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MAY 31 - JUNE 30, 2013. Volume 5, Number 5 www.thejetnewspaper.

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By JOSEPHINE NAVULA
Peoples PM
Prime Minister Bainimarama referred to as a true friend of the people
Residents affected by last year’s
Tropical Cyclone Evan were all
smiles after they were handed
over their new homes by the head
of government, Prime Minister
Voreqe Bainimarama on Friday,
May 24.
PM Bainimarama handed over
two houses in Votualevu and an-
other one in Bila, Nadi back road.
Emotional Nadi farmer, Abdul
Intikhab Ahmed said he is very
thankful to the government for tak-
ing out their time to help out the
people of the community.
“I feel very happy today and I
want to thank the Prime Minister
for being here to open my new
home,” he said.
“A friend in need is a friend in-
deed and our PM is a true friend of
the people.”
District Officer Nadi Peni Koro
said the opening of the new homes
is always a proud moment for both
the government and the people
who have suffered full wrath of
natural disasters.
“Today we once again witness
the handing over of another new
home for the people who were af-
fected by TC Evan last December
and it is indeed a proud moment
for the people and also the govern-
ment,” he said.
Mr Koro informed that the to-
tal cost of each house donated is
$15,800 which includes labour and
material costs.
“These houses are fully funded
by government and are donated to
residents whose homes were com-
pletely damaged by Tropical Cy-
clone Evan. And for those homes
that were partially damaged, the
government only provides them
with materials needed,” he said.
The new homes are part of
Government’s commitment to as-
sist those individuals and families
whose homes were fully destroyed
during Tropical Cyclone Evan late
last year.
Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama is surrounded by members and friends of the
Singh family of Votualevu. INSET: PM with Bila residents Abdul Intikhab Ahmed and
his niece. Photos: JOSEPHINE NAVULA.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 2
FROM THE DESK
ON THE BRIGHT SIDE
“Fiji - the way the world should be”
“ Being the hub of the Pacific, Fiji has everything that a spectacular tropical paradise
has to offer - from private island resort accommodations, top class restaurants to
white sandy beaches, inbound tours, jet boat rides, hot air balloon rides, mountain
trekking, inland tours, eco tourism, sky diving, helicopter rides, cruise trips, scuba
diving, massage and beauty parlours, vibrant night life and a lot more than any other
destination in the world offers ”
COMMUNITY NOTICE BOARD
EMPOWER PACIFIC
(Formerly PCSS) provides
private, confidential counsel-
ling on depression,
family/marital, stress, grief,
abuse, suicidal thoughts,
STI’s, drugs, alcohol & be-
havior lifestyle changes.
Opens 8am – 3pm, Monday –
Friday.
Call us on 6708169 Located
at Nadi old hospital road.
ROTARY CLUB OF NADI
is on a membership drive to
increase members who repre-
sent all sections of the com-
munity. Nadi Rotarians meet
every Wednesday at Sitar
Restaurant in Martintar at
6.30pm.
Interested people can call
club president Krupesh Patel
on 6700478
SOROPTIMIST INTER-
NATIONAL is a vibrant,
dynamic organisation for to-
day’s professional and busi-
nesswomen, working through
projects to promote equality,
development and peace. We
are seeking members to join
our club. Interested ladies can
call SI Nadi president Zeaba
Rahiman on 9977058
FIJIAN WRITERS ASSO-
CIATION which has been
established to form the first
ever formal body represent-
ing writers, poets, journal-
ists and everyone who has a
passion for writing is seek-
ing new members. Interested
people can contact Professor
Subramani via email:-
subramani@fnu.ac.fj
THE JET is Fiji’s first community newspaper published monthly by
SHAMBU ADVERTISING from Nadi - the tourism capital of Fiji.
PUBLISHER : SHALENDRA PRASAD Cell: 9232073
PHONE OFFICE : (679) 7767574/ 6708188
FAX : (679) 6708188
EMAIL : thejetnewspaper@gmail.com
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LAYOUT BY SHALENDRA PRASAD & MUNAUWAR KHAN
SHALENDRA PRASAD
Bollywood Bonanza
By SHALENDRA PRASAD
By MARGARET NAQIRI
Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum officiates the shooting of ‘Santa Banta’ at Port
Denarau while actors Lisa Ray Haydon, Veer Das, Neha Dhupia and Boman Irani look on.
Photo: MUNAUWAR KHAN.
Yet another Bollywood
team is in the country to shoot
a comedy flick titled ‘Santa
Banta’.
The movie shooting was
officially launched by Attor-
ney-General Aiyaz Sayed-
Khaiyum at Port Denarau on
Monday, May 6 in the pres-
ence of top Bollywood stars
and local stakeholders and
fans.
Fiji has recently seen a
surge in movie production
not only from Bollywood but
from other industries as well
due to very attractive govern-
ment policies.
Directed by Akashdeep
Sabir, Santa Banta is featur-
ing some of the very common
names in Bollywood such as
Boman Irani, Neha Dhupia,
Veer Das, Lisa Ray Haydon,
Johnny Lever, Ram Kapoor
and Sanjay Mishra (well
known as ‘Papa’ locally).
Film Fiji CEO Florence
Swamy says while there have
been numerous Bollywood
The Rotary Club of Nadi
continues to assist students with
educational needs.
The club donated four car-
tons of text and story books
each to Nadi Sangam Primary
School and Sangam SKM Col-
lege respectively.
The books were given to the
club by Sydney based Ranfurly
Book Aid.
“We receive such books on a
quarterly basis and it is distrbut-
ed to various schools within our
boundaries,” offered Krupesh
Patel, president of the Rotary
Club of Nadi.
shootings in the country, Di-
rector Akashdeep Sabir has
brought in the biggest number
of crew and cast from India.
Close to eighty people are
here from India to carry on the
shooting for 28-days.
The film which has a bud-
get of $1.4 million is based
on two main characters San-
ta (Boman Irani) and Banta
(Veer Das) who originate from
Ludhiana in Punjab, India and
find themselves in Fiji under
mysterious circumstances.
Nadi Rotary donates books to Sangam schools
A new home owner in the Western Division praised the de-
termination of the Bainimarama Government to improve
lives of ordinary Fijians by providing new homes.
For Nadi farmer, Arvind Singh, a new home will mean better
life for his family.
This after the head of government, Prime Minister Voreqe
Bainimarama opened the family’s new home at Votualevu
in Nadi after requesting government for housing assis-
tance.
The Singh family thanked the head of government for think-
ing of them in time of need.
The family will have a better life because of the new home
especially for the children who had to endure hardship
after their home was devastated during cyclone Evan last
December.
Mr Singh said Prime Minister Bainimarama is the best lead-
er Fiji has ever had and he wants this government to con-
tinue for many more years to come.
PM Bainimarama opened the new home at the farming set-
tlement and urged the community to work closely with
each other.
The head of government also opened several other homes on
the same day that have been fully funded by government.
The new homes are part of government’s commitment to as-
sist those individuals and families whose homes were ful-
ly destroyed during Tropical Cyclone Evan late last year.
The best
Prime
Minister Fiji
ever had
Sangam Primary School librarian Heena Kalavadia, left, and assistant head teacher Sa-
tyendra Kumar, right, receive books from members of the Rotary Club of Nadi. Photo:
MARGARET NAQIRI.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 3
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 4
LOCAL NEWS
New activities planned
for Bula Festival
New and hyped up activi-
ties have been organized as
preparations for the upcoming
2013 Vodafone Bula Festival
is well underway.
Nadi Bula Festival Associ-
ation President Titilia Vuataki
said they are organizing a lot
of programmes and activities
to make this year’s carnival a
memorable one.
“We have arranged shows
like agricultural, women’s
handicrafts from the women
of the interiors of Nadi to
come and showcase their tal-
ents, not forgetting the new
show this year is the “Coro
Walidi” organized by the Bula
FM crew and other activities
that will make the carnival
lively.”
“We have also organized
By JOSEPHINE
NAVULA
oratory competition for pri-
mary school students of
Nadi,” she said.
Ms Vuataki said the money
raised from this year’s car-
nival will be donated to the
unfortunate ones of the com-
munity.
“We have confirmed that
money raised from this year’s
carnival will go towards the
underprivileged children at
the Loloma Home including
the single mother’s that have
been shut down by their fami-
lies,” she said.
Bula Festival Commit-
tee Secretary Winnie Silikula
confirmed that they are aim-
ing to have twelve contestants
this year.
This year’s Vodafone Bula
Festival will take place from
the 13th - 20th of July at the
Koroivolu Park and Prince
Charles Park respectively.
Reigning Miss Vodafone Bula Festival Shahin Shahista with Bula
Festival Association president Titilia Vuataki and Vodafone Fiji’s
chief marketing officer Sanjeewa Perera during the crowning night
last year. Photo: SHALENDRA PRASAD
CyclePower – Creating change in Fiji and Australia
This June eighteen Aus-
tralian cyclists, both able
bodied and people with dis-
ability, will complete Cycle-
Power, a demanding 550km
ride around Fiji.
CyclePower Fiji aims to
support those living with a
disability in Fiji, by raising
awareness of people with
disability and demonstrating
their sporting ability.
Chief Executive Officer
of Disability Sport and Rec-
reation, Rob Anderson, said
“sport is a wonderful vehicle
to provide understanding and
social inclusion.
“We are bringing people
with disability into Fiji to
send a message to locals
that incredible feats can be
achieved, challenging their
perception of disability.”
The event also provides a
rare sporting opportunity for
Australians with disability,
and raises funds for Victorians
with disability to participate
in sport.
This year sees the event’s
biggest contingency of hand-
cyclists, with seven complet-
ing the gruelling 550km on a
handcycle in just seven days.
A handcycle is an impres-
sive three-wheeled vehicle,
powered by the arms, rather
than the legs.
Along their journey, Cycle-
Power participants will donate
sporting equipment such as
basketballs and footballs to
various Special Development
Schools and disability organi-
sations.
CyclePower is in its third
year of action, with previous
rides held in Vietnam in 2011
and Cambodia in 2012.
CyclePower participants
with disability range from 20
to 66 years of age, showcasing
a range of disabilities and life
challenges.
Disability Sport and Rec-
reation (DSR) is an Australian
charity with many initiatives
supporting people with a dis-
ability in Victoria.
For over 50 years, DSR
has worked to ensure people
with a disability have equal
opportunities to participate in
activities of their choice, lead-
ing to both physical and men-
tal health benefits.
CyclePower Riders from last year’s ride in Cambodia. Photo: SUPPLIED.
PRESS RELEASE
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 5
LOCAL NEWS
Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama has announced a bum-
per year for Fiji's sugar cane industry.
According to figures released by the Fiji Sugar Corporation,
after a 4th payment to sugar cane farmers of $20.40 per tonne of
raw sugar, the total paid out so far for the 2012 season will be a
record-breaking $78.74 per tonne.
The Prime Minister added that there was one final clean-up
payment yet to be made that would bring the year's total to at
least $80.74 per tonne, if not more.
The Prime Minister said that this was a huge achievement for
Fiji, and was a sign that his Government’s reforms of the sugar
cane industry were paying off.
"This is what you can achieve when you depoliticise the sug-
ar cane industry," he said. "With politics out, we will be able to
focus all of our energy and resources at achieving better results
for farmers and other stakeholders."
The Prime Minister also announced that the forecast price
for raw sugar in 2013 was $62.58 per tonne, but that FSC of-
ficials were confident the likely payment would be more than
$73 per tonne.
“Considering the significant reduction in the world wide
price of raw sugar, this is a major achievement. At this level,
the sugar cane industry becomes extremely viable and able to
healthily support industry stakeholders as well as attract more
Fijians to the industry,” he said.
Two-and-a-half years ago, the payout was $49.16 per tonne
of raw sugar.
In 2011, this increased to $65.67 and the price is now sitting
around $80 per tonne.
“Although the price of raw sugar on the international market
is volatile, with a record payment this year and a high price se-
cured for next year, we are beginning to see stability and growth
re-enter the Fijian sugar cane industry,” he said.
“We will continue to carry out our reforms to increase ef-
ficiency and productivity in the industry, and we will remain
committed to ensuring that all stakeholders, especially our
farmers, benefit from these reforms,” he added. “As we con-
tinue to modernise and adapt the industry and reduce unneces-
sary costs, we will be able to pass on more and more savings to
industry stakeholders.”
Record cane payment
for last season
MINFO
MINFO
PM opens international sugar meet
Prime Minister Voreqe
Bainimarama opened an
international workshop de-
signed to provide a source of
fuel, fibre and food through
the nobilisation of ‘erianthus’
- a sugar hybrid on Thursday,
May 23.
As a hybrid, erianthus
is gaining interest in cross-
ing with other sugar hybrids.
While this has seen consider-
able success across institu-
tions in China, India and Aus-
tralia, this workshop brings
international sugar research
experts to present techniques
in making crosses in erian-
thus. While the workshop
will discuss the necessary
processes needed for this
hybrid crossing, it will also
present recommendations to
improve existing breeding
programs.
Acknowledging the chal-
lenges for the sugar industry
on the international stage
including challenges faced
by smaller sugar producing
countries, the Prime Minis-
ter highlighted the need to
strengthen sugar reforms in
Fiji.
"As the current chair of the
International Sugar Council
(ISC), we are firmly commit-
ted to advancing the cause of
this global industry and the
millions of ordinary people
the world over who depend on
it for their livelihoods".
“Naturally, it is the small
players such as Fiji that are
most vulnerable to these un-
certainties and fluctuations of
the marketplace,” PM Baini-
marama said.
“I mention all this, ladies
and gentlemen, because al-
though there are certain forces
that are out of our control, we
must act on the reforms that
are within our control.
“It means being smarter.
It means adopting new prac-
tices. It means taking advan-
tage of new technologies and
techniques.”
Highlighting the condi-
tions that Fiji’s sugar industry
faced in the past, the head of
government who also heads
the sugar ministry, said that
ensuring the sustainability of
the industry will improve the
lives of ordinary Fijians, in
particular those that depend
on it.
“For all the uncertainties
that existed in the interna-
tional market, there was cer-
tainty in Fiji that the industry
was in serious trouble. So we
set ourselves to carrying out
a comprehensive series of re-
forms. It has been a demand-
ing process to change the old
mindsets. However, with vi-
sion and planning it will pay
dividends.”
“In this respect, I am
pleased to say that only last
week I was able to announce
to the Fijian people a record
payment to cane farmers for
last year’s harvest, as well as
a high price secured for next
year.”
The Prime Minister said
that the workshop presents an
opportunity for participants
from eight nations to impart
knowledge and experiences
for Fiji.
"For the sugar industry,
these opportunities often
come in the form of new sug-
arcane varieties. In fact, the
development of new cane
varieties forms an absolutely
critical part of the industry."
"Like many of the coun-
tries represented here, Fiji has
a sugarcane research centre.
We have produced many com-
mercial varieties of sugarcane,
and we have achieved great
successes in developing cane
varieties low in impurities,
adaptable to poor soils, requir-
ing less water and resistant to
hurricanes and droughts."
The workshop also saw
a presentation on recent im-
provements in cane breeding
in the country and an over-
view of sugar research in the
country.
PM Bainimarama, right, with Jai Shree Gawander, CEO of the Fiji
Sugar Research Institute. Photo: MINFO.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 6
LOCAL NEWS
By JOSEPHINE
NAVULA
By JOSEPHINE
NAVULA
By JOSEPHINE
NAVULA
Guide for farmers and nurserymen launched
Stakeholders in the agri-
cultural sector gathered in
large numbers to witness the
launch of a book titled “Grow-
ing Vegetable seedlings in Fiji
- A practical guide for farmers
& Nurserymen” in Votualevu,
Nadi on Wednesday, May 8.
Speaking at the ceremo-
ny, Secretariat of the Pacific
Community (SPC), Land Re-
source Development director
Josua Wainiqolo highlighted
on how farmers have recov-
ered from natural disasters
and experiences on how reha-
bilitation efforts have been so
difficult to sustain prior to the
establishment of initiatives as
such.
“The readiness of the re-
habilitation programme to
meet the urgency of these cir-
cumstances has always been a
huge set back,” Mr Wainoqolo
said.
He said the decision to
venture into a nursery seed-
ling enterprise will hopefully
alleviate such setbacks.
