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OFFICIAL YEAR BOOK OF THE MISS AMERICA PAGEANT

ATLANTIC CITY 1951

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MISS -TLMERICA OF 1951 AND HER NEW

Nash Motors is Proud and Happy To Participate in the Sponsorship of the Miss America Pageant and Scholarship Awards. S E E ALL 3 The Ambassador G R E A T NASH AIRFLYTES -^ The Statesman • The Rambler

DIVISION

OF

NASH-KELVINATOR

CORPORATION,

DETROIT,

MICHIGAN

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--KCOMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 1351 PAGEANT COMMITTEES Mrs. Robert W. Leeds—Miss Atlantic City Ball Mrs. Malcolm Shermer—Hostess Committee James N. Butler—Judges Committee Joseph Hitzel—Housing Committee B. L. England—Advertising and Promotion Robert W, Leeds—Parade Committee Joseph LeChard—Special Events George B, Bruni \ _ I D i, ,, , T ^.»T •„ ( Coronation Ball Paul J, O Neill ' Josiah White—Guarantors Committee Hugh L, Wathen—Public Relations Park W. Haverstick—Budget Frank P. Gravatt—Breakfast Parties loseph Wagenheim ^ ^^^^^^ ^^^,^.j Joseph M, Hitzel, Jr, ^ * ^ K. B, Walton—Program Book J. •> -.. . Events _, .in. Auditorium « . • . ^ Howard „ Buzby , i Stagmg George Buzby 5 Wm. F, Casey—Reviewing Stands Hugh L, Wathen—Parade Judges K. B, Walton—Police and Ushering Dr, David B, Allman—Medical Director Phil. E. Thompson—Comptroller James N. Butler—Attorney Auditors—Wm. J, Lichtenberger and Carl R. Fiore Tellers—John C, Howe and Jess W, Speidel

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ARTHUR G. BROLL President JOSEPH WAGENHEIM Vice-President JOSEPH LeCHARD Vice-President P. E. M. THOMPSON Treasurer GOVERNOR ALFRED E. DRISCOLL , „ _, , MAYOR JOSEPH ALTMAN ^ " ° " - Chairmen

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Arthur G. Broll—Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. George B. Bruni—Claridge Hotel James N. Butler—Attorney J. Howard Buzby—Dennis Hotel Major Wm. F. Casey—City Commissioner B. L. England—Atlantic City Electric Co. Frank P. Gravatt—Realtor Park W, Haverstick—Eldredge Storage Joseph M, Hitzel—Shelburne Hotel Joseph LeChard—Atlantic City Sewerage Co, Robert W, Leeds—Chalfonte-Hoddon Hell Paul J. O'Neill—Investments P, E. M, Thompson—Convention Hall Mgr, Joseph Wagenheim—The Wagenheim Co, Kenneth B, Walton—Kents Restaurants Hugh L. Wathen—South Jersey Gas Co. Josiah White, IV—Marlborough-Blenheim Hotel Warren F, Wielland—Apollo Circuit Theatres

ARTHUR G. BROLL
President of the Miss America Pageant, P r o m i n e n t in civic affairs and manager of the A. C. PepsiCola Bottling Co., Mr. Broil is pastpresident of the Rotary Club, was a member of the Miss America judges committee for nine years, and is a veteran of W o r l d W a r II.

INDEX AND PICTURE GUIDE TO YOUR FAVORITE CONTESTANT
MISS ALABAMA ARKANSAS CALIFORNIA CANADA CHICAGO COLORADO CONNECTICUT DELAWARE DIST. OF COLUMBIA FLORIDA GEORGIA HAWAII IDAHO ILLINOIS INDIANA IOWA KENTUCKY LOUISIANA MAINE MARYLAND MASSACHUSETTS MICHIGAN MINNESOTA MISSISSIPPI MISSOURI Page 15 27 7 13 9 IS 31 9 13 25 7 II 25 31 21 II 29 31 13 29 II 15 21 25 7 MISS MONTANA NEBRASKA NEVADA NEW HAMPSHIRE NEW JERSEY NEW YORK CITY NEW YORK STATE NORTH C A R O L I N A NORTH DAKOTA OHIO OKLAHOMA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA PHILADELPHIA PUERTO RICO SOUTH C A R O L I N A SOUTH DAKOTA TENNESSEE TEXAS UTAH VERMONT VIRGINIA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA WISCONSIN WYOMING Page 27 27 7 13 27 13 II 25 15 29 31 29 9 9 15 II 29 9 21 31 25 21 21 7 27 15

INDEX
Scholarship Miss Americas Scholarship Miss Americas 1950 Runners-Up Talent and Congenialty Awarels Miss Americas Today Meet Bob Evans Statistics on Contestants Pageant Program of Events Silver Anniversary Parade Program Trio of 1950 Scholarship Winners Story of First Pageant 1951 Pageant Judges How to Judge Behind the Footlights History of Scholarships Scholarship Sponsors 2 3 4 5 6 10 16 I6A

(Center Spread) I7A 17 20 22 23 24 28 32

We Present, In Their Everglaze Coronation Gowns, the Six $5,000 Scholarship Winning Miss Americas

M I S S A M E R I C A 1945, Bess Myerson of New York City. Bess is a graduate of H u n t e r College, with a Master's Degree from Columbia. A brilliant pianist, with her own television show today, she has combined a career with marriage. In private life she is Mrs. Alan W a y n e , and the mother of an adorable four-year-old daughter named Barbara-Carroll,

M I S S A M E R I C A 1946, Marilyn Buferd of Los Angeles, CaHfornia. Marilyn worked for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer during the year of her reign, and was tutored in dramatics by the finest teachers in Hollywood. She then journeyed to Rome, Italy, and continued her educjition at the University of Berlitz. She is now under contract to a major Italian Motion Picture Company in Italy.

M I S S A M E R I C A 1947, Barbara Jo W a l k e r of Memphis, Tennessee, Barbara was graduated in June, 1948, at Memphis State College. She then married Dr. John V. Hummel, and continued her voice training with a private teacher in Baltimore, while her husband interned at Johns Hopkins. Today Dr. H u m m e l is an officer in the Medical Corp of the U. S. Navy, and Barbara is back home in Memphis, awaiting his return and the arrival of a third member of the Hummel family.

M I S S A M E R I C A 1948, BeBe Shopp of Hopkins, Minnesota. BeBe was the first Miss America to tour Europe during her reign. Today, she is an honor student at the M a n h a t t a n School of Music for the second year, and hopes to become a successful concert and television artist in the future. She is a mistress of percussion instruments, but her favorite is the vibraharp.

M I S S A M E R I C A 1949, Jacque Mercer of Litchfield, Arizona. Jacque attended the Phoenix, Arizona, Junior College for one year, then captured the Miss America title and officially visited forty of the forty-eight states, as well as Mexico, during her reign. She will now continue her studies in dramatics at a Southern California school. In private Hfe today she is M r s . Douglas Cook,
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M I S S A M E R I C A , 1951, Yolande Betbeze of Mobile, Alabama, is our reigning queen. Yolande will always have to explain that she won the Miss America title at the turn of the mid-century, and that the P a g e a n t directors decided to give her a post-dated title for three months, whereas her p r e decessors had past-dated titles for nine months. H e n c e there was no "Miss America 1950" title winner. Yolande is booked solid for personal appearances until next September, and will visit practically every state in the Union, as well as foreign lands. H e r beautiful lyric coloratura soprano voice has been heard on numerous radio and television shows from coast to coast, and everyone is predicting a brilliant operatic career for this talented southern beauty. Next year she will study abroad on her Miss America Scholarship.

1950 Runners-Up To Miss America in Talent Performances

M I S S S O U T H D A K O T A , Irene O'Connor of $3,000 Scholarship winner. Irene is a Junior Dakota. She captured a Preliminary Talent rendition of a scene from "Joan of Lorraine". test by Hot Springs Chamber of Commerce.

Burbank. First Runner-Up, at the University of South Award with her dramatic She was sponsored in con-

M I S S F L O R I D A , Janet Ruth Crockett of St. Petersburg. Second RunnerUp. $2,500 Scholarship winner, J a n e t Ruth has just completed two years of Junior College work, and will continue her music and dramatic studies in New York City. A popular singer and brilliant young comedienne, J a n e t won the nod from the judges and thunderous applause from the audience with her rendition of Hollywod bits, entitled "The Perils of Pauline" based on the old flicker movie days. She was sponsored in contest by the Florida State Junior Chamber of Commerce.

M I S S A R K A N S A S , Mary Jennings of Hot Springs. Third Runner-Up, $2,000 Scholarship winner. Mary is attending the University of Arkansas, and is a voice student of the famous Metropolitan Opera S t a r Marjorie Lawrence. Singing "Un Bel Di" from "Madame Butterfly" as her talent rendition, this beautiful girl with a truly great lyric soprano voice completely captivated the hearts of the tremendous Pageant audience and the judges. She was sponsored in the contest by the East Arkansas Young Men's Club.

Page 4

1950 Runners-Up To Miss America (Continued)

M I S S O K L A H O M A , Louise O'Brien of Tulsa. F o u r t h Runner-Up. $1,500 Scholarship winner. Louise is a student at the University of Tulsa, and musical comedy is her goal. T h e first real Irish Beauty to sing the songs that put tears in an Irishman's eyes, she held the P a g e a n t audience spellbound with "T'was Only An Irishman's Dream", and left a never-to-be forgotten memory of her charm and talent with P a g e a n t lovers fortunate enough to see and hear her. Louise was sponsored in the contest by the Oklahoma State Junior Chamber of Commerce.

Special

S^ckolarihny

-AjwarciA

MISS H A W A I I , Dell-Fin Kalaupaona Poaha of Honolulu, our reigning M I S S C O N G E N I A L T Y , and winner of $1,000 Scholarship. Dell-Fin was loved by all the Miss America contestants from the moment she set foot on Atlantic City soil, and by the end of the week they unanimously voted her the most popular girl in the contest. T h e title of Miss Congeniality is the most prized title in the entire contest, for the panel of judges are the contestants themselves. W h e r e v e r the girls congregated P a g e a n t week, you would find a ukulele strumming away and Dell-Fin teaching her fellow contestants the authentic Hula dance. This lovely girl from the beautiful Islands of Hawaii is now attending Hamline University in St. Paul. She was sponsored in the contest by the Honolulu Junior Chamber of Commerce,

M I S S N O R T H D A K O T A , Joan Teets of Minot. W i n n e r of $1,000 Talent Scholarship. The Talent Award is another very coveted scholarship at the National Finals due to the fact the Judges consider Talent Only when casting their ballot and only non-finalists are eligible for same. Joan was priceless in her impersonation of Katrina from her own original skit '-'A Touch of Norway". Joan's great ambition was to continue with her college education, and when the judges' decision was announced on the night of the finals, tears poured down her pretty cheeks, while fifty-three fellow contestants voiced their approval by rising and applauding her as she accepted the talent trophy and scholarship. Joan was sponsored in the contest by the Disabled American V e t e r a n s of the State of N o r t h Dakota.

Fagc 5

WHAT BECOMES OF FORMER MISS AMERICAS?
M A R G A R E T G O R M A N — M i s s America 192 I, is now Mrs, Victor Cahili, wife of a prominent Washington, D, C. real estate man. Miss G o r m a n , who hails from Washington originally, was the first Miss America. M A R Y KATHERINE CAMPBELL— Miss America 1922 and 1923, is the only young lady to twice win the coveted title. A f t e r her second triumph, it was decided t o limit the title to a single year for any one contestant. She is now Mrs. Fred Townley of Newark, N. J . RUTH M A L C O M S O N — M i s s America 1924, still makes her home In Philadelphia. She is married t o Major Carl Schoebel, Instructor of military tactics at Pennsylvania Military College, who served overseas In W o r l d W a r II. FAY LAMPHIER— Miss America 1925, came from Oakland, California, to win her title and now resides In one of Oakland's smarter suburbs, O r i n d a . She Is now Mrs. W l n f l e l d J . Daniels, wife of a noted California engineer and book collector, and the mother of two lovely daughters. N O R M A S M A L L W O O D — M i s s America 1926, who came from Tulsa, Oklahoma, t o become the first and only Oklahoma beauty to win the title, Is happily married to G e o r g e FH. Bruce and resides In W i c h i t a , Kansas, where her husband Is engaged In the petroleum business. LOIS DELANDER— Miss America 1927, whose home was In Jollet, Illinois, Is now married and making her home in Evanston, III. She is married to Ralph Lang, a salesman, and the proud mother of two children. No Pageants or contests were held from 1927 until 1933 when the event was revived. It was In 1933 that the judges selected:— M A R I O N BERGERON— Miss America 1933, of W e s t Haven, Connecticut. Miss Bergeron, like her predecessors, is married and makes her home in Dayton, Ohio, where her husband Is an executive In a wholesale drug concern. Now Mrs, Donald Ruhlman, she is the mother of two lovely children, a boy and a girl, o (No Pageant in 1934,) o HENRIETTA LEVER— Miss America 1935, Is now Mrs. F, J . Nessor of Columbus, O h i o . Married in 1936, she has one daughter, aged 41/^, Divorced In 1944, she remarried several years later. ROSE V E R O N I C A C O Y L E — M i s s America 1936, Is a native of Yeadon, Pa., and was married to the late Leonard Schlesslnger, a W a r n e r Bros, executive. She has remarried and is now Mrs, Robert Dingier, of Haverton, Pa. BETTE C O O P E R — M i s s America 1937, astounded the judges and the Pageant officials when she turned down glory of winning by returning the same night she was crowned to her home in Hackettstown, N. J . She returned to college, graduated and then spent the next five vears as public relations director of the Sandy Valley Grocery Company In Ashland, Ky, In 1945, she resigned, went to New York to study singing and dancing, still beautiful and still single. M A R I L Y N MESEKE— Miss America 1938, hails from Marion, Ohio, where she conducted a dancing school. She returned to her school and continued teaching until her marriage in 1944 to Major Stanley Hume of the U. S, A r m y . They now reside in Coral Gables, Florida. PATRICIA M A R Y D O N N E L L Y — M i s s America 1939, halls from Detroit. She appeared in pictures and sang and danced In bond and soldier shows during the W a r . She Is married now to publicist Robin Harris, and lives in Manhasset, L. I, FRANCES MARIE BURKE— Miss America 1940, Is a Philadelphia girl. Married to Larry Kenney of the Kenney Casket Co., of Phila. The mother of two lovely children, she Is still regarded as Philadelphia's t o p fashion model. ROSEMARY LaPLANCHE— Miss America 1941, is a Los Angeles product. From the time she was crowned until two years ago she was under contract t o RKO Pictures. Now married to producer-writer Harry Koplan, she stars on his CBS television show, " M e e t the Missus". J E A N BARTEL —Miss America 1943, was a graduate of U C L A when she was crowned Miss A m e r i c a . A f t e r a series of concert tours, she Is now the official greeter for the " C i t y of Times Square" a group o f New York hotels, and makes guest television appearances. VENUS RAMEY —Miss America 1944 retired to her farm and a husband after three years as a singing comedienne. Married to Joseph Murphy, Jr., promient Kentucky automobile distributor and gentleman farmer, she has two sons. BESS M Y E R S O N — M i s s America 1945, a graduate of Hunter College, N. Y. C i t y , became the first queen to win a $5000 Scholarship. Now Mrs. Alan W a y n e and the mother of a 4-year-old daughter, Bess has her own television show and is serving as a judge in this year's Pageant. M A R I L Y N BUFERD— Miss America 1946, returned to her home In Los Angeles after winning the title and studied and acted under an M G M contract. She left Hollywood to study at Berlitz U., in Rome, and for the past two years has been featured in Italian motion pictures. BARBARA J O WALKER— Miss America 1947 returned to Tennessee following her triumph to graduate from Memphis State College and married Dr, John Hummel, an interne at Johns Hopkins. They have one son, A n d y . BEBE SHOPP— Miss America 1948, Is a native of H o p kins, Minn., and was the first Miss America to tour Europe. Now a student at Manhattan School of Music, she hopes for a television and concert career. J A C Q U E MERCER — M i s s America 1949, hails from Litchfield, Arizona, surprised her friends by marrying boyhood sweetheart, Doug Cook, during her reign, visited 40 of the 48 States and Mexico, and Is continuing her studies in dramatics. (While Miss Mercer w:is Miss America 1949, she reigned during 1950 until September 9th, when Yolahde Betbeze took over as Miss America 1951. Because the major portion of Miss America's year on the throne is in the year following her selection, the Pageant Board voted to date the title a year ahead—hence Miss America 1952 will be selected this year.)

Page 6

C A R O L R U T H R O M A N N is a native of Granite City, III., on the Missouri border. At 19, she has completed three years at Lindewood College in St. Charles, Mo. She's 5-8 with light brown hair and blue eyes and has sewing for a hobby. H e r special training includes private lessons on the bassoon with H e r m a n Herzberg of the St. Louis Symphony. She'll play a bassoon solo. Miss Missouri P a g e a n t sponsored by St, Louis Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Top Right.) D O N N A J O A N N S O L L A R S first saw the light of day in Stockton, California, on J u n e 27, 1930. She attended the College of the Pacific two years and then completed her courses at Nevada U. Standing S-Sy, with brown hair and blue eyes. Donna has had eight years of piano study, five years of choral work and one year of dramatics. She'll sing in the talent competition. Miss Nevada P a g e a n t directed by Reno Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) P H Y L L I S L E E W A L K E R was born Christmas Eve in Charleston back in 1932 and at 18 is now a Sophomore at W e s t Virginia U. H e r special training has been in speech, dramatics, dancing and art. Phyllis stands 5-6, has light brown hair and hazel eyes. She is an expert swimmer and a member of the Dolphin, honorary swimming society. She'll give a dramatic reading in the talent competition. Miss W e s t Virginia P a g e a n t directed by Optimist Club of Morgantown. (Lozver Right.) C A R O L F R A N C E S T A Y L O R , of Alma, Georgia, was this year's "Miss Berry College", while she was a Sophomore. At 20, she has had five years of music training, three years of dramatics and will combine both talents in the P a g e a n t competition. A rabid baseball fan, Carol stands 5-7, has brown hair and grey eyes and collects dramatic monologues as a hobby. T h e Miss Georgia P a g e a n t directed by Columbus J r . Chamber of Commerce. (Center Below.) P A T R I C I A M A R I E L E H M A N is a native CaHfornian, having been born in Crescent City and now making her home in Sacramento. At 25, she is a primary grade teacher in her home town, is an accomplished pianist and self-taught accordianist. Standing 5-7, blonde and blue-eyed, Patricia will offer piano selections in the talent competition. Miss California Pageant directed by Santa Cruz Chamber of Commerce. (Lower

Left.)

Page 7

FREEDOM
is everybpdy^s Job!
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AMERICAN

Ofg.

COMPANY

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FROM

MAIIVE TO

FLORIDA

Page 8

S U Z A N N E P A R R O T T of Dover is the Delaware choice to be the new Miss America. In addition to graduating in J u n e from Dover H. S., Suzanne has studied music at W e s l e y Jr. College for two years, with 12 years vocal study in all. She is 18, stands 5-6J/2, weighs 120 and has light brown hair and brown eyes. Music is her hobby and hockey her favorite sport. Miss Delaware P a g e a n t directed by Delaware Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Top Right.) M A R G A R E T M A R Y R A M S D A L E is Peggy to all of her friends as well as her family. She now makes her home in Clifton Heights, a suburb of Philadelphia w h e r e she was born 19 years ago. Singing, swimming, tennis and oil painting are among her varied hobbies, but it will be her voice she'll be using in the talent competition. Statistically she is 5-6, weighs 126 and has dark brown hair and brown eyes. Greater Philadelphia P a g e a n t directed by Phila. Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) J E A N H A R P E R was born in Bruce, Mississippi, M a r c h 18, 1932. Now a resident of Memphis, she attended Memphis State College for two years. Six years of voice training and four years of dramatics have rewarded her with a fine lyric soprano voice. Jean stands 5 - 6 ^ , weighs 120, has dark brown hair and eyes and her hobby is teaching small children to sing as well as church work. She hopes for a Scholarship to continue her vocal training. Miss Tennessee P a g e a n t directed by Memphis Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lower Right.) C L A R E M A R I E L I P P E R T was born in the little town of Brackenridge and now makes her home in T a r e n t u m , P a . She'll be 19 on the 29th of September, but at 18 she's a high school graduate with an "A" average for four years. Clare stands 5 - 5 ^ , weighs 117, has light brown hair and grey-green eyes. H e r eight years of piano study and seven years of voice should make her mezzo-soprano solo in the talent competition right pleasing to the audience. Miss Pennsylvania P a g e a n t directed by Larry Woodin, Wellsboro, Pa. (Center Below.) A D R I A N N E F A L C O N is a native of the W i n d y City as was evidenced when a panel of nationally famous artists selected her "Miss W i n d y City". Following her graduation from bt. Patrick Academy in '50, she attended Loyola U., in Chicago, this year. She stands 5-4, with honey blonde hair, and, believe it or not has one brown eye and one green. She hopes for a career in musical comedy or television. Miss Chicago P a g e a n t directed by Miss Patricia Stevens. (Lower Left.) Page 9 .iS^i''

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MISS t7/u'ceiaa\

Meet Mr. Robert Evans— His Friends Call Him "Bob'
Arkansas is famous for Bob Burns, the Ozarks and a friendly young man, Robert (but everybody calls him " B o b " ) Evans, the soft-spoken fellow who is the master-of-ceremonles and talent director of this year's Miss America week. The story of one, the dating day he of back left Bob to his Evans is an interesting Pageant, and the only male to be found on the A u d i t o r i u m stage this

hometown tion sports

Helena,

to become a combinaannouncer and singer on Stations WMC and W H B Q in

Memphis,
It wasn't long after midnighters heard him UD East and New York beckoned, with the re-

BOB EVANS
Gotham

sult that for the next 13 years he made he was

his home, except for the time

entertainment director for the Italian Line cruises between Manhattan and South America. A d d to that the Broadway musical "Crazy W i t h the Heat", a flock of duet records with Judy Canova, and then the famous radio quartet, " H i g h , Lo, Jack and the Dame", which starred on the Fred Allen, Kate Smith and Paul W h i t e m a n shows. Hollywood came next and then he moved to Fred W a r i n g and the Pennsylvanians as featured vocalist, later taking over the script writing Icates was f o r m e d , producing transcriptions and for arranging. W h i l e with W a r i n g , Bob Evans Assonational radio advertisers. W e might still be listening to Evans' jingles but it was not right, he reasoned, to have Mrs, Evans and the Evans' offsprings stay home in while he worked at all hours in New York, Helena, So, in

120 MILES OF SUPERB BEACHES
STATE PROMOTION SECTION
Dept. of Conservation a n d Economic Development 6 0 1 State House, Trenton, N . J.

