You are on page 1of 36

in

No

bullet

can stop

"TWO-GUN LUCK"

1^8*^%^
-i\.> ^ti, During- an Indian raid on Fort Parker in 1836, the Comanches captured young John Parker and his sister, Cynthia. They were taken to an Indian village where they were

separated

anil sent to live

with different bands of the

tribe.

Cynthia gradually forgot her English lan-

guage and manners, accepting those of the


Indian. Treated kindly, she learned to love the Comamhes and their way of life.

Occasionally. Cynthia met people of her race. With sign language they tried to persuade her to return, but happy with her adopted people, she always refused.

own

ing no desire to return to a forgotten


life, Cynthia married Chief Peta Nocoma. They had four children who were raised in ihe tradition and honor of the Comanche.

Peta

Nocoma was

killed

by the white

Cynthia returned to her own people. Quanah, her son. remained with the Indians and later became a great Comanche Chief.

ifs jusr
i'p

A SWOBf

BIP6,

TASS
-

se buck 6/ TME TWiE you

AMNie;..

sadw.ee>
I

va 8 HOME'
EMEMSEfi'

BESIDES,

SEEM TO

SOME

)RK.'

L^
;

IJfrf; -1
_

6
j-q^

jj5nf)TEfc

ml
j

mlr^
DELL COMICS ARE GOOD COMICS
yMSi\

(.Ofry was sufiE frGwr asout hK WOT SE1N6 VERY FeiEHdV SHE WQtf'T EVEN iff HEBSELF LIKE ANYONE.' \T B LONELY, PEELIN6

MS"

LIKE

THAT

"

VBPUT7

M'S TMS <W THAT^ CZ&Z ! 1 KH&N WHERE I f

SHOOTINS

AW

I PlPN'T U-

mi

WAS JU5TTievi&

MSftftWHILE, PST

mO 6B
^~

PfP A QOOO JOB, PETE.' THAT WOUNPEP


YQ\S

\
\

I'M.

("BETTY

GOOD AT

***

FAWN', ALL eiSHT'

AIW

SOUTiNE

SURE
:

fool&o everyone
3U REALLY

y A
_^f

HAD THAT OiP WOMAN HOPP/NS MAOJ

6UT 1 PONT LtKE SEii4S WITNESS AT THAT _* TBIAL T^Moecow T.'

i *%

-"V

g%~#PI
50 WHAT? WrTH WU AS A WITNESS, THE COURT'LL SENTENCE THE OLD GIRL FOE 5U2E
Twe LOOSER SHE STAYS in JML, THE SETTE/? WE CAN UiPE THE -<jeS65 AND WAIT TO SELL THEM WHEN THE ?Rice ,'S RI6WT,

St-I^Mf"

JVE WAP EN0U6H WELCOMING MC TODAY, THANK YOU' AMP AS MR WHAT THE PEPUTY
SAID ABOUT YOU THAT POESN'f MEAN A THINS YOU COULD gE FOOLING
.'

I SURE WISH YOU YOU DIPN'T FEEL THE WAY iW 001 A LOT oF FOLKS IN

'

PIAgLO WOfJLP LIKE


-To

MM,

taoj

BE JUE FEiEWDStOLI'O LET THEM i

Slowly mo wafflcWLtx smgfs riy Winjc pown mi .


-

'mm ^

--

4VA.V-

*v.

.-;-.

.vis /a-

cxiereow, waeee Mflerws

r^t/u.

is

w feo&esss.

m a wnure, -rweyu check my ACM AMP KHOtJ SHE'S RIGHT.'


MAYBE
If

.-

jj^sjij*!

fWE/'U MAKE

OJMFKS tfRyriM6, MV SENTENCE

/^, IT'S TBUfi / J JU CONFESS .'7 P (

USHTBB!

\\9

The second home pears amp 7"" backs its wa60n into SWEET, ASAtN SLOCKiNS

WW...