“The addition of disaster
mitigation containers to store
seedlings in the event of cy-
clones or floods has added
another dimension to the proj-
ect.”
SPC and AusAid have ami-
cably engaged in many devel-
oping projects as such.
The manual was launched
by Acting Australian High
Commissioner His Excellen-
cy Glenn Miles.
Veteran agricultural sec-
tor leader and owner of Bula
Agro Enterprises Sant Ku-
mar has also played a major
role in the successful launch
of the manual and played a
key role in the installation of
around twenty disaster miti-
gation containers which can
save seedlings during natural
disasters around the country.
The containers will en-
sure a quick turnaround in the
availability of fresh fruits and
vegetables following natural
disasters.
Kamlesh Prasad (Farmboy) shows the new flood mitiga-
tion containers during the launch at Bula Agro Enterpris-
es in Votualevu. Photo: SHALENDRA PRASAD.
Ice Bar to host upcoming
Global Party for charity
Nadi’s famous night spot
Ice Bar has shown their sup-
port to raise funds for Trea-
sure Children’s Home fol-
lowing their announcement to
host the Global Party- linking
the world for a worthy cause.
Ice Bar Managing Director
Roneel Sami (pictured) con-
firmed that the money raised
will be given to the Treasure
Children’s Home Orphanage.
“Hundred percent of what-
ever is raised will go directly
to the Treasure Home,” he
said in a press conference on
Wednesday, May 15.
Sami said the party will ac-
knowledge Fiji in 120 coun-
tries, and they are expecting
about five hundred people at
the venue.
“This Global Party is cele-
brated in 120 countries around
the world, and apparently this
might boost our tourism sec-
tor,” he said.
Sami confirmed all invita-
tion will be done online and
it is going to be a strictly VIP
party.
Global Party is a charitable
event which supports many
organizations such as Nelson
Mandela Children Funds,
Saint John’s Ambulance and
Bible Society.
The party will take place at
Ice Bar on Friday, June 28.
Women living with cancer
were uplifted with encourage-
ment after an original artwork
was auctioned and sold for
$550 at the Fiji Cancer Society
- Western Branch’s first fund-
raiser gathering of the year at
the First Landing Resort in
Vuda.
Fiji’s well known Artist,
Lambert Ho (pictured) said his
painting is a reflection and tes-
tament of a woman’s struggles
through cancer.
“The painting that I donated
to the Western Cancer Society
depicts a woman’s face. She
represents all women. Women
who have a story to tell regard-
ing this dreaded disease we call
Western Cancer society
continues good work
cancer. She is all beautiful, she
is all powerful, she is all love,
she is all gentle and pure, she is
the bones and the blood and the
sweat and the tears that make all
things possible.”
“The artwork is a reflection,
a testament of her struggles
through cancer that sometimes
woman is devoid and robbed of
her ‘woman-ness’,” Ho said.
Ho said the colours he used
in the paintings all have a mean-
ing to it.
“And the choice of colour
that I used in the artwork is
mainly pink, a gentle colour
that is all woman. There is a
hint of yellow in the blossom
she wears on her ear, this is the
confidence and poise, the hope
that all who suffer are strong
enough to overcome the barri-
ers and the stigma that relate to
our women, wherever in society
they come from,” Ho added.
Fiji Cancer Society - West-
ern Branch Vice-President, Mi-
lika Marshall said the gathering
was about raising awareness
and membership drive within
the community.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 7
LOCAL NEWS
North American volunteers
help hospital
Group leader Laura Thomas of Stampin! Up, centre, is flanked by Nadi Hospital Board sec-
retary Israr Khan and board member Sunila Karan during the clean up works at the hospital
by a group of 200 volunteers from America and Canada. Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
By SHALENDRA
PRASAD
A group of two hundred
North Americans who were
recently in Nadi for a week
long holiday decided to give
something back to the com-
munity during their short visit
to our shores.
Affiliates of Stampin! Up
– a US based craft and rubber
company were busy giving the
Nadi Hospital a much needed
boost with various initiatives
such as grass cutting, painting
and light handy work.
Group leader Laura Thom-
as said it was exciting to visit
Fiji which is a real tropical
paradise with the added plea-
sure of doing something for
the community.
“Out of our week-long
holiday plan, we wanted to
do something good here. We
teamed up with our travel
agents Pacific Destinationz
and the hospital board to carry
out the works,” Ms Thomas
said.
Nadi Hospital board sec-
retary Israr Khan said it was
so encouraging to see visitors
taking part in such community
initiatives.
“Running a hospital comes
with so much hard work and
dedication and such gestures
from visitors are highly ap-
preciated,” Mr Khan said.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 8
NADI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
Airports Fiji Limited
(AFL) is receiving over-
whelming interests from con-
tractors around the globe for
the redesign of the Nadi Inter-
national Airport.
AFL acting chief executive
officer, Naushad Ali said they
have received expressions of
interest from companies as far
as South Africa for works ex-
pected to begin in July.
“We have received over-
whelming responses from
China, Korea, Singapore,
Australia, New Zealand,
South Africa and other local
companies that have shown
Overwhelming response for airport upgrade
interest in these major works
at Fiji’s main gateway,” Mr
Ali said.
“This shows the level of
interest from renowned inter-
national and local companies
who want to be part of the
unique designing of the new
look Nadi Airport terminal.”
Initial plans are now be-
ing developed on a multi-
million dollar upgrade with
special emphasis on new and
improved passenger facilities
such as retail shopping and
dining.
“We are currently in the
designing stages and Fiji will
soon boast a modern interna-
tional airport with local archi-
tecture to portray the unique
Fijian culture,” Mr Ali said.
“We are not rushing into
things but we hope to start
by July and we want to do it
right.”
Mr Ali said the urgency of
the upgrade aligned well with
the recent Government decree
that has cancelled all present
concessionaires’ contracts for
a twelve month period, while
new contracts are either en-
tered into or tendered out,
based on the upgraded facili-
ties.
Many of the changes would
be integrated into a new, larg-
er departure lounge extending
out to the edge of passenger
walkways that provide access
to and from departing or arriv-
ing aircraft.
Mr Ali said the changes
would also improve passenger
facilitation by creating more
space for passengers to be
comfortably processed when
arriving or departing from
Nadi.
The proposed changes are
believed to create a better en-
vironment for all stakehold-
ers.
“Ultimately it will be our
visitors to Fiji who will ben-
efit, enjoying an international
shopping and food experience
in surroundings that would be
world-class, and a fitting first
and last impression of the
country at Nadi International
Airport,” Mr Ali said.
The airport serves close
to a million international
passengers every year at its
single terminal.
The last major upgrade
to the Nadi airport had been
done in 2003, with an in-
vestment of FJ$72m while
26,000m” apron area was re-
placed in 2006 at a total cost
of about FJ$11m.
MINFO
Naushad Ali. Photo:
JOSEPHINE NAVULA.
Newly recruited firefighters of Airports Fiji Limited pose for a photo with senior management and staff
during their graduation ceremony on Friday, May 3. Photo: JOSEPHINE NAVULA.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 9
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 10
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Enrolment for
Semester 2, 2013
is now open at UniFiji
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Lautoka
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PrivatcȱMai!ȱBagǰȱLautnkaǰȱPhDZȱŜŜŚŖŜŖŖȱȱFaxDZȱŜŜŚŖŝŖŖȱȱinInȓunię|iǯacǯĦȱȱwwwǯunię|iǯacǯĦ
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 11
NADI TOWN COUNCIL NEWS
CAPACITY: 7.5 KVA
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EMPOWERING PEOPLE AGAINST POWER BLACKOUTS !!
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31 Viria Road, Vatuwaqa, Suva, Fiji
P.O.Box: 1068, Suva
Phone :(679) 338 6000
Fax :(679) 337 0431
Mobile :(679) 999 4531 / 999 4565
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4
2
Four lane
work to start
soon
Council im-
pressed with
ratepayers
The proposed four lane proj-
ect will be undertaken this
June according to Nadi
Town Council CEO Nemia
Tagi.
“The four lane road will come
from the airport all the way
down to Wailoaloa junc-
tion, and then it will split
from there. A two lane road
will run through the empty
lands following up the rail-
way lines to Narewa.”
Nadi Town Council is im-
pressed with their rate
payers.
“The council is pleased with
the progress from our
rates collection. So far
we have received eighty
percent of the amount
that is being owed to us,”
Nadi Town Council CEO
Nemia Tagi said.
Tagi said they have been
having regular meetings
with the stake holders re-
garding the rates.
“For the last two months,
the council has initiated
awareness meetings with
our stakeholders and rate
payers and we wish to
work closely with every-
one for a better Nadi.”
Council briefs by
JOSEPHINE NAVULA
Public advised to stay away from river project area
By JOSEPHINE NAVULA
Nadi Town Council is urg-
ing members of the public not
to carry out any development
around the proposed river di-
version canal area.
“We are also informing
those who are buying proper-
ties by the area that the pro-
posed river canal will be run-
ning along that direction upon
approval so they need to hold
all development plans until
further notice,” NTC CEO
Nemia Tagi said.
Tagi said it is a very big
project that will involve a lot
of things that will take time
before it takes shape.
“There will be a lot of re-
search carried out for the pre-
liminary surveys, before the
final design can be put into
place,” he said.
Tagi also said the reports
of the related projects on the
river canal has been collected
and is now being analyzed
thoroughly in Japan.
“The reports that were
done by the engineers that
came in from Japan in 1996 to
1998, have been collected last
year and they are looking at it
carefully and thoroughly right
now,” he said.
“There are many factors to
be considered while the proj-
ect is commencing, such as
high tides and flooding,” he
said.
Tagi thanked the Japanese
Government and its aid agen-
cy JICA for all the support
given to the township so far.
“We look forward to work-
ing with the Japanese Govern-
ment to make Nadi and Fiji at
large a better place for all.”
Nadi Town Council special administrator Aisea Tuidraki, right,
hands over a token of appreciation to the Japanese ambas-
sador His Excellency Eiichi Oshima for their timely donation of
a Komatsu excavator recently. Photos: JOSEPHINE NAVULA.
NTC CEO Nemia Tagi
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 12
BUSINESS MENTORING
A new series of articles with challenging perspectives for your businesses
By CLAIRE-DIANE
GIRALDEAU
Are you treating your women equally?
In this article I will review
various ways to look at eth-
ics and gender equality in the
context of work, at home with
the family and also in the com-
munity in general. With our
“Virtuous Business Women
Network” regular meetings,
it has become more than ob-
vious that in many occasions
women are not treated fairly.
Even though there are many
attempts by women’s orga-
nizations, ministries, human
rights or the new constitution
the fact remains that women
do not get the same opportuni-
ties as men do. It may be more
obvious here in Fiji but hey, it
is the same all over the world.
I do not intend to get into
a complicated thesis here, so
don’t worry I simply would
like the readers to do a quick
check of their own ways,
whether you have a small
business, shop in town, res-
taurant, hotel or manage some
of our bigger businesses in
Nadi would you pass the
“equality quiz” and do you
have basic ethic practices?
Let’s go through some general
questions and issues faced by
women:
1. Do women in your
company get paid the same
salary as men and do they get
the same opportunity for pro-
motion and job selection?
I realize that we can get
trapped in qualifications and
requirements here, yet I have
faced this kind of difference in
pay for tenders or while nego-
tiating a contract applying for
consultancy work. It seems
like women have to be 3 times
better to get paid the same and
even that will not give us busi-
ness contract.
In the consultancy market,
ethics is at times missing-it is
more a question of the “boy’s
network” as we see the prac-
tice and in various advertise-
ment for tender, too often the
“so good overseas consultant”
has already been selected be-
cause of a connection in the
department… so why bother.
It’s amazing to see what
women share in our group,
whether there is a true rec-
ognition of the experience or
the quality of service, whether
there are policies in place in
bigger organization the actual
practice is very different from
the human resources guide-
lines.
2. How many women
do you have in management
position and I mean true de-
cision making posts?
One of the most common
positions in management for
women seems to be “human
resources” manager. It prob-
ably is because men do not
know how to look after peo-
ple….just a joke guys don’t
get offended. Yet it is often a
post where there are various
challenges and conflicts to
be handled and women have
the experience and practice in
their many family duties when
it comes to sorting things out.
I personally think that term
“human resource” should not
exist, I remember reading the
history of that term when I did
my MBA, and you may not
know that it comes from the
industrialization period. In
fact a resource cannot be “hu-
man”, as the word resource
refers to things, objects, and
machineries not people. So
these 2 words should never
have been put together in the
first place. From the time em-
ployees were considered ma-
chines, their status changed to
be resources.
As far as I am concerned it
should be changed to “human
asset” and we should get the
finance manager to see people,
employees as asset not just in
words and beautiful speeches
for corporate social responsi-
bility, but in practice and even
more so with women.
Now it is not because you
would have a policy to have
30% women on boards or in
your management team that it
creates a more equitable state
for women. While working
with a NGO in Papua New
Guinea, I have seen that in
many cases, women will not
speak up during these meet-
ings; they have not been given
the appropriate confidence
training to do so or they will
get in trouble with their hus-
band if they dare oppose what
a man says.
The general attitude of the
men on the boards is discred-
iting instead of being encour-
aging. I recall being the only
women with 12 men on our
Life Insurance Association
Board, I had to learn the hard
way believe me. First they
assigned me the committees
that did not function well, be
it the magazine, I took it with
6 pages and brought it to 14
with enough advertising to
totally finance its publication.
Then monthly lunch meet-
ings which had less than 25
participants with a member-
ship of 6000, has declined so
badly, I formed a committee
of 16 members from different
companies who had to sell a
table of 10 each that brought
back the participation to 150
minimum every month. Lastly
the annual congress had gone
havoc as well, I managed
to get some famous guests
speaker in the field, motiva-
tors and we broke our atten-
dance record with over 2000
participants that year. I had to
revamp these and make them
succeed. After three years
of being pushed around, the
President and board awarded
me with the Best Volunteer of
Year Trophies as they finally
saw that I had much more to
offer than they had planned.
3. What can your
management team do to im-
prove on equality; do you
have women on your board
and executive team?
I would say to first look at
your women as having been
created to be partners, equally
with different qualities that
complement men’s work. We
are meant to be respected and
given the same opportunities
as men. If only you would
realize what you are miss-
ing when you choose to dis-
criminate. We have natural
ways of being more practical,
multi-tasked we can handle
much more at once than men
can with their compartmental
thinking. There is not one bet-
ter than the other but rather
two different sex with differ-
ent strengths & weaknesses,
which once put together cre-
ate the best of both world.
Look at your own ways of
treating the women in your
life, your mother to start with,
your wife, your sisters, your
daughters. I have been watch-
ing the great FBC show of
Aamir Khan on Wednesdays
and I tell you this guy is bring-
ing so much awareness about
many issues that it makes me
jump when I think of it. I won-
der when it will change, yet it
could start with simple steps
around you.
4. How do you really
treat women in your work-
place?
Are you polite and courte-
ous, do you make inappropri-
ate comments or jokes that re-
fer to their physique. Do you
respect the fact that a married
women should not be talked to
in the same manner as a man. I
sometimes see behaviors that
are so offending, these bad
habits that certain men have to
just flirt without respect even
when they themselves are
married. Where are the values
of families, what about your
wife, when people start hav-
ing affairs within the work en-
vironment, how much trouble
will that cause? Where is the
ethic and professional behav-
iors? Of course in many cases
only the women gets blamed,
it reminds me of the story of
the woman in the bible ac-
cused of committing adultery,
when she was brought up by
men to Jesus to be judged they
wanted to stone her and Jesus
said to the men, that the one
who has never sinned throw
the first stone, they all walked
away. It does take two to tan-
go as one would say.
When we look at all the
internet rubbish, emails that
are being sent around with
stupid jokes with women I re-
ally think it’s time to grow up
guys, you should spend more
time on your own work and be
productive instead of losing
time to pass these around.
Lately I spend time with
various women groups do-
ing workshops and training.
I am so amazed at what so
many women tolerate, how
strong they are, the amount of
time they work in a day and
yet when the husband comes
home there is very little at-
tention and respect shown to
these virtuous women. Wom-
en you are wonderful and may
we all remember that we are
loved by our God anyway and
we shall be blessed by Him
who created us!