1949 he "packed i n " the Big Town and returned to his home to devote his time to his family and to the large cotton plantation he owns as well as the cotton brokerage business he manages. W e ' r e betting right now t h a t you're going to like " B o b " just as does everybody out there in '\rkansas . . . and besides doing a very creditable |OD or presenting each of the Miss America contestants, we'll wager, too, that you'll g e t a real thrill out of his wonderful voice.

Please send me FREE a copy of "FunFilled Days In N E W JERSEY, Vacation Host to the N a t i o n . " NAME ADDRESS

I
Page 10

CITY

STATE

l u — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — "

MOUNTAIN LAKES

FAMOUS RESORTS

J O Y C E E A R L E P E R R Y was born in Alcolu, S. C , July 11, 1933, and now lives with her parents in Conway, where she was graduated from high school last June. H e r favorite hobby is art and she has an ambition to study art for a career, Joyce is 5 - 7 ^ , weighs 126 pounds, has light brown hair and brown eyes. H e r favorite sport is basketball. Miss South Carolina Pageant directed by S. C. Junior Chamber of Commerce. (Top Right.) C L A I R E K A T H E R I N E H E E N is a native of Honolulu, where she was born 18 years ago. A g r a d u a t e of P u n a h o u School last June, she is seeking secretarial training and a career in Social Work. She will dance the Hula in the Pageant talent competition. Swimming and horseback riding are her hobbies. Claire stands 5-5H, weighs 115, has black eyes and brown hair and has had special training in Hawaiian dances. Miss Hawaii Pageant directed by Honolulu Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) M I L D R E D A L M E I D A was born in Boston, but now makes her home in New Bedford, Mass. An honor roll graduate from Girls' H i g h in 1947, she has had a year of dramatic training, teacher's training course in dancing, and hopes to attend the New Y o r k Conservatory for further study. For her talent she'll do a fashion modeling skit. She's 21, stands 5-4, weighs 112 and has brown hair and eyes. H e r hobby is photography. Miss Massachusetts Pageant directed by Station W N B H . (Lower Right.) N A N C Y J A N E N O R M A N is a native of Shenandoah, Iowa, and at 19 has already completed two years at Nebraska University. H e r other training includes three years of private voice lessons, two in college and six years of piano lessons. She will sing in the talent competition. Nancy is 5-3, weighs 103 and has brown hair and blue eyes. Book collecting, golf and swimming are her principal hobbies outside class. Miss Iowa Pageant directed by Clear Lake Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Below.) L O U I S E O R L A N D O is a native of Syracuse, and at 19 has graduated from N o r t h H. S. and finished her F r e s h m a n year at Syracuse University. Her extra training includes seven years of voice, five of piano, six ballet, one ballet and one violin, all of which adds up to a very versatile young lady. Since voice is her first choice, she'll sing in the talent competition. Louise is 5-5, weighs 110, and has brown hair and eyes. Miss N. Y, State P a g e a n t directed by Syracuse Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Left Below.)

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ATLANTIC CITY

4 STORES ' BOARDWALK AT ARKANSAS AVE. BOARDWALK AT KENTUCKY AVE. -BOARDIVALK AT TENN,AVENUE -BOARDWALK AT VIRGINIA AVE.

JITNEY MEN'S ASSOCIATION

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ON THE BOARDWALK AT SOUTH CAROLINA AVE. Page 12

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S A N D U S C O T T was 21 last July 10th, and became Miss New York City 37 days later. Born in Detroit, she was graduated from high school in 1947 and spent two years at W a y n e University. H e r hobby is teaching swimming and she hopes for a motion picture career. Special training in voice and dramatics has also added to her talent ability. She's 5-8, weighs 130 and has black hair and brown eyes. Miss New York City P a g e a n t directed by Grace Downs Model School. (Top Right.)

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M A R J O R I E A L M A K E L L Y was 23 on August 2nd. Following graduation from Simcoe High School and Alma Ladies College, she enrolled this year at the University of W e s t e r n Ontario. She has had six years of voice training for her lyric dramatic soprano voice which helped gain her an Associate Degree in Voice. Reddish brown hair and blue-grey eyes augment her 5 - 2 ^ height and 110 pounds. Painting, ice skating and dancing are her hobbies. Miss Canada P a g e a n t directed by "Miss Canada Pageant" at Hamilton, Ont. (Center Right.)

B E V E R L Y A N N E M E R Y is a native of Auburn, and will be 20 come Sept. 22nd. Following graduation from High School in 1949, she attended the Philadelphia Museum of A r t two years. H e r special training includes music and art, while her hobbies are sewing, jewelry design and fashioning, swimming and horseback riding. Beverly is 5-8, weighs 125 with brown hair and eyes. She'll sing in the talent division. Miss Maine Pageant directed by Skowhegan State Fair. (Lower Right.)

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C O L L E E N P H Y L L I S G A L L A N T was born in Berlin (N. H.) and now makes her home in Laconia, where she graduated from high school last June. H e r special talent is water skiing, but she hopes for a career in fashion modeling. Designing and making her own clothes is another attribute she possesses. Colleen is 5-8, weighs 133, has brown hair and blue eyes, will m a r k her 19th birthday October 5th. Miss New Hampshire Pageant directed by Manchester Union Leader. (Center Below.)

t(/a^^7(!n. P.C.

J U N E B E V E R L Y K L E I N was born in Brooklyn 21 years ago and now makes her home in W a s h i n g t o n , where she graduated from Roosevelt High in '48 and then spent the next three years at Wilson Teachers College. H e r talents include a mezzo dramatic soprano voice and pencil sketching. J u n e stands 5-6M, weighs 123 and has brown hair and dark brown eyes. H e r ambition is a singing career following graduation from college. Miss District of Columbia P a g e a n t directed by Radio Station W W D C , Washington. (Lower Left.)

Page ?3

Three Talented 1950 Semi-Finalists — All $1,000 Scholarship Winners

M I S S G R E A T E R P H I L A D E L P H I A , Janice Eileen M u r r a y of Philadelphia. Janice is a graduate of Ohio State University, with a Bachelor of Music Degree. She is now studying for her Masters Degree at the University of Pennsylvania. The 1950 P a g e a n t audiences will long remember the girl who held them ?pelibound as she sang "O Don Fatale". W e predict a great operatic future for this brilliant and talented young mezzo-soprano, who was sponsored in the contest by the Philadelphia Junior Chamber of Commerce.

M I S S T E X A S , M a r g a r e t Sue Sommers of Dallas. M a r g a r e t Sue is a University of Texas junior, studying for a Bachelor of Music Degree, after which she would like to teach voice. A petite little girl with a great mezzo-soprano voice, M a r g a r e t Sue selected "Jalousie" as her talent competition song, and completely captivated the audience and judges. She was sponsored in the contest by the Texas State Junior Chamber of Commerce.

M I S S W A S H I N G T O N S T A T E , Karlyne LaRae Abele of Des Moines, Washington. Karlyne is now a student at the University of Washington at Seattle, and is also taking dancing lessons. She proved once again the versatility of Miss America contestants by presenting as her talent the dramatic reading of an editorial from a New York paper, entitled "The Flag". She was sponsored in the contest by The Miss Washington Pageant, a non-profit civic corporation of that state.

Page 14

J E A N N E M O O D Y was born and raised in Cherokee, Ala., and at 21 has already attended Birmingham Southern College, New York University and Jacksonville State Teachers College. While in New York, she had special training in drama, voice and dancing, and hopes for a theatre-television career. She stands 5-7^^, weighs 128 is blonde and blue-eyed. H e r hobbies are music, swimming and the theatre. Miss Alabama P a g e a n t directed by Birmingham News and Alabama Theatre. (Top Right.) P A T R I C I A J O A N S E A B E C K will be 21, September 12th. Lives in Casper, Wyoming, where she attended Junior College for two years. Presently employed as a stenographer, " P a t " hopes for a career in T V or radio. She stands 5-7, weighs 120, has auburn hair and hazel eyes. Sewing and skiing are her hobbies. She is a member of Beta Sigma Phi Sorority, and has special dramatic training. Miss W y o m i n g P a g e a n t directed by W y o m i n g Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Second Right.) M A R I L Y N J E A N W A L K E R will be 20 come September 21st, but at 19 she has already completed two years at Minot State Teachers College. She has special training in voice, art and modeling and will present a group of her paintings in the talent competition. Marilyn stands 5-8y, weighs 127 and has dark brown hair and blue eyes. H e r hobbies are cooking and badminton. Miss N o r t h Dakota P a g e a n t directed by Minot Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Third Right.) D O L O R E S M A R I A B E R R U E Z O was born in Dearborn, Mich., F e b r u a r y 13th, 1932, and now lives in St. Clair Shores. Following graduation from high school, she enrolled in W a y n e U., Detroit. She hopes for a career as a dancer. Dolores is 5-7, weighs 122, and has brown hair and eyes. H e r hobbies arc dancing and swimming. She was selected to represent Detroit this year at the Annual Spring Siesta in Mexico. Miss Michigan Pageant directed by Muskegon Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lower Right.) J O L O N D O N was born in Como, Texas, g r a d u a t e d from Spur, Texas, High School in 1947 and then spent a year at Texas Tech. When the family moved to Aurora, Col., she enrolled at Colorado State, where she's been a student two years. Entertaining wounded veterans at Fitzsimmons hospital, dancing, swimming and tennis are her hobbies. She stands 5-7, weighs 128, has black hair and dark blue eyes and was 20 last April 9th. Miss Colorado P a g e a n t directed by Denver Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Below.) O T I L I A J I M E N E Z was born in Arecibo, P u e r t o Rico, May 7. 1926. Following graduation from Arecibo High School in 1942, she attended the Royal Commercial College where she won first prize in a secretary contest. Otilia is currently secretary to the vice-president of a bank. H e r favorite sport is swimming. Statistically she is 5 - 5 ^ . weighs 125, has brown hair and eyes and a tan complexion. Miss P u e r t o Rico P a g e a n t directed by the Miss P u e r t o Rico Institution. (Lower Left.)

t^M^mnf
Cl - •

t^-^

JMISS

Page 15

Dote On Figures?—Here Are Statistics On Contestants

MISS A L A B A M A , MISS A R K A N S A S ,

Jeanne

Moody,

Cheokee, Ala Little Rock, A r k Calif Sacramento, III Conn

B-jy 5-7 5-7 S-iy 5-4 5-6 5-5i^ 5-6^ Fla S-Sy 5-7 Hawaii Idaho S-Sy 5-4>4 5-4 Ind Iowa Ky La 5-5 5-3 5-4 5-7^ 5-8 5-6 5-4 5-7 5-4 5-8 5-6 S-Sy 5-8 5-6 5-8 5-5 5-8% 5-5 5-5 5-8 5-5% ....5-6 5-5 5-7% B-by 5-3% Utah 5-10 5-5^ Va Wash Va 5-8 5-4% 5-6 5-7 5-7 City,

128 130 128 110 110 129 118 120 123 130 128 115 112 115 115 103 115 128 125 122 112 122 128 115 128 132 123 123 133 125 130 110 134 127 114 120 129 117 126 125 126 122 120 109 143 119 126 116 124 124 120

36 36 37 34 34 36 34 34 37 35 35 34 34 35 35 33y 34 35 35 36 34 35 35 35 33 36^ 36 35 36 3by 37 34 36 34 34 35 345^ 33 35^^ 35^^ 34 35 35^4 34% 36 35 35 34 34 35 35

36 36 37 35 33 36 35 35^ 36 37 35 36 34 35 35 33 35 36 37^4 36 35 35 36 35 35 36^ 36 36 37 35 37 34 37 35 35 35 35V2 34 35^ 36^ 35 36 35 35 36 35y 36 3Ay 37 35 34

25 24 26 24;^ 23 25 24 25 26 23J^ 24 24 23 24 25 23 23 24^ 25 24^ 23>4 24 25 23 23^ 25 24 25 24 25 26 24 26 24 24 25 24^ 24 25]^2 25 24 24 24 22^ 24 24 25 24 24^ 24 24

21 18 25 23 19 20 19 18 21 19 20 18 19 18 21 19 21 19 19 20 21 19 20 18 19 21 19 21 18 18 21 19 19 19 22 18 18 18 19 25 18 19 19 18 25 19 21 19 18 18 20

Blonde Dr. Brown Blonde Reddish-Br. Blonde Black Black L t . Brown Brown Blonde Brown Black M e d . Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown L t . Brown Brown Brown Dr. Brown Dr. B l o n d e L t . Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Dr. Brown Black Brown Brown Dr.-Brown L t . Brown Brown Dr. Brown Lt. Brown Dr. Brown Brown L t . Brown Blonde Dr. Brown Brunette Blonde Brown Brown Brown L t , Brown Blonde Auburn

Blue Brown Blue Blue-Grey Brown-Green Dr. Blue Brown Brown Dr.-Brown Blue Grey Brown Blue Brown Blue Blue Blue Brown Brown Blue Brown Brown Hazel Hazel Blue Blue Blue Blue Blue Brown Brown Brown Hazel Blue Brown Brown Dr. Brown Grey-Green Brown Brown Brown Brown Dr, Brown Brown Blue Blue Blue Green Hazel Green Hazel

Fair Olive Fair Fair Fair Olive Fair Fair Medium Fair Medium Fair Fair Fair Fair Fair Fair Olive Fair Fair Olive Fair Olive Olive Olive Medium M e d . Dark Medium Olive Fair Fair Olive Fair Fair Medium Olive Olive Fair Lt. O l i v e Olive Medium Fair Medium Olive Fair Light Medium Olive Fair Fair Medium

Charlotte Patricia

Simmen, Lehman,

MISS C A L I F O R N I A , MISS C A N A D A , MISS C H I C A G O , MISS C O L O R A D O , MISS D E L A W A R E , MISS MISS MISS FLORIDA,

Marjorie Alma Adrianne Jo London, Beverly

Kelly, C o u r t l a n d , O n t a r i o Aurora, Burlant, Col Bridgeport. Del

Falcon, C h i c a g o ,

MISS C O N N E C T I C U T ,

Suzanne

Parrott,

Dover,

M I S S D I S T R I C T O F C O L U M B I A , J u n e Beverly K l e i n , W a s h . . D. C . . . 5 - 6 % Mary Carol Elizabeth Frances Katherine Charlene Mae Jane Jeanne Georgia Mitchell, Godwin, Taylor, Ralstin, Gainesville. Alma, Ga MISS G E O R G I A , IDAHO,

H A W A I I , Claire Phyllis Doris Carol

Heen, Honolulu, Nezperce, III Harvey,

MISS I L L I N O I S , MISS I N D I A N A , MISS MISS MISS IOWA,

King, Norman,

Indianapolis, Bowling Baton

Nancy

Shenandoah,

KENTUCKY, LOUISIANA,

Dottye

Nuckols,

Green, Rouge. Md

Thompson,

M I S S M A I N E , Beverly A n n MISS M A R Y L A N D . MISS M A S S A C H U S E T T S , MISS M I N N E S O T A , MISS MISS M I S S O U R I , •MISS M O N T A N A , MISS NEBRASKA, MISS N E V A D A , MISS N E W MISS N E W MISS N E W

Emery, A u b u r n , M a i n e Reed, Baltimore,

M i l d r e d A l m e i d a , N e w B e d f o r d . Mass Rose Clark, Minneapolis, Newton. Miss III Neb City, Minn

M I S S M I C H I G A N , Dolores M a r i a Berruezo, St. C l a i r Shores, M i c h . . . 5-7 Kathryn Ruth M I S S I S S I P P I , Jessie W y n n Carol Morgan,

Romann, Marie

Granite

Patricia Joan M c G l n t y , G r e a t Geraldlne Jo Ann Sollars, Reno,

Falls. M o n t a n a . . . . 5 - 7

Elseman, O m a h a . Nev

Donna

M I S S N E W H A M P S H I R E , C o l l e e n Phyllis G a l l a n t , L a c o n i a . N . H JERSEY, Bernice YORK YORK Dolores Massi. C a m d e n . N , J N. Y N, C Syracuse. N. Y CITY, Sandu Scott, N e w York C i t y . STATE, Louise O r l a n d o ,

MISS N O R T H MISS O H I O .

CAROLINA, Ruth Diane

Lu L o n g O g b u r n , S m i t h f i e l d . Creek, Astoria, Mary Ohio Ore

MISS N O R T H D A K O T A , Marilyn Jean Walker, M i n o t , N , Dakota....5-8J^ Howell, Apple Ann MIstretta, Marie MISS O K L A H O M A , MISS O R E G O N , MISS MISS GREATER Clifton MISS PUERTO MISS S O U T H MISS S O U T H MISS TEXAS, Bobby Jene Simmons. O k l a h o m a C i t y . O k l a Clare Pa, Jimenez, Earle Santurce, Perry, Puerto Rico S. C Joyce Conway. L I p p e r t , T a r e n t u m . Pa Ramsdale

Audrey

PENNSYLVANIA,

PHILADELPHIA, Heights, RICO, Otilla

Margaret

CAROLINA, DAKOTA, Glenda

Marlene Harper,

Margaret

RIeb, Parkston. S. D...5-7

MISS TENNESSEE, Jean MISS U T A H , Colleen MISS V E R M O N T , MISS V I R G I N I A ,

M e m p h i s , Tenn O d e s s a , Texas Lake Rutland. Vt Norfolk, Seattle,

Jane

Holcomb, Gilbert.

Kay H u t c h l n s , S a l t Ann Louise Bryant, Shaffer,

Peggy Shirley

MISS W A S H I N G T O N , MISS WEST V I R G I N I A ,

Darlene Marie

Phyllis Lee W a l k e r . Murphy,

Charleston. W . Marshfield, W i s

M I S S W I S C O N S I N , Sheila

M I S S W Y O M I N G , P a t r i c i a J o a n Seabeck, C a s p e r , W y o

Iff you drive/ park In the Auditorium Garage IF YOU DON'T DRIVE - CALL
FAST-SAFE COURTEOUS SERVICE

YELLOW CAB
Page 16

PHONE

4-1221

BROOKS & IDLER — PRINTERS — ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.

The Miss America Pageant Program of Events
BOB EVANS. Director and M . C .
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 5 8:30 P.M.
ORGAN M u s i c Lois Miller

JOE FRASETTO. Orchestra Conductor
FRIDAY, SEPT. 7 8:30 P.M.
ORGAN M U S I C Lois Miller

THURSDAY, SEPT. 6 8:30 P.M.
ORGAN M U S I C Lois Miller

FINALS
SATURDAY, SEPT, 8 8:00 P , M ,
ORGAN MtJsic Lois Miller

OvERTURE-'She's Miss America'
WELCOME — Miss Atlantic City,

OvERTURE-'She's Miss America'
WELCOME — Miss Atlantic City,

OvERTURE-'She's Miss America'
WELCOME — Miss Atlantic City,

OvERTURE-'She's Miss America'
WELCOME — Miss Atlantic City
M I S S AMERICA 1951^

Janet Barab
PAR.\DE OF T H E STATES—Miss AMERICA CONTESTANTS M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Janet Barab
PARADE OF T H E STATES—Miss AMERICA CONTESTANTS M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Janet Barab
PARADE OF T H E S T A T E S — M i s s AMERICA CONTESTANTS M i s s AMERICA 1951—

Yolande Betbeze
PARADE OF T H E STATES—

Miss America Contestants
NATIONAL A N T H E M INTRODUCTION OF JUDGES ANNOUNCEMENT OF T H E 15 $1,000.00 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS T E N SEMI-FINALISTS

Yolande Betbeze
NATIONAL A N T H E M INTRODUCTION OF JUDGES M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

Yolande Betbeze
NATIONAL A N T H E M INTRODUCTION OF JUDGES M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

Yolande Betbeze
N.\TIONAL A N T H E M INTRODUCTION OF JUDGES M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

(In Evening Gown)
PANORAMA INTERLUDE PRESENTATION OF T H E SCHOLARSHIP W I N N E R S FIVE

(In Evening Gown)
1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12. 14. 16. ARKANSAS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA GEORGIA 4, HAWAII IDAHO 6, INDIANA IOWA MASSACHUSETTS MINNESOTA MISSOURI II, NEW JERSEY N. Y. STATE 13, N. DAKOTA S. CAROLINA 15, UTAH WISCONSIN 17, WYOMING 1, 3, 5, 7, 9. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16.

