam

MARY L. ADKINS December 14, 1928 - May 4, 2007

MEAGHER

DAVIS
Of Springfield, Virginia on Sunday May 1, 2011. Preceded in death by his parents, Russell E. and Marion I. Davis. Beloved brother of Tim Davis and Deborah Muzyka; loving uncle of Tim Davis II and Michael Davis. He is also survived by three aunts, an uncle and five great nieces and nephews. Visitation will be held Thursday May 5, from 6 to 9 p..m at the DEMAINE FUNERAL HOME, 5308 Backlick Road, Springfield, VA, where services will be held Friday May 6 at 11 a.m. Interment will follow at National Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Capital Caring, 2900 Telestar Court, Falls Church, VA 22042. www.demainefunerals.com

KENNY M. DAVIS

On Sunday, May 1, 2011, at Sibley Hospital. Survived by children, Suzanne Holmes Crooker, Robert Holmes, Marilyn Holmes and Janice Holmes; grandchildren, Brian, Scott and Marly Holmes and Miranda Turner; sister, Jean Holmes Keithley; numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral service will take place at Arlington National Cemetery in the summer; a memorial gathering will be held at Ingleside at Rock Creek, 3050 Military Rd., NW, Washington, DC at 11 a.m., Tuesday, May 10, 2011. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to John and Frances Holmes Memorial Scholarship, Bradley University, 1501 W. Bradley Ave., Peoria, IL 61625, or National Museum of the Marine Corps, c/o Marine Corps Heritage Foundation, P.O. Box 998, Quantico, VA 22134.

DONALD C. HOLMES

HORSTMAN
On Saturday, April 30, 2011 of Bethesda, MD. Beloved wife of Dr. Harry A. Horstman, Jr. of 68 years. Loving mother of Linda Kirvan (William), Harry A. Horstman, III, Karen Kamerick (Anthony) Martha Sweeney (Raymond) and Deborah Hinderer (William). Suzanne was predeceased by her son Christopher Horstman. Devoted grandmother of 12 and great grandmother of 16. Loving sister of Vivian Neuhauser and her predeceased brother John Patrick Cissel. Family and friends will be received at PUMPHREY’S BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE FUNERAL HOME, 7557 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD on Wednesday, May 4 from 7-9 PM. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic Church, 9601 Old Georgetown Road, Bethesda, MD on Thursday, May 5 at 11 a.m. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in her honor to Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart, 9101 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814 or Middletown Valley Historical Society, P.O. Box 294, Middletown, MD 21769. Please view and sign the family guestbook at www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com

SUZANNE CISSEL HORSTMAN (Age 90)

We think about you every day, remembering all the wonderful things that made you the beautiful person God sent us but called back to Him too soon. You will continue to be in our hearts and in our minds forever. We love you and miss you. Your Loving Family

SOPHIA MEAGHER "Sophie"

DUNN
Answered the heavenly call to enter eternal life and the joy of the Lord on April 27, 2011 after a nearly 10-year battle with complications resulting from a stroke in the summer of 2002. Left to cherish Lawrence’s memory and to celebrate his life include his son, Devon; and devoted friend Sabreen Madyun; siblings Mark, Kelli, Rosemary, Jalin, Tory and step-sister, Aubrey. His father, Lawrence Sr., and stepmother Gwendolyn; aunts, Doris Hicks, Mary Mason, Joetta Dunn, Donna Donna; and an uncle, Jose’ Zellars; and nephews, nieces, and cousins. Services on May 5 at Reid Temple AME Church, 11400 Glenn Dale, Blvd., Glenn Dale, Md. Viewing 9:30 a.m., funeral 11 a.m. Interment, Maryland National Memorial Park, Laurel.

LAWRENCE ERIC DUNN, JR. (Age 32)

NICHOLAS
On Wednesday, April 27, 2011, beloved husband of Evelyn Nicholas; devoted father of KaTrina J. Miller, Angela L. Young and A'Donna Bademosi. He is also survived by three grandchildren, Promyce Miller, Alandria Bademosi and Ashley E. Young; sister, Mary Matthews; other relatives and friends. Mr. Nicholas will lie in state at Providence St. John Baptist Church, 5607 Old Crain Hwy., Upper Marlboro, MD 20772, Thursday, May 5 from 11 a.m. until service at 12 noon. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham. Services by STEWART.

GEORGE EDWARD NICHOLAS

DEATH NOTICE

BRANCH

FRANCA

JAMES
On April 20, 2011. Visitation "TODAY", May 4, from 10 a.m. until Service at 11 a.m. at the Garden Memorial Presbyterian Church, 1720 Minnesota Ave. SE. Interment private.

PATRON
Born in the Philippines on September 10, 1935 and she passed away in Arlington, VA on April 30, 2011. Funeral services will be held at National Funeral Home, 7482 Lee Highway, Falls Church, VA on Saturday, May 7 at 11 a.m., followed by interment in National Memorial Park. A visitation will take place on Friday, May 6 from 3 to 9 p.m. www.nationalfh-mp.com

JUANITA DELA CRUZ PATRON

WILLIAM A. JAMES

LANGFORD
Shawaun S. Branch, age 37, of Jamaica Queens, NY, died on Friday, April 29, 2011. She was the loving mother of Shakiera A. Branch, Shakita K. Branch, and Shakeia I. Branch; the daughter of Audrey J. Branch and the late Joseph Redman; and the sister of Gwendolyn Branch, Nashawn J. Branch, and Julius Branch. Services will be held on Thursday, May 5, 2011, at Marzullo Funeral Chapel, 6009 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD, from 10 a.m. until time of funeral service at 12 noon. Interment The Trinity Cemetery. Arrangements by Marzullo Funeral Chapel.

SHAWAUN S. BRANCH (Age 37)

Janet K. Leedy
REAL ESTATE AGENT Janet K. Leedy, a real estate agent with Coldwell Banker Carriage House Realty in Fredericksburg from the late 1980s until she retired in the mid-1990s, died April 18 at Greenspring Village, a retirement community in Springfield. She was 87 and had complications from a series of strokes. Mrs. Leedy began her real estate career in the early 1980s as an agent with Cooper-Leedy Realtors in Fredericksburg, where she lived for two decades until moving to Springfield in 2001. She was born Janet Rebecca Kerr in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and was a 1943 graduate of the old Briarcliff College in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. When she first moved to the Washington region in the early 1950s, she was a secretary at the State Department. During the late 1970s, she was an administrative assistant at Goodwin House, a retirement community in Alexandria. Mrs. Leedy was a member of the Fairfax County Democratic Committee; a founder of the old Mount Vernon Junior Cotillion, a series of etiquette classes for middle-school students in Fairfax County; and a past chair of the Fredericksburg Electoral Board. She was a volunteer at the Little Theatre of Alexandria during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Survivors include her husband of 57 years, Frederick A. Leedy of Springfield; two daughters, Ellen L. Gorman and Marjorie L. Green, both of Arlington; and four granddaughters.
— Lauren Wiseman

David M. Altwegg
NAVY REAR ADMIRAL David M. Altwegg, 81, a decorated Navy rear admiral who later became executive director of the Defense Department’s Missile Defense Agency, died April 18 at his home in Alexandria. He had leukemia. Adm. Altwegg served in the Vietnam and Korean wars. During his naval career he commanded the Naval Ship Weapon Systems Engineering Station in Port Hueneme, Calif., and what is now known as the Naval Air Warfare Center in Point Mugu, Calif. His last active duty assignment was as assistant deputy chief of naval operations for surface warfare at the Pentagon from 1983 until he retired from active duty in 1985. His military decorations include the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star, the Meritorious Service Medal and the Navy Commendation Medal. In 1987, he was appointed to the civilian Senior Executive Service and joined the Missile Defense Agency in 2002. He served as the deputy for program integration and the deputy for agency operations before becoming the agency’s executive director. He retired in February 2011. David Mattson Altwegg was born in Watertown, N.Y. In 1952, he received a bachelor’s degree in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. He received a master’s degree in engi-

BROSNAN
Suddenly on Friday, April 29, 2011 of Rockville, MD. Loving husband of Jean Martinelli Brosnan; brother of Michael Brosnan, Patrick Brosnan and Teresa Dockrill. John is also survived by his 11 nieces and six nephews. Friends will be received at PUMPHREY’S COLONIAL FUNERAL HOME, 300 West Montgomery Avenue (Rte. 28, exit 6-A just off I-270), Rockville, MD on Saturday, May 14 from 12:30 until time of service at 1 p.m. Interment private. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Lab Rescue of LRCP, Inc., P.O. Box 1814, Annandale, VA 22003. Please view and sign family guestbook at www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com

JOHN F. BROSNAN, JR. (Age 53)

BURNS
On Saturday, March 19, 2011 of Gaithersburg, MD. Beloved wife of Robert E. Burns, SKC, USN (Ret.). Loving mother of Teri A. Taylor of Westminster, MD. Grandmother of Christopher R. Taylor. Mrs. Burns is also survived by her sister Shirley Leather of Fayetteville, NY. Service will be held at the Columbarium at Arlington National Cemetery on Wednesday, May 11, 2011 at 2 p.m. All those who plan to attend should meet at the Administration Building at 1:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058-5216. Please view and sign family guestbook at www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com

BEVERLY A. BURNS

Beautiful son, brother, relative, soul mate and friend… You taught the world to not waste time, to LIVE, not just exist, to love with all of your heart. Thank you for the gift that is you….Your journey truly has changed the lives of many. We are so proud of how you chose to fight the unthinkable……. On May 1, 2011 Nick Franca, age 21 joined the angels after a six year battle with neuroblastoma. He is survived by his parents, Caryn and Jim Franca, his sister and her husband Alyson and Mark Pollard, and his brother Jeffrey Franca. He is also survived by his grandparents Barbara and Jack Miller, his great-great- grandfather Frank Carpenter, his uncle David Miller and his wife Molly, uncle Mike Franca, and uncle Robert Franca and his wife Rose. He was uncle to Alexis, Trey and Jackson Pollard, and Katy and Tommy Long. He leaves behind cousins, friends and his soul mate, Kelli Ann Embley. Visitation will be Wednesday evening, May 4, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA Thursday at 4 p.m. a Celebration of Life service will be held at Centreville United Methodist Church, 6400 Old Centreville Road, Centreville, Va. In lieu of flowers contributions can be made to Band of Parents, at www.bandofparents.org, to fund new treatments for Neuroblastoma. A memorial scholarship has been established at Lynchburg College for students with health conditions. Send contributions payable to Lynchburg College, 1501 Lakeside Dr., Lynchburg, VA 24501, attn: Gene Frantz, for the Nicholas Franca Memorial Scholarship. www.fmfh.com

NICHOLAS TOMS FRANCA "Nick"

Was called home on Friday, April 29, 2011. Born on January 20, 1926 in Washington, DC. She is survived by two children, Leon C. Langford and Linda Langford Bing; three grandchildren, Kenneth Kee, Ameenah (Absolom) Medley and Linda Langford; five great-grandchildren; one brother, Thomas C. Powell; and a host of other relatives and friends. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband of 60 years, Leon B. Langford; a son, Stephen C. Langford; three brothers, William, Milton and Redelle Powell. Visitation, Friday, May 6 from 10 a.m. until time of service, 11 a.m. at Emmanuel Baptist Church, 2409 Ainger Place S.E., Washington, DC. Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery. Services by HENRY S. WASHINGTON & SONS.

BERNICE M. POWELL LANGFORD

PULMAN
Died at her home in Alexandria on Easter Sunday morning, April 24, 2011. She was preceded in death by her husband, William C. Pulman, Sr., and her son, William C. Pulman, Jr. She is survived by a daughter, Marjorie Smith (Ray) and a son, Charles Pulman; four grandchildren Anne Smith, Douglas Smith (Amy), Will Pulman, and Judith Pulman; and a great-grandson, Jed Smith. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, May 6, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. at All Saints Episcopal Church-Sharon Chapel, 3421 Franconia Road, Alexandria, VA 22310 with burial in the churchyard immediately following. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions to All Saints-Sharon in her memory.

CELELIA KOCI PULMAN

LIPSCOMB

RESTLY
Donald Paul Restly, 90 of North Palm Beach, Florida and formerly of College Park, Maryland passed away April 30, 2011 at the Hospice Unit of Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. A native of New Baltimore, Pennsylvania, he was the son of the late Josephine and Peter Restly. He was a World War II veteran, serving in the United States Air Force from 1942 to 1948. After military service he worked for the US Post Office Accounting Division in Washington, DC for 22 years and the Washington Suburban Sanitation Commission Payroll Department for 10 years, retiring from both jobs. Don was a lifetime member of the Knights of Columbus, St. Vincent de Paul Society and the American Legion. He is survived by his beloved wife of 65 years, Myrtle M. Restly of North Palm Beach, sons Michael W. Restly (Colette) of Jupiter, Florida, Donald P. Restly, Jr. (Tracy) of Severn, Maryland, grandchildren Dana Burton (Lee), Kyle Restly, Tara Restly, Brendan Restly, several great grandchildren and four nieces. To commemorate Don’s deep love for the church, the poor and patriotism, the family requests any memorial donations be made to St. Vincent de Paul Society of St. Clare Catholic Church in North Palm Beach or the Hospice of Palm Beach County. Don will be remembered by the many lives he touched, friends he kept in touch with over the years and his smile to all he met. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Clare Catholic Church, 821 Prosperity Farms Road, North Palm Beach, Florida 33408 at 1 p.m. Friday May 6, 2011. Interment to follow at the South Florida National Veterans Cemetery in Lake Worth, Florida.

DONALD P. RESTLY "Don"

CHRISTEN
Departed this life on Thursday, April 28, 2011, Carl H. Christen of Silver Spring, MD; beloved husband of 34 years of the late Mary E. Christen; loving stepfather of Peter G. (Marsha) Coope, Mary E. (Wally) Shafer and Kathryn V. (Jud) Hill; grandfather of Michael, Allison, Thomas, Cory and Timothy; great-grandfather of Cora and Dylan. A memorial service will be held on Thursday, May 5, 2011 at The Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd, 4200 Olney/Laytonsville Road, Olney, MD 20832 at 9:30 a.m. Interment private. Memorial contributions may be made to The Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd. Please view and sign the family guestbook at www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com

GARLAND
We regret to inform our members of the passing of Robert "Buddy" A. Garland, Book # 609903, on May 1, 2011. He became an Ironworker for Local #5 in 1956. Service and viewing from 3 to 5 p.m., at Covenant Funeral Home, 4801 Jefferson David Hwy, Frederick, VA. Cremation follow the service. Brother Garland will be greatly missed by all. Death Assessment #62.

On April 24, 2011 Devoted husband of Margaret Lipscomb of 62 years; loving father of Pearl, Evelyn, Lawrence and Michael. He is also survived by grandchildren Lonnell, Robert, Lawrence and Cameron; eight great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may visit with the family Friday, May 6 from 9 a.m. until time of Service 10 a.m. at Solid Rock Full Gospel Baptist Church, 7711 Walker Mill Dr., Capitol Heights, MD. Interment Quantico National Cemetery. Send condolences to: www.marshallmarchfh.com

LAWRENCE LIPSCOMB

CARL H. CHRISTEN (Age 87)

ROBERT A. GARLAND

LONG
On Monday, May 2, 2011, C. Virginia Long of Ijamsville, Maryland. Beloved wife of Robert D. Long; loving mother of Jimmy Reed and wife Ryon Warfield Reed and of Samantha Long; grandmother of Isabel Reed, Daniel Frederick Reed, and Robert Carrie Reed. Friends may call 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, May 5 at MolesworthWilliams P.A., Funeral Home, 26401 Ridge Road, Damascus, Maryland 20872. Funeral services and interment will be private. In lieu of flowers please make memorial contributions to American Cancer Society, 801 Roeder Road, Suite 800, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910. Please indicate on your contribution it is in memory of Carrie Virginia Long. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.MolesworthWilliams.com

RHODES
On May 1, 2011 of Bethany Beach, DE and Delray Beach, FL and formerly of Washington, DC. Beloved husband of the late Marion Rhodes; devoted father of Steven Rhodes and Diane L. Ternahan (Robert); and loving grandfather of Brandon, Julia, Robert, III, Kelley, Erin, Alex and Andrew. Funeral service will be Thursday, May 5 at 2 p.m. at HASTINGS FUNERAL HOME, 19 S. Main St., Selbyville, DE 19975. Burial will be on Friday, May 6 at 1 p.m. in King David Memorial Gardens, 7482 Lee Hwy., Falls Church, VA. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 15120, Chicago, IL 60693 or the American Diabetes Association, 114 Baptist St., Salisbury, MD 21801. www.hastingsfuneralhome.net

CARRIE VIRGINIA LONG

ARNOLD RHODES

GASKINS
Passed away on April 20, 2011. She is survived by her devoted nieces, nephews, other relatives and many friends; and also her God given daughter, Rose. Graveside funeral will be held at Bethel Cemetery, Alexandria, VA on Thursday, May 5, 2011 at 12 Noon.

MAZIE GASKINS

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011
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DEATH NOTICE

RHODES
On Saturday, April 30, 2011 of Sandy Spring, Maryland. Beloved wife of Edgar Rhodes; loving mother of Major Jeffrey Rhodes and Cynthia Perez; sister of Edward and Thomas Maslak. Expressions of sympathy may be made to Wounded Worrier Program or to a Children’s Medical Charity of choice. Services and interment private.

SIMMONDS
RICHARD G. SIMMONDS
Members of the Association of Retired Police Officers of D.C. are notified of the May 1, 2011 death of Richard G. Simmonds. He was a CPT with the MPD-IAD when retired on February 25, 1985.

WALBERT
On Tuesday, May 3, 2011, the beloved wife of the late Thomas P. Walbert, Sr.; mother of Tom, Jr. and Lisa Walbert, Leslie Yousefi and Heather Jones. She is also survived by seven grandchildren. Pat was an insurance agent for over 30 years with State Farm in P.G. County. Relatives and friends are invited to Pat's Life Celebration at the GEORGE P. KALAS FUNERAL HOME, 6160 Oxon Hill Rd., Oxon Hill, MD on Thursday, May 5 from 3 p.m. until service time at 7 p.m. Interment Quantico National Cemetery on Friday, May 6 at 10 a.m. Online guestbook available at: www.KalasFuneralHomes.com

KANA

REISER

WILLIAMS

SANDRA LEE RHODES

PATRICIA B. WALBERT

RINEHART
On Monday, May 2, 2011, of Silver Spring, MD. Beloved companion of Pamela Westman; nephew of Ruth Hornbaker. Also survived by several cousins and other loving family and friends. Relatives and friends may call at Collins Funeral Home, 500 University Boulevard, West, Silver Spring, MD, Friday, May 6, 2011 from 12 p.m. until time of Memorial Service at 1 p.m. www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com

SINANIAN
Of Nottingham, PA, and formerly of the Washington D.C. metropolitan area, passed away on April, 19, 2011. He was a veteran of the Korean Conflict serving with the US Marine Corp. and the owner of the Quality Quick Shoe Repair store in Bethesda, MD for forty years. Mimi is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; a brother, and many other family and friends. Services will be Private.

MIHRAN SINANIAN "Mimi" (Age 80)

DONALD E. RINEHART (Age 70)

IN MEMORIAM

WILEY

ROBERTS
Husband of Dayl H. Reid-Roberts and a resident of Onancock, VA, formerly of Bethesda, MD, passed away at his residence on Sunday, May 1, 2011. Funeral services will be conducted from the Arlington National Cemetery with Military Honors, with date and time to be announced. Memory tributes may be shared with the family at www.williamsfuneralhomes.com. Arrangements Funeral Home. by the Williams-Onancock

SPROW
Departed this life on Saturday, April 30, 2011. She is survived by a son, Raymond Key, Sr.; daughter-in-law, Geneva; grandchildren, greatgrandchildren, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Services will be held on Friday, May 6; visitation 9 a.m., funeral service to follow at 11 a.m. at Purity Baptist Church and Urban Center, 1325 Maryland Ave. N.E. Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery. Funeral service arrangements provided by JOHN T. RHINES FUNERAL HOME.

Col. DAVID GILLIES ROBERTS, II (Age 82)

IDA B. SPROW

Passed away on Saturday April 30, 2011 at Casey House Hospice in Rockville, Maryland. He is survived by his fianceé and loving partner of 25 years, Roddi Krivanek of Bethesda, MD. A celebration of life will be held in the near future. Interment will occur at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date. Condolences may be made at www.rappfuneral.com or contributions made to the American Cancer Society.

RICHARD DAVID KANA (Age 61)

Died in his home after a prolonged illness, surrounded and comforted by his beloved family. He was born on April 10, 1931, in Winzeln, Germany, and educated as a physicist at the Johannes Guttenberg University of Mainz. Martin and his family immigrated to the United States in 1961. He joined the faculty of the University of Maryland in 1965, where he was a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering for 33 years. Martin is survived by his wife, Inge; two children, Bettina and Christopher; three grandchildren, Nicole, Brendan and Monika and three living sisters in Germany. We would like to express our gratitude and appreciation to friends, colleagues and medical caretakers for all their support throughout the years. Memorial services will be held at a later time when friends will be invited to celebrate Martin’s life.

MARTIN PAUL REISER April 10, 1931 – May 1, 2011

KUNEC

On April 26, 2011 of Ellenwood, GA; formerly of Bowie, MD. Survived by wife Renee Williams; three daughters Desiree Hargett, Tyrenee Williams and Christina-Marie Williams; three grandchildren; four sisters; and a host of other relatives and friends. Celebration of Life Service will be held on Thursday, May 5, 2011; 10 a.m. Viewing, 11 a.m. Service at Victory Christian Ministries, 3911 Saint Barnabas Rd., Suitland, MD. Interment Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery. Services by J.B. JENKINS FUNERAL HOME, INC.

TYRONE WILLIAMS (Age 63)

THOMPSON
On May 1, 2011, James R. "Bob" Thompson, beloved husband of the late Mary Helen Thompson (nee Burroughs), devoted father of Susan Thompson Riehl (Kurt,Jr.) Timothy A. Thompson (Melissa), and the late Jackson "Jack" Thompson, III and the late Mildred Rebecca "Mick" Parsley dear grandfather of Kurt J., Michael and Steven Riehl and Connor and Amelia Thompson and great-grandfather of Paige, Claire and Jack Riehl. A funeral liturgy will be held on Tuesday at 10 a.m. at St. John Roman Catholic Church, Westminster. Interment will be in Mt. Carmel Cemetery. The family will receive friends at Haight Funeral Home & Chapel (6416 Sykesville Rd) Sykesville on Monday from 6 to 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make donations to Carroll Hospice, 292 Stoner Ave., Westminster, MD 21157 or to the charity of their choice. See www.haightfuneralhome.com

ROOSMA
On Friday, April 29, 2011. Loving husband of Sandra; loving father of Tracey Meeks, Kelsey and Mike Tsompanas; devoted grandfather of Kellyn, Tanner, Dimitri and Devon; brother of John and Garry Roosma. The family will receive friends at FAIRFAX MEMROIAL FUNERAL HOME, 9902 Braddock Rd. on Tuesday, May 10 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. A full honors funeral will be scheduled at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Young Life, 231-A West Timonium Rd., Timonium, MD 21093 or Heartland Hospice, 3900 Jermantown Rd., Suite 460, Fairfax, VA 22030. www.fmfh.com

JAMES ROBERT THOMPSON "BOB"

We Miss You ! Wilson Wiley and the Children

VANNETTE E. WILEY May 29, 1939 - May 4, 2008

MOTHER'S DAY May 8, 2011
Remember your Loved Ones with an In Memoriam Text Deadline: 3 p.m., Saturday, May 7 Photo Deadline: 2 p.m., Saturday, May 7
Call 202-334-4122 Fax 202-334-7188 Email deathnotices@washpost.com

WILLIAM A. ROOSMA "Will" Major General, U.S. Army (Ret.)

DEATH NOTICE

SINKOVITS
Of McLean, VA entered into eternal rest after a courageous battle with metastatic breast cancer on April 27, 2011. She was the beloved daughter of Dr. Peter and Ingrid Kunec of McLean, VA; loving sister of Hans Peter Kunec and his wife, Terry Wright of Fairfax, VA. She was predeceased by her brother, Anthony C. Kunec. Heidi was active at the Sport & Health Club of Tyson’s Corner as a personal trainer for nearly 20 years. A Mass of Christian Burial will offered at St. John the Beloved Catholic Church, 6420 Linway Terrace, McLean, VA at 1 p.m., Friday, May 6. Inurnment private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Capital Hospice.

BRISCOE

HEIDI VICTORIA KUNEC (Age 38)

SCOTT
Surrounded by her loving family, Justine Dorney Scott, 84, died on May 1, 2011 after a long illness. She was known as "Dusty" to the many friends she made moving around the world as an Army wife, and her husband of 61 years was the man everyone knew as "Scotty", the late Lt. Gen. Willard W. Scott, Jr., who was the 52nd Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. After moving 33 times, and raising seven children along the way, Dusty and Scotty lived for many years near Mount Vernon in Alexandria, where Dusty was an avid gardener and active member of the Mount Vernon Neighborhood Association and Good Shepherd Catholic Church. Dusty was devoted to her husband, her family and the military. Always wearing a signature flower in her hair, Dusty worked for years ensuring military families were supported in time of need. She was especially involved with Army Community Services and the Red Cross. Her work was recognized with the Distinguished Civilian Service Award in 1986. For many years, Dusty was an Army Arlington Lady, assisting families whose loved ones were buried at the National Cemetery. She and her husband considered their time at West Point, from 1981 through 1986, as the highpoint of their lives. Originally from New Rochelle, New York, Dusty met Scotty while he was a cadet at West Point, and they were married in 1948. She is survived by Mary Starner of Springfield, VA., Elizabeth Raveché of Forked River, N.J., W. Warren Scott of Sydney, Australia, Catherine Rosenshein of Montclair, N.J., Susan Shanahan of Honolulu, Hi., Margaret Scott of New York, N.Y., and Ann Marie Kilkelly of Hanover, PA.; 25 grandchildren and two great-granddaughters. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Monday, May 9, at Good Shepherd Catholic Church, 8710 Mt. Vernon Highway, Alexandria, Va. Dusty will be buried next to her husband at West Point on Tuesday, May 10, 2011.

TORMEY
Paul David Tormey died on April 29, 2011. He was born in Worcester, Massachusetts on March 12, 1934 to Dr. Leonard and Anita Lamarre Tormey. He received mostly private education, and later received degrees from Assumption College, Boston University, The University of California at Berkeley, Middlebury, and the University of Paris. He traveled all over the world including a fascinating six month trip with two friends, Will Baker and Stan Benjamin in a VW green “beetle” across Iran, Turkey, Afghanistan and India in the 1950’s. He served in the Army, and was stationed in France for the Dept. of Defense. He spoke French fluently, and met his first wife, Denise Lucienne Leroux while in Nantes. The couple had three sons and lived in Korea and Berlin where Paul was Director of Education for the Eighth Army overseas. They later settled in Colonial Heights where he worked and retired from Fort Lee. He greatly enjoyed buying and restoring antiques and skillfully renovated homes in Petersburg, as well as his own. Paul is predeceased by his wife of 30 years, Denise and survived by his present wife, Carol and three sons, Marc of St. Petersburg, Florida, Lawrence of Boca Raton and his wife, Mirian, and Patrick of Ashland and his wife, Cheryl. He leaves four grandchildren, Deni, Jake, Iris, and Jordan; stepchildren, John Trammell of Bumpass, Julia McGill of Charlottesville, and Mark Trammell of Cleveland Heights; and stepgrandchildren, Alec, Maddie, and Hannah Trammell, Matthew and Adam McGill, and Lillie, Rowan, Yorrick, and Berkeley Trammell. “Pip” was the youngest in his family, leaving sisters, Terry Todd of Worcester, Massachusetts and Florence Blouin of Montreal; and brother, John Tormey Sr. of Maynard, Massachusetts and his wife, Joan. If ever there was a Renaissance man, Paul was he. He will be sadly missed by all. A graveside service will be held at 2 p.m. Friday May 6, 2011 in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, 535 S. Crater Road, Petersburg, Virginia 23803, with the procession leaving the funeral home at 1:45 p.m. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the Colonial Heights Chapel of the E. Alvin Small Funeral Homes & Crematory, 2033 Boulevard. Condolences may be registered at www.ealvinsmall.com

JUSTINE DORNEY SCOTT (Age 84)

PAUL DAVID TORMEY "Pip"

LOOPER
On Tuesday. April 26, 2011. Loving son of Bridzette Lane and Ralph Briscoe, Jr.; beloved brother of Kai'La, DaShawanda, Cierra, Dayanna and Rico. Also survived by grandparents, Jesse Draughn, Cherie Smith, David Epps and the late Shelia Draughn; a host of other relatives and friends. Family will receive friends on Friday, May 6, 9:30 a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at Morning Star Baptist Church, 3204 Brothers Place S.E. Interment Harmony Memorial Park. Services by FREEMAN.

RALPHAEL TYRIC BRISCOE

CHANEY-ESCOBAR
On April 27, 2011 of Fort Washington, MD. Survived by two sons Anthony (Natasha) Looper and Dennis (Tamika) Looper; mother Elba Coleman; sister Shirley Harris; brother Jams Coleman; five grandchildren; one greatgrandchild; and a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral Service Friday, May 6, J.B. JENKINS FUNERAL HOME, 7474 Landover Rd., Landover, MD. Viewing 12:30 p.m. Service 1:30 p.m.

Formerly of Arlington, VA and a longtime parishioner at St. Agnes Catholic Church, on Saturday, April 30, 2011. Loving wife of the late John Francis Sinkovits; loving mother of John S. Sinkovits (Claudia) and Valerie Sinkovits (John Cook); grandmother of Robert, Steven, Jessica, Sarah, Amanda, Laura, Andrew and Steven; sister of Martha Fidler, Bernard Repel, Mary Ann Rickard and the late Agnes Graham. The family will receive friends at FAIRFAX MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME, 9902 Braddock Rd., Fairfax, VA on Wednesday, May 4 from 5 to 8 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at the Church of the Nativity, 6400 Nativity Lane, Burke, VA on Thursday, May 5 at 10:30 a.m. with interment to follow at National Memorial Park. www.fmfh.com

CECILIA M. SINKOVITS

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PAID DEATH NOTICES

GLORIA JEAN LOOPER (Age 60)

SMITH

PEEBLES

COLTERYAHN
From 1954-56, Mr. Colteryahn played football professionally with the Baltimore Colts. For the next 26 years, he was employed by Bethlehem Steel, Sparrows Point Plant. When he retired in 1984, he was a General Foreman in the Plate Mills. Mr. Colteryahn married Peggy Lee Bradley on January 31, 1953. “Colt”, as he was called by his friends, and Peggy made their home in Baltimore until his retirement to the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Peggy passed away on March 1, 1994. Although Colt enjoyed his time on the shore, he started spending his winters in Florida with his daughter Karen in 2007. He was a member of the National Football League Alumni Association and a past President of the Baltimore Colts Alumni Association. Other affiliations include the Grand National Waterfowl Association, Taylors Island Methodist Church, and Taylors Island Fire Company.

On May 1, 2011 passed away at the U.M. Medical Center. She leaves behind life partner Hector Escobar; daughters, Cheryl, Robin and Penny; grandchildren, Samantha, Jessica, Frankie, Nicholas and Katelynn and two great grandchildren, Shyann and baby Frank. Family and friends are invited to share in Karin's Life Celebration on Thursday, May 5 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. at GASCH'S FUNERAL HOME P.A., 4739 Baltimore Ave., Hyattsville, MD where a service will be held on Friday, May 6 at 12 p.m. at Gasch's. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Karin's name to the SPCA/HS of Prince George's County, P.O. Box 925 Bowie, MD 20718. www.gaschs.com

KARIN CHERYL CHANEY-ESCOBAR (Age 67)

Bessie R. Smith, retired teacher, died at her home in Washington, D.C. on April 28, 2011. She leaves to mourn her passing her husband, Joseph Smith; her daughter, Mildred Joyner; a nephew, Albert Richardson; a beloved cousin, Bertha Hammett, and many other relatives and friends. Bessie was a Washington, D.C. native. She received her bachelor's degree from Allen University in Columbia, S.C. and a master's degree from American University in Washington, D.C. She taught at DC's Murch Elementary School for many years before retiring in 1995. She attended Metropolitan A.M.E. Church, where she was a member of the Sons and Daughters of Allen and the Senior Citizens Club. She was also a dedicated volunteer at N Street Village, which provides services for homeless women. Funeral services will be held on May 5, 2011 at Metropolitan A.M.E. Church, 1518 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC with visitation at 10 a.m., followed by an 11 a.m. service. Interment will follow at Fort Lincoln Cemetery. If friends desire, memorial contributions may be sent to N Street Village, 1333 N Street, N.W., Wash., D.C. 20005. Arrangements by McGuire.

BESSIE R. SMITH, Teacher

Notices with photos begin at 3" ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID MEMORIAL PLAQUES: All notices over 3" include complimentary memorial plaque. Additional plaques start at $25 each and may be ordered. All Paid Death Notices appear on our website through www.legacy.com LEGACY.COM Included in all death notices Optional for In Memoriams PLEASE NOTE: Notice must be placed before you come to The Washington Post to drop off photos. We no longer can accept notices in person.

IRVING

Peacefully passed on April 27, 2011; father of Angela Abdullah. Also survived by three grandchildren; one great-grandchild; two sisters; and two brothers and a host of other relatives and friends. On Thursday, May 5, friends may visit with the family from 10 a.m. until time of Funeral Service at 11 a.m. at MARSHALL-MARCH FUNERAL HOME, 4308 Suitland Rd., Suitland, MD. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD. Send condolences to: www.marshallmarchfh.com

HORACE V. PEEBLES

Mr. Colteryahn is survived by three daughters: Of Taylors Island, MD and Dunedin, FL, died at Lura-Lee (and Michael) Baker, Karen Lee BayCare Alliant Hospital in Dunedin on May 2, Colteryahn, Judy Lee Colteryahn; two granddaughters Kara-Lee and Kirsten Lee Baker; brother 2011 after a brief illness. Wayne Colteryahn, sisters Norene Garrett and Born in Pittsburgh, PA on August 26, 1931, he Wilma Krauss; and several nieces and nephews. was the son of the late William A. and Anna Mae Colteryahn. He attended public schools in A viewing will be held at Thomas Funeral Home Pittsburgh and is an honored member of the in Cambridge, Maryland on Friday, May 6 from Brentwood High School Hall of Fame. After high 2 to 4 and 5 to 7 p.m. A viewing and graveside school, he attended the University of Maryland and service will be held at Fort Lincoln Cemetery in graduated in 1955. He was a member of the Brentwood, Maryland on Saturday, May 7 starting championship Maryland football team which played at 1 p.m. with the service starting at 2 p.m. In in the 1952 Sugar Bowl Game. He also played lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the in the all-star Blue-Grey Game and Senior Bowl in Taylors Island Volunteer Fire Company, P.O. Box 277 Taylors Island, MD 21669. 1953.

LLOYD K. COLTERYAHN (Age 79)

DEATH NOTICE

PRICE

BOWEN
in 1984. While her children were in nursery school, Nancy became a teacher's assistant and then a teacher at Geneva Day School in Potomac, Md. She enrolled at Hood College and received a M.A. in Early Childhood Education. She then taught pre-kindergarten at Christ Episcopal School in Rockville, Md. and kindergarten at The Harbor School in Bethesda, Md. She retired from teaching kindergarten at The Barnesville School in 2010 due to illness. Nancy was an eager volunteer for her children's schools, including Geneva Day School, Norwood School, Christ Episcopal School, and Landon School. She also volunteered for many years as a Sunday School teacher at St. Francis Episcopal Church in Potomac. Her hobbies included cooking, entertaining, gardening, crossword puzzles, and beachcombing.

SAUNDERS
government here and abroad. Mr. Saunders also spent time lecturing in Germany and Thailand, regarding nuclear weapons effects and he was advisor to the Prime Minister of Iran in Tehran in establishing a national emergency preparedness system. Mr. Saunders´ avocation was beef cattle farming, and he dabbled in real estate after his retirement from the federal government. The list of his civic participation is endless and his service in Freemasonry spans more than 60 years and includes responsibilities in the Holy Order of the High Priesthood and the Sovereign Order of Knights Preceptor. The Right Worshipful Edward Ripley Saunders, Jr. became a Master Mason in September 1946 in Kensington, MD. He later moved to Virginia, became active in several Lodges, 303, 271, 78, 1777, 1949, and served as Grand Lodge Chaplain in 1992. He served as Master of Cochran Lodge 271 in The Plains, VA and Washington Lodge 0078 in Washington, VA. In 1984, he was named Grand Commander, Grand Commandery of Virginia, and in 1990-91 he was Grand High Priest, Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Virginia. He was District Deputy Grand Master in District 4 in 1973 and a member of Cochran Lodge 271 AF&AM in The Plains, VA until his passing. The Masonic community will miss his zeal to serve and teach the art of being a Mason. On September 5, 1947, Mr. Saunders married Hazel Perry, who passed away following a stroke in July 2002. He is also preceded in death by his parents, Edward and Pearl Saunders. He is survived by his second wife, Eleanor Saunders (Rice), who he married in November 2004, his daughter Dawn Jacobs, his four sons Ted, Tim, Todd, and Tom, two step daughters Mary Pavlos of Salisbury, MD and Janet Farley of Taneytown, MD; a sister, Jackie Mothersole of Fort Worth, Texas; fourteen grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held on Friday, May 6, at 11:30 a.m. at Marshall United Methodist Church. Viewing will be on Thursday, May 5 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at Royston Funeral Home in Marshall, VA.

On April 27, 2011, of Silver Spring, MD. Survived by nieces, Patricia "Dydi" Green, Marcel "Mickey" Jones, Linda White; nephews, William "Timmy" Green, Glen White, Tony White and Kirk Hall; stepson, Douglas Irving and a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral service will be held Friday, May 6 at the First Baptist Church of North Brentwood, 4000 Wallace Rd., N. Brentwood, MD, 10 a.m. viewing, 11 a.m., service. Interment immediately following. Arrangments by J.B. JENKINS FUNERAL HOME, INC.

HELEN MARIE WHITE IRVING

JOHNSON

EDWARD R. SAUNDERS, JR.
September 30, 1924 - May 1, 2011 Edward Ripley Saunders, Jr., 86, of Charlestown, WV, formally of The Plains, VA, and loving husband of Eleanor Rice, passed away Sunday, May 1. A dedicated supporter of his country and community, Mr. Saunders served the federal government for almost 30 years. A graduate of the University of Maryland with a degree in electrical engineering and having post-graduate work from the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Michigan in mathematics, nuclear physics and engineering, he started his career as an electronic scientist performing research in atomic and nuclear physics. Mr. Saunders holds patents on betatron and synchrotron energy control systems; he performed nuclear weapons tests and he designed detecting and telemetering equipment to measure the effects of nuclear weapons; he worked for the Executive Office of the President; represented the Office of Emergency Preparedness before NATO in Paris, before both houses of Congress, and before governors of states; he assisted in briefing several presidents; and he authored many technical and policy papers; and made presentations at all levels of

Of Washington, DC, passed away Thursday, March 10, 2011. Beloved wife of Johnnie Arthur Johnson who preceded her in death in 1992. Survived by daughter Jocelynn Celeste Johnson and son Johnnie Gilbert Johnson; grandchildren Jonathan Ball, Alysha DeGroot, and Marquet Schuller; and a host of other family in North Carolina and New York, neighbors and friends. Her body was donated to medical science. Memorial Service at Asbury United Methodist Church 926 11th Street N.W., Washington, DC 20001, May 6, 2011 at 10 a.m. Dr. Rev. Shockley, officiating. The family requests in lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Sankie’s name to the Asbury United Methodist Church.

SANKIE EVERETTE JOHNSON (Age 92)

On Saturday, April 30, 2011, JEAN BREADY PRICE of Arlington, VA passed away. She is preceded in death by her husband Aubrey C. Price and her siblings Ramsey and Robert Bready and Alice Naff. She is survived by her four children, Barbara Robinson of Monroe, NC, Carroll Price of Myrtle Beach, SC, George Price and his wife Laura of Herndon, VA and Bob Price and his late wife Dawn of Dumfries, VA; five grandchildren, Ashley Watson and her husband Paul, Kirstin Ruiz and her husband John, Ben Price, Jamie Sylvester and Rachel Price. She is also survived by six great-grandchildren, Chad, Celena and Corrin Ruiz and Paige, Gregory and Sarah Watson. On January 10, 1917 Mrs. Price was born and raised on the family dairy farm in Herndon, VA to her parents George and Edna Bready. She was the granddaughter of Herdon's first Mayor Isiah Bready. She later graduated from the Washington School for Secretaries and briefly worked for a Washington DC Tax Law Firm. Mrs. Price was a longtime member of Walker Chapel United Methodist Church of Arlington. She served tirelessly for years as a volunteer in the church office and for missions including Senior Day Care Outreach and Meals on Wheels. She also participated in numerous civic and community based programs, as an organizer for the American Cancer Society, Drivers Program and Co-Chair Woman for a garden therapy program for disabled children. In her spare time Jean enjoyed needle pointing, caring for numerous family dogs and spending time with family and friends. The family will receive friends at the MURPHY FUNERAL HOME of ARLINGTON, 4510 Wilson Blvd. on Wednesday, May 4 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held at Walker Chapel United Methodist Church, 4102 North Old Glebe Rd., Arlington, VA on Thursday, May 5 at 11 a.m. Burial will follow at Fairfax City Cemetery. Contributions may be made in her name to the Walker Chapel Building Fund in memory of Jean B. Price.

JEAN B. PRICE

Nancy Rogers Bowen, beloved wife of Brooks Jefferson Bowen, and devoted mother of B.J. (Brooks, Jr.) and Christopher Pendleton Bowen, died from ovarian cancer on April 29, 2011, at Sanctuary at Holy Cross in Burtonsville, Maryland. Born in New York, N.Y. on September 17, 1948, Nancy grew up in Locust Valley, Long Island. She attended The Green Vale School in Glen Head, N.Y. and Miss Porter's School in Farmington, Conn. She graduated from Hollins College in Roanoke, Va. in 1970, with a B.A. degree in Art History. She worked for eight years as Assistant Editor in the Byzantine publications department at Dumbarton Oaks Center for Byzantine Studies in Washington, D.C.

NANCY ROGERS BOWEN (Age 62)

Nancy is survived by her husband, Brooks, of Potomac; son B.J. and his wife Kate of Mt. Pleasant, S.C.; son Christopher, of Alexandria, Va.; mother Barbara Franklin Rogers Stevenson, of Hobe Sound, Fla.; brother Elliott Rogers and his wife Gail, of Southport, Conn.; mother-in-law Polly Bowen of Hockessin, Del.; sisters-in-law Beth Bowen of Peachtree City, Ga. and Vicki Bowen of Berkeley, Calif., and nephew Ian Bowen Richards. She is also survived by hundreds of students whose lives she touched as a teacher, and many devoted friends. Her father, Howard Elliott Rogers, predeceased her.

A memorial service celebrating Nancy’s life will be held on Saturday, May 7, 2011, at 10 a.m. at St. Francis Episcopal Church, 10033 River Road, Potomac, Maryland. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the American After marrying Brooks in 1975, they moved to Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123-1718. Maryland. B.J. was born in 1981 and Christopher

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A cool Canadian air mass dips into the area, with lots of cloud cover and showers, especially in the morning. Highs are only expected to reach the low 60s with winds up to 15 mph at times from the north and northwest, making it feel cooler.

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Style
Sunday’s viewership is believed to be the largest TV audience of Obama’s presidency.”
— The TV Column, C6
MOVIES

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2 TONY AWARDS

Bad choice of code name?

The Osama bin Laden raid name left a sour taste for Native Americans. C2

A new ending to bin Laden hunt film

‘Book of Mormon’ gets 14 nods
“Scottsboro Boys” was second in number of nominations. C12

Screenwriter Mark Boal’s script in progress now has a final act. C10

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LIVE TODAY @ oia washingtonpost.com/conversations Reliable Source columnists Amy Argetsinger and Roxanne Roberts Noon  Web Hostess Monica Hesse 2 p.m.

JAN ERIK SVENDSEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

BY

M ONICA H ESSE
IN OSLO

Lo, have we found him? Here, on the east coast of Norway, on the west side of Oslo, in a butter-yellow apartment building across from a day care called Urmafaba? Here, on this chilled spring morning, which the locals insist, with typically polite standoffishness, is unseasonable? Have we journeyed so long and so patiently to at last spot the rare and precious specimen that publishers speak of in hushed and desperate tones? Have we found . . . the next Stieg Larsson? A man opens the door. A slender man, with pale hair, crinkly eyes and weatherbeaten skin, pulled tight across his face. His artfully ripped jeans settle low on his hips. His voice has a lilt: His S’s become

Coming in from the cold
Norway’s Jo Nesbo: If you don’t know this crime novelist now, you will soon enough

“Sh’s,” Oslo is Oshlo. “Yooo Nez-baugh,” he says, extending his hand. Jo Nesbo. Pulp star, pop star, unlikely children’s author. The new Scandinavian import of our dizzy American dreams.

The next big thing?
In Oslo, which would look like Ann Arbor, Mich., if you didn’t know better, Nesbo is a household name. “He is the best crime writer,” the clerk at Grensen Libris bookstore says proudly, skimming her fingers over the rainbow of colorful spines on the Nesbo shelf. “Harry Hole eats here,” says a customer at Schroder restaurant, an Oslo standard, a classic cod-and-potatoes sort of place. Harry Hole. The alcoholic hero of Jo

Nesbo’s crime novels. (Hole is fictional; his favorite restaurant is real.) The dyspeptic detective who has trudged, world-weary, through eight battles with sadistic criminals in a cold climate. In Norway the books have sold about 2 million copies. This is more impressive when you consider the population of Norway is fewer than 5 million people. “The series has been,” Nesbo says modestly, “a slow burn.” Nesbo, 51, is about to begin an American tour, tied to the U.S. release Tuesday of his latest novel. In “The Snowman,” Hole deals with the fact that his ex-love and her son have a new man in their lives. Simultaneously, he chases a killer who targets mothers. The murderer’s method nesbo continued on C10

McQueen retrospective: ‘Savage Beauty’ in fashion
Met’s Costume Institute showcases late designer’s profound creativity
BY

THE ‘FOLLIES’ WOMEN

Fourth in a week-long series profiling the Kennedy Center’s Sondheim stars

D ANA T HOMAS

new york — When Alexander McQueen committed suicide at the age of 40 in his London home 14 months ago, there was a collective sense in the fashion community that it had lost an extraordinary talent far too soon. Though the brand carries on under the sure hand of his former assistant, Sarah Burton, who designed Kate Middleton’s wedding dress, “Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty,” a powerful and moving retrospective of McQueen’s work at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, magnifies that sentiment. The presentation, which opens to

the public on Wednesday, spans work from the designer’s postgraduate collection in 1992 to his final womenswear collection last year. The exhibit shows his profound creativity, his deft cutting skills and his darkly romantic voice. His clothes overflowed with historical references — such as the Salem witch trials (after he learned an ancestor was a victim), medieval England and Victoriana — yet they were among the most modern on the runways. They were certainly the most astonishing, and each time he presented a new collection — usually in a complex, performance-art-like production in a big hall in Paris — there was a sense that what had just happened was something monumental. That was because McQueen didn’t simply design clothes that you and I might want to wear. He used fashion as a tool to express something far mcqueen continued on C11

Late in her reign, a crowning achievement
‘Queen’ Regine continues her career with yet another ‘Ah! Paris’ moment
BY

D AN Z AK

BEBETO MATTHEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

RUNWAY LOOK: The Met exhibit of McQueen’s work opens Wednesday.

When the asteroid Kardashian crashed into the planet, the notion of pure celebrity became extinct. Since then, there’s been no quick-and-dirty way to measure true renown, true longevity, true fabulosity in the hierarchy of female fame. No way except for one: the ability to reach and retain firstname-only status. Cher, for example. Also, Madonna. And Oprah, Hillary, Bjork and Beyonce. Lindsay (Lohan) is trying, and failing. It is the realm of few, and rarely these

days is Regine classified among them — even though, in 1953, she chucked the jukebox in her tiny subterranean Parisian club andreplaceditwithtwoturntables,thereby inventing the first discotheque and starting an evolution that enabled Studio 54 and spawned temples to disco, house and hiphop. Going dancing this weekend at some fancy club with a brand-name DJ? Regine calls herself the first DJ. Thank her for the idea. This may be a grandiose estimation of her nightlife legacy, but grandiosity is her art form. She is, after all, the “Queen of the Night.” The woman who taught the Twist to SophiaLorenandtheDukeofWindsor.The singer who Frenchified “I Will Survive.” The discriminating hostess to Andy Warhol, Zsa sondheim continued on C3

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THE RELIABLE SOURCE
Roxanne Roberts and Amy Argetsinger

A prince on American soil
P
rince Charles — better known these days as the father of the groom — arrived Tuesday for a busy three-day visit to the nation’s capital. Fresh off the royal wedding, the prince (without wife Camilla) came to Washington to talk about one of his passions: organic farming. He’s giving the keynote address Wednesday at “The Future of Food” conference at Georgetown University. But first, a tour of Common Good City Farm, the District’s only urban farm. Officials tried to get first lady Michelle Obama to visit the half-acre where herbs, fruits and vegetables are grown and distributed to low-income residents. “We came close to having her. We tried once. It fell through,” said Executive Director Pertula George. Instead, they got real royalty. “I’m beyond excited,” she told our colleague Nikita Stewart. A Clarence House spokesman told reporters that the trip, the prince’s first to the United States in four years, has three main themes: environmental sustainability, education and cooperation between British and American forces. Other stops on the prince’s agenda: a Marshall Scholar alumni reception at the Supreme Court; a reception for British Forces Foundation and USO; a White House visit Wednesday with President Obama (who’s traveling to Britain for a state visit later this month); and a private dinner at the Georgetown home of Sen. John Kerry. And what fun is royalty without a little pomp? Before he leaves Thursday
Susan Sarandon Alex Ovechkin Daniel Dae Kim Tim Daly

HEY, ISN’T THAT . . . ? 

Susan Sarandon playing table tennis and eating pizza at Comet Ping Pong. The actress — who honored young volunteers at the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards on Sunday — lingered in town for the evening with Jonathan Bricklin, her younger beau and partner in an N.Y.C. table-tennis club, to check out the D.C. ping-pong scene.  Alex Ovechkin stopping into Bicycle Pro Shop on M Street with a Russian pal to buy a couple of bikes over the weekend — what is it with Ovechkin and biking in Georgetown

these days?  Daniel Dae Kim enjoying Negronis and small plates at the bar at the Source on Monday night. The “Lost” and “Hawaii Five-O” star — yet another show-bizzer in town for the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner — asked for skim milk with his dessert of chocolatechip cookies; restaurant staff had to run over to Capital Grille to borrow some.  Tim Daly, another WHCA dinner holdover, dining at Rasika on Monday night with journalist Howard Fineman.

IN OTHER NEWS
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

In town for “The Future of Food” conference at Georgetown University, Prince Charles walks with Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer on Tuesday. 

Prince Charles wowed the crowd during tour of Common Good City Farm in LeDroit Park. See story, B2

morning, Charles will present honors from the queen to three Americans at an investiture ceremony: Folger Shakespeare Library Director Gail Paster and Henry Becton, former president of Boston’s WGBH public television station, will receive the Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE); educator Martin Lancaster will get an OBE.

“I find that with humor that it’s better to have a stoical face.”
— Donald Trump insisting to the New York Times on Monday that he was actually “honored” by the jokes at his expense at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner on Saturday, no matter what the grim look on his face may have suggested. 

Nothing like some birther humor at the end of a long week! In just over two days, President Obama’s White House Correspondents’ Association dinner speech broke the record to become C-SPAN’s most popular YouTube video ever, passing the 6 million views mark midday Tuesday. The cable channel’s version of Seth Meyers’s WHCA dinner stand-up routine is now its seventh most popular, with 1.5 million views. A milder viral success: a 16-second clip of Fox 5 anchor Will Thomas mistakenly announcing at the end of POTUS’s speech Sunday night that “President Obama is, in fact, dead,” before correcting himself (“I’m sorry — Osama bin Laden”). It had more than 700K views as of Monday night.  Royal wedding: Officially over now. The new Duke and Duchess of Cambridge — a.k.a. Wills & Kate — took a long weekend break somewhere in Britain but headed back to his military base in Wales on Tuesday. They’re waiting to take an overseas honeymoon later.
JOHN STILLWELL/ASSOCIATED PRESS

No honeymoon yet: The new Duke and Duchess of Cambridge took a long weekend break in Britain.

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Native Americans object to ‘Geronimo’ as bin Laden code
Military’s choice of Apache leader’s name in Pakistan raid is questioned
BY

N EELY T UCKER

He died 102 years ago in Oklahoma, a beaten warrior, a prisoner of war, an exile from his homeland, a propped-up sideshow, a gambler and a lukewarm Christian. His family was murdered by Mexicans. The Americans stripped him of most everything else. And yet, the Apache born near the Gila River in present-day Arizona with the not-very-impressive name of Goyahkla (“One Who Yawns”) rode into history as the legendary Geronimo. It was his name that the U.S. military chose as the code for the raid, and perhaps for Osama bin Laden himself, during the operation that killed the al-Qaeda leader in Pakistan. That led to the iconic transmission from the raid: “Geronimo EKIA.” Geronimo, Enemy Killed in Action. In a triumphant moment for the United States, the moniker has left a sour taste among many Native Americans. “I was celebrating that we had gotten this guy and feeling so much a part of America,” Tom Holm, a former Marine, a member of the Creek/Cherokee Nations and a retired professor of American Indian studies at the University of Arizona, said by phone Tuesday. “And then this ‘Geronimo EKIA’ thing comes up. I just said, ‘Why pick on us?’ Robert E. Lee killed more Americans than Geronimo ever did, and Hitler would seem to be evil personified, but the code name for bin Laden is Geronimo?” Suzan Shown Harjo, president of the Morning Star Institute, a Native American advocacy group based in Washington, has long fought against the use of

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ENEMY MONIKER? The campaign to apprehend the Apache leader Geronimo, above, became famous because he eluded capture for more than a decade.