Contact:
emgfi j i @connect . com. fj
Mobile 925 8050
or 707 8050
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 13
ANIMALS FIJI MONTHLY FEATURE
Animal Care and Health from the veterinarians at Animals Fiji Nadi Clinic
By DOCTOR JO OLVER
Heartworm disease
H
eartworm disease is a
serious and potential-
ly fatal condition caused by
parasitic worms living in the
major arteries of the lungs and
often in the right side of the
heart of dogs, cats and other
species of mammals, includ-
ing wolves, foxes, ferrets, sea
lions and (in rare instances)
humans. We do not see many
of these other animal species
in Fiji – but we do see LOTS
of heartworm disease in our
dogs.
Most of the information in
this article is obtained from
the American Heartworm So-
ciety. Their website is listed
at the end of the report. For
videos, pictures and further
information this is our best
resource for information on
this disease. As is usual with
the internet all kinds of infor-
mation and misinformation
abound – use good sources to
become informed.
Mosquitoes are necessary
for transmission of this dis-
ease from dog to dog. Heart-
worm disease does not spread
directly from animal to ani-
mal. When found in the heart
adult heartworms resemble
a tangled pile of white cord
– some have even described
them as looking like spaghetti.
Of these worms the adult fe-
males release their young (lar-
vae) into a dog’s bloodstream.
These larvas resemble a mi-
croscopic maggot and must
undergo several molts before
it arrives in another heart to
finish growth into an adult and
start the cycle all over.
The larvae are called mi-
crofilariae and they are picked
up by a mosquito when it
takes a blood meal from a
dog. In the mosquito they
go through a couple of molts
to become infective to a dog.
Once the microfilariae reaches
the infective stage in its life it
is deposited on the skin of a
dog when the mosquito takes
another blood meal. This lar-
va enters into the skin of the
dog and has now started the
process of heartworm disease
in that particular dog. If you
have ever seen what the mos-
quito sticks in your skin to
suck blood you will have an
idea how tiny these microfi-
lariae are.
Over the course of the next
6 – 9 months this larva will
eventually take up residence
in the blood vessel or heart
of this dog and mature into an
adult worm.
For both cats and dogs,
signs of heartworm disease
are not recognized in the
early stages of disease as the
number of heartworms in an
animal tends to accumulate
gradually over a period of
time and with repeated mos-
quito bites. Signs in a chroni-
cally or heavily infected dog
may include mild, persistent
cough, reluctance to move or
exercise, exercise fatigue, re-
duced appetite or weight loss.
Heartworm disease in cats
often shows signs similar to
asthma.
The two most common
ways of detecting this disease
involves simple blood tests
which either looks for the mi-
crofilariae or tests for proteins
(antigen) which come from
the adult worms. Neither test
is consistently positive until
about 7 months after infection
has occurred. This is one of
the reasons for an annual test.
Usually, all but the most
advanced cases of heartworm
disease can be successfully
treated in dogs. If you can
imagine this pile of worms in
the heart – once killed there
are worms and bits of worms
which now can end up causing
severe blockages. Treatment
drugs and protocols have been
established to help prevent
serious consequences from
these dead worms in your dog.
HOWEVER, by far the
best protection is to prevent
heartworm disease and not
wait until your dog has these
parasites. There is an injec-
tion which can be adminis-
tered once a year or you can
chose from several different
types of monthly medications
to prevent heartworm disease
in your dog. Furthermore
most of these preventives
function as a good general de-
wormer for other internal par-
asites – an ever present threat
to both dogs and people.
Start your puppies on pre-
ventives at 6 months of age,
and continue for life and you
will not need to worry about
this disease.
You may find further in-
formation by going to www.
heartwormsociety.org
A little girl plays with her best friend. INSET: Adult heartworms inside the heart and large
blood vessels of a dog. These take 6 – 9 months from the time of being bitten by an infected
mosquito. Photos: SUPPLIED.
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 14
TRAVEL AND TOURISM
Fiji celebrity chef Lance
Seeto was a special guest of
the Hawaii Visitors and Con-
vention Bureau, the equiva-
lent of Tourism Fiji, when he
visited the American island as
a member of the International
Food Wine and Travel Writers
Association earlier this month.
The award winning media
personality has attracted the
interest of Hawaii’s tourism
body, who along with other
international journalists, had
organised a seven day tour of
Celebrity chef visits Hawaii
PRESS RELEASE
PRESS RELEASE
the Polynesian island to dis-
cover ancient Hawaii through
history, arts, culture, and food.
The Hawaiian Polynesians
are distant cousins of the Fi-
jian iTaukei and were an ex-
tension of the great seafaring
adventures more than 3,500
years ago across Asia, Aus-
tralasia, the South Pacific, Ha-
waii and the United States.
Seeto was in Hawaii as a
journalist to experience the
differences between the two
island nations and how histo-
ry set Fiji and Hawaii on two
very different paths.
Unlike Fiji, Hawaiians of
mixed Chinese and Japanese
ancestry make up nearly half
of the population. Seeto took
advantage of Air Pacific’s di-
rect flights from Nadi to Ho-
nolulu to meet and sample
food from Hawaii’s top chefs
across its islands, and to learn
how the American tourism
body markets itself to the
world.
The Sofitel Fiji Resort & Spa has taken the
next step in its gourmet tour de force on fine
food in Fiji, consolidating its elegant approach
to Pacific dining with the appointment of ex-
perienced French Executive Chef, Jean-Marc
Ruzzene.
Chef Ruzzene’s arrival follows the depar-
ture of the resort’s award-winning former Ex-
ecutive Chef and local culinary identity Bren-
don Coffey who departed in February after
more than seven years with the resort.
Chef Ruzzene says he is looking forward
to further building the resort’s deep apprecia-
tion for local flavours and a respect for inter-
national cuisine, cultivated by his predecessor
Chef Coffey.
“As a result of Brendon’s passion for Fijian
food and ingredients I’ve inherited not only a
seasoned team of talented local chefs but an
amazing onsite garden and hotel farm with
fresh ingredients for inspiration,” he says.
“I hope to add my own unique European ap-
proach and Michelin star background to what
is already a well-regarded and established rep-
utation at this resort for serving up innovative
and sophisticated dining options for guests.”
Jean Marc started his career in France at
the renowned three-star Michelin establish-
ment, Yves Thuries before heading to Ger-
many to join the Queens Hotel Bermen. He
later returned to France working first at two-
star Michelin restaurant Le puit St Jacques and
then at one-star Michelin restaurant Le Hittau.
This was followed by a three year stint at the
Sheraton Skyline in London before moving
to the Philippines to assist the Westin Manila
Plaza with its year-long Beaujolais Nouveau
Celebrations.
Jean-Marc decided to emigrate and settle
in Australia, taking on the role of Sous Chef
at Brisbane’s Royal on the Park almost a de-
cade ago. A career highlight in Australia was
his role at Queensland’s Government House
and the “Office of the Governor”. Here, Jean-
Marc was Head Chef, personally looking after
visiting Heads of States and Political Officials
who visited Quentin Bryce, current Governor
General of Australia and then Governor for
Queensland. Immediately prior to Fiji, Jean-
Marc was Executive Sous Chef at the Sofitel
Brisbane Central.
Sofitel Fiji Resort & Spa General Manager
Simon Jinks says Jean-Marc’s French pedi-
gree ties in perfectly with the Sofitel’s brand’s
proud Parisian origins and distinct European
approach to hospitality and cuisine.
“It’s a timely appointment as Jean-Marc
joins the resort’s new Director of Food &
Beverage Jean-Francois Delahaye who is also
French,” says Mr Jinks. “Together I think they
represent the start of a fresh and exciting new
era for Sofitel Fiji which will only strengthen
our credentials as the region’s best foodie des-
tination.”
Sofitel Fiji Resort & Spa’s offers Fiji’s best
New head chef for Sofitel
choice of casual and elegant dining experiences.
Sofitel boasts Denarau Island’s most sophisti-
cated signature restaurant, plus relaxed bars and
café-style eateries for amazing variety, indoors
and out. Creative menus showcase the best local
produce and selected imported delicacies, mak-
ing this resort the place to be on the Fiji food
trail. Restaurants include previous winner of Fi-
ji’s ‘restaurant of the Year Award, Salt for down
to earth and delicious meals; Lagoon Restaurant
for themed buffet options and open aired terrace
dining, and V Restaurant - a contemporary and
comfortably cool Fijian dining encounter seat-
ing for up to 70 guests who truly enjoy the art of
fine food and wine. Other outlets include Lati-
tude 17 Cocktail Bar, Breeze Bar and French
sidewalk cafe, La Parisienne.
Sofitel Fiji Resort & Spa executive chef Jean-
Marc Ruzzene. Photo: SUPPLIED.
Chef Seeto's visit was about culture and the direction of food. He met with key group of
chefs who are responsible for transforming Hawaii from a place renowned for terrible local
food, to one of the best places to eat on the planet. On his first day, he caught up with Chef
George Mavrothalassitis (pictured on left above), chef/proprietor of Chef Mavro, Honolulu’s
fine dining, top-rated restaurant and holds the prestigious James Beard award, considered
the “Oscars” of the culinary world. Seeto spent nearly 2 hours talking about food, especially
local fresh foods, and Chef Mavro's pioneering influence on Hawaiian cuisine that has pro-
pelled the island nation into one of the hottest culinary hot spots in USA. Photo: SUPPLIED.
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 15
TRAVEL AND TOURISM
Fiji Chefs cook up a
storm in world meet
By SHALENDRA
PRASAD
Fiji Chefs Association president Shailesh Naidu, centre, is flanked by his members
during their AGM at Tanoa International Hotel. Photo: SHALENDRA PRASAD.
Fiji Chefs Association
members have been cooking
up a storm in world circles
following a successful out-
ing at the recent Global Chefs
Challenge in Australia.
Led by FCA president
Shailesh Naidu, the head chef
of award winning Outrigger
on the Lagoon Fiji, the team
consisted of 2012 Pastry Chef
of the Year Kelera Nalewabau
of Fiji Beach Resort & Spa
(managed by Hilton); 2012
Junior Chef of the Year Ab-
hinesh Sharma of Sheraton
Fiji Resort and 2012 Fiji Chef
of the Year Priya Darshani of
Outrigger on the Lagoon.
Abhinesh Sharma scooped
the first prize in the ‘Global
Young Chef of the Year’ cat-
egory relegating New Zealand
to the second spot while Priya
Darshani took on the third
spot in the overall ‘Global
Chefs Challenge’ behind Aus-
tralia (1st) and New Zealand
(2nd) respectively.
Under the ‘Global Pastry
Chefs’ challenge, Kelera Na-
lewabau also registered the
third spot under her name with
New Zealand scooping the
first and Australia the second
spot respectively.
Pacific Oz-tralasia was
the main sponsor of the team
which was also funded by Fiji
Chefs Association. The team
also had strong backing from
the Outrigger on the Lagoon ·
Fiji; Fiji Beach Resort & Spa
(managed by Hilton), Shera-
ton Fiji Resort and APTC.
The team is also grateful
to chef Jason Carroll and chef
Clinton Webber from Hilton
and Sheraton respectively for
the sound training sessions.
FCA also makes a special
mention to the world class
patisserie tutor of APTC, chef
Amanda Young for her highly
specialized pastry training for
pastry chef Kelera Nalew-
abau.
FCA president Shailesh
Naidu is all excited about
the recent achievements and
many other positive things
happening within the Associa-
tion.
“Please note that all the
winners will be representing
the Pacific Rim continent in
the World Finals against win-
ners of six other continents in
Stavanger, Norway in 2014.
This will be held during the
WACS Chefs Congress rep-
resented over by 93 countries
from around the globe,” Mr
Naidu informed.
“Once again I extend a big
thanks to everyone involved.
We couldn’t have done this
without your support. We are
now stepping into the world
stage to compete and it is
proud to say that our Fiji flag
will be flying high amongst
the top countries in the world
cuisine.
“As for now we start to
plan and prepare for the big
one; I will again need your
help and support to see chef
Abhinesh Sharma off to Eu-
rope,” Mr Naidu said.
“Another good news is
that we have finally launched
our website, please log on to
www.fijichefs.org for more
info.”
Meanwhile Mr Naidu has
been re-appointed the presi-
dent of the Fiji Chefs Asso-
ciation following their annual
general meeting at the Tanoa
International Hotel on Sun-
day, May 11.
Chef Adrian Brett, Group
Chef of Tanoa Hotels has been
appointed the business man-
ager of the association as well.
The association is now
planning a golf fundraising
drive with the help of Mat-
thew Allan of Bakels Fiji.
Global young chef of the year Abhinesh Sharma, right,
with FCA president Shailesh Naidu. Photo: SHALENDRA
PRASAD.
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 16
TRAVEL AND TOURISM
New look website
for Tourism Fiji
Fiji’s effort to attract more
international visitors has been
given a significant boost with
the launch of a new Tourism
Fiji website to showcase the
country and its attractions.
The search engine-friendly
address, www.fiji.travel, is a
state of the art, interactive site
that allows holidaymakers to
organize most aspects of their
visit themselves before they
leave home, including obtain-
ing quotes and making book-
ings.
The website’s unique built-
in Travel Planner can tailor
individual preferences for the
full range of Fiji’s offerings
- family holidays, romance,
backpackers, diving and ad-
venture. Prospective visitors
can also share their holiday
plans with friends and family
via social media outlets such
as Facebook.
Designed by a New Zea-
land-based specialist compa-
ny, Sparks Interactive, the new
website is part of the recently
announced global rebranding
of the country’s tourism effort
under the slogan “Fiji – Where
Happiness Finds You”.
Launching the site in Nadi
recently, the Attorney General
and Minister for Tourism, Ai-
yaz Sayed-Khaiyum, said the
initiative puts Fiji on the cut-
ting edge of website market-
ing and had important benefits
for the Fijian tourism industry.
“We expect that the ability
of holidaymakers to get quotes
and book their holidays direct
will lead to an overall increase
in the number of bookings.
Those direct bookings mean
more money in the pockets
of local operators, rather than
their overseas agents, and
more of the returns from tour-
ism being kept in Fiji. Local
operators are also empowered
by giving them easy access to
the website to showcase their
various attractions. It acts as a
kind of living travel brochure
about Fiji that can be altered
and updated at any time,” he
said.
The Minister said the web-
site exemplified the efforts of
the Bainimarama Government
to harness the most innovative
means, where possible, to ad-
vance the national interest.
“The international tourism
market is highly competitive
and there are many other des-
tinations vying for the same
trade. This website puts us in
a great position because of it’s
interactive capability and the
imaginative way in which it
showcases the unique Fijian
travel experience,” he said.
The Acting Chair of Tour-
ism Fiji, Elizabeth Powell,
said prospective holidaymak-
ers now had a much higher de-
gree of control over what they
wanted to see and do in Fiji.
“Visitors used to be de-
pendent on travel agents for
advice or the word of mouth
of family and friends. Now
they can examine all of the
available options on one inter-
active website from the com-
fort of their homes anywhere
in the world. With all the in-
formation they need at their
fingertips in a user friendly
online environment, they’re
in the best possible position to
get the most out of their holi-
days and Fiji has more oppor-
tunities to get repeat business
,” she said.
The new website is a vital
component of the major over-
haul and brand transformation
announced by Tourism Fiji
last year. This includes the
appointment of a new global
advertising agency, the selec-
tion of new public relations
and media partners in Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and the
US, the appointment of a new
social media partner and the
appointment of a new CEO,
Rick Hamilton.
The Minister said Fiji
had embarked on an exciting
transformation in its efforts to
market the country, grow the
tourism industry and provide
ordinary Fijians with more
opportunities for employ-
ment.
“This is all about taking a
holistic approach to the whole
tourism effort and bringing to-
gether the various stakehold-
ers to work for the common
cause of growing our industry
and the national economy.
Tourism currently provides
over a third of Fiji’s Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) and
we are laying the foundation
for more growth. Our goal is
more visitors, bigger-spend-
ing visitors, more return on
our collective investment in
marketing, more investment
in the local industry and above
all, more jobs and prosperity
for ordinary Fijians,” the Min-
ister added.
MINFO
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THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 1
J. KEVI GROUP
Reddy is ready to serve
By SHALENDRA
PRASAD
They say work is for people who don’t play golf but one
of Nadi’s leading businessman Narendra Reddy likes to
mix work and golf together to ultimately give customers
the best service and products on the course.