( I n Evening Gown)
CANADA 2. DELAWARE 4, ILLINOIS 6, MICHIGAN 8, NEVADA N, HAMPSHIRE N. CAROLINA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA TENNESSEE 15. VERMONT 17. COLORADO FLORIDA LOUISIANA NEBRASKA 1. 3, 4, 5, 7, 9. 11. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

( I n Evening Gown)
ALABAMA 2. CALIFORNIA CHICAGO CONNECTICUT KENTUCKY 6, MARYLAND MAINE 8. MISSISSIPPI MONTANA 10. N, Y, CITY OHIO 12. OKLAHOMA PHILADELPHIA PUERTO RICO S. DAKOTA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA

PRESENTATION OF F I R S T H A L F OF T H E R E M A I N I N G CONTESTANTS BOB EVANS TEN SEMI-FINALISTS

(In Swim Suit)
PRESENTATION OF SECOND H A L F OF T H E R E M A I N I N G CONTESTANTS DIVERTISEMENT TEN SEMI-FINALISTS

TEXAS VIRGINIA

M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Yolande Betbeze
MISS 1, 3. S. 7. 9. 10. 11, 12. 13. 14. 16. AMERICA CONTESTANTS COLORADO FLORIDA LOUISIANA NEBRASKA

M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Yolande Betbeze
MISS 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9. 11, 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. AMERICA CONTESTANTS

M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Yolande Betbeze
MISS CALIFORNIA MARYLAND MISSISSIPPI N. Y. CITY OKLAHOMA 1. 2. 3. 5. 7. 8. 9. 10. 12. 14. 16, AMERICA CONTESTANTS

(Talent Competition) (In Swim Suit)
ARKANSAS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA GEORGIA 4. HAWAII IDAHO 6, INDIANA IOWA MASSACHUSETTS MINNESOTA MISSOURI 11, NEW JERSEY N. Y. STATE 13. N. DAKOTA S. CAROLINA 15. UTAH WISCONSIN 17. WYOMING DIVERTISEMENT PRESENTATION OF PARADE AWARDS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS

(In Swim Suit)
CANADA 2, DELAWARE 4. ILLINOIS 6, MICHIGAN 8, NEVADA N. HAMPSHIRE N. CAROLINA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA TENNESSEE 15, VERMONT 17.

(In Swim Suit)
ALABAMA 2, CHICAGO CONNECTICUT KENTUCKY 6, MAINE 8. MONTANA 10, OHIO 12, PHILADELPHIA PUERTO RICO S. DAKOTA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA

For Congeniality and Talent
A N N O U N C E M E N T OF FIVE F I N A L ISTS AND INDIVIDUAL INTERVIEW BEFORE JUDGES GUESTS OF HONOR A N N O U N C E M E N T OF FOUR RUNNERS-UP CROWNING OF

TEXAS VIRGINIA

GUEST OF HONOR M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

G U E S T OF HONOR M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

G U E S T OF HONOR M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

(Talent Competition)
1. 3. 4. 5. 7, 9. 11. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. ALABAMA 2, CALIFORNIA CHICAGO CONNECTICUT KENTUCKY 6, MARYLAND MAINE 8, MISSISSIPPI MONTANA 10. N. Y. CITY OHIO 12. OKLAHOMA PHILADELPHIA PUERTO RICO S. DAKOTA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA

M I S S A M E R I C A 1952
FINALE Entire Company

(Talent Competition)
1. 2. 3. 5. 7. 8. 9. 10. 12, 14. ARKANSAS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA GEORGIA 4. HAWAII IDAHO 6. INDIANA IOWA MASSACHUSETTS MINNESOTA MISSOURI 11. NEW JERSEY N. Y. STATE 13. N. DAKOTA S. CAROLINA 15. UTAH 17. WYOMING 1. 3. 5, 7. S. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16,

(Talent Competition)
CANADA 2. DELAWARE 4, ILLINOIS 6, MICHTGAN 8, NEVADA N. HAMPSHIRE N. CAROLINA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA TENNESSEE 15, VERMONT 17, COLORADO FLORIDA LOUISIANA NEBRASKA

TEXAS VIRGINIA

IG, WISCONSIN DIVERTISEMENT

DIVERTISEMENT BOB EVANS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS

DIVERTISEMENT BOB BOB EVANS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS EVANS

In Swim Suits and Talent Competition
FINALE Entire Company

In Swim Suits and Talent Competition
FINALE Entire Company

In Swim Suits and Talent Competition
FINALE Entire Company

CREDITS Auditorium Staflf, (Set U p ) Comm. W . S. Cuthbert,(Police) Coronation Gowns and Official Pageant Gowns, Courtesy "Everglaze" Fabrics, Wilmington, Delaware Charles L. Fischer, Atlantic City—Coronation Roses J. J. Habermehl's Sons, (Floral Setting) Hair Fashion Council of America, Inc.—Hair Stylists for Miss America Contestants Nash Motors, Detroit, Mich.— Transportation John Wanamaker, Philadelphia, Pa. (Properties)

"Miss America, Here's Your Dream"—Words and Music by Bob Evans Overture "She's Miss America"—Words and Music by W m . B. Richter Page 16A

O F TffTTW f S S
It was in 1921 that an energetic Atlantic City newspaperman sold the idea of staging a national beauty contest for the selection of Miss America, His name was Herb Test, and he died long before he could see his brainchild grow into the magnitude the Miss America Pageant enjoys today. Fittingly enough, the Nation's Capital produced the first Miss America—blonde, blue-eyed garet Gorman, who won the title MarFollowing in annual succession to the crown were Ruth Malcomson of Philadelphia In 1924; Fay Lamphier. of Oakland. California, in 1925; Norma Smallwood of Tulsa. Oklahoma, in 1926, and Lois Delander. of Joliet, Illinois, in 1927, who was also destined to become the last of the Miss Americas of the Roaring Twenties, since the Pageant took a financial nose-dive and went into moth-balls until 1933. It was also in 1927 that a blonde youngster from Dallas carried the Lone Star State's banner in the Atlantic City contest—but she didn't come close to being Miss America and went to Hollywood instead. Her name was, and still is, Joan Blondell, and she's still starring on stage and television after a very successful motion picture career. Like its most recent predecessor, the 1933 contest was a financial failure, but it did bring the Miss America crown to a sixteen-year-old youngster from West Haven, Conn,, Marion Bergeron, who holds the distinction of being the last sixteen-yearold to become Miss America, for in 1935, when the contest was revived, the age minimum was moved to 18 years.

hands-down

garbed in a full-skirted black bathing suit, kneelength stockings, a colorful sash and a bright bandana gracing her long curly locks. She won a huge loving cup to prove she was queen and returned home, little knowing that she was to become the first of an estimated 500,000 "queens"- who have been selected in tlie United States since that Sun-

% *.

day afternoon, September 10, 1921, she returned to live in Washington. Columbus, Ohio, holds the distinction of being the home of the only girl to become Miss America twice, for, since Mary Katherine Campbell won the title both in 1922 and again In 1923, the Miss America Pageant Board ruled a limit of one year's reign for any one contestant.

A M E R I C A S
Since 1935 not only has Miss America as a contest been both successful and highly improved, but it has been the spark that ignited a nation-wide fury to create queens, titles and beauty contests In general. A very conservative 25,000 contests featuring beauty are now run annually in the United States, and practically every other country in the civiliied world has its share of competitions. For a nation that was founded on and lives by Democracy at its best, we produce more "royalty" In any one 24-hour stretch than all of the sovereign nations together In a decade. To get back to 1935 and the second revival of the Miss America contest—for it was in that year that it acquired the foothold that has brought it to the top of the ratings that go with beauty contests as such . . . and even a big step beyond. Beginning with Henrietta Lever, of Pittsburgh, Miss Americas of the 30's include Rose Coyle of Philadelphia in 1936; Bette Cooper of Hackettstown, N. J,, in 1937; Marilyn Meseke of Marion. Ohio, in 1938, and Patricia Donnelly of Detroit, Mich,, in 1939. It was Bette Cooper who made the headlines sparkle in 1937 when she returned home the same night right after winning the title. to their own qualifications. " —-_-^r=#' First of the Miss Americas to be picked on a combination of talent, charm, poise and beauty was Frances Marie Burke of Philadelphia, and following her have been an even 10 young ladies, who possessed all four In the eyes of such noted judges as Russell Patterson. Harry Conover, John Robert It would make the presentafrorf o f the contestants more entertaining to the paying customers, the Board reasoned, and so sponsors of local contests throughout the country—franchised to select girls for the national finals—.feast j ^ ^ a d d "talent" In 1940, re-valuing the acceptance of the Miss America Pageant as a strictly beauty contest based on the definition of beauty and such synonyms as "loveliness, fairness, comeliness, handsomeness, prettiness, exqulsiteness, grace, charm and pulchritude", the Pageant Board went Webster one better by adding the word "talent" to its requirements for a

Powers. Coby Whitmore, Earl Wilson, Cornelius Otis Skinner, Dr. Frank Black and Deems Taylor to mention but a few.
(Continued on Pd^e 26)

MISS AMERICA 1951 BOARDWALK PARADE
{3 P. M., Tuesday, Sep+ember 4, Line of March — New Jersey to Hartford Avenues) OFFICIALS
H O N . W M . S . CUTHBERT

Grand Marshall

OFFICIAL LINE-UP OF FLOATS. CONTESTANTS AND BANDS
Motorcycle Escort Police Color Guard GRAND MARSHALL Director Wm. S. Cuthbert PHILADELPHIA POLICE (Band) U. S. M A R I N E C O L O R and HONOR GUARD HER MAJESTY'S FLOAT Featuring Yolande Betbeze "Miss America 1951" (Sponsored by the Miss America Pageant) MISS S W E D E N FLOAT Featuring Miss Anita Ekberg (Sponsored by W a s a Crisp Bread) DURNING'S STRING BAND CITY "MISS "MISS "MISS IOWA" KENTUCKY" LOUISIANA" "MISS "MISS "MISS OREGON" PENNSYLVANIA" PHILADELPHIA" SCHOOL
B. H.

*
FRAPART

Director

BELMAR COMMUNITY BAND (Philadelphia, Pa.) SALT W A T E R T A F F Y FLOAT (Sponsored by Fralinger's Salt Water Taffy) "MISS 'MISS "MISS MAINE" MARYLAND" MASSACHUSETTS" BAND

BURLINGTON HIGH BAND Burlington, N. J.

*
P a r a d e Committee
RoBT. W. LEEDS,

S K Y S C R A P E R BY T H E S E A FLOAT (Sponsored by the Claridge Hotel) MISSION B E L L FLOAT Featuring "Miss Puerto Rico 1951" (Sponsored by Miss Puerto Institution) "MISS "MISS SOUTH SOUTH CAROLINA" DAKOTA"

Chairman

N E W A. C. S T R I N G

W I L L I A M CASEY

B E A U T I E S OF T H E S E A FLOAT (Sponsored by Hackney's Restaurant) "MISS MICHIGAN" "MISS MINNESOTA" "MISS MISSISSIPPI" U. S. N A V Y F O U R T H DISTRICT BAND NAVAL

Rico

Grandstand

K.

B. W A L T O N ,

P E N D E L L STRING BAND MONARCH OF T H E B O A R D W A L K FLOAT (Sponsored by Ambassador Hotel) "MISS "MISS "MISS TENNESSEE" TEXAS" UTAH"

Pohcing

and

Ushering

CITY OF ATLANTIC FLOAT Featuring Janet Barab ''Miss Atlantic City" "MISS ALABAMA" "MISS ARKANSAS" "MISS CALIFORNIA"

U. S. N A V A L A I R S T A T I O N Color Guard and Rifle Platoon W I N T E R F A N T A S Y FLOAT (Sponsored by the Dennis Hotel) "MISS MISSOURI" "MISS MONTANA" "MISS NEBRASKA" HAMMONTON HIGH BAND SCHOOL

HUGH L. WATHEN,

Judges

M U S I C I A N S L O C A L 661 (Band) "MISS "MISS "MISS CANADA" CHICAGO" COLORADO"

PENNSVILLE COMMUNITY BAND (Pennsville, N. J.) LUCKY S W I N G FLOAT (Sponsored by Atlantic City Race Course) "MISS "MISS "MISS VERMONT" VIRGINIA" WASHINGTON" POST

ROBERT GLASS

Bleacher

Construction

LIONS CLUB DRUM A N D BUGLE CORPS Perth Amboy, N. J. CIRCUS FLOAT Featuring "Miss Connecticut 1951" (Sponsored by W a r n e r Co., Bridgeport, Conn.) "MISS DELAWARE" "MISS DIST. OF COLUMBIA" HEGERMANN STRING BAND "MISS FLORIDA" "MISS GEORGIA" "MISS HAWAII" BAYWAY BAND REFINERY ESSO

S H O W BOAT FLOAT (Sponsored by M. E. Blatt Co.) "MISS NEVADA" "MISS NEW HAMPSHIRE" "MISS NEW JERSEY" ONIZED BAND

MEREDITH KERSTETTER,

Deputy Director of Public Safety

PEARL OF THE ATLANTIC FLOAT
(Sponsored Hall) "MISS NEW 'MISS NEW by Chalfonte-Haddon CITY" STATE" YORK YORK

H A R R Y P. M O R R I S O N AMERICAN LEGION (Band) Sakm, N. J.

CAPT. W I L L I A M MULLOY,

Auxiliary

Police

W A T E R B A L L E T FLOAT (Sponsored by Steel Pier) "MISS IDAHO" "MISS ILLINOIS" "MISS INDIANA" POLISH BAND AMERICAN STRING

RAMBLER COUNTRY CLUB FLOAT (Sponsored by Nash Motors, Detroit, Mioh.)

P U B L I C UTILITIES FLOAT (Sponsored by A. C. Electric Co., S O U T H E R N B E L L E FLOAT and South Jersey Gas Co.) Featuring "Miss North Carolina" "MISS WEST VIRGINIA" (Sponsored by N. C. Jr. Chamber "MISS WISCONSIN" of Commerce) "MISS WYOMING" AQUA STRING BAND Y.M.CA. FLOAT M O D E R N F A R M I N G FLOAT M I S S F L O R I D A 1950 (Sponsored by James Salt Water Taffy) Janet Crockett "MISS NORTH DAKOTA" M I S S P H I L A D E L P H I A 1950 "MISS OHIO" Janice Murray "MISS OKLAHOMA" U N I T E D F U N D FLOAT ATLANTIC CITY DRUM AND (Sponsored by United Fund of BUGLE CORPS Atlantic County) A TOUCH OF V E N U S FLOAT ST. J O S E P H HIGH SCHOOL (Sponsored by Boardwalk National Bank, Guarantee Trust Co., & D R U M and B U G L E C O R P S Ventnor City National Bank) (Hammonton, N. J.)
Copyright by Official Pageant Publications

PAUL

J.

O'NEIL,

Chairman Assembly-March Robert Doughty George T. Graves, Jr. Albert A. Marks, Jr. Richard Mason Maurice Mower Harold Rich Edwin C. Silvers Daniel F, W a t e r s , 2nd

PHILADELPHIA

POLICE

Director Samuel Rosenberg

(Nash Convertibles carrying former Miss Americas and 1950 Contestants courtesy of Nash Motors, Detroit, Mich.)
1951

Page 17 A

A Trio Of The Ten 1950 Miss America Pageant Semi-FinaUsts Whose Talent Helped Capture $1,000.00 Scholarships

M I S S C O N N E C T I C U T , Renee Dianne Roy of Hartford. Rcnec is a dramatic and dancing student, who is continuing her studies in New York, A born comedienne, Renee walked away with a preliminaiy talent trophy, when she im])ersonated a department store Cosmetician, demonstrating cheap cosmetics and then for a brief moment relived the heyday of her youth— the Charleston era. She was sponsored in contest by Alfred Patricelli Public Relations,

MISS D I S T R I C T O F C O L U M B I A . Sandra Joanne Stahl of Washington, D. C. Sandra is a former University of Arizona student. She has had eight years of voice training and will continue with same, along with languages and repertoire. Sandra received a thunderous ovation as she sang a portion of the "Bell Song" from "Lakmc", and easily captured a Talent Preliminary Trophy. She was sponsored in contest by Radio Station WWDC.

M I S S N E V A D A , Tosca Carolyn Masini of Sparks. Tosca is a graduate of the University of Nevada, a Tri-Delt and a public school teacher. School boys and girls over the country poured in their letters of congratulations and good wishes to the math teacher not afraid of "figures". H e r original musical comedy sketch was a highlight of talent performances P a g e a n t W e e k . She was sponsored in contest by the Reno Junior Chamber of Commerce,

Page 17

A t l a n t i c C i t y will be 100 years old in 1954 and on this p a g e are a n u m b e r of firms, business leaders and utilities t h a t have been largely mental In making this C i t y the g r e a t resort It Is t o d a y . They salute the 2 5th Miss A m e r i c a and we. in turn, salute t h e m ,

Instru-

A T L A N T I C CITY E L E C T R I C CO. (Established in 1907) A T L A N T I C C I T Y L U M B E R CO. (Established in 1872) A T L A N T I C C I T Y S E W E R A G E CO. (Established in 1888) AUSTIN FUEL COMPANY (Established in 1921) W A L T E R & BEN BRICK (Dealing in Lumber since 1908) BROOKS & IDLER ( P r i n t e r s for over 40 years) C H A R N E Y ' S S T A T I O N E R Y and OFFICE SUPPLIES CHILD'S RESTAURANT (EstabHshed in 1914) COCA-COLA B O T T L I N G CO. (Established 1920 in Atlantic City) J O E DAILY T I R E SERVICE, INC (Established in 1915) DOCK'S O Y S T E R H O U S E (Established in 1897) DORLAND ADVERTISING AGENCY (Established in 1883) DUNGAN, FRY & S P E N C E (Fine Furniture Since 1901) EASTERN MOTOR COMPANY (EstabHshed in 1911) ELDREDGE STORAGE (Established in 1886) W A L T E R R. E S H B A C H , INC. (Canvas and Awnings Since 1919) FISCHER FLOWERS (Established in 1876) B E N J . B. F O X (25 Years Electrical Contractor)

FRALINGER'S ORIGINAL SALT WATER TAFFY (EstabHshed in 1885) FRENCH'S PAINT STORE (Established in 1898) FREUND BROTHERS—OPTICIANS (Established in 1898) FRIEDEBERG'S JEWELERS (EstabHshed in 1890) C H A S . W. GALE, INC., I N S U R A N C E (EstabHshed in 1913) G E T T L E M A N F U R S , INC. (EstabHshed in 1914) ~ GINSBURG BAKERY (EstabHshed in 1915) H A R R Y G O D S H A L L , INC. (Insurance Since 1915) GROSSMAN'S KENSINGTON C A R P E T CO. (EstabHshed in 1912) G U A R A N T E E B A N K & T R U S T CO. (EstabHshed in 1900) H O M E ICE COMPANY (EstabHshed in 1913) J A M E S SALT W A T E R TAFFY (EstabHshed in 1880) K E N T S R E S T A U R A N T & B A K I N G CO. (EstabHshed in 1903) W A T S O N R. L E W I S & SON (Poultry, Butter and Eggs Since 1881) N A T H A N L E V I N F U R S , INC. (EstabHshed in 1910) J O H N A. M A J A N E — N E W S D E A L E R (EstabHshed in 1891) CITY O F M A R G A T E CITY (Incorporated in 1897) M. B. M A R K L A N D C O N T R A C T I N G CO. (Established in 1915) Page 18

J. V A U G H N M A T H I S (Architect Since 1905) T H E R. C. M A X W E L L CO. (Outdoor Advertising Since 1904) J O H N H M O O R E & SON (Plumbing Contractors Since 1899) PACKMAN BROTHERS (Wholesale Grocers Since 1912) PHILLIPS COMPANY (Real Estate and Insurance Since 1879) L O U I S ST. J O H N (Chairman, First P a g e a n t Judging)

SHREVE TRAVEL SERVICE
(EstabHshed in 1890) SAM S L O T O R O F F & S O N S , INC. (Men's and Boys' Clothing Since 1912) S O U T H J E R S E Y GAS CO. (EstabHshed in 1910) S O U T H J E R S E Y T R A N S F E R CO. (Established in 1919) G R A N V I L L E H. S T E E L M A N (Insurance Since 1904) STEELMAN'S LAUNDRY (Established in 1913) T I F F T , L A Y E R & CO. (Insurance Since 1920) T R I P I C I A N CANDY S T O R E (EstabHshed in 1900) W A L T E R D. U L L R I C H (Adjuster Since 1921) CITY O F V E N T N O R CITY (Incorporated in 1903) JOS. W A G E N H E I M CO. (Fine Meats and Poultry since 1912) W E S T S I D E L U M B E R CO. (Established in 1898) W I L S O N D A I R Y CO. (EstabHshed in 1877)

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Newspapers Started It All
While the history of the Miss America Pageant is recorded in full in this edition of the Year Book, it seems logical to relate a bit about the very first contest, how it came about and ho-.v it differs from the more modern version of a Miss America Pageant. Early In 1921, the circulation manager of the now-extinct Atlantic City Gazette-Review, the late Harry Finley, attended a meeting of Eastern circulation managers in Pennsylvania. Seeking ways to get new readers and more circulation for their papers, the delegates decided to run a series of "Popularity Contests" in their papers to pick the most popular young lady in their Individual cities. The grand prize was to be a vacation In Atlantic City. Finley returned to the resort and told the editorial department about the plan. That was when the late Herb Test, a better-tlian-average writer and likewise an astute reporter, suggested that if they were going to have a number of girls here at one time, the City should pick one as the be:t-of-tSe-crop in a bathing suit and call her Miss America. Thus, the Inter-City Beauty Contest was born. The idea took hold and plan: wore soon made for a Pageant In September of that year. There were a total of seven entries, not including Miss Ethel Charles of Atlantic City, who had been selected Miss Atlantic City via the popularity vote route. Other cities represented were Pittsburgh, Washington, Camden, N«w York, Ocean City, Harrisburg and Philadelphia. Miss Washington won. Louis St. John, then local manager for General Outdoor Advertising, was chairman of the first judges committee, that numbered, according to Mr. St. John, about 100 Important citizens. The event opened with an Arrival Parade on the Boardwalk, followed on successive days with a Baby Parade, an evening-gown competition in the ballroom of the old Garden Pier, a Bather's Revue on Steel Pier and a floral-decorated roller chair parade on the Boardwalk and finally a "Big Float Parade." Judges for the several parades were seated on a special platform erected in front of the old Steeplechase Pier. After compiling all their votes. Miss Washington, Margaret Gorman, came up with the top count for beauty in a bathing suit and the first Miss America title, with crowning ceremonies In the Million Dollar Pier ballroom. King Neptune was the official greeter of the beauties on their arrival, and. In the Bather's Revue, just about everybody but the local gendarmes wore bathing suits to add color. If little else, to the occasion. Imagine that event in 1921 and compare It with the spectacle you are witnessing in 1951. , , , It has come a long way, you'll have to admit.
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SEND SOUVENIR YEAR BOOK TO SERVICEMEN
A copy of this Anniversary be mailed to any serviceman Send check or Money Atlantic City. I'liit or Company; of Post Office. edition of the Miss America Year Book zvill Hall, Number;


Q\

or woman anywhere

in the world for only 50 cents. Year Book, Convention Name; Serial

Order to Miss America or Comparable

Be sure to designate Regiment

clearly—Grade;

Unit; APO

if overseas and name order.