Indian imagery in American life (including as the mascot of the Washington Redskins). She sighed when asked about the latest iteration of Geronimo. “It’s how deeply embedded the ‘Indian as enemy’ is in the collective mind of America,” she said. “To this day, when soldiers are going into enemy territory, it’s common for it to be called ‘Indian country.’ ” It isn’t clear yet which branch of the military came up with the nickname — the Army, Navy, CIA or any of the anti-terror special forces groups involved in planning the raid — but it apparently wasn’t bin Laden’s nickname for very long. A database search of news stories shows that, while military leaders sometimes compared bin Laden’s elusiveness to Geronimo’s, there is no news account of calling the al-Qaeda leader “Geronimo” until this past weekend. But the Apache leader’s name has often been used in the name for projects in Afghanistan, such as the Marine Forward Operating Base Geronimo in the Helmand province, reports show. Military code names and nicknames have a long history, dating to when written or radio transmissions could be easily intercepted, and thus the name for a secret language that only some people involved in a particular operation would understand. But not all code names and nicknames have been loaded terms, even when the stakes were high. The plan to build the atomic bomb (the Manhattan Project) resulted in two atomic bombs (“Little Boy” and “Fat Man”) being dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Boeing B-29 Superfortress bomber that dropped the bombs was nicknamed “Enola Gay,” after Enola Gay Tibbets, mother of the pilot, Paul Tibbets. The U.S. military now has strict formats for official code names and nick-

names for designated targets, but the results are sometimes more goofy than intimidating. “Operation Red Dawn,” for example, the campaign that led to the capture of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, gave all the appearances of being inspired by a campy 1984 film in which teenagers fight to save the United States from a Soviet invasion. The 19th-century U.S. Army campaign to apprehend Geronimo and stop his raids on settlers did become famous, particularly in military circles, because he eluded capture for more than a decade. By the time of his surrender in Arizona in 1886, more than 5,000 troops had participated in the hunt to track him down. After years of degradation, included being trotted out by whites as an example of the Wild West, he died in Oklahoma in 1909. He was buried in a prisoner-of-war camp. “There is little doubt [the] use of a leader like Geronimo to refer to bin Laden is ill-advised,” Keith Harper, a partner at the D.C. firm of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton and a member of the Cherokee Nation, wrote in an e-mail Tuesday. Harper represented the plaintiff class of 500,000 individual Indians in the landmark Indian trust funds lawsuit, which last year settled its claims against the U.S. government for $3.4 billion. He was also the principal adviser and chair of the Native American Domestic Policy Committee for the Obama campaign. “No one would find acceptable calling this arch-terrorist by code name Mandela, Revere or Ben-Gurion,” Harper wrote. “An extraordinary Native leader and American hero deserves no less.”
tuckern@washpost.com

I the elite counter-terrorism unit that took out Osama bin Laden at
MORE PHOTOS See a photo gallery on

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DOONESBURY

by Garry Trudeau

CUL DE SAC

by Richard Thompson

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

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THEATER REVIEW

To this ‘Cyrano,’ you may want to just say nose
Folger’s colloquial adaptation speaks an uncompelling language
BY

P ETER M ARKS

Cyrano de Bergerac has a flaw that cuts far deeper than that ludicrous nose. He’s a bit of a bore. Everyone who shares this point of view, follow me! What — wait — no one? You mean to say, I’m the only person who finds Edmond Rostand’s tale of the swashbuckling poet with the thing for the pretty verse-worshiping girl a polyunsaturated wheel of cheese? Well, so be it. I’ve sat through enough productions of the play — good, bad and in between — to speak for the minority. Some of the stagings have managed to tease out a charismatic poignancy or wittiness to offset the tale’s shameless melodramatics. But Folger Theatre’s new version, simply called “Cyrano,” never establishes an adequate counterbalance for the schmaltz. It’s a faithful, even credulous, treatment that ultimately comes across as wordy and weightless. This adaptation arrives with a decent pedigree: It has been composed by dramatist Michael Hollinger (“Opus”) and frequent Folger director Aaron Posner, represented most recently by “The Comedy of Errors” and, at Arena Stage, “The Chosen.” They have for the most part eliminated the oft-employed rhyming couplets

THE MAIN MAN: Eric Hissom as Cyrano de Bergerac.

PHOTOS BY ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

WHO LOVES YA, BABY? Bobby Moreno as Christian and Brenda Withers as Roxane.

in favor of more colloquial language, a decision that should make it inviting for school groups. The well-spoken Eric Hissom, an actor of personable if not arresting presence, has been engaged to play the title character. And the cast has been trimmed to an economical nine players, requiring a few of the men, cutely, to fill female roles (but not, the gods be thanked, the part of Roxane;

that key assignment has gone to Brenda Withers). With the addition of workmanlike design contributions by Devon Painter on costumes and Daniel Conway with the set, you have the ingredients for a reasonable treatment of an audience-friendly piece. Still, while the evening prompts a lot of reflexive laughter, its earnestness exposes the play’s shallowest aspects: the

overworked plot mechanics; the love story’s hollow core; the hero’s unbecoming self-absorption. By the time Cyrano shows up in the final scene, after having been clunked on the head by a particularly well-aimed log, the words “oh, brother” may have crossed your mind once or twice. Many of the shortcomings can be redressed with, to quote Cyrano himself, some panache in the

central portrayals. This happier circumstance elevated the 2007 Broadway revival with Kevin Kline and Jennifer Garner, just as Geraint Wyn Davies carried Shakespeare Theatre Company’s cheekier, anachronism-spewing adaptation in 2004. Hissom, an excellent Porter in Posner and magician Teller’s delightful “Macbeth” at Folger a few years ago, has the wry delivery required of Hollinger and Posner’s script. As for the panache: Well, there’s a deficiency here of larger-than-life-ness that renders suspect Cyrano’s implausible stunts. This guy, taking on 100 swordsmen? I don’t think so. Neither do he and Withers exude much chemistry. You are supposed to believe at the night’s

conclusion that Roxane realizes retroactively that she was in love with Cyrano all along. That teary catharsis never truly occurs; the relationship with Bobby Moreno’s thick-headed Christian, on whose behalf Cyrano writes the lyrical lines that bewitch Roxane, on this occasion seems to be the more promising one. Moreno offers one of the evening’s more nuanced portrayals, investing Christian with a dignified restraint. The other performances range from very good — as always, Todd Scofield is your go-to guy for incisive support, here as a fatuous actor and fussy nurse — to bland: Craig Wallace’s portrayal of De Guiche reminds you less of a pompous French nobleman than of an assistant high school principal. The result is a show of admirable intention and minimal persuasiveness.
marksp@washpost.com

Cyrano
by Edmond Rostand, in an adaptation by Michael Hollinger and Aaron Posner. Directed by Posner. Lighting, Thom Weaver; original music and sound, Veronika Vorel; fight director, Dale Anthony Girard. With Dan Crane, Chris Genebach, Richard Ruiz, Steve Hendrickson. About 2 hours 40 minutes. Through June 5 at Folger Theatre, 201 East Capitol St. SE. Call 202-544-7077 or visit www.folger.edu/theatre.

View video D of preview scenes from “Cyrano” at washingtonpost.com/style.
VIDEO ON THE WEB

BACKSTAGE

Approaching ‘North’ with more of a moral compass
BY

J ANE H ORWITZ

Danny Yoerges doesn’t view Stephen Bellamy, the young press secretary he plays in “Farragut North,” as just a callow, amoral go-getter. That wouldn’t be enough of an acting challenge. Rather, Yoerges sees Bellamy as someone who needs love and approval, though everything that comes out of his mouth sounds like spin, and his actions are those of a callow, amoral go-getter. In Beau Willimon’s 2008 political melodrama, running at Olney Theatre Center’s MulitzGudelsky Theatre Lab through May 22, Bellamy works in the primary campaign of an insurgent presidential candidate who attracts idealistic young voters. Yet already by the age of 25, his idealism has curdled into Machiavellian machinations. So when the opposing campaign director tempts him to jump ship, he doesn’t jump ship, but he doesn’t tell his boss about the meeting, either. Those issues of loyalty vs. ambition taint his personal life, as well — a fiancee abandoned; a seduced intern abandoned; an underling browbeaten. The actor says he’s determined to find as much subtext as possible in a role that he concedes is “written with broad strokes, but also colorful strokes.” Yoerges, who grew up in Alexandria and studied at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, says Bellamy is more impressionable than he seems and “is

really a person who is desperate for the approval and love of those around him, and he does everything within his power in every aspect of his life in order to get that love. I think his real flaw is that he’s unable to see the reality of the world in which he’s trying to make his way. There are people who have their own needs and obligations, and they’re seasoned in the art of deceiving one another . . . and they kind of ruin him.” The show’s director, Clay Hopper, an associate artistic

Metro stop for many K Street lobbyists who, according to a speech in the play, try idealism for a while and then sell out. Hopper says he noticed Yoerges’s attempt to give Bellamy soul at his first audition — which the actor attended on a whim while appearing in “All’s Well That Ends Well” at the Shakespeare Theatre Company. “He had one of those auditions where I learned something about the character I didn’t know,” Hopper recalls. “He managed to bring to it that youthful, almost naive efferves-

ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

GLOBE-TROTTER: Belgian-born Regine has the role of Solange La Fitte (and the solo “Ah! Paris”) in the Kennedy Center’s revival of “Follies.” She was relaxing in St-Tropez when she was offered the part.

Regine, managing to stay in rotation
sondheim from C1 Zsa Gabor and Brigitte Bardot. The onetime empress of a worldwide circuit of nearly two dozen clubs. “I am a special specimen,” says Regine, 81, skinning the paper wrappingoffastraw.She’ssettledin an armchair under a flock of whiteorchid blossoms in the Chinese Lounge of the Kennedy Center, midway through a day’s rehearsal for “Follies,” in which she plays the fashionable Solange La Fitte. Her lips are plump and cushy, like a miniature version of a plush banquette on which Mick Jagger would’ve sat at her New York club at the Delmonico Hotel in the ’70s. Her voice is sibilant, seductive, almost guttural, but warmed by a syrupy French accent that gums up her English grammar. “There is not two Regines,” Regine explains, on a tangent about the Perfect Night Out. “There will never be. The young people like to bewithmebecauseIamfunny,Iam crazy, I go dancing, I am out every night. There’s a few people with the joie de vivre, the generosity — they come in the room and immediately the room go crazy. That I am.” The perfect night out, she says, requires boldface names who mingle, amusing young upstarts who aspire, and a masterful hostess who nudges them toward each other. Born Regine Zylberberg in Belgium, she waited out World War II in a French convent, then waited tables at her father’s cafe in Belleville, then took over the cellarlike Whisky a Gogo in 1953 in Paris. She opened her first Chez Regine club in 1958 and set the gold standard for exclusive partying. The empire spread over three continents. It was a nonstop party of the privileged through the ’60s and ’70s. Times and tastes changed. Just two clubs still bear her name — one in Paris and one in the capital of Kazakhstan — and she plans to perform at the latter in six months. She’s hoping her 22-year-old granddaughter will eventually star in a musical based on her life, maybe titled “The Duchess of Chutzpah.” She’splanningabigeventinParisin the next two years, but won’t say exactly what it is. “I don’t stop,” Regine says. “I’m immortal. You know — like the vampire.” Her solo number in “Follies” is “Ah! Paris,” a globe-trotting ode to fine living, with lyrics that always boomerang back to the majesty of France. Which is fitting. Regine was relaxing in St-Tropez when she was offered “Follies.” After a lifetime of running her own show, Regine decided it was time to join an ensemble.She’sneverthoughtofherselfas a smart businesswoman anyway. “I think the money has to be spent,” she says. “It’s what I’m doing. I’m a sickness buyer. What we call that? It’s a term. I have to buy everything.” A shopaholic? “Yes,” she says. “I don’t care. I’m in Chanel? I buy Chanel.” For a shopaholic, she is remarkably unadorned, save for a single ring crusted with diamonds that belonged to her mother. Hidden under the ring is a thin, tarnished silver band — a gift from the designer Diane von Furstenberg, who frequented her club in Paris when she was in her 20s, Regine says. That’s all. Accouterments are extraneous. “I do not need it,” she says, pattering out of the lounge, back to rehearsal. “I am a jewelry by myself.”
zakd@washpost.com

“I think his real flaw is that he’s unable to see the reality of the world in which he’s trying to make his way.”
— Danny Yoerges on his press secretary character in “Farragut North”

director at Olney, saw Greek tragedy in “Farragut North” amid the profanity-laced dialogue. “It had all these commonalities with the classic form, even though it was steeped in the political vernacular,” Hopper says. He figures that’s why the film version, directed by George Clooney and due out this fall, has been retitled “The Ides of March.” Clooney’s company may also see the original title as too inside-baseball for folks around the country who don’t know that Farragut North is a

cence. . . . He gives the character much more dimension than you would expect.” The tragic “kicker” in the play, Yoerges says, is that Bellamy “accepts that he’s a bad person and he embraces it. . . . That’s the story of modern political warfare. You see these people with unbelievable amounts of potential, but they choose to focus their energies on these squabbles and ways to sling mud. . . . It’s such a waste.”
style@washpost.com Horwitz is a freelance writer.

6

THE OTHER STARS Read more

profiles of the actresses starring in Sondheim’s “Follies” at washingtonpost.com/style.

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LITERARY CALENDAR

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

BOOK WORLD
BY

WEDNESDAY 6 P.M. Local writer Garrett Peck reads from and discusses his new book, “Prohibition in Washington, D.C.: How Dry We Weren’t,” at the coffee house Pound the Hill, 621 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. A book sale and signing follow. Call 202-643-1231 for details.

Award-winning science fiction and mystery novels
F IONA Z UBLIN

FOR YOUNG READERS

G

enre fiction is a literary ghetto. Anything tarred with the labels mystery, western, sci-fi or fantasy goes on its own separate shelf, far away from the high culture of literary fiction. But there are annual prizes in genre fiction that catch everyone’s attention, and two were given out last week: The Edgar Award for the best mystery novel went to Steve Hamilton’s The Lock Artist, and the Arthur C. Clarke Award for the best science-fiction novel went to Lauren Beukes’s Zoo City. Before it is a science-fiction novel, “Zoo City” is a detective story, the tale of a woman thrust into the middle of a mystery. In this alternate-universe version of South Africa, murderers (called

“zoos”) carry their guilt with them in the form of a spirit animal that’s bound to them and gives them magical powers. The animal stands between the guilty and the Undertow, a force that swallows up any zoos whose animals are killed. Zinzi is a zoo with a blackmail problem who gets drawn into investigating the disappearance of a teenage pop star and winds up uncovering a much more sinister plot. Beukes, who lives in Cape Town, is an enchanting writer, but the last third of her novel becomes disconnected from the tight first segment and grows so fantastical that it’s hard to stay engaged. One gets the sense that the author wasn’t sure how to end her story, so she brought in the machetes. With a narrator who hasn’t spoken since the age of 8 because of a Terrible

Secret That Will Someday Be Revealed, Hamilton’s “The Lock Artist” seems almost guaranteed to be a letdown. Spoiler: It’s not. Hamilton, who works for IBM in Upstate New York, understands what’s truly scary, what’s truly suspenseful. Michael, a mute 17-yearold with a talent for drawing and lock-picking, tells two concurrent stories: one of his senior year in high school and one of his experience as a master safecracker. While the structure of the book seems at first as simple as its aggressively unstylish prose, it shifts quickly from a teenage love story to a heist-gone-wrong. The racing conclusion feels inevitable but entirely fresh.
bookworld@washpost.com Zublin is a writer for The Post.

HOORAY FOR AMANDA & HER ALLIGATOR By Mo Willems Baltzer & Bray/HarperCollins. $17.99. Ages 4-8 When you’re a small bluey-green stuffed alligator with a “perfectly good, unused ‘BOO!’ and no one to give it to,” what do you do? Alligator has the perfect solution: He gives it to himself. Therein you have story No. 2½, “An Extra Surprise,” along with six more equally endearing chapters in this collection of minimalist stories about an effervescent young lady named Amanda and her best friend who is . . . well . . . small and bluey-green and prone to “fiddling his tail.” After exchanging surprises and tickles in the first three (and ½) chapters, a surprise of another sort arises in Chapter 4: Alligator discovers his price tag: “ ‘Seven cents!’ gasped Alligator. ‘Why am I only worth seven cents!?’ ” Ever-adroit Amanda manages to be matter-of-fact while simultaneously assuaging Alligator’s damaged self-esteem. It’s Alligator himself, however, who negotiates the crisis in the final chapter when Amanda returns from a trip to the zoo with a new friend. “The panda was huge. The panda was fluffy. The panda did not look like it came from the sale bucket.” Willems’s deft draftsmanship and expressive lines — a flat eyebrow here, a wobbly tail there — tell the emotional story that lies behind the guileless text, a classic combination that’s endlessly familiar and endlessly surprising. — Kristi Jemtegaard

THE LOCK ARTIST By Steve Hamilton St. Martin’s. 336 pp. Paperback, $14.99

ZOO CITY By Lauren Beukes Osprey. 416 pp. Paperback, $7.99

THE EMERALD ATLAS By John Stephens Knopf. $17.99. Ages 8-12 With e-books and apps in ascent, the physical book seems beleaguered these days. But in John Stephens’s first fantasy novel, “The Emerald Atlas,” everything depends on a mysterious paper-and-ink book. Three siblings — Kate (14), Michael (12) and Emma (11) — find a strange, greencovered tome in a hulking orphanage, their 13th dismal home in 10 years. This book whisks them willy-nilly to points in the past, but the children dwell for most of the tale in a time 15 years prior to their arrival at the orphanage when a beautiful, evil countess rules the mountainous region. She forces the inhabitants to search for a magical, longhidden emerald atlas. As the children learn more about the identity and power of the book in their possession, they gradually discover how intricately it twines through their family history. Might this atlas offer passage to their parents, who disappeared a decade ago? As Kate grapples with that question, Michael and Emma prepare to battle the countess and her undead minions with the help of friendly dwarves and giant natives. The novel’s high energy and humor lighten the tone while still honoring the heartfelt quest for family. The ending — with some questions answered and others emerging — paves the way well for the second book in this promising trilogy. — Mary Quattlebaum

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CARRIE LYLE/THE WASHINGTON POST; SOURCE IMAGES VIA ISTOCKPHOTO

POKING HOLES IN A MYTH: Russell draws her portrait of Doc Holliday, left, before he and Wyatt Earp ever get to Tombstone and the O.K. Corral.

BY

R ON C HARLES

I

f I had a six-shooter (and didn’t work in the District), I’d be firing it off in celebration of “Doc,” Mary Doria Russell’s fantastic new novel about Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp. Since winning top honors for her science fiction 15 years ago, Russell has blasted her way into one genre after another, and now she’s picked up the old conventions of the Wild West and brought these dusty myths back to life in a deeply sympathetic, aggressively researched and wonderfully entertaining story. “Doc” is no colorized daguerreotype; it’s a bold act of historical reclamation that scrapes off the bull and allows those American legends to walk and talk and love and grieve in the dynamic 19th-century world that existed before Hollywood shellacked it into cliches. (Stay tuned: Next year Val Kilmer will star in “The First Ride of Wyatt Earp.”) With open disdain for those lowdown, stinkin’ writers who prefer “well-dressed drama to bare-naked fact,” Russell can evoke plenty of grandeur and hell-raising without squaring every lawman’s jaw and waxing every villain’s mustache to a deadly point. And just to prove it, she mentions that famous gunfight at the O.K. Corral several times in these 400 pages but then draws her story of Doc Holliday and the Earp brothers to a perfect close before they ever get to Tombstone. Take that, dime novels. “He began to die when he was 21,” Russell writes at the opening, “but tuberculosis is slow and sly and subtle.” The whole novel takes place in the shadow of that death sentence, which Dr. John Henry Holliday postponed with a rough mixture of fury, gentility and bourbon. Born in Georgia in 1851 with a cleft palate, Holliday had already beaten the odds just by surviving infancy, but his wealthy mother was determined that her son would speak like a gentleman and receive the classical education his fierce intellect deserved. He grew up on Virgil and Homer, and from beginning to end Russell casts his tragic life not in terms of Old West myths, but of those far older heroes who were his boyhood models. “The Fates pursued him from the day he first drew breath,” she writes, “howling for his delayed demise.” How this smart, talented young man constructed his life under these deadly conditions is the true subject of Russell’s affecting novel. Her Doc Holliday is a person of great pride and Southern refinement who finds his ideals shredded by illness and economic necessity. Trained in dentistry (as opposed to medicine, which at the time was for quacks), he’s determined to relieve the suffering so common among people who have never seen a toothbrush. Problem is, he can make a year’s wages in a good night of card playing, and alcohol is the only thing that keeps those razor-sharp coughs from slicing up his lungs. You can’t help but feel your throat clench in sympathy as he strains for breath. Although it sometimes reaches back to preCivil War days and refers to events ahead in the

In Mary Doria Russell’s bold new novel, Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp run tired western cliches out of town.
20th century, “Doc” focuses on Dodge City, Kan., in 1878. Russell captures this wildest of the Wild West towns in all its mud-stained virility. “Front Street was alive with young men,” she writes. “Sauntering, staggering. Laughing, puking. Shouting in fierce strife or striking lewd whispered bargains with girls in bright dresses. They were giddy with liberty, these boys, free to do anything they could think of and pay for, unwatched by stern elders, unseen by sweethearts back home, unjudged by God, who had surely forsaken this small, bright hellhole in the immense, inhuman darkness that was west Kansas.” This is a town caught in the swift confluence of national changes. Brawling saloons and accommodating whorehouses are locked in a death match with new forces of respectability and temperance, all greased with astronomical sums of money. The “city had a single purpose,” Russell writes, “to extract wealth from Texas. Drovers brought cattle north and got paid cash. Dodge sent them home in possession of neither.” Into this explosive, oversexed, alcoholic town rides a collection of characters who need no help from Tinseltown to fill their boots. (At the front of the book, there’s an intimidating list of more than 60 players, but don’t let that scare you off.) Russell moves gracefully along two intertwined story lines. One involves Holliday, “snake-slender and casual in fresh-pressed linen the color of cream,” who comes to Dodge for the climate and hopes to set up a new dental practice. His extraordinary companion is Kate Harony, a formidable Hungarian prostitute with a classical education to match Doc’s (he’s particularly taken with her Latin). Their tumultuous relationship, a mixture of scheming, love and intellectual repartee, serves as the emotional heart of the novel, as they both struggle to be something neither his health nor wallet will allow. Woven through that sad, romantic tale is the
DOC By Mary Doria Russell Random House. 394 pp. $26

story of Doc’s friend, a young lawman named Wyatt Earp, who “had not smiled since 1855, and didn’t like to say much more than six or seven words in a row.” Drawn to Dodge by the presence of his brothers — one a bailiff, the other a brothel manager — Wyatt takes a job as the deputy marshal only after getting the mayor to agree to his terms: “Somebody breaks the law, I don’t care whose friend he is, I’m taking him in,” he says. “There’s got to be one law for everybody, or I can’t do this job.” In a town that runs on alcohol and corruption, that will prove to be a dangerous principle. But then he turns to his new staff and lays down the rules: “You see any weapon at all, bash whoever’s carrying it. Don’t argue. Don’t explain. Don’t wait.” (John Wayne claimed he based his film persona on Earp, who worked in Hollywood in the early 20th century.) What’s so beautiful about this novel is the way Russell dismantles rickety legends while reconstructing her own larger-than-life characters on a firmer foundation of historical fact and psychological insight. Playing subtly with the patter of those old westerns, her voice alternately pays homage and pokes fun at them, picking up the cowboy accent, plumbing the real heroism of these men, and enjoying their capacity for tenderness and corniness. And she’s not content to follow the arc of the old story lines either. The murder of an affable black teenager — one of her few inventions here — provides a thin wire on which to hang the plot, but the mystery of that crime fades into the background through most of these chapters. As though it’s a corrective to 150 years of shoot-’emup westerns, “Doc” remains daringly free of quick draws or showdowns. Russell can choreograph a tavern brawl or a trigger-finger card game, but far more of this engaging novel is taken up with the day-to-day struggle to keep the peace, encourage one’s friends, and quiet the shame that haunts Doc and Wyatt, two very different men who respect each other’s implacable discipline. While exploring the fluid state of post-Civil War race relations, the seesawing economic conditions of the United States, and the precarious fortunes of sex workers, she keeps the story moving almost entirely by the force of her sensitive characterizations. The gun-slinging confrontations are violent but brief and always marked by Russell’s disarming reminders of the combatants’ pedestrian hopes and concerns. In the middle of one vicious fistfight, Doc yells to Wyatt: “For the love of God! Your teeth!” I’m in awe of how confidently Russell rides through this familiar territory, takes control and remakes all its rich heroism and tragedy. Clearly, there’s a new sheriff in town. Given her propensity to strike out into radically different subjects, I suspect she’ll mosey on to someplace entirely different next time. But how I wish she’d settle here for a spell and give us a sequel.
charlesr@washpost.com Charles, The Post’s fiction editor, reviews books every Wednesday.

THE WATCHER Jane Goodall’s Life With the Chimps By Jeanette Winter Schwartz & Wade. $17.99. Ages 4-8 Inspired by animals and the fictional heroes who communed with them, Jane Goodall got herself from the English countryside to a remote African forest in her early 20s and found her calling. Like Dr. Dolittle, she talked to the animals, but mostly she observed them. In “The Watcher,” author-illustrator Jeannette Winter manages to convey Goodall’s story and much about the chimpanzees of Gombe that she has worked hard to save from extinction. Concisely told and charmingly illustrated, the picture book begins with 5-year-old Jane waiting to witness how a hen lays an egg. Winter then focuses on Goodall’s patience in getting to know the chimpanzees. At first, Goodall heard their calls but couldn’t see them. Winter’s gorgeous acrylic-paint-and-ink scenes of the forests start out featuring chimps peeking from behind trees and sleeping in nests made in high branches, but after one distinguishedlooking chimp approaches Goodall and takes bananas from her hand, other chimps allow her to be near them and study them. The double-page spread showing a forest being cut down and a chimp and baby being aimed at with a gun is not exactly realistic — Winter’s images are too simple and geometrical for that — but it starkly captures the threats to chimps that Goodall has tried to bring to the world’s attention. The book’s last scenes show Goodall back at Gombe, where she is inspired and enlightened anew by her favorite animals. — Abby McGanney Nolan

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

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An online guide to events, night life and entertainment

Nightlife Agenda
The week’s best DJs, bands, dance nights and parties
Calle 13
You can question the logic of Puerto Rican superstars Calle 13 playing a show celebrating Cinco de Mayo, a Mexican celebration of independence. Or you can just take advantage of an opportunity to see the reggaeton duo deliver their dizzying percussive romps that have rightfully made the group the face of the popular Latin American genre. It’s not a role the band has embraced, and its attempts to escape being pigeonholed were fully realized on the 2010 album “Entre Los Que Quieren,” which showed off a more expansive sound with nods to Bollywood and to other South American styles. In a live setting, though, expect less experimenting and more simple energy, harnessed by frontman Residente. Thursday at 9 p.m. Galaxy Night Club, 2301 E. University Blvd., Hyattsville. 301-803-9313. $40. Beloved ’90s D.C. post-punk band Jawbox gave just a tease of a reunion in late 2009 when it performed three songs on “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon,” leaving fans clamoring for a full tour, new material, anything. It didn’t happen, but the former members are still keeping busy, and you can catch up with some of them Friday. Office of Future Plans, featuring Jawbox singer-guitarist J. Robbins, headlines the show, presented by Positive Force as a benefit for Fight SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy), and the band’s equally crunching and slashing songs are sure to appeal to old Jawbox fans. Former Jawbox drummer Zac Barocas is behind the kit for openers Bells≥, an instrumental quartet that packs a mighty punch. Friday at 8 p.m. St. Stephen’s Church, 1525 Newton St. NW. $5.

ART PHILLIPS AFTER 5

In honor of the Philip Guston exhibition “Roma,” the Phillips Collection is celebrating Italian culture for this month’s after-hours art party. Washington National Opera’s DomingoCafritz Young Artists will set the mood with selections from “Don Pasquale” at 6:30 and 7:30 p.m., while gallery talks at 6 and 7 p.m. will delve into Guston’s many influences. There will also be tastings of white wines from Italy, a jazz performance by Project Natale and a dose of Milan thrown in, thanks to a fashion show with the latest from Armani, Etro, Roberto Cavalli and Missoni. Thursday from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. 202-387-2151. www.phillipscollection.org. $12; $10 seniors and students. — Stephanie Merry

Office of Future Plans

PRIVATE COLLECTION, WOODSTOCK, N.Y.

BELLA: “Rome Garden” (1971), oil on paper, by Philip Guston.

WILLARD HOTEL

CHEERS: Jim Hewes mixes a mint julep at the Willard’s Round Robin bar, site of a Kentucky Derby party.

Kentucky Derby viewing parties
The Kentucky Derby is called the fastest two minutes in sports, but most Kentucky Derby parties go on far longer. Bourbon’s annual viewing party is one of the best in town: exceptional juleps served in frosted silver julep cups with springs of fresh mint; servers passing out pieces of derby pie and other Kentucky snacks; and racing form guides lying around the bar so you can assess each horse’s chances. Over at the Willard’s Round Robin Bar, the annual “Bonnets and Bow-Ties” is a little classier: The $75 ticket includes a Southern buffet, two of the excellent juleps served in official souvenir Kentucky Derby glasses (the kind you’d get at Churchill Downs) and entry into the “Best Bonnet” and “Most Bodacious Bowtie” contests. Finally, Acadiana’s “Run for the Roses” party includes a bourbon tasting with

Ewan Morgan of Bulleit Bourbon, the race on large high-definition TVs, and a $5 menu of food and drink, including juleps and Kentucky hot browns. Bourbon: Saturday, 4-7 p.m. 2348 Wisconsin Ave. NW and 2321 18th St. NW. www.bourbondc.com. Free. Round Robin Bar: Saturday, 4-7 p.m. 1401 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-637-7305 $75. Acadiana:Saturday, 4-7 p.m. 901 New York Ave. NW. 202-408-8848. www.acadianarestaurant.com. Free.

Dale DeGroff’s ‘Talk of the Town’
Dale DeGroff is, by any measure, one of the most influential bartenders of the past century. His tenure at New York’s Rainbow Room in the 1980s and ’90s helped give rise to the return of the craft cocktail — using fresh fruits and quality spirits to give life to
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classic recipes — and, for better or worse, he’s the man credited with repopularizing the Cosmopolitan in the mid-’90s. But more than that, DeGroff is a cocktail historian with a gift for storytelling, who can turn the minutiae of the evolution of the martini recipe into a lively tale. DeGroff is in town this week to present “On the Town,” a history of cocktails and the evolution of bars from saloons to speak-easies to modern temples of mixology. While he speaks at the Passenger, the audience gets to try sample drinks. Win-win all around. Monday, 6:30-8 p.m. The Passenger (seating in the Warehouse Theatre), 1021 Seventh St. NW. www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org. $40 in advance; $45 at the door. — Fritz Hahn and David Malitz
INFORMATION TO

PRIVATE COLLECTION

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Television
bout 57 million TV viewers watched President Obama announce Sunday that U.S. military forces had killed Osama bin Laden in a targeted attack. Although that audience is dwarfed by the 82 million who watched thenPresident George W. Bush address the nation in the immediate aftermath of the bin Laden-orchestrated Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on U.S. soil, Sunday’s viewership is thought to be the largest TV audience of Obama’s presidency. “Tonight, I can report to the American people and to the world, the United States has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of al-Qaeda, and a terrorist who’s responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children,” Obama announced about 11:35 p.m. Sunday, speaking from the East Room of the White House. “It was nearly 10 years ago that a bright September day was darkened by the worst attack on the American people in our history. The images of 9/11 are seared into our national memory — hijacked planes cutting through a cloudless September sky; the twin towers collapsing to the ground; black smoke billowing up from the Pentagon; the wreckage of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, where the actions of heroic citizens saved even more heartbreak and destruction,” the president continued. Nielsen reported that the audience was 56.7 million viewers. By comparison, shortly after being sworn into office, Obama drew 52 million for his first Address to the Joint Session of Congress. (That’s Washington-speak for “guy who just got inaugurated five weeks ago’s State of the Union Address.”) In coming up with Sunday’s stat, Nielsen counted viewers who watched Obama on ABC, CBS, NBC, Telemundo, Univision, CNN, Centric, CNBC, FNC, HLN and MSNBC. To put Sunday’s audience into presidential perspective:  Nearly 68 million people watched in 1998 as President Bill Clinton acknowledged that he’d had a relationship with Monica Lewinsky.  About 60 million people watched President Richard M. Nixon deliver his resignation speech in 1974 — when there were lots fewer people, and certainly lots fewer TVs, in the United States.  About 41 million people watched Ronald Reagan inaugurated in 1981 — the largest presidential inauguration on record. (About 38 million watched Obama’s inauguration in January 2009,

6 TV NEWS ONLINE 3
THE TV COLUMN
Lisa de Moraes

INTERACTIVE TV LISTINGS
Keep track of your favorite television shows and movies with our interactive TV listings at washingtonpost.com/tv.

From TV’s top shows to industry buzz, get the latest television news in the TV Column blog at washingtonpost.com/tvcolumn.

Close to 57 million people watched Obama announce bin Laden’s killing

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which is the second-most watched presidential inauguration.)  About 133 million people watched the first night of the Persian Gulf War, on Jan. 17, 1991.  About 95 million viewers sat transfixed to their TV sets as authorities engaged in a slow chase in Los Angeles with O.J. Simpson’s Ford Bronco back on June 17, 1994.  Just more than 33 million viewers watched Princess Diana’s funeral, on Sept. 6, 1997.  And, of course, 23 million watched Prince William wed Kate Middleton last Friday.

Pelley gets Couric’s seat
The worst-kept secret finally reported by CBS: Jeff Fager, the “60 Minutes” exec producer who assumed oversight of the entire CBS News division in February, has selected longtime “60 Minutes” correspondent Scott Pelley to anchor the “CBS Evening News.” Fager picked Pelley to be the face of the evening newscast under his watch. Pelley replaces Katie Couric, who finally made it official that she was leaving the gig in the nick of time — one week before CBS News went out with its Pelley announcement. Still no official word yet on where she’s going — presumably to host a syndicated talk show and become The Next Oprah, while also keeping one foot in the news game. In his new gig, Pelley will also be the managing editor of “CBS Evening News” — a program name usually accompanied by “mired in third place.” Since word of the Pelley pick got out weeks ago, The Reporters Who Cover Television have included in their coverage references to Pelley oozing credibility from his pores and such gags as “not groundbreaking,” “not innovative,” “not risky” and “staying the course.” These assessments get right in among Fager’s ganglions. “He’s more experienced than any reporter who could qualify for this job,” Fager told the TV Column on Tuesday. “His pure reporting experience gives him a credibility that will serve him so well being managing editor, which is not a small part of the job.” At “60 Minutes,” where correspondents are also editors, Pelley has developed a “breadth of experience and depth that is incomparable,” Fager added. “I’m not comfortable in third place at all,” he said. “CBS News shouldn’t be in third place. That’s just a fact. We have to come out of that; we have to grow.” So much of “TV news, is about

JOHN P. FILO/CBS

OOZING CREDIBILITY: Scott Pelley brings “depth” to his new job and is highly “experienced,” a CBS official says.

“It’s not about the anchor. The anchor needs to get out of the way.”
— Scott Pelley, on his new job as “CBS Evening News” anchor

packaging things. . . . They package what happened today into sound bites and voice-overs, and you can’t figure out what the hell you’re getting out of it,” Fager said. “Don’t just tell me what happened today — dig and dig and give me some more detail and a better understanding of that story. “That’s what we apply every Sunday [at ‘60 Minutes’]. . . . I’m confident Scott is going to push that among the troops. And that’s what I mean by how important the managing editor [aspect of the] job is.” Pelley’s response? “What he said” —

or words to that effect: “The least important part of my day is going to be anchoring the broadcast. The most important part of my day is all day long, as managing editor.” That part of the job, Pelley explained, includes working with senior producers in the morning to determine what stories to follow, talking to correspondents and producers about how to cover those stories, and helping work on scripts before hitting the air. “It’s not about the anchor. The anchor needs to get out of the way and let these brilliant men and women of CBS News all around the world shine. . . . They are experts in their fields. My job is to be moderator of a panel of experts,” he said. And if you think Fager’s talk about plans to “dovetail” the evening news and the flagship Sunday newsmag is big stuff, you should hear Pelley talk about bringing down “the Chinese Wall” between the two operations. “With Jeff Fager, the executive producer of ‘60 Minutes,’ now running CBS News and a [‘60 Minutes’] correspondent as managing editor, you can expect lots of cross-pollination,” Pelley told the TV Column, adding that

not all of it will be seen onscreen. “We trained the very best people at ‘60 Minutes,’ ” he said, and he intends to borrow from the newsmag staff as stories warrant. “There will not be a Chinese Wall anymore,” Pelley said. Pelley said CBS News will not remake the evening-news set in advance of his June 6 debut, as the network did when Couric took over the newscast. “I do not want to spend one nickel on anything that does not gather news on the street,” Pelley said. “I don’t worry at all about sign-offs, catchphrases, hairstyles and clothing. It’s all completely immaterial to me,” he said, in marked contrast to all the hoopla there was about all of the above when Couric took over the newscast five years ago. In fairness, some of it was not Couric’s fault — or the fault of then-CBS News chief Sean McManus. They couldn’t help it that The Reporters Who Cover Television insisted on asking her, for instance, what she planned to wear on her first night as the first woman to solo anchor a major broadcast-television evening newscast.
demoraesl@washpost.com

VIRGINIA SHERWOOD/NBC

‘LAW & ORDER SVU’: John Stamos guest-stars as the creepy fiance of a woman whose recently adopted baby is abandoned (NBC at 10).

HIGHLIGHTS

Frankie’s ideal Mother’s Day present is a day all to herself on “The Middle” (ABC at 8). When that goes awry (naturally), Mike tries a “redo” of the special day but includes the whole family. Lauren, James, Jacob, Scotty and Haley have made it to the Top 5 on “American Idol” (Fox at 8). Their reward? Getting to sing two songs — one from the 1960s and one current tune — on Wednesday’s performance night. China’s Terra Cotta Warriors are explored on “Secrets of the Dead” (MPT at 8, WETA at 10), which looks at the collection of 8,000 warrior sculptures that were buried about 2,200 years ago. Claire and Gloria take the kids hiking for Mother’s Day, which seems like a great idea at the time. But then again, so does leaving their husbands at home to cook dinner — and neither plan turns out very well on “Modern Family” (ABC at 9). The team heads to North Carolina on “Criminal Minds” (CBS at 9) to investigate the disappearance of one woman and the injury of another, but soon realizes that there are more victims in the area. “Nova” (WETA and MPT at 9) looks at the ghosts of Machu Picchu and examines the archaeological aspects of the place called the Lost City of the Incas on a mountain in Peru. Travis is on the brink of a

major decision on “Cougar Town” (ABC at 9:30), and the always-nosy Jules does all in her power to stick to her resolution and not get involved in her son’s life; meanwhile, the gang decides to stop taking one another for granted and forms a council to hand down punishments if and when anyone makes that mistake. New reality series “Spouse vs. House” (TLC at 10) gives married couples $25,000 to redecorate their house. But in a nifty twist sure to cause fights, the husband is in charge of the renovation for three weeks while the wife moves out to create her own dream design. Then they will see if her hopes match up with the real thing. John Stamos takes a turn as a creepy guest star on “Law & Order: SVU” (NBC at 10), as he plays the fiance of a woman whose recently adopted baby is found abandoned on a playground. Actress Betty White and reality TV star Rick Harrison visit “Late Show With David Letterman” (CBS at 11:35) along with musical guest Morning Teleportation. “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno” (NBC at 11:35) hosts actress Kate Hudson and actor Chris Hemsworth, and features a performance by Sergio Mendes and Siedah Garrett.
— Emily Yahr

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Judith Martin

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Coffee shop etiquette: When a request becomes a demand
Dear Miss Manners: I was at a coffee shop today and I was happy to get one of the “comfy” chairs, where I could relax and enjoy my coffee and book. After a little while, a woman approached me and asked if she could have my seat. She explained that she needed to use her laptop computer, and the chair that I was in was the only seat close to an electrical outlet not already in use by other customers with laptops. I was a bit taken aback by her request, since it would mean moving from the comfy chair to a far less comfortable table. When I expressed reluctance to move, she said that since I obviously didn’t need the electrical outlet, she thought she should have priority. She was polite, yet her request in itself struck me as inappropriate and rude. Not wanting to be rude myself, and because I’d been planning to leave the coffee shop soon anyway, I said she could have the seat, and I left. However, I was a bit irritated. What is the etiquette here?

There doesn’t seem to have been much of it. Although you say that that this was a request made politely, it strikes Miss

Manners as verging on a demand, and you acceded because you were feeling cowed, not obliging. The entire concept of asking and considering a favor seems to have been forgotten — not just in this instance, but in general. Instead, people go around demanding what they consider to be their rights of those who feel that their only choices are to yield or to fight. Suppose the lady had said, “Excuse me, please, but I wonder if there is some way I could get to that plug that you are not using?” You might have felt inclined

to say, “Sure, I’ll move,” but that was not your only polite option. You could also have said, “I’ll be leaving soon” or “It’s this chair I like — perhaps we could move it.” You also could have politely refused: “I especially like this kind of chair. There might be another plug around somewhere, but if you see another of this kind of chair free, I’ll be glad to change.”
Dear Miss Manners: I just received a large inheritance from a great aunt who passed away a year ago. It has literally changed my life and

I am so very grateful, humbled and in complete shock. Her husband is still alive, and I want to send some sort of thanks, but I am not sure how to say it and not sure if I need to. Can you point a polite girl in the right direction?

Dear Miss Manners: Can I replace the salad fork for the dessert fork just for this one event?

Sure, go ahead. Miss Manners will never tell, provided you promise not to tell anyone she condoned it.
Feeling incorrect? E-mail questions to Miss Manners at MissManners@unitedmedia.com; enter them at www.missmanners.com or mail to United Media, 200 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016.
© 2011, King Features Syndicate

Write him that “It has literally changed my life and I am so very grateful, humbled and in complete shock.” Miss Manners gathers that you are a polite person, and that she only need correct the address to which you sent these sentiments.

MOVIE DIRECTORY
Water for Elephants (PG-13) Smithsonian Lockheed Martin IMAX Theater 1:00-3:55-6:40-9:30 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 601 Independence Avenue SW Prom (PG) 12:55-3:30-6:00-8:40 (PG) 2:20 To Fly (NR) 11:20-2:00 AMC Loews Fast Five (PG-13) 3:55-7:00-10:00 Hubble 3D (G) 12:00-2:40-4:40St. Charles Town Ctr. 9 African Cats (G) 1:20-3:4011115 Mall Circle 6:40
AMC Loews Georgetown 14 3111 K Street N.W.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011 www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Hanna (PG-13) 1:30-4:15-7:009:45 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 1:15-4:00-7:05-9:55 Source Code (PG-13) 2:10-5:107:40-10:10 Rio 3D (G) (!) 1:45-6:45 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) (!) 3:15-6:40-8:45 Atlas Shrugged: Part 1 (PG-13) 5:15 Hop (PG) 1:20-3:40-6:50 Arthur (PG-13) 9:10 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) 1:10 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 2:30-5:00-7:5010:20 Hanna (PG-13) 1:50-4:40-7:3010:05 Prom (PG) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) 1:25 Rio (G) 1:50-4:25-7:35 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:30-2:004:30-5:00-7:30-8:00-10:20 Scream 4 (R) 10:05 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 1:15-1:45-3:454:15-6:45-7:15-9:35-10:10 Hanna (PG-13) 1:10-7:10 Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PG13) 1:55-4:35-7:40-10:15 Prom (PG) 1:20-4:05-7:20-9:55
Regal Rockville Stadium 13 199 East Montgomery Avenue

DISTRICT

6:10-8:30 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 2:10-4:50-7:4010:10 Hanna (PG-13) 2:35-5:20-7:5510:35 The Conspirator (PG-13) 1:304:20-7:20-10:05 The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 2:05-5:00 Source Code (PG-13) Closed Caption: 1:10-3:30-6:05-8:25 Win Win (R) 2:50-5:40-8:20 Rio 3D (G) 2:30-4:55-7:25-9:55 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) 4:45-7:10-9:30 Source Code (PG-13) 1:10-3:306:05-8:25 Fast Five (PG-13) 2:55-6:00-9:00 Limitless (PG-13) 1:15-3:507:05-10:25 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 1:40-4:30-7:30-10:20 Prom (PG) 2:25-5:10-7:35-10:15
AMC Loews Uptown 1 3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.

The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 4:00-7:00
AMC Mazza Gallerie 5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) 12:10 Rio 3D (G) 1:40-4:20-6:50-9:20 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) 2:40-4:50-7:10-9:30 Fast Five (PG-13) 10:10-1:004:00-7:00-10:10 African Cats (G) (!) 10:00-12:302:50-5:05-10:15 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 12:20-3:00-5:308:00-10:30 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 11:10-1:50-4:40-7:40-10:20 Prom (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:007:30-10:00
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum 6th Street and Independence Ave SW

Journey to the Stars (NR) 11:301:30-2:30-3:30-4:30-5:30-6:30 Cosmic Collisions (NR) 11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-4:00-5:006:00-7:00 One World One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure (NR) 12:30-3:00
Avalon 5612 Connecticut Avenue

Ulysses’ Gaze (To vlemma tou Odyssea) (NR) 8:00 Bill Cunningham New York (NR) 1:30-5:45 I Am (2010) (NR) 11:30-3:30 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:15
Landmark E Street Cinema 555 11th Street NW

The Human Resources Manager (NR) 2:10-4:40-7:45-10:00 Win Win (R) 2:15-4:45-7:20-9:50 POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold (PG13) 1:45-4:00-7:15-9:30 Atlas Shrugged: Part 1 (PG-13) 1:50 Bill Cunningham New York (NR) 4:30 The Princess of Montpensier (La Princesse de Montpensier) (NR) 2:00-5:00-8:00 Nostalgia for the Light (Nostalgia de la luz) (NR) 1:00-3:005:20-7:40-10:00 The Four Times (Le quattro volte) (NR) 1:20-3:30-5:307:30-9:45 Jane Eyre (PG-13) 1:30-4:157:00-9:40
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 707 Seventh Street NW

African Cats (G) 11:55-2:10-4:307:00-9:30 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 12:40-1:40-3:40-4:35-6:40-7:559:35-10:40 Hanna (PG-13) 11:55-2:30-5:057:40-10:15 Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PGLegends of Flight (NR) 10:25Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 13) 12:00-2:40-5:15-7:50-10:35 The Conspirator (PG-13) 1:00-3:40-5:40 (PG) (!) 11:30AM 11:55-8:00 Hop (PG) 1:10 Smithsonian - Samuel C. The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 10:20 Johnson IMAX Theater Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 11:40Source Code (PG-13) 1:15-7:20 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW 2:40-5:40 Dinosaurs 3D: Giants of Patago- Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Insidious (PG-13) 6:30-8:55 Soul Surfer (PG) 12:55-3:35Family (PG-13) 3:40-6:20 nia (NR) 2:25-4:25-6:25 6:25-9:05 Grand Canyon Adventure: River Water for Elephants (PG-13) Rio 3D (G) 12:35-2:15-3:05-4:4511:20-2:10-5:00-7:50 at Risk 3D (NR) 10:25-12:25 Rio 3D (G) 11:00-1:30-4:20- 5:35-7:15-8:05-9:45-10:35 Born To Be Wild IMAX 3D (G) Arthur (PG-13) 4:10-9:40 6:50 11:25-1:25-3:25-5:25 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy West End Cinema Family (PG-13) 12:00-12:25-1:05(!) 1:40-4:00-6:30 3D (PG) 2301 M Street NW Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:10- 1:35-2:10-2:35-3:20-4:00-4:40In a Better World (Haevnen) 4:55-5:40-6:20-6:55-7:40-8:007:20 (R) 4:50 8:35-9:10-9:50-10:40 Scream 4 (R) 1:20-4:40-7:30 Lunch Line (NR) 7:00 Fast Five (PG-13) 11:55-12:25That’s What I Am (NR) 3:15-5:20- Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy 1:45-2:55-3:30-5:05-6:05-6:50Family (PG-13) 11:10-1:507:30-9:40 8:20-9:25-10:05 4:50-7:40 Certified Copy (Copie conforme) Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Prom (PG) (!) 11:15-2:00-4:30(NR) 2:40-9:20 Evil 3D (PG) 11:55-2:05-4:157:10 Making the Boys (NR) 3:00 6:35-9:00 AMC Loews White Flint 5 The Bang Bang Club (NR) 5:10Prom (PG) 1:30-4:25-7:05-9:55 11301 Rockville Pike 7:20-9:30 Fast Five (PG-13) 12:45-4:05Hop (PG) 1:30-4:00-7:00 7:35-10:35 Soul Surfer (PG) 2:00-5:00-8:00 Hoyt’s West Rio 3D (G) 1:45-4:45-7:15 AFI Silver Theatre Nursery Cinema 14 Fast Five (PG-13) 1:15-4:30-7:45 Cultural Center 1591 West Nursery Rd. Water for Elephants (PG-13) 8633 Colesville Road Source Code (PG-13) 6:55-9:20 1:00-4:15-7:30 Win Win (R) 12:30-2:45-5:00Insidious (PG-13) 2:10-4:40AMC Magic Johnson 7:15-9:30 7:45-10:10 Capital Center 12 48 Hour Film Project (NR) (!) Soul Surfer (PG) 1:30-4:00800 Shoppers Way 7:00-9:30 6:30-9:30 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Jane Eyre (PG-13) 12:00-2:20(PG) (!) 12:10 4:40-7:00-9:20 3D (PG) 1:15-3:40-6:45-9:10 Hop (PG) 12:15-2:40-5:10 AMC Columbia 14 Gnomeo & Juliet 3D (G) 1:35Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 12:30-4:00- 3:45-6:50-9:40 10300 Little Patuxent Parkway Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 7:00-10:15 Scream 4 (R) 12:00-2:35-5:15(PG) 2:15-4:25-7:35-9:50 (PG) (!) 10:00-12:15 8:00-10:40 Rio (G) 1:05-3:35-6:35-9:05 Hop (PG) 11:30-1:50-4:20-6:50 African Cats (G) (!) 12:00-2:15Hop (PG) 1:40-4:20 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 10:45-2:004:35-6:55-9:20 5:15-8:30 Fast Five (PG-13) 1:10-3:05-4:05African Cats (G) (!) 11:15-1:30- Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy 6:20-7:05-9:15-10:05 Family (PG-13) (!) 11:40-2:203:50-6:15-8:40 Scream 4 (R) 1:45-4:55-7:40-10:15 5:20-8:20 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) (!) 11:10-12:30- Insidious (PG-13) 7:50-10:25 Family (PG-13) 1:00-2:00-3:301:45-3:30-4:30-6:10-8:45-10:30 Rio 3D (G) 12:05-2:25-5:054:30-6:30-7:30-9:00-10:00 7:35-10:05 Hanna (PG-13) 9:10 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Water for Elephants (PG-13) (!) Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 1:20-4:15-7:10-9:55 3D (PG) (!) 2:30-5:00-7:40-10:00 Prom (PG) 1:25-3:50-6:40-9:25 11:00-1:55-4:55-7:50-10:35 Rio (G) 11:00-1:30-4:05 Prom (PG) Closed Caption: (!) Kentlands Stadium 10 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 11:50-3:1012:00-2:30-5:00-7:40-10:10 629 Center Point Way 6:20-9:30 Source Code (PG-13) 12:40Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 5:10-8:00 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy 5:50-10:40 Water for Elephants (PG-13) (!) (!) 10:30-12:20Family (PG-13) Insidious (PG-13) 10:15-3:004:55-7:10-9:25 1:20-3:00-4:20-6:00-6:40-7:208:10 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy 9:00-9:40-10:20 Fast Five: The IMAX Experience Family (PG-13) (!) 5:00-7:05-9:15 (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:30 Prom (PG) (!) 11:30-2:05-4:50Rio (G) 5:05-7:05-9:05 7:30-10:30 Rio 3D (G) 10:50-1:25-4:00Academy Stadium Theaters Rio 3D (G) 6:30-8:45 6:45-9:15 Scream 4 (R) 7:15-9:20 6198 Greenbelt Rd. Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick 3D (PG) (!) 2:25-4:40-7:00-9:20 Rules (PG) 5:05 Soul Surfer (PG) 11:35-2:20-5:05- (PG) 12:25-2:50-5:25-7:30 Rio 3D (G) 12:25-2:50-5:25-7:30 Arthur (PG-13) 5:00-7:15-9:20 7:45-10:25 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Limitless (PG-13) 4:55-7:05-9:05 Rio (G) 12:10 Soul Surfer (PG) 5:05-7:10-9:15 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 12:05-3:15- Family (PG-13) (!) 12:10-2:355:10-7:40; 12:45-3:10-5:35-8:05 The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 5:006:30-9:40 7:10-9:20 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 12:35-1:35Scream 4 (R) 2:45-5:20-8:00Landmark 3:35-4:35-6:35-7:25 10:35 Bethesda Row Cinema Prom (PG) (!) 12:30-3:00-5:40AMC Loews Center Park 8 7235 Woodmont Avenue 8:05 4001 Powder Mill Rd. Win Win (R) 1:45-4:15-7:00-9:30 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 12:15-2:50-5:25-8:05 POM Wonderful Presents: The (PG) (!) 2:15 Greatest Movie Ever Sold (PGBow Tie Annapolis Mall 11 Hop (PG) 2:30 13) 2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55 1020 Annapolis Mall Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 3:00-4:10Winter in Wartime (OorlogswinRio (G) 1:00-3:40 6:15-7:00 ter) (R) 1:50-4:25-7:10-9:40 Hop (PG) 1:40-4:10-6:40 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy African Cats (G) 1:55-4:35Family (PG-13) 1:30-4:00-5:00- Fast Five (PG-13) 12:40-1:506:50-9:15 3:00-3:50-5:00-6:10-7:00-7:306:30-7:30 Jane Eyre (PG-13) 1:25-4:058:10-9:20-10:00 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 6:45-9:25 Scream 4 (R) 2:30-5:10-7:401:45-4:25-7:10 Of Gods and Men (Des hommes 10:15 Rio 3D (G) 2:50-5:15-7:45 et des dieux) (PG-13) 1:30-4:10Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy 6:55-9:35 Family (PG-13) 12:30-2:10-3:103D (PG) (!) 4:30-6:45 The Conspirator (PG-13) 1:354:50-5:50-7:50-8:40-9:40 Prom (PG) (!) 2:00-4:45-7:20 4:20-7:05-9:50 Prom (PG) 1:10-4:00-6:50-9:30 AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 Potiche (R) 2:00-4:30-7:15-9:45 Source Code (PG-13) 10:10