Reddy who owns J. Kevi Group has been a pioneer in
distributing quality golf carts to golf courses and resorts all
over Fiji for the past twenty one years now.
“E-Z-GO is the best product of its type and is made in
USA and we are proud to be the exclusive local distributors
of E-Z-GO - A Textron Company and also Jacobsen turf
equipment,” Mr Reddy offered.
Mr. Reddy added his company is now also distributing
other lines of golf carts from Augusta Golf Cars such as
Cushman and Bad Boy.
“Each model has its own uniqueness and is built to sat-
isfy the individual needs of customers,” Mr Reddy adds.
While addressing guests at the official handing-over of
the new E-Z-GO carts for Mana Island Resort, Mr. Reddy
said his company provides the greatest products and ser-
vices for golf carts and utility carts around golf courses,
resorts and island properties.
“We are very confident that there will be no room for
complaints from valued customers and we will be fully
geared for all back up service.
“A lot of you already know about Cushman products and
it is a pleasure to inform that the Cushman line is back in
the country.”
Mr. Reddy also acknowledged the support of Mr Shiri
Singh, Director Finance of Mana Island Resort and their
General Manager Mr Masao Tanaka together with the entire
management of the resort.
While officially receiving the carts, Mr Shiri Singh com-
mended the management and staff of J. Kevi Group for
their great products and exceptional customer service.
Its a deal... J. Kevi Group chairman Narendra Reddy, left, hands over the E-Z-GO Golf Carts to
Mr Shiri Singh, director finance of Mana Island Resort. INSET: Mr Shiri Singh tries out one of the
new carts. Photos: JOSEPHINE NAVULA.
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THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 2
NISSAN URVAN NEW MODEL LAUNCH


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THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 3
NISSAN URVAN NEW MODEL LAUNCH
2013 Nissan NV350 Urvan, when
beauty meets safety
PRESS RELEASE
PRESS RELEASE
T
he car has a history
dating back to 1973
when it was first
made. Its new E26 model
is the fifth generation and it
boasts of cutting-edge tech-
nology, class and unrivalled
comfort and safety that make
it outstanding.
The Nissan NV350 Urvan
is the ultimate meeting point
of beauty and comfort. Its
sleek body and comfortable
seats complete a classy ambi-
ence. It also has state-of-the-
art shiny silver headlamps, in-
dicators and brake lights with
their smooth curved edges,
making for a smooth driving
experience with a complete
peace of mind.
The 2013 Nissan NV350
Urvan is available in 4 vari-
ants, namely Panel Van, 12
seater window Van, 15 Seater
Hi-roof window van and 16
seater Hi-roof, wide body,
window van. The 15 and 16
Seater 2013 Nissan NV350
Urvan’s are longer than the
previous model E25 Nissan
Urvan.
The 15 and 16 seater van
comes with a spacious inte-
rior that allows more com-
fort, giving the passengers
more legroom and a chance
to enjoy a long journey with
a large cargo area.
Built for driver
One has a choice of ei-
ther the narrow or wide body
model. Its powerful stylish
exterior offers a fresh design
and is complemented by a
driver-friendly cockpit that
allows free movement of the
driver’s limbs with ample leg-
room.
The car is generally de-
signed around the driver for
maximum efficiency. This
ensures that the van’s most
important occupant, the driv-
er, is in control no matter the
traffic.
Powerful, fuel-efficient
engine
The versatile and respon-
sive five-speed transmission
hosts an impressive array of
advanced computerised tech-
nologies that maximise ef-
ficiency, ensuring a smooth,
dynamic ride at all times.
The 16-valve engine is fuel
efficient with 2.5-litre direct
injection.
Room for safety
The safety of both the
driver and the passengers is
well taken care of with fea-
tures like the anti-lock brak-
ing system that helps prevent
skidding during emergency
braking; brake assist which
enhances full braking during
emergency; and the collaps-
ible impact zones and front
air bags that all combine to
make every journey as safe as
it is comfortable.
It also has a raised roof
that reduces the risk of head
injuries in case of an accident.
Carpenters Motors corporate business unit manager James
Speight addresses invited guests during the launching of
the new Nissan Urvan at their Namaka showroom in Nadi
on Wednesday, May 15. Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
It’s the new
Nissan Urvan
for Red Bull
Red Bull Racing, which is based in Milton Keynes in
the UK, is making use of Nissan light commercial vehicles
supporting its race operations at this year’s Japanese Grand
Prix.
To assist with Red Bull’s transportation needs, Nissan’s
Light Commercial Vehicle Business Unit is supplying a fleet
of more than 30 vehicles and related services to the team.
Jonathan Wheatley, Red Bull Racing team manager, said:
“Within such a high-pressure and challenging environment
as Formula One, we need reliable partners taking care of all
our versatile transportation needs all over the world.”
“Extensive travel is part and parcel of Formula One, and
the transportation of our material and staff are an essential
part of our successful operations.
An invited guest tries the comfort of the new Nissan
Urvan. Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
Invited guests and a sales staff of Carpenters Motors in front
of the new Nissan Urvan. Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
Staff of Carpenters Motors in front of the new Nissan
Urvan. Below: The new Nissan Urvan which was on display
during the launching. Photos: MARGARET NAQIRI.
Nadi customers impressed
By JOSEPHINE
NAVULA
Customers and invited
guests were deeply impressed
with the features of the new
Nissan Urvan which was offi-
cially launched at the Carpen-
ters Motors Namaka branch
on Wednesday, May 15.
Unveiling the brand new
model in Nadi, Carpenters
Motors National Operations
Manager Alvin Sharma (pic-
tured) said the new Nissan
Urvan is the best choice for
customers in Fiji.
“We need new models of
vehicles in Fiji as they come
with better and more user-
friendly features, are safer,
more fuel efficient and keep
us on par with the rest of the
world. The 2013 Nissan Ur-
van is a quantum leap from
any other Nissan Urvan sold
previously in Fiji for all these
reasons,” Mr Sharma said.
The new model NV350
Caravan was premiered at the
2011 Tokyo Motor Show. It
went on sale in Japan in 2012
with diesel engine and super
long body variants and is now
available for sale in Fiji.
“The new NV350 Caravan
comes with the new YD25D-
DTi engine with clean diesel
technology that achieves the
class-leading fuel economy of
12.2km per liter based on Ja-
pan’s JC08 mode test cycle,”
Mr Sharma added.
He said the tough and
rigid body construction, and
advanced safety devices are
important for commercial ve-
hicle drivers who work long
hours with their vans.
“Nissan Urvan’s extremely
rigid body, with other- top-in-
class safety features, ensures
years of trouble free opera-
tion.”
Sharma added that Carpen-
ters Motors is the clear leader
in automotive sales, in terms
of number of vehicles sold.
“We have always believed
and succeeded in providing a
variety of options to our val-
ued clients, especially for a
small developing market like
Fiji,” he said.
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THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 4
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL NADI
Due to a growing need for
well structured and meaning-
ful Early Childhood education
in Nadi, International School
Nadi has expanded its Pre-
school. The school now offers
classes for children starting as
young as two years old. There
are four different programmes
depending on the age of your
child.
International School Nadi
believes that the basic skills
that children learn during their
early childhood years are the
foundation for all future learn-
ing and that children learn best
when activities and materials
are authentic, concrete and
relevant to their lives. The Pri-
mary Years Progamme offered
in the primary school at ISN
is an excellent framework that
gives support to active learn-
ers and inquirers, enabling
them to construct meaning in
what they do.
In the Early Childhood
classes children are given op-
Extension of
early childhood
education
By DIANNE KORARE
Principal - ISN
portunities to learn and de-
velop through exploration,
play and a variety of struc-
tured activities. Children are
continually and consistently
encouraged to grow and de-
velop individually, honoring
each child’s uniqueness. ISN
believes that self esteem is
central to a child’s growth.
In a guided way, children are
encouraged to make their own
play choices and take control
of their own learning.
In Playgroup (Friday
mornings) and Headstart
(three afternoons) activities
include Music/movement
and singing; imaginative play
outdoor and free play; art and
craft activities, language de-
velopment and constructive/
manipulative play. Children
participate in new experienc-
es, develop and increase their
social/emotional skills, learn
sharing, cooperation and
simple routines, interact with
adults and children in a safe
environment and enjoy learn-
ing more about their world.
In Early Childhood 1 (four
mornings) the children do
real work that allows them to
demonstrate what they know.
ISN takes great pride in offer-
ing young children a day full
of delight in learning and be-
ing together at school. Chil-
dren are encouraged to ex-
plore and problem solve with
materials and diverse experi-
ences; they are given opportu-
nities to express their imagi-
nation and creativity within a
structured environment. They
are provided with opportuni-
ties to develop mathemati-
cal skills and are introduced
to mathematical concepts
such as quantity, time, order
and shape and encouraged to
use mathematical language
as they talk about their find-
ings. Through a range of math
based activities, students
will develop the ability to
sort and classify shapes, size
and colour, arrange things in
order and tell the difference
between different shapes and
begin to understand numbers.
They will become problem
solvers. The reading readiness
and language programme will
provide opportunities for stu-
dents to discuss pictures they
see in story books and encour-
age them to begin to take an
interest in reading and writ-
ing. Art, Music and Physical
Education are also a central
part of the programme.
In Early Childhood 2
(Four full days and one morn-
ing) there is a strong empha-
sis on preparing the child
for formal schooling and at
ISN, language is central to
all learning. Students experi-
ence a variety of contextual
and meaningful opportunities
for reading, writing, speak-
ing, viewing and presenting;
for a range of purposes, situa-
tions and audiences. They are
encouraged to ask and answer
questions, recall stories and
events, concentrate and listen,
recognize and identify letters.
Through science-based activ-
ities within the inquiry topics,
students explore ways objects
and living things function.
They explore and discuss the
ways the world works and
show care and respect for
themselves and other living
things and the environment.
Students watch things grow,
are inquisitive, curious and
investigate and make connec-
tions between existing knowl-
edge and new learning. They
extend their knowledge of
mathematics and take part in
Music, drama, Art and Physi-
cal Education with specialist
teachers.
A lovely new playground
has been built as a PTA (Par-
ents, Teachers and Friends
Association) initiative and
another classroom has been
specially set up for the new
programme. The Principal,
Dianne Korare (dkorare@isn.
school.fj) and the Early Child-
hood Coordinator, Babra Nar-
ian are available during the
week to personally meet with
interested parents to discuss
these exciting programmes
for children.
Children enjoying the horse ride during the family fun day last
year. Photo: SHALENDRA PRASAD.
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THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 5
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL NADI
Family fun day is back!
International School Nadi (ISN) is busy preparing for its
fantastic Fun Day. This is the highlight of the year for the
school and all the many people who attend. The Fun Day is be-
ing held on Saturday, 8th June from 10am until 3pm.
Each class at ISN is preparing their stall; some examples
are: Arts and Crafts, Face Painting, Water Balloon Bucket Toss,
Disco and the famous Haunted House. The students from Inter-
national School Nadi come from twelve different nationalities
and there will be food stalls selling food from Korea, Fiji, Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and India! There will be activities such as
the Bouncy Castle (courtesy of MacDonald’s), the Bungy tram-
poline and Buggys, Quad Bikes (Westside Motorbike Rentals).
Other stalls include Nail Art, Braiding, Massages, Henna,
Pot Plants, Flower arrangements and the popular White Ele-
phant Stall which promises great bargain such as second-hand
clothes, toys etc.
Another great community service on the day is the Breast
Cancer Caravan which will offer free blood pressure checks
and other health checks. The West Trust Animal Welfare will
be there also and they will be putting on a 30 minute pet show.
The great thing about the Fun Day is that the entry is free
and there is also a free return shuttle bus outside Jack’s in Nadi
town every 30 minutes with the first bus departing at 10am.
International School Nadi (ISN) is a private co-educational
school located in Nadi. It is a fully accredited International
Baccalaureate World school that offers the Primary Years
(PYP), Middle Years (MYP) and Diploma (DP) Programmes
from Early Childhood to Year 13 (Form 7). It has an enthusi-
astic and hardworking staff and a happy and motivated student
body. ISN has a current roll of 222 students, from 12 different
nations, 30% of whom are Fiji Nationals.
Fun Day is an excellent initiative by ISN parents. Interna-
tional School Nadi is very fortunate to have such an interested
group of parents who willingly organize activities for the stu-
dents to celebrate the different cultures in our school. Our PTA
(Parent, Teachers Association) have done an excellent job this
year under the leadership of Jules Samuels and the hardwork-
ing Fun Day committee, parents, staff, students and friends of
ISN. There is always such a great feeling of community on the
day and the money raised assists with important developments
within the school.
International School Nadi also offers full and half scholar-
ships to outstanding students in Fiji to do the prestigious In-
ternational Baccalaureate Diploma. This qualification gives
the students access to any university throughout the world.
Funds raised at the Fun Day will also support this excellent
programme.
The Principal of ISN, Dianne Korare and the whole ISN
community encourage everyone in Nadi to come along to Fun
Day on Saturday 8th June, as we can promise you all a really
great time! PRESS RELEASE
TOP: Kavita Raniga serves food during last year’s family fun day. BELOW: More pictures from last year.
Photos: SHALENDRA PRASAD.
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THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 6
TISI SANGAM MICRO INSURANCE
Sangam teams with LICI for Micro Insurance
By MARGARET NAQIRI
Then India Sanmarga Ikya (TISI) Sangam has embarked on
a visionary initiative to provide micro insurance cover to eli-
gible people who are affiliated with them by way of member-
ship in order to provide social protection and a self supporting
mechanism.
The aim is to offer the benefits of life insurance through a
group micro insurance scheme at affordable costs to TISI San-
gam members.
TISI Sangam CEO Jagannath Sami said the launching was
basically the signing and hand over of Master Policy from Life
Insurance Corporation of India (LICI) to TISI Sangam.
Those people who have already signed and became mem-
bers of this micro insurance group also received certificates
from LICI acting general manager Sanjeev Jain.
“This scheme is to target the disadvantaged, the very poor
in our community and we are very hopeful that this would be a
great service to our members who are in the lower rank of the
economic table. It provides financial support to the families for
funeral expenses,” Mr Sami said.
“We have done enough in culture, religion and education,
what we have not done is reaching out to our poor members.
Our biggest challenge is we have to help the members and no
scheme can be successful without the members so we need to
have a target set,” Mr Sami added.
“For the first time in the Pacific there is an insurance scheme
that is typically targeting the most vulnerable in the community
and the country,” says Reuben Summerlin, Regional Financial
Inclusion Advisor and Project Manager (Pacific Financial In-
clusion Programme - PFIP).
“Over 71 people have bought the Micro insurance Policy
and are covered for the life insurance for as low as $14.00 a
year.”
TISI Sangam Gives Members
Economic Hope
Saturday, 13th April,
marked the signing of the
LICI -TISI Sangam Microin-
surance policy document for-
malizing the process of reg-
istering Then India Sanmarga
Ikya Sangam (TISI Sangam)
members in the Nadi district
to one of the lowest premi-
ums on the insurance market
in Fiji. The event was held at
the Sangam school complex
in Nadi.
For the past two years,
AusAID together with de-
velopment partners Asian
Development Bank (ADB),
International Labor Organiza-
tion (ILO) and the Pacific Fi-
nancial Inclusion Programme
(PFIP) have collaborated to
offer an insurance product that
will offer protection to low-
income Fijian communities.
The LICI -TISI Sangam
Microinsurance Scheme of-
fers TISI Sangam’s members
the ability to cope with un-
expected shocks by paying a
minimum premium of FJ$14/
year for FJ$1,000 annual fu-
neral coverage. “LICI con-
gratulates TISI Sangam for
bringing this scheme to the
masses and LICI is happy to
be partnering with TISI San-
gam to help contribute to the
community at large and pro-
vide much needed insurance
to the vulnerable communities
who need it most, “expressed
Mr. Sanjeev Jain, Acting Gen-
eral Manager, LICI.
Mr. Jagannath Sami, CEO,
TISI Sangam, Fiji was all
smiles as months of planning
and negotiations was finally
being formalized. Mr. Sami
expressed. “For the past two
years we have been working
with LICI, PFIP and other
donors to bring this funeral
insurance benefit to our door-
step, offering our members
from the ages of 18-65 a low
premium cover that will give
them security and support
during unpredictable events
like death or accidents.”