Books zi'ill be sent immediately

upon receipt of

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Page 19

,S FAMOUS FOR ITS
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SPECIALTIES COCKTAIL LOUHGE
MIKE J. FIORE, MSR-

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SUPERB FOOD FINE LIQUORS ENTERTAINMENT.
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Your trip to Atlantic City is not complete without

HACKMEYiS
Boardwalk at Maine Ave ^ " ' ' • ' " " ^ ^ • - " • - / - "="-9 Cha,>W;ce R'9''t To the Door

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Thirty years have made a lot of changes in women's fashions as Is evidenced by this picture of the first Miss America Pageant contestants. By way of Identifications they are—left to right: "Miss Washington". Margaret Gorman (who became Miss America 1921); "Miss Pittsburgh", Thelma Mathews; "Miss Harrisburg", Emma Pharo; "Miss Ocean City". Hazel Harris; "Miss Camden", Kathryn Gearon; "Miss Atlantic City", Ethel Charles (Official Hostess); "Miss New York", Margaret Bates; and "Miss Philadelphia". Nellie Orr.

Page 20

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C A R O L M I T C H E L L makes her home in IndianapoHs, where she was born 21 years ago. Now a Senior at Indiana U., her talent is quite different than any of the other Pageant contestants, combining a chalk-talk sketch with two dancing marionettes. She was picked by American Magazine as Coed of the M o n t h last March and is a veteran on T V shows. Carol is 5-5, weighs 115 and has brown hair and blue eyes. Miss Indiana P a g e a n t directed by Lafayette Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Top Right.) S H I R L E Y L O U I S E B R Y A N T gets her mail at Norfolk, where she was born October 6, 1929. H e r schooling includes a diploma from high school and two years at WilHam and Mary's N o r folk branch. Beyond that she has had private lessons in voice and piano, and tap, toe and ballet dancing. She'll sing in the talent competition. Shirley stands 5-8, weighs 126 and has brown hair and blue eyes. She hopes for a theatrical career via a Scholarship. Miss Virginia P a g e a n t directed by Alpha Rho Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi, Norfolk. (Center Right.)

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K A T H R Y N R O S E C L A R K was born in LaCrosse, Wis., where she graduated from high school in 1948. Now a resident of Minneapolis where she attended the MacPhail School of Music for three years, K a t h r y n will offer a lyric dramatic soprano solo in the talent division. H e r training includes more than three years of voice and nine piano. H e r hobbies are reading and composing. She stands 5-7, weighs 128 and has dark brown hair and hazel eyes. Miss Minnesota Pageant directed by Excelsior P a r k Co., Minneapolis. (Lozver Right.)

D A R L E N E S H A F F E R first saw the Hght of day in Mission, S. D., graduated from high school in Sand Point, Idaho, and now makes her home in Seattle. While she has had eight years of ballet, she's been sewing since three and will model and display gowns she designed and made when she competes in talent. Swimming and water skiing are her favorite sports, and designing her hobby. She's 5 - 4 ^ , weighs 116 a n d has brown hair and green eyes. Miss W a s h i n g t o n P a g e a n t directed by Miss Washington State Pageant, Inc. (Center Below.)

G L E N D A J A N E " J A N I E " H O L C O M B started her journey to Atlantic City when she won the preliminary contest in her home town of Odessa. H e r monologue from J o a n of Arc, plus her personality and beauty won the state title two weeks later. At 19, J a n e is one of the outstanding dramatic students at Texas U., and hopes to duplicate the feat of another Texas girl, Jo Carroll Dennison, of Tyler, who was Miss America 1942. Texas Pageant directed by Texas Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Left Belozv.)

Page 21

Meet The Judges Who Will Pick Miss America 1952
Judging talent is a daily routine for Norwood Baker, She is in charge of the Arts Program of the Association of American Colleges and is responsible for selecting artists who appear in colleges. This marks her fourth year as a judge. One of America's most talented designers and the creator of the official Pageant gown being worn by Miss America, Ceil Chapman is serving her second year as a judge. She is as adept at judging as she is designing fashions for women. Mr, Coste is one of the nation's top advertising executives, being identified for 21 years with the Coca-Cola Co,, and instrumental in creating " T h e Pause That Refreshes", Now is director of advertising and head of marketing.
FELIX W . COSTE

NORWOOD BAKER

WILLIAM SELDEN

Director of Admissions and Assistant Dean of Students is the job William Selden fills at Northwestern U. He will be 40 Armistice Day, is married, has two sons, and prior to his present post was an assistant dean at both Princeton and Brown, One of America's foremost music critics, composers and commentators, Deems Taylor is serving his second year as a judge. Long associated with the N. Y. Philharnionic and author of "Men of Music", his fame is world-wide.

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CEIL C H A P M A N

D E E M S TAYLOR

DxRESS UP YOUR WINDOWS!!
A Super-Attraction Wherever Shown!

P A N O R A M A PHOTOGRAPHS 1 9 5 1 PAGEANT BEAUTIES
(Size 40 inches long by 10 inches high) $2.50
Special Combination of Panorama of all contestants plus beautiful portrait of Miss America 1952, only $3.00 sent postpaid anywhere in United States.

VINTON FREEDLEY

Vinton Freedley is a graduate of Harvard and U. of Penna. Law School and was Marine Corps Captain World W a r I. After five years as actor, he turned to producing such hits as " L a d y Be Good", "Girl C r a z y " and a dozen others and is producer-host of the ANTA TV "Showtime U.S.A.". You may not recognize her by her married name of Mrs. Lawrence Kenney, but you will remember her as Frances Marie Burke, Miss America 1940. She is serving her first term as a judge, and knows what requirements are needed to be Miss America. Recognized as one of America's greatest portrait photographers, Hal Phyfe is serving his third year as a judge. Not only is he regarded as an expert in the photographic arts but in picking beauties as well.

CENTRAL STUDIOS
15 SOUTH VIRGINIA AVENUE
Official Photographsrt for Mist America Pageant

M^ubiic Service

Buses
TO

...

Playground Express Buses
PHILADELPHIA
Buses leave Bacharach Boulevard and Tennessee A v e n u e at 6:20 A M , 9:20 A M , 10:20 A M , 11:20 A M , 4:20 PM, 5:20 PM, 6:20 PM, 7:20 PM.
(42 Regular Daily Trips between Atlantic City and Philadelphia)

NEW YORK
Buses leave Bacharach Boulevard and Tennessee Avenue at 6:30 AM, (Men, Only) 7:00, 9:00, 11:00, Noon, 1:00 PM, 2:00 PM, 3:00 PM, 4:00 PM, 6:00 PM, 8:00 PM, Sun. Only 3:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30,8:30 PM.

FRANCES KENNEY

»1.75

$4.50

(Plus Tax)

(Plus Tax)

HAL P H Y F E

4.DAY R O U N D TRIP

R O U N D TRIP $2,50 ONE WAY (Plus Tax)

Lee Price, Jr., president of the U. S. J r . Chamber of Commerce is a lawyer, 33, blonde, over 6-foot and father of three children, including twins. Served with FBI and OSS during War. He makes his home in Swainsboro, Ga.
L E E PRICE, JR. Page 22

FAST, C O M F O R T A B L E

SERVICE

PUBLIC SERVICE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY

Do You Want To Be a Judge?

Pick Your Own Winner

(Names and D a t a on All Contestants elsewhere in this Book) Vote five points for your first choice, four for your second, t h r e e for your third, t w o for your fourth and one for your fifth. W r i t e in names of t h e five best in each of t h e Judging divisions and vote for them accordingly. Tally each division, then add up your votes in the Final Tally t o see how your judgment compares with t h e actual judges.

TALENT
Name
F I R S T CHOICE ( S Points) SECOND CHOICE (4 Points) T H I R D CHOICE (3 Points) FOURTH CHOICE (2 Points) F I F T H CHOICE (1 P o i n t ) ,

BATHING SUIT
Name
F I R S T CHOICE (5 P o i n t s ) SECOND CHOICE (4 P o m t s ) T H I R D CHOICE (3 P o i n t s ) FOURTH CHOICE (2 Points) F I F T H CHOICE (1 P o i n t )

PERSONALITY
Name
F I R S T CHOICE (5 Points) SECOND CHOICE (4 P o m t s ) T H I R D CHOICE (3 Points) FOURTH CHOICE (2 Points) F I F T H CHOICE (1 P o i n t )

EVENING GOWN
Name
F I R S T CHOICE (5 P o i n t s ) SECOND CHOICE (4 Points) T H I R D CHOICE (3 P o i n t s ) FOURTH CHOICE (2 Points)

Fii-TH CHOICE (1 Point)

IS YOUR CHOICE THE ONE WHO WON?
(Total AU Your Votes and Tally Below) Name WINNER - - (Total Points (Total Points (Total Points (Total Points (Total Points ) ) ) ) ) v Home Tozm or City

FIRST R U N N E R - U P SECOND R U N N E R - U P THIRD R U N N E R - U P FOURTH RUNNER-UP

Here's How Judges W i l l Select Miss America 1 9 5 2
There are three nights of Preliminary Judging. All contestants appear each evening. However, they are divided into three groups and one-third of them compete for Bathing Suit honors t h e first night, another one-third compete t h e same evening for Evening Gown honors, a n d t h e remaining one-third compete for Talent honors. At the conclusion of t h e third preliminary contest, votes will be tallied. T h e fifteen contestants with t h e highest number of votes will win at least a $1,0(X) Scholarship. T h e top 10 will then become semi-finalists, a n d compete in bathing suit, talent, evening gown and personality Saturday night. The semi-final judging follows almost t h e pattern for the preHminaries, except t h a t t h e 10 semi-final contestants will also be judged for personality on t h e basis of their stage appearances and the Judges' two breakfasts with all t h e contestants during t h e week. As t h e successive competitions proceed Saturday evening, t h e Judges cast separate ballots for the five most outstanding contestants in bathing suits, evening gowns, talent and most outstanding for their personality. Following this, judges cast new ballots a n d the five highest become finalists and from that group Miss America will be chosen. SCORING—Each Judge's vote will be scored in each classification for the contestants he chooses, both in t h e preliminaries and in t h e semi-finals Saturday night, using five points for Page 23 first choice, four points for second, three points for third, two points for fourth a n d one point for fifth choice of each Judge. T A B U L A T I O N — T h e points awarded by all of t h e Judges are added up for t h e score of each contestant. Thus, on Saturday night, each of t h e 10 semi-finahsts will be credited with all these points, added together for each of t h e four classifications then used. T h e effect of this is to give t h e following value to each of t h e four classifications: B a t h i n g Suit 2 5 % ; E v e n i n g Dress 2 5 % ; Talent 2 5 % ; Personality 25%. DETERMINATION O F WINNER AND RUNNERSU P — W h e n t h e five finalists a r e chosen, as above, by t h e J u d g e s ' votes a m o n g the 10 semi-finalists, all of t h e five finalists make appearances before t h e microphone on the stage. Then t h e Judges take a final, well-considered ballot, each Judge n a m i n g all five of his choice, in order, for Miss America. T h e points a r e scored in the same w a y as above, and Miss America is t h e contestant with t h e largest number of points on this final ballot. T h e runners-up in order a r e the contestants with t h e successively next number of largest points on this final ballot. In case of a tie for winner for a n y place, t h e Judges will be requested to vote again for those t w o Finalists only. This vote t o be simply for first choice between t h e t w o w h o have tied.

1951 PAGEANT GUARANTORS
ABBOTTS DAIRIES, INC. MR. AND MRS. PAUL L, AIKEN ALGAR'S MEN'S SHOP DR. AND MRS. DAVID B. ALLMAN THE AMBASSADOR HOTEL F. W. AMSTUTZ AMUSEMENT PUBLISHING CO, ATLANTIC CITY CARPET CLEANING WORKS ATLANTIC CITY ELECTRIC COMPANY ATLANTIC CITY LUMBER CO, ATLANTIC CITY SEWERAGE CO. AUSTIN FUEL CO, BATEMAN MOT«^'H CO. RALPH W. BATES MR. AND MRS. MORRIS BATZER BELL & COPE WALTER E. BEYER M. E. BLATT CO. (Department Store) ALEX J. BOLDUC - PAINTING CO. WILLIAM C. BOYER BREAKERS HOTEL J. BENJAMIN BRICK THE BRIGHTON BROOKS & IDLER (Printers) DR, J. CARLISLE BROWN JAMES N. BUTLER MR, AND MRS. J. HOWARD BUZBY MAJOR WILLIAM F. CASEY CENTRAL PIER CO, CHALFONTE-HADDON HALL MAYOR FRED V/. CHAPMAN (Somers Point) CHARNEY-S CHELSEA HARDWARE CO. CHILDS RESTAURANT CLARIDGE HOTEL, INC, HENRY L. COHEN COLTON MANOR HOTEL DEALERS LIQUOR COMPANY HOTEL DENNIS DORLAND ADVERTISING AGENCY ELDREDGE STORAGE ENDICOTT, DOWLING & ENDICOTT HON. FRANK S. JrHRi.EY CHARLES E. FELL FERRY CONSTRUCTION CO, FRANK D. FIORE C. W. FISCHER BENJ. B. FOX (Electrical Contractor) FRALINGER'S ORIGINAL SALT WATER TAFFY GARDEN STATE CONSTRUCTION CO, THOMAS L. GLENN HARRY GODSHALL, INCORPORATED FRANK P, GRAVATT OLE HANSEN & doNS, INC, H, W, HEMPHILL F, W, HOFFMAN < S CO., INC, HOLMHURST HOTEL HERBERT HORN HURLEY JONES CO, SAMUEL W, IRELAND DR, v . EARL JOHNSON MRS. GEORGE H. KEATES KENTS RESTAURANTS & RETAIL SHOPS KENTUCKY HOTEL MR. AND MRS. ELWOOD F, KIRKMAN KOHR BROS., INC. LAFAYETTE HOTEL SAMUEL I. LEOPOLD MR. AND MRS. JOHN LLOYD. JR. MARY LOUISE MAJANE MR, AND MRS. ALBERT A, F. McGEE GEORGE W. MACK TEDDY MACK MAEDALE DAIRIES, INC, E. A. MANN M, B, MARKLAND CONTRACTING CO, MARLBOROUGH-BLENHEIM HOTEL MASON CO., INC. MAYFAIR HOTEL, 15 S. Delaware Ave, THE MAYFLOWER CHARLES SUMWiia MOORE H, G, MYERS & CO, NEW CLARION HOTEL OZONE WATER COMPANY PACKMAN BROS. HOTEL PENN-ATLANTIC PEPSI-COLA BOTTT.ING CO, OF ATLANTIC CITY PHILLIPS COMPANY DANIEL E. REARDON THE RITZ-CARLTON SEASHORE SUPPLY CO. HOTEL SENATOR THE SHELBURNE SHILL ROLLING CHAIR CO. JOHN R. SIRACUSA A. H. SKEAN MR. AND MRS, EARL SMITH MR, AND MRS. W. SHAFFER SMITH JOSEPH SOLTZ PAINT STORE SOUTH JERSEY TITLE INSURANCE CO. MR. AND MRS. VERNON F. STANTON CAPT, C. W, STARN STERLING HOTEL WALTER D. ULLRICH VIENNA RESTAURANTS JOSEPH WAGENHEIM WALLACE OFFICE SUPPLY CO. MR, AND MRS, HUGH L, WATHEN WILSON DAIRY CO, EDWARD A, WILSON CO,

BEHIND THE FOOTLIGHTS WITH THE MISS AMERICA PAGEANT
She didn't originate the Miss America P a g e a n t ! In fact, when the P a g e a n t was born thirty years ago, Lenora Slaughter was a little blonde lass learning her ABC's in a St. Petersburg, Florida, grade school That, however, has nothing to do with the story of how she did a man's-sized job for the St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce up until 1935, when the P a g e a n t Committee heard about her ability and persuaded her to go to Atlantic City. H e r long study of the Miss America P a g e a n t told her that while it was a tremendous spectacle, a crowd-pleasing program that brought people to Atlantic City, and got hundreds of pictures of bathing girls in the newspapers, it still lacked something. It was a crack by a critic back in 1944 about "beauty but no brains" that started the Slaughter brain working overtime and within the next six months she had sold the idea of adding talent and intelligence to the requisites for competing for the L E N O R A S L A U G H T E R Miss America title. She went to work on setting up a Scholarship Foundation, and solicited five national manufacturing companies to contribute $1,000 each to make up a $5,000 educational fund for the 1945 Miss America. W h a t the Scholarships have done for the girls who have gone to Atlantic City to compete since then has been fully covered elsewhere, but it is safe to say that Miss Slaughter has proved to the world that beauty, brains and talent really make up the typical American girl—the girl the Miss America P a g e a n t is proud to present. No, she didn't originate the Miss America Pageant, but she's the gal behind the scenes in what is now the top event of its kind in the country. J. H O W A R D BUZBY, vicepresident of the Hotel Dennis, has been producer of the Miss J. H O W A R D B U Z B Y America Pageant for the past five years. During this time his artistic ability has been evidenced annually by the magnificent stage productions he has created and executed. His quiet and unassuming manner, as well as his gracious charm, has won the hearts of the contestants who work under his supervision Pageant Week. Mr. Buzby has been on the Board of Directors of the P a g eant for 15 years. H e served as President for two years and throughout his entire association with the P a g e a n t has been the guiding genius of all the stage productions, with each year seeming to be better than the one before, thanks to his very special talent for creating elaborate sets. J A N E T E S T H E R BARAB is "Miss Atlantic City in 1951", and while she doesn't compete in the P a g e a n t she is the envy of all Atlantic City young girls for she is not only the official hostess to the 51 vis.ting beauties but is | also Atlantic City's official "AmJ A N E T B.Al^AB bassadoress". She won a $1,000 Scholarship with her title to help her with her studies at Endicott, Mass., Junior College. Statistically, she's 5-4, 19 years old, brown hair and eyes and dark-complexioned, with singing and horseback riding as hobbies. Page 24

J E S S I E W Y N N M O R G A N is a native of Newton, Miss., and a Sophomore at Millsaps College. Sketching and designing are her hobbies, and she hopes for a scholarship to further her study of dramatics and ballet dancing. Jessie will be 19, October 15th, has dark brown hair, hazel eyes and an olive complexion. H e r favorite sport is swimming. T h e Mississippi Pageant was directed by the Pilot Club of Oxford. (Top Right.) L U LONG O G B U R N was born in Smithfield, N. C , on May 31, 1932. Now 19, she has already completed one year at Salem College in addition to 11 years of piano study together with additional voice and choral training. H e r ambition is to get a B.M. degree in music and to then study abroad. Lu L o n g stands 5-8)4, has brown hair and hazel eyes and a fair complexion. T h e N o r t h Carolina P a g e a n t was directed by the N. C. Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) P E G G Y A N N G I L B E R T hails from Rutland, where she graduated from high school a year ago. She has had special training in dancing and will combine her talented feet with a fine soprano voice in the talent competition. Now 19, she has brown hair and blue eyes plus a light complexion. H e r hobby is collecting records and her favorite sports are swimming and football. T h e Miss Vermont P a g e a n t was directed by the Burlington N«ws. (Lower Right.) P H Y L L I S C H A R L E N E R A L S T I N was born in Nezperce, Idaho, on June 24, 1932. After graduating from high school in 1950, she enrolled at the University of Idaho, where she completed her freshman year in June. Standing 5-4y, with medium brown hair and blue eyes, she'll offer a soprano solo in the talent competition. She has had a wealth of singing experience including solo and choir work in high school and college. Miss Idaho P a g e a n t directed by Boise Lions Club. (Center Belozv.) M A R Y E L I Z A B E T H G O D W I N was born in Elmira, N. Y., 19 years ago last April, and now makes her home in Gainesville when she is not attending college at the University of Florida, where she is a Sophomore. H e r talent consists of an uncanny pantomime presentation to a phonograph record. She stands S-Sy, is blonde and blue-eyed, and has photography, including dark room work, as a hobby. Miss Florida Pageant sponsored by State Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lower Left.)