Prom (PG) 11:50-2:20-4:507:30-10:00

MARYLAND

9811 Washingtonian Blvd.

Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 12:10-12:503:10-4:10-6:30-7:10-9:50-10:20 Scream 4 (R) 10:50 Limitless (PG-13) 12:20 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 12:45-7:15 Insidious (PG-13) 2:50 Rio 3D (G) (!) 11:45-2:10-4:306:55-9:20 Source Code (PG-13) 12:40-3:005:40-8:10-10:30 The Ride (2011) (NR) (!) 7:00 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) (!) 2:25-4:40-7:00-9:10 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) 12:10 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 11:30-2:305:30-8:40 African Cats (G) 3:20-6:20-8:40 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 12:05-1:40-2:404:20-5:20-8:00-10:10-10:40 Hanna (PG-13) 11:35-2:15-5:007:50-10:35 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 3:50-10:05 The Conspirator (PG-13) 1:104:00-7:40-10:25

Rio (G) 12:35-3:10-5:45-8:20 Hop (PG) 12:30-2:55-5:25 African Cats (G) 12:30-2:45-5:007:15-9:35 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 11:00-1:40-4:207:00-8:00-9:40 Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PG-13) 11:25-2:00-4:507:35-10:10 The Conspirator (PG-13) 1:20-4:20 Soul Surfer (PG) 11:15-1:50-4:307:15-10:05 Rio 3D (G) 11:35-2:10-4:457:20-9:55 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) 1:30-3:45-5:55-8:1010:30 The Warring States (Zhan Guo) (NR) 1:35-4:40 Source Code (PG-13) 7:10-9:55 Chalo Dilli (NR) 12:25-3:256:30-9:25 Win Win (R) 1:35-4:10-7:05-9:40 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) 11:20AM Fast Five (PG-13) 12:05-1:053:00-4:15-6:10-7:20-9:20-10:30 Scream 4 (R) 7:40-10:20

Marlow 6 Theatre Rio 3D (G) 12:10-2:00-2:40-4:303899 Branch Ave 5:20-8:00-10:20 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Arthur (PG-13) 12:00 2:00-3:45-5:30-7:15-9:00 (PG) Bow Tie Harbour 9 Rio (G) 2:15-4:15-6:15-8:15 2474 Solomons Island Road Win Win (R) 12:30-4:00-6:30-9:20 Hop (PG) 2:05-4:05-6:05-8:05 Fast Five (PG-13) 2:50-5:20-7:50 Soul Surfer (PG) 2:00-4:30Scream 4 (R) 6:05-8:20 7:00-9:30 Atlas Shrugged: Part 1 (PG-13) Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 2:10-3:00-4:202:20-5:10-7:30-10:00 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 5:10-6:30-7:20-8:40 Montgomery Royal Theatres 3D (PG) 1:20-3:50-6:50-9:10 11006 Viers Mill Road African Cats (G) 12:20-2:40-5:00Water for Elephants (PG-13) (!) 7:20-9:40 5:00-7:25 Hanna (PG-13) 11:50-2:30-5:20Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 5:00-7:35 7:50-10:10 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Water for Elephants (PG-13) 12:00-2:10-3:00-4:50-6:00-7:40- (PG) (!) 4:00-6:05-8:05 9:00-10:20 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) (!) 4:00-6:10-8:10 The Conspirator (PG-13) 1:404:20-7:10-10:00 Prom (PG) (!) 4:05-6:05-8:05 Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Rio (G) 4:00-6:05-8:05 7000 Arundel Mills Circle P and G Old Greenbelt 129 Centerway

Rio (G) 1:20-4:00 Hop (PG) 1:50-4:20-6:45 Your Highness (R) 9:15 Scream 4 (R) 2:20-5:00-7:4510:30 Limitless (PG-13) 2:50-5:3010:45

Win Win (R) 5:00-7:30
Regal Bethesda 10 7272 Wisconsin Avenue

Rio (G) 4:15-9:15 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:30-2:254:20-7:10-7:50-10:00-10:30

Hop (PG) 1:30-4:05-6:30 Scream 4 (R) 9:00 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-2:004:00-5:00-7:10-8:10-10:20 Regal Cinemas Water for Elephants (PG-13) Bowie Crossing Stadium 14 1:20-4:20-7:20-10:10 15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard African Cats (G) 12:30-9:50 Hop (PG) 1:10 Rio 3D (G) (!) 2:40-5:20-8:00-10:35 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:55-3:00- Source Code (PG-13) 1:10-3:503:30-4:50-6:05-6:30-7:50-9:106:40-9:10 9:30-10:45 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Rio 3D (G) (!) 1:30-3:55-6:25-8:55 3D (PG) (!) 4:40-7:00-9:25 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) (!) 3:45-5:55-8:05-10:15 (PG) 2:20 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Rio (G) 12:50-3:30-6:00 (PG) 1:35 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 3:00-6:10Rio (G) 2:20-4:45 9:20 Hop (PG) 2:00-4:20-6:55 African Cats (G) 2:50-5:10-7:30 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:00- Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy 7:00-10:00 Family (PG-13) 2:10-4:50-7:40Scream 4 (R) 10:30 10:30 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Hanna (PG-13) 1:50-7:50 Family (PG-13) 12:55-1:50-2:40- The Conspirator (PG-13) 3:20-4:30-5:15-6:00-7:15-8:004:30-10:40 8:30-9:50-10:40-11:00 Prom (PG) 1:40-4:10-6:50-9:30 Hanna (PG-13) 7:25-9:55 The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 8:40 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Regal Westview Stadium 16 1:45-4:35-7:20-10:05 5243 Buckeystown Pike Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PGFast Five (PG-13) (!) 2:00-5:0013) 2:30-5:00-7:30-10:10 8:00-10:50 Prom (PG) 2:10-4:40-7:10-9:45 Soul Surfer (PG) Open Caption: Regal Cinemas 2:45-8:15 Germantown Stadium 14 Rio 3D (G) (!) 12:15-2:45-5:1520000 Century Boulevard 8:00-10:30 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 2:00-4:50Source Code (PG-13) 12:30 7:50-10:45 Rio 3D (G) (!) 2:10-4:40-7:10-9:40 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) (!) 2:15-4:30-7:15-9:30 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Insidious (PG-13) 9:00 1:50-7:30 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Soul Surfer (PG) 12:15-5:30-10:45 Arthur (PG-13) 8:45 3D (PG) (!) 4:10-6:40-9:10 Soul Surfer (PG) 1:40-4:20-7:20- Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) 11:45AM 10:00 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Rio (G) 1:15-3:45-6:15 Hop (PG) 1:15-3:45-6:15 (PG) 1:30 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-1:30Rio (G) 1:10-3:30-6:10-8:40 4:00-4:30-7:00-7:30-10:00-10:20 Hop (PG) 1:20-3:45-6:20 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-3:00- Scream 4 (R) 3:30-6:30-9:15 African Cats (G) 11:45-2:153:50-6:00-6:50-8:50-9:45 African Cats (G) 3:40-6:30-9:00 4:45-9:30 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 2:15-5:00-8:00- Family (PG-13) 12:00-1:30-2:304:00-5:15-6:45-7:45-9:45-10:30 10:30 Hanna (PG-13) 2:00-8:15 Hanna (PG-13) 8:45 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Water for Elephants (PG-13) 12:45-1:45-3:30-4:45-6:30-7:304:45-10:20 9:15-10:15 Prom (PG) 1:45-4:30-7:15-9:50 The Conspirator (PG-13) Regal Cinemas Majestic 4:45-10:45 Stadium 20 & IMAX Prom (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:00900 Ellsworth Drive 7:45-10:15 Hop (PG) 1:00-3:30-6:00-8:25 The Movies at Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:15-2:00Montgomery Mall 4:05-4:50-6:55-7:40-9:55-10:35 7101 Democracy Blvd. African Cats (G) 3:00-5:15Rio 3D (G) 2:00-4:30-6:50 7:15-9:20 Hop (PG) 2:35-4:50-7:05 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Water for Elephants (PG-13) 2:10-4:55-7:50-10:40 Fast Five: The IMAX Experience 1:30-4:20-7:10 UA Snowden (PG-13) (!) 2:30-5:20-8:10-10:55 Square Stadium 14 Rio 3D (G) (!) 1:30-4:00-6:15-8:35 9161 Commerce Center Drive Source Code (PG-13) 2:35-7:30 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:40-4:307:50 3D (PG) (!) 4:10-6:25-8:40 Soul Surfer (PG) Open Caption: Insidious (PG-13) 5:05-9:50 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 2:55-5:50- 2:40-7:55 Rio 3D (G) (!) 2:20-4:50-7:10-9:30 8:55 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Source Code (PG-13) 10:20 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) 1:55 3D (PG) (!) 4:45-7:15-9:20 Rio (G) 2:15-4:45-7:00-9:45 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 12:30-3:35- Win Win (R) 3:50-6:30-9:00 Soul Surfer (PG) 5:20-10:30 6:30-9:25 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Scream 4 (R) 3:10-5:35-8:05(PG) 2:10 10:30 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Rio (G) 3:10-5:40-8:00 Family (PG-13) 12:40-1:20-2:05- Hop (PG) 1:45-4:15-6:40 African Cats (G) 3:00-5:103:20-3:50-4:40-5:40-6:20-7:057:25-9:40 8:15-9:00-10:00-10:50 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 3:30-6:50Hanna (PG-13) 12:35-3:159:50 6:10-8:45 Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PG- Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 2:50-4:40-5:3013) 1:40-4:15-6:40-9:10 7:20-8:10-10:00 The Conspirator (PG-13) Hanna (PG-13) 9:10 1:50-7:20 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Water for Elephants (PG-13) 4:00-7:00-10:15 4:30-10:05 Prom (PG) 2:45-5:25-7:55-10:20 The Conspirator (PG-13) 3:406:35-9:25 Regal Hyattsville Royale The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 1:50 Stadium 14 Prom (PG) 2:25-5:00-7:35-10:10 6505 America Blvd. Hop (PG) 1:40-4:10-6:50 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-3:304:00-6:30-7:00-9:20-9:50 AMC Courthouse Plaza 8 Scream 4 (R) 1:05 2150 Clarendon Blvd. Water for Elephants (PG-13) Hop (PG) 4:20-6:40-9:00 2:05-4:50-7:45-10:30 Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PGSource Code (PG-13) 10:00 13) (!) 5:00-7:25-9:50 Rio 3D (G) (!) 1:35-4:20-7:25-9:45 The Conspirator (PG-13) 4:15Insidious (PG-13) 3:55-9:40 6:55-9:40 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Source Code (PG-13) 3:00-5:153D (PG) (!) 3:40-6:40-9:25 7:40-9:55

VIRGINIA

Fast Five: The IMAX Experience (PG-13) (!) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00 Rio 3D (G) 12:55-3:25-5:508:25-10:50 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) (!) 12:40-2:55-5:157:20-9:40 AMC Hoffman Center 22 Source Code (PG-13) 11:25-1:50206 Swamp Fox Rd. 4:30-7:05-9:25 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Soul Surfer (PG) 10:35-1:20-4:20(PG) 11:15-1:40 7:10-9:50 Hop (PG) 10:05-12:35-3:05Arthur (PG-13) 10:20-3:30-8:30 5:35-8:05 African Cats (G) (!) 10:25-12:45Fast Five (PG-13) 11:45-3:003:05-5:25-7:35-9:55 6:15-9:30 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Scream 4 (R) 11:20-2:15-5:00(PG) (!) 10:30AM 7:50-10:30 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 11:00-2:005:00-8:00-11:00 Family (PG-13) 10:10-11:0512:55-1:50-3:40-4:35-6:25-7:20- Scream 4 (R) 11:05-1:40-4:407:15-10:15 9:10-10:05 Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PG- Limitless (PG-13) 12:50-5:5511:00 13) 11:00-1:45-4:25-7:10-9:55 Airbus IMAX Theater Water for Elephants (PG-13) 14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway 11:25-2:25-5:25-8:20 The Conspirator (PG-13) 10:30- To Fly (NR) 1:00-3:45 1:25-4:20-7:15-10:10 Fighter Pilot: Operation Red Flag Prom (PG) 12:05-2:40-5:20-8:00 (G) 12:00-2:45 The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 10:30 Legends of Flight (NR) 11:00Fast Five: The IMAX Experience 1:45-4:30 (PG-13) 10:00-1:15-4:30-7:45 Alexandria Old Town Theater Rio 3D (G) 10:15-12:45-3:25815 1/2 King St 6:05-8:45 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 5:00-7:30 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Hanna (PG-13) 5:30-7:50 3D (PG) 4:05-6:30-8:50 The Big Lebowski (R) 9:30 Source Code (PG-13) 1:35-7:05 Bow Tie Cinemas Insidious (PG-13) 11:35-2:05Reston Town Center 13 4:40-7:25-10:20 11940 Market Street African Cats (G) 10:00-12:25Source Code (PG-13) 12:40-3:002:50-5:10-7:40-10:00 5:50-8:05-10:15 Rio (G) 11:30-2:10-4:50-7:30 Win Win (R) 12:15-2:40-5:25Fast Five (PG-13) 10:45-12:30- 8:00-10:20 2:00-3:45-5:15-7:00-8:30-10:15 Soul Surfer (PG) 1:20-3:50Limitless (PG-13) 10:50-4:156:30-9:00 9:35 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:45 Family (PG-13) 12:00-2:45-5:30- Rio (G) 11:40-2:10-4:40-7:10-9:30 8:15-10:25 Hop (PG) 12:10-2:50-6:20-8:50 Hanna (PG-13) 11:10-1:55-4:45Fast Five (PG-13) 1:00-4:007:35-10:25 7:00-10:00 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Limitless (PG-13) 4:20-9:20 9:55-12:50-3:50-6:50-9:50 African Cats (G) 11:45-2:00-4:10Prom (PG) 10:40-1:20-4:006:50-9:40 6:40-9:20 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy AMC Loews Shirlington 7 Family (PG-13) 12:20-3:10-5:402772 South Randolph St. 8:10-10:30 Winter in Wartime (Oorlogswin- Jane Eyre (PG-13) 1:40-6:40 ter) (R) 1:00-3:30-6:40 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Jane Eyre (PG-13) 1:40-4:30-7:20 1:30-4:30-7:15-10:05 Of Gods and Men (Des hommes The Conspirator (PG-13) 12:30et des dieux) (PG-13) 1:203:30-6:10-9:10 4:00-6:50 Prom (PG) 11:50-2:20-4:50The Conspirator (PG-13) 1:307:20-9:50 4:10-7:10 Cinema Arts Theatre Potiche (R) 12:50-3:10-5:30-7:50 9650 Main St Win Win (R) 1:50-4:20-7:00 Win Win (R) 10:05-12:15-2:45POM Wonderful Presents: The 5:10-7:50-9:55 Greatest Movie Ever Sold (PGWinter in Wartime (Oorlogswin13) 1:10-3:20-5:30-7:40 ter) (R) 9:40-12:00-2:30-5:00AMC Potomac Mills 18 7:30-9:45 2700 Potomac Mills Circle Jane Eyre (PG-13) 2:25-4:50-9:35 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Of Gods and Men (Des hommes (PG) (!) 10:10AM et des dieux) (PG-13) 9:45Hop (PG) 10:05-12:40-3:20 12:05-7:10 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 11:50-3:00- Water for Elephants (PG-13) 6:10-9:20 9:50-12:10-2:40-5:05-7:40-10:00 Scream 4 (R) 10:50-1:35-4:20The Conspirator (PG-13) 9:557:05-9:50 12:20-2:50-5:15-8:00-10:15 African Cats (G) (!) 10:00-12:30- Potiche (R) 10:10-12:25-2:353:10-7:15-9:45 4:40-7:20-9:25 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Phoenix Theatres Worldgate 9 Family (PG-13) (!) 11:40-12:2013025 Worldgate Drive 2:30-3:30-5:20-6:15-7:30-8:20Hop (PG) 12:05-2:45-5:15-7:459:10-10:10 10:00 Hanna (PG-13) 1:50-7:20 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Dylan Dog: Dead of Night Family (PG-13) 11:35-2:10-4:40(PG-13) (!) 10:35-1:25-4:05- 7:15-9:40 6:50-9:35 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Insidious (PG-13) 11:10-4:35 11:45-2:20-4:55-7:30-10:05 Fast Five: The IMAX Experience Prom (PG) 12:00-2:35-5:05(PG-13) (!) 10:00-1:00-4:007:40-10:15 7:00-10:00 Rio 3D (G) 11:50-2:25-4:50Rio 3D (G) 10:40-1:15-3:557:20-9:30 6:35-9:15 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Evil 3D (PG) 11:30-2:00-4:303D (PG) (!) 12:35-3:05-5:25-7:40- 7:00-9:10 10:10 Mr Perfect (NR) 1:00-4:15-7:55 Source Code (PG-13) 1:05-6:30 Nenu Naa Rakshashi1:05-4:20-8:00 Soul Surfer (PG) 10:45-1:30Fast Five (PG-13) 12:15-3:504:25-7:10 6:50-9:50 Rio (G) 11:05-1:45-4:30 Rave Motion Pictures Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 10:30-11:00Centreville 12 1:40-2:20-4:50-5:30-8:00-8:40 6201 Multiplex Drive Limitless (PG-13) 10:25-3:35 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy (PG) 1:30 Family (PG-13) (!) 6:55-9:40 Rio (G) 1:25-4:25-6:50-9:30 Water for Elephants (PG-13) (!) Hop (PG) 1:20-4:20-7:20 10:20-1:20-4:15-7:05-10:05 Prom (PG) (!) 10:15-12:55-3:40- Fast Five (PG-13) 12:55-1:454:00-4:45-7:00-7:45-10:00-10:45 6:40-9:30 African Cats (G) 1:15-4:10AMC Tysons Corner 16 7:10-9:25 7850 Tysons Corner Center Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Rio (G) 11:30-2:00-4:35-7:20-9:45 Family (PG-13) 1:00-4:35-7:40Hop (PG) 12:05-2:35-4:55 10:40 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:00- Water for Elephants (PG-13) 7:00-10:00 1:10-4:15-7:15-10:05 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Prom (PG) 1:50-4:50-7:30-10:10 Family (PG-13) (!) 11:10-1:55The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 9:40 4:50-7:45-10:20 Source Code (PG-13) 1:05-3:55Hanna (PG-13) 10:40-1:25-4:25- 7:25-9:45 7:25-10:05 Soul Surfer (PG) 1:35-4:40-7:50Water for Elephants (PG-13) (!) 10:35 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:40-10:25 Rio 3D (G) 2:00-5:00-7:55-10:20 Prom (PG) (!) 10:50-1:30-4:05Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 7:05-9:35 3D (PG) 4:05-7:05-9:20 The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 10:30

Rio 3D (G) 4:00-7:00-9:30 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) (!) 2:50-4:50-7:10-9:20 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 4:45-7:30-10:00 Prom (PG) (!) 4:30-7:15-9:45

Water for Elephants (PG-13) 1:20-4:10-7:10-10:10 Rio 3D (G) (!) 2:10-4:40-7:20-9:50 Your Highness (R) 1:25-4:20The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 3:10-9:10 7:35-10:20 Source Code (PG-13) 1:40-4:20Scream 4 (R) 1:15-1:55-4:056:50-9:20 4:35-7:10-7:55-9:50 Soul Surfer (PG) 1:50-4:50-7:50African Cats (G) 1:10-4:1510:30 7:00-9:40 Arthur (PG-13) 8:30 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Family (PG-13) 1:05-2:00-4:10- 3D (PG) (!) 2:20-4:30-7:30-9:40 5:00-7:05-7:40-9:45-10:20 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick (PG) 12:10 Rules (PG) 1:35-4:25 Rio (G) 12:40-3:40-6:10 Jane Eyre (PG-13) 1:30-4:25Hop (PG) 12:50-3:20-6:20-8:40 7:20-10:15 African Cats (G) 12:30-3:30Hanna (PG-13) 1:40-4:30-7:15- 6:30-8:50 10:00 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PG- Family (PG-13) 12:15-2:50-5:3013) 1:50-4:35-7:45-10:25 8:10-10:40 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 12:00-3:001:00-1:45-3:55-4:40-7:45-10:25 6:00-9:00 The Conspirator (PG-13) 1:25Water for Elephants (PG-13) 4:20-7:15-10:15 2:30-5:20-8:20 Insidious (PG-13) 7:30-10:10 Prom (PG) 12:05-2:40-5:10Atlas Shrugged: Part 1 (PG-13) 7:40-10:20 1:20-4:00-7:25-10:05 Regal Kingstowne 16
Rave Motion Pictures Fairfax Corner 14 11900 Palace Way

Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:45-3:004:45-6:00-7:40-9:00-10:30 Hanna (PG-13) 1:30-4:15-6:559:40 African Cats (G) 2:30-4:507:05-9:20 Prom (PG) 2:25-4:55-7:35-10:15 Soul Surfer (PG) 1:15-3:556:35-9:05 Rio 3D (G) (!) 1:00-3:35-6:10-8:45 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 3D (PG) (!) 5:10-7:45-10:05 Source Code (PG-13) 4:056:20-8:50 Insidious (PG-13) 1:10 Arthur (PG-13) 1:20 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) 2:50 Rio (G) 2:40-5:05-7:25 Hop (PG) 1:50-4:25-6:45-9:10 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:00Regal Cinemas Manassas 7:00-9:55 Stadium 14 & IMAX Scream 4 (R) 9:50 11380 Bulloch Drive Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 2:20-5:00- Family (PG-13) 2:45-3:45-5:205:30-8:00-8:30-10:50 6:30-8:00-9:25-10:30 Insidious (PG-13) 1:50 The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 1:05 Fast Five: The IMAX Experience Water for Elephants (PG-13) (PG-13) (!) 1:20-4:20-7:20-10:20 1:25-4:10-7:10-10:00 Rio 3D (G) (!) 2:00-4:00-6:20-8:50 The Conspirator (PG-13) 3:40Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 6:50-9:35 3D (PG) (!) 2:30-4:50-7:10-9:20 Regal Potomac Yard 16 Soul Surfer (PG) 1:00-3:303575 Jefferson Davis Highway 6:30-9:10 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:30-2:00Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 4:30-5:00-7:30-8:00-10:30 (PG) 12:10 African Cats (G) 1:45-6:45 Rio (G) 12:20-2:40-4:40-7:00 Rio 3D (G) (!) 1:15-3:40-6:20-9:05 Hop (PG) 1:10-3:20-6:10 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 12:00-12:40- 3D (PG) (!) 4:20-7:10-9:40 3:00-3:40-6:00-6:40-9:00-9:40 Source Code (PG-13) 9:55 Scream 4 (R) 8:40 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil African Cats (G) 2:10-4:30(PG) 1:50 7:30-9:50 Rio (G) 2:20-4:45-7:15 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) 1:30-5:10-7:50- Hop (PG) 2:40-5:15-7:35 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-3:0010:30 3:30-4:00-6:05-6:30-7:00-9:00Hanna (PG-13) 10:10 9:30-10:00 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Scream 4 (R) 4:10-9:45 12:30-3:50-6:50-9:30 Prom (PG) 1:40-5:20-7:40-10:00 African Cats (G) 4:15-9:15 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Regal Countryside 20 Family (PG-13) 1:10-2:05-3:5045980 Regal Plaza 4:50-6:40-7:40-9:20-10:20 Rio (G) Open Caption: 1:00-6:10 Hanna (PG-13) 1:35-6:55 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 2:30-4:00- Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PG5:30-7:00-8:30-10:00 13) 2:30-5:10-7:50-10:25 Water for Elephants (PG-13) Water for Elephants (PG-13) 1:40-4:30-7:20-10:10 1:20-4:05-6:50-9:35 Prom (PG) 1:50-4:35-7:25-9:55 Prom (PG) 2:10-4:40-7:20-9:50 Soul Surfer (PG) 12:45-3:45The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 10:10 6:45-9:25 Tally Ho Theatre Source Code (PG-13) 3:10-5:3519 West Market Street 7:55-10:20 Rio (G) 4:45-6:45 Rio 3D (G) (!) 12:00-1:30-2:25Hop (PG) 4:30-6:30 4:50-7:15-9:40 UA Fairfax Towne Center 10 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 4110 West Ox Road 3D (PG) (!) 2:40-4:55-7:10-9:30 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-1:50Insidious (PG-13) 12:40 3:50-4:40-6:40-7:30-9:40-10:30 Dum Maaro Dum (R) 2:45Soul Surfer (PG) 1:30-4:105:45-8:45 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 6:50-9:35 Rio 3D (G) (!) 1:10-4:00-7:00-9:50 (PG) 12:20 Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil Rio (G) 3:30-8:40 3D (PG) (!) 4:20-7:20-9:30 Hop (PG) 1:15-4:10-6:35 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 12:15-1:45- Source Code (PG-13) 1:15-3:457:10-10:00 3:15-4:45-6:15-7:45-9:15 Hop (PG) 1:20-3:40-6:30 Scream 4 (R) 1:10 Limitless (PG-13) 9:20 African Cats (G) 2:50-5:10Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil 7:30-9:50 Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy (PG) 1:40 Family (PG-13) 12:05-1:25-2:40- Rio (G) 2:00-4:50-7:50 4:05-5:15-6:40-7:50-9:20-10:25 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 2:40-5:308:20 Hanna (PG-13) 9:00 Prom (PG) 1:45-4:30-7:40-10:10 The Conspirator (PG-13) 3:506:50-9:45 The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 10:20 Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (PGUniversity Mall Theatre 13) 2:20-5:05-7:40-10:15 10659 Braddock Road Water for Elephants (PG-13) Gnomeo & Juliet (G) 12:15-2:0012:25-3:25-6:20-9:10 3:45-5:30 Prom (PG) 12:50-3:35-6:25-8:55 Mars Needs Moms (PG) Regal Fox Cinemas 12:40-2:35 22875 Brambleton Plaza Arthur (PG-13) 7:30-9:45 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:00-2:00- The King’s Speech (PG-13) 4:00-5:00-7:00-8:00-10:00 4:30-7:15-9:35 Limitless (PG-13) 12:20-6:40 Rango (PG) 12:30-2:45-5:00 Hanna (PG-13) 1:10-3:50-6:45- Battle: Los Angeles (PG-13) 9:30 7:40-9:55 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 1:30-3:204:30-5:20-6:10-7:40-8:30-9:10 Scream 4 (R) 1:30-7:10 African Cats (G) 3:00-5:30-7:5010:10 Hanna (PG-13) 2:20 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 1:50-4:40-7:30-10:30 Insidious (PG-13) 4:20-9:40 Win Win (R) 2:10-4:45-7:2510:05 Limitless (PG-13) 2:50-5:40-8:20 Fast Five (PG-13) (!) 3:50-7:0010:00 The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 2:405:30-8:10 Hanna (PG-13) 1:10-4:10-7:2010:20 Water for Elephants (PG-13) 3:40-6:40-9:30

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The next Stieg Larsson? Perish the thought.
nesbo from C1 of execution is gruesome; what’s more bloodcurdling are the snowmen he leaves as a warning. Facing into houses. Watching his prey. “Suspense is the same as humor, I think,” Nesbo says. We’ve moved from his apartment now, bicycled to a nearby cafe where Nesbo likes to write and drink the apple cider made in-house. “You think that you laugh because you’re surprised, but really, the success is that it delivers the punch line a second before the reader reaches the same conclusion. Suspense does that, too.” “The publishing world has been reading a lot of Scandinavian crime fiction,” says Sonny Mehta, the Knopf editor who acquired “The Snowman.” “He really is being heralded as the new Scandinavian writer.” Mehta knows something about Scandinavian writers. He was the editor responsible for the Americanization of another Nordic scribe, a dragon-tattooed one named Stieg whose posthumous trilogy about a Swedish cyberpunk finally upended “The Da Vinci Code” as the book everyone reads on planes. You see the similarities: Scandinavia. Literary crime fiction. “The Snowman” is set against the backdrop of George W. Bush’s presidency, and so Nesbo and Larsson also share a propensity for political commentary. In London, where “The Snowman” has become a bestseller, bookstores lump Nesbo’s novels with Larsson’s, label the whole lot “Scandi-crime,” and lure buyers by affixing deceptive little stickers to Nesbo’s covers: Read this if you like STIEG LARSSON. Everyone really, really hopes they’ve found the next big thing. the Larssonization of American bookstores. “Our countries are so closely linked, culturally,” he says of the U.S. embrace of Scandinavian literature. “We have the same references, watch the same movies.” He might be particularly attuned to this — his father was raised in New York by immigrant parents who later moved back — but Norwegians “are all becoming Americans. Paris Hilton is famous in Norway for no other reason than she is an American star. When the driving conditions are bad in Chicago, we see it on Norwegian television.” Has he hit on the secret of the great Scandi-crime boom? The books are foreign, but only foreign enough to intrigue, not to frighten. Even when an American reader doesn’t understand what Mikael Blomkvist or Harry Hole is ordering for lunch, they still understand the concept of going into a cafe. It’s America with monaphthongal vowels, which make the books seem like crime novels for eggheads. The trouble is that what made Larsson’s novels so successful was that their success could never have been predicted. Billys Pan Pizzas and midnight suns were novel concepts when Larsson wrote about them. But now that we know to look out for politically inclined Scandinavian crime writers, isn’t it more likely that the next Larsson— the next writer whose subject matter and style will inflame the entire reading world — will be a Japanese satirist or a nun from Malawi who writes romances on the side? liked the structure. He ended up with Harry Hole. “I found it quite easy,” he says. “In crime, you have this intimate conversation with the reader,” both obeying the laws of the genre. His apartment is littered with remnants of these former lives: a keyboard and guitar set up in a corner (he still performs 50 or 60 gigs a year) and an indoor rock-climbing wall snaking up the side of his office, a shrine to continued athleticism. A few years ago, he took up the unlikeliest of projects when he began penning a children’s series about an absentminded professor named Doktor Proktor. “It was really for the worst reason,” he says. He has a daughter, who is now 11 (he and the girl’s mother are not married), and he thought it would be fun to write down some of the bedtime stories they made up together. “When you’re an established name, you know that a children’s book will have a pretty good chance of getting picked up. Like Madonna. It’s not that I had this great idea.” He pauses, considering something. “Actually, in my case, it was a great idea.”

Coming into his own
A phone call. Nesbo pauses his cider-drinking to answer. It was, he explains later, a Norwegian reality show. The host moves in with a different Norwegian celebrity every week; the producers want to know if she can move in with Nesbo next. He declines. It’s a typical request as of late. It’s one thing to be famous in a country so intimate that morning walkers can dawdle on the lawn of the Oslo palace that houses King Harald V. It’s another to go global. For years, Nesbo turned down bids to option his books for the movies. Film is such a definitive medium, he says. “I’d rather have 1,000 different Harrys in the mind of my readers” than one chosen by a production company. Recently, though, he’s agreed to sell the rights for “The Snowman” to Working Title. He’s been asked to write a new Doktor Proktor installment, and he’s working on developing a television series — the storyboards cover one wall of his dining area — though he won’t say what it’s about. When told that about the London marketing ploy — the stickers with the Stieg Larsson prompt — he laughs. “Now that the book is number one in the U.K., they won’t have to use that anymore.” Maybe, he muses, someone can create a new sticker to slap on the cover of the next Scandi-crime sensation. “Read this,” it will say, “if you like Jo Nesbo.”
hessem@washpost.com

Or just his own man?
The real misfortune of comparing Nesbo to Larsson (or Henning Mankell, whom Larsson himself was originally compared to) is that Nesbo is interesting on his own. He began as an athlete. In his youth, he played for Norway’s premier club soccer team; everyone said he would go pro, but then he blew out his knee at 19. He got a degree in economics instead, became a stockbroker by day. He’d written songs for friends’ bands in his youth (“I even wrote for a Christian band!” he says delightedly. “I love Jesus, okay!”), so, by night, he decided to form his own group with his brother, Knut. Di Derre became an unlikely pop success, performing well on the European charts. You can see some of their performances on YouTube. They’ll remind you of A-Ha. It was during his touring days that a friend at a publishing house contacted him: With the success he’d had with lyrics, perhaps he might want to try his hand at another form of writing? Nesbo gave himself five weeks to write a novel, choosing the crime genre because he

Or the guy who was there first?
Which Nesbo, naturally, finds irritating. It’s frustrating that someone would label you “next” when your first books were published years before the works you are supposed to be succeeding. “The idea that Scandinavian crime writers have something in common is a myth,” he says. “The biggest thing they have in common is that they are from Norway, Sweden or Denmark.” His literary heroes growing up in the midsize town of Molde weren’t necessarily Scandinavian, weren’t even crime writers. He loved Ray Bradbury. He loved Jim Thompson, who elevated noir to art, who wrote in his own bleak climate of Oklahoma. Of the Larsson comparison: “I don’t really like it.” But the fact is that Nesbo has already had three Harry Hole books printed in the United States with another publish-

JAN ERIK SVENDSEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

SCANDINAVIAN IMPORT: Oslo-based author Jo Nesbo, 51, will be touring the United States to promote his latest thriller, “The Snowman,” which will be released Tuesday. The book is already a bestseller in London: “In crime, you have this intimate conversation with the reader,” the songwriter-turned-novelist says.

er — “The Redbreast,” “The Devil’s Star” and “Nemesis” — and none of them became big hits. It’s possible that “The Snowman” is simply a better novel. When it was published in Norway in

2008, it won the Norwegian Book Club Prize for best novel of the year. But it’s more likely that this book is garnering so much attention because it’s the first of Nesbo’s to come to the States since

Showing a wanted man’s death
U.S. newsrooms fret that bin Laden photos might be too graphic
BY

For bin Laden film screenwriter, a final act
‘Hurt Locker’ author is working on movie about the hunt
BY

P AUL F ARHI

The White House says it has photos of the dead Osama bin Laden and they’re “gruesome.” That raises a question in America’s newsrooms: To publish or not to publish when the pictures are released? Short answer: It all depends on your definition of “gruesome.” The potential release of photographs documenting the U.S. raid on bin Laden’s Pakistani hideout presents the news media — at least the so-called mainstream media — with a historic dilemma. The images are the very definition of news, but they’re also likely to be horrifyingly graphic, the sort of thing that American newspapers and television networks avoid showing their readers and viewers. White House press secretary Jay Carney said Tuesday that administration officials are still debating whether to make public any of the photos and video taken by U.S. military forces during and after the raid early Sunday. The image cache includes grisly shots of bin Laden, who reportedly suffered massive facial and skull wounds above his left eye from gunshots fired by American commandos. Carney said officials are concerned about the “sensitivity” of releasing such photos because of their disturbing nature and because they could inflame antiAmerican sentiment around the world. But officials are also eager to rebut skepticism among bin Laden’s supporters and sympathizers that reports of his death are part of an American disinformation campaign and that he is still alive. People in the news media are faced with a related, if somewhat different, issue: Would such obviously newsworthy pictures be so revolting that they’d create a wave of complaints?

“Obviously, I can’t say whether or how we will run a photo we haven’t even seen,” said Bill Keller, editor of the New York Times. He added: “We generally avoid pictures that are gratuitously ghastly. But the key word is ‘gratuitously,’ meaning the images, besides being disturbing, don’t have significant journalistic value. Pictures of Osama bin Laden dead certainly have significant journalistic value.” Associated Press director of photography Santiago Lyon said his organization would screen the material before distributing it to news outlets and would alert them to any “particularly graphic images” beforehand so they can make their own calls. Most news organizations that subscribe to AP do their own screening, he said, but some have feeds that automatically publish online APdistributed work. CNN evaluates each image it broadcasts or publishes online but has no general policy about the use of grisly content, Washington producer Sam Feist said. In 2006, for example, the network showed the battered faces of Saddam Hussein’s dead sons, Uday and Qusay. The rationale parallels the argument in favor of running pictures of bin Laden’s body: The photos provided direct evidence that the Husseins had actually been killed, he said. In any event: “We’d prepare the audience [before showing them something graphic]. . . . We know that some of these images do make people uncomfortable.” “It sounds old-fashioned, but we are a family newspaper,” said Liz Spayd, The Washington Post’s managing editor. “We are mindful that people’s children see the paper, and we don’t want to publish anything gratuitously. At the same time, we don’t want to hide what’s happening.” Short of airing a close-up picture, ABC News might elect to show one that indicated the dead man was bin Laden, such as a photo taken from a distance, spokesman Jeffrey Schneider said. As a general rule, American media organizations shy away

from presenting images of death, especially the violent kind. Even in war zones or after natural disasters where thousands may have died, news pictures tend to emphasize destruction and the suffering of the living rather than corpses. The violent deaths of newsworthy individuals, however, sometimes create exceptions. The New York Times, The Post and other newspapers ran photos of Saddam Hussein’s body after he was executed in Iraq in late 2006. The bloodied face of Iraqi terrorist Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi was broadcast around the world after he was killed by a U.S. airstrike in the same year. And pictures of people leaping from the burning World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001, were widespread. But the deaths of Americans are usually a different story, says Fred Ritchin, a professor of photography and imaging at New York University. It’s exceptionally rare to see the body of a U.S. soldier, he said. And gruesome footage of the beheading of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl by terrorists in Pakistan wasn’t broadcast by mainstream news outlets. In the absence of photographic confirmation of bin Laden’s death, mainstream media outlets resorted Monday and Tuesday to relatively tame file images of a very live bin Laden: shooting a gun, haranguing Westerners in his infamous video communiques or gazing into the middle distance. In the end, however, Ritchin says it doesn’t really matter how the traditional news media try to handle government-issued photos of bin Laden — they’ll appear someplace, and probably many places, online. “The gatekeepers,” he says, “aren’t keeping the gates anymore.”
farhip@washpost.com

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ON THE WEB For the latest

coverage on the killing of Osama bin Laden, including a detailed look inside the raid in Abbottabad and worldwide reaction to the terrorist leader’s death, go to washingtonpost.com.

Like most Americans, Mark Boal was overwhelmed with emotion Sunday night when he heard that Osama bin Laden had been killed. It wasn’t until a reporter emailed him an hour later that he realized he now had a new third act. For the past decade, Boal — a former journalist who became a screenwriter and won an Oscar last year for “The Hurt Locker” — has been working on a screenplay about the hunt for bin Laden. He has partnered with “Hurt Locker” director Kathryn Bigelow. Just as “The Hurt Locker” focused on an elite bomb squad working in Iraq, Boal’s untitled bin Laden script revolves around the special operations personnel and intelligence officials who planned to capture or kill the al-Qaeda leader, and was based on extensive research Boal conducted through his contacts with the U.S. military. Last weekend, Boal and Bigelow were in what the screenwriter calls “soft pre-production” with the film, scouting locations, meeting with actors and planning on visiting Afghanistan for a research trip. When he heard that bin Laden was dead, “I actually didn’t think about the film at all,” the hard-to-reach Boal said on Tuesday, reluctantly agreeing to a brief phone conversation between meetings. “I was just stunned. It brought back so many memories of 9/11. It was just a really powerful moment.” He said, “I’ve been following the intelligence efforts to kill or capture bin Laden as best as I have been able to over the years.” He remembers pitching the story to news magazines as far back as 2003, when he was a freelance writer. “So [his death] was certainly an eventuality that I was prepared for, and on some level anticipating, but not the exact

ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES FOR DGA

TERRIFIC TIMING: Director Kathryn Bigelow and screenwriter Mark Boal plan to shoot the bin Laden film this year.

timing of it. . . . The bigger picture is there’s now a definitive ending to this particular chapter in American history. That definitely makes my job a little more straightforward.” Boal now finds himself in the rare position of rewriting his script virtually in real time, as he scours news reports and calls on his own sources to piece together the remarkable events of last weekend. “What I’m doing is figuring out how to respectfully and truthfully represent the work of all the players in this saga, from the intelligence guys to the policymakers in the White House to the work force on the ground,” he said. Bin Laden most likely won’t appear in the movie. “The focus is going to be on the men and women — and there are some interesting women involved here, too — tasked with hunting the guy,” Boal said. Last January, Variety reported that Boal and Bigelow’s bin Laden film would be financed by producer Megan Ellison through her company, Annapurna Pictures. More recently, Australian actor Joel Edgerton (“Animal King-

dom”) has been mentioned as a possible cast member. Boal said plans are still on track to film late this summer or in early fall, with a 2012 release. He declined to specify locations, “for any number of reasons, mostly having to do with wanting to be respectful of the fact that this is a story that’s still inflammatory to a lot of people in the world.” Although Oliver Stone has been attached to “Jawbreaker,” an adaptation of CIA field commander Gary Berntsen’s memoir of his pursuit of bin Laden, Bigelow and Boal’s project looks to be the front-runner, timing-wise. What’s more, its third act will benefit from current events. “It’s such a resounding tactical victory and moral victory,” he said. Boal considers it a “privilege” to write about the commandos who executed the mission. “It’s an extraordinary group of people who, by their own professional credo, almost always go unrecognized. And they’re some of the most interesting and committed and complicated people I’ve ever come across, which is probably why I like to write about them.”
hornadaya@washpost.com

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A life remembered for its impressive design
mcqueen from C1 deeper and intellectually complicated. Many designers pretend to be artists; McQueen actually was. “I’m making points about my time, about the times we live in,” he once said. “My work is a social document about the world today.” McQueen was born on St. Patrick’s Day in 1969 in London, the youngest of six to a London cabdriver and a homemaker, and grew up in the rough East End section of the city. Early on, he realized he had a love for fashion but was lousy in school, so at 16 he dropped out and got a job as an apprentice tailor on Savile Row. After a few years there and a brief stint at a theatrical costume company, he went to work for established fashion designers Koji Tatsuno in Paris and Romeo Gigli in Milan. In 1991, he returned to London and entered Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design’s master’s program in fashion design. His graduation collection in 1992, entitled “Jack the Ripper Stalks His Victims,” introduced some of what would become his signature designs, such as the three-point “origami” frock coat. Among those in the audience was a young, eccentric British fashion editor named Isabella Blow. Enthralled, she bought the entire set — to wear, as well as for her fashion collection — paying in installments. In Blow, McQueen found a muse, consultant and unwavering supporter. With Blow’s enCHRIS JACKSON/ GETTY IMAGES couragement, McQueen set up his Isabella Blow, own company, and in 2006. for his first show, “Taxi Driver,” he introduced his “bumster” pants: hip-huggers so low they revealed the top of one’s derriere. At the time, pant waistlines in fashion were up around the navel. In response to McQueen’s bumsters, waistlines began dropping and have remained low on the hip for nearly two decades now. In 1995, McQueen established his reputation both as a bad boy and true force in fashion with a show titled “Highland Rape,” based on the 18thcentury Jacobite Risings and the 19th-century Highland Clearances. The models staggered down the runway in torn tartan dresses, splattered with blood. In response, some fashion writers charged that McQueen was a misogynist, an accusation McQueen rejected as utterly wrong. In fact, Andrew Bolton, curator for both the Costume Institute and the exhibit, explains in the show’s equally stunning catalogue that “Highland Rape” was “a powerful and heartfelt declaration of McQueen’s [Scottish] national identity.” McQueen went on to stupefy fashion with his languid gowns and razor-sharp suits and dresses, and Blow continued to serve as his inspiration and cheerleader. “He is the only hope of British fashion,” she told one editor. A mere three years after he began his career, McQueen was hired by the global luxury conglomerate LVMH as the creative director for Givenchy. He was 27. The ever-supportive Blow longed to work with him in an official capacity, but in a flash of his dark side, he chose not to bring her along. Their relationship was tenuous ever after.

FINBARR O'REILLY/REUTERS

HAIL MCQUEEN: The Met’s “Savage Beauty” exhibit, above, spans Alexander McQueen’s work from his 1992 postgraduate collection to his final womenswear last year; left, three of his jacket designs; below, the late designer poses with Sarah Jessica Parker in 2006.

BEBETO MATTHEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

STUART RAMSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

McQueen’s Givenchy debut, of gold and white Grecian gowns wrapped with garlands of gilded ivy leaves, was dismissed by the press and clients as distasteful. One critic described it as “rejects from a remake of ‘Jason and the Argonauts.’ ” McQueen himself later admitted in Vogue that the collection was “crap.” Working with the Givenchy atelier, however, was like a master class for McQueen: He began to reach for heights in design no one else contemplated. Several of his Givenchy creations, including a black leather corset shift with a red pheasant-feather high-neck collar and a red-beaked resin vulture skull on each shoulder, are on display.

In late 2000, Blow — by then the fashion director of the Sunday Times of London and a style icon — suggested to then-Gucci designer Tom Ford that Gucci Group buy a majority stake in McQueen’s long-struggling eponymous company. The deal was signed in December, and McQueen left Givenchy to focus on his own brand. Again, he did not hire Blow. Again, she felt betrayed and was devastated. While his work soared, his personal life was plagued by drug addiction and heartbreak: He married then split from one boyfriend, then reportedly took up with a porn star and an East End gangster. When Blow, a manic depressive, committed suicide

in 2007 by drinking weed poison, McQueen spiraled into his own depression. The death of his long-supportive mother in February 2010 appeared to be more than he could handle. He took his own life 10 days later, hanging himself in his bedroom closet. Within weeks of McQueen’s death, the Costume Institute announced the retrospective. While the show is dedicated to McQueen’s work, Blow’s influence is apparent, too — along with several pieces from Blow’s personal collection, there is the breathtaking hat of a cloud of red butterflies that another Blow “discovery,” the Irish milliner Philip Treacy, made

with McQueen for McQueen’s tribute collection following her death. “My collections have always been autobiographical . . . like exorcising my ghosts,” he once said. “They were to do with my childhood, the way I think about life and the way I was brought up to think about life.” Sadly, as this show proves, that life was too short.
style@washpost.com Thomas is a freelance writer. See photo galleries I of the Costume Institute Gala red carpet and “Savage Beauty” exhibit at
MORE PHOTOS

washingtonpost.com/style.

Should he tell his family about his premonition of death and ‘bucket list’?
Dear Carolyn: I am in my 50s, married 30 years and have four children and six grandchildren. I am not religious but am spiritual. I am in relatively poor health, with diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure and cholesterol, but generally feel good and work out daily. In my early 40s, when I was in good health, I had a premonition or whatever that I had till age 58 to live. Rationally, I understand that odds are I am deluding myself, but I sincerely believe this is my fate. Outside of this, I seem to be mentally stable. I am struggling with whether to share these feelings with my wife and children on my 57th birthday or thereabouts. On the one hand, I know this would worry them and don’t wish for their added attention or concern. On the other hand I plan to fill my “last year” with my personal bucket list and think that, without any knowledge of my concern for my nearing demise, they will all find my rather dramatic change of direction somewhat disturbing, especially my wife. I plan to stop work and travel for six months and do some, for me, quite unusual things. Money is not an issue and they will be taken care of. If I do reach 59 I plan to resume my “normal” life and work until I am done. I love my work and never plan to retire.

CAROLYN HAX
I do not wish to cause my family any negative feelings whatsoever over what may be just a fantasy. Your thoughts would be appreciated. Torn

Your motivation may be a fantasy, but your response to it is a detailed, thought-out, financially accounted-for plan. Because of that — and because the 57th-birthday bombshell brings more drama, when less is best — I believe you should tell your wife (i.e., not your whole family gathered ’round) about those plans as soon as possible. You may be preoccupied by your vision, but no one else needs to be — especially since, under the purple smoke and incense, what you have is a natural impulse that just about anyone over, I dunno, 12 can relate to. So please tell your wife, using as little embellishment as possible. For example: “About a decade ago, crazy as it sounds, I had this vision that I

wouldn’t live to see 60. Ever since then, I’ve thought about taking six months off to finish my bucket list — and going back to work when I’m done. We have the money and I can swing the time off work, so I’d like to start making plans to do it.” It covers motivation, intent and means — without once using the term “my last year.” Your wife might still be upset, especially if your plans exclude her and/or your list includes anything adulterous, felonious, dangerous or more than vaguely hinky. But I expect she’ll be calmer if you give her time to adjust and some say in your plans. The follow-up conversations also will go better if you keep in mind that your impulse isn’t spooky, it’s something a lot of us would like to do instead of sitting here writing/reading about it. You might even displace the gratuitous stress of deathpreoccupation with the joy of openly planning your trip.
Write to Tell Me About It, Style, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071, or tellme@washpost.com. Join the discussion live at noon 3 Fridays at washingtonpost.com/conversations.

NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

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Apple sold nearly 15 million iPads in 2010 and expects to sell more than 40 million of the devices this year.

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School supply list includes iPads
Not everyone agrees that kindergartners need the devices
e could hardly blame you if you want to move to Maine. And go back to kindergarten. That’s because last month, the Auburn, Maine, school district announced that it would give Apple iPad 2s to its nearly 300 kindergartners in the fall. The students are just the latest around the country to get the touchpad computers to help them learn ABCs, 1-2-3s, drawing and even music. Schools Superintendent Tom Morrill calls the iPad “a revolution in education.” But others question whether spending $200,000 for kids young enough to use flashcards and fingerpaints is a good idea. “I understand you have to keep up with technology, but I think a 5year-old is a little too young to understand,” said Sue Millard, a Maine mother with children in fourth grade and high school. Apple spokeswoman Trudy Muller wouldn’t talk about how iPads are being used in schools, but dozens of school districts around the country have been giving iPads to students. Schools in Nebraska, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, South Carolina and Arizona are among the places where kindergartners are using them. Maine was the first state to give students statewide computers when

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PHOTOS BY JOEL PAGE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Auburn, Maine, kindergartner Lucius Rice demonstrates an iPad to teachers, from left, Sue Larue, Kelly McCarthy, Amy Heimerl and Maurie Dufour.

it distributed Apple laptops to all seventh- and eighth-graders in 2002. Angus King, the former Maine governor who launched the state’s laptop program, said the idea of iPads in kindergarten wows him. Anything that holds the attention of pupils will help in the learning process, he said. “If your students are engaged, you can teach them anything,” King said. But there’s no real evidence that technology helps kids learn better, and educators say it’s still important for young students to use threedimensional objects such as blocks or books. Auburn’s Morrill says that too much of anything can be a bad thing. “I’m not saying they should be on this 24-7,” he said. “The students still need to move, get up, dance, socialize.”
— Associated Press

DAN WHEAT/WENATCHEE WORLD VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gary Weddle displays the beard he had been growing for years.

Bin Laden’s death means teacher gets close shave
A middle school teacher in Washington state vowed after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, that he would not shave until Osama bin Laden was caught. On Sunday night, after learning that bin Laden had been killed by American forces in Pakistan, Gary Weddle shaved. “I couldn’t get it off fast enough,” Weddle, 50, said. The gray stringy growth made him look a bit like bin Laden, the leader behind the Sept. 11 attacks. Weddle was teaching on the day that members of bin Laden’s al-Qaeda group hijacked four airliners. Nearly 3,000 people died when the planes crashed in Northern Virginia, New York City and Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Weddle said he was so absorbed in the news that he didn’t shave. A week later, he decided to keep his beard until bin Laden was captured. He figured it would be just a month or two. At the start of each school year, Weddle told students the beard was a reminder of the attacks.

So be honest, do you think giving iPads to students is a good use of money? Tell us why or why not and how you would use an iPad for schoolwork. (Playing “Angry Birds” doesn’t count.) E-mail us your thoughts in no more than 100 words to kidspost@washpost.com. Put “iPad” in the subject line, and include your name, age, home town and phone number. Always ask permission before going online.
Heimerl tries out a program for learning letters on an iPad. Next year the area’s nearly 300 kindergartners will be given iPad 2s for schoolwork. The initiative will cost $200,000.