“We are finally reaching
out to our poor Sangam com-
munities. For years, Sangam
members have been going to
Sangam conventions, send-
ing their children to Sangam
schools-this is an initiative we
know that will meet the needs
of our members.”
PFIP facilitated this part-
nership and offered extensive
technical assistance to both
partners with financial assis-
tance from AusAID. Mr. Reu-
ben Summerlin, PFIP Project
Manager and Regional Finan-
cial Inclusion Advisor com-
mented, “Through this part-
nership with LICI and TISI
Sangam, we think we can
clearly demonstrate that there
is great potential for insurance
among low income people –
that they can understand in-
surance and they are willing
to pay for insurance coverage.
The death of an individual not
only often removes a family’s
source of income; it also can
force them into debt. Prod-
ucts like this will enable poor
people to better cope with
risks rather than sinking deep-
er into poverty.”
During the event, Ms.
Muni Ratnam Mestry, a TISI
Sangam community facilitator
was awarded best salesperson
award, managing to sign up
51 TISI Sangam members for
this funeral insurance scheme.
Asked whether she would stop
here, she answered fervently,
“Oh no! I think I will sign up
some more of our members
because this is something
good and will greatly benefit
not just the poor but everyone,
so I am encouraging all our
women members to sign up
for themselves and their hus-
bands!”
PFIP is a Pacific-wide pro-
gramme helping to provide
sustainable financial services
to low income households. It
is a joint project of the UN
Capital Development Fund
(UNCDF) and the United
Nations Development Pro-
gramme (UNDP) and has
received additional support
from AusAID and the Euro-
pean Union. The programme
operates from UNDP Pacific
Centre in Suva, Fiji.
PRESS RELEASE
Community facilitators and stakeholders pose for a group photo
during the function on Saturday, April 13 at Sangam SKM College.
Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
LICI acting general manager Sanjeev
Jain, right, seals the deal while TISI San-
gam CEO Jagannath Sami and PFIP’s re-
gional financial inclusion advisor Reuben
Summerlin look on. Photo: MARGARET
NAQIRI.
PFIP’s regional financial inclusion advisor Reuben Summerlin hands over a token of ap-
preciation to Ms Muni Ratnam Mestry for signing up the highest number of policies so far.
Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
www.thejetnewspaper.com
THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 7
TISI SANGAM MICRO INSURANCE
www.thejetnewspaper.com
THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 8
AIR PACIFIC ARRIVAL OF SECOND A330 AIRBUS
Air Pacific (soon to be ‘Fiji
Airways’ in June) has wel-
comed their second Airbus
A330 as it made its maiden
voyage to Nadi, Fiji from
Toulouse via Los Angeles on
Thursday, May 23.
To highlight its role as
‘Fiji’s flying ambassador and
continue a proud tradition of
naming its aircraft after Fiji’s
islands, the new A330 has
been named Island of Namu-
ka-i-Lau. This island plays an
important role with the soon
to be adopted ‘Fiji Airways’
identity. Namuka-i-Lau native
and renowned Fijian Masi
artist Makereta Matemosi de-
signed the distinctive Teteva
symbol at the heart of the new
brandmark and various Masi
motifs used in various design
elements of the new brand.
Namuka-i-Lau is located in
Fiji's Lau archipelago and lies
northeast of Kabara and south
of Moce.
The second of three Airbus
A330s ordered in October
2011 and designed exclusive-
ly for Fiji’s national carrier
- the new aircraft carries the
new ‘Fiji Airways’ branding
that is authentic, distinctive,
and true to the airline’s Fijian
roots. The aircraft represents
state-of-the-art comfort, best-
in-class amenities, and the
strong future of Air Pacific,
which is being renamed ‘Fiji
Airways’ in June of 2013.
On board the aircraft for
its inaugural flight were Act-
ing CEO Aubrey Swift, and
Permanent Secretary for Fi-
ji’s Ministry of Tourism and
Public Enterprise, Elizabeth
Powell. On the ground in Fiji,
the flying ambassador was
welcomed with applause as it
arrived at the Air Pacific han-
gar after a low fly over across
the Lau Island group. Fijian
Prime Minister Commodore
Voreqe Bainimarama and At-
torney General Aiyaz Sayed-
Khaiyum were on hand to
welcome the aircraft home.
“We’re delighted to re-
ceive delivery of our second
brand new A330 on schedule
and to have introduced the
aircraft and th new ‘Fiji Air-
ways’ livery and design to the
United States. Our new A330
fleet will give Fiji a chance
to expand services to new
and emerging markets and to
continue to encourage visitors
from the United States to visit
Fiji,” said Aubrey Swift, Air
Pacific Acting CEO.
He continues, “As the flag
carrier and national airline
of Fiji, we’re committed to
bringing attention to the na-
tion’s beautiful outer islands,
many of which have distinct
and unique attractions and
attributes. We are extremely
proud to name our second
Airbus A330 Island of Namu-
ka-i-Lau after our Makereta
Matemosi’s home.”
The new aircraft will go
into service on June 3rd with
a flight to Sydney, one of the
airline’s most important mar-
kets.
Air Pacific’s first A330-200
aircraft, Island of Taveuni, ar-
rived in March this year.
These state-of-the-art air-
craft feature industry leading
capabilities and an enhanced
customer experience. These
include:
* State-of-the-art in-
flight entertainment from
Panasonic’s eX2 industry-
leading in-flight entertain-
ment system, with on-demand
audio/video, games, com-
munications and applications
that will be available in both
Economy and Business Class.
* 24 business and
249 economy class seats are
National Carrier Names Second Airbus A330 ‘Island of Namuka-i-Lau’, paying
homage to ‘Fiji Airways’ brandmark designer Makereta Matemosi’s home island
Second A330 arrives home
provided by Weber/Zodiac,
ensuring optimal comfort for
passengers in terms of space,
ease of movement, and cush-
ioning.
* Incorporating the
Panasonic in-flight entertain-
ment system, each seat will
also have a USB and power
outlet for computers, iPads,
iPods, tablets and similar de-
vices.
“The new A330s allow us
to dial up our product offering
like never before and once the
aircraft are inducted in our
fleet and our ‘Fiji Airways’
brand coming online soon,
we are well on our way to of-
fering our customers the best
flying experience in the south
Pacific.”
“This aircraft will deliver
improved frequencies across
our network, which will cre-
ate more connectivity options
between Fiji and the South
Pacific to Australian, Hong
Kong, New Zealand, USA
and beyond.”
Tomorrow, Air Pacific will
also see the delivery of their
first B737 rebranded in the
new ‘Fiji Airways’ livery and
design. Another refreshed
B737 will return to the airline
in two weeks time.
In June, Air Pacific will
be officially re-launched as
Fiji Airways. The new brand
will include a roll-out across
the international marketplace,
ticket offices, check-in coun-
ters, airport lounge facilities,
uniforms and the airline’s
official website; and a new
in-flight experience with en-
hanced on-board meal offer-
ings across all flights.
All four existing Boeing
737s in the airline’s narrow-
body fleet will be rebranded
and upgraded by September
2013. The third A330 will ar-
rive in November, by which
time the airline’s B747 fleet
will be returned. At this point,
the full turnaround and brand
transition will be complete.
PRESS RELEASE
The new A330 Airbus named ‘Island of Namuka-I-Lau flies over the Nadi skies before touching down at the Nadi International Airport
on Thursday, May 23. Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama and Attorney-General
Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum witness the arrival of the new aircraft.
Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
www.thejetnewspaper.com
THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 9
AIR PACIFIC ARRIVAL OF SECOND A330 AIRBUS
Makereta Matemosi, right, who has designed the concept
of the new livery disembarks from the new Airbus. Photo:
MARGARET NAQIRI.
Distinguished guests,
My fellow Fijians.
Bula vinaka and a very good afternoon to you all.
Two months ago, I stood here with many of you to welcome
the first of the new Fiji Airways A 330s – Island of Taveuni.
It was a day we will never forget because of the surge of
pride that flowed through every Fijian.
As the new plane flew low over our islands, cities, towns
and villages, tens of thousands of people came out to welcome
it.
The sense of excitement was amazing. It was a special day
to be Fijian.
When they gazed up, people could see Fiji Airways in big
bold letters - the name of our country on a brand new wide-
bodied plane, the first we’ve ever owned.
And they could see something spectacular – a design that
speaks to all of us - the masi livery created not by some fancy
design studio overseas but by one of our own – an ordinary
Fijian by the name of Makareta Matamosi.
Like every Fijian, I was tremendously impressed and in-
spired by her creation.
How wonderful that this is the image of Fiji that these new
planes will take to airports around the world.
How wonderful that Makareta’s creation has been hailed as
brilliant by so many design experts around the world.
Makareta, vinaka vakalevu. You did us proud. You did your
country proud and you did your home island proud.
Which is why today we welcome “ Island of Namuka-i-lau”.
As you all know, Air Pacific has a tradition of naming its
aircraft after islands and this tradition continues with Fiji Air-
ways.
And so it was that I suggested to the Air Pacific Board that
we name this second Airbus after Makareta’s island in honour
of her work.
This afternoon, before it landed here in Nadi, the plane flew
low over Namuka-i-Lau to give the people there a closer look.
We can be sure it was a thrill they will remember for the rest
of their lives.
Because now Namuka-i- Lau isn’t just a small obscure is-
land in Lau but the name on a state- of- the- art aircraft that
millions of people will see at airports around the world.
Of course, the arrival of our second A330 can never be as
exciting as the first. But I believe this is equally special because
we are reminded of the richness of our culture and the wonder-
ful creativity of artisans like Makareta who keep it alive and
display it to the world.
The plane itself is the second of three that have been de-
signed for our use from the ground up.
They are hugely important for the new Fiji Airways and
for every Fijian – because they are destined to bring millions
of visitors to our shores in the coming years to underpin the
strength of our economy and ensure the nation’s prosperity.
They are also flying billboards for Fiji – a message to the
world that we are open for business and want to share our
beautiful surroundings, our culture and our hospitality with the
peoples of other lands.
“Fiji, where happiness finds you”. Fiji Airways, the best
way to get to Fiji because the Fijian experience begins before
you arrive.
As I’ve said before, my Government encourages competi-
tion as the best way to keep airfares affordable for ordinary
people. But that doesn’t stop me from urging every Fijian to
support their national airline, to keep their dollars in Fiji and
safeguard the jobs of Fijian workers.
With these new planes, Fiji Airways gains a new ability to
compete against its rivals.
Now that the second is here, the airline will be starting its
A330 service to Sydney in a couple of weeks, to add to those
already operating to Auckland, Brisbane and Hong Kong. And
soon, the new aircraft will begin flying to Los Angeles, with
extra services coming on stream later in the year when the third
and final Airbus arrives and our 747s are retired.
Later next month, Air Pacific formally becomes Fiji Air-
ways. The new branding will be unveiled across its network,
cabin staff will begin wearing their new uniforms and higher
standards of in-flight services will be introduced.
When that happens, Fiji Airways will really begin to soar
– confident, competitive and eager to find new routes and op-
portunities.
I want to thank the management and staff of Air Pacific for
the way in which they’ve worked together over the past couple
of years to reverse the airline’s fortunes.
There’s a new spirit in the airline as workers begin to share
in the profits that are flowing from its better performance. It is
spearheading the labour reforms that my Government wants in
the interests of all Fijians. Far from reducing workers’ rights
– as some claim – we are empowering them by giving them
a financial stake in the airline’s success. A stake in the future.
The evidence of that new spirit is all around us today – a day
to remember, a day to be proud of our national airline, a day to
be proud to be Fijian.
We welcome the “Island of Namuka-i-lau”.
Vinaka vakalevu. Thank you.
PM’s official
address at the
arrival of new
A330 Airbus
People of Namuka-I-Lau were also present to mark the arrival of
the new A330 Airbus. Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
Makereta Matemosi explains
the significance of the ‘masi’ de-
signs on the new livery. Photo:
MARGARET NAQIRI.
Captain Josua Cavalevu, centre, has once again brought
the new A330 home. Photo: MARGARET NAQIRI.
www.thejetnewspaper.com
THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 10
McHAPPY DAY
McDonald’s Fiji held their inaugural McHappy Day event
in their restaurants on Saturday, May 11.
McHappy Day is an annual event for McDonald’s restau-
rants worldwide whereby a percentage of that day’s sales go
towards charity.
The McDonald’s Fiji restaurants organised a main event
at their restaurant in Laucala Bay which included an outside
broadcast in partnership with local media as well as the hosting
of various games and competitions for children.
All three restaurants gave out balloons and offered face
painting for kids to commemorate this day.
Radio personalities were also present behind the counters
at Suva and Laucala Bay in support of the event from 10am
to 2pm.
McDonald’s Fiji fundraising efforts included the sale of $1
McHappy Day Smiles from April 11th – May 11th and the do-
nation of $1 from every McValue Meal sold on McHappy Day.
The response for the McHappy Smiles has been very posi-
tive with all three restaurants exceeding expectations.
The proceeds from the fundraising will go directly towards
Fiji Kid’s! Learning for Life – A charitable organisation based
out of Sigatoka whose focus is on connecting less fortunate
families with sponsors who provide the funds to ensure their
children are able to attend school.
McHappy Day a great success
PRESS RELEASE
By SHALENDRA
PRASAD
Fiji Kids! thanks
McDonalds
Fiji Kids! Founder Julie
Hoskison has conveyed her
utmost appreciation to the
management of McDonalds
Fiji for teaming up with
them.
From its humble begin-
ning in 2009 following the
devastating floods that year,
Fiji Kids! has grown and to-
day is in need of more stra-
tegic partners and donors in
order to carry out its core
activity – that is to help send
the poorest kids to school
for a brighter future.
“We cannot believe how
much we have grown in that
time and so appreciate the
support from McDonalds
Fiji and of course The Jet
newspaper,” Ms Hoskison
stated via an email message.
The organisation is based
in Sigatoka and more infor-
mation can be found on their
website www.fijikids.org.
64 kids from Sigatoka were able to go to school following timely overseas donations last year.
Photo: THE JET FILE 2012.
www.thejetnewspaper.com
THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 11
McHAPPY DAY
"Congratulations to McDonalds on your inaugural McHappy Day"
“The management
of McDonalds
wishes to thank
all customers who
have
supported the
McHappy
Day”
Think of Fiji and the first
thing that comes to mind is
a memorable island holiday,
a luxurious resort, a tropical
paradise with miles of idyllic
golden sand and swaying co-
conut trees.
For almost 1 million peo-
ple the beautiful islands of
Fiji is home.
But for many, life in para-
dise is no holiday. Home is a
basic shelter with no power or
water. The family must grow
everything it needs to eat, and
cash income may amount to a
few dollars a week. Even the
basics are out of reach.
Despite the number of
families living below the
bread line, education is not
free in Fiji.
The cost of school fees,
uniforms, shoes and books
amounts to hundreds of dol-
lars every year.
For many children, com-
Dollar a day can help erase poverty
pleting their education is an
impossible dream. Without an
education, another generation
will be trapped in poverty.
Fiji Kids! Learning for
Life was registered as a char-
ity in Fiji in 2010. We connect
destitute families with spon-
sors who provide the funds to
ensure these children are able
to attend school.
Our sponsors commit to
continue their support until
the student leaves school.
Through education we give
these young people and their
families hope for the future.
They have the opportunity to
get meaningful employment
and to break out of the pov-
erty cycle.
Fiji Kids! Sponsors change
lives for less than $1 per day.
In one such incident, little
Shalini was abandoned by
her parents and lives in deep
poverty in an abandoned farm
building, cared for by her aunt
and grandmother. Neither of
them is literate and they have
no means of supporting her.
Shalini’s education is now
sponsored through Fiji Kids.
We pay for her fees, uniforms,
books and all school supplies,
and will continue to do so un-
til she completes high school.
We hope and pray this assis-
tance means a better future
for Shalini.
Mr Deo is a single father
caring for 3 small boys. They
live in a make shift dwelling,
sharing one large mattress.
The family earns a small
amount of money farming
cabbages. The day starts at
5am collecting fire wood for
the stove which is an impro-
vised 44 gallon drum. They
have no electricity, running
water or toilet. Clothes and
bodies are washed in the river.