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Page 25

The Silver Anniversary of the Miss Americas
(Continued from Center Spread)

For every

Miss Annerica

now, though, there are

an

the most notable of these being Cloris Leachman of Chicago, who took her Scholarship money in 1946 to study piano in New York, discovered she liked acting better, and has since been featured in a number of Broadway stage hits for the past two years. In addition t o the $133,000 t h a t the Miss America

estimated 25,000 single girls between the ages of 18 and 28 who annually connpete in the more than 1,000 contests t h a t precede the national finals in A t l a n t i c C i t y . Some 50 of the original 25,000, however, D O go t o A t l a n t i c C i t y in Sep+ember and each is representative of the best that the home area can offer. Girls from 44 states, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Canada and the three metropolitan cities of New York, Chicago and Philadelphia, as well as the District of Columbia, compete, not only in the hopes of awarded runners-up. The Scholarship idea was the brain-child of Lenora becoming Miss America, but t o also make a bid for the scholarships

Pageant has poured into Scholarships through its sponsors during the past five years, an estimated $250,000 more has been contributed In State, district and local contests by sponsors who likewise feel if their winner has ambitions for a career—and it runs the gamut of all phases of the entertainment business and professional field — she should be given the chance t o realize those ambitions. A c t u a l reward for being Miss A m e r i c a , other than the year of reigning as the nation's t o p "queen", depends largely on the individual's ability. Some Miss Americas have made anywhere from $5,000 to $35,000 during their " t e r m in o f f i c e " , so t o speak. 21-year-old Yolande However, the current title-holder, Mobile, Alabama, who Betbeze, of

Slaughter, who was associated with the Pageant since its revival in 1935 and became its executive director in 1940. If a girl, she reasoned, had ambitions of furthering herself beyond the crown and gold-plated trophy t h a t goes with the title, something should be done about it. In 1945, her efforts t o make the t i t l e mean something more than just a title was rewarded when five manufacturers contributed $ 1,000 each to a $5,000 Scholarship for Miss America in return for endorsement privileges. First of the Scholarship winners was a tall brunette from New York C i t y — i n f a c t the tallest of all the Miss Americas to date, standing five-foot-ten. a pianist. The 1952 Miss America, who will succeed Yolande, will In 1946, the Scholarship Fund was upped t o $25,000, with Miss America still g e t t i n g $5,000, but the other four finalists g e t t i n g scholarships amounting to $3,000, $2,500, $2,000 and $1,500 respectively, with the next 10 finalists each receiving $1,000 scholarships. Another $1,000 Scholarship has been a d d e d and is f i n d t h a t if one were t o build a composite from the 23 young ladies who have worn the crown since Margaret Gorman first donned i t in 1921, she would be 5 ' - 6 ' / 2 " tall, weigh 124 pounds, have brown hair and blue eyes and be just 18 years and six months o l d . A n d , if she looks a t the record, she'll see t h a t 17 of the 23 have married, have a t o t a l of 18 children, and are even more beautiful today than when they were crowned Miss A m e r i c a . O n e thing seems certain—Miss America and beauty contests are here to stay—and, t o the average man who marFew of the Miss Americas have ever become great ries, the O N E he picks Is the most beautiful In the whole world. A n d what judge would dare argue that point with him? stars, but many of them have continued in the entertainment field even after marriage. Likewise many o f the most talented finalists continue their pursuit of stardom, one of She was Bess Myerson, a graduate of Hunter College at 2 ! and highly talented as

possesses a better-than-average voice and has the beauty and charm t o back it up, will probably t o p them all by the time she relinquishes her crown September 8th. Her regal jackpot has already reached the $50,000 mark In personal, appearance fees and gifts, carrying out a schedule that kept her on the go right up until September Ist, when she returned t o A t l a n t i c C i t y to reign over Pageant Week.

given annually but the Miss America judges cast no ballots. It is for Congeniality, and is v o t e d by the contestants themselves to the girl, who, in their combined been the most congenial during the week together in A t l a n t i c C i t y . opinions, has they spend

Page 26

G E R A L D I N E M A R I E E L S E M A N is 19, and a native of Omaha, where she graduated from South High in 1949. H e r favorite hobby is correspondence and favorite sport horseback riding. She stands 5-6, weighs 123 and has brown hair and blue eyes with medium dark complexion. H e r ambition is to become an accomplished actress and will give the P a g e a n t audience a sample of her dramatic ability. Miss Nebraska Pageant directed by the Baker Agency of Omaha. (Top Right.) S H E I L A M A R I E M U R P H Y was born in Mason City, Iowa, on Feb. 9, 1933, and now makes her home in Marshfield, Wis., where she graduated from high school last June. Standing 5-7, with blonde hair and green eyes. Sheila has ambitions for a career in either radio, television or merchandising. Swimming, horseback riding and skiing are her favorite sports. Miss Wisconsin Pageant directed by Milwaukee Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) C H A R L O T T E R O S A L I E S I M M E N is a native of Little Rock, Ark., the State Capital, and at 18 has already completed high school and a year at Little Rock Junior College. Painting and singing are her two hobbies, and she hopes for a Scholarship and more study in art and voice. She stands 5-7, weighs 130 pounds and has dark brown hair and eyes. Miss A r k a n s a s Pageant directed by East Arkansas Young Men's Club. (Lozifer Right.) P A T R I C I A J O A N M c G I N T Y was born in Sandpoint, Idaho, on May 9, 1930, and now makes her home in Great Falls, Montana. She attended Colorado W o m e n ' s College for two years and then returned to Montana and a diploma at Montana U. W i t h six years of voice training she will pit her mezzo-soprano voice against the other 50 contestants in the talent division. She's 5-7 with brown hair and blue eyes. Miss Montana Pageant directed by Montana State U. (Center Belozv.) B E R N I C E D O L O R E S M A S S I is only 18, and a graduate of Camden Catholic High, but she has already had two m o n t h s of singing experience in the Music Circus at Lambertville this Summer. H e r training includes three years of piano, two years organ and two years of dramatics. She stands 5-6, has dark brown hair and brown eyes and has swimming as her favorite sport and organ playing as a hobby. Miss New Jersey P a g e a n t directed by "Miss N. J. Pageant", Ocean City. (Left Belozv.)

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Page 27

96 GIRLS HAVE RECEIVED MISS AMERICA PAGEANT SCHOLARSHIPS AT NATIONAL FINALS. OVER 500 GIRLS HAVE BENEFITED FROM SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED IN PRELIMINARY LOCAL AND STATE CONTESTS.
.Since 1945, when the Miss America Pageant inaugurated its scholarship program, ninety-six American girls have received educational scholarships amounting to $143,250.00 at the National Finals in Atlantic City. Each year these scholarships total $26,000, and at least seventeen national finalists benefit from the Miss America P a g e a n t Scholarship Foundation,
DR. GUY E, SNAVELY Exec, Director Assn, of American Colleges

Scholarships awarded annually at the National Finals include: MISS AMERICA 1st Runner-Up 2nd R u n n e r - U p 3rd Runner-Up 4th R u n n e r - U p Next Ten Finalists (each) Most Talented Non-Finalist Miss Congeniality $5,000 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 1,000 1,000

Scholarships range

from

The following Rules and Regulations govern the Scholarships: 1. Miss America and the other scholarship winners shall submit to the Scholarship Committee a statement of the type of education or training they wish to pursue and of the qualifications which fit them for such education or training. The statement of qualification shall be diplomas, certificates or letters from private teachers or school authorities. 2. Miss America and the other scholarship winners shall con-

$5,000 to $1,000 each.

Recipients of the

scholarships have been students at the leading colleges and universities in the Americas, as well as abroad.

Civic organizations, directing local and state contests over the Americas are today responsible for awarding another $75,000 annually in scholarships. These are distributed to winners and In 1950 alone, two preliminary scholarships in runners-up in local and state pageants. hundred American girls received

fer with the Scholarship Committee to discuss their plans and to receive guidance in the choice of schools or private teachers. 3. The Scholarship Committee shall approve of the schools They shall submit evidence that they will

contests a m o u n t i n g to $75,000 thus swelling the total scholarships in one year awarded Miss America contestants to over $100,000, with 218 girls benefiting from same. Today, the Miss America P a g e a n t and its cooperating civic organizations sponsoring local and state contests, can proudly claim the largest scholarship foundation for girls in the world. T h e reigning Miss America, Yolande Betbeze, formerly Miss Alabama 1950, was the winner of the State contest which awarded the largest number of scholarships in local and state contests in the country. $12,500 in scholarships to leading Alabama colleges and universities, as well as conservatories of music and dramatic schools were made available to Alabama girls competing for the Miss Alabama title. As Miss America was the 6. The use of the Scholarships must begin within six months from the date of the award, with the exception of Miss America, vfho must begin the use of her Scholarship within one year from the date of the award. ScholarAny vrinner who does not use the Scholarship within above designated time shall forfeit her T h e guiding genius of the Miss America Pageant claim to the Scholarship and shall receive, in cash, one-fifth of the amount of her Scholarship in full payment. 7. Miss America and the other scholarship winners shall If a ship Foundation is Dr. Guy E. Snavely, Executive Director of the Association of American Colleges, who serves as National Counselor of the Foundation. H e has served in this capacity since the inauguration of the Foundation in 1945, and is ever ready and willing to assist civic leaders directing state pageants, as well as the national directors of the Miss America Pageant. His untiring work in assisting scholarship winners with plans for their education and his loyalty to the ideals upon which the Miss America P a g e a n t is operated, are largely responsible for the success story the pageant represents today. recipient of a $5,000 scholarship from the national foundation, she graciously released her Alabama scholarship to a runnerup in her state contest, thus opening the door for a college education to a less fortunate Alabama girl. or private teachers chosen by Miss America and the other scholarship winners. be accepted by the schools or private teachers selected, 4. The Scholarships shall be expended for tuition, room, The allowance for room and board will be

board and supplies.

discontinued if the recipient marries. 5. The money is to be paid in accordance with the needs of

the recipients of the Scholarships based upon the type of education they pursue, and at the discretion of the Scholarship Committee.

submit quarterly reports to the Scholarship Committee. ship is automatically cancelled.

period of six months elapses without such reports the scholarTraining under the scholarship must b.<; continuous, and completed within four years from the date of entering upon the courses, 8. Any unused portion of the Scholarships shall revert t o the

Miss America Schclarship Fund.

Page 28

R U T H D I A N E H O W E L L was born 22 years ago in Apple Creek, O., and still makes her home there. Before graduating from Baldwin-Wallace College, she appeared in a number of school plays, has had eight years of piano study and two of voice and will be a high school teacher this Fall. She's 5-5, weighs 114 and has brown hair and eyes. H e r hobbies are piano playing and singing. Miss Ohio P a g e a n t directed by Mentor Beach Business Assn. (Top Right.) M A R L E N E M A R G A R E T R I E B is the 19-year-old daughter of Dr. and Mrs. William Rieb of Parkston, S. D. While she's had nine years of piano training her main interest is baton twirling, at which she's both expert and likewise a teacher. She's 5-7, blonde and brown-eyed, and hopes to become a physician like her illustrious father. Following her Sophomore year at S. Dakota U., will take a pre-med course. Miss S. Dakota Pageant directed by Hot Springs C. of C. (Center Right.) D O T T Y E N U C K O L S , is a native of Bowling Green and last Fall reigned as queen of the E a s t - W e s t All S t a r Football game. A Junior at W e s t e r n State, Dottye is 5-4, has brown hair and blue eyes and weighs 115. H e r hobbies are art and horseback riding, and she has ambitions of a singing career, aided by completion of her college studies. Miss Kentucky Pageant directed by Owensboro Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lozver Right.) G E O R G I A R E E D claims Baltimore as her birthplace and home. Besides graduating from Seton H. S. in 1949, she has had three years of vocal training, 12 years of dancing and a year of dramatic training. H e r hobby is writing poetry and her favorite sport ice-skating. She is 5-6, weighs 122 and has light brown hair and blue eyes. Miss Maryland P a g e a n t directed by Maryland Jr, Chamber of Commerce, (Center Belozv.) A U D R E Y A N N M I S T R E T T A was born in Long Beach, Cal., but has spent most of her 18 years in Astoria, Ore., where she graduated from high school last June, H e r ambition is to become a voice teacher via study in voice to help further develop her contralto voice. She is 5-8, weighs 129 pounds and has dark hair and eyes. P h o t o g r a p h y and swimming are her hobbies. Miss Oregon P a g e a n t directed by Seaside Chamber of Commerce. (Left Below.)

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Page 29

FIRST...

IN HEALTH and PLEASURE TOPS. , , IN FINEST HOTELS

For more than 96 years Atlantic City has been serving the peoples of not only America but the world at large as a health spa, a haven for rest, on unexcelled vacation center. Behind its unexcelled beach , , , its famous Boardwalk , , , its wonderful climate , , , stands an elaborate monument to the comfort and service of the millions who come here each year to work in convention, to recuperate their health, to enjoy hundreds of unsurpassed vacation hours. This monument, dedicated to the service of these millions, is the hotel industry of Atlantic City, exemplified by the hotels listed here now, and always, AT YOUR SERVICE!

AMBASSADOR
Boardwalk at Stenton Place

DENNIS
Boardwalk at Michigan Ave.

NEW BELMONT
1317 Boardwalk

BELVEDERE
157 S. South Carolina Ave. BREAKERS at New Jersey

DRAKE
S. Carolina and Pacific Aves. FLANDERS 127 St. J a m e s Place HOLMHURST 121 S, Pennsylvania Ave, JEFFERSON 136 S. Kentucky Ave, KENTUCKY 126 S. Kentucky Ave, LAFAYETTE 109 S. N o r t h Carolina Ave. LEXINGTON New Y o r k Ave. near Boardwalk MADISON 123 S, Illinois Ave. MARLBOROUGH-BLENHEIM Boardwalk at Ohio Ave, MAYFAIR 15 S. Delaware Ave. MAYFLOWER Boardwalk at Tennessee Ave, MONTICELLO 131 S. Kentucky Ave. MORTON 150 S. Virginia Ave.

NEW CLARION
151 S. Kentucky Ave.

PENN-ATLANTIC
1219 Bacharach Blvd.

Boardwalk

Ave.

BRIGHTON Boardwalk at Indiana Ave. BOSCOBEL S. Kentucky

PRESIDENT
Boardwalk at Albany Ave.

PRINCESS
Ave. 144 S. South Carolina Ave,

125

BYRON 120 S. Kentucky Ave. CAROLINA CREST 134 S. N o r t h Carohna Ave. C H A L F O N T E - H A D D O N HALL Boardwalk at N o r t h Carolina Ave. CHELSEA Boardwalk at Morirs Ave, CLARENDON 118 S, Virginia Ave. CLARIDGE Boardwalk at P a r k

RITZ-CARLTON
Boardwalk at Iowa Ave,

ROYAL PALMS
126 S. Maryland Ave.

SENATOR
S. South Carolina Ave. at Boardwalk

SHELBURNE
Boardwalk at Michigan Ave.

ST, CHARLES
Boardwalk at St. Charles Place

STERLING
144 S. Kentucky Ave.

Place

COLTON MANOR 110 S. Pennsylvania Ave. COSMOPOLITAN 3850 Atlantic Ave. CRILLON Pacific & Indiana Aves.

STRAND
Boardwalk at Pennsylvania Ave,

WATER GAP
127 S, South Carolina Ave,

WORTHINGTON
2200 Pacific Ave,

Page 30

MISS

J E A N N E V A U G H N T H O M P S O N is a native of Opclousas, Miss., and now lives in Baton Rouge. She'll be 20, December 7th while a Senior at Louisiana U. Jeanne stands 5 - 7 ^ , has brown hair and eyes and will offer an inspirational dance of the Louisiana swampland in the talent part of P a g e a n t competition. Her special training includes piano, modeling and French and Modern Art. T h e Miss Louisiana P a g e a n t was directed by the Northeast Louisiana Sports Carnival Association. (Top Right.) D O R I S M A E K I N G is a product of Harvey, Illinois, and will be 19 on December 15th. H e r special training has been in writing, modeling and drama, with 12 years of dancing in addition. W i t h brown hair and eyes, she stands 5-4 and tips the scales at 115. Swimming and horseback riding are her favorite pastimes, and she hopes for a scholarship to further her dance and drama studies. Miss Illinois P a g e a n t directed by Illinois Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) C O L L E E N K A Y H U T C H I N S was 25 last May 23rd, and claims Los Angeles, Calif., as her birthplace. Now living in Salt Lake City, she is a scholarship student at the Graduate School of the University of Utah, where she played the lead role in two college plays this year. Standing 5-10, blonde and blue-eyed. Colleen hopes to further her education at the American Academy of Music. T h e Miss U t a h P a g e a n t directed by Utah State Fair Assn. (Center Right.) B E V E R L Y R O S E M A R Y B U R L A N T was born in Bridgeport, J a n u a r y 8, 1932. For the past two years she has been a student at Bridgeport U., to add to her five years of piano, eight years of dancing, two years of modeling and a year of drama study. She's S-Sy, has black hair and brown eyes, weighs 118 and has sewing and designing as hobbies. H e r favorite sport is football Miss Connecticut P a g e a n t directed by the Alfred Agency. (Center Below.) B O B B Y J E N E S I M M O N S calls Oklahoma City home, and at 18, has had eight years of voice and music, which fits her ably for the lyric soprano solo she'll offer in the Pageant talent competition. Bobby stands 5-5, weighs 120 and has brown hair and eyes. H e r favorite sport is swimming and her hobbies include oil painting. Will be Sophomore at Oklahoma U. this Fall. Miss Oklahoma P a g e a n t directed by Oklahoma State Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lower Left.) Page 31

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MISS

Two Great Leaders in Industry Sponsor Miss America Scholarship Fund
T h e Miss America Pageant, and its local and state contest sponsors, are proud to have the support and endorsement of two stalwart leaders of American Industry, who have made possible the 1951 Miss America Scholarship Fund of $26,000. W . R. M a c l n t y r e heads the great Bancroft Corporation, creators of the famous "Everglaze" as well as scores of other crease-resisting fabrics. Back in 1945 Mr. M a c l n t y r e joined the Scholarship P r o g r a m because he was convinced that the ambition for education and personal advancement by young American girls is a program that should be furthered. George W . Mason, President of Nash-Kelvinator Corp., who manufacture the popular Nash line of automobiles, joined the Scholarship Foundation in 1948. H e has enthusiastically supported the program for four years, in addition to awarding Miss America a custom-made Nash each year.

W. RALPH MacINTYRE President Joseph Bancroit & Sons, Co. Wilmington, Del,

GEORGE W. MASON President Nash-Kelvinator Coip, Detroit, Mich,

ATLANTIC CITY HOSTESS COMMITTEE CHAPERONE CONTESTANTS AT NATIONAL HNALS
Sixty-five of Atlantic City's most prominent and gracious women put aside their private lives P a g e a n t week, to serve as official chaperones to the visiting Miss America Contestants, They also serve as hostesses to mothers and appointed state visiting cha})erones. An Atlantic City hostess accompanies each contestant every time she walks out of her hotel, whether to keep a reheasal date, to make a civic appearance, meet the press and newsreel, or to perform in the world famous Convention Hall. She protects her charge from all annoying contacts, which might hinder her progress or distract her attention from the primary objective she is seeking—a scholarship or the title of Miss America. No one is permitted an interview with a contestant without her hostess present to protect her interest, and at no time is a contestant permitted to enter a cocktail lounge or partake of an intoxicating beverage. It is also a "manless week", for members of the male sex are not permitted to talk to contestants except with the permission, and in the presence of their hostesses. This includes relatives, sponsors, even fathers and brothers. And, who approves most of these rules? The contestants and their parents, who form lasting friendships with their hostesses during P a g e a n t week.

The Miss A mericas
0
1921—Margaret Gorman. Washington, D. C 1922-23—Mary Campbell, Columbus, Ohio 192-^—Ruth Malcolmson, Philadelphia, Pa 1925—Fay Lamphier, Oakland, Calif 1926—Norma Smallwood, Tulsa, Okla 1927—Lois Delander. Joliet, III 1933—Marion Bergeron, West hiaven. Conn 1935—Henrietta Leaver, Pittsburgh, Pa 1936—Rose Coyle, Philadelphia, Pa 1937—Bette Cooper, Bertrand Island, N. J 1938—Marilyn Meseke, Marion, Ohio • 1939—Patricia Donnelly, Detroit, Mich |940_Frances Marie Burke, Philadelphia. Pa 1941—Rosemary LaPlanche, Los Angeles, Calif 1942—JoCarroll Dennison. Tyler, Texas 1943—Jean Bartel, Los Angeles, Calif 1944—Venus Ramey, Washington, D. C 1945—Bess Myerson, New York City 1946—Marilyn Buferd, Los Angeles, Calif 1947—Barbara Jo Walker, Memphis. Tenn 1948—BeBe Shopp. Hopkins, Minn 1949—Jacque Mercer, Litchfield, Ariz 1951—Yolande Betbeze, Mobile, Ala COMPOSITE

in

R eview
30 35 34 35 33 33 32 33 34 32 34^ 36 34 34 34 36 36^ 35^ 35^ 35 37 34 35 35^ 25 26 25 26 25 25 26^^ 23 23^ 26 26 25 23 24 22 23 25 25 25^ 25 27 22 24 25% 32 36 34 37 34 34 37^ 35i/4 34^ 36 35^ 34 35 36 34^ 35 37^ 35 36 35 36 34 35 35 y 13 13 13^ 13 13 13 y 13 13 13 13 13 14 13^ 13 13 14^ 13^ 13 I4J^ I3>:+ 13^ 13^^

5-1 5-7 5-6 5-8 5-4 '.b-Sy 5-4^ 5-6^ 5-6 5-6 5-7 5-7 5-9 S-Sy 5-5 5-8 5-7 5-10 5-8 5-7 5-9 5-4 5-5i^ 5-534

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16 16 18 19 18 17 16 19 22 17 20 19 19

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Blue
Blue Brown Hazel Blue Blue-Grey Blue Blue Brown Blue Blue Brown Green Hazel Brown Blue

Blonde
Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Auburn Brunette Brown Brunette Brown Brunette Brown Brown

19 19 21 21 21 18 18 21 19

Blue
Hazel Blue Hazel Hazel Brown Brown Blue

Page 32

TwereAA ARm^/¥D
t95\
. September and October. ^ The GoWen ^Aonths-Sep ^ . ,.ad..onaUa..W HoV-day. ^ThaoksgW.9convenOooHaU. ,,eHocWeV-^eV.oriasUr.e of tKe

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S^^'°"' . ,1 Headliners ..oon ^Aonth, Hat-onal Hea ^ June-Honeymoon N ^ '™*''" ^jJyandAugu^" sports and many . des Horse Radng, a« ,ents.

September 3td to 8tli

MISS

AMERICA

1951

and

the

fabulous

EVERGLAZE* Cotton

Satin

Miss America's j e w e l e d m e d a l l i o n was c r e a t e d by M . Balmain f o r the 2,000th birthd a y o f Paris. It was presented t o her by M . Balmain to commemorate her appointment as Special Envoy from the United States by the Bi-Millenaire Committee.
* A trade-mark signifying fabric finished and tested occording to processes and standards controlled and prescribed by Jdsepti Bancroft & Sons C o .

The 1951 Pageant Gown was especially designed and created in Paris for Miss America, Yolande Betbeze, by the famous designer, Pierre Balmain. The luxurious fabric is white cotton satin, hand-stencilled in j * gold—"Everglaze"—one of a broad group of fabrics distinguished for
r

/

their lasting beauty, washability and wrinkle-resistance.