Tony noms reflect a strong belief in ‘Mormon’
A SSOCIATED P RESS “The Book of Mormon” nabbed a leading 14 Tony Award nominations Tuesday, earning the profane musical one nod short of the record for most nominations and putting it in the driver’s seat when the awards are handed out next month. The second-highest number of nominations went to “The Scottsboro Boys,” a searing tale of 1930s injustice framed as a minstrel show. Though it closed abruptly after playing just 49 performances and 29 previews, it received 12 nominations, including best musical, best book of a musical and best original score, as well as a leading actor and two featured actor nods. It marked the final collaboration of songwriters John Kander and Fred Ebb. “Mormon” and “Scottsboro” face competition from “Catch Me if You Can” and “Sister Act.” The plays that were nominated include the heartwarming human-puppet hybrid “War Horse,” David Lindsay-Abaire’s “Good People,” Jez Butterworth’s “Jerusalem” and Stephen Adly Guirgis’s “The [Expletive] With the Hat.” Among individual actors who earned nominations were Al Pacino, who played Shylock in “The Merchant of Venice,” Vanessa Redgrave in “Driving Miss Daisy,” Edie Falco in “The House of Blue Leaves” and Ellen Barkin in “The Normal Heart.” A complete list of Tony nominees, with excerpts of reviews by Washington Post theater critic Peter Marks, follows: Best Play: “Good People,” “Jerusalem,” “The [Expletive] With the Hat,” “War Horse.” Peter Marks on “Jerusalem”: “[Jez] Butterworth’s rousing play at the Music Box Theatre is an extremely funny and, ultimately, surprisingly profound contemplation of a fading time in Western civilization when iconoclastic giants walked among us.” Best Musical: “The Book of Mormon,” “Catch Me if You Can,” “The Scottsboro Boys,” “Sister Act.” Peter Marks: The marvel of “The Book of Mormon” k is that even as it profanes some serious articles of faith, its spirit is anything but mean. The ardently devout and comedically challenged are sure to disagree. Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play: Brian Bedford, “The Importance of Being Earnest”; Bobby Cannavale, “The [Expletive] With the Hat”; Joe Mantello, “The Normal Heart”; Al Pacino, “The Merchant of Venice”; Mark Rylance, “Jerusalem.” Peter Marks: Bobby Cannavale, playing the paranoid, misogynist, violenceprone Phil, an ex-con trying to break into the movies, brings a magnetic pull to the most repulsive of predators. Best Performance by an Actress in Leading Role in a Play: Nina Arianda, “Born Yesterday”; Frances McDormand, “Good People”; Lily Rabe, “The Merchant of Venice”; Vanessa Redgrave, “Driving Miss Daisy”; Hannah Yelland, “Brief Encounter.” Peter Marks: McDormand is a flatout marvel here, offering up a performance that is terrifying in its reasonableness and righteousness. Best Book of a Musical: “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson,” “The Book of Mormon,” “The Scottsboro Boys,” “Sister Act.” Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre: “The Book of Mormon,” “The Scottsboro Boys,” “Sister Act,” “Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown.”
ARI MINTZ

Best Revival of a Play: “Arcadia,” “The Importance of Being Earnest,” “The Merchant of Venice,” “The Normal Heart.” Best Revival of a Musical: “Anything Goes,” “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.” m

Godley, “Anything Goes”; John Larroquette, “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”; Forrest McClendon, “The Scottsboro Boys”; Rory O’Malley, “The Book of Mormon.” Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical: Laura Benanti, “Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown”; Tammy Blanchard, “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”; Victoria Clark, “Sister Act”; Nikki M. James, “The Book of Mormon”; Patty LuPone, “Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown.” Best Scenic Design of a Play: Todd Rosenthal, “The [Expletive] With the Hat”; Rae Smith, “War Horse”; Ultz, “Jerusalem”; Mark Wendland, “The Merchant of Venice.” Best Scenic Design of a Musical: Beowulf Boritt, “The Scottsboro Boys”; Derek McLane, “Anything Goes”; Scott Pask, “The Book of Mormon”; Donyale Werle, “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson.” Best Costume Design of a Play: Jess Goldstein, “The Merchant of Venice”; Desmond Heeley, “The Importance of Being Earnest”; Mark Thompson, “La Bete”; Catherine Zuber, “Born Yesterday.”

Christopher Shutt, “War Horse.” Best Sound Design of a Musical: Peter Hylenski, “The Scottsboro Boys”; Steve Canyon Kennedy, “Catch Me if You Can”; Brian Ronan, “Anything Goes”; Brian Ronan, “The Book of Mormon.” Best Direction of a Play: Marianne Elliott and Tom Morris, “War Horse” m; Joel Grey and George C. Wolfe, “The Normal Heart”; Anna D. Shapiro, “The [Expletive] With the Hat”; Daniel Sullivan, “The Merchant of Venice.”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical: Norbert Leo Butz, “Catch Me if You Can”; Josh Gad, “The Book of Mormon”; Joshua Henry, “The Scottsboro Boys”; Andrew Rannells, “The Book of Mormon”; Tony Sheldon, “Priscilla Queen of the Desert.” Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical: Sutton Foster, “Anything Goes”; Beth Leavel, “Baby It’s You!”; Patina Miller, “Sister Act”; Donna Murphy, “The People in the Picture.” Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play: Mackenzie Crook, “Jerusalem”; Billy Crudup, “Arcadia”; John Benjamin Hickey, “The Normal Heart”; Arian Moayed, “Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo”; Yul Vazquez, “The [Expletive] With the Hat.” Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play: Ellen Barkin, “The Normal Heart”; Edie Falco, “The House of Blue Leaves”; Judith Light, “Lombardi”; Joanna Lumley, “La Bete”; Elizabeth Rodriguez, “The [Expletive] With the Hat.” Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical: Colman Domingo, “The Scottsboro Boys”; Adam

PAUL KOLNIK

Best Costume Design of a Musical: Tim Chappel and Lizzy Gardiner, “Priscilla Queen of the Desert”; Martin Pakledinaz, “Anything Goes”; Ann Roth, “The Book of Mormon”; Catherine Zuber, “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.” Best Lighting Design of a Play: Paule Constable, “War Horse”; David Lander, “Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo”; Kenneth Posner, “The Merchant of Venice”; Mimi Jordan Sherin, “Jerusalem.” Best Lighting Design of a Musical: Ken Billington, “The Scottsboro Boys”; Howell Binkley, “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”; Peter Kaczorowski, “Anything Goes”; Brian MacDevitt, “The Book of Mormon.” Best Sound Design of a Play: Acme Sound Partners and Cricket S. Myers, “Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo”; Simon Baker, “Brief Encounter”; Ian Dickinson for Autograph, “Jerusalem”;

Best Direction of a Musical: Rob Ashford, “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”; Kathleen Marshall, “Anything Goes”; Casey Nicholaw and Trey Parker, “The Book of Mormon”; Susan Stroman, “The Scottsboro Boys.” Best Choreography: Rob Ashford, “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”; Kathleen Marshall, “Anything Goes”; Casey Nicholaw, “The Book of Mormon”; Susan Stroman, “The Scottsboro Boys.” Best Orchestrations: Doug Besterman, “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”; Larry Hochman, “The Scottsboro Boys”; Larry Hochman and Stephen Oremus, “The Book of Mormon”; Marc Shaiman and Larry Blank, “Catch Me if You Can.”

JOAN MARCUS

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ON THE WEB View photos of the Tony nominees and read full reviews of the shows at washingtonpost.com/theater.

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A Rose in bloom

Chicago’s third-year point guard, Derrick Rose, wins the NBA MVP award, at 22 supplanting Wes Unseld as the youngest to do so. D3

Kentucky Derby Before the Derby draw takes place, check out Andrew Beyer’s analysis. Box Seats Fans’ takes on how NFL players may violate antitrust law, and trusting Bruce Boudreau. Baseball Insider A “leading off” post each morning, plus insights from Dave Sheinin and others.

A familiar feeling

With the Seattle Sounders up next, recent ugly losses have D.C. United worried about sinking to last season’s depths. D6

Lightning 4, Capitals 3

Third down and long
CAPS ON VERGE OF ELIMINATION
Tampa Bay scores twice in 24 seconds in third
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K ATIE C ARRERA

tampa — For the first time in this Eastern Conference semifinal series, the Washington Capitals entered the third period with a lead. A one-goal cushion that would force the Tampa Bay Lightning to take risks and stray from its smothering defense. But then it evaporated as Steven Stamkos and Ryan Malone scored 24 seconds apart to put Tampa Bay ahead, and that 4-3 edge stood as the Lightning went up three games to none in the best-of-seven series. The Capitals now face elimination in Game 4 on Wednesday at St. Pete Times Forum. “It’s not over. We’re not going to give up. We’re going to win,” Alex Ovechkin said. “We have to defend our lead and play our game but we didn’t. I think when we get the puck deep only one guy was chasing. We tried to play too safe. We didn’t play our way at all.” After playing one of their best periods of the series in the middle stanza to establish their second lead of the
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Alex Ovechkin, Coach Bruce Boudreau and the Capitals are looking at a 3-0 series deficit against the Lightning in their Eastern Conference semifinal series.

Game 4: Tonight at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. (Comcast SportsNet) Lightning lead series, 3-0

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PostSports.com: Get the latest updates from the Capitals Insider blog and check out the interactive shot chart, video and photo gallery.

Four: Number of playoff series the Capitals have trailed 3-0; they were swept twice and lost in five games twice. Only three teams in NHL history have come back from 3-0 series deficits: 2010 Flyers, 1975 Islanders and 1942 Maple Leafs.

he Capitals played one of their best periods of the postseason Tuesday night in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinals against the Tampa Bay Lightning. A three-goal spurt in the second period against Dwayne Roloson gave the Caps a 3-2 lead, and for a time it seemed they might finally break out of their funk against the Bolts. But one good period isn’t enough, not against Tampa Bay, not in these playoffs. The Bolts scored two goals 24 seconds part early in the third period and just like that, the momentum the Capitals had worked so hard to build was gone. And it wasn’t coming back, especially after the Bolts went into a Habs-like trap to hold on to a 4-3 victory. Now the Caps have to win here Wednesday night in Game 4 at St. Pete Times Forum, or once again the hockey season in Washington will hamilton continued on D7

On Werth’s return to Philadelphia, Phillies hand Nationals a 4-1 loss
BY

A DAM K ILGORE

philadelphia — The first boos cascaded
from the Citizens Bank Ballpark stands as Jayson Werth stepped out of the on-deck circle, not knowing what to expect, ready for his first at-bat here as a Washington National. They continued, louder and louder, coming from Philadelphia Phillies

fans who held aloft signs that read “$tiff” and “Welcome Back Loser” and “I only came to boo Jayson.” By late Tuesday night, when Werth’s old team had again asserted its superiority over his new one, this time with a 4-1 victory, Werth and, surprisingly, Phillies fans had shown their appreciation for one another.

The loss that sent the Nationals back below .500 — incidentally, their 1,000th game since baseball returned to Washington — included the dual hallmarks of their first month: strong starting pitching and nonexistent offense. Livan Hernandez allowed three runs in 61/3 innings while pitching around 10 hits, but the Nationals’ offense against Cole

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A no-hitter for Liriano

Hamels, who threw a five-hitter, consisted entirely of Michael Morse’s solo homer in the seventh. Werth went 0 for 3 with a walk, lowering his average this year to .226. The Phillies have beaten the Nation-

als 54 times in their past 76 meetings. But the memory that will last for Werth and for the 45,695 who came to watch his return happened in Werth’s first at-bat. By the end, Werth had turned into an enemy of the people here, once and for until he retires. He can live with that. “Hopefully, nationals continued on D5

AT
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THE SIDELINE
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he Redskins, as you’ve probably heard, selected three players from Nebraska in this year’s draft — Roy Helu, DeJon Gomes and Niles Paul — meaning Cornhuskers make up 25 percent of their draft class. Fans, brilliantly, have already labeled this trio the “Nebraskins.” This was the first time the Redskins have selected three players from the same school since 1975, when they also took three Cornhuskers. Which is sort of weird. So I went back to read the coverage of that 1975 draft, which took place in January, lasted 21 hours over two days, and ended with a guard from Nebraska, Stan Hegener, going to

6 WASHINGTONPOST.COM/CAPITALS Cup playoffs: Check out complete 3 Stanley coverage of the Capitals and follow the NHL’s
postseason schedule and results.

WASHINGTON POST LIVE WITH IVAN CARTER
5 P.M. ON COMCAST SPORTSNET Post columnist Jason Reid will be in studio along with CSN Capitals analyst Alan May.

Redskins hope this current crop of ‘Nebraskins’ works out better than the last
was a chaotic affair, in which they didn’t have any picks in the first four rounds and made four trades in the draft’s second day. That year’s Nebraskins were hardly hyped and barely noted by The Post — “In the final rounds of the draft yesterday, the Redskins selected their second and third players from Nebraska, cornerback Ardell Johnson and guard Dennis Pavelka, a 6-3, 261pounder. Washington had taken Nebraska tackle Mark Doak [in] the sixth round,” Ken Denlinger wrote. Doak was listed at 6-3 and 265 pounds when drafted, and was the team’s second player selected behind running back Mike Thomas. Bobby Mitchell called him “the most improved player on Nebraska’s team last year,” adding that the tackle was “tough, aggressive, and very strong.” He was the only Nebraskin who rated a mention in George Allen’s post-draft wrap-up. Johnson was cut in late July, on the day when the headline was linebacker Dave Robinson generating 2.7 horsepower on a stationary bike, equal to half of an old VW engine. Pavelka was injured in training camp; his eventual release never even made The Post. But Doak we know more about, since he was chosen by The Post’s Lenny Shapiro to share his training camp experiences. The 24-year-old was married with no children and a sheepdog at the time, though his wife stayed in Pittsburgh with her folks. He started training camp with the first-string offense, and his quotes could probably be plugged into training camp stories 35 years later without anyone blinking. “That first day, well, it was like going from junior high and touch football to high school and tackle,” he told Shapiro. “I had butterflies, I was queasy about it. You know, it’s a do-or-die kind of situation. It’s not for fun anymore. It’s a business, and if you don’t do it, you’re gone.” Doak stuck around training camp as the roster was whittled, getting decent playing time as his weight fluctuated between 268 and 272. Then he forgot to take salt tablets, dropped to 260, and cramped dramatically while walking down a hallway. “So I sat down,” he told Shapiro. “It seemed like the sensible thing to do.” He spent 90 minutes in a hospital getting treated for dehydration, and came back talking about how he still had six (six!) more preseason games to impress coaches. But Doak was cut less than two weeks later, and wound up starting that fall for Birmingham of the WFL. None of the Nebraskins ever played a game with Washington.
steinbergd@washpost.com

D.C. SPORTS BOG
Dan Steinberg
the Steelers. “I would classify him as a sleeper,” Steelers executive Art Rooney Jr. told the New York Times, which failed to solicit Mel Kiper’s opinion on the matter. (Wondrously, The Post reported that the Jets and Giants were booed for their picks.) As for the Redskins’ haul, it

Champions Tour tennis comes to town on Sept. 23
BY

Hot Topic AllMetSports
Excerpts from allmetsports.com

L IZ C LARKE

There was a time, a decade or two ago, when an uncommonly gifted generation of American men so dominated tennis that it seemed they simply took turns hoisting the trophy at Grand Slam events. The hard-serving Pete Sampras was peerless on Wimbledon’s grass. Jim Courier’s gritty resolve translated beautifully to the red clay of Roland Garros, site of the French Open, as well as the withering heat of the Australian Open. And Andre Agassi’s all-around skill produced titles at all four of the sport’s majors. All three players, joined by compatriot Michael Chang, will return to competition in Washington Sept. 23, when the 2011 Champions Series — tennis’s version of a senior tour — visits Verizon Center. Details of the circuit, featuring Washington as second stop on a 12-city tour that spans Sept. 22 to Oct. 22, were unveiled Tuesday. As described by Courier, coowner of the company that launched the Champions Tour in 2005, the roughly three-and-ahalf hour program promises to blend spirited competition among former world No. 1s, a dose of nostalgia and irrefutable evidence that tennis is a sport for life. And, ideally, it will spark new interest in the game, which continues to grow at the recreational level, with more players of all ages taking up rackets, yet struggle (at least in the United States) in the professional ranks. Heading into this month’s French Open, the season’s second major, there isn’t an American man ranked among the world’s top 10 — inconceivable when Courier, Sampras and Agassi were jockeying for the No. 1 perch.

“We’ve had a great run historically in the United States,” said Courier, 40. “But it’s getting more and more competitive every day. More and more people [from other countries] are trying to become competitive tennis players. We have to earn it. We’ve become kind of spoiled.” Added Courier, new captain of the U.S. Davis Cup squad: “I’m bullish about American tennis but recognize it’s going to be difficult going forward because you have so many people around the world trying.” Agassi, who joined Courier on a conference call Tuesday, said he wanted to take part in the tour to compete against friends and rivals without the stress that dogged their competitive careers. He added that the schedule, with breaks to recover between matches, made it possible for him to play despite chronic back pain from his years on the tour. “In all cases it’s a better platform for me to do what I can do,” said Agassi, 41. “We also can play pretty darn well if we’re healthy. It’s just the recovery that gets tougher as we get older.” Each of the 12 one-night tournaments will feature four former champions squaring off in one-set semifinals. The lineup of players will change slightly at each city, with John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg and Mats Wilander taking part in other markets. The winners of each semifinal will then play for the title in an eight-game pro-set championship, collecting points, as well, toward a share of the $1 million prize pool that will be split among the top three finishers at tour’s end. Tickets start at $35 and go on sale Monday through the Verizon Center box office or Ticketmaster.
clarkel@washpost.com

TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST

Vickie Cutsforth, Sean Cutsforth’s mother, wipes away a tear as Sean’s former teammates present her with her son’s baseball jersey.

Brentsville honors a fallen hero
BY P RESTON W ILLIAMS AND T ONI L . S ANDYS

TELEVISION AND RADIO MLB
2 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 8 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago White Sox » WGN Washington at Philadelphia » MASN, WJFK (106.7 FM) Los Angeles Angels at Boston » ESPN Baltimore at Kansas City » MASN2, WWXT (92.7 FM), WWXX (94.3 FM), WTEM (980 AM)

NHL PLAYOFFS
7 p.m. 7 p.m. Washington at Tampa Bay » Comcast SportsNet, WFED (820 AM, 1500 AM) Philadelphia at Boston » Versus

NBA PLAYOFFS
8 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago » TNT Dallas at Los Angeles Lakers » TNT

SOCCER
2:45 p.m. UEFA Champions League semifinal, Schalke at Manchester United » FX

only from Comcast.

When Sean Cutsforth pitched and played first base at Brentsville High School, the left-hander spoke when spoken to but not a whole lot otherwise, Tigers Coach Brian Knight recalled of the quiet and respected 2006 graduate. Cutsforth was content to let his actions do his talking for him. Tuesday night the Brentsville community did the same, naming its high school baseball facility Army Specialist Sean Russell Cutsforth Memorial Field in honor of Cutsforth, who was killed in Afghanistan in December and buried in Arlington National Cemetery in February. He was 22. Cutsforth’s parents, Robert and Vickie; wife, Ashley; and newborn son, Sean Jr.; as well as members of his platoon, former teammates and local school and government officials were on hand for the dedication in Nokesville, which was held before the Tigers’ 7-4 home loss to Kettle Run. Former teammates presented Cutsforth’s framed No. 15 jersey to his parents, and his closest military friend, Army Spec. Brandon Kelly, presented a retired flag that had flown over the Tomb

of the Unknown Soldier. A Brentsville student, Lynsey Fadul, performed the national anthem. Brentsville’s players and coaches had “SRC 15” written on their caps in white marker. Sean Cutsforth Cutsforth’s father choked up as he told the was killed in crowd, “It was just five Afghanistan. years ago that Sean was playing on this field.” As Robert Cutsforth left the field on Tuesday, he turned towards the Brentsville dugout and yelled, “Win one for Cuts.” Born at Fort Belvoir and married on the Fourth of July in 2009, Sean Cutsforth played varsity baseball at Brentsville for three years and threw the only no-hitter in the recent history of the program, when he blanked Central-Woodstock his junior season. He played on scholarship for one year at Virginia Wesleyan before joining the service. Cutsforth also played football at Brentsville and was a Virginia AA statequalifying swimmer. He holds the 8-andunder 25-meter backstroke record for the Ben Lomond Swim Team in Manassas, a mark that has stood since 1997.

His military decorations included the Army Commendation Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Afghanistan Campaign Medal. “When you got him on the mound, he was a bulldog,” Knight said. “You’d go out in a tough spot and try to loosen things up if it was a little tense, try to get in a oneliner or a joke or something. He wouldn’t even crack a smile. He was all business. I knew that’s what he was going to bring to the table.” Knight did not think that the recent elimination of Osama bin Laden by U.S. forces, and the subsequent wave of patriotism, would make the Brentsville ceremony any more moving than it already would have been, given the circumstances of a 22-year-old father-tobe being killed by small-arms fire in the Ghazni province of Afghanistan. “I’m sure the range of emotions are going to be different for each family member of everybody who lost somebody,” Knight said Monday. “I’m sure there will be families of people who know somebody serving right now, or who possibly died while serving. They may not shed a tear for Sean, but they might shed a tear for their own family member.”
williamsp@washpost.com sandyst@washpost.com

DIGEST
PRO FOOTBALL

NFL’s appeal on lockout to be heard June 3
A federal appeals court Tuesday scheduled a hearing for June 3 in St. Louis on the NFL’s appeal of a judge’s decision to end the sport’s lockout. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit will hold the hearing. The NFL reimposed the lockout Friday after three appellate judges granted the league’s request for a temporary stay of the April 25 preliminary injunction, which lifted the original lockout. The stay temporarily delays implementation of that order by U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson. The three appeals court judges — Steven M. Colloton, Duane Benton and Kermit E. Bye — also are considering an NFL request for a longer stay of the injunction that would remain in effect until the appeal is resolved. That ruling is likely to be made in the next few days. Until then, the temporary stay they granted Friday remains in effect. If the longer stay is granted, the lockout would remain in effect until a ruling by the court on the NFL’s appeal after the June 3 hearing. If the league’s request for a stay pending its appeal is denied, the sport might be forced back into operation.
— Mark Maske
SOCCER

winning the semifinal on 3-1 aggregate as Pedro Rodriguez scored off a perfect through pass from Andres Iniesta in the 54th minute. In the fourth match between the rivals in 18 days, Rodriguez gave Barcelona a three-goal lead in the home-and-home, totalgoals series. Marcelo scored for Real Madrid in 64th minute off a pass from Angel Di Maria, whose initial shot bounced back off a post. Marcelo’s was the only shot on goal by the visitors in the match. Seeking its fourth Champions League title and third in six years, Barcelona plays Manchester United or Schalke on May 28 at Wembley.
TENNIS

Serena Williams after he tried to enter her gated subdivision. Palm Beach Gardens police say 40-year-old Patenema Ouedraogo tried to walk into the subdivision Monday night. They say security guards asked for his driver’s license and found he matched the description of a man accused of stalking Williams. . . . Top-ranked Caroline Wozniacki reached the third round of the Madrid Open by beating Bojana Jovanovski of Serbia, 6-4, 6-4.
ICE HOCKEY

Sweden on Wednesday.
AUTO RACING

Martin Truex Jr. fired his pit crew after a botched final stop at Richmond, and Michael Waltrip Racing responded with four personnel changes for the driver. . . . Ho-Pin Tung will try to become the first Chinese driver to start the Indianapolis 500 when qualifying begins May 21. Co-owners Sam Schmidt and Jay Penske say Tung will drive the No. 8 car for Schmidt Dragon Racing.
COLLEGES

Barcelona advanced to the Champions League final by dominating Real Madrid in a 1-1 tie,

Police in South Florida say they charged a man with stalking star

Alex Pietrangelo scored at 4 minutes 14 seconds of overtime to give Canada a 4-3 win over Switzerland to complete the group stage of the world championship in Kosice, Switzerland, with a perfect record. Canada has three wins in three games. The United States faces

The Pac-10 agreed to a 12-year television contract with Fox and ESPN worth about $3 billion, allowing the conference to quadruple its media rights fees and start its own network. The contract, which will begin with the 2012-13 season, guarantees each of the 12

schools about $21 million. . . . Georgia Tech’s Iman Shumpert said he is remaining in the NBA draft, bypassing his senior season and hiring an agent. . . . Gonzaga basketball guard Demetri Goodson has requested his release from the school so he can pursue playing football at another school. Gonzaga, who would have been a senior, started all 35 games last season, averaging 5.2 points and 2.6 assists. He could have two years of football eligibility remaining. . . . Colgate has hired DePaul assistant Nicci Hays-Fort as its women’s basketball coach. Hays-Fort replaces Pamela Bass, who resigned in March. The Raiders were 7-22 this past year, losing their final eight games.
— From news services and staff reports

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EASTERN CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Best-of-seven; x-If necessary

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Low-key presence at high-stakes race

(5) ATLANTA LEADS (1) CHICAGO, 1-0
Game 1: Atlanta 103, at Chicago 95 Wednesday: Atlanta at Chicago, 8 Friday: Chicago at Atlanta, 7 Sunday: Chicago at Atlanta, 8 x-Tuesday: Atlanta at Chicago, TBD x-Thursday, May 12: Chicago at Atlanta, TBD x-Sunday, May 15: Atlanta at Chicago, TBD

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(2) MIAMI LEADS (3) BOSTON, 2-0
Game 1: at Miami 99, Boston 90 Tuesday: at Miami 102, Boston 91 Saturday: Miami at Boston, 8 Monday, May 9: Miami at Boston, 7 x-Wednesday, May 11: Boston at Miami, TBD x-Friday, May 13: Miami at Boston, TBD x-Monday, May 16: Boston at Miami, 8

WESTERN CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Best-of-seven;x-If necessary

(3) DALLAS LEADS (2) L.A. LAKERS, 1-0
Game 1: Dallas 96, at L.A. Lakers 94 Wednesday: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 Friday: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 9:30 Sunday: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 3:30 x-Tuesday, May 10: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Thursday, May 12: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, TBD x-Sunday, May 15: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 3:30

MIKE EHRMANN/GETTY IMAGES

Miami’s LeBron James dunks over Kevin Garnett, left, and Ray Allen for two of his game-high 35 points.

(8) MEMPHIS LEADS (4) OKLAHOMA CITY, 1-0
Game 1: Memphis 114, at Oklahoma City 101 Tuesday: Memphis at Oklahoma City, Late Saturday: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 Monday, May 9: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 x-Wed., May 11: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, May 13: Okla. City at Memphis, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Memphis at Okla. City, TBA

Heat seizes a 2-0 lead
Celtics stay close until late cold stretch dooms them
BY

HEAT 102, CELTICS 91
BOSTON ............................. 26 MIAMI ................................ 27 BOSTON Pierce Garnett JO'Neal Rondo Allen Davis Green Krstic West Wafer TOTALS 16 20 25 25 24 — 91 30 — 102

A MY S HIPLEY

miami — The Boston Celtics
never lost their composure, never lost their cool Tuesday night, but they have to wonder where in the world they put their shooting touch. Two days after dropping Game 1 of this Eastern Conference Semifinals series to the Miami Heat amid a barrage of referees’ whistles, the Celtics botched the basketball part of the game, fumbling away Game 2 amid a sea of misfired jump shots and wasted chances. And adding to the frustration, they got close, too. Their 102-91 defeat featured nine lead changes and 10 ties, including 80-80 with 7 minutes 10 seconds remaining. The Celtics never trailed by double digits until late in the fourth quarter, when the Heat pulled away with a 14-0 run to rile up the home crowd and snatch a 2-0 series lead. “Even when you think at times you’re outplaying them, they’re still right there,” Heat Coach Erik Spoelstra said. “Because they have so much experience, and they don’t panic, they don’t really let you pull away too much. . . . At no point did we feel like we could relax.” The story for Miami? Dwyane Wade’s dynamism in the first half, an electric LeBron James in the second, and constant harassment on the defensive end that made some of the Celtics’ misses understandable. The Heat blocked nine shots, giving them 17 in two games. James, who scored 24 of his 35 in the last half. Wade earned 16 of his 28 in the first, and Chris Bosh chipped in 17. “I felt very comfortable with my shot,” James said. “I felt very comfortable with everything I was doing at that point. I was doing whatever I could for us to grasp that lead.” Boston’s stars labored in every

MIN FG FT O-T A PF PTS 32:32 5-11 2-2 1-5 1 2 13 37:06 8-20 0-0 1-6 0 5 16 18:30 2-7 4-5 5-9 1 4 8 41:42 7-16 6-8 1-6 12 3 20 34:29 2-7 2-2 1-5 2 5 7 25:37 2-7 2-3 0-2 1 3 6 21:48 4-6 1-2 1-4 0 1 11 11:19 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 14:55 4-4 0-0 0-1 1 1 10 2:02 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 240 34-79 17-22 10-38 18 24 91

Percentages: FG .430, FT .773. 3-Point Goals: 6-11, .545 (Green 2-2, West 2-2, Allen 1-2, Pierce 1-4, Rondo 0-1). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 12 (10 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Garnett, J.O’Neal). Turnovers: 11 (Rondo 3, Garnett 2, West 2, Allen, Green, J.O’Neal, Pierce). Steals: 7 (Green 2, Allen, Davis, Garnett, Rondo, West). Technical Fouls: Coach Rivers, 2:48 fourth. MIAMI James Bosh Ilgauskas Bibby Wade Anthony Jones Miller Chalmers TOTALS MIN FG FT O-T A PF PTS 44:03 14-25 5-8 2-7 2 3 35 38:45 5-10 7-11 3-11 4 1 17 10:46 1-5 0-0 1-3 0 3 2 26:55 3-6 0-0 1-4 3 3 8 39:24 8-20 11-13 1-8 3 3 28 34:31 1-2 4-4 2-5 1 3 6 18:55 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 3 0 5:36 1-1 0-0 0-2 0 1 3 21:05 1-5 0-0 2-3 2 2 3 240 34-75 27-36 12-44 15 22 102

Percentages: FG .453, FT .750. 3-Point Goals: 7-16, .438 (Bibby 2-4, James 2-4, Miller 1-1, Wade 1-3, Chalmers 1-4). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 10 (14 PTS). Blocked Shots: 9 (Anthony 3, Bibby 2, Bosh 2, James, Jones). Turnovers: 10 (Wade 4, Bosh 2, Chalmers 2, Ilgauskas, Miller). Steals: 6 (Bibby 2, Bosh, Chalmers, James, Wade). Technical Fouls: None. A: 20,104 (19,600). T: 2:34.

way possible. Paul Pierce had foot problems and scored 13 points, Ray Allen got poked hard in the chest and experienced shortness of breath; he scored just seven, attempting just seven field goals. Rajon Rondo struggled with a sore back and led with 20 points, and Kevin Garnett chipped in 16. The Celtics converted just 43 percent of their field-goal attempts for the second straight game. Wade and James, meantime, propelled Miami and provided quite a bit of entertainment while they were at it. James was so delighted about a dunk off a loose ball with just over five minutes remaining that he started pumping his fist while hanging off the rim. Another two came on a gorgeous spin move around Rondo on the break that sent the fleet-footed guard into a backward somersault as James finished with another jam. “We like it when he’s aggressive,” Bosh said. “Any time he has some chances to get some dunks, he’s always pretty emphatic. Especially here at home, you have to try to tear the rim off.”

Wade provide a few showstoppers, too. He literally spun Garnett around on a fastbreak with a jaw-dropping inside-outside move that took him out of traffic into an easy layup. And the pair got to the foul line, too. The Heat attempted 36 free throws; the Celtics just 22. Like in Sunday’s opener, there was plenty of drama, only it came not from fisticuffs and frayed nerves, but rather from two teams that wouldn’t back down. In a league in which big runs and double-digit margins come and go, neither led by more than eight until there were just more than five minutes remaining. A few dreadful scoring droughts served only to heighten the tension. The Heat would miss. The Celtics would miss. The Heat would miss. The Celtics would miss, get the offensive rebound, and miss again. “Guys are pretty tired in the locker room,” Spoelstra said. “We had to fight for every inch of that court tonight. At some points it was a tough struggle to get some points on the board. . . . Now the mental discipline begins. This thing is just getting started.” After scoring six points in the opener and four in the first half Tuesday, Garnett got hot and dropped in 10 on five of seven from the field in the third quarter. Yet James kept pace, scoring 12, all in the last 4:35 of the period, allowing Miami to enter the final quarter with a 72-67 advantage. The Celtics made just 5 of 22 field goals (22.7 percent) in the second period, scoring only 16 points. Allen didn’t make his first field goal until hitting a threepointer with 5:25 remaining in the first half. Though the Heat went through a 5:45 stretch without a field goal and tallied just 20 second-quarter points, Wade threw down 10 points in the last 48 seconds that seemed to seize the momentum. Boston intends to seize it back on its home court. “Being down 2-0 doesn’t scare any of us,” Allen said. “It doesn’t make us nervous. We have an opportunity to come out shining.”
shipleya@washpost.com

MAVERICKS 96, LAKERS 94

Late Monday When Kobe Bryant drained a three-pointer to put Los Angeles up by 16 points in the second half, nobody would have been surprised if Dallas packed it in. After all, the Mavericks aren’t exactly known for their playoff tenacity. Their stirring comeback against the two-time defending champions showed that Dirk Nowitzki and Dallas just might be capable of creating whole new reputations this season. Nowitzki scored 28 points and hit two go-ahead free throws with 19.5 seconds left, Jason Kidd forced a crucial turnover moments later, and the Mavericks escaped with a victory in Game 1 when Bryant missed two late chances to steal it back for the Lakers. Jason Terry scored 15 points and Nowitzki had 14 rebounds for Dallas, which erased that huge third-quarter deficit before the dramatic finish to the perennial playoff teams’ first postseason meeting in 23 years. The Mavericks trailed 92-87 with 3:32 to play, but finished on a 9-2 run. “I thought we did a great job hanging in there,” Nowitzki said. “It wasn’t looking good, but we talked about in the huddle. Just stick with it, try to get some stops, don’t turn the ball over, and get a shot up every time. Just at least give ourselves a chance to make it.” Game 2 is Wednesday night at Staples Center. Pau Gasol had 15 points and 11 rebounds for the Lakers.
DALLAS ........................ 25 L.A. LAKERS ................. 23 DALLAS Marion Nowitzki Chandler Kidd Stevenson Stojakovic Terry Haywood Barea Brewer TOTALS MIN 34:13 37:59 34:48 33:35 9:34 23:48 30:05 13:11 14:26 8:21 240 FG 5-13 11-22 5-8 2-4 0-3 4-8 6-10 1-1 3-6 2-4 39-79 19 30 FT 0-0 5-5 1-2 1-2 0-0 0-0 2-2 0-0 0-0 0-0 9-11 27 25 25 — 96 16 — 94 PF PTS 1 10 1 28 2 11 2 7 1 0 1 10 2 15 4 2 1 8 2 5 17 96

O-T A 2-4 4 1-14 3 1-9 1 1-5 11 0-0 1 0-2 0 0-3 4 0-0 0 0-2 5 0-1 1 5-40 30

Percentages: FG .494, FT .818. 3-Point Goals: 9-20, .450 (Kidd 2-3, Stojakovic 2-3, Barea 2-4, Brewer 1-2, Nowitzki 1-2, Terry 1-4, Stevenson 0-2). Team Rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 11 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Chandler 3, Haywood, Kidd, Marion, Nowitzki, Terry). Turnovers: 11 (Kidd 5, Marion 2, Stevenson 2, Nowitzki, Terry). Steals: 8 (Kidd 3, Nowitzki 2, Brewer, Marion, Terry). Technical Fouls: Chandler, 1:30 second L.A. LAKERS Artest Gasol Bynum Fisher Bryant Odom Blake Brown Barnes TOTALS MIN FG FT O-T A PF PTS 31:14 1-8 0-0 1-3 4 0 2 36:01 5-10 5-6 5-11 7 3 15 28:58 3-8 2-2 0-5 1 1 8 30:55 3-6 1-1 0-1 6 3 8 35:08 14-29 4-5 0-5 0 2 36 31:01 5-10 5-5 3-12 2 1 15 17:05 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 13:38 3-6 0-1 0-1 0 0 6 16:00 2-6 0-0 2-5 1 2 4 17- 11240 36-84 21 12 94 20 44

With MVP, Rose edges Unseld
Bulls guard becomes youngest ever to receive NBA honor
BY

M ICHAEL L EE

chicago — Derrick Rose was born in 1988, the year Wes Unseld was inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, so there was no reason to expect that the Chicago Bulls’ all-star point guard would be familiar with the only player to win a league’s most valuable player award while representing the Bullets/Wizards franchise. On the day that he supplanted Unseld as the youngest player in NBA history to claim the most prestigious individual award, Rose could recall Unseld only from seeing someone wearing his throwback No. 41 jersey. “The Bullets, right? Wasn’t he a big man or something like that?” Rose asked. “I never watched any of his games.” But Rose has helped bring back some attention to Unseld, who turned 23 only nine days before he won the MVP award in 1968-69, after leading the Baltimore Bullets to their first winning season in franchise history and inspiring a 21-game improvement as a rookie. When contacted by phone on Tuesday — a few hours before Rose accepted the Maurice Podoloff Trophy at the tender age of 22 years, seven months — Unseld was

neither excited nor disappointed that Rose bumped him by one spot. “I’m not trying to be coy here with you, but it’s not something I think about, or ever thought about,” Unseld said. “I didn’t even know it myself.” Rose, the No. 1 overall pick of the 2008 NBA draft, boldly announced his candidacy in training camp when he asked, “Why can’t I be the MVP of the league?” He earned the award — receiving 113 out of a possible 121 first-place votes — after propelling the Bulls (62-20) to the league’s best overall record and also inspiring a 21game improvement, while averaging 25 points, 7.7 assists and 4.1 rebounds in this third season. He joined Michael Jordan, Oscar Robertson, Jerry West, Larry Bird, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James as the only players in NBA history to average at least 25 points, 7.5 assists and 4.0 rebounds. “It’s amazing. This is only my third year. I’m still learning things about the game, still making careless turnovers, things like that,” said Rose, the first player since Moses Malone to win the award in just his third season. “But to be MVP at 22 years old, it makes me want to push harder, work harder, stay in the gym longer. Those are the types of things that push me, especially having this award. I’m blessed to be in this position right now.” After the Bullets selected him second overall behind Elvin Hayes

in the 1968 NBA draft, Unseld went on to average 13.8 points and 18.2 rebounds, and he and Wilt Chamberlain remain the only players to win rookie of the year and MVP in the same season. He said he found out about the award while he was home in Kentucky after he returned from a fishing trip. His father told him that the Bullets had called and left a message for him to call back. “I called them and they said, ‘You won most valuable player.’ I said, ‘Thank you.’ They said, ‘Okay.’ And that was it,” Unseld said. “I was surprised, but again, it wasn’t something you thought about. The award was not like it is today. It wasn’t a big media thing.” While reflecting on his honor, Unseld gave credit to his teammates. “I was lucky to be surrounded by a bunch of very talented players, who at the time, didn’t know how talented they were,” Unseld said. “You start talking about Earl Monroe, Gus Johnson and most people don’t know how talented Jack Marin was, or Kevin Loughery. And then some of the other guys on that team, Ray Scott, Leroy Ellis. It was an easy fit for me to come in and try to be a part of it.” Unseld said he hasn’t watched Rose play much this season, but has seen enough to see that “he’s obviously a wonderfully talented young man. He knows how to get things done. I’m happy for this young man, because obviously, he deserves it.”
leem@washpost.com

Percentages: FG .429, FT .850. 3-Point Goals: 5-19, .263 (Bryant 4-9, Fisher 1-2, Barnes 0-1, Blake 0-1, Odom 0-1, Brown 0-2, Artest 0-3). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 11 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Artest, Barnes, Brown, Bryant, Bynum, Fisher, Gasol, Odom). Turnovers: 11 (Bryant 3, Gasol 3, Brown 2, Artest, Barnes, Odom). Steals: 9 (Artest 3, Brown 2, Fisher 2, Blake, Bryant). Technical Fouls: Gasol, 1:30 second. A: 18,997 (18,997). T: 2:24.

rainers who win the Kentucky Derby usually do so because they make the race their single-minded focus. With every promising young colt in their barns, they think, long-range, about the first Saturday in May. That’s why Bob Baffert, Todd Pletcher and Nick Zito saddle contenders at Churchill Downs almost every year and will be prominent again on Saturday. And that’s why Graham Motion will probably never be a dominant Derby trainer. Motion will start Animal Kingdom in Saturday’s race; his more accomplished runner, Toby’s Corner, was withdrawn from the field because of an injury. With neither 3-year-old did the trainer display fervor to get to the Derby. He didn’t even tell the colt’s owner when he nominated Toby’s Corner to the Triple Crown series. He raced Animal Kingdom only twice this year, once on grass and once on a synthetic track, hardly a regimen that seems designed to win on the Churchill Downs dirt. In Louisville this week Motion will be a low-key presence. “Graham seems a little uncomfortable in the limelight of the Derby,” said Barry Irwin, head of the partnership that owns Animal Kingdom. To a casual racing fan, such an attitude might seem inexplicable. How can a trainer not be obsessed by America’s biggest race? It’s as if a coach in the National Football League was indifferent to the Super Bowl, saying it didn’t suit his coaching style. But Motion is the product of a school of training — the old school — that believes you shouldn’t push horses aggressively to reach an objective because you want it. Instead, the horse himself is supposed to signal when he is ready for a particular objective. Of the Derby, Motion said, “I want to be taken there.” The son of parents who operated a stud farm in England, Motion was 16 when he came with his family to the United States. Determined to have a career in the horse business, he went to work for trainer Jonathan Sheppard, best known as a developer of steeplechasers and long-distance turf runners, and from this future Hall of Famer he got his old-school education. Motion launched his career on the Maryland circuit in 1993, managing horses of all types — including plenty of lowlevel claimers — but eventually a gelding named Better Talk Now would define him as a trainer. In an era when thoroughbreds’ careers are getting shorter and shorter, Motion managed the gelding through nine seasons of racing. Better Talk Now won his first minor stakes race when he was 4. He captured the nation’s most important grass race, the Breeders’ Cup Turf, at the age of 5. He almost won it a second time when he was 7. He continued to run well in Grade I stakes company until he was 10, retiring with a record of 14 wins in 51 starts and earnings of $4.3 million — a demonstration that contemporary horses, when handled patiently, can have long, productive careers. It is a record that also stands as a rebuke to the contention of the training establishment that thoroughbreds need a broad array of drugs to withstand the rigors of modern racing. The 46-year-old Motion has become a hero to many racing fans because of his views and his record on medication. He

ANDREW BEYER
prefers to rest horses with physical problems rather than to keep them going with drugs. He administers medications judiciously but admitted, “Everybody uses them as a crutch — me included.” He uses Lasix regularly (it’s an “integral part” of the modern game, he says) and Bute when necessary. While doing so he has compiled an extraordinarily distinction. Most of the country’s top trainers — such as Pletcher and Steve Asmussen — have multiple drug violations on their records. Derby-winning trainer Rick Dutrow, has a record of infractions as long as his arm. But in the nearly 8,000 starts that comprise his career, Motion has never been cited for a medication infraction. Not one. A journalist described him in print as the “anti-Dutrow,” the example that it’s possible to succeed in the sport without generating suspicions and cynicism about the use of illegal “juice.” Characteristically, Motion is uncomfortable with such acclaim. “It makes me nervous to talk about it,” he said. Motion has fashioned a professional style and an operation that suit him perfectly. He is based at a training center in Fair Hill, Md., a European-style facility that allows horses to spend plenty of time outside their stalls. The relaxed daily regimen helps the horses learn to relax when they are in competition — a key element in the grass races at which Motion specializes. Irwin, the managing partner of the TeamValor syndicate, liked the arrangement so much that he took all of his horses away from other trainers and put them in Motion’s care. “Graham is very patient, very relaxed, very thoughtful,” Irwin said. “And not only is he talented, he has a hell of a team,” Irwin said. “It’s an impressive organization.” In the last 13 months, Motion has won 13 graded stakes on the grass and only one on the dirt: the Wood Memorial with Toby’s Corner. His reputation as a grass specialist has become self-perpetuating, because clients mainly ask him to train horses with turf-running ability or potential. “People don’t send us a horse who might be as precocious 2-year-old,” he said. If Animal Kingdom distinguishes himself on Saturday, he could help Motion break this stereotype. The colt won his most recent start by rallying from last place in a field of 11 to win the Spiral Stakes on Turfway Park’s Polytrack. He has never raced on dirt, but when Motion tested him at Churchill Saturday morning, the colt worked six furlongs in 1:13.17 and dazzled most of the clockers. In a weak field, he could spring an upset. But it is possible that Motion, with his patient style and unwillingness to push young horses too hard, will never receive the public recognition and acclaim that go to trainers who win Triple Crown races. This surely won’t bother him. It’s not so bad to be esteemed inside the sport for skill, good judgment and integrity.
sports@washpost.com

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

NATIONAL LEAGUE
EAST W L PCT GB L10 STR CENTRAL W L PCT GB L10 STR WEST W L PCT GB L10 STR

AMERICAN LEAGUE
EAST W L PCT GB L10 STR CENTRAL W L PCT GB L10 STR WEST W L PCT GB L10 STR

Phila. xFlorida Atlanta Wash. New York

19 18

9 .679 9 .667

— 7-3 W-1
1/ 2

xSt. Louis Cincinnati Milw. xChicago Houston

16 13 .552 14 15 .483 13 15 .464 12 16 .429 12 17 .414

— 6-4 L-2 2 4-6 L-2 2 6-4 W-2 21/2 4-6 L-3 31/2 3-7 L-2 4 5-5 W-3

xColorado xL.A. San Fran. xArizona

17

9 .654

— 5-5 L-1 4 5-5 W-1 41/2 4-6 W-1 51/2 4-6 W-1 71/2 3-7 L-1 x-Late game

New York T.B. Boston Baltimore Toronto

17 10 .630 16 13 .552 14 15 .483 13 14 .481 13 16 .448

— 6-4 L-1 2 7-3 W-1 4 6-4 W-3 4 5-5 L-1 5 4-6 L-3

xCleveland K.C. Detroit Minn. Chicago

19

8 .704

— 7-3 W-6 41/2 4-6 W-3 71/2 3-7 W-1 91/2 4-6 W-1 10 3-7 L-1

xTexas L.A. xOakland xSeattle

16 13 .552 16 14 .533 15 14 .517 13 16 .448

— 4-6 L-2
1/ 2

7-3 W-2

15 15 .500 14 15 .483 12 15 .444

15 13 .536 13 17 .433 10 18 .357 11 20 .355

4-6 L-2

15 15 .500 14 15 .483 12 17 .414

5 7-3 W-2 51/2 5-5 L-1 71/2 6-4 L-1

xPittsburgh 14 15 .483

1 6-4 W-2 3 7-3 L-1 x-Late game

xSan Diego 11 18 .379

TODAY’S NL GAMES
NATIONALS AT PHILLIES, 7:05 W-L ERA TEAM

There’s nothing like a no-hitter
INDIANS’ CHOO ARRESTED FOR DUI
4-1 1-0 0-0 2-4 5-1 2-4 4-2 2-4 --3-3 3-3 2-2 3-2 1-5 3-2 2-3

Marquis (R) Worley (R) Rodriguez (R) Wood (L) Zambrano (R) Lilly (L) Correia (R) Richard (L) Greinke (R) Hudson (R)
GIANTS AT METS, 7:10

3-0 1-0 0-0 1-3 3-1 2-2 4-2 1-2 --3-2 2-3 2-2 2-2 0-2 3-2 1-2

2.62 0.00 6.75 6.82 4.91 4.45 2.90 3.82 ---3.48 2.90 6.04 6.39 3.89 2.91 5.76

ASTROS AT REDS, 12:35

CUBS AT DODGERS, 3:10

PIRATES AT PADRES, 6:35

BREWERS AT BRAVES, 7:10

Indians OF Shin-Soo Choo was arrested Monday on suspicion of drunken driving. The team said Choo was arrested in Sheffield Lake, Ohio. The 28-year-old South Korean was expected to be in the lineup Tuesday night in Oakland. He joins teammate Austin Kearns, Seattle’s Adam Kennedy, Detroit’s Miguel Cabrera, Oakland’s Coco Crisp and Atlanta’s Derek Lowe as players arrested since Jan. 1 on suspicion of DUI.
BREWERS-BRAVES RAINED OUT

Liriano has no-hitter for Twins, 1-0
BY

R ICK G ANO

chicago — Francisco Liriano pitched the major leagues’
first no-hitter of the season, throwing his first career complete game in the Minnesota Twins’ 1-0 victory over the Chicago White Sox on Tuesday night. Liriano (2-4) walked six and struck out two, throwing 123 pitches in the 95th major league start for the 27-yearold left-hander. “I can’t explain it. I feel so nervous and so happy right now,” Liriano said. “I can’t explain my feeling right now.” He survived a rocky ninth inning that began when Brent Morel grounded to shortstop and Matt Tolbert made a one-hop throw that first baseman Justin Morneau scooped. Juan Pierre walked and Alexei Ramirez popped to shortstop. Liriano fell behind Adam Dunn 3-0 in the count, then got a pair of strikes. After a foul ball, Dunn lined out to Tolbert as Liriano and his Twins teammates celebrated at the mound. “I thought it was a base hit,” Liriano said. “When I saw him catch it I was so excited.” Liriano, the reigning AL comeback player of the year, was backed by Jason Kubel’s fourth-inning homer. He threw just 66 pitches for strikes but kept Chicago off-balance in a game that took just 2 hours 9 minutes. In his previous start, he lasted just three innings in an 8-2 loss to Tampa Bay. The shutout lowered his ERA for the season to 6.61. Edwin Jackson (2-4) lost his fourth straight decision despite allowing six hits in eight innings. Then with Arizona, Jackson no-hit Tampa Bay last June 26 despite walking eight. It was the seventh no-hitter for the Twins-Washington Senators franchise and the first since Eric Milton’s against the Angels on Sept. 11, 1999. It was the first no-hitter in the major leagues since Philadelphia’s Roy Halladay’s against Cincinnati in last year’s NL division series. The White Sox were no-hit for the 13th time, the first since they were beaten by Kansas City’s Bret Saberhagen on Aug. 26, 1991. Liriano burst on to the scene in 2006, going 12-3 with a 2.16 ERA and dominating overmatched hitters with an untouchable slider. But the violent delivery caused him to develop arm problems toward the end of that season and had elbow ligament-replacement surgery that November.
— Associated Press
TWINS 1, WHITE SOX 0
MINNESOTA AB Span cf .................. 4 A.Casilla 2b ........... 4 Morneau 1b ........... 3 Kubel dh ................ 4 Cuddyer rf ............. 4 Tosoni lf ................ 3 Valencia 3b............ 3 Butera c................. 3 Tolbert ss .............. 3 TOTALS 31 CHICAGO AB Pierre lf ................. 1 Al.Ramirez ss........ 4 A.Dunn dh ............. 4 Konerko 1b ............ 2 Quentin rf.............. 2 Rios cf ................... 3 R.Castro c.............. 2 Lillibridge pr .......... 0 Pierzynski c ........... 0 Beckham 2b........... 3 Morel 3b ................ 3 TOTALS 24 R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 H BI BB SO AVG 1 0 0 0 .283 1 0 0 0 .194 0 0 1 0 .217 1 1 0 1 .350 1 0 0 1 .227 1 0 0 1 .200 1 0 0 0 .214 0 0 0 0 .100 0 0 0 1 .167 6 1 1 4 — H BI BB SO AVG 0 0 3 0 .248 0 0 0 0 .250 0 0 0 1 .157 0 0 1 0 .298 0 0 1 0 .283 0 0 0 0 .164 0 0 1 1 .222 0 0 0 0 .321 0 0 0 0 .258 0 0 0 0 .208 0 0 0 0 .187 0 0 6 2 —

Lincecum (R) Capuano (L) Vazquez (R) Carpenter (R) Chacin (R) Enright (R)

MARLINS AT CARDINALS, 8:15
MIKE GROLL/ASSOCIATED PRESS

The game in Milwaukee was postponed by rain; they’ll play two Wednesday.
PERSONNEL DEPT.

ROCKIES AT DIAMONDBACKS, 9:40

Francisco Liriano is met by Drew Butera, left, and Danny Valencia after his gem.
QUOTABLE

NL SCORES
TUESDAY’S RESULTS

at Phillies 4, Nationals 1 Astros 10, at Reds 4 Giants 7, at Mets 6 (10 innings) Brewers at Braves, ppd. (rain) Marlins at Cardinals, Late Rockies at Diamondbacks, Late Pirates at Padres, Late Cubs at Dodgers, Late
MONDAY’S RESULTS

“Only halfway? It’s nothing to get too caught up in or excited about right now.”
— Andre Ethier, Dodgers RF, who extended his hitting streak to 28 games Monday night, halfway to Joe DiMaggio’s record.
STAR OF THE DAY

TODAY'S GAME TO WATCH

at Nationals 2, Giants 0 at Braves 6, Brewers 2 Marlins 6, at Cardinals 5 Pirates 4, at Padres 3 at Dodgers 5, Cubs 2 Astros at Reds, ppd. (rain)

Francisco Liriano, Twins LHP The 27-year-old pitcheda no-hitter in a 1-0 victory over the White Sox, the first complete game of his career and the first no-hitter of the 2011 MLB season.

Nationals at Phillies 7 p.m., MASN Washington tries to even the series behind Jason Marquis, fresh off a 3-0 shutout of the Giants last Friday. Vance Worley gets the start for Philadelphia.