The three young boys now
attend the nearby primary
school. Their father no longer
worries about how to afford
the fees. The boys smile a lot,
and are excited to go to school
in their smart uniform, shiny
shoes and with a bag full of
colouring pencils!
Shabnam is a bright and
diligent student but her moth-
er was unable to keep up with
the cost of sending her two
daughters to high school.
Shabnam was sponsored
to complete the last 3 years
of her education. Her gener-
ous sponsor even provided
her with a laptop – a complete
luxury! Shabnam has now
graduated and been accepted
into a Diploma course to
study to be a primary school
teacher.
In January each year, Fiji
Kids enrols all students into
school, pays school fees and
on one (very busy) day issues
each student with their uni-
forms, books, shoes and sup-
plies for the year. Sponsors
are invited to join in the day
as volunteers.
Overseas sponsors are
welcome to visit throughout
the year to meet their “Fiji
Kid”.
Fiji Kids! now sponsors 82
students at 12 schools - as a
“volunteer only” grass-roots
charity we have reached our
capacity. Every day we are
faced with desperate parents
who live in extreme hard-
ship. However, we have taken
the very hard step to suspend
all further sponsorships. It is
heart-breaking to say no, es-
pecially with a wait-list of
sponsors ready to go.
To continue our work, we
need your help - your dona-
tion will help us fund a local
Education Officer and set up
a sustainable program based
in Fiji.
Our target this year is
FJ$20,000 (AUD$10,000).
With this support we can en-
sure we give our students the
support they need, and sup-
port additional stricken fami-
lies.
If you can help us, we can
help them – click www.fijik-
ids.org/donate.php for your
donations which will make
that difference in a needy
kid’s life.
Vinaka Vaka Levu.
By JULIE HOSKISON
of Fiji Kids!
www.thejetnewspaper.com
THE JET COMMERCIAL FEATURES
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 12
CUPPABULA COFFEE SHOP
New menu at
Cuppabula
Words: JOSEPHINE NAVULA
Photos: MARGARET NAQIRI
People of Nadi will now no longer have to travel far to get
the best mouth watering food and special varieties of ‘Pacific-
feel-good’ drinks - thanks to the Tappoo Groups’ Cuppabula
Coffee Shop which launched their new menu recently.
Opened in October last year, the new café is located within
their Fiji Market outlet along the main street in the corner of
Ashram Road.
“Our Fiji Market concept store has been operational in Nadi
since 2007. Its popularity amongst customers and exemplary
success warranted an expansion, so we re-designed and opened
Fiji Market opposite our Tappoo Nadi department store last Oc-
tober, bigger and better,” Tappoo Nadi Department Store Man-
ager Ratesh Prasad said.
“The new Fiji Market also houses our famous Cuppabula
Coffee Shop. Prior to this we had customers traveling from
Nadi to our Cuppabula outlet in Sigatoka to enjoy our famous
Ice Coffee and Pizza, which we reckon is the best in Fiji,” Mr
Prasad added.
Mr Prasad said Fiji Market has a lot to offer from other simi-
lar shops in town.
“Fiji Market is much more than a handicraft store - it is
a true Fijian experience, offered for the first time in Fiji by
any retailer. Tappoo Fiji Market offers an extensive range of
products, complimented by Spa Fiji, Cuppabula Coffee Shop,
live in-store entertainment, henna and tattoo art, hair braiding
amongst other offerings which are all seamlessly linked to each
other,” he said.
The Tappoo Group also invited VIP guests at the launching
of the new menus at the Cuppabula Coffee Shop recently.
Tappoos Group has Fiji Market concept stores in Nadi, Siga-
toka, Tappoo City in Suva and Nadi Airport.
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 17
ADVERTISEMENT
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 18
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 19
MOTORING
POCKET ROCKET
D
reams do turn in reality,
and a perfect example is
Nitin Nitesh Nair’s Toy-
ota Starlet GT. The 29-year-old
Customs OIfcer, originally Irom
Kulukulu, Sigatoka and now re-
siding in Martintar, Nadi had the
aspiration to build something one
of a kind.
And it all began Irom his child-
hood days.
'My passion Ior cars began
Irom my Iather Late Mr Shan-
karan Nair well known as Moon`
who was a Taxi driver and also
a motor mechanic,” Nair offered.
“On Sundays he used to repair
cars and I was his tool boy, got to
know about the makes and mod-
els oI cars and a bit about engines
as well. I still remember that he
always told me that it`s you who
drives the car and not the car
who drives you. As I grew up my
knowledge and understanding oI
cars also grew and as well as my
passion,” Nair added.
'Growing up there with many
inspirations, my eyes reached
Empire Autoparts’ EP82 Toyo-
ta Starlet GT with registration
'OUTLAW¨ which was owned
by Mr. Saheed.
'At frst sight it touched my
heart as I told myself - one day
I will have something similar oI
this kind oI my own,¨ he says.
Mr Nair got the opportunity to
grab an EP82 Toyota Starlet one
day at a reasonable price, where
the dream project about creating
its own image in terms oI looks
and perIormance started to slowly
turn into reality.
With the help oI Iriends Mr
Saheed and Mr Khalid oI Fargo
Investments / Empire Autoparts
Nadi, the ever popular 4EFTE en-
gine was imported, installed and
tuned by them.
With tireless efforts and sleep-
less nights together with enor-
mous monetary investments, the
GT was fnally complete. Even
now the owner Ieels there is room
Ior improvement and he will keep
working on the car as he fnds
time.
The current (engine) specs oI
the vehicle include: 4EFTE en-
Nitin with his ride - TOPGUN Photo: Krishneel Chand
rrañ|e kame: kitia kitesh kair
kqe: zº years
0tteçatiaa: cestams 0íñter
kiáe: tayata !tar|et 0t
Maáe|: lrêz
car keq: t0r00k
c|e|: Ii[i cars
Photos: Courtesy oI Krishneel Chand
Meaaewar khaa
0esiqa a layaet
gine running 12psi boost with top
mount intercooler: Boosted and
Tuned by Fargo Investments Ltd,
Chipped ECU by TDS perfor-
mance, High pressure Iuel pump,
Exedy clutch plate, Turbo smart
boost controller, Turbo upgraded
recently, HKS turbo timer, Iorged
internals, HKS blow oII valves,
AIter market waste gate actuator
and Platinum Racing plugs.
To Iancy the exterior the ve-
hicle has custom made body kits
made by Mukesh Chand oI Kulu-
kulu Sigatoka and League brand-
ed 13inch outer mag wheels.
As for sounds the car features a
Sony Xplod DVD Head unit with
2 screens, 12inch JVC dual coil
subs and Kenwood 6x9`s.
COVER STORY
y at a reasonable price, where gine running 12
!haraaa !hah
!tary
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 20
KHUDDAMUL AHMADIYYA MUSLIM JAMAAT
www.reviewofreligion.org
www.mta.tv
www.askislam.org
www.muslimsforpeace.org
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SCIENCE
Origin of Life
“And, surely, We created man from dry ring-
ing clay, from black mud wrought into shape.”
(Ch.15 v.27)
“And the Jinn We had created before from the
fre oI hot wind.¨ (Ch.15 v.28)
“He created man from dry ringing clay which
is like baked pottery.” (Ch.55 v.15)
“… And We made from water every living
thing…”(Ch.21 v.31)
Evolution
“That you shall assuredly pass on from one
stage to another.¨ (Ch.84 v.20)
“What is the matter with you that you expect
not wisdom and staidness from Allah? ‘And
He has created you in different forms and dif-
Ierent conditions.¨ (Ch.71 v.14-15)
“O man, what has emboldened thee against
thy Gracious Lord, Who created thee, then
perfected thee, then proportioned thee aright?
In whatever form He pleased, He fashioned
thee.¨ (Ch.82 v.7-9)
Clay subjected to cycles of wetting and drying can link
molecules of the amino acid known as glycine. The
cycling transfers energy from the environment to the
organic molecule. Direct heat Irom fre played a vital
role in the creation and maintenance of pre-biotic or-
ganisms; their decay and fermentation created the pri-
mordial soup. The Holy Qur’an clearly states that the
material used for the making of pottery-like plates was
decayed organic matter-stagnant blackish mud.
Embryology
“… We have indeed created you from dust,
then from a spermdrop, then from clot-
ted blood, then Irom a lump oI fesh, partly
formed and partly unformed, in order that We
may make Our power manifest to you. And We
cause what We will to remain in the wombs for
an appointed term; then We bring you forth as
babes; then We rear you that you may attain to
your age of full strength …” (Ch.22 v.6)
“… He creates you in the wombs of your
mothers, creation after creation, in threefold
Verses in the Holy Qur’an describe the different stages
of fetal development. Various references are made to
the different shapes and forms of the fetus, to the fact
that not all fertilized embryos complete the full fetal cy-
cle and to the existence of the abdominal wall, uterine
wall and the embryonic sacs (the “threefold darkness”).
The Holy Qur’an speaks of creation only in step by
step progressive stages which are well provided for,
categorically rejecting the concept of spontaneous gen-
eration. Several verses suggest an evolution controlled
and directed by the hand of the Creator.
Evolution
“That you shall assuredly pass on from one
stage to another.¨ (Ch.84 v.20)
“What is the matter with you that you expect
not wisdom and staidness from Allah? ‘And
He has created you in different forms and dif-
Ierent conditions.¨ (Ch.71 v.14-15)
“O man, what has emboldened thee against
thy Gracious Lord, Who created thee, then
perfected thee, then proportioned thee aright?
In whatever form He pleased, He fashioned
thee.¨ (Ch.82 v.7-9)
Signs for the People
“Verily, in the creation of the heavens and the
earth and in the alternation of night and day,
and in the ships which sail in the sea with that
which profts men, and in the water which Al-
lah sends down from the sky and quickens
therewith the earth after its death and scatters
therein all kinds of beasts, and in the change
of the winds, and the clouds pressed into ser-
vice between the heaven and the earth — are
indeed Signs for the people who understand.”
(Ch.2 v.165)
Those who remember Allah while standing, sitting, and
lying on their sides, and ponder over the creation of the
heavens and the earth: ‘Our Lord, Thou hast not created
this in vain; nay, Holy art Thou; save us, then, from the
punishment oI the Fire.` (Ch.3 v.192)
Contrary to the common belief at that time and for the
many centuries to come the Holy Qur’an clearly stated
that the mountains are not stationary and are rather
foating like the clouds, the only logical inIerence to be
drawn from this would be that the earth is also rotating
along with them. The Holy Qur’an is thus highlighting
the motion of the earth along its orbit around the sun,
centuries before it became common knowledge.
Moving Mountains
“And thou seest the mountains which thou
thinkest to be frmly fxed, but they shall pass
away like the passing of the clouds — the
work of Allah Who has made everything per-
fect. Verily, He knows full well what you do.”
(Ch.27 v.89)
The word “wahi” used to indicate “inspiration” is also
used for God’s revelation to his prophets. The Honey
Bee is the recipient of the divine revelation or inspira-
tion that in this context means the natural instincts with
which God has endowed this species.
1he Inspired Bee
“And thy Lord has inspired the bee, saying,
‘Make thou houses in the hills and in the trees
and in the trellises which they build. ‘Then eat
of every kind of fruit, and follow the ways of
thy Lord that have been made easy for thee.’
There comes forth from their bellies a drink
of varying hues. Therein is cure for men.
Surely, in that is a Sign for a people who
refect.¨(Ch.16 v.69-70)
“And We have made the heaven a roof, well protected;
yet they turn away from its Signs.” (Ch.21 v.33)
Sky - 1he Roof
“Who made the earth a bed for you, and the
heaven a roof, and caused water to come down
from the clouds and therewith brought forth
fruits for your sustenance. Set not up, there-
fore, equals to Allah, while you know.” (Ch.2
v.23)
The Holy Qur’an depicts many aspects of cosmology
and astronomy including the beginning of the universe
and the big bang, the expanding nature of the universe,
the celestial orbits, path of the sun and the moon, the
different nature of light coming from the sun and the
moon, the collapse and ending of the universe as we
know it, the recreation of the universe, the existence of
Extraterrestrial Life and our contact with it.
Cosmology
“Do not the unbelievers see that the heavens
and the earth were a closed-up mass, then We
opened them out …” (Ch.21 v.31)
“And the heaven We built with Our own pow-
ers and indeed We go on expanding it.” (Ch.51
v.48)
“Remember the day when We shall roll up the
heavens like the rolling up of written scrolls
by a scribe. As We began the frst creation, so
shall We repeat it – a promise binding upon
Us; We shall certainly perform it.” (Ch.21
v.105)
Contrary to the common belief at that time, the Holy
Qur’an clearly distinguishes between the light coming
from the sun and the moon and uses words that de-
scribe sun as a source oI light and the moon as a refec-
tor. The Holy Qur’an also clearly states that the sun
and the moon move in well defned orbit and that the
sun itself is also moving towards a prescribed course,
clearly indicating the celestial orbits and the move-
ment of the entire solar system within the milky way.
Astronomy
“He it is Who made the sun radiate a brilliant
light and the moon refect a lustre .¨ (Ch.10
v.6)
“And He it is Who created the night and the
day, and the sun and the moon, each gliding
along in its orbit.¨ (Ch.21 v.34)
“And the sun is moving on the course pre-
scribed for it. That is the decree of the Al-
mighty, the All- Knowing God. And for the
moon We have appointed stages, till it be-
comes again like an old dry branch of a palm-
tree. It is not for the sun to overtake the moon,
nor can the night outstrip the day. All of them
foat in an orbit.¨ (Ch.36 v.39-41)
The word used to depict living creatures in this verse is
“Da’bbah”, it covers all animals which creep or move
along the surface. It does not apply to animals which
fy or swim. It is certainly not applicable to any Iorm oI
spiritual life. This verse speaks not only of the possibil-
ity of extraterrestrial life, but it categorically declares
that it does exist. The last part of the verse states that
He (Allah) will bring together the life in the heavenly
bodies and the life on earth when He so pleases.
Extraterrestrial Life
“And among His Signs is the creation of the
heavens and the earth, and of whatever living
creatures He has spread forth in both. And He
has the power to gather them together when
He pleases.¨ (Ch.42 v.30)
Visit
www.reviewofreligions.org
to read our comparative
religious magazine
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 21
TRAVEL AND TOURISM
7 2 : $ 5 ' 6 ( ; & ( / / ( 1 & ( , 1 / ( $ 5 1 , 1 * $ 1 ' . 1 2 : / ( ' * ( & 5 ( $ 7 , 2 1
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First ever locally built $3
Million Catamaran launched
By JOSEPHINE NAVULA
Launching of the new Ma-
lolo Cat 4 catamaran at the
Musket Cove Island Resort
recently has marked a mile-
stone in the local tourism
industry. Describing the first
ever catamaran to be built in
Fiji, Leeward Island Services
Director, Jayson Raffe said
Malolo Cat 4 now represents
the best value, and most reli-
able, passenger ferry services
in Fiji, as it marks the special
day in the history of Leeward
Island services.
“Leeward Island services
began as a joint venture be-
tween Dick Smith, Reg Raffe,
and Sir Ian Mcfarlane in the
1970’s. The company was
formed to develop and operate
the Malolo-Lailai airfield, to
allow guests another form of
access to the Island,” he said.
Raffe said in 1997, Dick
and Reg decided to expand
the business and purchased
a 60 person passenger ferry
from Cougar Catamarans in
Queensland.
“Malolo Cat 4 is the larg-
est composite boat built in Fiji
that can accommodate 181
passengers, including 160 in-
door premium economy seats
from Bertereaux Australia.”
“Malolo Cat was built in
Fiji, as an alternative to im-
porting a vessel. This allowed
us to tailor the boat to our
needs, take a more command-
ing role in the design process,
whilst employing as many as
40 local staffs,” he said.
Chief Guest at the cere-
mony, Honorable Minister for
Tourism & Attorney General,
Aiyaz Sayed- Khaiyum said
the launching is a milestone
achievement for the country
as a whole.
“Today marks the launch
of the first ever catamaran
built in Fiji, and we should all
celebrate in this,” he said.
Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum and Leeward Island Services director Jayson
Raffe onboard the Malolo Cat 4 during its maiden voyage. Photo: MUNAUWAR KHAN.