STATEMENT REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF AUGUST 24, 1912, AS AMENDED BY THE ACTS OF MARCH 3. 1933. AND JULY 2. 1946 (Title 39, United States Code. Section 233) SHOWING THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT. AND
CIRCULATION OF
Sublished
ictober
1.

Annie Oakley and Tagg


at*

quarterly
1957.

New

York,

N.

Y..

for

1. The names and addresses o[ the publisher, editor, managing editor, and business managers are: Publisher, Georse T. Delaiorte, jr., 261 Fifth Avenue. New York 16. N. Y.: Editor. Helen Meyer, 261 Fifth Avenue, New York 16, N. Y.; Managing editor. None; Business manager. Helen Mever, 261 Fifth Avenue, New York 16, N. Y.

other security holders owning or holding 1 per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages. 07 other securities are: None. 4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases where the stockholder or security holder appears upon the hooks of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, the name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is acting: also the statements in the two paragraphs show the affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the circumstances and conditions under which stockholders and security holders who do not appear upon the books of the company as trustees, hold slock and securities in a capacity other than that of a bona fide owner.
(Signed)

2. The owner is: Dell Publishing Company. Inc., 261 Fifth Avenue, New York 16, N. Y.: George T. Delacorte, Jr.. 261 Fifth Avenue. New York 16, N.'Y.; Margarita Delacorte, 261 Fifth Avenue. New York

HELEN MEYER
Business

Manager
1 9t.Ii

Sworn

to

and subscribed before me

this

day

of September, J957.

JOHN
S.

C.

WEBER
30. 1958)

The

km

bfindholden.

longag

and

(Seal)

(My Commission Expire? March

The wagon

train

was formed

into a circle

with the horses staked out in the center oi the large ring. Weary pioneers gathered around their cooking fires to eat their evening meal. They were almost finished when a mildlooking little man in soiled buckskins entered
the circle of firelight.

The weary travelers rolled up in their blankets, and soon the whole camp was dark
silent. The uneasy shuffling of the horses and the occasional conversation of the sentries were the only sounds that

and

drifted out into the night. But these

sounds

were enough

for the Indian raiders to locate

He slid from his saddle and approaching one man in the group asked, "Could I see your wagon boss for a minute?" Jud Wilson rose from beside the fire, "I'm the wagon boss. What do you want?" The little man seemed ill at ease. "I'sighted a. big war party up in the hills about an hour's ride away, When I saw your camp, I rode in to warn you!"
"Jack, come here a minute," Jud called. Jack Willet was, from appearances, all a scout should be. And he wore his beaded buckskins with an air of authority. Pointing to the little man, Jud said, "Jack, this feller, here, says there are Indians about
trail

the camp. In the faint light of dawn, a line of Indian horsemen broke over the edge of the plains and attacked the wagon camp. The outriders and sentries hardly had time to shout a warning before the air was split with war whoops and gunfire. The pioneers fought hard, making every shot count, but from the first, it was obvious that they were fighting a losing battle. Unless help came soon they were doomed. Suddenly the Indians were thrown into confusion. They drew away from the besieged wagon train and wheeled their horses toward

the

hills in

the distance.

in the hills."

Jack Willet eyed the stranger, then he spoke. "Listen, this is friendly country; besides I've been out ahead of the train all day, and I saw no fresh sign. There's nol an Indian
in

From behind a wagon, one man pointed toward the hills and shouted, "Look, yonderl"
Jack Willet scanned the horizon.
"It's

an

Indian

smoke

signal, a

warning

that troops

are on the way!"

twenty miles

of here."

lone rider streaked across the plains

The little man faced up to him, "I'm telling you what I saw. They know you're here and most likely will attack about dawn!"
His face darkening into looked down at the stranger,
think you are. telling
I

scowl.

Jack

headed for the wagon camp. The men recognized him as the stranger who had warned them of the raid. As he leaped from his horse, he called out
anxiously, "Everything
all

can't see?