Mariners: OF Milton Bradley has been suspended for one game and fined following his ejection Saturday. His appeal will delay any penalty until after a hearing. Rays: All-star 3B Evan Longoria was activated from the 15-day DL. He had been sidelined since April 3 with a strained left oblique. Rockies: IF Ty Wigginton went on the 15-day DL with a strained left oblique; 3B Ian Stewart was recalled from Class AAA Colorado Springs.
ASTROS 10, REDS 4

RAYS 3, BLUE JAYS 2

RED SOX 7, ANGELS 3

TIGERS 4, YANKEES 2

TODAY’S AL GAMES
ORIOLES AT ROYALS, 8:10 W-L ERA TEAM

Arrieta (R) Davies (R) Blackburn (R) Danks (L) Morrow (R) Niemann (R) Garcia (R) Scherzer (R) Santana (R) Beckett (R) Tomlin (R) Cahill (R) Wilson (L) Pineda (R)

3-1 1-3 1-4 0-4 0-1 1-3 1-1 4-0 1-3 2-1 4-0 4-0 3-1 4-1

5.01 7.98 5.14 3.92 3.97 5.60 2.00 3.82 4.89 2.65 2.45 1.88 3.35 2.01

4-2 2-4 1-4 0-6 1-1 2-3 2-1 5-1 2-4 3-2 4-1 4-2 4-2 4-1

TWINS AT WHITE SOX, 2:10

B.J. Upton hit a two-run homer in the ninth inning to send Tampa Bay past Toronto. After Ben Zobrist singled to start the ninth off Jon Rauch, Upton hit an 0-1 pitch into the left field seats for the victory. Toronto’s Jo-Jo Reyes had his personal winless streak reach 24 straight games.
TORONTO AB R.Davis rf.............. 4 C.Patterson cf....... 4 Y.Escobar ss ......... 2 Lind 1b .................. 3 J.Rivera lf ............. 4 Arencibia c ............ 4 Cooper dh.............. 4 Encarnacion 3b ..... 4 McCoy pr-3b ......... 0 Jo.McDonald 2b .... 3 TOTALS 32 TAMPA BAY AB Fuld lf ................... 4 Damon dh ............. 3 Longoria 3b........... 4 Zobrist rf .............. 4 B.Upton cf............. 4 S.Rodriguez 2b ..... 3 Shoppach c............ 1 Jaso ph-c............... 1 D.Johnson 1b ........ 3 Kotchman 1b ........ 0 E.Johnson ss......... 3 TOTALS 30 R 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 R 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 H BI BB SO AVG 0 0 0 1 .191 2 0 0 0 .282 0 0 2 0 .262 2 1 1 0 .292 0 0 0 1 .213 1 0 0 0 .260 0 0 0 1 .143 2 1 0 0 .256 0 0 0 0 .235 0 0 1 0 .217 7 2 4 3 — H BI BB SO AVG 0 0 0 0 .274 0 0 0 0 .245 1 0 0 2 .111 1 0 0 1 .259 1 2 0 0 .248 1 0 0 1 .220 1 1 1 0 .167 0 0 0 0 .241 0 0 0 1 .134 0 0 0 0 .333 1 0 0 0 .235 6 3 1 5 —

BLUE JAYS AT RAYS, 6:40

YANKEES AT TIGERS, 7:05

Jon Lester struck out 11, Adrian Gonzalez and David Ortiz hit consecutive homers and Boston pulled within one game of .500. The Red Sox, who improved to 6-0 against Los Angeles this season, are 12-6 following a 2-9 start. Lester struck out 10 or more for the 15th time in his career. Gonzalez and Ortiz hit Boston’s first consecutive homers this season to start the eighth. Three batters later, Marco Scutaro hit a two-run blast.
L.A. AB M.Izturis 3b........... 4 Abreu dh................ 4 H.Kendrick 2b........ 4 Tor.Hunter rf......... 4 V.Wells lf .............. 3 Aybar ss ................ 4 Trumbo 1b ............. 3 Mathis c ................ 4 Bourjos cf .............. 4 TOTALS 34 BOSTON AB Ellsbury cf ............. 4 Pedroia 2b ............. 4 Ad.Gonzalez 1b ..... 4 Ortiz dh ................. 4 Lowrie 3b............... 4 J.Drew rf ............... 4 Scutaro ss ............. 4 Crawford lf ............ 3 Saltalamacchia c ... 4 TOTALS 35 R 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 3 R 1 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 7 H BI BB SO AVG 2 0 0 1 .340 0 0 0 2 .267 0 0 0 2 .294 2 0 0 0 .246 1 0 1 2 .176 1 1 0 1 .317 1 2 0 2 .253 1 0 0 1 .193 1 0 0 1 .295 9 3 1 12 — H BI BB SO AVG 1 0 0 1 .274 0 0 0 1 .255 2 2 0 1 .316 2 1 0 0 .286 2 1 0 1 .350 0 0 0 3 .231 2 2 0 1 .197 2 0 1 1 .194 1 1 0 0 .207 12 7 1 9 —

Scott Sizemore had three hits in his return to the major leagues, helping Detroit snap a seven-game losing streak. Sizemore was called up from Class AAA Toledo to try to bolster the top of the Tigers’ struggling lineup, and for one night at least, the move paid off. Leadoff man Austin Jackson hit a double and a triple, and Sizemore hit a double and two singles batting behind him.
NEW YORK AB Jeter ss ................. 4 Granderson cf........ 4 Teixeira 1b ............ 3 Al.Rodriguez 3b..... 4 Cano 2b.................. 4 Posada dh.............. 4 An.Jones rf............ 3 Swisher ph ............ 0 Martin c................. 4 Gardner lf .............. 2 TOTALS 32 DETROIT AB A.Jackson cf .......... 5 S.Sizemore 2b ....... 4 Ordonez dh ............ 4 Kelly pr-dh............. 0 Mi.Cabrera 1b........ 2 Raburn lf ............... 4 Jh.Peralta ss ......... 4 C.Wells rf .............. 3 Avila c.................... 3 Inge 3b................... 3 TOTALS 32 R 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 R 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 H BI BB SO AVG 1 0 0 0 .250 0 0 0 0 .260 1 1 1 0 .261 1 0 0 0 .268 0 0 0 1 .308 2 0 0 1 .167 1 0 0 0 .280 0 0 1 0 .231 1 1 0 1 .289 1 0 1 0 .219 8 2 3 3 — H BI BB SO AVG 2 1 0 1 .197 3 1 0 1 .750 2 1 0 0 .169 0 0 0 0 .233 1 1 1 0 .352 0 0 0 2 .234 1 0 0 1 .258 1 0 1 0 .250 0 0 1 1 .298 1 0 1 1 .211 11 4 4 7 —

Winning pitcher J.A. Happ singled home a run in Houston’s six-run fourth as the Astros routed Cincinnati to leave the Reds with their first losing record in nearly a year. Cincinnati fell to 14-15, the first time they’ve been below .500 since an identical mark last May 7.
HOUSTON AB Bourn cf................. 5 Bourgeois lf........... 5 Pence rf ................. 5 Wallace 1b............. 5 C.Johnson 3b......... 5 Hall 2b ................... 2 Barmes ss ............. 4 Quintero c.............. 3 Happ p ................... 3 Bogusevic ph ......... 1 TOTALS 38 CINCINNATI AB Stubbs cf ............... 4 Renteria ss............ 4 Votto 1b ................ 4 Phillips 2b.............. 3 J.Gomes lf ............. 4 Heisey rf................ 4 R.Hernandez c ....... 4 Janish 3b ............... 4 Leake p .................. 1 Hermida ph............ 1 Valaika ph ............. 1 Bruce ph ................ 0 TOTALS 34 R 1 0 1 2 2 2 1 0 1 0 10 R 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 4 H BI BB SO AVG 1 0 0 1 .279 3 2 0 0 .390 1 0 0 2 .288 2 1 0 1 .383 2 1 0 0 .196 0 1 2 0 .213 2 2 1 1 .182 0 2 0 2 .273 1 1 0 2 .500 1 0 0 0 .333 13 10 3 9 — H BI BB SO AVG 1 2 1 2 .265 1 1 1 0 .324 2 0 0 0 .363 0 1 0 0 .340 0 0 0 1 .182 1 0 0 1 .256 2 0 0 1 .310 0 0 0 0 .286 0 0 0 1 .231 1 0 0 0 .111 1 0 0 0 .167 0 0 1 0 .238 9 4 3 6 —

TWINS NO-HITTERS
MINNESOTA
MAY 3, 2011 Francisco Liriano at Chicago White Sox, 1-0 SEPT. 11, 1999 Eric Milton vs. Anaheim, 7-0 APRIL 27, 1994 Scott Erickson vs. Milwaukee, 6-0 AUG. 25, 1967 Dean Chance at Cleveland, 2-1 AUG. 26, 1962 Jack Kralick vs. Kansas City Athletics, 1-0

ANGELS AT RED SOX, 7:10

INDIANS AT ATHLETICS, 10:05

WASHINGTON SENATORS
AUG. 8, 1931 Bob Burke vs. Boston, 5-0 JULY 1, 1920 Walter Johnson at Boston, 1-0

RANGERS AT MARINERS, 10:10

TORONTO ..........100 100 000 — 2 7 0 TAMPA BAY ......010 000 002 — 3 6 0 No outs when winning run scored. LOB: Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 5. 2B: Encarnacion 2 (10). HR: B.Upton (4), off Rauch. TORONTO IP Jo-.Reyes................6 Camp.......................1 Rzepczynski............1 Rauch......................0 TAMPA BAY IP W.Davis ..................6 B.Gomes .................2 C.Ramos ..............0.2 Farnsworth..........0.1 H 4 0 0 2 H 6 0 0 1 R 1 0 0 2 R 2 0 0 0 ER BB SO 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 ER BB SO 2 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 ERA 4.66 2.45 2.63 4.09 ERA 2.77 0.00 5.40 0.87

HOUSTON...........010 620 001 — 10 13 0 CINCINNATI .......100 020 100 — 4 9 0 LOB: Houston 6, Cincinnati 7. 2B: Bourgeois 2 (3), Barmes 2 (2), Stubbs (3), Votto (8). 3B: C.Johnson (1). HR: C.Johnson (3), off Leake; Wallace (2), off Jor.Smith. HOUSTON IP Happ.....................6.1 Del Rosario ..........0.1 Abad.....................0.1 Melancon ................1 Figueroa ..................1 CINCINNATI IP Leake....................3.2 Jor.Smith .............1.1 Fisher ......................2 Masset ....................1 Ondrusek.................1 H 8 0 0 1 0 H 7 3 1 1 1 R 4 0 0 0 0 R 7 2 0 0 1 ER BB SO 4 1 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 ER BB SO 7 1 5 2 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 ERA 6.23 5.40 5.91 1.76 7.96 ERA 5.77 5.29 0.00 6.06 1.59

MOST RECENT NOHITTERS
Team-by-Team x-perfect game

AL SCORES
TUESDAY’S RESULTS

L.A. .....................010 000 002 — 3 9 0 BOSTON .............000 002 14X — 7 12 1 E: Lester (1). LOB: Los Angeles 6, Boston 5. 2B: M.Izturis (10), Aybar (5), Ellsbury (9), Saltalamacchia (4). HR: Trumbo (5), off Lester; Ad.Gonzalez (2), off Haren; Ortiz (4), off Takahashi; Scutaro (1), off Takahashi. L.A. IP H R ER BB SO ERA Haren ......................7 9 4 4 0 8 1.76 Takahashi ...............1 3 3 3 1 1 6.59 BOSTON IP Lester......................7 Bard.........................1 Papelbon .................1 H 6 0 3 R 1 0 2 ER BB SO 1 1 11 0 0 0 2 0 1 ERA 2.33 3.29 3.18

NEW YORK.........000 100 010 — 2 8 0 DETROIT.............200 020 00X — 4 11 2 E: S.Sizemore (1), Avila (1). LOB: New York 6, Detroit 9. 2B: Martin (5), A.Jackson (4), S.Sizemore (1), Jh.Peralta (4). 3B: A.Jackson (2). HR: Teixeira (8), off Schlereth. NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO ERA Sabathia..................7 10 4 4 3 6 2.68 Robertson ...............1 1 0 0 1 1 1.69 DETROIT IP Penny ......................6 Schlereth ................2 Valverde..................1 H 6 2 0 R 1 1 0 ER BB SO 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 ERA 5.23 2.31 1.42

AMERICAN LEAGUE
BALTIMORE Bob Milacki (6 innings), Mike Flanagan (1), Mark Williamson (1) and Gregg Olson (1) vs. Oakland, 2-0, July 13, 1991. BOSTON Jon Lester vs. Kansas City, 7-0, May 19, 2008. CHICAGO x-Mark Buehrle vs. Tampa Bay, 5-0, July 23, 2009. CLEVELAND x-Len Barker vs. Toronto, 3-0, May 15, 1981. DETROIT Justin Verlander vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 4-0, June 12, 2007. KANSAS CITY Bret Saberhagen vs. Chicago White Sox, 7-0, Aug. 26, 1991.

Orioles at Royals, Late at Rays 3, Blue Jays 2 at Tigers 4, Yankees 2 at Red Sox 7, Angels 3 Twins 1, at White Sox 0 Indians at Athletics, Late Rangers at Mariners, Late
MONDAY’S RESULTS

MINNESOTA ......000 100 000 — 1 6 0 CHICAGO ............000 000 000 — 0 0 0 LOB: Minnesota 4, Chicago 3. 2B: Valencia (4). HR: Kubel (3), off E.Jackson. MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO ERA Liriano.....................9 0 0 0 6 2 6.61 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO ERA E.Jackson ................8 6 1 1 1 2 4.98 Thornton .................1 0 0 0 0 2 7.71 WP: Liriano (2-4) LP: E.Jackson (2-4). T: 2:09. A: 20,901 (40,615).

at White Sox 6, Orioles 2 at Athletics 5, Rangers 4 (10 innings) Yankees 5, at Tigers 3 at Red Sox 9, Angels 5

WP: Farnsworth (2-0); LP: Rauch (1-2). Rauch pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. HBP: by Jo-.Reyes (Damon). T: 2:40. A: 10,248 (34,078).

WP: Lester (4-1); LP: Haren (4-2). Haren pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T: 2:41. A: 37,043 (37,493).

WP: Penny (2-3); LP: Sabathia (2-2); S: Valverde (6). IBB: off Sabathia (Mi.Cabrera), off Robertson (Avila). T: 2:54. A: 23,551 (41,255).

WP: Happ (2-4); LP: Leake (3-1). Inherited runners-scored: Del Rosario 2-1, Abad 2-0, Jor.Smith 2-2. WP: Fisher. T: 3:04. A: 12,005 (42,319).

NL LEADERS
Entering Tuesday’s games

GIANTS 7, METS 6 (10)
SLUGGING PCT.
Berkman, StL ......... .781 Braun, Mil ............... .686 Soriano, Chi ............ .634 Holliday, StL ........... .627 Votto, Cin ............... .602

PIRATES 4, PADRES 3

DODGERS 5, CUBS 2

NL TEAM STATS
BATTING St. Louis Chicago Cubs Houston Milwaukee Cincinnati L.A. Dodgers Philadelphia Florida Arizona N.Y. Mets Colorado San Francisco Atlanta Pittsburgh Washington San Diego PITCHING S.D. Phi. Atl. Fla. StL. Washington S.F. Pit. Col. Mil. L.A. Dodgers N.Y. Mets Cin. Ari. Hou. Chi. Cubs W 11 18 15 18 16 14 13 14 17 13 15 12 14 12 11 12 Avg .293 .272 .268 .268 .262 .258 .256 .254 .250 .249 .237 .236 .233 .232 .227 .213 L 18 9 15 9 13 14 15 15 9 15 15 16 14 15 17 16 Slg AB .444 1017 .401 986 .385 968 .420 960 .422 962 .378 1027 .380 938 .407 913 .427 919 .388 964 .386 873 .365 950 .378 1005 .344 957 .349 900 .308 977 ERA 2.96 3.07 3.14 3.30 3.38 3.40 3.45 3.63 3.70 3.71 4.32 4.36 4.49 4.82 4.88 4.96 CG 0 3 1 1 2 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 R 154 111 122 120 147 116 121 124 131 120 123 99 122 103 105 87 Sh 1 5 4 2 3 2 1 2 2 5 1 0 0 1 2 1 Sv 6 8 7 10 8 9 9 9 12 5 8 7 4 6 4 8 H 298 268 259 257 252 265 240 232 230 240 207 224 234 222 204 208 H 237 214 235 205 249 238 204 244 214 233 271 258 244 253 287 254 2B 57 51 55 41 45 47 39 55 55 57 50 43 45 40 36 36 R 100 90 98 103 118 110 105 122 104 116 138 132 130 142 151 146 3B 5 5 7 6 2 5 4 5 7 4 4 4 4 2 4 6 ER 89 85 95 90 99 95 96 105 98 103 129 122 125 129 133 136 HR 29 22 15 31 35 22 23 25 31 23 24 24 31 21 22 15 BB 100 73 67 84 105 83 87 95 92 92 106 72 99 104 95 110 SO 179 189 212 192 204 223 184 198 198 213 207 206 205 244 203 249 SB 18 6 24 16 27 21 18 11 24 25 18 12 5 22 21 35

BATTING
Holliday, StL ........... .410 Berkman, StL ......... .406 Polanco, Phl ............ .385 Wallace, Hou .......... .382 Ethier, LA ............... .374 Kemp, LA ................ .368 Votto, Cin ............... .357 Freese, StL ............. .356

Aubrey Huff homered in the 10th inning as San Francisco beat New York.
SAN FRAN. AB Rowand cf-lf.......... 5 Tejada 3b............... 5 Fontenot ss ........... 4 Posey c .................. 5 Huff 1b .................. 5 Schierholtz rf ........ 4 C.Ross lf ................ 3 F.Sanchez ph ......... 1 Burriss 2b.............. 5 Vogelsong p........... 2 Rohlinger ph.......... 1 Ford cf ................... 1 TOTALS 41 NEW YORK AB Jos.Reyes ss.......... 3 Dan.Murphy 2b...... 5 D.Wright 3b........... 4 Beltran rf............... 4 I.Davis 1b .............. 4 Duda lf................... 2 Hairston ph-lf ....... 0 Harris ph-lf............ 1 Thole c ................... 5 Pridie cf ................. 4 Dickey p................. 1 Turner ph............... 1 R.Paulino ph .......... 1 Hu ph ..................... 1 TOTALS 36 R 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 7 R 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 H BI BB SO AVG 1 1 0 0 .286 0 0 0 0 .200 1 2 1 1 .244 1 0 0 1 .263 1 1 0 0 .190 2 1 1 1 .295 1 0 1 0 .200 0 0 0 1 .262 2 1 0 0 .300 1 1 0 0 .250 0 0 0 1 .000 1 0 0 0 .286 11 7 3 5 — H BI BB SO AVG 3 1 3 0 .325 0 0 1 1 .257 1 0 1 0 .254 2 3 1 0 .283 1 2 1 1 .314 0 0 0 2 .105 0 0 1 0 .182 0 0 1 0 .222 3 0 0 0 .256 1 0 0 1 .267 0 0 0 0 .100 0 0 0 0 .235 0 0 0 0 .556 0 0 0 0 .071 11 6 9 5 — 1 — 7 11 0 0 — 6 11 1

ON-BASE PCT.
Holliday, StL ........... .510 Votto, Cin ............... .492 Berkman, StL ......... .467 Wallace, Hou .......... .450 Braun, Mil ............... .444 Ethier, LA ............... .442 Kemp, LA ................ .442

HOME RUNS
Soriano, Chi ............... 11 Braun, Mil .................. 10 Berkman, StL .............. 9 Tulowitzki, Col ............ 7 Pujols, StL ................... 7 Young, Ari ................... 7 Heyward, Atl ............... 7

Late Monday Garrett Jones and Chris Snyder each hit a two-run homer in the first inning to back James McDonald, and Pittsburgh beat San Diego. The Pirates snapped a ninegame losing streak to San Diego dating to 2009. They have won four of six overall.
PITTSBURGH AB A.McCutchen cf..... 4 Paul lf .................... 4 G.Jones rf.............. 3 Walker 2b.............. 4 Overbay 1b ............ 3 Snyder c................. 3 Alvarez 3b ............. 3 Cedeno ss .............. 3 Ja.McDonald p....... 2 Diaz ph .................. 1 Pearce ph............... 1 TOTALS 31 SAN DIEGO AB Venable rf.............. 5 Bartlett ss............. 4 Ludwick lf.............. 4 Cantu 3b ................ 3 Maybin cf .............. 3 O.Hudson 2b.......... 4 Hawpe 1b .............. 4 Hundley c............... 4 Harang p................ 1 E.Patterson ph ...... 1 Headley ph-3b ....... 2 TOTALS 35 R 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 R 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 H BI BB SO AVG 0 0 1 1 .217 2 0 0 1 .333 1 2 1 0 .280 1 0 0 0 .286 0 0 1 0 .225 1 2 1 1 .317 0 0 1 1 .206 1 0 1 1 .205 0 0 0 1 .100 0 0 0 0 .200 0 0 0 1 .280 6 4 6 7 — H BI BB SO AVG 1 0 0 1 .195 1 0 0 1 .223 2 1 0 1 .210 1 2 1 1 .194 0 0 1 1 .245 1 0 0 2 .237 1 0 0 1 .173 1 0 0 0 .272 0 0 0 1 .100 0 0 0 0 .071 1 0 0 0 .236 9 3 2 9 —

BASES ON BALLS
Votto, Cin .................. 26 Gomes, Cin ................ 20 Hudson, SD ................ 18 Iannetta, Col .............. 18 Fowler, Col ................ 18

HITS
Ethier, LA .................. 43 Polanco, Phl ............... 42 Kemp, LA ................... 42 Castro, Chi ................. 40 Berkman, StL ............ 39

Late Monday Andre Ethier extended his hitting streak to 28 games with an infield RBI single that capped a three-run fifth inning, and Clayton Kershaw pitched seven strong innings in a victory by Los Angeles over Chicago. Ethier is batting .393 during his streak with three home runs and 17 RBI, a stretch in which the Dodgers are 13-15.
CHICAGO AB S.Castro ss ............ 4 Barney 2b .............. 4 Byrd cf ................... 4 Ar.Ramirez 3b ....... 4 Soto c .................... 4 A.Soriano lf ........... 4 C.Pena 1b .............. 4 Re.Johnson rf........ 4 J.Russell p............. 2 DeWitt ph.............. 1 TOTALS 35 L.A. AB Carroll ss ............... 4 Sands 1b................ 4 Ethier rf................. 4 Kemp cf ................. 4 Uribe 3b ................. 4 Thames lf .............. 3 Barajas c................ 2 De Jesus 2b ........... 3 Kershaw p ............. 2 Loney ph-1b........... 1 TOTALS 31 R 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 R 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 5 H BI BB SO AVG 0 0 0 1 .325 0 0 0 0 .320 1 0 0 0 .293 1 0 0 0 .291 1 1 0 2 .236 2 1 0 1 .267 0 0 0 1 .157 1 0 0 0 .357 1 0 0 1 .167 1 0 0 0 .250 8 2 0 6 — H BI BB SO AVG 0 0 0 1 .284 1 2 0 0 .196 1 1 0 1 .374 1 0 0 1 .368 2 1 0 0 .247 0 0 0 1 .176 1 0 0 0 .209 1 1 0 1 .185 0 0 0 1 .267 0 0 0 0 .202 7 5 0 6 —

LOS ANGELES Mark Langston (7) and Mike Witt (2) vs. Seattle, 1-0, April 11, 1990. NEW YORK x-David Cone vs. Montreal, 6-0, July 18, 1999. OAKLAND x-Dallas Braden vs. Tampa Bay, 4-0, May 9, 2010. SEATTLE Chris Bosio vs. Boston, 7-0, April 22, 1993. TAMPA BAY Matt Garza vs. Detroit, 5-0, July 26, 2010. TEXAS x-Kenny Rogers vs. California, 4-0, July 28, 1994. TORONTO Dave Stieb at Cleveland, 3-0, Sept. 2, 1990.

TOTAL BASES
Berkman, StL ............ 75 Braun, Mil .................. 72 Kemp, LA ................... 68 Soriano, Chi ............... 64 Fielder, Mil ................ 63 Ethier, LA .................. 62 Tulowitzki, Col .......... 59 Votto, Cin .................. 59

RBI
Howard, Phl ............... 28 Berkman, StL ............ 27 Fielder, Mil ................ 26 Braun, Mil .................. 23 Drew, Ari ................... 22

AL LEADERS
Entering Tuesday’s games

HR HBP BB SO WP 21 4 84 204 5 15 7 75 223 4 15 9 81 229 13 22 4 90 191 6 23 10 92 199 14 15 11 78 167 6 14 9 96 236 6 23 6 102 186 13 25 9 82 195 14 29 6 87 213 9 31 6 96 220 12 29 13 105 197 8 34 7 100 220 6 37 9 87 205 7 30 10 92 193 3 30 11 117 228 4

NATIONAL LEAGUE
ARIZONA Edwin Jackson at Tampa Bay, 1-0, June 26, 2010. ATLANTA Kent Mercker at L.A. Dodgers, 6-0, April 8, 1994. CINCINNATI x-Tom Browning vs. L.A. Dodgers, 1-0, Sept. 16, 1988. CHICAGO Carlos Zambrano vs. Houston at Milwaukee, 5-0, Sept. 14, 2008. COLORADO Ubaldo Jimenez at Atlanta, 4-0, April 17, 2010. FLORIDA Anibal Sanchez vs. Arizona, 2-0, Sept. 6, 2006. HOUSTON Roy Oswalt (1 inning), Pete Munro (2 2/3), Kirk Saarloos (1 1/3), Brad Lidge (2) and Octavio Dotel (1), Billy Wagner (1) at N.Y. Yankees, 8-0, June 11, 2003. LOS ANGELES Hideo Nomo at Colorado, 9-0, Sept. 17, 1996. Milwaukee (AL)Juan Nieves at Baltimore, 7-0, April 15, 1987. PHILADELPHIA Roy Halladay, vs. Cincinnati, 4-0, Oct. 6, 2010, NLDS. PITTSBURGH Francisco Cordova (9) and Ricardo Rincon (1), vs. Houston, 3-0, 10 innings, July 12, 1997. ST. LOUIS Bud Smith at San Diego, 4-0, Sept. 3, 2001. SAN FRANCISCO Jonathan Sanchez vs. San Diego, 8-0, July 10, 2009. WASHINGTON x-Dennis Martinez (Montreal) at L.A. Dodgers, 2-0, July 28, 1991.

AL TEAM STATS
BATTING Kansas City Cleveland Texas L.A. Angels N.Y. Yankees Toronto Detroit Boston Chicago White Sox Oakland Tampa Bay Baltimore Seattle Minnesota PITCHING Oak. L.A. Angels Cle. T.B. N.Y. Yankees Tor. Sea. Tex. Bos. Chi. White Sox K.C. Bal. Det. Min. W 15 16 19 15 17 13 13 16 13 11 15 13 12 9 Avg .274 .272 .267 .262 .254 .254 .250 .245 .242 .242 .242 .237 .231 .230 L 14 13 8 13 9 15 16 13 15 19 13 14 17 18 Slg AB .432 982 .445 920 .456 961 .408 1023 .472 850 .409 966 .384 991 .382 947 .372 1030 .364 983 .392 942 .384 902 .334 956 .324 904 ERA 2.66 3.14 3.48 3.50 3.69 3.85 3.92 3.95 4.19 4.44 4.48 4.52 4.70 5.06 CG 2 3 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 R 145 146 146 119 144 127 120 119 119 102 120 112 111 85 Sh 2 2 2 2 0 0 3 2 3 1 1 2 3 0 Sv 8 7 7 5 12 5 7 8 5 4 7 5 5 7 H 269 250 257 268 216 245 248 232 249 238 228 214 221 208 H 234 225 219 223 224 220 241 243 221 277 274 233 256 253 2B 65 53 59 56 44 44 56 53 40 60 50 36 46 41 R 100 106 99 105 105 123 125 126 120 151 137 125 144 149 3B 9 2 7 6 3 8 4 4 2 6 8 3 2 4 ER 77 95 95 98 97 108 110 112 114 133 127 121 134 132 HR 24 34 36 27 45 30 23 23 30 16 25 30 16 12 BB 100 97 93 89 106 109 98 112 83 90 77 71 116 76 SO 178 196 155 222 179 201 214 203 175 189 214 182 203 159 SB 35 16 23 19 14 33 9 16 17 22 31 9 25 11

BATTING
Bautista, Tor .......... .357 Kubel, Min .............. .354 Cabrera, Det ........... .350 Joyce, TB ................ .346 Hafner, Cle ............. .342

SLUGGING PCT.
Bautista, Tor .......... .762 Cabrera, Det ........... .631 Cano, NY ................. .630 Granderson, NY ...... .620 Avila, Det ............... .593 Zobrist, TB ............. .587

SAN FRAN. ..... 004 101 000 NEW YORK ..... 302 001 000

HOME RUNS
Bautista, Tor ............... 9 Cano, NY ...................... 8 Granderson, NY ........... 8 Konerko, Chi ................ 8 Teixeira, NY ................. 7 Beltre, Tex ................... 7 Cruz, Tex ...................... 7 Cabrera, Det ................ 7 Zobrist, TB .................. 7

ON-BASE PCT.
Bautista, Tor .......... .530 Cabrera, Det ........... .469 Butler, KC ............... .438 Abreu, LA ............... .416 Joyce, TB ................ .411 Kubel, Min .............. .406

E: Thole (2). LOB: San Francisco 7, New York 11. 2B: Jos.Reyes (10), D.Wright (7), Beltran (10), Pridie (2). HR: Schierholtz (2), off Dickey; Huff (3), off T.Buchholz; Beltran (4), off Vogelsong; I.Davis (6), off Vogelsong. SAN FRAN. IP Vogelsong ...............4 Runzler....................2 Affeldt .................0.2 Mota........................1 Ja.Lopez ...............1.1 Br.Wilson ................1 NEW YORK IP Dickey .....................6 Gee .......................1.2 Isringhausen ........0.1 F.Rodriguez.............1 T.Buchholz ..............1 H 5 3 0 1 1 1 H 7 1 0 2 1 R 5 1 0 0 0 0 R 6 0 0 0 1 ER BB SO 5 4 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 ER BB SO 6 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 ERA 4.40 6.60 3.55 2.29 0.82 6.35 ERA 4.62 4.20 3.24 1.50 1.62

PITTSBURGH......400 000 000 — 4 6 0 SAN DIEGO.........000 002 010 — 3 9 1 E: Harang (2). LOB: PIT 6, S.D. 7. 2B: Hawpe (4). HR: G.Jones (6), off Harang; Snyder (1), off Harang; Cantu (2), off Ja.McDonald. PITTSBURGH IP Ja.McDonald ...........6 Veras.......................1 Resop ......................1 Hanrahan ................1 SAN DIEGO IP Harang ....................5 Luebke.....................3 Frieri ....................0.1 Gregerson ............0.2 H 5 0 2 2 H 5 1 0 0 R 2 0 1 0 R 4 0 0 0 ER BB SO 2 1 5 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 ER BB SO 4 2 4 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 1 1 ERA 6.75 2.92 1.76 1.69 ERA 4.37 4.24 1.69 1.35

CHICAGO ............100 000 100 — 2 8 1 L.A. .....................020 030 00X — 5 7 0 E: Byrd (1). LOB: Chicago 6, Los Angeles 3. 2B: Soto (7), Sands (6), Uribe (6), Barajas (2). HR: A.Soriano (11), off Kershaw. CHICAGO IP J.Russell ..............4.2 Berg......................1.1 Samardzija..............2 L.A. IP Kershaw..................7 Padilla .....................1 Broxton ...................1 H 6 1 0 H 8 0 0 R 5 0 0 R 2 0 0 ER BB SO 4 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 2 ER BB SO 2 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 1 ERA 8.15 3.38 2.45 ERA 3.38 1.80 4.38

BASES ON BALLS
Bautista, Tor ............. 30 Abreu, LA .................. 24 Cust, Sea ................... 22 Cabrera, Det .............. 22 Youkilis, Bos .............. 21 Barton, Oak ............... 20 Butler, KC .................. 20

HITS
Young, Tex ................. 40 Suzuki, Sea ................ 39 Gordon, KC ................. 38 Cabrera, Det .............. 36 Gonzalez, Bos ............ 35 Kendrick, LA .............. 35

RBI
Zobrist, TB ................ 25 Konerko, Chi .............. 24 Young, Tex ................. 23 Beltre, Tex ................. 23 Lind, Tor .................... 22

TOTAL BASES
Cabrera, Det .............. 65 Bautista, Tor ............. 64 Quentin, Chi .............. 63 Cano, NY .................... 63 Kendrick, LA .............. 62 Francoeur, KC ............ 62

WP: Ja.Lopez (1-0); LP: T.Buchholz (1-1); S: Br.Wilson (9). Inherited runners-scored: Mota 1-0, Ja.Lopez 2-0, Isringhausen 2-0. IBB: off Mota (Jos.Reyes), off Ja.Lopez (Beltran, Harris), off Runzler (Hairston), off F.Rodriguez (Fontenot), off Gee (Schierholtz). WP: Dickey, Gee. T: 3:32. A: 32,288 (41,800).

WP: Ja.McDonald (2-2); LP: Harang (4-2); S: Hanrahan (9). Inherited runners-scored: Gregerson 2-0. WP: Resop. T: 3:08. A: 20,546 (42,691).

WP: Kershaw (3-3); LP: J.Russell (1-4); S: Broxton (7). Inherited runners-scored: Berg 1-0. HBP: by Berg (Barajas). WP: J.Russell. T: 2:30. A: 30,239 (56,000).

HR HBP BB SO WP 17 4 91 209 11 25 7 100 216 11 18 9 88 176 3 21 12 80 169 7 21 6 85 185 11 27 13 109 214 11 17 5 87 197 17 35 11 97 183 10 28 10 94 186 10 30 8 91 228 13 35 6 101 168 8 37 5 92 174 2 29 9 107 213 17 31 9 95 152 7

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011
BASEBALL

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SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL
NBA
2011 MOST VALUABLE PLAYER VOTING
Voting is on a 10-7-5-3-1 basis PLAYER, TEAM .....................1 2 Derrick Rose, CHI ..............113 6 Dwight Howard, ORL ............3 57 LeBron James, MIA...............4 26 Kobe Bryant, LAL ..................1 18 Kevin Durant, OKC ................ - 6 Dirk Nowitzki, DAL ............... - 5 Dwyane Wade, MIA .............. - 1 Manu Ginobili, SA ................. - 2 Amar'e Stoudemire, NY........ - Blake Griffin, LAC ................. - Rajon Rondo, BOS ................. - Tony Parker, SA .................... - Chris Paul, NO ....................... - 3 2 31 39 32 10 3 1 1 1 1 4 16 31 40 20 11 2 1 5 TOTAL - 1182 11 643 12 522 12 428 38 190 30 113 6 24 6 20 4 9 5 5 3 2 2

HIGH SCHOOLS
BASEBALL DISTRICT Wilson 21, Theodore Roosevelt 2 MARYLAND Bethesda-Chevy Chase 8, Churchill 2 Eleanor Roosevelt 2, Bowie 1 (8) Gaithersburg 10, Damascus 2 Laurel 13, High Point 2 Magruder 15, Richard Montgomery 4 Poolesville 6, Rockville 3 Quince Orchard 14, Northwest 2 Sherwood 2, Blake 1 Whitman 11, Blair 8 Wootton 11, Northwood 1 (5) VIRGINIA George Mason 6, Clarke County 3 Hayfield 11, Wakefield 7 Kettle Run 7, Brentsville 4 Lake Braddock 12, West Potomac 1 Loudoun County 20, Tuscarora (Va.) 4 McLean 12, Madison 3 Mount Vernon 16, Falls Church 2 (5) Mountain View 6, Albemarle 4 Osbourn 6, Heritage 3 South County 13, T.C. Williams 6 W.T. Woodson 4, Annandale 3 (8) Washington-Lee 9, Yorktown 7 Westfield 1, Robinson 0 Woodbridge 24, Freedom-Woodbridge 1 (5) PRIVATE Georgetown Prep 13, Bullis 1 Maret 7, Flint Hill 6 McNamara 13, St. Mary's Ryken 3 Middleburg 16, Fresta Valley 0 (5) Riverdale Baptist 8, Georgetown Day 4 Spalding 22, Gonzaga 4 (5) St. Albans 6, St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 4 The Heights 16, Christian Home Educators Network 6 OTHERS Dominion 7, Washington 4 BOYS' LACROSSE MARYLAND Atholton 11, Centennial 9 Chesapeake 13, Glen Burnie 1 Marriotts Ridge 18, Hammond 1 Northwood 7, Einstein 6 (2OT) Severna Park 9, Arundel 4 PRIVATE Georgetown Prep 12, Episcopal 4 Highland 14, Seton (Va.) 9 John Paul the Great 9, Randolph-Macon 5 Landon 5, St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 3 Middleburg 13, The Heights 4 Potomac School 11, Maret 2 Sidwell Friends 8, Georgetown Day 7 (2OT) TOURNAMENTS WCAC Tournament — Quarterfinals Gonzaga 17, Bishop Ireton 1 BOYS' SOCCER VIRGINIA Chantilly 3, South County 2 Falls Church 4, Lee 1 Gar-Field 3, Forest Park 2 George Mason 3, Clarke County 2 (2OT) Herndon 3, Annandale 1 Kettle Run 2, Brentsville 1 Langley 4, McLean 1 Madison 1, South Lakes 0 North Stafford 2, Stafford 1 Osbourn 2, Heritage 1 Park View 4, Briar Woods 0 Stuart 3, West Springfield 1 Tuscarora (Va.) 2, Loudoun County 1 Washington-Lee 6, Westfield 0 Yorktown 4, West Potomac 0 BOYS' TENNIS Flint Hill 4, Maret 3 Landon 7, The Heights 0 Potomac School 7, St. Andrew's 0 GIRLS' LACROSSE MARYLAND Chesapeake 13, Glen Burnie 1 Glenelg 20, Reservoir 6 Mount Hebron 18, Long Reach 1 Quince Orchard 14, Watkins Mill 10 River Hill 23, Wilde Lake 7 Thomas Stone 19, Westlake 4 Wootton 16, Northwest 15 VIRGINIA Annandale 10, Lake Braddock 7 Langley 12, W.T. Woodson 9 Osbourn Park 19, Potomac (Va.) 3 West Springfield 15, Woodgrove 6 PRIVATE Bishop Ireton 19, Elizabeth Seton 7 Episcopal 15, National Cathedral 6 Flint Hill 23, Highland 15 Georgetown Visitation 12, Bullis 11 Good Counsel 23, McNamara 2 Holton-Arms 15, St. Andrew's 4 Holy Child 19, Madeira 9 Sidwell Friends 16, Maret 6 St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 18, Stone Ridge 7 GIRLS' SOCCER VIRGINIA McLean 1, Langley 1 (OT) Annandale 1, Herndon 0 Battlefield 4, Loudoun Valley 0 Broad Run 3, Potomac Falls 1 Chantilly 3, South County 0 Forest Park 4, Gar-Field 0 George Mason 3, Clarke County 1 Heritage 4, Osbourn 3 Madison County 5, Manassas Park 1 Robinson 7, Edison 1 Westfield 3, Washington-Lee 1 PRIVATE Trinity at Meadow View 8, Foxcroft 0 GIRLS' TENNIS T.C. Williams 8, Lee 1 GOLF DeMatha 9, St. John's 0 Pallotti 17.5, Severn 3.5 Paul VI Catholic 8, St. Albans 1 SOFTBALL MARYLAND Blair 13, Whitman 3 (6) Damascus 9, Gaithersburg 6 Huntingtown 7, Patuxent 0 Largo 31, Friendly 4 (5) Northern 8, Calvert 0 Paint Branch 9, Walter Johnson 2 Poolesville 14, Rockville 0 (5) Reservoir 4, River Hill 1 Sherwood 7, Blake 3 Urbana 12, Thomas Johnson 2 Wootton 17, Northwood 0 VIRGINIA Battlefield 5, Loudoun Valley 0 Briar Woods 10, Park View 0 (6) Chantilly 3, Oakton 0 Edison 10, Stuart 2 Falls Church 21, Mount Vernon 20 Fauquier 4, Liberty 3 (9) Hayfield 15, Wakefield 3 (5) Lee 13, West Springfield 12 McLean 9, Madison 4 Potomac Falls 12, Broad Run 2 (6) South County 14, T.C. Williams 1 (5) Stafford 3, North Stafford 0 Stone Bridge 16, Fairfax 3 (5) W.T. Woodson 3, Annandale 1 West Potomac 4, Lake Braddock 1 Westfield 8, Robinson 0 PRIVATE Elizabeth Seton 13, Pallotti 1 (5) Foxcroft 25, Quantico 4 (2) Georgetown Visitation 7, Flint Hill 2 Highland 8, Seton (Va.) 5 Holton-Arms 7, Madeira 5 Jewish Day 7, Oakcrest 4 Maret 5, Stone Ridge 1 O'Connell 15, St. John's 2 (6) Sidwell Friends 8, Potomac School 2

PAST MVPS
2011 — Derrick Rose, Chicago 2010 — LeBron James, Cleveland 2009 — LeBron James, Cleveland 2008 — Kobe Bryant, L.A. Lakers 2007 — Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas Mavericks 2006 — Steve Nash, Phoenix Suns 2005 — Steve Nash, Phoenix Suns 2004 — Kevin Garnett, Minnesota Timberwolves 2003 — Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs

SOCCER
MLS
EAST W New York .................... 4 Philadelphia ................ 4 Houston ...................... 3 Columbus .................... 3 New England .............. 2 D.C. United .................. 2 Toronto FC .................. 1 Chicago ....................... 1 Sporting K.C. .............. 1 WEST W Los Angeles ................ 4 Real Salt Lake ............ 4 Seattle ........................ 3 Colorado ..................... 3 Dallas .......................... 3 Portland ...................... 3 Chivas USA ................. 2 Vancouver .................. 1 San Jose ..................... 1 L 1 1 1 1 3 4 3 3 4 L 2 1 2 3 3 3 2 4 4 T 2 1 3 3 3 1 4 3 1 T 3 0 3 1 1 1 3 3 2 Pts 14 13 12 12 9 7 7 6 4 Pts 15 12 12 10 10 10 9 6 5 GF 10 5 11 7 8 10 7 10 10 GF 11 8 10 9 10 10 8 11 6 GA 2 2 6 5 12 16 13 13 13 GA 9 2 7 8 10 13 6 14 10

WEDNESDAY’S MATCHES
Seattle FC at D.C. United, 7:30 Colorado at Houston, 8:30

FRIDAY’S MATCH
Philadelphia at Portland, 10:30

SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Dallas at D.C. United, 7:30 Chivas USA at Real Salt Lake, 4 Houston at Toronto FC, 7 Colorado at New England, 7:30 Seattle FC at Columbus, 7:30 Vancouver at Chicago, 8:30 New York at Los Angeles, 11

WPS
W W. New York ...............2 magicJack....................2 Boston.........................2 Atlanta ........................1 Philadelphia ................0 Sky Blue FC .................0 L 0 0 2 2 1 2 T 1 0 0 1 1 1 Pts 7 6 6 4 1 1 GF 7 3 6 4 3 2 GA 3 1 4 9 4 4

FRIDAY’S MATCH
Sky Blue FC at Western New York, 7:30 p.m.

H. RUMPH JR./ASSOCIATED PRESS

SUNDAY’S MATCHES
Atlanta at magicJack, 4 Boston at Philadelphia, 6

Washington starter Livan Hernandez gives the ball to Manager Jim Riggleman after getting lifted in the seventh inning of the 4-1 loss.

Hamels shuts down Nats as Werth makes his return
nationals from D1
NATIONALS ON DECK

PHILLIES 4, NATIONALS 1
WASHINGTON AB Espinosa 2b ................. 4 Desmond ss................. 4 Werth rf ...................... 3 Ad.LaRoche 1b ............ 4 Morse lf....................... 3 Hairston Jr. cf ............. 3 I.Rodriguez c ............... 3 Bixler 3b ...................... 3 L.Hernandez p ............. 2 Coffey p....................... 0 Slaten p ....................... 0 W.Ramos ph................ 1 H.Rodriguez p.............. 0 TOTALS 30 PHILA. AB Rollins ss..................... 4 Victorino cf.................. 4 Polanco 3b................... 3 Howard 1b................... 4 B.Francisco rf .............. 3 Ibanez lf ...................... 4 Orr 2b .......................... 2 Mayberry ph................ 0 W.Valdez 2b ................ 0 Schneider c.................. 4 Hamels p ..................... 4 TOTALS 32 R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 H 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 BI BB SO AVG 0 0 1 .219 0 0 1 .235 0 1 1 .226 0 0 1 .181 1 0 1 .234 0 0 0 .190 0 0 1 .234 0 0 0 .100 0 0 0 .091 0 0 0 --0 0 0 --0 0 0 .351 0 0 0 --1 1 6 — BI BB SO AVG 1 1 0 .279 0 1 0 .292 1 1 1 .375 1 1 1 .294 0 1 0 .257 1 0 0 .168 0 1 0 .278 0 1 0 .313 0 0 0 .235 0 0 0 .147 0 0 1 .333 4 7 3 — 1 5 4 12 0 0

HOCKEY
IIHF
MEN'S WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP
At Bratislava and Kosice, Slovakia PRELIMINARY ROUND

GROUP A
GP Germany .................. 3 Russia...................... 3 Slovakia ................... 3 Slovenia................... 3 W OT OTL L 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 W OT OTL L 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 W 2 1 0 0 OT 0 0 1 0 OTL 0 1 0 0 GF GA PTS 9 5 8 10 9 6 9 9 3 7 12 1 GF GA PTS 17 5 8 8 5 6 3 11 3 3 10 1 L GF 9 7 7 1 GA 3 5 8 8 PTS 6 4 2 0

the fans will remember the good times,” Werth said before the game, “even if it’s just for one at-bat.” After the initial onslaught of boos, a few cheers pierced the din while Werth strode into the batter’s box. Werth, a man apt to do the unexpected, stepped backwards, removed his helmet, held it up and circled it over his head. For a moment, the fans set aside the seven-year, $126 million contract Werth signed this winter and remembered the World Series title he helped the Phillies win in 2008. As Werth tipped his cap, the nastiest fans in sports gave Werth a standing ovation. “It’s an atmosphere like no other place,” Werth said. “The fans welcomed me back, and I was very grateful. I’ll remember that for the rest of my career. That meant a lot. It really did. It was something that I’ll definitely remember for a long time. From here on out, whatever happens, I’ll definitely always remember that first at-bat.” When Werth jogged to right field, the fans in the bleachers greeted him with more boos and more derisive signs. The biggest read, “Werthless: You bad mouthed the Phils. now we’re bad-mouthing you. Boooooo.” Before he played warm-up catch with center fielder Jerry Hairston, as boos showered over him, Werth took off his cap and waved it. Again, cheers overtook boos.

at Phillies Tonight, 7:05 (MASN) Thursday, 7:05 (MASN) at Marlins Friday, 7:10 (MASN2) Saturday, 7:10 (MASN) Sunday, 1:10 (Ch. 50, MASN2) at Braves Tuesday, 7:10 (MASN) May 11, 7:10 (MASN) May 12, 7:10 (MASN)

Before the game, Werth visited with members of the grounds crew and chatted with security guards, people he once saw every day. While he walked in for his turn during batting practice, a few fans behind the dugout yelled, “We miss you, Jayson!” and “Good luck this year!” Werth is typically oblivious during his pregame routine. When he saw them, he smiled and waved. He understood not every fan would be so friendly. Beforehand, some Nationals joked they should send Andrew Melnick, a clubhouse attendant who bears resemblance to Werth, to right field dressed in Werth’s uniform. When the opportunity arose, most of the fans turned the “mutual respect” Werth spoke about before the game into one-way derision. The place shook in the third inning when Werth just missed a leaping catch at the right field wall, a deep drive that turned into the first triple of

Hamels’s career. He scored the Phillies’ first run when Jimmy Rollins stroked a two-out single. They hollered when Werth had trouble digging a ball out of the corner in the fifth, which helped Rollins scoot to third for a triple of his own. They cheered when Werth made his three outs — the first of which would have been a double if not for a diving stop by Placido Polanco at third — and hardly hid their disappointment when he did not make a mistake. Werth’s nifty catch in the right field corner to end the fifth inning drew an audible groan. In the late innings, the fans behind Werth serenaded him with chants, some of them with words very much fit for the Philadelphia bleachers, but not for print. “There was a little bit of everything going on,” Werth said afterward with a smile. At one point, he turned and glared, pressed his brim between his fingers and waved his glove at them. Hamels and the Nationals’ continued offensive futility sent those fans home happy. Hamels, the 2008 World Series MVP, walked only one batter and struck out six. Nationals hitters raved about his ability to spot all of his pitches for strikes. The Nationals have not been providing the stiffest offensive challenge, having averaged 2.8 runs in their past nine games. “We’re going to be fine,” catcher Ivan Rodriguez said. “We can all hit here.”
kilgorea@washpost.com

GROUP B
GP Canada ..................... 3 Switzerland ............. 3 France ...................... 3 Belarus .................... 3

R H 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 4 12

GROUP C
GP United States .......... 2 Sweden.................... 2 Norway .................... 2 Austria..................... 2 0 0 1 2

GROUP D
GP Czech Republic ........ 2 Finland..................... 2 Latvia....................... 2 Denmark .................. 2 W OT OTL L 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 GF GA PTS 10 2 6 8 3 5 4 7 1 1 11 0

WASHINGTON......... 000 000 100 — PHILA....................... 001 010 20X —

LOB: Washington 3, Philadelphia 12. 2B: I.Rodriguez (3), Ibanez 2 (4). 3B: Rollins (1), Hamels (1). HR: Morse (2), off Hamels. RBI: Morse (11), Rollins (6), Polanco (20), Howard (29), Ibanez (11). SB: Werth (3), Rollins (6), Victorino (6). SF: Polanco. DP: Washington 3 (L.Hernandez, I.Rodriguez, Ad.LaRoche), (Espinosa, Desmond, Ad.LaRoche), (Espinosa, Desmond, Ad.LaRoche); Philadelphia 2 (Rollins, Orr, Howard), (Hamels, Rollins, Howard). WASHINGTON IP H L.Hernandez.............6.1 10 Coffey ......................0.1 0 Slaten.......................0.1 1 H.Rodriguez ................1 1 PHILA. IP H Hamels........................9 5 R ER BB SO NP ERA 4 4 4 3 97 3.57 0 0 0 0 6 4.05 0 0 1 0 10 0.00 0 0 2 0 24 0.00 R ER BB SO NP ERA 1 1 1 6 108 2.66

Three points for a regulation win, two for an overtime win and one for an overtime loss.
FRIDAY’S RESULTS Germany 2, Russia 0 Slovakia 3, Slovenia 1 Switzerland 1, France 0 (OT) Canada 4, Belarus 1 SATURDAY’S RESULTS United States 5, Austria 1 Finland 5, Denmark 1 Czech Republic 4, Latvia 2 Norway 5, Sweden 4 (SO) SUNDAY’S RESULTS Russia 6, Slovenia 4 Germany 4, Slovakia 3 Canada 9, France 1 Switzerland 4, Belarus 1 MONDAY’S RESULTS United States 4, Norway 2 Czech Republic 6, Denmark 0 Finland 3, Latvia 2 (SO) Sweden 3, Austria 0 TUESDAY’S RESULTS Germany 3, Slovenia 2 (SO) Russia 4, Slovakia 3 Canada 4, Switzerland 3 (OT) France 2, Belarus 1 (OT) WEDNESDAY’S GAMES Denmark vs. Latvia, 10:15 a.m. Finland vs. Czech Republic, 2:15 Austria vs. Norway, 10:15 a.m. Sweden vs. U.S., 2:15

WP: Hamels (4-1); LP: L.Hernandez (3-3). Inherited runners-scored: Coffey 1-0, Slaten 1-1. IBB: off L.Hernandez (Orr, Howard), off Slaten (Mayberry). T: 2:35. A: 45,695 (43,651).

HOW THEY SCORED
PHILLIES THIRD Orr fouled out. Schneider lined out. Hamels tripled. Rollins singled, Hamels scored. Victorino singled, Rollins to second. Rollins stole third. Victorino stole second. Polanco struck out. Phillies, 1-0 PHILLIES FIFTH Hamels struck out. Rollins tripled. Victorino walked. Polanco hit a sacrifice fly, Rollins scored, Victorino to second. Howard was intentionally walked. B.Francisco walked, Victorino to third, Howard to second. Ibanez fouled out. Phillies, 2-0 NATIONALS SEVENTH Ad.LaRoche grounded out. Morse homered. Hairston Jr. grounded out. I.Rodriguez struck out. Phillies, 2-1 PHILLIES SEVENTH Victorino singled. Polanco grounded out, Victorino to second. Howard singled, Victorino scored. B.Francisco lined out. Ibanez doubled, Howard scored. Mayberry was intentionally walked. Schneider grounded out. Phillies, 4-1

TENNIS
ATP/WTA
MUTUA MADRILENA MASTERS/OPEN
At Caja Magica; In Madrid Purse: Men, $4.5 mil., (WT1000); Surface: Clay-Outdoor

SINGLES
MEN’S FIRST ROUND Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 7-5, 6-2; Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Viktor Troicki (16), Serbia, 4-6, 7-5, 6-4; Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 6-4, 6-2; Gilles Simon, France, def. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, 7-5, 7-6 (10-8); Kevin Anderson, S. Africa, def. Olivier Rochus, Belg., 6-2, 6-4; Juan Martin del Potro, Arg., def. Mikhail Youzhny (13), Rus., 6-1, 3-6, 6-3; Feliciano Lopez, Spn., def. Milos Raonic, Can., 4-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4; Lu Yen-Hsun, Tai., def. Fernando Verdasco (15), Spain, 7-6 (9-7), 7-5. MEN’S SECOND ROUND Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, def. Pere Riba, Spain, 6-4, 6-2; Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. John Isner, United States, 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (7-3); Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Thiemo De Bakker, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-3; David Ferrer (6), Spain, def. Adrian Mannarino, France, 7-5, 0-6, 6-0; Juan Monaco, Argentina, def. Gael Monfils (9), France, 6-2, 3-0 retired. WOMEN’S SECOND ROUND Samantha Stosur (5), Australia, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slov., 7-6 (7-1), 7-5; Bethanie Mattek-Sands, U.S., def. Vania King, U.S., 6-0, 6-2; Petra Kvitova (16), Cz. Rep., def. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 6-3, 6-3; Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-4, 6-4; Jarmila Gajdosova, Australia, def. Agnieszka Radwanska (10), Poland, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3; Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, def. Marion Bartoli (11), France, 7-5, 6-1; Francesca Schiavone (3), Italy, def. Sara Errani, Italy, 6-0, 2-6, 6-3.

TRANSACTIONS
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
MLB: Suspended Seattle OF Milton Bradley one game and fined him an undisclosed amount for his actions during an April 30 game at Boston. Oakland Athletics: Named Mike Henriques interim strength and conditioning coach. Tampa Bay Rays: Reinstated 3B Evan Longoria from the 15-day DL. Designated INF Felipe Lopez for assignment. Recalled RHP Brandon Gomes from Durham (IL). Colorado Rockies: Placed INF Ty Wigginton on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 27. Recalled INF Ian Stewart from Colorado Springs (PCL). Houston Astros: Announced INF Joe Inglett cleared waivers and accepted his assignment to Oklahoma City (PCL). New York Mets: Placed OF Jason Bay on paternity leave. Recalled OF Lucas Duda from Buffalo (IL). Milwaukke Brewers: Reinstated OF Nyjer Morgan from the 15-day DL. Placed LHP Zach Braddock on the 15-day DL.