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 22
OPINION
Violence and Entertainment
By DOCTOR ROHITASH
CHANDRA
Dr Rohitash Chandra is
the Founder and Executive
Director of Software Foun-
dation Fiji. This article
expresses the independent
view of the author which
does not represent or as-
sociate with any particular
organisation.
A large portion of chil-
dren are exposed to violence
when they are growing up
with family violence and
those through entertainment
such as games and movies.
We should question on the
gain in allowing our chil-
dren to play violent games
and watch violent movies.
There is nothing that kids
gain, actually they lose in
terms of time and money. If
these games are replaced by
educational games that help
children in thinking, prob-
lem solving, humane values
and creative thinking, then it
will help in their education
and life.
Human beings in general
are in a very fragile state at
the moment. We are torn be-
tween science and religion
that has been influenced by
politics. There is a lot of rage
in people and violent games,
pornography and videos cer-
tainly incite people. Why
should the world take risks
and entertain itself with such
forms of violence? We can
understand that some level
of violence in videos and
games is acceptable which
may also train the mind and
body for self defense when
it is needed. The theme of
the game is important and
violence in sporting games
such as boxing and wrestling
games is understandable.
The same applies to movies
and television.
Proper censorship of abu-
sive music, games and vid-
eos can have good effects on
students and their behavior.
Freedom has responsibility
and just as we like to drink
clean water, it is important
to censor the forms of enter-
tainment and make it more
educational. Entertainment
can become educational. In-
stead of giving importance
to celebrities such as movie
actors, the media can give
importance to scientists, en-
gineers, doctors, writers and
social workers who contrib-
ute to the community. Edu-
cation needs to be entertain-
ing and 'cool' - something
that is fun to take part. Mu-
sic art and literature is very
important for the society and
their forms can define the
flux of the society in terms
of peace and prosperity.
Violent games and other forms of such entertainments
are creating a negative impact on our society according
to Dr Rohitash Chandra. Photo: GOOGLE.
www.thejetnewspaper.com Newsroom 5164 Vodafone / Inkk
THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 23
HUMAN RESOURCES
By SUNILA KARAN
Factors that influence employee
performance - Part 1
S
ome people say per-
formance is getting
the job done. Produc-
ing the result that we aim for,
and nothing else matters. If
we don’t reach the results, we
haven’t done the job well.
When we hire employees,
there are certain factors out-
lined by the employer. These
include the basic employee
performance expectations,
and the tasks and projects that
employee will be responsible
for. During the time of em-
ployment, the employee will
undergo evaluation, where
review will be conducted and
performance will be evaluated
to see whether the employee is
working towards the company
goals or not. Along with the
hiring, a list of responsibili-
ties and expectations comes
along too, like, customer sat-
isfaction, market research, for
example.
Employee performance is
most important for the organi-
zation. It keeps the employee
on track in terms of his/her job
responsibilities. Performance
reviews ensure that the em-
ployee is focused on their jobs
and are working towards the
company’s goals.
What internal factors might
influence employee perfor-
mance?
The three factors that influ-
ence employee performance
and those that are most com-
mon in many organizations
are, (1) skills deficit, which
arises when skills do not
match the job description
and responsibilities. From the
employee’s perspectives, it
means, “I don’t really know
how to perform this task or
job”, (2) motivational deficit,
which means, employees do
not have the interest to per-
form the task or job, and from
their perspective, it means, “I
don’t really want to perform
this job.” And (3) resources
deficit, which means there are
very little or no resources or
tools to perform the task or
job, and from the employee’s
perspective, it means “Can
I really perform this task or
job, or am I getting burnt-out
trying so hard to perform this
job?”
For example, healthcare
industry is unique in which
both performance and suc-
cess are not only measured
by financial returns, but also
by customer satisfaction. The
most successful healthcare
organizations act upon the
needs of all its customers to
improve the delivery of care
and achieve memorable expe-
riences for its customers.
In healthcare, it’s vital
that a job gets done properly;
therefore, the performance of
the workers is most important.
In an article written by
Fletcher (2001), job dissat-
isfaction was one of the fac-
tors that impacted employee
performance in a hospital. He
said many doctors and nurses
felt “devalued in their job.”
Extrinsic work values such
as job security, salary, fringe
benefits, and work schedules
are all considered important
for job satisfaction and re-
strictions in scheduling and
limited availability of time off
promotes frustration and dis-
satisfaction.
It can be said that produc-
tivity is the result of good
performance, or non-produc-
tivity is the result of under-
performance. D.K.McNeese-
Smith (2001), in a research
found out that productivity
was based on two categories:
quantity, and quality of work.
A third category was “person-
al factors that influenced the
quantity and quality of work”
(McNeese-Smith 2001).
Senior managers of Air Pacific flank former Managing Director and CEO Dave Pflieger , centre, during his farewell
function at the airlines’ hangar in Nasoso on Thursday, May 2. Mr Pflieger has lined up one of the best airline manage-
ment teams in the history of Air Pacific before departing for USA to join Silver Airways. Air Pacific’s acting CEO and MD
Aubrey Swift is seen on the far right. Photo: SHALENDRA PRASAD.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 24
TALK BUSINESS
By PRANESH
AMARSEE
Bula everybody.
When a sporting team goes
out on the field, what does
it do? This may be a strange
question to some thinking
what the hell is this guy talk-
ing about. Well put it this way,
what do you do every day? By
now you must be thinking and
you don’t have to think hard.
A sports team be it soccer,
rugby or netball when goes
on the field of play, it has one
common mind set, that is to
play hard and win. When you
wake up everyday you get
ready to go to work or school
and you can’t change that. If
you are working you can’t get
up one day and say I will go
to school. We all are binded
by our needs and wants and
in order to achieve these we
need to stay focussed. A sports
team needs to stay focussed.
In life we all have set motives.
We all know what actions to
take everyday. We all have
our own goals to achieve.
However if we get distracted
or start doing things which are
not part of our lives, we will
fail in achieving the desired
goals. Similarly in every busi-
ness we do or own, our focus
will be in the “core business”.
Core business - The pri-
mary area or activity that a
company was founded on or
Focusing on your ‘core business’
focuses on in its business op-
erations. Many market lead-
ers aim to maintain a strong
position in their core business
areas, but they usually remain
open to developing new areas
of activity as perceived busi-
ness opportunities arise.
Core business is where a
company's resources perform
most effectively and where
you have determined are its
best long term opportunities
for creating value. The identi-
fication of what is a company's
core business, and a review of
the alignment between activi-
ties and its core business are
part of the strategic business
planning process.
Refocusing resources on
core business has been strong-
ly linked with companies that
have performed well during
recessions and that have po-
sitioned themselves for strong
growth in the following re-
covery period.
Strategic investments for
the long term are critical to
any business. In a recession,
maintaining expenditure on
investments for the future
such as brand building, in-
troducing new products and
R&D are a key part of posi-
tioning the company for re-
covery.
Successful management
of a business during a reces-
sion often involves cutting out
parts of a business that are not
creating value so as to con-
centrate resources on the core
activities, even increasing ex-
penditure on core marketing
and development activities.
Selling under-performing
assets is often undertaken in
difficult times specifically to
bolster cash reserves. Busi-
ness activities and assets re-
lated to non-core business
may also be tying up internal
resources and distracting the
company's capabilities in scat-
tered directions away from
activities that are critical to
its future. Strategic decisions
to divest peripheral activities
may assist in allowing core
activities to be more effective-
ly supported and preserved.
Where a company is in a
position to do so, a downturn
often presents the opportunity
to acquire businesses, equip-
ment and skilled people that
would not be accessible in
normal times. Strategic ac-
quisitions that augment core
capabilities are an efficient
means to access new tech-
nology, products or markets
quickly and cost effectively.
However, acquisitions that
diverge from core business or
that require intensive support
may well create undue strain
on the company's personnel,
finances and other resources.
Your belief in the strength
of your core business is a
guide to managing through a
recessionary period, invest-
ing in your most competitive
capabilities to build market
share, develop new products
and move ahead of competi-
tors.
A new Australian surf busi-
ness has learnt a lesson from
surf brand Billabong's recent
troubles: never turn your back
on your main market, namely
passionate surfers.
Ryan Mets, 26, one of the
founders of Boardcave, an
online marketplace of custom
surfboards, says surf brands
suffer dire consequences by
drifting away from their core
customer base.
''In these early stages we
are aware of the importance of
our core customers or 'image
leaders', which are actually
defined by Billabong's own
researchers as board sport
fanatics and board sport par-
ticipants, who are the major
influences in the surf market,''
says Mets.
''A large percentage of our
customers are made up of this
core market and it's essen-
tial we stay relative to and in
touch with these influencers
as we broaden our product of-
fering,'' he says.
Let me now explain in
simple language. My very
good friend and close buddy
always reminded us as fol-
lows: an electrician cannot
open a plumbing business,
an accountant cannot open
a pharmacy, a doctor cannot
open a mechanical garage,
and an engineer cannot open
a garment factory, and so on.
We will do business which we
are capable of doing from day
one. Off course diversifica-
tion of business is important
but it only happens with hir-
ing of expertise. Sometimes,
amongst all the promotion,
e-mails, blogging, and the
likes – we can lose focus on
our core business. If you are
a crafter, then your core busi-
ness is your craft. If you are an
artist, then your core business
is your art, your style. We can
forget sometimes to actually
work on improving our core
business, because we are dis-
tracted by all the necessary
marketing and other admin-
istrative tasks that surround
the running of a one-person
micro-biz.
Here are two good exam-
ples.
Sony. Not long ago, the
Walkman was as ubiquitous
as the iPod is today, and Sony
dominated the market for
TVs, cameras, video record-
ers, and many other consumer
electronics. But as Sony be-
came a huge conglomerate
with film and music divisions,
it lost leadership in many of
its core product lines. What
tripped up Sony and some of
its competitors was the move
from hardware to software,
which put the emphasis on
the brains of the device rather
than the circuitry. As a result,
faster-moving competitors
like LG, Samsung, Vizio, Ap-
ple, and the various makers of
cell phones—which of course
come with cameras these
days—have outpaced this old-
school innovator. However
Sony was quick to realise its
core business. Sony has po-
sitioned its digital imaging,
game and mobile businesses
as the three main pillars of its
electronics business and will
focus investments in these
areas going forward. Sony
anticipates that approximately
70% of its total R&D budget
will be dedicated to these ar-
eas. By growing these three
businesses, Sony aims to gen-
erate approximately 70% of
total sales and 85% of operat-
ing income for the entire elec-
tronics business from these
categories by the fiscal year
ending March 31, 2015 (fiscal
year 2014).
Motorola. Its first big suc-
cess came with car radios,
which led to two-way radios,
which eventually led Motoro-
la to build and sell the world's
first mobile phone. Motorola
dominated that business as
recently as 2003, when it in-
troduced the trendy Razor, the
biggest-selling mobile phone
ever at the time. But Motor-
ola failed to focus on smart-
phones that can handle E-mail
and other data, and rapidly
lost share to newcomers like
Research in Motion, Apple,
LG, and Samsung. Motorola
was vanquished so swiftly
that its cell phone division be-
came a perennial money-loser
and the firm announced plans
this year to spin it off into a
separate company, allowing
the core Motorola to focus on
networking equipment and a
few other areas.
So remember Businesses
core business activity is some-
thing it does especially well in
comparison to its competitors.
It has an advantage because
the Company acquires exper-
tise that competitors do not
have. The processes may be
such things as better research,
better manufacturing process-
es, technology etc. The art and
science of business strategy is
in defining oneself as differ-
ent from others, in a way that
builds on who we really are
(i.e. that avoids 'strategy by
wishful thinking') and that is
relevant to a set of customers.
Then we must set out to 'own'
that space. Companies that
succeed in doing this move
away from the head-to-head,
price-based competition that
drives returns down.
God bless Nadi, Fiji
‘A large percentage
of our customers
are made up of this
core market and it’s
essential we stay
relative to and in
touch with these
influences as we
broaden our prod-
uct offering ’
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KIDS CORNER
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MAMANUCA ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY
Georgia students study corals
PRESS RELEASE
PRESS RELEASE
Georgia Institute of Tech-
nology students visited Mana
Island Resort and Spa for the
first time to study its coral
reef structure as part of their
three months Pacific Study
Abroad Program.
The group spent six weeks
in New Zealand, four in Aus-
tralia and finished the pro-
gram with two weeks in Fiji
which was spent in the Coral
Coast and in Mana Island.
During the time of this
program the students take
up courses covering the en-
vironment, culture, history
and economics of the visited
region. According to the Pro-
gram leader Professor David
Garton, the group are mostly
students from the College of
Engineering and some from
other majors such as Biology,
Chemistry and Management.
Professor Garton stated
that besides lectures on the
ecology of reef systems the
students also learned about
threats to coral reefs and the
important role of Marine Pro-
tected Areas.
Field exercises in this
course required students to
identify major reef species
(corals and invertebrates),
their distribution, and relative
abundance before analysing
and presenting their field data
in class.
Professor Garton added
that while the academic exer-
cises provided a background
on how coral reef systems
function, the Biology course
covered the study of coral reef
at three locations (Heron Is-
land on the Great Barrier Reef
in Australia and the two loca-
tions in Fiji the Coral Coast
and at Mana Island).
Part of their program on
Mana Island was attending
a lecture session by the Ma-
manuca Environment Society.
The Society Assistant Manag-
er, Mrs Marica Vakacola cov-
ered major project areas in the
Mamanuca Group and shared
the challenges they face in
conserving endangered turtle
species and restoration of
coral reefs.
She also emphasised the
importance of working in col-
laboration with the Mamanu-
ca member resorts, the local
communities and networking
with government, non- gov-
ernment organisations and
academic institutions in the
effort in sustainably manag-
ing natural resources and con-
serving the Mamanuca biodi-
versity.
Mrs Vakacola said that the
university students actively
took part in coral specimen
collection, replanting on coral
tables and transplanting the
grown coral onto the North
Beach reef edge.
The exercise was also part
of the resorts Environment
day activity where guests took
part and at the end of the ac-
tivity, the house guests were
issued certificate of participa-
tion.
Professor Garton said that
“the coral planting activity
was an excellent introduction
for their students to important
environmental issues associ-
ated with development in the
island region. It also provided
an experience in management
and restoration of a coral reef,
where knowledge is applied to
local problems and issues.”
Professor Garton said that
the coral planting activity
compliments the classroom
material presented over their
six-week long course and
hopes to repeat the Mamanuca
trip next year.
Georgia institute of Technology stu-
dents planting corals. Photo: MES.
Little turtle delights Mana
By MARICA VAKACOLA
A baby turtle was found crawling ashore at the South Beach of Mana Island on April 1st much
to the delight of the staff.
For many years, there was no nesting at the Magical Mana Island and the drifter has been
named ‘Ratu Mana.’
Probably tired of drifting passively around the Mana Lagoon, fighting waves and predators,
the tiny hatchling finally gave up on the popular South Beach.
Jimilai Bete who was on duty saw the baby turtle crawling ashore and took it to the rearing
pond.
Activities Manager, Deborah Manulevu said, “The turtle hatchling was very inactive during its
first hours in their captive pond. After three days the hatchling started feeding and moved around
actively and is in the care of the Marine Activities staff. The hatchling is feeding well on seagrass
and halimeda which is calcerousgree algae.”
Ratu Mana is a Hawkbill turtle belonging to the Eretmochelys imbricate species.
The turtle has a shell width of 4.2cm and a length 5.7cm. All measurements recorded was
entered in the Turtle Research and Monitory Database Tool (TRED) which is monitored by Sec-
retariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) of which Mamanuca Environ-
ment Society is a member.
According to SPREP Turtle Monitoring Representative, Catherine Siota, “The data for the new
hatchling will be considered as a unique encounter.”
It is the first turtle recorded in the TRED for the Mamanuca group this year and Mana Environ-
ment Team is happy to keep Ratu Mana in their captive breeding pond together with seven other
Hawksbill turtles.
Three out of the seven hawksbill turtles are ready for release to the environment.
“Hawksbill turtles are an endangered species in Fiji and keeping them in captive breeding
pond allows more chances of survival. The main danger for hatchlings is from artificial lighting.
When the babies emerge, they instinctively move in the brightest direction,” Ms Siota said.