- -

''

Related Interests

c^^^XV<^

/wmsssmsimss!^'

MISS -TLMERICA OF 1951 AND HER NEW

Nash Motors is Proud and Happy To Participate in the Sponsorship of the Miss America Pageant and Scholarship Awards. S E E ALL 3 The Ambassador G R E A T NASH AIRFLYTES -^ The Statesman • The Rambler

DIVISION

OF

NASH-KELVINATOR

CORPORATION,

DETROIT,

MICHIGAN

THE

etcca

f^jQGE^nr
--KCOMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 1351 PAGEANT COMMITTEES Mrs. Robert W. Leeds—Miss Atlantic City Ball Mrs. Malcolm Shermer—Hostess Committee James N. Butler—Judges Committee Joseph Hitzel—Housing Committee B. L. England—Advertising and Promotion Robert W, Leeds—Parade Committee Joseph LeChard—Special Events George B, Bruni \ _ I D i, ,, , T ^.»T •„ ( Coronation Ball Paul J, O Neill ' Josiah White—Guarantors Committee Hugh L, Wathen—Public Relations Park W. Haverstick—Budget Frank P. Gravatt—Breakfast Parties loseph Wagenheim ^ ^^^^^^ ^^^,^.j Joseph M, Hitzel, Jr, ^ * ^ K. B, Walton—Program Book J. •> -.. . Events _, .in. Auditorium « . • . ^ Howard „ Buzby , i Stagmg George Buzby 5 Wm. F, Casey—Reviewing Stands Hugh L, Wathen—Parade Judges K. B, Walton—Police and Ushering Dr, David B, Allman—Medical Director Phil. E. Thompson—Comptroller James N. Butler—Attorney Auditors—Wm. J, Lichtenberger and Carl R. Fiore Tellers—John C, Howe and Jess W, Speidel

-x^
ARTHUR G. BROLL President JOSEPH WAGENHEIM Vice-President JOSEPH LeCHARD Vice-President P. E. M. THOMPSON Treasurer GOVERNOR ALFRED E. DRISCOLL , „ _, , MAYOR JOSEPH ALTMAN ^ " ° " - Chairmen

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Arthur G. Broll—Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. George B. Bruni—Claridge Hotel James N. Butler—Attorney J. Howard Buzby—Dennis Hotel Major Wm. F. Casey—City Commissioner B. L. England—Atlantic City Electric Co. Frank P. Gravatt—Realtor Park W, Haverstick—Eldredge Storage Joseph M, Hitzel—Shelburne Hotel Joseph LeChard—Atlantic City Sewerage Co, Robert W, Leeds—Chalfonte-Hoddon Hell Paul J. O'Neill—Investments P, E. M, Thompson—Convention Hall Mgr, Joseph Wagenheim—The Wagenheim Co, Kenneth B, Walton—Kents Restaurants Hugh L. Wathen—South Jersey Gas Co. Josiah White, IV—Marlborough-Blenheim Hotel Warren F, Wielland—Apollo Circuit Theatres

ARTHUR G. BROLL
President of the Miss America Pageant, P r o m i n e n t in civic affairs and manager of the A. C. PepsiCola Bottling Co., Mr. Broil is pastpresident of the Rotary Club, was a member of the Miss America judges committee for nine years, and is a veteran of W o r l d W a r II.

INDEX AND PICTURE GUIDE TO YOUR FAVORITE CONTESTANT
MISS ALABAMA ARKANSAS CALIFORNIA CANADA CHICAGO COLORADO CONNECTICUT DELAWARE DIST. OF COLUMBIA FLORIDA GEORGIA HAWAII IDAHO ILLINOIS INDIANA IOWA KENTUCKY LOUISIANA MAINE MARYLAND MASSACHUSETTS MICHIGAN MINNESOTA MISSISSIPPI MISSOURI Page 15 27 7 13 9 IS 31 9 13 25 7 II 25 31 21 II 29 31 13 29 II 15 21 25 7 MISS MONTANA NEBRASKA NEVADA NEW HAMPSHIRE NEW JERSEY NEW YORK CITY NEW YORK STATE NORTH C A R O L I N A NORTH DAKOTA OHIO OKLAHOMA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA PHILADELPHIA PUERTO RICO SOUTH C A R O L I N A SOUTH DAKOTA TENNESSEE TEXAS UTAH VERMONT VIRGINIA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA WISCONSIN WYOMING Page 27 27 7 13 27 13 II 25 15 29 31 29 9 9 15 II 29 9 21 31 25 21 21 7 27 15

INDEX
Scholarship Miss Americas Scholarship Miss Americas 1950 Runners-Up Talent and Congenialty Awarels Miss Americas Today Meet Bob Evans Statistics on Contestants Pageant Program of Events Silver Anniversary Parade Program Trio of 1950 Scholarship Winners Story of First Pageant 1951 Pageant Judges How to Judge Behind the Footlights History of Scholarships Scholarship Sponsors 2 3 4 5 6 10 16 I6A

(Center Spread) I7A 17 20 22 23 24 28 32

We Present, In Their Everglaze Coronation Gowns, the Six $5,000 Scholarship Winning Miss Americas

M I S S A M E R I C A 1945, Bess Myerson of New York City. Bess is a graduate of H u n t e r College, with a Master's Degree from Columbia. A brilliant pianist, with her own television show today, she has combined a career with marriage. In private life she is Mrs. Alan W a y n e , and the mother of an adorable four-year-old daughter named Barbara-Carroll,

M I S S A M E R I C A 1946, Marilyn Buferd of Los Angeles, CaHfornia. Marilyn worked for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer during the year of her reign, and was tutored in dramatics by the finest teachers in Hollywood. She then journeyed to Rome, Italy, and continued her educjition at the University of Berlitz. She is now under contract to a major Italian Motion Picture Company in Italy.

M I S S A M E R I C A 1947, Barbara Jo W a l k e r of Memphis, Tennessee, Barbara was graduated in June, 1948, at Memphis State College. She then married Dr. John V. Hummel, and continued her voice training with a private teacher in Baltimore, while her husband interned at Johns Hopkins. Today Dr. H u m m e l is an officer in the Medical Corp of the U. S. Navy, and Barbara is back home in Memphis, awaiting his return and the arrival of a third member of the Hummel family.

M I S S A M E R I C A 1948, BeBe Shopp of Hopkins, Minnesota. BeBe was the first Miss America to tour Europe during her reign. Today, she is an honor student at the M a n h a t t a n School of Music for the second year, and hopes to become a successful concert and television artist in the future. She is a mistress of percussion instruments, but her favorite is the vibraharp.

M I S S A M E R I C A 1949, Jacque Mercer of Litchfield, Arizona. Jacque attended the Phoenix, Arizona, Junior College for one year, then captured the Miss America title and officially visited forty of the forty-eight states, as well as Mexico, during her reign. She will now continue her studies in dramatics at a Southern California school. In private Hfe today she is M r s . Douglas Cook,
•\\^
V

M I S S A M E R I C A , 1951, Yolande Betbeze of Mobile, Alabama, is our reigning queen. Yolande will always have to explain that she won the Miss America title at the turn of the mid-century, and that the P a g e a n t directors decided to give her a post-dated title for three months, whereas her p r e decessors had past-dated titles for nine months. H e n c e there was no "Miss America 1950" title winner. Yolande is booked solid for personal appearances until next September, and will visit practically every state in the Union, as well as foreign lands. H e r beautiful lyric coloratura soprano voice has been heard on numerous radio and television shows from coast to coast, and everyone is predicting a brilliant operatic career for this talented southern beauty. Next year she will study abroad on her Miss America Scholarship.

1950 Runners-Up To Miss America in Talent Performances

M I S S S O U T H D A K O T A , Irene O'Connor of $3,000 Scholarship winner. Irene is a Junior Dakota. She captured a Preliminary Talent rendition of a scene from "Joan of Lorraine". test by Hot Springs Chamber of Commerce.

Burbank. First Runner-Up, at the University of South Award with her dramatic She was sponsored in con-

M I S S F L O R I D A , Janet Ruth Crockett of St. Petersburg. Second RunnerUp. $2,500 Scholarship winner, J a n e t Ruth has just completed two years of Junior College work, and will continue her music and dramatic studies in New York City. A popular singer and brilliant young comedienne, J a n e t won the nod from the judges and thunderous applause from the audience with her rendition of Hollywod bits, entitled "The Perils of Pauline" based on the old flicker movie days. She was sponsored in contest by the Florida State Junior Chamber of Commerce.

M I S S A R K A N S A S , Mary Jennings of Hot Springs. Third Runner-Up, $2,000 Scholarship winner. Mary is attending the University of Arkansas, and is a voice student of the famous Metropolitan Opera S t a r Marjorie Lawrence. Singing "Un Bel Di" from "Madame Butterfly" as her talent rendition, this beautiful girl with a truly great lyric soprano voice completely captivated the hearts of the tremendous Pageant audience and the judges. She was sponsored in the contest by the East Arkansas Young Men's Club.

Page 4

1950 Runners-Up To Miss America (Continued)

M I S S O K L A H O M A , Louise O'Brien of Tulsa. F o u r t h Runner-Up. $1,500 Scholarship winner. Louise is a student at the University of Tulsa, and musical comedy is her goal. T h e first real Irish Beauty to sing the songs that put tears in an Irishman's eyes, she held the P a g e a n t audience spellbound with "T'was Only An Irishman's Dream", and left a never-to-be forgotten memory of her charm and talent with P a g e a n t lovers fortunate enough to see and hear her. Louise was sponsored in the contest by the Oklahoma State Junior Chamber of Commerce.

Special

S^ckolarihny

-AjwarciA

MISS H A W A I I , Dell-Fin Kalaupaona Poaha of Honolulu, our reigning M I S S C O N G E N I A L T Y , and winner of $1,000 Scholarship. Dell-Fin was loved by all the Miss America contestants from the moment she set foot on Atlantic City soil, and by the end of the week they unanimously voted her the most popular girl in the contest. T h e title of Miss Congeniality is the most prized title in the entire contest, for the panel of judges are the contestants themselves. W h e r e v e r the girls congregated P a g e a n t week, you would find a ukulele strumming away and Dell-Fin teaching her fellow contestants the authentic Hula dance. This lovely girl from the beautiful Islands of Hawaii is now attending Hamline University in St. Paul. She was sponsored in the contest by the Honolulu Junior Chamber of Commerce,

M I S S N O R T H D A K O T A , Joan Teets of Minot. W i n n e r of $1,000 Talent Scholarship. The Talent Award is another very coveted scholarship at the National Finals due to the fact the Judges consider Talent Only when casting their ballot and only non-finalists are eligible for same. Joan was priceless in her impersonation of Katrina from her own original skit '-'A Touch of Norway". Joan's great ambition was to continue with her college education, and when the judges' decision was announced on the night of the finals, tears poured down her pretty cheeks, while fifty-three fellow contestants voiced their approval by rising and applauding her as she accepted the talent trophy and scholarship. Joan was sponsored in the contest by the Disabled American V e t e r a n s of the State of N o r t h Dakota.

Fagc 5

WHAT BECOMES OF FORMER MISS AMERICAS?
M A R G A R E T G O R M A N — M i s s America 192 I, is now Mrs, Victor Cahili, wife of a prominent Washington, D, C. real estate man. Miss G o r m a n , who hails from Washington originally, was the first Miss America. M A R Y KATHERINE CAMPBELL— Miss America 1922 and 1923, is the only young lady to twice win the coveted title. A f t e r her second triumph, it was decided t o limit the title to a single year for any one contestant. She is now Mrs. Fred Townley of Newark, N. J . RUTH M A L C O M S O N — M i s s America 1924, still makes her home In Philadelphia. She is married t o Major Carl Schoebel, Instructor of military tactics at Pennsylvania Military College, who served overseas In W o r l d W a r II. FAY LAMPHIER— Miss America 1925, came from Oakland, California, to win her title and now resides In one of Oakland's smarter suburbs, O r i n d a . She Is now Mrs. W l n f l e l d J . Daniels, wife of a noted California engineer and book collector, and the mother of two lovely daughters. N O R M A S M A L L W O O D — M i s s America 1926, who came from Tulsa, Oklahoma, t o become the first and only Oklahoma beauty to win the title, Is happily married to G e o r g e FH. Bruce and resides In W i c h i t a , Kansas, where her husband Is engaged In the petroleum business. LOIS DELANDER— Miss America 1927, whose home was In Jollet, Illinois, Is now married and making her home in Evanston, III. She is married to Ralph Lang, a salesman, and the proud mother of two children. No Pageants or contests were held from 1927 until 1933 when the event was revived. It was In 1933 that the judges selected:— M A R I O N BERGERON— Miss America 1933, of W e s t Haven, Connecticut. Miss Bergeron, like her predecessors, is married and makes her home in Dayton, Ohio, where her husband Is an executive In a wholesale drug concern. Now Mrs, Donald Ruhlman, she is the mother of two lovely children, a boy and a girl, o (No Pageant in 1934,) o HENRIETTA LEVER— Miss America 1935, Is now Mrs. F, J . Nessor of Columbus, O h i o . Married in 1936, she has one daughter, aged 41/^, Divorced In 1944, she remarried several years later. ROSE V E R O N I C A C O Y L E — M i s s America 1936, Is a native of Yeadon, Pa., and was married to the late Leonard Schlesslnger, a W a r n e r Bros, executive. She has remarried and is now Mrs, Robert Dingier, of Haverton, Pa. BETTE C O O P E R — M i s s America 1937, astounded the judges and the Pageant officials when she turned down glory of winning by returning the same night she was crowned to her home in Hackettstown, N. J . She returned to college, graduated and then spent the next five vears as public relations director of the Sandy Valley Grocery Company In Ashland, Ky, In 1945, she resigned, went to New York to study singing and dancing, still beautiful and still single. M A R I L Y N MESEKE— Miss America 1938, hails from Marion, Ohio, where she conducted a dancing school. She returned to her school and continued teaching until her marriage in 1944 to Major Stanley Hume of the U. S, A r m y . They now reside in Coral Gables, Florida. PATRICIA M A R Y D O N N E L L Y — M i s s America 1939, halls from Detroit. She appeared in pictures and sang and danced In bond and soldier shows during the W a r . She Is married now to publicist Robin Harris, and lives in Manhasset, L. I, FRANCES MARIE BURKE— Miss America 1940, Is a Philadelphia girl. Married to Larry Kenney of the Kenney Casket Co., of Phila. The mother of two lovely children, she Is still regarded as Philadelphia's t o p fashion model. ROSEMARY LaPLANCHE— Miss America 1941, is a Los Angeles product. From the time she was crowned until two years ago she was under contract t o RKO Pictures. Now married to producer-writer Harry Koplan, she stars on his CBS television show, " M e e t the Missus". J E A N BARTEL —Miss America 1943, was a graduate of U C L A when she was crowned Miss A m e r i c a . A f t e r a series of concert tours, she Is now the official greeter for the " C i t y of Times Square" a group o f New York hotels, and makes guest television appearances. VENUS RAMEY —Miss America 1944 retired to her farm and a husband after three years as a singing comedienne. Married to Joseph Murphy, Jr., promient Kentucky automobile distributor and gentleman farmer, she has two sons. BESS M Y E R S O N — M i s s America 1945, a graduate of Hunter College, N. Y. C i t y , became the first queen to win a $5000 Scholarship. Now Mrs. Alan W a y n e and the mother of a 4-year-old daughter, Bess has her own television show and is serving as a judge in this year's Pageant. M A R I L Y N BUFERD— Miss America 1946, returned to her home In Los Angeles after winning the title and studied and acted under an M G M contract. She left Hollywood to study at Berlitz U., in Rome, and for the past two years has been featured in Italian motion pictures. BARBARA J O WALKER— Miss America 1947 returned to Tennessee following her triumph to graduate from Memphis State College and married Dr, John Hummel, an interne at Johns Hopkins. They have one son, A n d y . BEBE SHOPP— Miss America 1948, Is a native of H o p kins, Minn., and was the first Miss America to tour Europe. Now a student at Manhattan School of Music, she hopes for a television and concert career. J A C Q U E MERCER — M i s s America 1949, hails from Litchfield, Arizona, surprised her friends by marrying boyhood sweetheart, Doug Cook, during her reign, visited 40 of the 48 States and Mexico, and Is continuing her studies in dramatics. (While Miss Mercer w:is Miss America 1949, she reigned during 1950 until September 9th, when Yolahde Betbeze took over as Miss America 1951. Because the major portion of Miss America's year on the throne is in the year following her selection, the Pageant Board voted to date the title a year ahead—hence Miss America 1952 will be selected this year.)

Page 6

C A R O L R U T H R O M A N N is a native of Granite City, III., on the Missouri border. At 19, she has completed three years at Lindewood College in St. Charles, Mo. She's 5-8 with light brown hair and blue eyes and has sewing for a hobby. H e r special training includes private lessons on the bassoon with H e r m a n Herzberg of the St. Louis Symphony. She'll play a bassoon solo. Miss Missouri P a g e a n t sponsored by St, Louis Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Top Right.) D O N N A J O A N N S O L L A R S first saw the light of day in Stockton, California, on J u n e 27, 1930. She attended the College of the Pacific two years and then completed her courses at Nevada U. Standing S-Sy, with brown hair and blue eyes. Donna has had eight years of piano study, five years of choral work and one year of dramatics. She'll sing in the talent competition. Miss Nevada P a g e a n t directed by Reno Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) P H Y L L I S L E E W A L K E R was born Christmas Eve in Charleston back in 1932 and at 18 is now a Sophomore at W e s t Virginia U. H e r special training has been in speech, dramatics, dancing and art. Phyllis stands 5-6, has light brown hair and hazel eyes. She is an expert swimmer and a member of the Dolphin, honorary swimming society. She'll give a dramatic reading in the talent competition. Miss W e s t Virginia P a g e a n t directed by Optimist Club of Morgantown. (Lozver Right.) C A R O L F R A N C E S T A Y L O R , of Alma, Georgia, was this year's "Miss Berry College", while she was a Sophomore. At 20, she has had five years of music training, three years of dramatics and will combine both talents in the P a g e a n t competition. A rabid baseball fan, Carol stands 5-7, has brown hair and grey eyes and collects dramatic monologues as a hobby. T h e Miss Georgia P a g e a n t directed by Columbus J r . Chamber of Commerce. (Center Below.) P A T R I C I A M A R I E L E H M A N is a native CaHfornian, having been born in Crescent City and now making her home in Sacramento. At 25, she is a primary grade teacher in her home town, is an accomplished pianist and self-taught accordianist. Standing 5-7, blonde and blue-eyed, Patricia will offer piano selections in the talent competition. Miss California Pageant directed by Santa Cruz Chamber of Commerce. (Lower

Left.)

Page 7

FREEDOM
is everybpdy^s Job!
^« 'Illlllllifc

A

AMERICAN

Ofg.

COMPANY

riV.L'K'l

FROM

MAIIVE TO

FLORIDA

Page 8

S U Z A N N E P A R R O T T of Dover is the Delaware choice to be the new Miss America. In addition to graduating in J u n e from Dover H. S., Suzanne has studied music at W e s l e y Jr. College for two years, with 12 years vocal study in all. She is 18, stands 5-6J/2, weighs 120 and has light brown hair and brown eyes. Music is her hobby and hockey her favorite sport. Miss Delaware P a g e a n t directed by Delaware Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Top Right.) M A R G A R E T M A R Y R A M S D A L E is Peggy to all of her friends as well as her family. She now makes her home in Clifton Heights, a suburb of Philadelphia w h e r e she was born 19 years ago. Singing, swimming, tennis and oil painting are among her varied hobbies, but it will be her voice she'll be using in the talent competition. Statistically she is 5-6, weighs 126 and has dark brown hair and brown eyes. Greater Philadelphia P a g e a n t directed by Phila. Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) J E A N H A R P E R was born in Bruce, Mississippi, M a r c h 18, 1932. Now a resident of Memphis, she attended Memphis State College for two years. Six years of voice training and four years of dramatics have rewarded her with a fine lyric soprano voice. Jean stands 5 - 6 ^ , weighs 120, has dark brown hair and eyes and her hobby is teaching small children to sing as well as church work. She hopes for a Scholarship to continue her vocal training. Miss Tennessee P a g e a n t directed by Memphis Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lower Right.) C L A R E M A R I E L I P P E R T was born in the little town of Brackenridge and now makes her home in T a r e n t u m , P a . She'll be 19 on the 29th of September, but at 18 she's a high school graduate with an "A" average for four years. Clare stands 5 - 5 ^ , weighs 117, has light brown hair and grey-green eyes. H e r eight years of piano study and seven years of voice should make her mezzo-soprano solo in the talent competition right pleasing to the audience. Miss Pennsylvania P a g e a n t directed by Larry Woodin, Wellsboro, Pa. (Center Below.) A D R I A N N E F A L C O N is a native of the W i n d y City as was evidenced when a panel of nationally famous artists selected her "Miss W i n d y City". Following her graduation from bt. Patrick Academy in '50, she attended Loyola U., in Chicago, this year. She stands 5-4, with honey blonde hair, and, believe it or not has one brown eye and one green. She hopes for a career in musical comedy or television. Miss Chicago P a g e a n t directed by Miss Patricia Stevens. (Lower Left.) Page 9 .iS^i''

Ml^^

MISS t7/u'ceiaa\

Meet Mr. Robert Evans— His Friends Call Him "Bob'
Arkansas is famous for Bob Burns, the Ozarks and a friendly young man, Robert (but everybody calls him " B o b " ) Evans, the soft-spoken fellow who is the master-of-ceremonles and talent director of this year's Miss America week. The story of one, the dating day he of back left Bob to his Evans is an interesting Pageant, and the only male to be found on the A u d i t o r i u m stage this

hometown tion sports

Helena,

to become a combinaannouncer and singer on Stations WMC and W H B Q in

Memphis,
It wasn't long after midnighters heard him UD East and New York beckoned, with the re-

BOB EVANS
Gotham

sult that for the next 13 years he made he was

his home, except for the time

entertainment director for the Italian Line cruises between Manhattan and South America. A d d to that the Broadway musical "Crazy W i t h the Heat", a flock of duet records with Judy Canova, and then the famous radio quartet, " H i g h , Lo, Jack and the Dame", which starred on the Fred Allen, Kate Smith and Paul W h i t e m a n shows. Hollywood came next and then he moved to Fred W a r i n g and the Pennsylvanians as featured vocalist, later taking over the script writing Icates was f o r m e d , producing transcriptions and for arranging. W h i l e with W a r i n g , Bob Evans Assonational radio advertisers. W e might still be listening to Evans' jingles but it was not right, he reasoned, to have Mrs, Evans and the Evans' offsprings stay home in while he worked at all hours in New York, Helena, So, in

120 MILES OF SUPERB BEACHES
STATE PROMOTION SECTION
Dept. of Conservation a n d Economic Development 6 0 1 State House, Trenton, N . J.