"Who do you me you can see what From the way you talk, anySam
Lee!"

right?"

body'd think you were

The
to the

little

man smiled but made no answer insult. He turned, mounted his horse,
off into the prairie night.

and rode

"Yup, the Indians pulled off. They got a smoke warning that troops are on the way!" The little man smiled, "There ain't no troops. I made that smoke signal to draw them off. You'd better get these wagons moving toward the fort before they find out

One member
were

of the

wagon

train

turned to

what a

liar I

am!"

Jack and asked, "Just


talking about?"

who is this Sam Lee you

Jack Willet scratched his head in amazement, "Just who are you, anyway?"

"Nobody, except one of the finest scouts en these plains nothing like thai little rene-

The

little

man smiled back over

his

gade."

shoulder as he mounted. "I'm the man trained Sam Lee. Name's Kit Carson."

who

Bighorn the Mountain Sheep is overlord of the western highlands. His throne is a sheer rock crag ... his domain, the high timber-rimmed meadows below. From this high world -on-edge, he gazes down on the immense plains of the West and is content
in the safe solitudes of his heights.

Bighorn is a true sheep, but he does not have wool. Instead.his heavy grayish-brown coat with buff-white rump patch is thick

coarse hair, like that of the deer. He is heavy-bodied and his massive horns curl inward, almost making a full circle. His hard-rimmed cloven hoofs have soft concave centers, like suction cups, enabling him to dash over loose rocks and steep crags with a sure-footed speed that quickly leaves his enemies behind. The swift silent pounce of the cougar is usually evaded by the alert Bighorn.

The big ram and his family are openly hunted by the gray timber wolf and the But the cougar, the wolverine, and sometimes a hungry lynx plan their atcoyote.

tack differently

they try to

ambush the Bighorn.


In the steep rocky heights the hungry hunters stand chance, but out on a rolling meadow or valley floor they gain the advantage for Bighorn is not a fast long-distance runner on open, level ground.
little

,'''!'

M
-',

,.Win.

But
the rams feed together, taking no interest in the ewes or lambs.
All

in late

N Jvember the mating

season

summer

arrives,

and then the rams scatter to

seek mates.

Often two rams stubbornly vie for the Isame ewe, while she stands aside and coyly watches the action that follows.

Being gentlemen, the big rams prepare


to settle their differences with a duel.

ferocious,

These mating battles are and sometimes deadly. The contestants fiercely charge from a distance of twenty-five feet and come together
terrific

head-on at full speed. The crash of their hollow horns echoes down the deep canyons. The shock-

ing impact dazes both


rams, but they quickly recover and back away crash again and again until one is defeated.

AV*

ifciWKJ^gr W^Sh^
Sometimes the loser departs and he minus one fine horn

m^M^^^C

\lllf

never fight again, for unsome other horned anima!s,he cannot grow a new one
will
like

By the end of the two-month-long courting season, Bighorn's grazing range is restricted by the heavy snowfalls of mid-winter . .

SK^Sse"
^SSfeSJS) >*S^g$&^

"^^s^M.-*

^fi

'^-"s'uit^.ifl

This is a time of double peril for the Bighorn clan, since food is scarce and hungry predators ar e abroad
.

Bighorn often must turn from food hunting to fighting with hoof and horn!

In their
fine fur,

warm

double coats of long coarse hair over Bighorn's clan survives the winter
. .

And in April the lambs a: born in sheltered are;

The newborn lamb is so tiny that it must stretch upward to reach its mother's milk
.
.

But after a month


that
it

it has grown so has to kneei to nurse!

tall

^
OrO^SPPPJF' ^'
/

WfiflK

|fegV
.''
;.

By

time the lamb can leap over the jagged rocks with the sure-footed speed of its mother
this
. .

J^BW^

V\Aj *^ ^^
s
t

*"*i

And pose on a thin pinnacle of rock with the haughty arrogance of Bighorn, his father.