“Normally, this would be the open night sky reflected by the ocean. On a developed beach,
artificial lights attract the hatchlings, causing them to crawl in the wrong direction. Other dangers
include obstructions on the beach, such as beach chairs, holes, or tire tracks, all of which can
block their path to the sea.”
Marine activities
staff measuring Ratu
Mana. Photo: MES.
Good leadership saves environment
The Mamanuca Environment Society took
the lead role on a Leadership and Management
Workshop for the Tikina Malolo at Solevu Vil-
lage on March 14 and 15.
Organized by the I’ Taukei Affairs Board
and Institute of Applied Science (IASUSP), the
program was intended to cover every province
in Fiji.
And it targets community leaders such as
the Turaga ni Yavusa, Turaga ni Mataqali,
Liuliu ni Tokatoka and other leaders that exist
within the village.
The main objective of the workshop was
to train leaders to acquire good leadership and
management skills-to positively impact com-
munity daily living.
Malolo District is compromised of four vil-
lages-Yanuya, Tavua, Yaro and Solevu Village.
MES-represented by Field Officer Sorope-
peli Seru was invited to speak on the projects
and programs the organization runs in-sync
with the district.
Mr Seru stressed the importance of proper
management and good leadership in the com-
munity could control peoples influence on var-
ious environmental laws that are put into place
by the government.
“An example was about protecting the ma-
rine endangered species. Since Turtles is a to-
tem to the village of Yanuya, if the Chief of
Yanuya possesses good leadership, he would
be able to protect the species that is their to-
tem by controlling his people. In other words it
would mean that they are protecting their cus-
toms and traditions, at the same time conserv-
ing the population of Turtles.
“Nowadays, community leaders with lack of
management and leadership skills would find it
hard to control its people in terms of customs
and traditions conservation and as well as the
protection of the Fijian bank of life, the natural
resources,” he said.
It was also agreed by the village leaders
for a formation of an environment committee
within the village which will work closely with
MES in future to deal with every environmen-
tal issue that arises.
This is part of the village’s community man-
agement and leadership plan for the future to
help leaders control environmental issues.
Fiji Locally Managed Area rep Semisi Meo
said good leadership and management skills
acquired by a leader will benefit the people,
land and sea, and its natural resources.
“Without good leadership and management,
people, land, sea and natural resources will be
affected. Resources are threatened because of
poor decision making and poor management by
traditional leaders.
“When there is good management and lead-
ership in a community, this will surely reflect
on the status of natural resources as it will be
utilized sustainably,” added Mr Meo.
Man of Solevu Village participating
in the workshop discussions. Photo:
MES.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 28
BUSINESS NOTICE BOARD
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 29
BUSINESS NOTICE BOARD
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 30
SPORTS
FASANOC has launched a major fundraiser, the FASANOC
Lottery, in conjunction with the PARTNERS FOR GOLD
sponsorship Program. The Partner for Gold initiative gives the
Corporate Community the opportunity to support Team Fiji’s
participation in the 2013 Pacific Mini Games.
The Games will be held from September 2-12 in Wallis &
Futuna.
Partners for Gold contribute an amount of $2,000.00 and in
return receive the following:
Sixty seven (67) FASANOC Lottery Books, valued at $30
per book, which may be used at their discretion e.g. incentive to
staff, marketing program for customers, gifts for clients.
Publicity for the business house through: Team Fiji press
releases, acknowledgement as a 2013 Partner for Gold in FA-
SANOC’s annual report, FASANOC website and Facebook,
Team Fiji website and Facebook, 2013 Partner for Gold mer-
chandise kit consisting of a 1 x PFG framed certificate, 1 x PFG
polo/t-shirt and 1 x PFG bula shirt and a chance to go into the
2013 Partners for Gold draw to win $2000.00 cash!
FASANOC is pleased to welcome its 1st 2013 Partner for
Gold – Holiday Inn – Suva.
In supporting this initiative, Mr Joseph Della Gatta, Gen-
eral Manager of the Holiday Inn Suva said: “Holiday Inn Suva
is excited to be able to raise funds for the 2013 Partners for
Gold Program with FASANOC towards the forthcoming Pa-
cific Mini Games.”
“The hotel supports the Partner for Gold program that assists
Team Fiji’s preparation and participation in the Pacific Mini
Games by raising funds to assist the athletes.
“Management and Staff of Holiday Inn Suva wish team Fiji
all the best with the games… Go Team Fiji!”
Alini Sovu, Chef de Mission 2013
Pacific Mini Games, Wallis & Futuna
receives the sponsorship cheque
from Joseph Della Gatta, General
Manager, Holiday Inn – Suva. Photo:
SUPPLIED.
Team Fiji prepares
for Mini Games
PRESS RELEASE
PRESS RELEASE
Digicel Fiji 7s Head Coach
Alivereti Dere has named a
30 member squad to prepare
for the 7s Rugby World Cup
in Moscow in June.
The squad includes play-
ers that played in the recent
2012/2013 IRB World 7s
Series. Naitasiri wing Sunia
Kubu and Nadroga Rover
Ratu Meli Kurinisau have
forced their way into the team
that also sees the inclusion of
eight overseas based players
and Alipate Ratini.
Member 2013 Rugby
World Squad List:- Jasa
VEREMALUA, Uliyasi LA-
WAVOU, Lepani BOTIA,
Jone VOTA, Setefano
CAKAU, Nemani NAGUSA,
Mosese SAUNIVANUA,
Sakuisa GAVIDI, Ilai TI-
Nadi will be a hive of ac-
tivity following the revival of
the annual Veterans Inter-Dis-
trict tournament by Fiji FA.
The tournament will be
played at Prince Charles Park
from July 5 - 7, 2013.
According to a circular re-
leased by Fiji FA, only play-
ers who are fourty-years and
Dere names RWC
squad
Veterans IDC all
set for Nadi
NAI, Emosi MULEVORO,
Osea KOLINISAU, Samisoni
VIRIVIRI, Leone NAKAR-
AWA, Donasio RATUBULI,
Joji RAGAMATE, Vilitati
SOKIVETA, Manasa NAYA-
GI, Manueli LAQAI, Vucago
BAINITABUA, Ratu Meli
KURINISAU, Sunia KUBU,
Alipate RATINI, Watisoni
VOTU (FRANCE), Seremaia
BUROTU (FRANCE), Joeli
LUTUMAILAGI (FRANCE),
Timoci MATANAVOU
(FRANCE), Vereniki GON-
EVA (ENGLAND), Nikola
MATAWALU (SCOTLAND),
Metuisela TALEBULA
(FRANCE), Waisea NAYA-
CALEVU (FRANCE).
By SHALENDRA
PRASAD
over will be able to participate
in the games.
The tournament has been
jointly sponsored by hardware
giants RC Manubhai and paint
manufacturers Apco Coatings.
According to the circular,
teams will be required to pay
an entry fee of $575 and play-
ers should be Fiji citizens or
blood relatives of former Fiji
citizens who have migrated
overseas.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 31
SPORTS
By SHALENDRA
PRASAD
Lautoka Golf Club to get a facelift
The Lautoka Golf Club is
undoubtedly one of the best in
Fiji as far as location and sce-
nic views is concerned.
The excellent mountain-
ous views on one side to the
beautiful ocean views on the
other overlooking the Lautoka
Port and the outer islands is
located directly opposite the
President's Bure.
And major plans are now
underway to capitalize on the
location and turn it around
into a major tourist attraction.
“We really want to make it
a tourist attraction once again
and every visitor and golfer
has marveled at the location -
the next move is to put in the
market to attract tourists,” of-
fered LGC chairman of trust-
ees Raymond Singh.
“I am confident of making
it happen and revive the inter-
est not only with the members
but new visitors as well,” Mr
Singh added.
The Lautoka Golf Club has
also begun the reconstruction
of the club house damaged by
cyclone Evan last December.
Mr Singh confirmed the
support given by National
Golf Association of Fiji and
the various tournament spon-
sors has enabled work to start.
“The club house was built
during the Colonial Sugar
Refinery days with the hon-
ors board having all records
intact since 1931,” Mr Singh
informed.
“The club has produced
many top golfers who have
gone to represent Fiji during
the South Pacific Games on
numerous occasions notably,
1987 SPG teams gold medal-
ist Shiu Sami Naidu and 1995
SPG teams gold medalist
Daven Gopal.
“Most notable is our very
own former world Number
One, Vijay Singh who record-
ed back to back wins in 1981
and 1982 to win the Lautoka
Open Championship before
turning professional.
“Despite the limited re-
sources the golf course and
club house has a great tour-
ist attraction location and we
wish to take full advantage of
this,” Mr Singh concluded.
Sports enthusiasts....from left are former Fiji Sevens manager and fitness guru Epeli La-
giloa, snooker champion Philip Gock , Lautoka Golf Club chairman of trustees Raymond
Singh and former Fiji soccer rep Vishwa Nair in this file picture. Photo: SHALENDRA
PRASAD.
Two sporting organisations
received a major financial boost
for overseas tournament prepa-
rations under government’s al-
location of $1.5 million for as-
sisting sporting bodies.
Fiji Association of Sports
and National Olympic Com-
mittee (FASANOC) and Net-
ball Fiji received a cheque of
$49,000 and $80,000 respec-
tively from the Fiji National
Sports Commission for their
preparation for international
tournaments.
Fiji National Sports Com-
mission (FNSC) executive
chairman, Peter Mazey said
the contributions given to the
two sporting organisations was
part of government’s allocation
of $1.5 million to assist FA-
SANOC (Pacific Mini Games),
Netball Fiji (World Youth
Championships in Glasgow
and Pacific Netball Series in
Samoa), Rugby League (World
Championships in United King-
Government boosts sporting bodies
dom) and Fiji Rugby (7s World
Cup in Moscow).
Mr Mazey said government
has provided substantial fund-
ing for sporting developments
this year.
“We have an additional $1.5
million for those sports and ad-
ditional funds as well for assist-
ing other sporting organisations
in the hosting of tournaments in
Fiji, bringing in sporting experts
and scholarships for athletes to
go overseas,” Mr Mazey said.
FASANOC chief executive
officer, Lorraine Mar said that
FASANOC was grateful for the
assistance and for government’s
support towards Team Fiji.
“FASANOC has already
utilised its resources in terms of
giving preparation grants to the
various sporting bodies,” Ms
Mar said.
“From last year, we had said
that government’s contribution
would be forwarded to them
once we receive it which we
will immediately do after this
as this money will be used for
training the athletes.”
Expressing her gratitude to
the FNSC, Netball Fiji presi-
dent, Wainikiti Bogidrau said
the contribution received would
go towards the Pacific Netball
Series.
“We are taking two teams
across- our national team and
our under 21 squad.”
“They will be playing in the
second tier competition against
the Samoan Under 21 team. As
for our national team, they are
there to defend their title, they
will be playing Papua New
Guinea on June 4th, Cook Is-
lands on June 5th and Samoa
the host nation who are also
our strongest competitors,” Ms
Bogidrau added.
The FNSC also confirmed
that total contributions for the
year to FASANOC will be
$142,000 and $210,000 for Net-
ball Fiji.
Netball Fiji President Wainikiti Bogidrau receives
the cheque from Fiji National Sports Commission
Executive Chairman Peter Mazey. Photo and
story: MINFO.
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THE JET - FIJI’S FIRST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 32
Tea | Coffee | Cappuccino |
Latte | Flat White | Milo/Cocoa
| Hot Chocolate | Iced
Chocolate | Iced Coffee | Iced
Mocha | Milkshake
Sandwich | Chicken Twist |
Chocolate Marble Cake | Cup
Cake | Lamington | Pie |
Samosa | Snacks
Located at Nippon Tyre Centre,
Nadi Back Road (Opposite
Homemaker)
OPEN 7 DAYS | 7am – 6pm
Specials on Lunch
on Fridays
Fiji athletes
get ready
for world
meet
For the first time in Fiji's athlet-
ics history, five athletes have quali-
fied on merit to compete at the IAAF
World Youth Championship.
Making the cut are runners Aaron
Powell (100m/200m), Jacob Waqa-
nivalu (100m/200m), Batinisavu
Uluiyata (200m/400m), Saula Nad-
rakoro (400m) and Danni Alakija
(200m/400m). Although the usual
quota is for one athlete from each
country to attend the games, this
year Fiji became the only nation in
the Pacific region to have multiple
athletes qualify on merit.
President of Fiji Athletics Albert
Miller has told Radio Australia's Pa-
cific Beat many of the nation's up-
and-coming athletes are emerging
from Fiji's secondary school system.
"We have an abundance of talent
coming out of the school system...
more than 90% of our athletes that
went to the 2011 Pacific Games in
New Caledonia were all secondary
school kids," Mr Miller said.
There are also improved facili-
ties and a more professional coach-
ing system in place in the secondary
schools.
"We've had a great increase in the
number of certified coaches within
the school system," he said.
"Now, with the brand new, reno-
vated facilities, we have a national
stadium, and finally these kids are
starting to really show their talent."
The Championship is being held
in Donetsk, Ukraine in July.
RADIO AUSTRALIA
Ruggers regain lost pride
A last minute penalty goal to
replacement fullback Vecisemani
Ratubalavu has earned Jacks of
Fiji Nadi a thrilling 22-20 win over
Namosi in the fifth round of the
Digicel Cup challenge at Prince
Charles Park. The Jetsetters trailed
8-10 at the break but fought back
to notch their much-needed win af-
ter a shock loss to Vatukoula in the
fourth round of games.
Nadi coach Iliesa Tanivula
praised his troops for winning the
game in such a tight situation.
“Hard-luck to Namosi for not
winning the game and the boys
showed a lot of guts to come back
with a win after a disappointing
loss to Vatukoula in the last game,”
Tanivula said.
With four wins and a loss, Nadi
remains in contention for this
year’s Digicel Cup challenge.
By EMOSI LASAQA
By SHALENDRA PRASAD
By SHALENDRA PRASAD
Bowling carnival a great success
The sixth Shop N Save Sunny West
Bowling Carnival was a great success
according to Nadi Sports and Social
Club bowls director Shorab Khan.
“The annual event is getting bigger
and better and this year we had a total
of 28 overseas based players,” Mr Khan
informed.
“Some of the overseas players have
been coming every year since the tour-
nament started.
“We wish to sincerely thank Shop
N Save for sponsoring the event for the
past three consecutive years and not
forgetting our minor sponsors Williams
and Gosling, Islands Electric, Graeme
and Kerry Kath, Eric Williams and
Spencer Tate,” Mr Khan concluded.
Former Fiji rep Shorab Khan in ac-
tion during the first day of the Shop
N Save sponsored Sunny West
Bowling Carnival on Friday, May
24. More information available on
www.thejetnewspaper.com. Photo:
JOSEPHINE NAVULA.
Green Machine leads
The Jacks Nadi side after beating Namosi at Prince Charles Park on Saturday, May
25. INSET: Former All Black Joe Rokocoko and Fiji TV sports editor Satish Narain in a
jovial mood. Photos: MARGARET NAQIRI.
Jacks Nadi continues to lead
the Fiji Sun / GP Batteries national
league series with 31 points out of 14
games played so far.
While all league matches will be
put on hold until the Vodafone Fiji
FACT is over, the green machines in
their last outing thrashed minnows
Tavua 5-0 at Govind Park in Ba on
Saturday, May 25.
The side will be soon going into
camp in preparation for the Vodafone
Fiji FACT which Nadi will be host-
ing at Prince Charles Park from June
21 after round one games are played
in Suva from June 15 – 16.
Ba still maintains the second spot
in the league ladder with 27 points
but have a three game advantage
having played only 11 matches so far
due to their Oceania League commit-
ment earlier on.
The capital side Suva is now en-
joying the third spot after thrashing
Labasa 5-2 at the ANZ National Sta-
dium on Sunday, May 26 and are sit-
ing with 25 points.
Meanwhile for the first time the
Vodafone Fiji FACT will have eight
teams participating in the tourna-
ment.
“It will be 90-minute soccer and
for the first time eight teams will be
participating in the Vodafone Fiji
Fact,” Fiji FA president Rajesh Patel
had earlier stated.
Vodafone Fiji FACT Pool 1:
Suva, Labasa, Nadroga, Ba; Pool
2: Nadi, Navua, Lautoka, Rewa.

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