1949 he "packed i n " the Big Town and returned to his home to devote his time to his family and to the large cotton plantation he owns as well as the cotton brokerage business he manages. W e ' r e betting right now t h a t you're going to like " B o b " just as does everybody out there in '\rkansas . . . and besides doing a very creditable |OD or presenting each of the Miss America contestants, we'll wager, too, that you'll g e t a real thrill out of his wonderful voice.

Please send me FREE a copy of "FunFilled Days In N E W JERSEY, Vacation Host to the N a t i o n . " NAME ADDRESS

I
Page 10

CITY

STATE

l u — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — "

MOUNTAIN LAKES

FAMOUS RESORTS

J O Y C E E A R L E P E R R Y was born in Alcolu, S. C , July 11, 1933, and now lives with her parents in Conway, where she was graduated from high school last June. H e r favorite hobby is art and she has an ambition to study art for a career, Joyce is 5 - 7 ^ , weighs 126 pounds, has light brown hair and brown eyes. H e r favorite sport is basketball. Miss South Carolina Pageant directed by S. C. Junior Chamber of Commerce. (Top Right.) C L A I R E K A T H E R I N E H E E N is a native of Honolulu, where she was born 18 years ago. A g r a d u a t e of P u n a h o u School last June, she is seeking secretarial training and a career in Social Work. She will dance the Hula in the Pageant talent competition. Swimming and horseback riding are her hobbies. Claire stands 5-5H, weighs 115, has black eyes and brown hair and has had special training in Hawaiian dances. Miss Hawaii Pageant directed by Honolulu Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) M I L D R E D A L M E I D A was born in Boston, but now makes her home in New Bedford, Mass. An honor roll graduate from Girls' H i g h in 1947, she has had a year of dramatic training, teacher's training course in dancing, and hopes to attend the New Y o r k Conservatory for further study. For her talent she'll do a fashion modeling skit. She's 21, stands 5-4, weighs 112 and has brown hair and eyes. H e r hobby is photography. Miss Massachusetts Pageant directed by Station W N B H . (Lower Right.) N A N C Y J A N E N O R M A N is a native of Shenandoah, Iowa, and at 19 has already completed two years at Nebraska University. H e r other training includes three years of private voice lessons, two in college and six years of piano lessons. She will sing in the talent competition. Nancy is 5-3, weighs 103 and has brown hair and blue eyes. Book collecting, golf and swimming are her principal hobbies outside class. Miss Iowa Pageant directed by Clear Lake Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Below.) L O U I S E O R L A N D O is a native of Syracuse, and at 19 has graduated from N o r t h H. S. and finished her F r e s h m a n year at Syracuse University. Her extra training includes seven years of voice, five of piano, six ballet, one ballet and one violin, all of which adds up to a very versatile young lady. Since voice is her first choice, she'll sing in the talent competition. Louise is 5-5, weighs 110, and has brown hair and eyes. Miss N. Y, State P a g e a n t directed by Syracuse Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Left Below.)

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Page 11

ATLANTIC CITY

4 STORES ' BOARDWALK AT ARKANSAS AVE. BOARDWALK AT KENTUCKY AVE. -BOARDIVALK AT TENN,AVENUE -BOARDWALK AT VIRGINIA AVE.

JITNEY MEN'S ASSOCIATION

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DAILY RACING POST TIME 2

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HOTEL BRIGHTON PUNCH BOWL

ON THE BOARDWALK AT SOUTH CAROLINA AVE. Page 12

2627 BOARDWALK

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S A N D U S C O T T was 21 last July 10th, and became Miss New York City 37 days later. Born in Detroit, she was graduated from high school in 1947 and spent two years at W a y n e University. H e r hobby is teaching swimming and she hopes for a motion picture career. Special training in voice and dramatics has also added to her talent ability. She's 5-8, weighs 130 and has black hair and brown eyes. Miss New York City P a g e a n t directed by Grace Downs Model School. (Top Right.)

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M A R J O R I E A L M A K E L L Y was 23 on August 2nd. Following graduation from Simcoe High School and Alma Ladies College, she enrolled this year at the University of W e s t e r n Ontario. She has had six years of voice training for her lyric dramatic soprano voice which helped gain her an Associate Degree in Voice. Reddish brown hair and blue-grey eyes augment her 5 - 2 ^ height and 110 pounds. Painting, ice skating and dancing are her hobbies. Miss Canada P a g e a n t directed by "Miss Canada Pageant" at Hamilton, Ont. (Center Right.)

B E V E R L Y A N N E M E R Y is a native of Auburn, and will be 20 come Sept. 22nd. Following graduation from High School in 1949, she attended the Philadelphia Museum of A r t two years. H e r special training includes music and art, while her hobbies are sewing, jewelry design and fashioning, swimming and horseback riding. Beverly is 5-8, weighs 125 with brown hair and eyes. She'll sing in the talent division. Miss Maine Pageant directed by Skowhegan State Fair. (Lower Right.)

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C O L L E E N P H Y L L I S G A L L A N T was born in Berlin (N. H.) and now makes her home in Laconia, where she graduated from high school last June. H e r special talent is water skiing, but she hopes for a career in fashion modeling. Designing and making her own clothes is another attribute she possesses. Colleen is 5-8, weighs 133, has brown hair and blue eyes, will m a r k her 19th birthday October 5th. Miss New Hampshire Pageant directed by Manchester Union Leader. (Center Below.)

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J U N E B E V E R L Y K L E I N was born in Brooklyn 21 years ago and now makes her home in W a s h i n g t o n , where she graduated from Roosevelt High in '48 and then spent the next three years at Wilson Teachers College. H e r talents include a mezzo dramatic soprano voice and pencil sketching. J u n e stands 5-6M, weighs 123 and has brown hair and dark brown eyes. H e r ambition is a singing career following graduation from college. Miss District of Columbia P a g e a n t directed by Radio Station W W D C , Washington. (Lower Left.)

Page ?3

Three Talented 1950 Semi-Finalists — All $1,000 Scholarship Winners

M I S S G R E A T E R P H I L A D E L P H I A , Janice Eileen M u r r a y of Philadelphia. Janice is a graduate of Ohio State University, with a Bachelor of Music Degree. She is now studying for her Masters Degree at the University of Pennsylvania. The 1950 P a g e a n t audiences will long remember the girl who held them ?pelibound as she sang "O Don Fatale". W e predict a great operatic future for this brilliant and talented young mezzo-soprano, who was sponsored in the contest by the Philadelphia Junior Chamber of Commerce.

M I S S T E X A S , M a r g a r e t Sue Sommers of Dallas. M a r g a r e t Sue is a University of Texas junior, studying for a Bachelor of Music Degree, after which she would like to teach voice. A petite little girl with a great mezzo-soprano voice, M a r g a r e t Sue selected "Jalousie" as her talent competition song, and completely captivated the audience and judges. She was sponsored in the contest by the Texas State Junior Chamber of Commerce.

M I S S W A S H I N G T O N S T A T E , Karlyne LaRae Abele of Des Moines, Washington. Karlyne is now a student at the University of Washington at Seattle, and is also taking dancing lessons. She proved once again the versatility of Miss America contestants by presenting as her talent the dramatic reading of an editorial from a New York paper, entitled "The Flag". She was sponsored in the contest by The Miss Washington Pageant, a non-profit civic corporation of that state.

Page 14

J E A N N E M O O D Y was born and raised in Cherokee, Ala., and at 21 has already attended Birmingham Southern College, New York University and Jacksonville State Teachers College. While in New York, she had special training in drama, voice and dancing, and hopes for a theatre-television career. She stands 5-7^^, weighs 128 is blonde and blue-eyed. H e r hobbies are music, swimming and the theatre. Miss Alabama P a g e a n t directed by Birmingham News and Alabama Theatre. (Top Right.) P A T R I C I A J O A N S E A B E C K will be 21, September 12th. Lives in Casper, Wyoming, where she attended Junior College for two years. Presently employed as a stenographer, " P a t " hopes for a career in T V or radio. She stands 5-7, weighs 120, has auburn hair and hazel eyes. Sewing and skiing are her hobbies. She is a member of Beta Sigma Phi Sorority, and has special dramatic training. Miss W y o m i n g P a g e a n t directed by W y o m i n g Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Second Right.) M A R I L Y N J E A N W A L K E R will be 20 come September 21st, but at 19 she has already completed two years at Minot State Teachers College. She has special training in voice, art and modeling and will present a group of her paintings in the talent competition. Marilyn stands 5-8y, weighs 127 and has dark brown hair and blue eyes. H e r hobbies are cooking and badminton. Miss N o r t h Dakota P a g e a n t directed by Minot Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Third Right.) D O L O R E S M A R I A B E R R U E Z O was born in Dearborn, Mich., F e b r u a r y 13th, 1932, and now lives in St. Clair Shores. Following graduation from high school, she enrolled in W a y n e U., Detroit. She hopes for a career as a dancer. Dolores is 5-7, weighs 122, and has brown hair and eyes. H e r hobbies arc dancing and swimming. She was selected to represent Detroit this year at the Annual Spring Siesta in Mexico. Miss Michigan Pageant directed by Muskegon Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lower Right.) J O L O N D O N was born in Como, Texas, g r a d u a t e d from Spur, Texas, High School in 1947 and then spent a year at Texas Tech. When the family moved to Aurora, Col., she enrolled at Colorado State, where she's been a student two years. Entertaining wounded veterans at Fitzsimmons hospital, dancing, swimming and tennis are her hobbies. She stands 5-7, weighs 128, has black hair and dark blue eyes and was 20 last April 9th. Miss Colorado P a g e a n t directed by Denver Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Below.) O T I L I A J I M E N E Z was born in Arecibo, P u e r t o Rico, May 7. 1926. Following graduation from Arecibo High School in 1942, she attended the Royal Commercial College where she won first prize in a secretary contest. Otilia is currently secretary to the vice-president of a bank. H e r favorite sport is swimming. Statistically she is 5 - 5 ^ . weighs 125, has brown hair and eyes and a tan complexion. Miss P u e r t o Rico P a g e a n t directed by the Miss P u e r t o Rico Institution. (Lower Left.)

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Page 15

Dote On Figures?—Here Are Statistics On Contestants

MISS A L A B A M A , MISS A R K A N S A S ,

Jeanne

Moody,

Cheokee, Ala Little Rock, A r k Calif Sacramento, III Conn

B-jy 5-7 5-7 S-iy 5-4 5-6 5-5i^ 5-6^ Fla S-Sy 5-7 Hawaii Idaho S-Sy 5-4>4 5-4 Ind Iowa Ky La 5-5 5-3 5-4 5-7^ 5-8 5-6 5-4 5-7 5-4 5-8 5-6 S-Sy 5-8 5-6 5-8 5-5 5-8% 5-5 5-5 5-8 5-5% ....5-6 5-5 5-7% B-by 5-3% Utah 5-10 5-5^ Va Wash Va 5-8 5-4% 5-6 5-7 5-7 City,

128 130 128 110 110 129 118 120 123 130 128 115 112 115 115 103 115 128 125 122 112 122 128 115 128 132 123 123 133 125 130 110 134 127 114 120 129 117 126 125 126 122 120 109 143 119 126 116 124 124 120

36 36 37 34 34 36 34 34 37 35 35 34 34 35 35 33y 34 35 35 36 34 35 35 35 33 36^ 36 35 36 3by 37 34 36 34 34 35 345^ 33 35^^ 35^^ 34 35 35^4 34% 36 35 35 34 34 35 35

36 36 37 35 33 36 35 35^ 36 37 35 36 34 35 35 33 35 36 37^4 36 35 35 36 35 35 36^ 36 36 37 35 37 34 37 35 35 35 35V2 34 35^ 36^ 35 36 35 35 36 35y 36 3Ay 37 35 34

25 24 26 24;^ 23 25 24 25 26 23J^ 24 24 23 24 25 23 23 24^ 25 24^ 23>4 24 25 23 23^ 25 24 25 24 25 26 24 26 24 24 25 24^ 24 25]^2 25 24 24 24 22^ 24 24 25 24 24^ 24 24

21 18 25 23 19 20 19 18 21 19 20 18 19 18 21 19 21 19 19 20 21 19 20 18 19 21 19 21 18 18 21 19 19 19 22 18 18 18 19 25 18 19 19 18 25 19 21 19 18 18 20

Blonde Dr. Brown Blonde Reddish-Br. Blonde Black Black L t . Brown Brown Blonde Brown Black M e d . Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown L t . Brown Brown Brown Dr. Brown Dr. B l o n d e L t . Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Dr. Brown Black Brown Brown Dr.-Brown L t . Brown Brown Dr. Brown Lt. Brown Dr. Brown Brown L t . Brown Blonde Dr. Brown Brunette Blonde Brown Brown Brown L t , Brown Blonde Auburn

Blue Brown Blue Blue-Grey Brown-Green Dr. Blue Brown Brown Dr.-Brown Blue Grey Brown Blue Brown Blue Blue Blue Brown Brown Blue Brown Brown Hazel Hazel Blue Blue Blue Blue Blue Brown Brown Brown Hazel Blue Brown Brown Dr. Brown Grey-Green Brown Brown Brown Brown Dr, Brown Brown Blue Blue Blue Green Hazel Green Hazel

Fair Olive Fair Fair Fair Olive Fair Fair Medium Fair Medium Fair Fair Fair Fair Fair Fair Olive Fair Fair Olive Fair Olive Olive Olive Medium M e d . Dark Medium Olive Fair Fair Olive Fair Fair Medium Olive Olive Fair Lt. O l i v e Olive Medium Fair Medium Olive Fair Light Medium Olive Fair Fair Medium

Charlotte Patricia

Simmen, Lehman,

MISS C A L I F O R N I A , MISS C A N A D A , MISS C H I C A G O , MISS C O L O R A D O , MISS D E L A W A R E , MISS MISS MISS FLORIDA,

Marjorie Alma Adrianne Jo London, Beverly

Kelly, C o u r t l a n d , O n t a r i o Aurora, Burlant, Col Bridgeport. Del

Falcon, C h i c a g o ,

MISS C O N N E C T I C U T ,

Suzanne

Parrott,

Dover,

M I S S D I S T R I C T O F C O L U M B I A , J u n e Beverly K l e i n , W a s h . . D. C . . . 5 - 6 % Mary Carol Elizabeth Frances Katherine Charlene Mae Jane Jeanne Georgia Mitchell, Godwin, Taylor, Ralstin, Gainesville. Alma, Ga MISS G E O R G I A , IDAHO,

H A W A I I , Claire Phyllis Doris Carol

Heen, Honolulu, Nezperce, III Harvey,

MISS I L L I N O I S , MISS I N D I A N A , MISS MISS MISS IOWA,

King, Norman,

Indianapolis, Bowling Baton

Nancy

Shenandoah,

KENTUCKY, LOUISIANA,

Dottye

Nuckols,

Green, Rouge. Md

Thompson,

M I S S M A I N E , Beverly A n n MISS M A R Y L A N D . MISS M A S S A C H U S E T T S , MISS M I N N E S O T A , MISS MISS M I S S O U R I , •MISS M O N T A N A , MISS NEBRASKA, MISS N E V A D A , MISS N E W MISS N E W MISS N E W

Emery, A u b u r n , M a i n e Reed, Baltimore,

M i l d r e d A l m e i d a , N e w B e d f o r d . Mass Rose Clark, Minneapolis, Newton. Miss III Neb City, Minn

M I S S M I C H I G A N , Dolores M a r i a Berruezo, St. C l a i r Shores, M i c h . . . 5-7 Kathryn Ruth M I S S I S S I P P I , Jessie W y n n Carol Morgan,

Romann, Marie

Granite

Patricia Joan M c G l n t y , G r e a t Geraldlne Jo Ann Sollars, Reno,

Falls. M o n t a n a . . . . 5 - 7

Elseman, O m a h a . Nev

Donna

M I S S N E W H A M P S H I R E , C o l l e e n Phyllis G a l l a n t , L a c o n i a . N . H JERSEY, Bernice YORK YORK Dolores Massi. C a m d e n . N , J N. Y N, C Syracuse. N. Y CITY, Sandu Scott, N e w York C i t y . STATE, Louise O r l a n d o ,

MISS N O R T H MISS O H I O .

CAROLINA, Ruth Diane

Lu L o n g O g b u r n , S m i t h f i e l d . Creek, Astoria, Mary Ohio Ore

MISS N O R T H D A K O T A , Marilyn Jean Walker, M i n o t , N , Dakota....5-8J^ Howell, Apple Ann MIstretta, Marie MISS O K L A H O M A , MISS O R E G O N , MISS MISS GREATER Clifton MISS PUERTO MISS S O U T H MISS S O U T H MISS TEXAS, Bobby Jene Simmons. O k l a h o m a C i t y . O k l a Clare Pa, Jimenez, Earle Santurce, Perry, Puerto Rico S. C Joyce Conway. L I p p e r t , T a r e n t u m . Pa Ramsdale

Audrey

PENNSYLVANIA,

PHILADELPHIA, Heights, RICO, Otilla

Margaret

CAROLINA, DAKOTA, Glenda

Marlene Harper,

Margaret

RIeb, Parkston. S. D...5-7

MISS TENNESSEE, Jean MISS U T A H , Colleen MISS V E R M O N T , MISS V I R G I N I A ,

M e m p h i s , Tenn O d e s s a , Texas Lake Rutland. Vt Norfolk, Seattle,

Jane

Holcomb, Gilbert.

Kay H u t c h l n s , S a l t Ann Louise Bryant, Shaffer,

Peggy Shirley

MISS W A S H I N G T O N , MISS WEST V I R G I N I A ,

Darlene Marie

Phyllis Lee W a l k e r . Murphy,

Charleston. W . Marshfield, W i s

M I S S W I S C O N S I N , Sheila

M I S S W Y O M I N G , P a t r i c i a J o a n Seabeck, C a s p e r , W y o

Iff you drive/ park In the Auditorium Garage IF YOU DON'T DRIVE - CALL
FAST-SAFE COURTEOUS SERVICE

YELLOW CAB
Page 16

PHONE

4-1221

BROOKS & IDLER — PRINTERS — ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.

The Miss America Pageant Program of Events
BOB EVANS. Director and M . C .
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 5 8:30 P.M.
ORGAN M u s i c Lois Miller

JOE FRASETTO. Orchestra Conductor
FRIDAY, SEPT. 7 8:30 P.M.
ORGAN M U S I C Lois Miller

THURSDAY, SEPT. 6 8:30 P.M.
ORGAN M U S I C Lois Miller

FINALS
SATURDAY, SEPT, 8 8:00 P , M ,
ORGAN MtJsic Lois Miller

OvERTURE-'She's Miss America'
WELCOME — Miss Atlantic City,

OvERTURE-'She's Miss America'
WELCOME — Miss Atlantic City,

OvERTURE-'She's Miss America'
WELCOME — Miss Atlantic City,

OvERTURE-'She's Miss America'
WELCOME — Miss Atlantic City
M I S S AMERICA 1951^

Janet Barab
PAR.\DE OF T H E STATES—Miss AMERICA CONTESTANTS M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Janet Barab
PARADE OF T H E STATES—Miss AMERICA CONTESTANTS M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Janet Barab
PARADE OF T H E S T A T E S — M i s s AMERICA CONTESTANTS M i s s AMERICA 1951—

Yolande Betbeze
PARADE OF T H E STATES—

Miss America Contestants
NATIONAL A N T H E M INTRODUCTION OF JUDGES ANNOUNCEMENT OF T H E 15 $1,000.00 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS T E N SEMI-FINALISTS

Yolande Betbeze
NATIONAL A N T H E M INTRODUCTION OF JUDGES M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

Yolande Betbeze
NATIONAL A N T H E M INTRODUCTION OF JUDGES M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

Yolande Betbeze
N.\TIONAL A N T H E M INTRODUCTION OF JUDGES M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

(In Evening Gown)
PANORAMA INTERLUDE PRESENTATION OF T H E SCHOLARSHIP W I N N E R S FIVE

(In Evening Gown)
1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12. 14. 16. ARKANSAS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA GEORGIA 4, HAWAII IDAHO 6, INDIANA IOWA MASSACHUSETTS MINNESOTA MISSOURI II, NEW JERSEY N. Y. STATE 13, N. DAKOTA S. CAROLINA 15, UTAH WISCONSIN 17, WYOMING 1, 3, 5, 7, 9. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16.