Annie
'-.
.."..

'--'V'

SCHOOL FOR SCOUNDRELS

I w'AS HELP UP AMP R06BEP OF $500 BETWEEN '"" ANP RJAlElE CIT/.'

eoLUv.' amp i even weore asout tdue SJfAVERV IN MV ENGLISH COMPOSITION ON "FAMiL.y ACTIVITIES" FOR MR. FLINT THg
(JEW

SCHOOLMASTER WHO TOOK OVER WHEN MK. HAYNES SOT SICK


.'

<UR.

COMPOSITION HEBE'S FLINT SAVE ME A fiOi.0 STAg FOR WHAT I WOTE


'

MY

BRANDIN
The riders slowly haze the nervous herd into the corrals
It ia
. .

RANGE

BISON

this

roundup time, but there is something special about roundup! It is the 1958 annual buffalo roundup on the 18,500 acre National Bison Range at Moiese, Montana," *

The cowboys on a roundup of this kind must


is

for a buffalo can be treachbe top hands erous, and a 2,000 pound charging buffalo not a job for an amateur to tackle!

The corraled buffalo calves are vaccinated, tested for T.E., and branded with a number designating the year of their birth. Calves born in 1958 are branded with an "S."

The history of this herd dates back to 1873, when a Pen D 'Oreille Indian, "Walking Coyote," captured a few buffalo calves and drove them into this lush, green valley in Montana. The descendants of Walking Coyote's herd are cared for and given refuge as they roam within the National Bison Range.

DELL COMICS ARE GOOD COMICS

Astound
Your
Friends
with the Dell
YOU'LL AMAZE your
Dell

friends with this FREE

Comic

gift.

You con guess oges and pick


the Magic

numbers from o person's mind as easy as onetwo-three!

AN you need

is

Window
it.

Set

and

the simple instructions that

go with

IT'S

EASY

to get one, too. Just order a

one

year subscription to any of the Dell Comic

Magic Window
Set

titles listed
is

below and the Magic Window Set


you ore already o subscriber,

yours FREE! Hurry! Send your order with


If

$1.20 today.
we'll start

your new subscription when your

present one expires.

-CUT ALONG DOTTED

LINE

EASY TO ORDER
DELL
ic
I

COMIC SUBSCRIPTIONS!

Window Sel ond Dell Comics Club Membership Cert om enclosing S1-20 for each subscription order,
by ordering any 5
Titles for $5.)

Just fill in this handy order form by checking bel Comic titles you wont. Fill out name and address and enclose $1.20 for each subscription orderec

SAVE! Order Any 5

Titles for

$5!

Th.s

litre

is

pijblifhed

quo

CARD TO READ FROM:


If Subscriptions ordered ate to go to different addres: include odditiona! addresses on separate sheets. Be s

o indicote which

ti!;e

goes

10

which oddress.

BOYS! GIRLS! GET THIS

AMAZING

10-IN-r ELECTRIC TRAIL-KIT!

SEND FOR
GET ONE OF THESE

THIS ELECTRIC

"10-in-I"

SGT.

PRESTON

QUAKER CEREAL PACKAGES


TEAR OUT ORDER BLANK NOW!
Pl.g nd
btiHery.
1

lMHrMr
COMPLETE WITH BATTERY

rne wy EtMtflc Sgt. PreHon Tmil-Kil, complete with enclose SO* in CO! h ( ll0 m pl piece} ond o b * tO p
,

Wheat. (Only rcnd

01,0 bo.top.]

ONLY 504
SEND

n d uaker bo x top

City

7niw

Stntr

for this amazing pen-shaped kit that includes 10 special, useful devices yet fits together into a compact, plastic kit designed to go wherever you go. Just send a boxtop from one of the Quaker Cereal packages shown above and only SQf. Your money back if you are not, satisfied.
.
.

NOW