Nationals Journal
Zimmerman has surgery, out 6 weeks
Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman underwent arthroscopic surgery Tuesday morning in Philadelphia as scheduled to repair a torn abdominal muscle. The operation lasted roughly 25 minutes, and Zimmerman was able to return to his hotel room in Philadelphia before noon. Bill Meyers, the specialist who diagnosed the tear Friday and performed the surgery Tuesday, “was pleased with the procedure and is optimistic that Ryan will be back playing at full strength soon,” said Brodie Van Wagenen, Zimmerman’s agent. The Nationals expect a six-

6Excerpts from washingtonpost.com/nationalsjournal
week recovery time, General Manager Mike Rizzo said Saturday. The Nationals, who began a nine-game trip against three National League East contenders in Philadelphia Tuesday, are 11-10 without their best player. Zimmerman is confident he and the Nationals took the proper approach to treating the injury. He played with a strain until April 9, when he slid into second base against the New York Mets and the strain turned into a tear. Zimmerman tried to rehab the injury, seeing surgery as a last resort, but decided to visit a specialist after a clear dearth of progress. Zimmerman will start the recovery process, Nationals athletic trainer Lee Kuntz said Saturday, by walking one mile on Wednesday. be prudent to rest Ankiel, who this year is batting .221. “He could play tonight,” Manager Jim Riggleman said. “The trainer suggested we give him a day. He’s playable, but we’re going to give him one day and then see if we can play him tomorrow.” Jerry Hairston replaced Ankiel in center field. Hairston has started in center once this season and just six times total since the start of the 2009 season, but “it’s not foreign to me,” Hairston said. “I definitely feel comfortable there.” Hairston said left field is much more difficult, and he reads balls off the bat better in center.
— Adam Kilgore

NHL
St. Louis Blues: Signed president of hockey operations John Davidson to a multiyear contract extension.

CONCACAF
CONCACAF: Announced president Jack Warner was re-elected.

Ankiel rests
Rick Ankiel rested Tuesday with what he called a “sore” right hand, which he suffered Monday while trying to make a diving catch late in the Nationals’ 2-0 win over the Giants. “Just give it a day, it’ll be fine,” he said. Twice, Ankiel dove straight ahead to attempt a diving catch. The first time, he snared the ball. The second, he just missed and rolled awkwardly on his right (glove) hand. It is nothing major, but Ankiel and the team’s training staff decided it would

MLS
D.C. United: Named Dawn Ridley vice president of business development.

DOUBLES
MEN’S FIRST ROUND Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez, Spain, def. Andy and Jamie Murray, Britain, 6-2, 6-2; Michal Mertinak, Slovakia, and Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Lukas Dlouhy, Czech Republic, and Andy Ram, Israel, 7-6 (7-3), 6-3; John Isner and Sam Querrey, United States, def. Daniel Gimeno-Traver and Ivan Navarro, Spain, 6-7 (8-6), 6-2, 10-8 tiebreak; Javier Marti and Daniel Munoz-dela Nava, Spain, def. Nikolai Nesterov, Russia, and Sergio PerezPerez, Spain, 6-0, 6-3. WOMEN’S SECOND ROUND Casey Dellacqua and Rennae Stubbs, Australia, def. vs. Lizel Huber and Lisa Raymond (4), United States, 6-4. 6-3; Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, and Maria Kirilenko (5), Russia, def. Peng Shuai and Zheng Jie, China, 6-2, 6-4; Vania King, United States, and Yaroslava Shvedova (3), Kazakhstan, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova and Vera Zvonareva, Russia, 6-3, 6-1; Gisela Dulko, Argentina and Flavia Pennetta (1), Italy, def. Nuria Llagostera Vives and Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 7-5, 6-2; Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and Katarina Srebotnik (2), Slovenia, def. Klaudia Jans and Alicja Rosolska, Poland, 6-2, 1-6, 10-3 tiebreak.

COLLEGES
Carroll (Mont.): Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach Shawn Nelson to take the same position at Central Washington, Dayton: Named Allen Griffin men’s assistant basketball coach. King (Tenn.): Named Simon Duffy women’s soccer coach. Lamar: Named Joseph Price men’s assistant basketball coach. Lenoir-Rhyne: Announced the retirement of football coach Fred Goldsmith. Named assistant head coach and defensive coordinator Mike Houston acting head coach. Miami: Announced OL Joel Figueroa has received a sixth season of NCAA eligibility. North Carolina State: Named Bob Alejo assistant athletics director for strength and conditioning and the strength and conditioning coach. Oglethorpe: Named Aaron Nester women’s basketball coach. Tulsa: Named Emmett Davis men’s assistant basketball coach. Wichita State: Named Greg Heiar men’s assistant basketball coach.

Victory123 D6

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KLMNO
HIGH SCHOOLS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

HOCKEY
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Best-of-seven; x-if necessary

DeMatha goes with a youthful approach
Brooks, 27, will coach Stags’ storied football program
BY

(5) TAMPA BAY LEADS (1) WASHINGTON, 3-0
Game 1: Tampa Bay 4, at Washington 2 Game 2: Tampa Bay 3, at Washington 2 (OT) Tuesday: at Tampa Bay 4, Washington 3 Wednesday: Washington at Tampa Bay, 7 x-Saturday: Tampa Bay at Washington, 12:30 x-Monday: Washington at Tampa Bay, TBA x-Wed., May 11: Tampa Bay at Washington, TBA

J OSH B ARR

As the five members of the selection committee debated whether Elijah Brooks was the best choice to be the next football coach at DeMatha High, they considered the obvious: Is a 27-yearold just four years removed from college ready to lead one of the most high-profile positions in all of high school athletics? “It was very briefly discussed to see if anybody thought that was an insurmountable hurdle,” DeMatha Principal Dan McMahon said. “But no one thought that.” The selection committee unanimously recommended Brooks — a former standout football and basketball player at the Hyattsville private school — for the position. Late Monday night, McMahon offered Brooks the chance to succeed Bill McGregor as the Stags coach and Brooks quickly accepted. “Youth is in, I can’t help my age,” Brooks said Tuesday, noting that veteran coaches Deno Campbell and Tim Breslin have agreed to be

his defensive and offensive coordinators, respectively. “There are some guys that have been coaching for 18 or 20 years, but that doesn’t make them a good coach. They’ve just been coaching for 18 or 20 years. “I’m very confident, and my players are very confident, in my abilities as a leader. I’ve been working hands-on with the team since the end of the season. We’re very excited to move forward.” Brooks is a 2002 graduate of DeMatha, having played three years each on the Stags’ varsity football and basketball teams. He was a linebacker and running back in football and a point guard in basketball. Brooks earned a football scholarship to Kent State, then transferred after 1½ years to William & Mary, where he also played running back before graduating in 2007 with a degree in kinesiology. He returned to DeMatha that fall, teaching world history and psychology and coaching running backs for McGregor, who resigned in late March after 29 years as the Stags’ head football coach. Hiring a coach so young and inexperienced is seen as a risky proposition by some — a group of alumni mobilized to try to find a more veteran candidate — but it is consistent with how DeMatha re-

placed legendary basketball coach Morgan Wootten in 2002 with one of his assistants, Mike Jones. Jones was 29 at the time of his hiring, and while DeMatha struggled in Jones’s first season, the Stags soon returned to their place as one of the nation’s top teams. “There are people suited for jobs even when they don’t have as many years in,” McMahon said. While it might be different to take orders from a head coach significantly closer to their age, DeMatha’s players are looking forward to running on the field under their new coach. “We feel it’s a new day and age, we’re going to come back and try to get the championship again,” said rising senior Michael Moore, a tight end and defensive end. “We’ve known Coach Brooks and he’s been at DeMatha so it’s not somebody new. “It’s not going to be any different, still the mind-set of he’s our head coach and we’re going to listen to him. Plus, with his age, we’ll be able to relate to him well and he can relate to us, too.” As part of the interview process to find McGregor’s successor, DeMatha officials asked Campbell if he would remain on staff and asked Breslin, a former assistant to McGregor who took last season

(3) BOSTON LEADS (2) PHILADELPHIA, 2-0
Game 1: Boston 7, at Philadelphia 3 Game 2: Boston 3, at Philadelphia 2 (OT) Wednesday: Philadelphia at Boston, 7 Friday: Philadelphia at Boston, 8 x-Sunday: Boston at Philadelphia, 3 x-Tuesday: Philadelphia at Boston, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Boston at Philadelphia, TBA

WESTERN CONFERENCE
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Best-of-seven; x-if necessary

MATT MCCLAIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Elijah Brooks is a 2002 graduate of DeMatha, having played three years on the Stags’ varsity football and basketball teams.

(1) VANCOUVER AND (5) NASHVILLE TIED, 1-1
Game 1: at Vancouver 1, Nashville 0 Saturday: Nashville 2, at Vancouver 1 (2OT) Tuesday: Vancouver at Nashville, Late Thursday: Vancouver at Nashville, 8:30 Saturday: Nashville at Vancouver, 8 x-Monday: Vancouver at Nashville, TBA x-Wed., May 11: Nashville at Vancouver, TBA

off, if he would return if Brooks was hired. Brooks, though, stressed that he was the one who asked Campbell and Breslin to be on his staff. “He’s more than willing to listen to what we have to say,” said Campbell, a DeMatha graduate who has coached at the school since 1985. “There have been some holes in the dike. We have to patch some things up and move forward.” Brooks takes over a program that is used to being among the best in the region and in the nation. However, after winning six consecutive Washington Catholic Athletic Conference titles, the

Stags have lost to rival Good Counsel in the league championship game each of the past two seasons. There is some concern whether DeMatha can maintain its position among the area’s elite programs. “We can’t worry about what our competitors are doing,” Brooks said. “Our ultimate focus is continuing to do things the DeMatha way. That’s my ultimate goal, to put a product on the field that competes hard and does things the right way. “DeMatha is not going anywhere. I’m fully confident we will remain a powerhouse in this area.”
barrj@washpost.com

(2) SAN JOSE LEADS (3) DETROIT, 2-0
Game 1: at San Jose 2, Detroit 1 (OT) Game 2: at San Jose 2, Detroit 1 Wednesday: San Jose at Detroit, 8 Friday: San Jose at Detroit, 7 x-Sunday: Detroit at San Jose, 8 x-Tuesday: San Jose at Detroit, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Detroit at San Jose, TBA

LIGHTNING 4, CAPITALS 3
WASHINGTON ................... 0 TAMPA BAY ....................... 1 3 1 0— 2— 3 4

FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Bergenheim 5 (Moore, Downie), 11:03. Penalties: R.Jones, TB (interference), 7:13; Washington bench, served by Ovechkin (too many men), 7:48; Knuble, Was (elbowing), 15:27.

SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Washington, Knuble 2 (Ovechkin), :59. 3, Washington, Carlson 1 (Chimera, Johansson), 7:58. 4, Tampa Bay, Lecavalier 5 (St. Louis, Purcell), 11:51. 5, Washington, Ovechkin 5 (Semin, Green), 17:27 (pp). Penalties: Backstrom, Was (holding stick), 12:45; Brewer, TB (holding), 13:50; Clark, TB (hooking), 15:52; Hall, TB (hooking), 16:26; Arnott, Was (slashing), 17:51.

AllMetSports.com
Excerpts from The Post’s high school sports Web site

THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 4 (Hedman), 5:23. 7, Tampa Bay, Malone 2 (Thompson, Hall), 5:47. Penalties: Hall, TB (hooking), 8:57.

SHOTS ON GOAL

Langley hangs tough against McLean
The top-ranked Langley boys’ soccer team had plenty of reasons to be motivated entering its matchup with No. 2 McLean on Tuesday. The Saxons (9-0-1, 5-0-1) were coming off of a tie with Stone Bridge on Friday that marked its first non-win in regular season play since 2009. They were playing their biggest rivals in a local derby, and it was McLean (8-1-2, 6-1) that handed Langley its first loss last season in penalty kicks in the district tournament championship. After Langley’s dominant 4-1 win, however, Dylan Price said he was proud his team showed something it has perhaps at times lacked: resiliency. “We’re proving to ourselves that we want to do what we need to do,” Price said. “It’s good to be tested with that kind of controversy and adversity. I’m happy as a team we overcame them.” The game opened with a bizarre sequence in the first minute when McLean goalkeeper

Robby Maffei misjudged a ball and let it bounce over his head. As Langley midfielder Nima Kassiri went to finish into an empty net, Maffei grabbed him over his shoulders from behind and essentially tackled him. The referee never blew his whistle. Price righted the wrong five minutes later when his curling free kick found the upper corner on a clever set piece, the first of his two goals. Josh Ellis and Nate Bremer finished the scoring for the Saxons.
— Paul Tenorio

Westfield’s needed win
Just over a minute and a half into the girls’ soccer game against Washington-Lee, Bulldogs forward Katherine Bukovsky received a pass and dribbled down the right wing. As the opposing goalie came towards her, she stopped about 12 yards short and curled a shot into the goal for an early lead. The speedy freshman added two more goals later in the game — earning the nickname “Kattrick” from her teammates — and provide a needed spark for a team that was reeling from a crushing double overtime loss to district rival Chantilly last week. Her hat trick powered the second-ranked Bulldogs (8-1-2) to a 3-1 non-district win over Washington-Lee (6-2-1) in Arlington. “It was nice,” senior defender Mollie Leon said. “It was like the first ten minutes and [Bukovsky] scored. That’s what we wanted. We wanted to bounce back from last game.”
— James Wagner

WASHINGTON ................. 13 14 5 — 32 TAMPA BAY ....................... 8 7 15 — 30 Power-play opportunities: Washington 1 of 5; Tampa Bay 0 of 4. Goalies: Washington, Neuvirth 4-4-0 (30 shots-26 saves). Tampa Bay, Roloson 7-3-0 (32-29). A: 20,613 (19,758). T: 2:38.

Printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 1x.75

PRESTON KERES FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Laughner lifts Sherwood
Warriors senior Amy Laughner, facing an 0-2 count with two outs and the bases loaded in the top of the seventh inning against Blake, smacked a tie-breaking single to left-center to score two runs. Sherwood scored twice more that inning and then closed out Blake for a 7-3 victory in Silver Spring. “I just know that when I come up there with a lot of energy, something is going to happen,” Laughner said. Blake (8-4) scored twice in the bottom of the first, but Sherwood (13-1) brought in freshman righthander Meggie Dejter the following inning and she was terrific, throwing 53 of 72 pitches for strikes and allowing only two Blake base runners over the next four innings. After Sherwood’s first two batters got on in the seventh with the score tied at 3, Emily Hughes singled and Tara Mitchell beat out a bunt. Amelia Niak walked to load the bases and bring up Laughner, who blooped a shot down the third-base line to drive in Hughes and Mitchell.
— Alan Goldenbach

Amy Laughner comes through for Sherwood with a two-run single in the top of the seventh inning to lead the Warriors over Blake.

Potomac Falls cruises
During his delivery to the second Broad Run batter of the game, Potomac Falls junior righthander Jackson Rogers’s cap got blown off by a gust of wind, causing him to plunk the hitter. From that point on for Rogers, it was not what was swirling in the air that mattered but what was dribbling on the ground. The next batter bounced into a 4-6-3 double play, the first of 10 groundouts recorded by Rogers in the Panthers’ 10-0 six-inning home win over No. 10 Broad Run, the Virginia AA Dulles District front-runner. Potomac Falls senior first

baseman Michael Lascomb, the reigning district player of the year, homered twice, including a three-run blast that ended the game by mercy rule with one out in the sixth. Rogers struck out five, walked none and allowed two hits. Potomac Falls (11-3, 8-2) needed a victory to avoid falling three games behind the Spartans (12-2, 10-1) in the Dulles, and that win came in emphatic fashion. The Panthers got the leadoff man on in all six innings, coaxed hits from eight batters and committed no errors against a team they had lost to 7-1 in the teams’ first meeting this season. “They pretty much embarrassed us,” Rogers said of that March 29 game. “We came into this game more prepared. The defense was unbelievable.”
— Preston Williams

senior Shannon Mitchell quickly motioned for her teammates to get in a circle and clasp hands as the team results were announced. The Kentucky-bound star needed to be sure of the Wildcats’ team county title before she could really start celebrating. Within a minute, Mitchell got her wish and a place at the center of a mob of screaming and highfiving teammates. Mitchell won three events (beam, bars and vault) to take the meet’s highest individual honor and help propel Walter Johnson to 173.700 points — nearly four points better than second-place Blair. “It’s amazing,” said Mitchell, who posted a 37.700 in the allaround. “I mean it’s my senior year. Oh my gosh. I’m just so excited.”
— Eric Detweiler hss@washpost.com

TRACY A. WOODWARD/THE WASHINGTON POST

Mitchell is victorious
After claiming her gold medal as the all-around champion at Montgomery County gymnastics championships, Walter Johnson

Langley’s Sam Walsh (23) goes up for a ball in a dominant victory over rival McLean.

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Listless losses have United wary of a repeat of 2010
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S TEVEN G OFF

United vs. Sounders
Where: RFK Stadium. When: 7:30 p.m. Records: United 2-4-1, 7 points; Sounders 3-2-3, 12 points. D.C. probable starters (4-4-2 formation): GK Bill Hamid; Ds Chris Korb, Perry Kitchen, Dejan Jakovic, Marc Burch; MFs Andy Najar, Clyde Simms, Dax McCarty, Chris Pontius; Fs Josh Wolff, Charlie Davies. Seattle probable starters (4-4-2): GK Kasey Keller; Ds James Riley, Patrick Ianni, Jhon Kennedy Hurtado, Tyson Wahl; MFs Osvaldo Alonso, Brad Evans, Erik Friberg, Alvaro Fernandez; Fs Nate Jaqua, Fredy Montero. — Steven Goff

The words and phrases invoked by D.C. United coaches and players this week are meant to galvanize a listing operation, but they’re also conjuring memories of last year’s ruinous campaign when the same terms were futilely tossed around. Unacceptable. Correctable. Accountable. Urgency and commitment. Fight and aggression. Not panicking. In this together. Part of a process. Seven matches into the 2011 MLS campaign, United is a long way from reaching the depths of last year’s squad, whose 6-20-4 mark was the worst in club history. But United has conceded four goals in consecutive league defeats, won just twice in the past eight games in all competitions (one of the wins coming on penalty kicks) and lost its most expensive player to a long-term injury. With the next three regular season matches at RFK Stadium, starting Wednesday night against the surging Seattle Sounders, United (2-4-1) has reached a critical early juncture. “We’re not in a state of panic,” midfielder Santino Quaranta

said, “but it’s real worrisome.” With several young players in key positions and a new group needing time to bond, Coach Ben Olsen had braced himself for rough patches. Indeed, he has witnessed many of them. He has been most disappointed, though, in baffling lapses in concentration and lack of resolve and energy. “The urgency and commitment — that part should be automatic,” he said. “The soccer isn’t going to be great all the time — we’re going to foul up plays — but the fight and aggression has to be there. If it’s not there, I’ll find guys that have it.” As it did two weeks ago against the New York Red Bulls, United allowed four goals in Houston last Friday. Unlike two weeks ago, United barely put up a fight against the Dynamo and

conceded goals on a through ball, a cross, a free kick and, most alarming, on a throw-in. As a player, Olsen was known for expressing emotion and intensity. At practice Monday, the first gathering since the Houston debacle, those traits surfaced in his coaching personality. With an imperfect gait shaped by countless ankle injuries, he marched into the middle of a workout to express displeasure and point out mistakes. His voice rose and cracked. The tone of practice reflected his mood as players performed with renewed purpose. “You are going to see a team with a different mentality,” said captain Dax McCarty, adding that the team should secure between seven and nine points in this home stretch against Seattle, Dallas and reigning champion

Colorado. “First and foremost, the heart and desire has to be there.” United displayed just that in the season opener, a 3-1 victory over Columbus, and ran circles around Toronto in a 3-0 win on April 16. But the club was outclassed by New York, fell behind New England by three goals in a U.S. Open Cup qualifier and then offered little resistance in Houston. In those two regular season matches, D.C. faced a deficit in the 12th and fourth minutes, respectively. In Houston, it yielded the go-ahead goal two minutes after scoring the equalizer and then conceded goals five minutes apart early in the second half. Despite his disappointment, Olsen has tried to maintain perspective. “As emotional and fiery as I am, it’s important to step back and understand and remind myself that this is still a process,” said Olsen, who celebrated his 34th birthday Tuesday. “I know [reporters] are going to be sick of me saying that, but we need to keep growing and learn and continue to get better. “I’m glad some of this stuff

goffs@washpost.com

M171f 1x12

happened now, so we can get it out of the way and make sure they understand where I’m coming from and I understand where they are coming from.” The players are also looking at the big picture and understand that a couple of victories during this homestand would alter the course of the season. “I realize the past couple games we haven’t been good,” McCarty said. “It’s not just from a soccer standpoint but a mentality standpoint. We’re not going to let this head in the same direction as last year.” United notes: Midfielder Branko Boskovic sought a third opinion on the MRI exam results that showed a torn knee ligament and hairline fracture. However, United expects him to undergo surgery soon and miss four to six months. The club has some financial flexibility to add a new player, United President Kevin Payne said. . . . Defender Jed Zayner, who missed five weeks with a hamstring ailment, aggravated the injury in his return at Houston and is sidelined again. . . . The Sounders are 3-0-3 since losing their first two matches.

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Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

KLMNO
NHL PLAYOFFS

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Game 7 May 11 at Verizon Center Time TBD (CSN)*
*if necessary

Game 1 Lightning 4, Capitals 2

Game 2 Lightning 3, Capitals 2 (OT)

Game 4 Today at Tampa Bay 7 p.m. (CSN)

Game 5 Saturday at Verizon Center 12:30 p.m. (NBC)*

Game 6 Monday at Tampa Bay Time TBD (CSN)*

Game 3: Lightning 4, Capitals 3 Tampa Bay leads conference semifinal series, 3-0
NOTEBOOK

Neuvirth struggles this time
BY

T ARIK E L- B ASHIR

tampa — Goaltender Michael Neuvirth has, on most nights in these playoffs, been the Washington Capitals’ steadiest player. In Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinals, though, the rookie’s uneven performance contributed to a 4-3 defeat that has left his team in a three-games-tonone hole. “I thought a couple of the goals he should have had,” Coach Bruce Boudreau said. “But at the same time, when they got the lead, he kept us in the game.” Boudreau didn’t specify which goals he took issue with, but they were likely Sean Bergenheim’s shot between the pads in the first period and Vincent Lecavalier’s redirection midway through the second period that knotted the game 2-2. On Tuesday morning, Boudreau said he had not contemplated switching to Semyon Varlamov after the Capitals dropped the series’ first two games. But with his team facing elimination Wednesday, the question almost certainly will be asked again prior to Game 4 at St. Pete Times Forum. It will be the third game in four nights, and Varlamov is 5-2-1 all-time against Tampa Bay with a 1.87 goals against average and .934 save percentage. Neuvirth, meanwhile, has yielded 10 goals (on 76 shots) in this series.

JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST

Lightning center Vincent Lecavalier directs a shot past Capitals goalie Michal Neuvirth in the second period. Washington scored three goals itself in the period.

Capitals on verge of being swept away
capitals from D1 game, the Capitals looked strangely flat in a critical closing frame. Washington tried to protect its advantage to an extreme that saw it muster only two shots on Dwayne Roloson (29 saves) in the first 13 minutes as the Lightning found its offense. A bad clearing attempt by Eric Fehr was picked off and captured by Stamkos, who skated to the high slot and wristed a shot high stick side against Michal Neuvirth (26 saves) that sent the water bottle flying. It tied the game at three, 5 minutes 23 seconds into the period. On the next shift, Nate Thompson snuck into the Capitals’ zone and sent the puck toward the crease where Malone was barreling into John Carlson and Neuvirth. The puck went off Malone’s skate and in the net for the goahead goal, the tally was reviewed but stood. “They’re uncanny when they want to get a goal,” said Mike Knuble, who scored the Capitals’ first goal of the game. “It’s like they just snap their fingers, hit a button, they just dial it up. . . . You’re upset because you’re giving them chances, keep letting them come back, letting them come back and you’re not going to win doing that.” Those two goals robbed the Capitals of any control they had only six minutes earlier and played directly to Tampa Bay’s strength. With the lead reclaimed the Lightning was content to rely on their 1-3-1 system to create a quagmire of neutral zone pressure that enveloped the Capitals, who turned the puck over repeatedly and only gave the Lightning more scoring chances. For Washington, trying to come back yet again and trying to take a lead for the third time in the contest was an exercise in frustration. But if they had been better able to protect the earlier advantages, players said, they might not have been in that situation late in the game. “We get up and I think we think it’s over and guys just relax a little bit,” Jason Arnott said. “It seems like we have a lapse during the

27-15

Washington’s shots on goal advantage during the first two periods of Game 3, when it built a 3-2 lead over Tampa Bay.

15-5

Tampa Bay’s shots on goal advantage in the third period, when it scored two quick goals to defeat Washington, 4-3.

game . . . and they capitalize on it. We’re not going to go too far. We’ve got to learn to play 60 minutes, solid defensively and not give up odd man rushes. When they get a goal we need to be even more prepared to go out and have a big shift after that.” Less than eight minutes into the game, the Capitals appeared to trump two of their larger demons in the series with one shot. Knuble slipped the puck past Roloson on the power play that would have given Washington its first, first period goal of the series, but the tally was immediately washed out by the referees. The Capitals had been called for too many men on the ice just moments before the puck went in, so it was as if the goal never happened. What caused the penalty was when Brooks Laich went to the bench after being hit in the

mouth by a shot. Both Alexander Semin and Carlson jumped on the ice – only Carlson was supposed to. Then it was the Lightning’s turn to seize momentum against the Capitals still reeling from the nongoal. A shift riddled with small mistakes by Washington in its own end resulted in a 2-on-1 for Tampa Bay. Sean Bergenhiem shot between Neuvirth’s legs to give the Lightning a 1-0 lead just more than 11 minutes in. When they came out for the start of the second, though, Ovechkin raced into the offensive zone on a breakaway on his first shift. Roloson turned away the initial shot but didn’t cover the puck and Knuble was able to lift it above the sprawling netminder to tie the game at 1 less than a minute into the period. The goal offered rejuvenation

for the Capitals, who would take a 2-1 lead just under eight minutes into the middle stanza when Carlson beat Roloson through traffic. It would be a short-lived advantage as Vincent Lecavalier scored on the doorstep to knot the score at 2. Washington did finally get a goal on the power play. Ovechkin scored on a 5-on-3, snapping a streak of tries without a goal at 14 for the 3-2 lead they took into the third period, but would let slip away. “It is another learning experience for us, backs against the wall, and we’ve got nothing to lose now. We’ve got to win tomorrow,” Arnott said. “We have to just stick to our system and when we do that we play great hockey. When we don’t it is in our head or there is breakdowns and we get into this run-and-gun situation and they seem to capitalize on it. We can’t do that if we want to win.”
carrerak@washpost.com

Green limited in third
Capitals defenseman Mike Green was limited to one shift in the third period because of what Boudreau would only describe as a “lower body injury.” The nature and extent of the injury was unclear, though Green was reportedly seen limping out of the arena favoring his left leg. In all, Green was limited to 13 minutes 24 seconds of ice time, which is roughly half of how much he played in Games 1 and 2. . . . Alex Ovechkin needed a handful of stitches to close a deep cut across the bridge of his nose. Ovechkin would only say that the injury occurred late in the third period. . . . Brooks Laich also needed a dozen stitches to close a cut on the inside of his mouth after being struck with a puck early in the first period.

Questioning two goals
Boudreau said he did not believe the Lightning’s gamewinning goal — scored off Ryan Malone’s skate — should have counted. The coach contended that Malone pushed Capitals defenseman John Carlson into Neuvirth. “If you look at it, Malone is driving to the net and he pushes our player into our goaltender and he can’t kick out his right leg to make the save,” Boudreau said. “It’s a no goal, no penalty call. I don’t think it should have counted.” . . . The Capitals believed they had taken a 1-0 lead 7:48 into the game when Mike Knuble pushed a rebound past Dwayne Roloson on the power play. But the goal was washed out because the Capitals had too many men on the ice. The confusion on Washington’s bench began when Laich went for a line change after being struck in the face by an errant puck. “Laich was playing defense and he came off the ice, and Semin went on and Carlson went on,” Boudreau said. “Carlson was supposed to go on. [Laich] got a puck in the mouth, 10 or 12 stitches.” Boudreau did not deny that the Capitals had too many men, but he felt the goal should have counted because the puck crossed the line before the referee made a call.
elbashirt@washpost.com

TRACEE HAMILTON

Caps have questions, but no answers
hamilton from D1 barely outlast the cherry blossoms. Game 3 was a must-win for the Capitals any way you looked at it — winning four straight in the playoffs is certainly not impossible, but it’s close — but losing the game the way they did added insult to injury. In the locker room afterward, the mood was reminiscent of December, when the Caps were in the midst of their eight-game losing streak and had that glazed look, unable to explain their inability to score or to do much of anything else, either. “I wish I could explain it,” said Karl Alzner of the third-period collapse. His teammates echoed those sentiments. Marcus Johansson found several ways to say that the Capitals had to score more goals and give up fewer goals — hard to argue with that. But no one in the room seemed quite sure of what happened, which is not good when the team has less than 24 hours to fix it. In December, they fixed the problem by changing their system, their style, and some of their personnel, all in an effort shots, but it was Ovechkin — assisted by Alexander Semin and Mike Green — who gave them their 3-2 lead and broke their scoreless streak on the power play in this series. Finally, they looked like the Caps of old — or at least like the Caps of the first round, when they dismissed the Rangers in five games, not with ease, but certainly not with this much effort and angst. “We played pretty good until the third period,” said Nicklas Backstrom, who has just two assists in the postseason. “We just gave it away.” “I can’t put my finger on it,” Alzner said. “We got a little complacent. We wanted to play smart and protect the lead.” It might be smart, to protect the lead, but the Capitals should never be complacent, not in the playoffs, not until they’ve shaken the reputation as a team that can’t get out of May and into June. “It’s going to take everything we have,” Alzner said. “We have the personnel to do it.” True. But it’s become evident in this series that so, too, do the Lightning.
hamiltont@washpost.com

JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST

Alex Ovechkin and the Capitals are on the brink of another disappointing postseason.

to be at their best not in January or February, but in April and beyond, because they wanted this to be the year they stayed in the playoffs past Mother’s Day, Memorial Day and all the other days of May. Now, they’re trying to hold on through Cinco de Mayo. “We’re a team that surprised a lot of people,” Alzner said. “We lost eight straight and came back and won the [Eastern Conference].” That was then; this is now.

They went nearly 12 minutes without a shot in the third period, uncharacteristic even in the new defensive scheme. That’s not going to get it done, not against a talented Tampa Bay team that needed seven games to dispatch Pittsburgh and is now looking and feeling invincible. Trailing 1-0 after the first period, Coach Bruce Boudreau must have had some choice words during the intermission. Less than a minute into the second, Alex Ovechkin had a

breakaway chance against Roloson, who blocked his shot. But Ovechkin got the rebound to Mike Knuble, who scored. The second goal came on a shot from John Carlson near the blue line that got past two defenders and Roloson with the deception of a Livan Hernandez curveball. Then came the Caps’ real opportunity, a 5-on-3 after hooking penalties on Tampa’s Brett Clark and Adam Hall. The Caps toyed with Roloson a bit before closing in with a flurry of

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Cars

Cars

1405

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Driver Mail Courier needed for Navy Mail Contract.Must read above 6th grade level, be able to lift up to 70 lbs., climb multiple flights of steps and stand for long periods of time.Requires strong administrative skills and attention to detail. Candidates must allow a national background and credit checks and submit to and pass a secret clearance. Send resume to mward@newviewoklahoma.org.

ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, # 750 WASH., DC 202-364-0306 WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM SALE OF CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 1003 CONTAINED WITHIN PREMISES 301 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., WASHINGTON, D.C. Pursuant to District of Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, Section 313, as amended, and by that certain Declaration of the Sonata Condominium, recorded December 8,2006 as Instrument No. 2006165855, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of the District of Columbia (the “Land Records”), and by the Condominium Bylaws recorded December 8, 2006 as Instrument No. 2006165856, and by the Condominium Plat and Plans recorded December 19, 2006 in Condominium Book No. 61 at Page 32, in the Office of the Surveyor of the District of Columbia, and in accordance with Public Law 90-566 and D.C. Code 42-1903.13, as amended, notice filed April 8, 2011 and at the request of the Attorney for the Unit Owners’ Association, we shall sell at public auction on the 10th day of May 2011, at twelve noon within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers, Inc. at 5301 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, D.C.,the following described premises situated in the District of Columbia and designated as and being Lot No. 2063, in Square 528, more particularly described as Condominium Unit #1003, in the Sonata Condominium, a condominium regime constituted and established under Condominium Act of 1976 of the District of Columbia, as amended, by that certain Declaration of the Sonata Condominium, recorded December 8,2006 as Instrument No. 2006165855 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of the District of Columbia (the “Land Records”), and by the Condominium Bylaws recorded December 8, 2006 as Instrument No. 2006165856, and by the Condominium Plat and Plans recorded December 19, 2006 in Condominium Book No. 61 at Page 32, in the Office of the Surveyor of the District of Columbia. Together with any and all interest in the limited common elements appertaining to said Condominium Unit as described in the said Declaration of The Sonata Condominium. Said Condominium Unit being part of the property designated as Lot numbered 30 in Square 528, as per plat recorded in the Office of the Surveyor of the District of Columbia in Condominium Book 61, at Page 32. TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to any prior liens, encumbrances and municipal assessments if any, further particulars of which will be announced at time of sale, but not subject to the first mortgage. A deposit of $10,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form as the attorney for the owners’ in its sole discretion requires. All conveyances, recordings, recordation tax, transfer tax, etc. at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit is forfeited and the property may be readvertised and resold at the discretion of the Unit Owner’s Association and at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association shall convey a deed pursuant to 42 D.C. Code 1903.13 (c) (1) and (3) as amended, and makes no further representations or warranties as to title. The Association can not guarantee clear title or the purchaser's ability to obtain Title Insurance. For this reason, the purchaser may not be able to obtain financing and must be able to pay the purchase balance in any case within 30 days. In the event of failure on the part of the Association to convey such deed purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit. Elizabeth Menist Attorney for Owner’s Association: Apr. 29, May 4, 9

MED BILL & CODING Trainees Needed Now
Medical Offices now hiring. No experience? Job Training & Placement Assistance Available.

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1-866-294-0466
PHARMACY TECH
Trainees Needed Now
Pharmacies now hiring. No experience? Job Training & Placement Assistance Available.

RECEPTIONIST
Salon in Old Towne Alexandria seeking P/T Receptionist. Call 703-548-5159

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JOBS

Engineering

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Sales-Bilingual
FT-PT sales for Major Energy company 10 per hour plus commission Great working environment Laurel MD 301-361-1111 Send resume scott@protocall.net
SALES/Cemetery Sales Hiring for several Locations, job security, high compensation Mr. Pay, 301-568-8410 or pyous@stonemor.com
SALES $Sales pros dream!$ $100k+w/ EZ 5 min sale!Product sells itself! 212-461-2506

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JOBS

Admin Office Clerk Will train, two positions. 4p-8p, Saturdays 8a-5p Eagle Haulers 7898 Cryden Way Forestville,MD Call 301-516-3604

Licensed VA Surveyor Street dedication, easement and boundary plat experience required. Survey Technician Must have 2+ years experience. AUTO CAD experience preferred. Excellent Benefits. Appli cant(s) must have High School Diploma or equivalent, a valid Virginia State Drivers License and work well with others. Send resumes to: RDA, Attn: Janice Blanchetti, 9300 West Courthouse Road, Suite 300, Manassas, VA 20110, Email to jeblanchetti@rdacivil.com or fax 703-257-5443. RDA is a Drug Free Workplace. EOE

ATTENDANT
Mr. Wash Carwash now hiring FT/PT position for Attendants. Will have to vacuum & wipe down cars. No experience necessary. Good pay & Tips.

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TELEMARKETING

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ENGINEER

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
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Part-Time
Construction

AUTO MAINT TECH/DRIVER Must have tools. Able to perform quality repairs, all makes & models. Clean driving record. 301-699-1030

Mechanical Estimator
Mechanical Contractor seeking mechanical estimator for HVAC/Plumbing for parttime position with experience in cost estimating, has good organization and time management skills, verifiable references and minimum 3 years experience and able to ocassionally travl to job site for surveying.Refer Resume to service@ horizonmechanical.net

Auto MD STATE INSPECTOR
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AUTO TECH
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Education
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Automotive

Seeking --Domestic Positions
CAREGIVER AVAIL- Car, cook, exp, exc refs. Live in/out. Non-smkr. Call 703-408-1347 ELDER CARE AVAIL- I will care for your loved ones. Exp. Own trans. A1 refs. 301-938-0302 HOUSE CLEANER- I clean houses, townhouses, apts, windows . 8 yrs exp. Call Maria 703-587-8376

TOYOTA SERVICE ADVISOR

Alexandria Toyota is accepting applications to join our award winning service team. We need and energetic person with FOREIGN LANGUAGE great CSI. Top pay & bonuses. Email Bobby Bell at Instructor for Media bbell@alexandriatoyota.com and German Language

AUTOMOTIVE AUTO BODY TECHNICIAN 10 plus years exp. Must have tools. Call 301-350-5100

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CONSTRUCTION

The Goethe-Institut Washington, the German cultural institute, is seeking an individual with profound technical background for technical multimedia instructions in German and another EU language. Look for "Position Openings" at www.goethe.de/

Positions Wanted
HANDY MAN- Hard working, honest, 35 years experience in all phases of plumbing, electric, carpentry, flooring, dry wall, painting, etc. Call 301-281-5767

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WASTEWATER OPERATOR
3 year Wastewater experience required. H.S. graduate, Mechanical skills. Able to obtain security clearance. DC location.

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Official Notices
ABC LICENSE

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Fax resume 703-506-1957
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Norman Bray Wilson and Sarah Chadeayae Cameron, trading as Weston's, 7145 Main St., Clifton (Fairfax County), Virginia 20124. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL for a Beer & Wine On Premises license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Norman Bray Wilson, President.

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PORSCHE OF ARLINGTON ROSENTHAL LANDROVER CHANTILLY
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BMW OF ALEXANDRIA

ARLINGTON, VA 3100 JEFFERSON DAVIS HWY. 1-866-458-8393 WWW.PORSCHEOFARLINGTON.COM

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DARCARS DODGE

ROSENTHAL FAIRFAX VOLKSWAGEN
FAIRFAX, VA 11050 MAIN STREET

SILVER SPRING, MD 1-888-378-0706 12511 PROSPERITY TERRACE WWW.DARCARS.COM

ROSENTHAL JAGUAR CHANTILLY
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1-888-321-6946 chantillyjaguarlandrover.com

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JIM COLEMAN TOYOTA

DARCARS CHEVROLET
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ROSENTHAL FAIRFAX HONDA
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WEDNESDAY V c o y123 MAY 4 20
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OPQRS
840

CLASS F ED
851

Trustees Sale - DC

Trustees Sale - DC

851

Prince Georges County

851

Prince Georges County

851

Prince Georges County

851

Prince Georges County

Prince Georges County

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Prince Georges County

851

NOT CES Prince Georges County

u ee Sa e —MD

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ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, # 750 WASH., DC 202-364-0306 WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM TRUSTEE’S SALE OF A COMMERCIAL BUILDING currently containing a restaurant located at 1100 Florida Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20009 (the “Commercial Property”) and 5 CONDOMINIUM UNITS and 8 PARKING UNITS located at 2250 11th St., NW, Washington, DC 20009 being Units #103, #104, #106, #107 and #404 and Parking Units #P-1, P-3, P-5, P-6, P-7, P-9, P-12 and P-13 (collectively, the “Condominium Property”). By virtue of a certain Deed of Trust, Security Agreement and Fixture Filing duly recorded December 14, 2007 as Instrument No. 2007155175 (the "Deed of Trust") among the Land Records of the District of Columbia (the "Land Records"), and in accordance with Public Law 90-566 notice filed April 8, 2011, a default having occurred in the payment of the indebtedness secured thereby and the covenants contained therein, and at the request of the party secured thereby (the "Noteholder"), the undersigned Trustee, will sell, at public auction, within the office of ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5301 WISCONSIN AVENUE, N.W., SUITE 750, WASHINGTON, D.C. on Tuesday, May 10, 2011 at 12:15 P.M. the following described land and premises: Lots 79 and 80 in Square 302 as per plat recorded in Book 200, Page 90, of the Records of the Office of the Surveyor of the District of Columbia on February 28, 2006; AND Lot 80 in Square 302 has gone into The Lacey Condominium and individual units and is now known as Lots 2027, 2028, 2030, 2031, 2050, 2051, 2053, 2055, 2056, 2057, 2059, 2062 and 2063 in Square 302 being part of record Lot 80 in Square 302 and being known as Condominium Units #103, #104, #106, #107 and #404 and Parking Units #P-1, P-3, P-5, P-6, P-7, P-9 and P-12, P13 (individually and collectively, the “Condominium Unit”) in The Lacey Condominium which was constituted and established under the District of Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, as amended, by that certain Condominium Declaration recorded December 30, 2008 as Instrument Number 2008130075 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of the District of Columbia, and by those certain Bylaws recorded December 30, 2008 as Instrument Number 2008130076 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of the District of Columbia (hereinafter called the “Condominium Bylaws”), and by that certain Plat and Plans of Condominium Subdivision recorded in the Condominium Book 69 at page 43 in the Office of the Surveyor of the District of Columbia (hereinafter called the “Condominium Plat and Plans”). Together with all of the appurtenances incident to said Condominium Unit as contained in the Condominium Declaration. The Condominium Declaration allocates to the Condominium Unit an undivided interested (stated as a percentage) in the common elements of the Condominium (hereinafter called the “Percentage Interest”). The Percentage Interest of the Condominium Unit is set forth in Exhibit B to the Condominium Declaration. TOGETHER WITH any and all buildings, structures, improvements or appurtenances now erected on the above-described land, including, without limitation, all equipment, apparatus, machinery and fixtures of any kind or character forming a part of said buildings, structures, improvements or appurtenances, and any furniture, furnishings, equipment, machinery and other personal property owned and located in, upon or about the above-described land and any buildings thereon all as more particularly described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust (the "Property"). TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to two precedent deeds of trust the first deed of trust dated March 14, 2005 recorded March 18, 2005 as Instrument No. 2005038435 in the original amount of $860,000 and the second deed of trust dated October 3, 2007 recorded October 5, 2007 as Instrument No. 2007129165 in the original amount of $1,003,800. The combined balance of the first and second trusts as of April 7, 2011 is $2,438,598.07 allocated as follows: As to the Commercial Property the allocated loan balance of the first and second trusts as of April 7, 2011 is $184,742.28; and As to the Condominium Property the allocated loan balance of the first and second trusts as of April 7, 2011 is $2,438,598.07. The bid which yields the highest price for the Property will be accepted by the Trustee (unless the sale is postponed or cancelled) and all bids will be provisional until acceptance. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Trustee absolutely reserves the right to postpone the sale and/or cancel the sale at any time until the auctioneer announces that the Property is "sold" and the deposit in the required amount and form is received by the Trustee. The Property will be offered as an entirety and the Commercial Property and the Condominium Property offered separately at the discretion of the Trustee. A deposit in the amount of $80,000 will be required at the time of sale if sold in the entirety and if sold separately the Commercial Property will require a deposit in the amount of $8,000 and the Condominium Property will require a deposit in the amount of $72,000. Such deposit must be by cashier's check or certified check or in such other form as the Trustee may determine in her sole discretion. The Noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust (or any related party) shall be exempted by the Trustee from submitting any bidding deposit. The Trustee will, as a condition of the sale, require all potential bidders except the Noteholder to show their deposit before any bidding begins. The retained deposit of the successful purchaser shall be applied, without interest, to the successful purchaser's credit at settlement, provided, however, that in the event the successful purchaser fails to consummate the purchase in accordance with the terms of sale as herein provided, such deposit(s), at the option of the Trustee, will be forfeited. The terms of sale must be complied with and settlement consummated thereon within 30 days from day of sale unless extended at the sole discretion of the Trustee. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. The balance of the purchase price over and above the retained deposit(s), with interest thereon at a rate of 10.00% per annum from the date of sale through the date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, will be due at settlement in cash or certified funds; and if not so paid, the Trustee reserves the right to retain the deposit(s) and resell the Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser, after such advertisement and on such terms as the Trustee may deem proper, and to avail herself and the Noteholder of any legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. The Property is sold subject to the rights, if any, of parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the Deed of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions, easements, rights of way, and limitations of record. The Property will be sold "WHERE IS" and in "AS IS" condition without any warranty as to condition, express or implied, and without any representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the information furnished to prospective bidders by the Trustee or any other party and without any other representations or warranty of any nature. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature, condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular use of any improvements, fixtures or personal property included within the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property or the compliance of the Property with federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Property with the Americans with Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v) compliance of the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall constitute a waiver of any claims against the Trustee or the Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters. The successful purchaser recognizes that any investigation, examination or inspection of the Property is within the control of the owner or other parties in possession of the Property and not within the control of the Trustee or the Noteholder. Conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without covenant or warranty, express or implied. The risk of loss or damage by fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Adjustment of all taxes, ground rents, public charges, assessments, sewer, water, drainage and other public improvements will be made as of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter by the successful purchaser, whether assessments have been levied or not. The Noteholder and Trustee assume no liability for fuel, gas, electricity, utilities and other operating charges accrued before or after the sale and all such charges shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser from the date of sale. All costs incident to the settlement and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all transfer taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. If the Trustee cannot convey title, the purchaser's sole remedy is a return of deposit. Further particulars may be announced at the time of sale. For further information, please contact the trustee or Alan S. Macdonald at 410-5710666. Amy Hurite Macdonald Trustee April 29, May 2, 4, 6, 9 851 851

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10147 SCOTCH HILL DR., UNIT #20-4 UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Sean Goodluck, dated July 10, 2007 and recorded in Liber 28720, folio 7 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 5, 2011 AT 10:01 AM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and described as Unit numbered 20-4 in the horizontal property regime known as "Cinnamon Ridge Condominium" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 4.75% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 APR. 20, 27 & MAY 4

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 6707 TERRA ALTA DR. LANHAM, MD 20706 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Luz Maria Perez and Jose Perez, dated March 23, 2005 and recorded in Liber 21849, folio 300 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 12, 2011 AT 1:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $32,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 9.5% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 APR. 27, MAY 4 & 11

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 7977 RIGGS RD., UNIT #9 HYATTSVILLE, MD 20783 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Maritza Vasquez and Carlos Armando Canales, dated July 11, 2006 and recorded in Liber 25861, folio 574 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 19, 2011 AT 1:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and described as Unit numbered 7977-9 in Building numbered 13, in a subdivision known as, "Bedford Towne Condominium" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 8.89% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 MAY 4, 11 & 18

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 8904 FRANCISCO CT. UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Antoine Washington and Jolie Washington, dated July 6, 2005 and recorded in Liber 23341, folio 545 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 19, 2011 AT 1:33 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $23,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 6.6% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 MAY 4, 11 & 18 Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 3701 HAMILTON ST. HYATTSVILLE, MD 20782 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Orlando Salinas and Julio Vasquez, dated October 18, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26459, folio 211 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 5, 2011 AT 10:03 AM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $38,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 6.625% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 APR. 20, 27 & MAY 4

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 5010 ROANOKE PL. COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Raquel Deogracia and Felipe Deogracia, dated September 29, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26180, folio 656 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 12, 2011 AT 1:31 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $38,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 6.5% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 APR. 27, MAY 4 & 11

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 3327 CHESTER GROVE RD. UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Michelle McKinnon, dated September 14, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26080, folio 472 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 19, 2011 AT 1:34 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and described as Unit D in Building 8, in the Second Additional to Westphalia Woods Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 8.0% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 MAY 4, 11 & 18

2604 KRESSON PL. BOWIE, MD 20715 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Louis M. Clark and Jennifer G. Clark, dated August 18, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26097, folio 119 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 19, 2011 AT 1:31 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $43,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Truste mm m m m m W w m m m m w m m m w m w m w m m m w M m W W M M m w M M w Wm W m m w m m m m m m m m w m m m % m

Prince Georges County

Prince Georges County

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 3607 PERRY ST. MOUNT RAINIER, MD 20712 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Lillie M. Dunston, dated July 21, 1999 and recorded in Liber 13302, folio 260 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 5, 2011 AT 10:00 AM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $12,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 11.125% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 APR. 20, 27 & MAY 4

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10133 RIGGS RD. HYATTSVILLE, MD 20783 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Annie Wilkins, dated August 23, 2006 and recorded in Liber 25901, folio 709 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 5, 2011 AT 10:02 AM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 4.75% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 APR. 20, 27 & MAY 4

Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 1205 ELLINGWOOD DR. ACCOKEEK, MD 20607 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Scott E. Riker, dated July 1, 2005 and recorded in Liber 23426, folio 168 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 12, 2011 AT 1:32 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 6.875% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 APR. 27, MAY 4 & 11

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Morris/Hardwick/Schneider 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, MD 21237 410-284-9600 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 3706 ETON DR. UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Otis Brown and Vanessa Brown, dated June 30, 2006 and recorded in Liber 25686, folio 312 among the Land Records of Prince George's Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co., 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St., on MAY 19, 2011 AT 1:35 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Prince George's Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $56,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's Co. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Sub-Trustees’ attorney fees of $750.00, plus all costs incurred, if the Sub-Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub-Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 2.0% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub-Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub-Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub-Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub-Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Purchaser agrees to pay $275.00 to the Seller’s attorney at settlement for review of the settlement documents. Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., Sub. Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 MAY 4, 11 & 18

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D10 V c o CLASS y123F ED
854

Carroll County

NOT CES u ee Sa e 854 Carroll County

—MD
872

MERCHAND SE Pe & An ma 872 Fairfax County Fairfax County

OPQRS
876

WEDNESDAY MAY 4 20
881

Loudoun County

878

Stafford County

Other VA Counties
TRUSTEE SALE 301 Duwamish Trail Winchester, VA 22602-1709 Frederick County

MD H PR. GEORGE'S CO.

260

Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 112 S. CHURCH ST. WESTMINSTER, MD 21157 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from John Jones and Stacey Jones, dated August 4, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4971, folio 245 among the Land Records of Carroll Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Carroll Co., at the Old Court House Door, Court St. Side, Westminster, on MAY 12, 2011 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Carroll Co., MD and described as Tax ID #07-085419 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Carroll Co. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. All public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, real property taxes, ground rent, condo/HOA dues, whether incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges or condo/HOA fees have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or without reselling the property, the Trustees may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale. The purchaser agrees to pay attorneys’ fees in the amount of $750.00 plus costs, which fee does not include attendance at any hearings, if the Trustees have moved to resell the property. Hearings will be charged at attorneys’ hourly rate. Purchaser agrees to pay $295.00 at settlement, to the Seller's attorney, for review of the settlement documents, $150.00 may be charged for document preparation and review and an additional $295.00 for review of any motion which may be subsequently filed with the Court to substitute a purchaser herein. Trustees’ file number 25735. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, John A. Ansell, III, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com APR. 27, MAY 4 & 11

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE 11582 GREENWICH POINT ROAD RESTON, VIRGINIA 20194 In execution of a Deed of Trust dated February 23, 2001, in the original amount of $520,000.00, recorded in Deed Book 11728 at Page 164 in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Fairfax County, Virginia, the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom may act, will on May 18, 2011, 10:30 a.m., by the main entrance to the Fairfax County Courthouse, 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder the following property with improvements thereon: Lot 5, Block 6, Section 33, RESTON, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 6239, page 1886, among the land records of Fairfax County, Virginia Tax Map Number 011-4-04-06-0005 This sale is subject to the restrictions, rights of way, conditions, easements, and mechanic's liens, if any, whether of record or not of record, to the extent any of the foregoing apply and take priority over the lien of the Deed of Trust. Deposit of $40,000.00 by cashier's check shall be required to qualify as a bidder prior to the sale, except from the Noteholder. The deposit, without interest, is applied to the purchase price at settlement. Settlement will be held on or before fifteen (15) days after sale; time being of the essence. Upon purchaser's default, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property shall be resold at the risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be in cash or its equivalent. Settlement shall be at the offices of the Substitute Trustees or other mutually agreed location. The property and any improvements thereon shall be sold in "as is" condition without any warranties. The successful bidder shall assume all loss or damage to the property from and after the time of the sale. Purchaser shall be responsible for all costs of the conveyance, which shall be by special warranty including, but not limited to, the preparation of the deed and the grantor's tax. In addition, at settlement, the successful bidder shall pay all assessments, sewer or water charges, and real estate taxes, and any penalties and interest due on any of the foregoing, with respect to the Property prorated to the date of the foreclosure sale. The sale is subject to such additional terms as the Substitute Trustees may announce at the time of sale. The purchaser will be required to sign a Memorandum of Sale incorporating all the terms of the sale. William H. Casterline, Jr. Jeremy B. Root Michael A. Howes For information contact: William H. Casterline, Jr. Blankingship & Keith, P.C. 4020 University Drive; Suite 300 Fairfax, Virginia 22030 Phone: 703-691-1235 May 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 2011

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 20096 NORTHVILLE HILLS TERRACE, Ashburn, VA 20147 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $417,000.00, with an annual interest rate of 6.7500% from SCOTT WHITE dated September 14, 2007, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN as Deed Book/Instrument # 20070917-0067841 RECOREDED SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction on the courthouse steps in front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on May 17, 2011 at 3:30 PM, the property with improvements to wit: LOT 1440, PHASE V, LAND BAY 'W', BELMONT. AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. /62/M13//1440/ ; PIN 115-39-1349000) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Trustee's File No. 10-203949D. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O Shapiro & Burson, LLP, 13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 201, Fairfax, VA 22033 (703-449-5800)

877
11317952

Spotsylvania/ Fredericksburg
TRUSTEE SALE 11705 Dukes Drive Bumpass, VA 23024-9666 Spotsylvania County

TRUSTEE'S SALE 21 Highlander Dr Fredericksburg, VA 22406 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $215,775.00, from Susan C. Ohlin and George R. Ohlin, Grantor(s), dated November 22, 2005, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the County of Stafford on November 23, 2005 as Instrument #050047173, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Courthouse for the Circuit Court of Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Rd., Stafford, VA on May 18, 2011 at 1:45PM, the property with the improvements thereon, if any, to wit: That certain condominium unit known as Unit# 41-1 (IRTA 1-41), Phase 28, The Villas at Falls Run Condominium, located in the County of Stafford, Virginia, And more fully described in the above Deed of Trust. Commonly known as 21 Highlander Dr, Fredericksburg, VA 22406. Tax ID: 45R-28411. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $12,000.00 or 10% of the sale price will be required in cash, certified or cashier’s check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. This notice is an attempt to collect on a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Loan Type: Federal National Mortgage Association (Trustee # 517033 ) Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee, LLC, PO Box 2548, Leesburg, VA 20177, 703-777-7101, website: http://www.atlanticlawgrp.com (05-04-11, 05-11-11)(270113)

Houses
UPPER MALBORO- TH 4br, 3 ba, D/W, L/R, D/R, W/D, 1 car gar, $1800+ sec dep, 301-758-6424

Furniture

D

In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $146,000.00, dated May 24, 2007 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Frederick County, Virginia, in Instrument 070008943, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Circuit Court, 5 North Kent Street, Winchester, Virginia, on May 9, 2011 at 2:45 o'clock pm the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 7A (Lots 7 & 8), Section M, Shawnee Land, with improvements thereon. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $10,000.00, or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check, will be required at the time of sale with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (40-005693-11/ CONV) 5040Corporate Woods Drive#120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 (757) 457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.

Roommates

MARYLAND

Hoosier Cabinet—$700, very good condition, Sellers, Elwood, ID, Annandale, VA, 703-256-0254 Leather Living Room Set—BRAND NEW LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used, Orig price $3000, Will Sacrifice $975 can deliver call bill 202-609 -7381 Thomasville—Entertainment Center, TV and combination DVD/VHS Player $400, Annandale, VA, 703-256-0254
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CAPITAL HEIGHTS- Room to share, off Addison Rd. $500/month includes utilities. 301-300-3648 FORT WASHINGTON- SFH, 1 room $600 all utils incl + deposit. Short term ok. Avail now. 240-672-4349 FT WASHINGTON- Shr SFH. Fully furnished rm w/ refrig, microwave, CATV. $175/wk. 301-775-0019 LANHAM-1 Room in SFH, quiet, no- smoking, W/D. $475+ $20 utils + dep. 240-645-2380 Lanham— $525,1 br, shared bath, Good Luck rd, Lanham, MD, heat, Cable, water, Elec, AC, 240-476-2224 Montgomery Village— $550, 1 br, 1 ba, 1 1/2ba, Sawgrass Dr, Gaithersburg, MD, 703-408-4951

265

Home & Garden
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Solid Hardwood Brazilian Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F., $2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190 269

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Jewelry & Watches

DIAMOND-1 loose modern round brilliant cut diamond. 1.23 carat, GIA cert, SI1J. $10,000. Call 703-585-4663

275

Merchandise Wanted
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NEED MONEY? Pawn or Sell, Your Choice! Gold, Silver, most items of value, top $$ paid for over 30 years. Call 301-439-4116

Riverdale—M/F to shr. apt. Available Immd $540 Nr. Public Trans/Metro SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH Shr Util. Call 240-305-6646 FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS/GOLD. Call Al, 301-807-3266 SILVER SPRING- Furnished Br, Prvt Ba, w/d, net, cable, phone. Available 280 now. $750 incld util. 202-702-3827

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Musical Instruments

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SUITLAND-2BR bsmt to shr, Mstr suite. W/D. All utils inc cable/wifi. NS. Mins Metro. $650. 301-433-5486 SUITLAND - Share house. Rooms for rent. 2 blocks from Suitland Metro. $185/week. Call 301-633-0993

Baby Grand—$5000, Reston, VA, 703-867-2567 Mint Ebony baby grand w/ unit to protect soundboard 5000 or best offer

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Sporting Goods & Services Garage Sales, D.C.
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UPPER MARLBORO- To share all of home, $500 + $50. dep. inc. w/d, cable/util. incl. 202-361-1810
WALDORF- Fem Pref to share 3 Br, 2.5 Ba house. Incl utils, internet & cbl rdy. Very clean inside and out. Study room incl if neeeded. $800/mo + dep. 240-299-9389

ORVIS FLYROD, VESTS, DECOYS, CAMPING EQUIPMENT, RAIN GEAR Call 703-534-8680

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Other VA Counties
TRUSTEE SALE 2352 Wildflower Way Locust Grove, VA 22508-2182 Orange County

876

Loudoun County

876

Loudoun County

872

Fairfax County

872

Fairfax County

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE 9990 LEE HIGHWAY FAIRFAX, VIRGINIA 22030 In execution of a Deed of Trust, Security Agreement and Assignment of Rents and Fixture Filing, as assigned (the “Deed of Trust”) dated March 1, 2007, in the principal amount of $15,700,000.00, and recorded among the land records of Fairfax County, Virginia (the “Land Records”) in Deed Book 19184 at Page 0410, which Deed of Trust also constitutes a security agreement and creates a security interest in all the fixtures and personal property described in the Deed of Trust, default having been made in the payment of the debt therein secured, the undersigned Substitute Trustees, either of whom may act, will offer for sale at public auction by the front entrance to the Fairfax County Courthouse, 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, on May 18, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., the following described real property, together with all improvements, fixtures and furnishings, if any, located thereon and owned by the borrower (the “Property”). The Property also includes all leases and other rights and interests as defined and described in the Deed of Trust. ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in Fairfax County, Virginia, and more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a point in the easterly line of Stafford Drive, a public street right-of-way 50’ wide, being a common corner N/F City of Fairfax, thence departing Stafford Drive and running with the line of N/F City of Fairfax N 86 degrees 15’38” E 497.25 feet to a point in the line of Fairfax Racquet Club, Inc., said point being in the center of Accotink Creek; thence with the lines of Fairfax Racquet Club, Inc., Lot B, Section 4, Boulevard Courts, and the Center of Accotink Creek the following courses and distances: S 02 degrees 15’ 12” E 40.69 feet to a point; S 15 degrees 15’ 20” W 145.94 feet to a point; S 10 degrees 34’ 50” E. 46.29 feet to a point; S 31 degrees 38’ 20” W 34.88 feet to a point; S 09 degrees 06’ 40” W 32.21 feet to a point; S 45 degrees 50’ 00” W 87.45 feet to a point; N 88 degrees 48’ 30” W 67.31 feet to a point; S 66 degrees 32’ 40” W 103.01 feet to a point; S 36 degrees 14’ 30” W 59.04 feet to a point in the northerly line of Lee Highway, Routes 29-211-50, a public street right-of-way, width varies; Thence with the line of said highway S 83 degrees 34’ 00” W 132.23 feet; S 06 degrees 26’ 00” E 48.00 feet, and S 83 degrees 34’00” W 318.11 feet to a point in the line of aforementioned Stafford Drive; thence with an arc of a curve to the right whose radius is 25.00 feet a distance of 42.05 feet to a point; with the arc of a curve to the right whose radius is 200.00 feet a distance of 112.64 feet, and N 34 degrees 03’ 00” E 447.71 feet to a point of beginning, containing approximately 5.9054 acres, more or less. Tax Map #: 48-3-02-001 The personal property and non-real estate rights and interests to be offered for sale by the Substitute Trustees consist of all forms of personal property located upon or related to the Property and owned by the owner of the Property, as more particularly described in the Deed of Trust, as assigned. No representations or warranties are made as to the existence or condition of any such items, it being the sole responsibility of the purchaser to make such determination. The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to exclude certain personal property from inclusion in the foreclosure sale with the Property. Such excluded items will be announced at the time of the sale. A deposit in the form of a cashier’s check of $500,000.00 will be required of all bidders at the time of sale, except from a bidder on behalf of the holder of the note (“Noteholder”) or its subsidiary or affiliate. The Property shall be sold “ AS IS” and “WITH ALL FAULTS.” Neither the Substitute Trustees nor the Noteholder, nor their respective agents, successors, and assigns, make any representations or warranties with respect to the Property including, without limitation, representations or warranties as to the structural integrity, physical condition, construction, workmanship, materials, habitability, fitness for a particular purpose or merchantability of all or any part of such Property. The purchaser recognizes and agrees that any investigation, examination, or inspection of the property being sold is within the control of the owner or other parties in possession and their agents and not within the control of the Substitute Trustees, the Noteholder, or their successors or assigns. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation or warranty as to the environmental condition of the Property or the compliance of the Property with federal, state, or local laws and regulations concerning the purchase or disposal of hazardous substances. Acceptance of the deed to the Property shall constitute a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees, the Noteholder, and their respective agents, successors, and assigns, concerning the environmental condition of the Property including, but not limited to, claims arising under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, and/or state or local law, ordinances or regulations. The purchaser shall be required to sign a sale memorandum waiving any cause of action it may have against the Substitute Trustees or the Noteholder for any condition of the Property that may not comply with any federal, state or local law, regulation or ruling including, without limitation, any laws, regulations and rulings relating to environmental contamination or hazardous wastes. Such agreement shall also provide that if, notwithstanding such agreement, a court of competent jurisdiction should permit such a claim to be made against the Substitute Trustee and/or the Noteholder, such agreement shall serve as the overwhelming primary factor in any equitable apportionment of response costs or other liability. Nothing in this paragraph shall release, waive or preclude any claims the purchaser may have against any person in possession or control of the Property. The Property shall be sold subject to all recorded and unrecorded liens, encumbrances, easements, rights of way, covenants, conditions, restrictions, and mechanics’ and materialmen’s liens, to the extent any of the foregoing may lawfully apply to all or a portion of the Property being sold and take priority over the liens, assignments and security interests of the Deed of Trust. The Property also shall be sold subject to all leases of spaces within the buildings on the Property. Neither the Substitute Trustees nor the Noteholder shall be responsible for the accounting for or the collection of prepaid rents or security deposits. Title to the Property shall be conveyed by a special warranty deed. Settlement shall be by cashier’s check or wire transfer of immediately available federal funds, and shall occur within fifteen (15) days from date of sale, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE. Settlement shall occur in the offices of the Substitute Trustees or such other place as mutually agreed upon. The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to extend the date of settlement as may be necessary to complete arrangements for settlement. The deposit, without interest, shall be applied to the credit of the successful bidder at settlement. If the successful bidder fails to complete settlement the deposit shall be forfeited and the Substitute Trustees may resell the subject Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to remove any all or any portion of the Property from sale at any time before the sale is announced as final, to reject any and all bids, waive deposit requirements, extend time for settlement, and announce additional terms of sale. Terms of sale announced at the public auction will supersede all advertised terms of sale. All closing costs, including the preparation of the Substitute Trustee’s deed and the grantor’s tax, shall be paid by the successful bidder. In addition, at settlement, the successful bidder shall pay all assessments, sewer or water charges, and real estate taxes, and any penalties and interest due on any of the foregoing, with respect to the Property prorated to the date of the foreclosure sale. The risk of loss or damage to the Property shall be paid by the successful bidder from and after the bid strikedown at the time of sale. The Substitute Trustees will not deliver possession of the Property to the successful bidder, who shall be solely responsible for obtaining possession of the Property. At the time of sale, the successful bidder shall be required to execute a memorandum of sale (the “Memorandum of Sale”) which shall include, by reference, all the terms and conditions contained herein. The form of Memorandum of Sale is available from the Substitute Trustee upon request and will be available at sale time. Immediately upon the conveyance by the Substitute Trustees of the Property to the purchaser at foreclosure, all duties, liabilities and obligations of the Substitute Trustees, if any, with respect to such Property shall be extinguished. For information contact: William H. Casterline, Jr. Jeremy B. Root Blankingship & Keith, P.C. 4020 University Drive; Suite 300 Fairfax, Virginia 22030 Phone: 703-691-1235 Substitute Trustees May 2, 3, 4, 2011 11318971

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE 42148 Black Hills Place Aldie, VA, 20105 By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated October 22, 2004, and recorded at Instrument Number 200410260114757 in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Loudoun County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $437,000.00. The appointed TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the main entrance of the Circuit Court at 18 E. Market Street, Leesburg, VA 20178 located across from the U.S. Post Office on June 1, 2011 at 11:30 AM improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of STONE RIDGE-NORTH SEC. 10, 200410260114756, 200307020083096P, LOT 35, ACREAGE: 0.18, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “ AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. A deposit of $44,000.00 in cash or cashier’s check payable to the TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale and Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments, including real property taxes, water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA dues or assessments, whether incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges or condo/HOA fees have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay the Seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $295.00 for review of the settlement documents. Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: Rosenberg & Associates, LLC (Attorney for Commonwealth Trustees, LLC) 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 301-907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $315,000.00, dated October 26, 2007 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the County Of Spotsylvania, Virginia, in Instrument 200700030532, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9113 Courthouse Road, Spotsylvania, Virginia, on May 24, 2011 at 10:30 o'clock am the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: LOT 31, CONTAINING 1.342 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, SECTION 1, DUKES PLANTATION SUBDIVISION, with improvements thereon. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check, will be required at the time of sale with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (01-023882-09 / CONV) 5040Corporate Woods Drive#120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 (757) 457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.

In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $357,905.00, dated July 27, 2005 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the County Of Orange, Virginia, in Instrument 050008430, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Circuit Court of Orange County, 110 North Madison Road Orange, Virginia, on May 18, 2011 at 11:00 o'clock am the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 7R (erroneously referred to as Lot 8R), Section 2, Wilderness Shores Subdivision, with improvements thereon. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check, will be required at the time of sale with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (01-016622-10/ CONV) 5040Corporate Woods Drive#120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 (757) 457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
TRUSTEE SALE 451 Canyon Rd Winchester, VA 22602-7048 Frederick County In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $411,000.00, dated January 18, 2008 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the County Of Frederick, Virginia, in Instrument 080001151, at page 116, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Circuit Court, 5 North Kent Street, Winchester, Virginia, on May 16, 2011 at 2:45 o'clock pm the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 139, Section 2-C, Sovereign Village, with improvements thereon. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check, will be required at the time of sale with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (01-001292-11 / CONV) 5040Corporate Woods Drive#120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 (757) 457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. TRUSTEE SALE 107 Blackfeet Trl Winchester, VA 22602-1304 Frederick County In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $202,500.00, dated September 21, 2006 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Frederick County, Virginia, in Instrument 060018602, at page 0030, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Circuit Court, 5 North Kent Street, Winchester, Virginia, on May 16, 2011 at 2:45 o'clock pm the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 43, Section B, Shawneeland, with improvements thereon. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check, will be required at the time of sale with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (40-001757-11/ CONV) 5040Corporate Woods Drive#120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 (757) 457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.

Apartments Condos H Co-ops

VA H ARLINGTON CO.

MANY FAMILY CHURCH SALE @ 201 4th St, SE. Sat., May 7 @ 8:30am-3:30pm. 202-567-1168 www.capitolhillpreschurch150.org

350

Garage Sales, MD
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ARL/BALLSTON-1 &2BR from $1150, incl. utils., near Metro, no pets. 703-522-7354 www.glenayrapartments.com

CHEVY CHASE, MD - 20815 Huge Community Yard Sale Sat 5/7, 8-2pm. Kenwood Forest II Corner of Hillandale Rd . & Chevy Chase Dr. incl Bradley Blvd, Offutt Ln & Willett Pkwy. Rain Date 5/14

VA H ARLINGTON

TRUSTEE SALE 202 Raven Rd Stephens City, VA 22655-2470 Frederick County In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $169,915.00, dated November 30, 2005 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Frederick County, Virginia, in Instrument 050028260, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Circuit Court, 5 North Kent Street, Winchester, Virginia, on May 31, 2011 at 2:45 o'clock pm the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 74, Greenbriar Village, Section Two, with improvements thereon. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $15,000.00, or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check, will be required at the time of sale with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (40-008801-11 / CONV) 5040Corporate Woods Drive#120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 (757) 457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.

Houses
ARLINGTON-3 lvl, 3BR, 2BA, end unit TH. Pentagon/FT Meyer area, just off Columbia Pike, 27(Washington Blvd) & 395. $2150. 914-282-9147

George's Episcpl Yard Sale 7010 Glenn Dale Rd at Lanham-Severn Rd, May 7, 8am2pm, 301-262-3285 rain or shine

Glendale—St.

355

Garage Sales, VA
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VA H FAIRFAX CO. Apartments Condos H Co-ops
HERNDON SUPER SAVINGS! ONE MONTH FREE RENT! 1 BR $1045, New kitchen. Utilities included, near shops 703-471-0817

Roommates

VIRGINIA

872

Fairfax County

872

Fairfax County

851

Prince Georges County

872

Fairfax County

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY MARK H. WITTSTADT GERARD WM. WITTSTADT, JR Substitute Trustee 9409 Philadelphia Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21237 V BRENDA POWERS 5314 Emerson Street Hyattsville, Maryland 20781 Defendant CASE # CAE11-02571 NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County this 20TH day of APRIL, 2011, that the foreclosure sale of the real property known as 5314 EMERSON STREET HYATTSVILLE, MARYLAND 20781, being the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Mark H. Wittstadt and Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr. Substitute Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20TH day of MAY, 2011. Provided a copy of this Order is inserted in some daily newspaper printed Prince George's County, once in each of three successive weeks, before the 20TH day of MAY, 2011. The Report states the amount of the Foreclosure Sale to be $145,469.26. Marilynn M. Bland #336 Clerk of the Circuit Court For Prince George’s County, Maryland

Home delivery starts your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
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TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 4404 HELMSFORD LANE, UNIT 103, Fairfax, VA 22033 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $220,000.00, with an annual interest rate of 3.6250% from QUOC NGUYEN dated October 5, 2004, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book/Instrument # 16571 AT PAGE 0329 RECORDED OCTOBER 5, 2004, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction on the courthouse steps at the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on May 10, 2011 at 11:30 AM, the property with improvements to wit: CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 5-3-103, STONECROFT CONDOMINIUM, AND THE LIMITED COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO AND ANY AMENDMENTS THERETO. AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. 0551 105C 0103) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Trustee's File No. 10-207802D. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O Shapiro & Burson, LLP, 13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 201, Fairfax, VA 22033 (703-449-5800)

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 7316 MALLORY CIRCLE Alexandria, VA 22315 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $288,500.00, with an annual interest rate of 3.7500% from JEFFREY W. PENNINGTON AND MARIBEL PENNINGTON dated September 22, 2004, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book/Instrument # 16568 AT PAGE 2025 RECORDED OCTOBER 5, 2004, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction on the courthouse steps at the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on May 10, 2011 at 11:30 AM, the property with improvements to wit: LOT THIRTY-THREE (33), SECTIONS TWENTY-ONE (21) AND TWENTYTHREE (23), KINGSTOWNE, AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED AND RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 6667 AT PAGE 138, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF FAIRFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA. AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. 0913 11210033) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Trustee's File No. 10-189022D. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O Shapiro & Burson, LLP, 13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 201, Fairfax, VA 22033 (703-449-5800) TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 2301 SOUTHGATE SQUARE Reston, VA 20191 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $173,200.00, with an annual interest rate of 5.8750% from MARIA MARTINEZ AND YACSY A. REYES AKA YACSY ALEXIS REYES dated February 28, 2008, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book/Instrument # 19815 AT PAGE 2096 RECORDED MARCH 5, 2008, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction on the courthouse steps at the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on May 10, 2011 at 11:30 AM, the property with improvements to wit: Lot 66, Block 1B, (Southgate Square Cluster) RESTON, Section TwentyEight (28) AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. 0261 081B0066) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Trustee's File No. 10-209702D. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O Shapiro & Burson, LLP, 13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 201, Fairfax, VA 22033 (703-449-5800) TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 6035 TERRAPIN PLACE, UNIT 303, Alexandria, VA 22310 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $326,800.00, with an annual interest rate of 3.3750% from AGNES WESTERFIELD dated November 18, 2005, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book/Instrument # 17979 AT PAGE 0614 RECORDED NOVEMBER 22, 2005, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction on the courthouse steps at the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on May 10, 2011 at 11:30 AM, the property with improvements to wit: Unit 6035-303, Building 6, Phase 6, in THE SYCAMORES AT VAN DORN CONDOMINIUM and any/all subsequent amendments thereto. AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. 0812 11 6035E) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Trustee's File No. 10-207205D. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O Shapiro & Burson, LLP, 13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 201, Fairfax, VA 22033 (703-449-5800)

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 6620 BOSTWICK DRIVE Springfield, VA 22151 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $350,075.00, with an annual interest rate of 6.6250% from NOEMY D. HERNANDEZ AND JOSE MERCADO dated January 3, 2008, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book/Instrument # 19737 AT PAGE 0903 RECORDED JANUARY 9, 2008, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction on the courthouse steps at the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on May 17, 2011 at 11:30 AM, the property with improvements to wit: Lot 189, Block 17, Section 3, EDSALL PARK SUBDIVISION. AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. 0714 05170189) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Trustee's File No. 11-214978D. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O Shapiro & Burson, LLP, 13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 201, Fairfax, VA 22033 (703-449-5800)

ANNANDALE- Large room, walk-in closet. Share bath & kitchen. $500 includes utilities. Call Renato 703-568-1389 ANNANDALE SHR TH, Rm in bsmt $550/month, all utilities included. No pets/smoke. Free int. 571-277-3888

ANNANDALE- Thur 5/5-Sat 5/7, 9am-4pm. 4385 Americana Dr. Great stuff, nice gifts. Most are new. Brambleton—Brambleton Community Wide Yard Sale, Brambleton/Ashburn, VA, May 7th, 8am12pm, 703-542-6263 Centreville—14340 Kettle Mountain Dr. Multi-Family yard Sale from 8-2, 05/07/11. Keepsake ornaments, plus size clothing, & whole lot more. FALLS CHURCH- Fri- Sat 8:30am-1pm. Recliner, dorm, frig,micro, household items, kitchen ware,baby/child, items, clothes, books, & much more. 7604 Bent Oak Ct (22043) Lorton—CHURCH YARDSALE! May7, 7am-noon 9301 Richmond Highway, 703-339-6572, rusty@pohick.org Oakton—HUGE Church Yard Sale. May 7 7am-1pm, Indoors, U-U Congregation of Fairfax, 2709 Hunter Mill Rd (1 mi N Rt. 123).

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OAKTON

Sat May 7, 8am

Ginormous moving sale: Household, LR tables, pots, antiques, clothing, car lug care, much more. Vale Road to 3431 Valewood Dr.

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ARLINGTON/BALLSTON- Furn rm, hrdwd floors, $925/m. Share Bath. Short/ Long Term. Call 703-522-0722 FAIRFAX/CHANTILLY- Share SFH, Spacious BR, w/ prvt Bath, W/D, N/S. No Pets. Nr Rt. 50, 28 & 66. $500 Available immed. 703-593-9483 WOODBRIDGE- Walk-out bsmt,nice lighting ,cable/net New carpet & paint. $1000 inc util 703-606-0359 Woodbridge— House to share $550/month util incl, cable tv. Call Bob after 4 pm. 571-292-6280

Vienna—BABY BOY/GIRL TWINS SALE! Gear,clothes to 12 mo size. 1004 Hillcrest Dr SW, Vienna, VA, 0507-11, 9am - 1pm, 703-431-8525 Vienna—MultiFamily! 5/7, 8am to 12, Whispering Wind Ct., Furn, TVs, Square Dance dresses, Mtn.Bikes, Toys, Books, Clothes, Jewelry, Dolls WOODBRIDGE- 12541 Caleb Ct., 22192. Sat. 5/7, 7a-3p. Great Saleinc. cust. cabinets, vinyl rock coll., Shabby Chic tin rm divider & more.
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DC Real Est. Auctions
FORECLOSURE AUCTION
160+ Homes, Bid Online: 5/12 Open House: 4/30, 5/7 & 8

Moving Sale

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Fredericksburg—UPSCALE downsizing-dealers OK! Sterling, ANTIQUE w PRINTS, rugs, china, furniture, 5/55/7 by appoinment 540-424-9047 Stratford Landing—8621 Highgate Rd,Alexandria,VA, May 7, 8am-1pm, m Furniture,tools twinbed, kitchenware,crystal &much more

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www.Auction.com
Auction.com, LLC RE Broker LL98370409

TRUSTEE SALE 9616 Laurel Oak Dr Fredericksburg, VA 22407 Spotsylvania County In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $382,500.00, dated May 14, 2007 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the County Of Spotsylvania, Virginia, in Instrument LR200700015092, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9113 Courthouse Road, Spotsylvania, Virginia, on May 17, 2011 at 10:30 o'clock am the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 88, Section 1-A, The Falls at Lee's Parke, with improvements thereon. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check, will be required at the time of sale with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (01-019992-10 / CONV) 5040Corporate Woods Drive#120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 (757) 457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.

Mountain Property MTN BARGAIN!
92 AC/Stream - 89,900
Was $144,900. Beautiful blend of rolling fields & gorgeous hardwoods with lots of wildlife! Hiking & ATV trails throughout. Long frontage on mtn stream for a relaxing sound that only nature can provide! Easy access. Excellent owner financing. Call now 877-526-3764 www.wvtimberland.com

365

Auction Sales

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6:00 PM WEDNESDAY ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES
Full catalog online. Weekly sale preview Wed 10am auction. Antique furniture, antique glass including depression and art glass, paintings, prints, lamps, lots of sterling, Asian decorative items, fine china, statues, Ephemera, jewelry including gold, fine crystal, art pottery, lighting, garden ornaments. Preview online @ www.quinnsauction.com QUINNS AUCTION GALLERIES 431 N. Maple Ave., Falls Church, VA 703-532-5632 VAR#2579

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Apartments Condos • Co-ops
Northeast 1126 48th Place.,NE One BDRM $625 Reduced Security Deposit Off Street Parking Bright Wardwoods Call 301-712-4211 or The Barac Co 202-722-2100 EHO

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Loudoun County

Office Space, Rent
FAIRFAX- 700, 902, 1104, 1335, 1698, 2034, 2144 SF Foster Mgmt. 703-385-8900
LARGO PARK-Exec offices fr $400 Also small & large class "A" suites www.realtyserviceco.com 301-322-8487

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TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 21680 FRAME SQUARE Ashburn, VA 20148 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $324,800.00, with an annual interest rate of 6.3750% from TIN CHUNG MAK AND HONGNANG KONG dated April 21, 2006, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN as Deed Book/Instrument # 200604250036375 RECORDED APRIL 25, 2006, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction on the courthouse steps in front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on May 10, 2011 at 3:30 PM, the property with improvements to wit: LOT 21A, SECTION 7, BROADLANDS. AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. /78///9////21/; PIN 119-47-0623000) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Trustee's File No. 10-209529D. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O Shapiro & Burson, LLP, 13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 201, Fairfax, VA 22033 (703-449-5800)

Dogs for Sale

www

DC H SOUTHEAST

BEAGLE PUPS- AKC, 7 mos old, Lemon and White, some running. 301-440-2992

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Apartments Condos H Co-ops
SE DC -The Gregory - Renovated garden style apartments. Spacious 2BR/1BA & 3BR/1.5BA. Off-street parking. Mins. from downtown. D/W, W/W carpet, CAC/Heat, Walkin closets, Secured Building, Direct metro access. Vouchers welcome. Call 202-574-5515 Southeast 1847 Massachusetts Ave.,SE One BDRM $700 Heat & Hot Water Included/W/Rent Reduced Security Deposit Bright Hardwoods Laundry Facilities On-Site Call 202-544-2356 or The Barac Co 202-722-21 EHO Southeast 2643-45 Naylor Rd.,SE One BDRM $775 Heat,Gas & Hot Water Included Reduced Security Deposit Bright Hardwoods Laundry & Manager On-Site Call 202-585-0804 or The Barac Co 202-722-2100 EHO

Warehouse Space, Rent
ARDMORE/ARDWICK GOOD RATE 3660, 7320 & 10,980 sf w/office and good parking. 301 309-9500
FAIRFAX CTY-1060, 1375 & 4920 sf Foster Mgmt 703-385-8900

C
BICHON FRISE- Beautiful Bouncing Baby Girl! S/W, 10 wks, $900 to loving family. Call 202-236-0461 Bichon Poo—Beautiful Puppy's with Personality PLUS! Lovingly raised with parents & pups! 703-577-1069 www.DCDogFinders.com $499 Bichon/ShihTzu—Adorable "TeddyBears" DC's fav family puppy! Super Cute $450-499 Call 703-577-1069 or www.DCDogFinders.com Biewer Yorkshire—a la Pom Pon. Five "MUST-SEE" pups. M&F CH bloodlines. Family-raised. Vets complete. Contact 434-589-8829 for more info. Border Collie—540-905-9482 QualitySocilized RegPups Blk&Wht BlueMerle TrueBlue&Wht see faithridge bordercollies.com BOSTON TERRIER PUPS- AKC, shots, wormed $650 Male, $700 Female. micro-chipping available. 8 weeks old. Call 540-788-4046 BOXERS- 8 weeks old, shots, vet checked, training started, parents on site
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LORTON/WOODBRIDGE 1800, 3450,5400 sq.ft w/ofc., good parking, good rate. 301-309-9500 Rockville GOOD RATE! 1200,1500,2400,3600 sq ft. with office. Good parking. 301-309-9500 SILVER SPRING GOOD RATE! 1360, 2660 & 5320 sq. ft. with office, good parking. 301-309-9500.

Churches & Halls
Largo Park-Church rent in ofc bldg. Up to 70-100 seat + classroom/ofc from $3,300/mo & up incl utiilities 301-322-8487 realtyserviceco.com

Wake up to home delivery

Roommates

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

208

Appliances Clothing, Shoes & Accessories

CAP HILL- Furnishd small rm for rent, $145/wk w/ DirecTV. 202-487-0282 Anytime,202-398-1781 After 5pm

WASHERS/ DRYERS/ RANGES/ REFRIGERATORS-Stackable, Warranty, Delivery. 301-537-3500

229
DC/NE-$700 Furn MBR Prof F. Sep Ba Shr kit. No Smoking , CAC. Near Metro. Utils incl. 202-241-0715 GEORGETOWN-Share House, Prof Fem. No smoking. Near Bus & shops, W/D. $730+ 1/3 util. 202-337-1308 NE/Ft Totten Metro- Prof. F to shr furn or unfurn BR, 4BR 2.5BA SFH. N/S, Cable, Wi-Fi, maid svc. CAC/heat $795/m incl utls. 202-494-3692 NE - Furn room, close to Metro, $160-$175/wk. Includes utilities & cable TV. Call 301-537-4710

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TRUSTEE'S SALE OF 43920 HICKORY CORNER TERRACE, UNIT 101, Ashburn, VA 20147 In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $259,980.00, with an annual interest rate of 6.0000% from HARRY L. REESE dated February 27, 2007, recorded among the land records of the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN as Deed Book/Instrument # 200702280015456 RECORDED FEBRUARY 28, 2007, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction on the courthouse steps in front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on May 10, 2011 at 3:30 PM, the property with improvements to wit: Unit 701, The Ridges at Belmont Country Club Condominium, together with any limited common element appurtenant thereto. AND further described in the above Deed of Trust. (Tax Map No. /62/M14P7/701/; PIN 083-17-9875001) THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in cash, certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustees may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced at sale. Loan type: Conventional. Trustee's File No. 10-209690D. PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O Shapiro & Burson, LLP, 13135 Lee Jackson Highway, Suite 201, Fairfax, VA 22033 (703-449-5800)

878

Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE 9 Kimberly Dr Stafford, VA 22554-7899 Stafford County

Children's Clothes- Save 60-70% on name brand kids clothes go to dandjkidsclothing.com

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In execution of a Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $350,400.00, dated July 13, 2005 recorded in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of the County Of Stafford, Virginia, in Instrument 050028410, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance to the Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia, on May 17, 2011 at 9:30 o'clock am the property described in said deed, located at the above address and briefly described as: Lot 53A, Section 7C, PARK RIDGE, with improvements thereon. TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sales price, whichever is lower, cash or certified check, will be required at the time of sale with settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of sale. Sale is subject to post sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, we advise you that this firm is a debt collector attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C., Substitute Trustee This is a communication from a debt collector. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (01-004992-11 / CONV) 5040Corporate Woods Drive#120 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 (757) 457-1460 - Call Between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.

Heavy Equipment, Machinery & Tools
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MD H MONTGOMERY CO.

Apartments Condos H Co-ops
BETHESDA BATTERY LANE 1 MONTH FREE RENT! 1BR $1485. 2BR $1685. util/pkg inc Walk to heart of Beth. 301-656-6279 BETHESDA STRATHMORE STREET 1 MONTH FREE RENT! 2BR $1710+ elec, Newly renov. KIT & BA, wlk hrt of Beth, 301-656-6279

A-1 STEEL CONTAINERS- For rental or sales or overseas shipping. Call Fannie at 1-800-714-5550.

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Apartments Condos H Co-ops
Laurel 301-490-3988

1 Brand New Queen Mattress—$95, Pillowtop Mattress and Box Set, New in Plastic w/ warranty, can deliver, 703-887-7666 1 Pillowtop Qn Matt Set $45! New in Plastic Can Del. 301-343-8630 3Pc king pillowtop matt set.$215New in plastic. 301-399-7870. Can del 5PC BDRM Cherry Set BRAND NEW—Still in Boxes, HB, Rails, Dresser, Mirror, NS, was $795 will take $395, can deliver, 703-887-7666 5PC Bedrm Cherry Set new in boxes $245 Can Deliver. 301-399-7870
Bedroom Set—Amazing Solid Wood Bedroom Set cherry never used, brand new factory sealedEnglish Dovetail. Original cost $3800 Will Sell for $895 Can Deliver Call Tom 202-558-2136

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Victory123

FOOD
wednesday , may
4, 2011 FIRST BITE

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Lincoln

Snack-size chicken potpies and other small plates at this new downtown spot. E3

Bags and baskets ready? See 2011 listings for farmers markets in the District, Maryland and Virginia. washingtonpost.com/food
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SUNDAY IN KIDSPOST

Young kitchen wizards
Oh, the fun kids have when they learn to cook.

EVY MAGES FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

MORE RECIPES Chorizo Carbonara E2 Lemon Couscous With Asparagus and Tomato E2

Mother’s Day recipes; Cinco de Mayo recipes; Spring Vegetable and Shrimp Risotto ONLINE

PHOTOS BY SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST

Diane Gross, co-owner of Cork Wine Bar and Cork Market and Tasting Room in Logan Circle, brings her 7-month-old son, Marley Pitts, to work each day.

A lift in their day
How four new restaurant moms are coping with babies and dinnertime

BY

S TEFANIE G ANS

Special to The Washington Post

With the aplomb of a multi-tasking mother, Diane Gross shifts her 7-monthold son, Marley, from hip to counter as she sniffs a glass of Raptor Ridge Pinot Gris, all the while listening to the cellar master from Oregon pitching New World wines for her modern shop, Cork Market & Tasting Room in Logan Circle. “I always let him smell, too,” she says as the baby tries to lock his lips on the rim. “It’s about the curiosity.” Marley nuzzles his head into her neck as his mom takes a sip, swirls it in her mouth and spits. The arrangement seems to work for the both of them. “You get to make up your rules,” Gross says about managing the roles of hands-

on mom and co-owner with her husband of the market and the restaurant across the street, Cork Wine Bar. “Restaurants are hard, because of the hours and how much you work. But you can bring your baby to work, and as long as he’s not screaming, everybody thinks he’s cute and nobody really cares.” Gross’s assessment is spot on, as demonstrated by the wine rep tickling Marley’s feet and Cork’s accountant asking, “Can I hold him? I need my baby fix!” This weekend, Gross, 41, and several other new Washington moms in the restaurant business will mark their first Mother’s Day — most likely on the job. The holiday is yet another thing Gross must fit into her busy schedule. As mothers continued on E6

RECIPES  Pasta With Merguez and Greens pictured above, E6  Chicken and Rice Bake ONLINE  Not Enough Thyme Chicken Fricassee E6  White Rice and Miso Soup ONLINE

Adria is fading. Arzak still inspires.

BY

A NDREAS V IESTAD

Special to The Washington Post

JOSE LOPEZ

At Arzak, as two liquids are combined to make a dessert syrup, a fractal forms.
RECIPES 
Garlic Wafers E6  Monkfish With Almond Marinade ONLINE

SAN SEBASTIAN, Spain — The waiter places a plate of clear, viscous liquid before me. From a small mug, he pours a red liquid into the clear one. I expect the mixture to turn pink; instead, the cardinal-colored liquid spreads, forming seemingly irregular shapes. It branches again and again, until a pattern emerges. In every new branch there is a copy of the larger form, as in a snow crystal or a coral; it is a miniature image of eterTHE GASTRONOMER nity. In just a few seconds, a perfect geometric form has emerged — a fractal — with thousands of small details, more exacting than a human hand could draw. It is possibly the most beautiful dish I have ever seen, and it leaves me stunned and speechless, afraid to touch it. Then the waiter tucks a spoon into the liquid, fills the spoon and pours the liquid over a lemon tart, breaking the form. As I eat, I keep wondering what happened, amazed that something so beautiful can appear and disappear so fast. Then the meal at Restaurante Arzak continues. In 1989, Arzak became the first place in Spain to achieve three Michelin stars. It was a turning point, heralding the start of the new Spanish gastronomy and the beginning of the end of French hegemony. Chef Juan Mari Arzak challenged the gastronomer continued on E4

Not a boiled potato on the plate
Inside chef Cathal Armstrong’s authentic, inventive Celtic banquet
BY

T IM C ARMAN

A level below the ornate ballroom at Capitale, a 19th-century beaux-arts events space in Manhattan, Cathal Armstrong is pounding a bottle of San Pellegrino mineral water. His face is covered with a thin sheen as beads of perspiration work their way down his forehead and cheeks. It’s hot as a Bronx subway platform in August in this subterranean kitchen. Armstrong has just finished a task that he would never, not even in his most fevered dream state, undertake at Restaurant Eve, his intimate, airtight operation in Alexandria: He was part of a production line that plated about 350 entrees of braised lamb shoulder with medallions of roasted loin. Armstrong gave himself the job of placing the slices of seared, peppercrusted loin atop the braised meat and root vegetables. They knocked out those entrees in about 20 minutes. Now Armstrong looks wiped, but in that pleasurable way in which the body is tapped out but the brain is flushed with endorphins. The chef seems almost giddy. Or as giddy as this dry, driven Dublin

HELAYNE SEIDMAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

native gets. “It’s exhausting. It’s fun,” Armstrong says between chugs of mineral water. “It’s not everyday, thank God.” You might be wondering why a fourstar chef and multiple James Beard Foundation Award nominee would put himself through such banquet hell. The answer is simple: Armstrong wanted to prove that Irish cuisine isn’t just stews, colcannon, boxty, chips, fadge and all those other dishes with potatoes coming out of their ears. The Archaeological irish continued on E4

Plate this way: Chef Cathal Armstrong of Alexandria’s Restaurant Eve shows the kitchen crew at a Manhattan banquet hall how to arrange the main course — braised lamb shoulder with roasted lamb loin medallions — for his Celtic feast.

Victory123 E2

Quick/healthful

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EE

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Chorizo Carbonara
4 servings

This dish is so simple and cross-culturally clever, we’ll look the other way when it comes to the nutritional information. Its author, British food writer Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, makes his own version of chorizo sausage and keeps it in the refrigerator as a pantry staple (see NOTE, below). If you have a little extra time, make some; here, we used fresh chorizo from the meat department, without the casings. The recipe can be easily cut in half. Serve with a salad of thinly sliced fennel and orange slices. This recipe calls for raw egg yolks. If you are concerned about the risk of salmonella, buy pasteurized eggs, available in select supermarkets. Adapted from Fearnley-Whittingstall’s “River Cottage Every Day” (Ten Speed Press, 2011).
INGREDIENTS
· Kosher salt · 8 ounces dried multi-grain spaghetti or linguine · 1 tablespoon olive oil · 1 pound (approximately 2 cups) fresh chorizo (may substitute 12 ounces cured chorizo, cut into very small dice) · 3 large egg yolks · 3/4 cup heavy cream (may substitute low-fat milk) · Freshly ground black pepper medium-high heat. Add a generous pinch of salt, then add the pasta and cook according to the package directions. Drain; return the empty pot to the just-used burner on the stove (turned off). · Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet (preferably nonstick) over medium heat. Slit and discard the chorizo casings. · Add the chorizo to the skillet in pinches; cook for about 15 minutes, stirring with a wooden spoon to break up clumps. As it fries, the sausage should form succulent little nuggets and crumbs, with crisped edges.

30
MINUTES

DINNER IN

with a tight-fitting lid. Use your clean hands to blend the mixture thoroughly. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to 1 week. To cook the chorizo, shape it into small patties, take pinches of the mixture or roll it into meatballs; fry in a skillet until cooked through.
NUTRITION | Per serving (with cream): 950 calories, 40 g protein, 42 g carbohydrates, 69 g fat, 28 g saturated fat, 320 mg cholesterol, 1570 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 2 g sugar Per serving (with low-fat milk): 820 calories, 41 g protein, 43 g carbohydrates, 53 g fat, 19 g saturated fat, 260 mg cholesterol, 1570 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 4 g sugar

MARK GAIL/THE WASHINGTON POST

DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

STEPS
· Bring a pot of water to a boil over

· Beat the egg yolks and cream together in a liquid measuring cup; season lightly with pepper to taste. · Return the drained pasta to the (empty) pot it was cooked in, then tip in the chorizo and a little of its rendered fat in the skillet. Use 2 forks to stir in the egg yolk-cream mixture so that a lightly colored sauce forms and the pasta is evenly coated. · Divide among individual plates; sprinkle each portion generously

with pepper. Serve hot. · NOTE: To make the author’s version of chorizo, combine 11/2 pounds of coarsely ground pork shoulder, 1 tablespoon of sweet smoked Spanish paprika, 2 teaspoons of hot smoked Spanish paprika, 2 finely chopped cloves of garlic, 2 teaspoons of fine sea salt, 11/2 teaspoons of fennel seed, 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper, 1/4 cup of red wine and freshly ground black pepper to taste in a plastic container

Lemon Couscous With Asparagus and Tomato
Bonnie S. Benwick, The Post’s deputy Food editor, tested this recipe. Questions? E-mail her at food@washpost.com. Have a quickdinner recipe that works for you? Send it along, too.
Makes 5 cups (8 servings)

6

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This side dish is great for an easy warm-weather meal. Just add grilled meat or fish. To keep things simple, buy medium-thick aswhose NOURISH paragus spears are all about the same size. This is best served right after it is made; otherwise, the lemon juice will discolor the asparagus. — Stephanie Witt Sedgwick
INGREDIENTS
· 1 cup plain dried quick-cooking couscous · 12 ounces asparagus, tough ends removed · 2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and cut into 1/3-inch dice (each tomato 6 ounces, 1 cup diced; see NOTE) · Finely grated zest and freshly squeezed juice of 2 lemons (2 tablespoons zest, 1/3 to 1/2 cup juice) · 2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil · 3 tablespoons chopped parsley · Salt · Freshly ground black pepper

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STEPS
· Prepare the couscous according to the package directions. Make sure to fluff and separate the grains when the couscous is done. Transfer to a large bowl. · Fill a large bowl with ice water. Bring a shallow pan of lightly salted water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the asparagus and cook for 4 to 6 minutes, just until tender. Transfer the asparagus to the ice water; cool for 5 minutes. Remove and dry the spears; cut into 1/2-inch lengths. · Add the following to the couscous: the cut asparagus, tomatoes, lemon zest and juice, 2 tablespoons of the oil, the parsley and salt and pepper to taste; toss to combine. Taste, and adjust the seasoning as needed. If the couscous seems dry, add the remaining tablespoon of oil. · Serve immediately. · NOTE: To peel tomatoes, use a small, sharp knife to cut an X in the bottom of each one. Drop them into a large bowl of just-boiled water; let sit for a few minutes. You should see the peel start to curl where the X is. Transfer to a bowl of cold water or let cool, then discard the peel. Cut the peeled tomatoes in half; gently squeeze to release and discard the seed gel in each half.
NUTRITION | Per serving: 130 calories, 4 g protein, 20 g carbohydrates, 4 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 40 mg sodium, 2 g dietary fiber, 2 g sugar Recipe tested by Stephanie Witt Sedgwick; email questions to food@washpost.com

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Top 5 readers’ recipe picks
Desserts and entrees are what readers were searching for in our Recipe Finder in April. Here are the top five most-viewed recipes online: 1. Georgetown Cupcake’s Chocolate Ganache Cupcakes. Need we say it? A fan favorite with staying power; winner of our 2008 Cupcake Wars. 2. Kolambi Kaju Curry. A Dinner in Minutes based on a dish from “How to Cook Indian” by master Indian chef Sanjeev Kapoor. 3. Lemon Layer Cake. A light, dairy-free Passover dessert from Paula Shoyer. 4. Olive Chicken Provencal. This French main course takes about 20 minutes in the pressure cooker; it was featured in the Washington Cooks column and is from Potomac cook Michele Arnaud. 5. Panko-Crusted Cod. A kidfriendly, healthful recipe from the Nourish archives; it also popped up on March’s most-viewed list.
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Editor: Joe Yonan • Deputy Editor: Bonnie S. Benwick • Art Director: Marty Barrick • Staff Writer: Tim Carman • Editorial Assistants: Becky Krystal, Timothy R. Smith • To contact us: E-mail food@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-7575 Mail: Food Section, The Washington Post, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071

FOOD

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

KLMNO
TOM SIETSEMA
First Bite

MG EE

Restaurants
GOOD TO GO

E3

Lincoln logs some early successes downtown
lan Popovsky plans to award $250 to the customer who can guess exactly how many pennies pave the floor of the main dining room in his new downtown restaurant, Lincoln. Here’s a hint, courtesy of the owner: The space is roughly 3,200 square feet. You’d never know that the fancy Il Mulino last occupied these quarters. Lincoln, inspired by the 16th U.S. president, is everything its predecessor was not. Once you take your eyes off the copper-colored floor, you’ll notice the colorful acrylic paintings of Lincoln on the wall, the clear water jugs doubling as light fixtures and an outsize white leather chair, a softer version of the famous perch supporting a marble president at the Lincoln Memorial. While researching the 1860s, Popovsky says, he learned that Civil War soldiers in the field ate some of their food from glass containers. Hence a reliance on Mason and other jars at Lincoln, where blackberry lemonade as well as pickled beets topped with mascarpone show up in jars. The evening menu features small plates, many of them meatless and shareable. “I want to reach out to the vegetarians in town,” explains Popovsky. To that end, chef Demetrio Zavala, who comes to Lincoln from Hudson, Popovsky’s West End restaurant, offers spaghetti squash gratin, gnocchi with ramps and asparagus, and a salad that feels

A

JUANA ARIAS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Carnivore Quinn Wallis opened vegetarian-vegan Maoz because people need “a little less meat in our meals.”

Maoz Vegetarian on M Street NW
Entering Maoz Vegetarian on M Street NW is like stepping inside a head of lettuce. Green abounds — on the walls, the ceiling, the tray mats, the windowpanes. It’s a fitting gesture to the fare. A Dutch chain with outlets in Europe and North America, Maoz specializes in vegetarian and vegan fast food. Its staple is falafel sandwiches in soft pita envelopes. Quinn Wallis, 28, a former University of Maryland student, opened the District location in November 2009. He’d discovered Maoz while studying in Barcelona about six years ago. “I am not a vegetarian, but I have the belief we can all do a little better by having a little less meat in our meals,” Wallis says. Occupying a red-brick rowhouse, the dining room, with bench seating, is small but packed. At lunchtime on a recent Wednesday, the line of customers stretched to the door and stayed constant throughout the fairly steady service. My usual vegetable intake consists of a patch of lettuce on a hamburger. I have long held doubts that I would ever enjoy a meatless meal. Although Maoz’s menu is fairly short, it presented no carnivore’s dilemma. My verdict: Pick anything. It’ll be good. There are five main items on the menu: the falafel sandwich ($5.25), a salad box with falafel ($8.35), pita with salad ($4.95), egg and eggplant pita ($5.85) and a junior falafel sandwich (half a pita, $4.85). Customers get an option of white or whole-wheat pita. Eight side items include crunchy McCain-brand thick-cut, skin-on Belgian fries and tangy sweet potato fries, which you can also order as a combo. The most popular choice is Meal Deal 1 ($9.15), a falafel sandwich with eggplant and hummus, Belgian fries and a beverage. The pristine salad bar showcased colors as vibrant as an artist’s primary palette: pickled eggplants a luscious pink, beets a lovely claret, verdant tabbouleh. The sauces are made on-site, as are the falafel, which are glutenfree and fried in a vegetable-soy oil blend, and the lemonade and iced tea. (Try the apple-gingermint; $2.25.) I was reluctant to order the vegan rice pudding (also housemade; $3.50) but was glad I did. Dusted with cinnamon, it tasted like chilled, creamy oatmeal. Most striking to me was the heartiness of my meals there. Unlike a trip to other fast-food joints, a stop at Maoz can leave one satiated without grease in the plumbing or remorse for overindulging.
— Timothy R. Smith Maoz Vegetarian 1817 M St. NW. 202-290-3117. www.maozusa.com. Hours: Mondays through Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

PHOTOS BY JAMES M. THRESHER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

At Lincoln, the face of Honest Abe hangs on the walls and covers the floor in a coppery mosaic.

both indulgent and healthful: thin ribbons of kale tossed with toasted hazelnuts, dried cranberries and a lemon vinaigrette. Zavala’s snack-size chicken potpie is as pretty as it is pleasing, and beef eaters are welcomed with sliced tenderloin served with creamed spinach. Lunch is bolstered by entrees (fish and chips, strip steak with fries) because “people don’t want to share their food at lunch,” says Popovsky.

This fresh face should find a better bread source and rethink its sad cheese board. Not all servers are created equal; my last waiter managed to interrupt in all the wrong places. In a part of town where interesting food is lacking, however, Lincoln is liberating.
sietsemat@washpost.com In a nod to 1860s custom, pickled beets and other dishes come to the table in glass jars. 1110 Vermont Ave. NW, 202-386-9200. www. lincolnrestaurant-dc.com. Small plates and sandwiches, $7 to $15.

DISH
Excerpted from the Going Out Gurus blog: washingtonpost. com/going-out-gurus-blog: FRENCH TWIST: Jacques Haeringer says he’s making the venerable L’Auberge Chez Francois — popular for its Alsatian setting and six-course dinner menu — more accessible for the chef ’s “friends and neighbors who would like to come more often” by opening Jacques’ Brasserie below the
A Washington Landmark Since 1875

formal restaurant in Great Falls. The 30-seat dining room and lounge (yes, the restaurant now has a bar) quietly opened Easter weekend and serves tartes flambees, lobster bisque, fresh oysters, hanger steak, chicken in wine sauce and trout with almonds Tuesday through Sunday evenings. L’Auberge Chez Francois has been offering something similar since November in its back dining room. The idea to move
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the concept to a spot of its own followed the death last June of Haeringer’s father, Francois, who opened the original L’Auberge Chez Francois in Washington in 1954 and continued to be a presence in the kitchen of the relocated restaurant until his passing at age 91. Why a brasserie now? “Dad didn’t want to do it before,” explains his son. “He didn’t want to change
WED. THURS. FRI. SAT. SUN. MON. TUES.

anything.” Chef Jacques, who didn’t always see eye to eye with his father, says “we got a little self-important over the years” by not offering something more approachable. The formal restaurant’s prix-fixe dinners cost $58 to $74 exclusive of drinks, tax and gratuity. Entree prices in the brasserie, open from 5 to 9 p.m., run from $15 to $26. For reservations, call 703-759-3800.
— Tom Sietsema

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J Lohr-Cabernet Seven Oaks.........10.97 J Lohr-Chardonnay Riverstone.........8.97 Kim Crawford-Sauvignon Blanc......11.97 Korbel-Brut,Extra Dry ...................10.97 Mark West-Pinot Noir .....................8.97 Martini & Rossi-Asti......................12.97 Meridian-Chard,Cab,Merlot .............6.97 Ravenswood-Vintner’s Zin,Cab,Mer ..6.97 Rodney Strong-Cab,Mer Sonoma ..14.97

Santa Margherita-PG Alto Adige .....18.97 Sterling Vintner’s-Cab,Merlot............9.97 Toasted Head-Chardonnay ..............9.97 Veuve Clicquot-Brut NV ................37.97 Yellow Tail-Chard,Cab,Merlot,Shiraz ..5.49 Barefoot Cellars--Cab,Chard,Mer,Mosc .. 8.97 Cavit--Pinot Grigio................................ 8.97 Woodbridge--Chard,Cab,Merlot,PN .... 8.97

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Capt. Morgan 1.75 L Cuervo Tequila 750 ml 15.99 1.75 L 39.99 1 L 24.99 15.99 1 L 18.99 20.99 1 L 21.99 29.99 1.75 L 1.75 L Cuervo Malibu Golden Margarita Woodford Reserve Bombay Fris Vodka Beefeater Absolut All Flavors Jameson 750 ml 17.99 750 ml 24.99 750 ml 36.99 27.99 750 ml 9.99 1.75 L 16.99 1.75 L 19.99 1.75 L 23.99 1.75 L Fris Vodka Beefeater Jameson Absolut All Flavors Pinnacle All Flavors Maker’s Glenfiddich Svedka All Flavors 750 ml ml 750 ml 29.99 750 ml 35.99 750 18.99 32.99 All12.99 1 L 10.99 750 ml 14.99 12yr old 18.99 1.75 L Firefly Belvedere Flavors Skyy All Flavors Sweet Tea Vodka Svedka All Flavors
• Cristalino......................................... 6.99 • Gruet Brut.......12.99 • Bouvet....... 10.99 • Mionetto or Riondo ........................ 11.99 • Zardetto.....12.99 • Gloria Ferrer.... 14.99 • Roederer Est Rose...21.99 • Brut... 17.99 • Dom Carneros Brut........................ 19.99 • Perrier Jouet Brut .......................... 29.99 • MummNapa…14.99 • MummCordonRouge... 29.99

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SEAFOOD WINES Brancott Sauv Blanc ................................. 7.99 1.75 L 26.99 Stellina Di Notte Pinot Grigio .................... 9.99 1.75 L 17.99 Ferrari Carano Chard 18.99 Fume........ 11.99 Smirnoff Vodka Pine Ridge Chenin Blanc (WA 90) ........... 12.99 Chivas Crios Torrontes (WA91).......................... 13.99 750 ml 49.99 26.99 1.75 L SMELL THE ROSES Chivas BT Syrah Rose CH Montaud Rose Balvenie 12Yr 750 ml 8.99 10.99 36.99
34.99 Glenlivet 12Yr
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1999

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3299

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Absolut 1.75L............................. 25.99 Bailey’s-Irish Cream 750ml ........... 17.99 Beefeater 1.75L.......................... 25.99 Bombay Sapphire 1.75L .............. 32.99 Burnett’s-Vodka 1.75L................. 11.49 Crown Royal 1.75L ..................... 37.99 Grey Goose 750ml ...................... 27.99

Jack Daniel’s-Black 1.75L............ 37.99 Jim Beam 1.75L......................... 25.99 Johnnie Walker-Red 1.75L ........... 31.99 Jose Cuervo-Gold 1.75L.............. 27.99 Kahlua 750ml ............................. 13.99 Ketel One 1.75L ......................... 37.99 Maker’s Mark 1.75L .................... 42.99

Malibu-Coconut Rum 1.75L ......... 17.99 Patron-Silver 750ml..................... 39.99 Seagram’s-7 1.75L..................... 13.99 Seagram’s-VO 1.75L................... 17.99 Skyy 1.75L ................................ 21.99 Svedka 1.75L............................. 17.99 Tanqueray Gin 1.75L ................... 29.99

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• Vendange-Citra ..........................6.99 • Sutter Home ...................................8.99 • Jacob’s Creek ........................................9.99 • Cavit…9.99 • Fontana Candida... 9.99 • Yellowtail-Bolla ............................9.99 • Franzia-Almaden Generics ..........11.99

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Victory123 E4

MG

EE

KLMNO
But it is unique in that father and daughter have managed what most modernist cooks struggle to do: combine modern technology and classical cooking. At El Bulli, the kitchen did not just look like a lab, it was a lab, with no pots or ovens to be seen, and eating the food — though sublime — was less like dining than like being subjected to an experiment that pushed the boundaries of the possible. At Arzak, the technology — whether it is a centrifuge, a siphon or Adria’s arsenal of culinary additives, such as the xanthan gum used to create the fractal — is there to make the food possible. The food is never served just to showcase the technology, to prove a point. After all, the fractal, which was inspired by the mathematics of Yale professor Benoit Mandelbrot, tastes of birch syrup and ends up being married to a quite recognizable and spectacularly delicious lemon tart. Much research work is still being done downstairs, in the traditional kitchen, where there are flames and pots and fumes. Even in the most elaborate dish, such as the still life representing a beach, with edible starfish and shells, there is something simple to be learned. In

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Arzak goes for taste, not technology
gastronomer from E1 French supremacy by using Spanish and Basque ingredients and new methods. By inventing new classics and reinterpreting old ones, he has playfully and quietly moved the boundaries of gastronomy. He didn’t get to the top by adhering to tradition — or even rebelling against it — but by being himself: proudly Basque, and more emotional than technical. Unlike at Arzak, the aim of El Bulli, Ferran Adria’s celebrated avant-garde restaurant outside Barcelona, has been not so much to please as to innovate. And when Adria closes his restaurant this year after more than a decade, it might be interpreted as a sign that his kind of cuisine has come to the end of the line. After spherification, foams, garlic-andalmond sorbet and “Kellogg’s Paella,” what would come next? What could come? Flying saucers? Is this the end of the new Spanish cuisine or, indeed, of modern cuisine, as its detractors claim? Did the revolution eat itself ? Meanwhile, Juan Mari Arzak and his daughter, Elena, have managed to keep their three stars, and the food is still playful and surprising. With the closing of El Bulli and the death in February of Adria’s fierce anti-modernist arch-rival, Santi Santamaria, Arzak will be considered arguably Spain’s finest restaurant, once again in the spotlight. This restaurant, not married to the ideology of modernism, might nonetheless show what the future holds for modern cuisine. When we look back on the Adria-dominated decade of modernist cooking, I am sure it will be seen as transformative, even revolutionary. I also think it will be seen as an anomaly, with its focus on technology over taste, method over result. You didn’t have to like the food as long as you knew that it was something the world had never seen before. (Although I enjoyed them tremendously when I had them at El Bulli, I am pretty sure people will not be eating artificial olives 50 years from now, if they can avoid it.) Throughout this time of upheaval, the Arzaks have stuck to their own formula. That is made clear as Juan Mari shows me around the old building on the outskirts of San Sebastian that houses the restaurant. Here tradition and innovation, history and revolution can be found side by side. Or, to be more precise, in adjacent rooms. “This is where I was born, in the restaurant,” Juan Mari says as he stops to catch his breath on the way up a flight of stairs. Then he leads me through the enormous wine cellar, where more than 100,000 bottles are aging and waiting for wealthy buyers. Some have been there as long as Juan Mari himself. Up another flight of stairs, we enter an apartment that is fitted out like a laboratory, where Igor Zalacain finds solutions to Juan Mari and Elena’s wishes. When Juan Mari has tasted green rice from Vietnam and wants to create something similar with local ingredients, he sits down with Zalacain, and they find a way to infuse Spanish rice with parsley using extractor centrifuges and pressurized chambers. The rice is then dried and rolled. The result does not look much like the Vietnamese rice that gave birth to the idea; it is something new and original. Arzak does not boast the most innovative cooking on the planet.

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Camarena Reposado or Silver 1.75L $29.99 Conquistador Gld or White 1.75L $18.99 Margaritaville Gld or Sil 1.75L Sauza Bl or Ex Gold Jose Cuervo Black Cabo Wabo Blanco Cabo Wabo Anejo Cazadores Anejo Cazadores Blanco Cazadores Reposado Corazon Agave Anejo Corazon Agave Blanco 1.75L Liter $21.99 $20.99 $21.99

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Corralejo Reposado Corralejo Anejo Don Eduardo Anejo Don Julio Anejo Don Julio Reposado Don Julio Silver El Mayor Anejo El Mayor Reposado Herradura Anejo Herradura Reposado Jose Cuervo Gld or Sil Milagro Silver Milagro Anejo Monte Alban Mezcal Reserva 1800 Silver

this case, Juan Mari is particularly proud of the method used to marinate and cook a piece of monkfish, something that demands no special equipment or training (see recipe at right). And among Elena’s all-time favorites are the three-ingredient garlic wafers that can be used “for almost everything” (recipe, Page E6). “Everything that is traditional has once been new,” Juan Mari says. “And everything that is new will one day be traditional. Or just old.” The aim of their food, father and daughter explain after dinner, is the same as it has always been: to satisfy. “We consider cooking to be much more of an emotional process than just technical,” Juan Mari says. He gets most of his inspiration from everyday things, such as the color of the garb worn by Peruvian musicians, the shape of ancient stone monuments dotting the landscape, a whiff of coffee when searing foie gras (and those last three come together in a strange and wonderful starter). He always has. What is different now is that the toolbox he uses to realize such ideas is vastly expanded.
food@washpost.com

750ml $26.99 750ml $34.99 750ml $32.99 750ml $41.99 750ml $35.99 750ml $34.99 750ml $29.99 750ml $26.99 750ml $31.99 750ml $26.99 750ml $14.49 750ml $21.99 750ml $31.99 750ml $15.99 750ml $19.99

Irish eyes, and not a potato in sight
irish from E1 Institute of America asked Armstrong if he’d be game to create his interpretation of an ancient Celtic dinner for its annual gala, and the chef gladly accepted. But even though Armstrong agreed to plan the meal for the country’s oldest and largest archaeological organization, he could have done what other chefs had before him: just consult on a menu and never show up for the actual event. Guest chefs for the previous two AIA galas, which featured Mayan cuisine and the foods of Peru, were not asked to make an appearance, because Capitale requires its kitchen to cook all meals. But Armstrong was not about to accept those conditions. He asked for and was granted an exception to the rule. He had learned his lesson in that regard. Last year, at a Jewish Council for the Aging program honoring The Washington Post’s retired food critic Phyllis Richman, Armstrong and other prominent D.C.-area chefs were asked to contribute recipes for early-evening hors d’oeuvres. He handed the cooks at a local hotel the instructions for his leek mini-tarts. He can’t remember what they did with his dish, or even whether they cooked it, but he recalls watching in horror as plate after plate of mediocre banquet fare was ultimately served to the best culinary minds in the region, including Bryan Voltaggio of Volt and Michel Richard of Citronelle. The evening left an impression. The chef had no intention of placing his reputation in the hands of others for the AIA dinner, where the master of ceremonies would be Gabriel Byrne, an archaeologist-turned-actor and now official cultural ambassador for Ireland. “Any time I’m going to put my name on something, I’ve got to make sure it’s hands-on,” Armstrong says as he methodically spoons fennel puree on a sea of white plates in the Capitale basement. “It’s my food.” Several weeks before the gala, Armstrong had made a trip to New York to inspect the Capitale kitchen and meet its 35-member crew, headed by executive chefs Osvaldo Garrido and Jason Munger. At Capitale, the chef found next to nothing that would limit him creatively. Instead, the limitations would come from the sheer scale of banquet cooking. Armstrong needed to plan a menu that could be largely prepped ahead of time and would avoid ingredients that ran afoul of the many dietary restrictions among the well-heeled guests. The AIA had forwarded the chef a list of potential ingredients for the ancient dinner but left it up to Armstrong to develop the menu. Armstrong, only half-seriously, was tempted to place platters of spit-roasted rabbit, birds and wild boar on the banquet tables, but he realized the absurdity of asking black-tie guests to break off hunks of meat and eat with their hands. Instead, he opted for less dramatic approaches to authenticity: For one, he banned the potato from the menu, if only to dodge cracks such as the one Colman Andrews reprises in his book “The Country Cooking of Ireland” (Chronicle Books, 2009): “An Irish seven-course dinner, went the old joke, was a potato and a six-pack of Guinness.” In the same vein, Armstrong said, “I didn’t want to do salmon.” Instead, he devised a threecourse meal that opened with a smoked mackerel salad with wild garlic, dandelion greens, fennel puree and pickled fennel. (“In medieval Ireland,” noted the menu description, “fennel was hung over doorways on Midsummer’s Eve to ward off evil spirits.”) The lamb course followed, served with barley wildflower-honey cakes. (The menu again: “. . . in ancient Ireland bees were associated with wisdom and were thought to be the messengers between our world and the spirit realm.”) Dessert was a trio of custards — mead, wild berry and apple-caramel. (“In Celtic mythology, it was said that a river of mead flowed through paradise and apples were used as a symbol of fruitfulness and healing.”) Armstrong swears that “the vast majority” of ingredients could have been found on the Emerald Isle back in the 4th century, way before the spud made its way to Ireland around the 16th century and then dominated the country’s cuisine, for better and for worse. “They didn’t have micro-arugula,” he says, “but they certainly had lamb, parsnips and carrots.” But if Armstrong’s ingredients were rooted in the past, some of his techniques, such as his sous-vide approach to preparing fennel, were clearly entrenched in the 21st century. A couple of days before he left for New York, Armstrong vacuum-sealed five pounds of fennel bulbs under the maximum pressure his Koch machine could apply, then cooked them in a water bath at 181 degrees for 45 minutes. “You get a more concentrated color and more flavor,” he said that afternoon at Eve. Armstrong would have preferred to sous-vide the carrots and parsnips in his lamb entree, too, but he didn’t have the capacity at Eve to cook the 50 pounds of root vegetables needed for 350 servings. Instead, he sauteed the carrots and parsnips in Kerrygold butter at Capitale. He also personally seasoned and seared each and every lamb loin at the New York venue, after chauffeuring the grass-fed Virginia lamb to the Big Apple himself. He did leave some work for the New York crew: He had more Virginia lamb shipped to Capitale, where Garrido and staff braised the shoulder meat for hours. The Capitale crew also got a rude surprise on April 26, the day of the gala: The mackerel fillets arrived late that morning — and with the pin bones still in them. A crew of four, including Armstrong, spent more than four hours cleaning, trimming and wood-smoking that fish. Capitale’s Garrido found Armstrong laid-back even under the trying circumstances of banquet cooking and late-arriving fillets. “He’s a very mellow chef,” he says. Up in the dining room, the official praise from the dais bordered on blarney. “Well done, Cathal,” noted Joe Byrne, the executive vice president of Tourism Ireland. “You did us . . . proud this evening.” The graying and bowtie-less Gabriel Byrne also had gracious things to say about Armstrong, calling him “an exquisite chef,” even though the actor had not yet tasted his meal — and hadn’t visited the chef ’s restaurant in Alexandria. The actor said he’d sampled Armstrong’s food while the chef was prepping the previous day. Whether that’s true was beside the point. This event was about rooting for the home team away from home, the Irish in America pulling for Ireland, that picturesque isle too often reduced to the land of leprechauns, Guinness, U2 and potatoes. In his way, Armstrong was one more cheerleader, personifying both past and future: a chef who embraces modern technology and French techniques but who knows that local, natural, farm-to-table ingredients are just part of his nature. Ireland, after all, never has had much taste for Big Ag. In this meal, you could see the beginnings of a modernist Irish cuisine, simultaneously ancient and forward-thinking. At least one impartial diner was impressed. Marshall Heyman writes the Heard & Scene column for the Wall Street Journal. He attends parties . . . well, he attends a lot of parties and banquets every month and isn’t one to pass out idle praise. “It was definitely one of the better meals [I’ve had],” Heyman said, “if not one of the top five.”
carmant@washpost.com

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HUNDREDS of Subject WINES and SPIRITS ON SALE to stock on hand. All items subject to prior sales. Some product not
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OTTERBEIN’S Cookies
Assorted Types 3.5oz

Chocolate Bars

Baltimore’s Best!
Assorted Types 8 oz

Typhoo
Reg 2/$4.00 Decaf $2.99ea

Tea 40 ct

Gourmet Salsas

MRS. RENFRO’S

XOCHITL
Corn Chips
All Natural
Yellow Corn or Organic Blue Corn 12 oz

Asst’d Types 16 oz

$2.99

$2.99

BUSSETO PLAINVILLE Turkey and Italian Style Ham Slices FARMS Salami Chubs All Natural - Local 7 oz $3.99
Assorted Types 8 oz

$1.79

$2.99

$3.99

FERRARA
Beans
Asst’d Types 15 oz

Dijon Mustard
7 oz 13.4 oz

MAILLE

Wine Specials

79¢

2/$5.00 $2.99ea 10/$10.00

Hummus

TRIBE

CASTELLANA
Italian Crostini
Asst’d Types 7 oz

• Wines 750 ml unless noted • Prices listed are for DC Only

Asst’d Types 8 oz

2/$5.00

Available at Wisc Ave & Rand Rd

Produce Specials

Packham Pears.................... 99¢ Lb Strawberries 1 Lb Box..... $2.49 Ea Navel Oranges “Sunkist”..... 2/88¢ Cantaloupes..................... $1.59 Ea Pineapples....................... $2.99 Ea Kiwi Fruit.............................. 3/99¢ BabyPeeledCarrots1LbBg $1.09 Ea Broccoli Crowns................ $1.27 Lb Cucumbers........................... 39¢ Ea Iceberg Lettuce................ $1.27 Ea Green or Yellow Squash ...... 99¢ Lb Idaho Potatoes 5 Lb Bag . $2.29 Ea

Seltzer Water
Assorted Flavors 1 Liter

2/$1.00 Singles $5.79 Case/12 $3.99

Goat Milk Cheese
From Sonoma, Ca
Assorted Types 3.5 - 5 oz

Pure

Laura Chenel’s Chevre

$2.99

Arborio Rice
2 Lb

Asst’d Types 6.3 - 25.4 oz

Instant Polenta
17.6 oz

Italian Savoiardi

Germany’s Favorite

$1.99

Lady Fingers

17 oz

2/$5.00 $2.99 - $7.99
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Sausage

ROGER & GALLET Boxed Soaps (Set of 3)
Great Gift For Mom, A Friend or... Treat Yourself 12 Lovely Fragrances To Choose From
Regular Price $19.99 - On Sale For Not Available at Randolph Rd - Limited Selections at White Flint

BEER SPECIALS

$14.99

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Peroni 6 packs $6.99.................. Cases $23.99 Pilsner Urquell, 6 packs.. $6.99 Bass Ale 6 packs............. $6.99 Dale’s Pale Ale 12 pks.. $13.99 Sol Case........................ $19.99 Spaten Asst types Case $19.99 Corona & Corona Light Case.................. $23.99 Victory Asst types Case......................... $29.99 Dominion Asst types Case..................... $23.99 Bud & Bud Light 24 pack cans............... $13.99 Stella Artois Case........ $22.99 Natural Light Case...... $10.99 Dos Equis Case............ $19.99 Tecate Case cans......... $16.99

• DC Store & Pharmacy - 5100 Wisconsin Ave., NW - Phone: 202.363.3466 • Wheaton, MD - 4301 Randolph Road (at Viers Mill Rd) - Phone: 301.946.3100 • North Kensington, MD - White Flint Plaza - 5148 Nicholson La - Phone 301.881.6253

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BLOCKBUSTERS Banfi Chianti Classico....................................... $9.99 Res. Chianti Classico..................................... $13.99 Campo Viejo Crianza........................................ $6.99 Reserva $9.99..................... Gran Reserva $14.99 Coppola Claret $13.99.............. Chardonnay $12.99 J Lohr Chardonnay $8.99........ Cab & Merlot $10.99 Casillero del Diablo Asst types............ $6.99 Rosenblum Richard Sauret Zinf.......... $19.99 RavenswoodVintnersBlendAssttypes $6.99 Chat Ste. Michellle Sauv. Blanc....... $6.99 Chardonnay $7.99 ........ Merlot $10.99 Indian Wells Cab or Merlot........ $12.99 MurphyGoodeSauv.Blanc&Chard $8.99 Estancia Chard $8.99 .......... Cab $10.99 Simi Chard $11.99.............. Cab $16.99 Franciscan Chard $10.99 .... Cab $16.99 Vendange Chard & Cab 1.5 liter..... $5.99 Yellow Tail Asst types 1.5 liter....... $8.99 Pinot Gris Pinot Grigio Acrobat................ $9.99 Mezzacorona........ $6.49 Estancia................ $9.99 Gabbiano............. $6.99 Kendall Jackson.. $13.99 Stellina................. $7.99 King Estate......... $13.99 Zenato................. $7.99 Benton Lane....... $14.99 Clos Du Bois......... $8.99 Las Perdices.......... $8.99 Kris...................... $9.99 Tiefenbrunner.... $12.99 SantaMargherita $17.99 PINOT NOIR SALE BV Coastal........... $5.99 Coppola.............. $13.99 Concannon ........... $6.99 Acrobat.............. $15.99 Blackstone ........... $7.99 Wild Horse.......... $15.99 Castle Rock Willamete......... $10.99 Saintsbury Garnett............ $16.99 Kenwood............ $10.99 WillametteValley $16.99 Chalone.............. $12.99 A to Z................. $17.99 Estancia.............. $12.99 Benton Lane....... $19.99 Mark West.......... $12.99 Steele Carneros.. $12.99 Orogeny............. $19.99 Thomas Henry.... $12.99 Adelsheim.......... $21.99 A by Acacia......... $13.99 Chehalem........... $24.99 CHAMPAGNE& SPARKLINGSALE Freixenet Cordon Negro................................... $6.99 Chat. Ste. Michelle................................ $8.99 Bouvet Brut......................................... $9.99 Gruet............................................. $12.99 Mumm’s Brut NV....................... $29.99 Perrier Jouet Brut NV........... $29.99 Roederer Brut NV............. $29.99 Veuve Clicquot................. $37.99

Victory123 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

KLMNO
WINE
Dave McIntyre

EZ EE

Drinks
SPIRITS
Jason Wilson

E5

Improvement can come by degrees
e tend to drink wine at the wrong temperature. Oh, here he goes again, making something needlessly complicated when it’s really quite simple: Serve white wines chilled, reds at room temperature. What could be easier? But that old maxim is too facile. I prefer to think in terms of a temperature range in which wine tastes best. Too cold, and a white loses its nuance; too warm, and a red tastes dull and flat. Both extremes, paradoxically, strip wine of its fruit flavors and accentuate the alcohol. The wrong serving temperature can throw a wine out of balance. Restaurants are particularly bad offenders when it comes to wine temperature, primarily because of storage limitations. If you want to play games with your servers, place your bottle of chardonnay on the table. See how quickly someone swoops by to plunk it back into its ice bath. To really flummox them, ask for an ice bucket for your red wine. It won’t need much time in there, just enough to create consternation about your sanity and what antics you might pull next. A few years ago I indulged in a temperature-controlled wine chiller, then abandoned that move into geekdom after it broke, its replacement broke and I refused to buy a third. Instead, until my collection of bottles outgrew it, I kept a small basement storage room at about 55 degrees and found that most whites tasted great straight from storage, while reds tended to be astringent but warmed quickly and tasted best when they were still noticeably cooler than room temperature. If I was organized, I’d take the reds out of the room about a half-hour before dinner. There were exceptions, of course. Roses and crisp whites benefited from time in the refrigerator, while lighter reds such as Beaujolais barely needed to warm up from storage temperature. So what is the best temperature range? Luckily, there is no need to stick a thermometer in your glass. Just remember some basic parameters. Refrigerator temperature is about 40 degrees, cellar temperature is 55 and room temperature 68 to 70. The optimal range for wine is 45 to 65 degrees. Within that range it helps to remember what wine you’re drinking. Roses, crisp whites such as pinot grigio or picpoul de pinet and simple sparkling wines such as cava or prosecco are best served well chilled and taste good just a few minutes out of the fridge. These also tend to be warm-weather wines that offer immediate refreshment. Complex whites such as chardonnay and champagne should be served only moderately chilled. With these wines, we need to balance refreshment with their subtleties (which is what we pay for, after all). About 30 to 45 minutes in the fridge or in an ice bath is enough; or if the wine has been numbed in the fridge, leave it at room temperature for about 20 minutes to let it start to get its circulation back. For reds, we can be more flexible. If you keep your wines in the coolest part of your house,

Not holy, but wholly extraordinary

W

Recession busters
rrrExceptional rrExcellent rVery Good
Prices are approximate. Check Winesearcher.com to verify availability, or ask a favorite wine store to order through a distributor.

H

Here are my monthly recommendations of notable wines that sell for $13 or less.  Simonnet-Febvre Saint-Bris 2009 rr Chablis, France, $11 Saint Bris is an enclave of sauvignon blanc in chardonnay-dominated Chablis. This wine, from a producer that seemingly can do no wrong, offers grassy sauvignon character with some of the richness of Chablis and Burgundy. The 2009 vintage is also quite ripe, giving the wine a little extra body.
M Touton Selection: Widely available in the District. Available in Maryland at Arundel Mills Wine & Spirits in Hanover; Bay Ridge Wine & Spirits in Annapolis; Bradley Food & Beverage and Georgetown Square Beer & Wine in Bethesda; Frederick Wine House, Old Farm Liquors and Viniferous in Frederick; Rosewick Wine & Spirits in La Plata; Silesia Liquors in Fort Washington; State Line Liquors in Elkton; the Wine Shoppe in Waldorf.

Ru Gavi di Gavi 2009 rr Piemonte, Italy, $13 This delightful wine is a prime example of why we should not serve whites too cold. At first sip, Gavi might not seem complex, but its apparent simplicity is deceptive. It has a bright beam of red currant fruit that emerges when the wine warms to just under room temperature. It’s sort of like when the sunlight hits the obelisk in “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Okay, well, maybe not that dramatic. It won’t drive apes to a frenzy or launch space missions, but it could be a celestial partner to your next fish dinner.
Siema: Available in the District at Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits, Zola Wine & Kitchen. Available in Maryland at Cork & Fork in Bethesda, Crush Winehouse in Annapolis, Viniferous in Frederick; on the list at Assaggi Restaurant Mozzarella Bar in Bethesda, Rustico Restaurant & Wine Bar in Stevensville. Available in Virginia at the Italian Store in Arlington, Market Street Wineshop and Wine Warehouse in Charlottesville; on the list at Zeffirelli in Herndon as well as several other restaurants in Virginia.

First Drop Wines the White One 2009/2010 rr South Australia, $14 An unusual blend, it combines the austere dryness of arneis, a crisp white grape from northern Italy, with the fleshiness of chardonnay. It grew on me throughout an evening: Don’t serve it too cold. The distributor recently changed to the 2010, both wines are available. There is also a nice red blend called the Red One that I can heartily recommend.
Nice Legs: Available in the District at Bell Wine & Spirits, Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits, D’Vines, S&R Liquors, U Street Mini Mart; on the list at Ulah Bistro. Available in Virginia at the Butcher’s Block and Rick’s Wine & Gourmet in Alexandria, Kybecca in Fredericksburg, the Organic Butcher and the Vineyard in McLean, Village Market & Bistro in Winchester, the Vineyard Table in Herndon, the Wine House in Fairfax; on the list at the Wine Kitchen in Leesburg.

Lavarini Valpolicella Classico 2009 r1/2 Veneto, Italy, $12 It’s a simple, juicy red, ideal for most weekday meals. There’s acidity to cleanse the palate, fruit to excite it, and just enough flavor to fuel the conversation without taking it over entirely. And most nights, that is precisely what we need in a wine.
J.W. Sieg: Available in the District at Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits; on the list at Clyde’s in Gallery Place and Georgetown, Old Ebbitt Grill and 1789. Available in Maryland at the Bottle Shop in Potomac, and Gilly’s Craft Beer & Fine Wine and King Farm Wine and Beer in Rockville; on the list at Clyde’s locations in Chevy Chase, Columbia, Tower Oaks. Available in Virginia at Unwined in Alexandria and Belleview; on the list at Clyde’s locations in Mark Center, Reston, Tysons Corner, Willow Creek Farm.

Bodegas Tintoralba BT Syrah Rose 2010 r1/2 Almansa, Spain, $10 The new vintage of roses is arriving just in time for warmer weather. This sappy sample from Spain is a deep red in color, with bright fruit and a slightly sweet finish. Not at all classic, but a crowd-pleaser.
Grapes of Spain/Elite: Available in the District at Circle Wine & Liquor, Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits, Connecticut Avenue Wine & Liquor; on the list at Hank’s Oyster Bar, Occidental Grill. Available in Virginia at Tivoli Gourmet in Arlington, Vino Market in Midlothian, the Wine House in Fairfax.

Bodegas Albae Tempranillo 2010 r Tierra de Castilla, Spain, $8 This straightforward tempranillo, unencumbered by oak, is another example of Spain’s powerful presence in the bargain-wine category. With grilling weather approaching, it is ideal for casual patio dining.
Dionysus: Available in the District at A. Litteri, Cork & Fork, Wagshal’s Market; on the list at Coppi’s, Policy. Available in Maryland at Balducci’s, Bethesda Market, Bethesda Chevy Chase Beer & Wine, Bradley Food & Beverage and Cork & Fork in Bethesda; Brookville Market and Chevy Chase Supermarket in Chevy Chase; Finewine.com and Grape Expectations in Gaithersburg; Germantown Beer & Wine; Iron Bridge Wine Co. in Columbia; Woodmoor Supermarket in Silver Spring. Available in Virginia at Balducci’s locations in Alexandria and McLean, Cork & Fork in Gainesville, Corks & Kegs in Richmond, Wine & Beer Westpark in Glen Allen, Fern Street Gourmet in Alexandria, Iron Bridge Wine Co. in Warrenton, Unwined in Alexandria and Belleview.

ere’s something you’ve probably never considered: Does bourbon taste better when it’s aged in barrels made of wood from the top of a white oak tree, or does it taste better in barrels made from the bottom of the tree? That’s the sort of issue you start pondering when you spend a couple of days hanging out with whiskey geeks. Which is precisely what I did last week in Frankfort, Ky., where Buffalo Trace Distillery unveiled a batch of bourbons that were the result of its super-secret, two-decadelong Project Holy Grail, which I wrote about in March. Like a boozy Lancelot, I must first report that I returned home from my pre-Derby trip to Kentucky bourbon country without exactly having tasted the Holy Grail. As Mark Brown, president of Sazerac Co., which owns Buffalo Trace, told the assembled journalists and critics: “Have we found the Holy Grail? No. Have we found clues? Maybe.” Those clues were revealed in the form of the limited-edition Single Oak Project, a collection of 90-proof bourbons that will sell for $46 per 375-ml bottle. Fewer than 400 bottles of each will be released, and 12 new bottlings will be released every quarter for the next four years. (To find some near you, call the distributor, Republic National, at 202-388-8400.) Now, plenty of distilleries release expensive, limitededition bottlings. But the Single Oak Project is unique and more noteworthy, for several reasons. More than a decade ago, Buffalo Trace went into the Missouri Ozarks to hand-select 96 trees. Those trees were split in half, then made into staves for 192 barrels, each tweaked according to numerous variables. Half of the barrels were air-dried for six months and half for 12 months. Some of the barrels were charred very dark, and some were charred lighter. Some barrels were filled with wheat-recipe bourbon, others were filled with ryerecipe bourbon; some of the contents was 105-proof, some was 125-proof. We can now see the resulting products, each aged eight years and labeled by barrel number. If the first batch is any clue, they are exquisite, with at least two of them, Barrel 131 and Barrel 68, among the finest bourbons I’ve ever tasted. As for whether the top or bottom of the tree makes a better bourbon: Barrel 131 was made from a top half and 68 from a bottom, so other factors, such as recipe and wood-grain size, are also in play. “We’re very serious about this,” said Harlan Wheatley, Buffalo Trace’s master distiller.

BUFFALO TRACE DISTILLERY

Bottles from the Single Oak Project are labeled by barrel number.

“We want to know whether a barrel is made from the top half or the bottom half of the tree. It makes a big difference.” Go ahead and roll your eyes if you must. But let me say here very clearly: It’s totally true. There are a lot of romantic, and exaggerated, tales in the spirits business. This is not one of them. After tasting the first dozen bourbons in the Single Oak Project, I was amazed by how much difference a single variable, such as wood-grain size or tree portion, makes. I tasted two bourbons, side by side, that had been distilled with the same recipe, put in the same proof and at the same time, and stored in similar warehouse locations. The bourbon that was stored in the barrel made from the top half of the tree had significantly different characteristics (fruitier, crisper, lighter) from the one from the bottom half of the tree (richer, with a deeper caramel color). In fact, once you’ve bought the whiskey and tasted it, you can log on to SingleOakProject.com and, after registering and rating, find out exactly which variables your barrel number possesses. Still, comprehensive as it is, the Single Oak Project doesn’t bring us to a Holy Grail. “You would need five quadrillion barrels to fully investigate all the variables,” said Sazerac’s Brown. For instance, Buffalo Trace has thus far isolated only 125 of the 300 possible chemical compounds in bourbon. “We looked at and dissected the ratings of top whiskey writers,” Brown told us. Then, in the tasting lab, the distillers investigated which chemical compounds caused certain flavors and aromas to occur. For instance, when a critic described a bourbon as “fruity” or “banana,” Buffalo Trace could tell that what he’d detected was most likely the presence of the chemical compound amyl acetate in whiskey. “So have you used that knowledge to fact-check your critics?” I asked. “Have you determined that certain aromas they describe can’t possibly be

in a certain bourbon because the chemical compound doesn’t exist in it?” “No, no,” said Brown, looking around at the writers in the room and chuckling nervously. “We trust the critics implicitly.” There were other chuckles in the room as well that might or might not have been nervous. Not all the compounds result in positive flavors and aromas. Brown shared with us a list of descriptors that Buffalo Trace tries to avoid in its whiskeymaking. “In no highly rated bourbon did the words ‘puke,’ ‘tar,’ ‘jasmine’ or ‘balsamic’ turn up in the review,” he said. Other descriptors they seek to avoid: blue cheese, popcorn, pumpkin, peanuts, celery and roses. I found the last of those — “roses” — interesting and a little confounding. Earlier in the day, I’d visited the nearby Four Roses distillery in Lawrenceburg. While there, I tasted the company’s delicious new limited-edition single-barrel bourbon. Everyone in the Four Roses tasting room, including me, was excited about the unique floral aroma that this bourbon exhibits — and that some people would describe as having a hint of . . . freshly cut roses. Which might prove that no matter how much science you throw at a project like this, a whiskey assessment will always come down to a subjective preference in the nose and mouth of the drinker. “This project actually raises more questions than it answers,” said Drew Mayville, Buffalo Trace’s master blender. “This is why we embarked on this project: to dispel myths, to learn new things. “Who knows if we’ll ever reach the Holy Grail? Or who knows; we just might get lucky one of these days.”
Wilson is the author of “Boozehound: On the Trail of the Rare, the Obscure, and the Overrated in Spirits” (Ten Speed Press, 2010). He can be reached at jason@jasonwilson.com. Follow him at twitter.com/boozecolumnist.
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Full Service Wine • Liquor • Deli @ Chevy Chase Circle LIMITED SUPPLY!! SAT. MAY 21ST • 1 - 4 P.M. 5626 Connecticut Ave., N.W.

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202-686-5271

Columbia Crest
they might be fine. But a halfhour in the door of the fridge won’t hurt and probably will help. That is especially true when outdoor temperatures soar, as heat and humidity seem to weigh down a big red wine. You don’t want to deny yourself a red in summer, after all, when there are steaks or burgers sizzling on the grill.
food@washpost.com
750 ML CHARD MERLOT
2 Vines

Di Majo
750 ML
92 POINTS! R. PARKER

Grand Veneur
C-D-R Reserve
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4.99

FULL SERVICE LA CHEESERIE & INTERNATIONAL DELI
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FINE WINES & SPIRITS
NOVA SCOTIA SALMON
$14.99
HAND SLICED TO ORDER!

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$7.99 LB. FINEST N.Y. STYLE LEAN REGULAR CUT $8.99 LB. EXTRA LEAN 1ST CUT $10.99 RARE $2.99

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Of The

PRE-SLICED PACKAGE

16.99

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OF WINE THE WEEK
2009 GRAN HAZAÑA OLD VINE GARNACHA CALATAYUD, SPAIN

Merryvale Chard ...12.99 • Cab..17.99 SimiChard•S.B.…11.99•Cabernet...16.99 J. Lohr Chard...9.99 • Cab • Mer....10.99 Cline Viognier • Zinfandel...........9.99 S. Blanc • Chard • Merlot 8.99 Zin • Pet. Sirah • Cabernet 9.99 Estancia Chard • P.G.…8.99 • Cab...10.99 Columbia Crest Grand Estate.......8.99 Clos Du Bois Chardonnay.............8.99 Mondavi Private Selection...........7.99 B.V.Coastal Chard•Cab•S.B.•Pinot...6.99

~Best Selling~

Bogle

H. B. Picpoul De Pinet..................6.99 ROUGE Mordoree C-D-Rhone.......................13.99 ROSE 90 PTS! Montebuena Rioja........................9.99 R. P. BEST BUY! R. P. Zenato Pinot Grigio.........................9.99 ASST'D Jip Jip Rocks..............................10.99 TYPES Kim Crawford Sauv. Blanc..........12.99

~Global Wine Values~ ~ Fire Up The Grill ~ ~Magnum Madness~
BEST BUY! WASH. POST Col DesVent Corbiere..................8.99 90 PTS! ShotfireShiraz•Quartage..............14.99 R.P. • W.S. GOLD MEDAL Ch. De La Lambertie...................12.99 CONCOURS 90 PTS! Finca Sobreño Crianza...............13.99 R. P. Di Majo. Sang •Ali Sangiovese...8.99 WHITE Ch. Suau Bordeaux.....................11.99 ROSE Hügl GrunerVeltliner.. . . . . . . . Ltr. 10.99 90 PTS! W. SPEC. Starborough Sauv. Blanc.............9.99 92 PTS! W. ENTH. San Polo Rubio ...........................13.99 BEST BUYS! Tapeña GarnachaTemp...............7.99 W. ENTH.
BEST BUY! R. PARKER

13.99

750 ML

11.99

Concha y Toro
1.5 LTR.
UP TO $12 MAIL REBATE

5.99

~Champagne/Bubbly~

WORLD
SALE REG
# # # # # # #

Sale Ends 5/10/11

5.99 6.99

# MANCHEGO (SPAIN)

PASTRAMI

8.99

LB.

ROAST BEEF
$9.99 LB. SAN FRANCISCO

7.99

BUSSETO SALAMIS

OZ. $5.99 LB. # FINE HAMS #

3.99

10

VA BAKED

$6.99 CITTERIO

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$12.99 LB # F I N E PAT E S #

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CAMPAGNE
AND

PORT WINE CHEDDAR (WIS-USA) 3.99 LB. CHEVRION (FRANCE) 9.99 LB. SPECIAL # CABOT CHEDDAR X SHARP (VT-USA) PURCHASE 6.49 LB. CAERPHILLY (ENGLAND) 9.99 LB. (FRANCE) TOMME de PYRENEES 9.99 LB. SPECIAL # BLUE d’AUVERGNE (FRANCE) PURCHASE 9.99 LB. ST. NECTAIRE (FRANCE) 9.99 LB. CAMBAZOLA (GERMANY) 11.99 LB. # JARLSBERG (NORWAY) 5.99 LB. FROMAGE d’AFFINOIS (FRANCE) 11.99 LB. TOMME de SAVOIE (FRANCE) 11.99 LB. SPECIAL # AMSTERDAM RESERVE (HOLLAND) PURCHASE 9.99 LB. IDIAZABAL (SPAIN) 16.99 LB. SOTTOCENERE AL TARTUFO (ITALY)16.99 LB. # GRUYERE (SWITZERLAND) 10.99 LB. HUMBOLT FOG (CA-USA) 16.99 LB. GRAYSON (VA-USA) 16.99 LB. # BELLETOILE 70% BRIE (FRANCE) 7.99 LB.

10.99 LB. 16.99 5.99 12.99 9.99 13.99 12.99 14.99 13.99 14.99 7.99 14.99 15.99 15.99 19.99 19.99 15.99 19.99 19.99 11.99
REGULAR

FOIE d’CANARD
$6.49 $7.49

MOUSSE TRUFFEE ALL REGULAR & 1/2
LB.

5.49

1/2 LB.

HOURS M-F 10-8:30 SAT 9:30-8:30

9.99 PRICED 6.49 LB DECAFFEINATED B COLOMBIAN PARK FREE ON OUR LOT O
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LB. $9.99 MORE THAN 30 TYPES ON SALE

COFFEE BEANS

FRESH

7.77

This 100% old vine Garnacha (Spanish for Grenache) from the undiscovered Calatayud region of Aragon, Spain, comes from 40- to 50-year-old vines planted on arid, unirrigated hillside vineyards. The vineyards look so stony, sparse and dry they make you thirsty just looking at them. Fortunately, the wine produced there is the perfect thirst quencher, loaded with oodles of juicy, upfront fruit that just seems to billow out from the glass in great puffy clouds of cherry, raspberry and grapy zest. The wine is fermented for 7 days at relatively high temperature, followed by 14 days maceration on the skins, methods which explain the glass coating, deep ruby/ purple color and saturated fruit flavors. Although this wine has great freshness and vivaciousness, it also proffers up a depth of tangy complexity that is delightful (and rare) to encounter in this price category.

Cutty Sark Stoli Vodka New Amsterdam Gin Captain Morgan 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 18.99 LTR. 21.99 LTR. 27.99 LTR. 15.99 LTR.
UP TO $5 MAIL REBATE UP TO $5 MAIL REBATE

P. Jouet • Mumm C. Rouge........29.99 Trouillard…24.99 • Bellefon........34.99 Billion…39.99 • L. Dauphin........27.99 RoedererEstate…16.99 • MummNapa...13.99 ClaraProsecco…13.99 • Ste.Michelle...8.99 ~Spirit Blockbusters~

Clos Du Bois Chardonnay............16.99 Milton Park Shiraz......................14.99 Beringer Fndr • Fat Bastard.......13.99 LaVielle Ferme • Ruffino...........12.99 Meridian • Santa Isabel..............11.99 Bella Sera • MestaTempranillo..10.99 LatourArdeche Chardonnay.......15.99 J. Creek • Rex Goliath • Cavit......9.99 Barefoot •Woodbridge................9.99 Stone Cellars •AliceWhite..........8.99 Citra •Vendange...........................6.99
Sale Ends 5/10/11

Jameson…36.99 • Bushmill.......31.99 Glenmorangie 10 Yr .........................69.99 Glenlivet 12 Yr ...62.99 • Dewar's...29.99 J. Walker Black…51.49 • Red....28.99 Chivas…48.99 • Ballantine.......22.99 Grant’s...21.99 • White Horse .....22.99 J & B…24.99 House of Stuart 13.99

~Scotch/Irish~

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Aberlour 12 Yr .............................35.99 Cardhu 12 Yr ...............................39.99 Chivas 18 Yr......................................49.99 Clynelish 14 Yr • Dahlwinnie 15 Yr ..41.99 Glenlivet 12 Yr .............................33.99 Glenrothes Select.......................36.99 J. Walker Gold 52.99 • Blue 149.99 Glenmorangie 10 Yr .....................31.99 Lagavulin 16 Yr • Oban 14 Yr........59.99 Laphroaig 10 Yr…43.99 • 1/4 Cask ..49.99 Macallan 12 Yr…43.99 • 18 Yr........ 149.99 RemyV.S.O.P....31.99 • FerrandAmbre...38.99 Courvoisier V.S.....19.99 • V.S.O.P......25.99 Hennessy V.S....25.99 • V.S.O.P.....39.99
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Victory123 E6

Recipes

EZ

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KLMNO

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

When motherhood is added to the menu
Pasta With Merguez and Greens
4 or 5 servings

It’s easy for Diane Gross of Cork Wine Bar to pick up her favorite ingredients for this dish: She goes across the street to Cork Market & Tasting Room, where they are stocked. Piment d’espelette is a spice made from the dried, ground chili peppers of the Basque region in France. It has more sweetness than heat and is available at gourmet kitchen stores such as La Cuisine in Alexandria (703-836-4435) and A&H Gourmet and Seafood Market in Bethesda (301-986-9692). From Gross, co-owner of Cork Wine Bar, Market & Tasting Room in the District.
INGREDIENTS
SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST MARK GAIL/THE WASHINGTON POST DAYNA SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Sadie, 8 months old, was born during a busy time at Restaurant Eve, so Carly Prow took just three weeks of maternity leave.

For Ari Kushimto Norris, co-owner of Kushi, teleworking helps her stay close to 8-monthold Sumi, though it has drawbacks.

Sommelier Nadine Brown works a late shift at Charlie Palmer; she and her husband do tag-team parenting of 4-month-old Emerson.

mothers from E1 parents everywhere can attest, a new baby brings major scheduling adjustments. Women in the industry sometimes find it’s easier to manage than other working moms do because of the built-in flexibility. Working and mothering, though, don’t always allow time for cooking and proper eating. With Marley in one arm, Gross heads down the stairs from the market office (which houses a Pack ’n Play and Jumperoo) and is stopped in the kitchen by chef Kristin Hutter, presenting her with fried duck skin, leftovers from duck rillettes. She takes a bite, muttering “I’m not going to lose my baby fat” as she walks on to meet a second round of wine distributors. Marley is with Gross at the market by day and helps welcome guests to the wine bar at night, strapped in a BabyBjorn. Gross stays through early dinner service a few days a week before her husband, Khalid Pitts, leaves his full-time job at the Service Employees International Union and takes over. For dinners at home, Gross takes advantage of her immediate access to top-shelf prepared foods. “I forage Cork Market for a lot of my meals,” she says, grabbing locally made Simply Sausage products, Italian pastas and the market’s own oven-roasted tomatoes. Eight-month-old Sumi Norris leaves the restaurant life to her parents. Before their daughter was born, Ari Kushimoto Norris and her husband, Darren Norris, would leave together for their new sushi and izakaya restaurant, Kushi. Ari worked in the restaurant’s office, creating graphics and organizing special events, and at the host’s stand, greeting diners. She has worked mostly from their Palisades home since Sumi was born. The baby’s name means “serene” in Japanese. Although teleworking allows Kushimoto Norris, 34, to stay close to her daughter and to dodge the distractions of working at the restaurant, she’s aware of its drawbacks. “It’s a challenge for me to understand what’s going on there,” she says. The biggest challenge of her post-delivery world is trying to do something new. “You have all of these great ideas every morning, but whether you can do it by the end of the day . . . nah, never. It goes on your to-do list.” Shuffling between the restaurant and the house doesn’t leave much time for her to eat at midday, even though a nanny comes a few days a week. Kushimoto Norris will have “any kind of bar, anything I can grab or microwave. If we go out, we’ll order extra, and that will usually be my lunch.” Nadine Brown eats on the run, often ducking into Starbucks and

Chipotle on her way to work at Charlie Palmer Steak. “I could not get out of the house,” she recently admitted upon arriving late for a meeting. “I just couldn’t find my shoe, and the dirty clothes are mixed up with the baby clothes.” As long as she was running behind, she figured, why not pick up caffeine and dinner? As the sommelier and wine buyer for the Capitol Hill restaurant, Brown can show up in midafternoon. That means she can tend to 4-month-old Emerson during the day. Her husband, Dan Fisher, the butcher for Restaurant Eve and the Majestic in Old Town Alexandria, starts work at 7 a.m., so he can be home before Brown drives to work around 3 p.m. The tag-team parenting doesn’t allow the couple much family time, but they have the industry-standard Monday off together. At their Alexandria home in the morning, the 38-year-old Brown reviews wine lists while the baby sleeps on a pillow on her desk. Brown chooses Honey-Nut Cheerios for breakfast and will eat leftovers for lunch. “I do a lot of cooking on Sundays and reheat throughout the week,” she says; an easy chicken fricassee is one of her favorite dishes. But she still has trouble finding the time for a sit-down meal. Brown books tastings in the afternoon, so she misses the 4:30 staff meal. Sometimes, however, she manages to be in both places at once. “I might taste [wine] with

someone and then literally say, ‘I’ll be back in 10 minutes,’ and eat something and then go back and taste.” With her double-booked schedule, it’s no surprise that she enlisted the help of the kitchen to plate her simple chicken fricassee rather elegantly for a photo session. Finding something to eat isn’t hard for Carly Prow, the assistant to chef Cathal Armstrong and private-events manager for Restaurant Eve. Prow works on the second floor, steps away from two staff meals the kitchen provides daily. Scrambled eggs and fried potatoes become a second breakfast for Prow. Her first: a bowl of multi-grain Cheerios after 8month-old Sadie wakes her at 7 a.m. If she’s not able to pull together a turkey sandwich to pack for work while keeping an eye on her almost-crawling daughter, she’ll grab a salad from the nearby Petite Fontaine Salad & Co. Staff dinner entices her to eat more. “I’m trying to cut out the first dinner of the day,” she says. “I started doing that when I was pregnant. It was nice because I could have an afternoon snack, but now I’m still tempted,” with one night featuring egg fried rice, tender broccoli and battered tofu. Prow, somehow, maintains control: The 30-year-old new mom returned to her pre-pregnancy weight within two months. A simple pasta dish or casserole is a normal dinner for the Prows. “I never make fish anymore,” Prow says. “It’s not something you can just throw in a pan and not think about. [Before Sadie,] everything would be a little more elaborate.” She has followed her boss’s admonition to cook with organic ingredients as much as possible. Because Prow gave birth right before the restaurant’s busiest time to book parties, she took only a quick three weeks of maternity leave. She eased back into her job, going in two days a week and working from home in Alexandria. But telecommuting became an obstacle: “If I was working, I felt like I should be playing. And if I was playing, I felt like I should be working.” Husband Jason Prow reminded her that to best support Sadie, they both had to work. Although she would like to be home with her daughter more, Prow said, she’d ideally choose working part time as a compromise, “to be able to get out, to be able to talk to adults. I’d still be working in the food industry. It’s a part of me.”
food@washpost.com Washington freelance writer Gans is editor of the food blog Endless Simmer.

· Pinch plus 1/2 teaspoon sea salt · 8 ounces dried pasta, preferably Rustichella brand strozzapreti (may substitute cavatelli) · 2 tablespoons olive oil · 2 large cloves garlic, coarsely chopped · 1/2 large onion, coarsely chopped · 5 oil-cured Roma tomato halves, coarsely chopped, with some of their oil · Freshly ground black pepper · 4 (9 to 10 ounces total) fresh merguez sausage links, preferably Simply Sausage brand, cut crosswise into 3/4-inch pieces (may substitute Simply Sausage French country sausage or Italian sausage) · 12 to 16 ounces tomato sauce, preferably Copper Pot Food Co. Blended Late Harvest Tomato Sauce · 3 to 4 cups chopped fresh spinach, arugula or kale (may substitute 2 cups blanched broccoli rabe; see NOTE) · 1/3 cup marinated feta cheese, such as Yarra Valley brand (may substitute fresh goat cheese) · Piment d’espelette, for garnish (optional, see headnote)

sausage is cooked through. Drain as much of the rendered fat from the sausage as desired. · Stir in the tomato sauce (to taste); reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for 5 minutes, stirring once or twice, so the flavors meld. · Place the greens (to taste) in a large serving bowl, then transfer the stillwarm pasta to the bowl. Pour the sauce mixture over and toss to incorporate. Crumble the feta over the top. If desired, sprinkle with piment d’espelette. · Serve warm or at room temperature. · NOTE: To blanch broccoli rabe, bring a pot of water to a boil over high heat. Add a pinch of salt and the broccoli rabe. Cook for about 2 minutes or just until the vegetable turns bright green. Immediately drain and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking process.
NUTRITION | Ingredients are too varied for a meaningful analysis.

STEPS
· Bring a pot of water to a boil over high heat. Add the pinch of salt and the pasta. Cook for about 7 minutes, until al dente. Drain. · Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large saute pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 1 minute, then add the onion and cook for 6 to 8 minutes, until the onion has softened. · Add the oil-cured tomato halves and 1 to 2 teaspoons of their oil. Season with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and the pepper to taste. Cook for about 3 minutes, stirring, then add the sausage and cook for 7 minutes or until the

SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST

on washingtonpost.com/recipes 
White Riso and Miso Broth  Chicken and Rice Bake, pictured above

Not Enough Thyme Chicken Fricassee
4 servings

want to know how to eat well?
Watch what these experts (and many others) have to say LIVE on washingtonpostlive.com:

Nadine Brown of Charlie Palmer Steak likes to prep weekday meals on Sundays so she can come home and just reheat them. She prefers using bone-in chicken thighs; the bones impart flavor as the chicken cooks. She serves this dish over quick-cooking couscous that is studded with golden raisins. From Brown, sommelier and wine director at Charlie Palmer Steak in the District.
INGREDIENTS
· 2 pounds bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (may substitute 11/4 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut lengthwise in half) · Kosher salt · Freshly ground black pepper · 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce · Pinch curry powder (may substitute your favorite spice) · 2 tablespoons vegetable oil · 1 medium onion, cut into small dice · 1 medium clove garlic, minced · 3/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth · 141/2 ounces canned no-salt-added diced tomatoes, with their juices · A few sprigs thyme, plus leaves from a few sprigs for optional garnish sauce and curry powder; toss to coat evenly. · Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook for a total of 6 to 8 minutes, turning as needed to brown it on both sides. · Reduce the heat to medium; add the onion and garlic, stirring to prevent burning. Cook for 6 to 8 minutes, until lightly browned, then add the broth, the tomatoes and their juices and a few thyme sprigs, using a wooden spoon to scrape the bottom of the pot to dislodge any browned bits. Reduce the heat to medium-low; partially cover and cook for 20 to 25 minutes, turning the chicken as needed to make sure it has cooked through. Discard the thyme sprigs. · Serve hot, with a few leaves of thyme sprinkled over each portion, if desired.
NUTRITION | Per serving: 270 calories, 29 g protein, 9 g carbohydrates, 13 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 120 mg cholesterol, 450 mg sodium, 2 g dietary fiber, 5 g sugar Recipes tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; e-mail questions to food@washpost.com

Gary Hirshberg Chairman, President, and CE-Yo of Stonyfield Farm

Eric Schlosser Author of "Fast Food Nation"

STEPS
· Trim off and discard all excess skin and visible fat from the chicken thighs. Cut the thighs in half lengthwise along the bone (so that 4 of the pieces include the bone). Place the chicken in a mixing bowl. Add the salt and pepper to taste, the soy

Sen. Jon Tester (D-Montana)

Susan Crocket Vice President, Senior Technology Officer, Health and Nutrition, General Mills

Gastronomer
Garlic Wafers
Makes 17 small wafers

Wednesday, May 4, 9 a.m.
The Future of Food Conference

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Many super-elaborate dishes from Restaurant Arzak in San Sebastian, Spain, are nearly or completely impossible to make at home. This one, on the other hand, is surprisingly simple, calling for no more than garlic, nutmeg and a little salt. The garlic becomes sweet as it is cooked. These wafers can be used for a multitude of different purposes with sweet and savory dishes: cheese or ham; soup, fish or meat. It is important to use garlic that is fresh, with no green shoots inside the cloves, to ensure that the wafers will not be bitter. Adapted by Gastronomer Andreas Viestad from an Arzak recipe.
INGREDIENTS
· Cloves from 2 heads garlic, peeled (a total of 16 cloves; see headnote) · Salt · 1 small pinch freshly grated nutmeg taste. · Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone liner. · Use the spatula to spread the garlic in a thin, even swath (about 11/2 inches wide) over the parchment paper or silicone liner. · Transfer the baking sheet to the oven; reduce the temperature to 200 degrees. Bake until the mixture has dried completely and is crisp like a cracker. It takes about 45 minutes to 1 hour, depending on your oven and how much water the garlic contained. · Let cool completely, then break into 17 wafers of roughly equal size. Store in an airtight container.
NUTRITION | Per wafer: 0 calories, 0 g protein, 1 g carbohydrates, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 20 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar Recipe tested by Kris Coronado; e-mail questions to food@washpost.com

In partnership with

STEPS
· Place the peeled cloves of garlic in a large saucepan filled with water (about 5 cups). Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cook uncovered for about 25 minutes, until the cloves have completely softened. Drain. · Mash the garlic, preferably by using the back of a spoon or a flexible spatula to press the softened cloves through a fine-mesh strainer into a bowl. Season with salt and nutmeg to

6

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