( I n Evening Gown)
CANADA 2. DELAWARE 4, ILLINOIS 6, MICHIGAN 8, NEVADA N, HAMPSHIRE N. CAROLINA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA TENNESSEE 15. VERMONT 17. COLORADO FLORIDA LOUISIANA NEBRASKA 1. 3, 4, 5, 7, 9. 11. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

( I n Evening Gown)
ALABAMA 2. CALIFORNIA CHICAGO CONNECTICUT KENTUCKY 6, MARYLAND MAINE 8. MISSISSIPPI MONTANA 10. N, Y, CITY OHIO 12. OKLAHOMA PHILADELPHIA PUERTO RICO S. DAKOTA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA

PRESENTATION OF F I R S T H A L F OF T H E R E M A I N I N G CONTESTANTS BOB EVANS TEN SEMI-FINALISTS

(In Swim Suit)
PRESENTATION OF SECOND H A L F OF T H E R E M A I N I N G CONTESTANTS DIVERTISEMENT TEN SEMI-FINALISTS

TEXAS VIRGINIA

M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Yolande Betbeze
MISS 1, 3. S. 7. 9. 10. 11, 12. 13. 14. 16. AMERICA CONTESTANTS COLORADO FLORIDA LOUISIANA NEBRASKA

M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Yolande Betbeze
MISS 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9. 11, 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. AMERICA CONTESTANTS

M I S S AMERICA 1951—

Yolande Betbeze
MISS CALIFORNIA MARYLAND MISSISSIPPI N. Y. CITY OKLAHOMA 1. 2. 3. 5. 7. 8. 9. 10. 12. 14. 16, AMERICA CONTESTANTS

(Talent Competition) (In Swim Suit)
ARKANSAS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA GEORGIA 4. HAWAII IDAHO 6, INDIANA IOWA MASSACHUSETTS MINNESOTA MISSOURI 11, NEW JERSEY N. Y. STATE 13. N. DAKOTA S. CAROLINA 15. UTAH WISCONSIN 17. WYOMING DIVERTISEMENT PRESENTATION OF PARADE AWARDS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS

(In Swim Suit)
CANADA 2, DELAWARE 4. ILLINOIS 6, MICHIGAN 8, NEVADA N. HAMPSHIRE N. CAROLINA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA TENNESSEE 15, VERMONT 17.

(In Swim Suit)
ALABAMA 2, CHICAGO CONNECTICUT KENTUCKY 6, MAINE 8. MONTANA 10, OHIO 12, PHILADELPHIA PUERTO RICO S. DAKOTA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA

For Congeniality and Talent
A N N O U N C E M E N T OF FIVE F I N A L ISTS AND INDIVIDUAL INTERVIEW BEFORE JUDGES GUESTS OF HONOR A N N O U N C E M E N T OF FOUR RUNNERS-UP CROWNING OF

TEXAS VIRGINIA

GUEST OF HONOR M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

G U E S T OF HONOR M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

G U E S T OF HONOR M I S S AMERICA CONTESTANTS

(Talent Competition)
1. 3. 4. 5. 7, 9. 11. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. ALABAMA 2, CALIFORNIA CHICAGO CONNECTICUT KENTUCKY 6, MARYLAND MAINE 8, MISSISSIPPI MONTANA 10. N. Y. CITY OHIO 12. OKLAHOMA PHILADELPHIA PUERTO RICO S. DAKOTA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA

M I S S A M E R I C A 1952
FINALE Entire Company

(Talent Competition)
1. 2. 3. 5. 7. 8. 9. 10. 12, 14. ARKANSAS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA GEORGIA 4. HAWAII IDAHO 6. INDIANA IOWA MASSACHUSETTS MINNESOTA MISSOURI 11. NEW JERSEY N. Y. STATE 13. N. DAKOTA S. CAROLINA 15. UTAH 17. WYOMING 1. 3. 5, 7. S. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16,

(Talent Competition)
CANADA 2. DELAWARE 4, ILLINOIS 6, MICHTGAN 8, NEVADA N. HAMPSHIRE N. CAROLINA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA TENNESSEE 15, VERMONT 17, COLORADO FLORIDA LOUISIANA NEBRASKA

TEXAS VIRGINIA

IG, WISCONSIN DIVERTISEMENT

DIVERTISEMENT BOB EVANS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS

DIVERTISEMENT BOB BOB EVANS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS PRESENTATION OF AWARDS EVANS

In Swim Suits and Talent Competition
FINALE Entire Company

In Swim Suits and Talent Competition
FINALE Entire Company

In Swim Suits and Talent Competition
FINALE Entire Company

CREDITS Auditorium Staflf, (Set U p ) Comm. W . S. Cuthbert,(Police) Coronation Gowns and Official Pageant Gowns, Courtesy "Everglaze" Fabrics, Wilmington, Delaware Charles L. Fischer, Atlantic City—Coronation Roses J. J. Habermehl's Sons, (Floral Setting) Hair Fashion Council of America, Inc.—Hair Stylists for Miss America Contestants Nash Motors, Detroit, Mich.— Transportation John Wanamaker, Philadelphia, Pa. (Properties)

"Miss America, Here's Your Dream"—Words and Music by Bob Evans Overture "She's Miss America"—Words and Music by W m . B. Richter Page 16A

O F TffTTW f S S
It was in 1921 that an energetic Atlantic City newspaperman sold the idea of staging a national beauty contest for the selection of Miss America, His name was Herb Test, and he died long before he could see his brainchild grow into the magnitude the Miss America Pageant enjoys today. Fittingly enough, the Nation's Capital produced the first Miss America—blonde, blue-eyed garet Gorman, who won the title MarFollowing in annual succession to the crown were Ruth Malcomson of Philadelphia In 1924; Fay Lamphier. of Oakland. California, in 1925; Norma Smallwood of Tulsa. Oklahoma, in 1926, and Lois Delander. of Joliet, Illinois, in 1927, who was also destined to become the last of the Miss Americas of the Roaring Twenties, since the Pageant took a financial nose-dive and went into moth-balls until 1933. It was also in 1927 that a blonde youngster from Dallas carried the Lone Star State's banner in the Atlantic City contest—but she didn't come close to being Miss America and went to Hollywood instead. Her name was, and still is, Joan Blondell, and she's still starring on stage and television after a very successful motion picture career. Like its most recent predecessor, the 1933 contest was a financial failure, but it did bring the Miss America crown to a sixteen-year-old youngster from West Haven, Conn,, Marion Bergeron, who holds the distinction of being the last sixteen-yearold to become Miss America, for in 1935, when the contest was revived, the age minimum was moved to 18 years.

hands-down

garbed in a full-skirted black bathing suit, kneelength stockings, a colorful sash and a bright bandana gracing her long curly locks. She won a huge loving cup to prove she was queen and returned home, little knowing that she was to become the first of an estimated 500,000 "queens"- who have been selected in tlie United States since that Sun-

% *.

day afternoon, September 10, 1921, she returned to live in Washington. Columbus, Ohio, holds the distinction of being the home of the only girl to become Miss America twice, for, since Mary Katherine Campbell won the title both in 1922 and again In 1923, the Miss America Pageant Board ruled a limit of one year's reign for any one contestant.

A M E R I C A S
Since 1935 not only has Miss America as a contest been both successful and highly improved, but it has been the spark that ignited a nation-wide fury to create queens, titles and beauty contests In general. A very conservative 25,000 contests featuring beauty are now run annually in the United States, and practically every other country in the civiliied world has its share of competitions. For a nation that was founded on and lives by Democracy at its best, we produce more "royalty" In any one 24-hour stretch than all of the sovereign nations together In a decade. To get back to 1935 and the second revival of the Miss America contest—for it was in that year that it acquired the foothold that has brought it to the top of the ratings that go with beauty contests as such . . . and even a big step beyond. Beginning with Henrietta Lever, of Pittsburgh, Miss Americas of the 30's include Rose Coyle of Philadelphia in 1936; Bette Cooper of Hackettstown, N. J,, in 1937; Marilyn Meseke of Marion. Ohio, in 1938, and Patricia Donnelly of Detroit, Mich,, in 1939. It was Bette Cooper who made the headlines sparkle in 1937 when she returned home the same night right after winning the title. to their own qualifications. " —-_-^r=#' First of the Miss Americas to be picked on a combination of talent, charm, poise and beauty was Frances Marie Burke of Philadelphia, and following her have been an even 10 young ladies, who possessed all four In the eyes of such noted judges as Russell Patterson. Harry Conover, John Robert It would make the presentafrorf o f the contestants more entertaining to the paying customers, the Board reasoned, and so sponsors of local contests throughout the country—franchised to select girls for the national finals—.feast j ^ ^ a d d "talent" In 1940, re-valuing the acceptance of the Miss America Pageant as a strictly beauty contest based on the definition of beauty and such synonyms as "loveliness, fairness, comeliness, handsomeness, prettiness, exqulsiteness, grace, charm and pulchritude", the Pageant Board went Webster one better by adding the word "talent" to its requirements for a

Powers. Coby Whitmore, Earl Wilson, Cornelius Otis Skinner, Dr. Frank Black and Deems Taylor to mention but a few.
(Continued on Pd^e 26)

MISS AMERICA 1951 BOARDWALK PARADE
{3 P. M., Tuesday, Sep+ember 4, Line of March — New Jersey to Hartford Avenues) OFFICIALS
H O N . W M . S . CUTHBERT

Grand Marshall

OFFICIAL LINE-UP OF FLOATS. CONTESTANTS AND BANDS
Motorcycle Escort Police Color Guard GRAND MARSHALL Director Wm. S. Cuthbert PHILADELPHIA POLICE (Band) U. S. M A R I N E C O L O R and HONOR GUARD HER MAJESTY'S FLOAT Featuring Yolande Betbeze "Miss America 1951" (Sponsored by the Miss America Pageant) MISS S W E D E N FLOAT Featuring Miss Anita Ekberg (Sponsored by W a s a Crisp Bread) DURNING'S STRING BAND CITY "MISS "MISS "MISS IOWA" KENTUCKY" LOUISIANA" "MISS "MISS "MISS OREGON" PENNSYLVANIA" PHILADELPHIA" SCHOOL
B. H.

*
FRAPART

Director

BELMAR COMMUNITY BAND (Philadelphia, Pa.) SALT W A T E R T A F F Y FLOAT (Sponsored by Fralinger's Salt Water Taffy) "MISS 'MISS "MISS MAINE" MARYLAND" MASSACHUSETTS" BAND

BURLINGTON HIGH BAND Burlington, N. J.

*
P a r a d e Committee
RoBT. W. LEEDS,

S K Y S C R A P E R BY T H E S E A FLOAT (Sponsored by the Claridge Hotel) MISSION B E L L FLOAT Featuring "Miss Puerto Rico 1951" (Sponsored by Miss Puerto Institution) "MISS "MISS SOUTH SOUTH CAROLINA" DAKOTA"

Chairman

N E W A. C. S T R I N G

W I L L I A M CASEY

B E A U T I E S OF T H E S E A FLOAT (Sponsored by Hackney's Restaurant) "MISS MICHIGAN" "MISS MINNESOTA" "MISS MISSISSIPPI" U. S. N A V Y F O U R T H DISTRICT BAND NAVAL

Rico

Grandstand

K.

B. W A L T O N ,

P E N D E L L STRING BAND MONARCH OF T H E B O A R D W A L K FLOAT (Sponsored by Ambassador Hotel) "MISS "MISS "MISS TENNESSEE" TEXAS" UTAH"

Pohcing

and

Ushering

CITY OF ATLANTIC FLOAT Featuring Janet Barab ''Miss Atlantic City" "MISS ALABAMA" "MISS ARKANSAS" "MISS CALIFORNIA"

U. S. N A V A L A I R S T A T I O N Color Guard and Rifle Platoon W I N T E R F A N T A S Y FLOAT (Sponsored by the Dennis Hotel) "MISS MISSOURI" "MISS MONTANA" "MISS NEBRASKA" HAMMONTON HIGH BAND SCHOOL

HUGH L. WATHEN,

Judges

M U S I C I A N S L O C A L 661 (Band) "MISS "MISS "MISS CANADA" CHICAGO" COLORADO"

PENNSVILLE COMMUNITY BAND (Pennsville, N. J.) LUCKY S W I N G FLOAT (Sponsored by Atlantic City Race Course) "MISS "MISS "MISS VERMONT" VIRGINIA" WASHINGTON" POST

ROBERT GLASS

Bleacher

Construction

LIONS CLUB DRUM A N D BUGLE CORPS Perth Amboy, N. J. CIRCUS FLOAT Featuring "Miss Connecticut 1951" (Sponsored by W a r n e r Co., Bridgeport, Conn.) "MISS DELAWARE" "MISS DIST. OF COLUMBIA" HEGERMANN STRING BAND "MISS FLORIDA" "MISS GEORGIA" "MISS HAWAII" BAYWAY BAND REFINERY ESSO

S H O W BOAT FLOAT (Sponsored by M. E. Blatt Co.) "MISS NEVADA" "MISS NEW HAMPSHIRE" "MISS NEW JERSEY" ONIZED BAND

MEREDITH KERSTETTER,

Deputy Director of Public Safety

PEARL OF THE ATLANTIC FLOAT
(Sponsored Hall) "MISS NEW 'MISS NEW by Chalfonte-Haddon CITY" STATE" YORK YORK

H A R R Y P. M O R R I S O N AMERICAN LEGION (Band) Sakm, N. J.

CAPT. W I L L I A M MULLOY,

Auxiliary

Police

W A T E R B A L L E T FLOAT (Sponsored by Steel Pier) "MISS IDAHO" "MISS ILLINOIS" "MISS INDIANA" POLISH BAND AMERICAN STRING

RAMBLER COUNTRY CLUB FLOAT (Sponsored by Nash Motors, Detroit, Mioh.)

P U B L I C UTILITIES FLOAT (Sponsored by A. C. Electric Co., S O U T H E R N B E L L E FLOAT and South Jersey Gas Co.) Featuring "Miss North Carolina" "MISS WEST VIRGINIA" (Sponsored by N. C. Jr. Chamber "MISS WISCONSIN" of Commerce) "MISS WYOMING" AQUA STRING BAND Y.M.CA. FLOAT M O D E R N F A R M I N G FLOAT M I S S F L O R I D A 1950 (Sponsored by James Salt Water Taffy) Janet Crockett "MISS NORTH DAKOTA" M I S S P H I L A D E L P H I A 1950 "MISS OHIO" Janice Murray "MISS OKLAHOMA" U N I T E D F U N D FLOAT ATLANTIC CITY DRUM AND (Sponsored by United Fund of BUGLE CORPS Atlantic County) A TOUCH OF V E N U S FLOAT ST. J O S E P H HIGH SCHOOL (Sponsored by Boardwalk National Bank, Guarantee Trust Co., & D R U M and B U G L E C O R P S Ventnor City National Bank) (Hammonton, N. J.)
Copyright by Official Pageant Publications

PAUL

J.

O'NEIL,

Chairman Assembly-March Robert Doughty George T. Graves, Jr. Albert A. Marks, Jr. Richard Mason Maurice Mower Harold Rich Edwin C. Silvers Daniel F, W a t e r s , 2nd

PHILADELPHIA

POLICE

Director Samuel Rosenberg

(Nash Convertibles carrying former Miss Americas and 1950 Contestants courtesy of Nash Motors, Detroit, Mich.)
1951

Page 17 A

A Trio Of The Ten 1950 Miss America Pageant Semi-FinaUsts Whose Talent Helped Capture $1,000.00 Scholarships

M I S S C O N N E C T I C U T , Renee Dianne Roy of Hartford. Rcnec is a dramatic and dancing student, who is continuing her studies in New York, A born comedienne, Renee walked away with a preliminaiy talent trophy, when she im])ersonated a department store Cosmetician, demonstrating cheap cosmetics and then for a brief moment relived the heyday of her youth— the Charleston era. She was sponsored in contest by Alfred Patricelli Public Relations,

MISS D I S T R I C T O F C O L U M B I A . Sandra Joanne Stahl of Washington, D. C. Sandra is a former University of Arizona student. She has had eight years of voice training and will continue with same, along with languages and repertoire. Sandra received a thunderous ovation as she sang a portion of the "Bell Song" from "Lakmc", and easily captured a Talent Preliminary Trophy. She was sponsored in contest by Radio Station WWDC.

M I S S N E V A D A , Tosca Carolyn Masini of Sparks. Tosca is a graduate of the University of Nevada, a Tri-Delt and a public school teacher. School boys and girls over the country poured in their letters of congratulations and good wishes to the math teacher not afraid of "figures". H e r original musical comedy sketch was a highlight of talent performances P a g e a n t W e e k . She was sponsored in contest by the Reno Junior Chamber of Commerce,

Page 17

A t l a n t i c C i t y will be 100 years old in 1954 and on this p a g e are a n u m b e r of firms, business leaders and utilities t h a t have been largely mental In making this C i t y the g r e a t resort It Is t o d a y . They salute the 2 5th Miss A m e r i c a and we. in turn, salute t h e m ,

Instru-

A T L A N T I C CITY E L E C T R I C CO. (Established in 1907) A T L A N T I C C I T Y L U M B E R CO. (Established in 1872) A T L A N T I C C I T Y S E W E R A G E CO. (Established in 1888) AUSTIN FUEL COMPANY (Established in 1921) W A L T E R & BEN BRICK (Dealing in Lumber since 1908) BROOKS & IDLER ( P r i n t e r s for over 40 years) C H A R N E Y ' S S T A T I O N E R Y and OFFICE SUPPLIES CHILD'S RESTAURANT (EstabHshed in 1914) COCA-COLA B O T T L I N G CO. (Established 1920 in Atlantic City) J O E DAILY T I R E SERVICE, INC (Established in 1915) DOCK'S O Y S T E R H O U S E (Established in 1897) DORLAND ADVERTISING AGENCY (Established in 1883) DUNGAN, FRY & S P E N C E (Fine Furniture Since 1901) EASTERN MOTOR COMPANY (EstabHshed in 1911) ELDREDGE STORAGE (Established in 1886) W A L T E R R. E S H B A C H , INC. (Canvas and Awnings Since 1919) FISCHER FLOWERS (Established in 1876) B E N J . B. F O X (25 Years Electrical Contractor)

FRALINGER'S ORIGINAL SALT WATER TAFFY (EstabHshed in 1885) FRENCH'S PAINT STORE (Established in 1898) FREUND BROTHERS—OPTICIANS (Established in 1898) FRIEDEBERG'S JEWELERS (EstabHshed in 1890) C H A S . W. GALE, INC., I N S U R A N C E (EstabHshed in 1913) G E T T L E M A N F U R S , INC. (EstabHshed in 1914) ~ GINSBURG BAKERY (EstabHshed in 1915) H A R R Y G O D S H A L L , INC. (Insurance Since 1915) GROSSMAN'S KENSINGTON C A R P E T CO. (EstabHshed in 1912) G U A R A N T E E B A N K & T R U S T CO. (EstabHshed in 1900) H O M E ICE COMPANY (EstabHshed in 1913) J A M E S SALT W A T E R TAFFY (EstabHshed in 1880) K E N T S R E S T A U R A N T & B A K I N G CO. (EstabHshed in 1903) W A T S O N R. L E W I S & SON (Poultry, Butter and Eggs Since 1881) N A T H A N L E V I N F U R S , INC. (EstabHshed in 1910) J O H N A. M A J A N E — N E W S D E A L E R (EstabHshed in 1891) CITY O F M A R G A T E CITY (Incorporated in 1897) M. B. M A R K L A N D C O N T R A C T I N G CO. (Established in 1915) Page 18

J. V A U G H N M A T H I S (Architect Since 1905) T H E R. C. M A X W E L L CO. (Outdoor Advertising Since 1904) J O H N H M O O R E & SON (Plumbing Contractors Since 1899) PACKMAN BROTHERS (Wholesale Grocers Since 1912) PHILLIPS COMPANY (Real Estate and Insurance Since 1879) L O U I S ST. J O H N (Chairman, First P a g e a n t Judging)

SHREVE TRAVEL SERVICE
(EstabHshed in 1890) SAM S L O T O R O F F & S O N S , INC. (Men's and Boys' Clothing Since 1912) S O U T H J E R S E Y GAS CO. (EstabHshed in 1910) S O U T H J E R S E Y T R A N S F E R CO. (Established in 1919) G R A N V I L L E H. S T E E L M A N (Insurance Since 1904) STEELMAN'S LAUNDRY (Established in 1913) T I F F T , L A Y E R & CO. (Insurance Since 1920) T R I P I C I A N CANDY S T O R E (EstabHshed in 1900) W A L T E R D. U L L R I C H (Adjuster Since 1921) CITY O F V E N T N O R CITY (Incorporated in 1903) JOS. W A G E N H E I M CO. (Fine Meats and Poultry since 1912) W E S T S I D E L U M B E R CO. (Established in 1898) W I L S O N D A I R Y CO. (EstabHshed in 1877)

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AND SALUTE THE 25 TH.
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MISS

A M E R I C A

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Newspapers Started It All
While the history of the Miss America Pageant is recorded in full in this edition of the Year Book, it seems logical to relate a bit about the very first contest, how it came about and ho-.v it differs from the more modern version of a Miss America Pageant. Early In 1921, the circulation manager of the now-extinct Atlantic City Gazette-Review, the late Harry Finley, attended a meeting of Eastern circulation managers in Pennsylvania. Seeking ways to get new readers and more circulation for their papers, the delegates decided to run a series of "Popularity Contests" in their papers to pick the most popular young lady in their Individual cities. The grand prize was to be a vacation In Atlantic City. Finley returned to the resort and told the editorial department about the plan. That was when the late Herb Test, a better-tlian-average writer and likewise an astute reporter, suggested that if they were going to have a number of girls here at one time, the City should pick one as the be:t-of-tSe-crop in a bathing suit and call her Miss America. Thus, the Inter-City Beauty Contest was born. The idea took hold and plan: wore soon made for a Pageant In September of that year. There were a total of seven entries, not including Miss Ethel Charles of Atlantic City, who had been selected Miss Atlantic City via the popularity vote route. Other cities represented were Pittsburgh, Washington, Camden, N«w York, Ocean City, Harrisburg and Philadelphia. Miss Washington won. Louis St. John, then local manager for General Outdoor Advertising, was chairman of the first judges committee, that numbered, according to Mr. St. John, about 100 Important citizens. The event opened with an Arrival Parade on the Boardwalk, followed on successive days with a Baby Parade, an evening-gown competition in the ballroom of the old Garden Pier, a Bather's Revue on Steel Pier and a floral-decorated roller chair parade on the Boardwalk and finally a "Big Float Parade." Judges for the several parades were seated on a special platform erected in front of the old Steeplechase Pier. After compiling all their votes. Miss Washington, Margaret Gorman, came up with the top count for beauty in a bathing suit and the first Miss America title, with crowning ceremonies In the Million Dollar Pier ballroom. King Neptune was the official greeter of the beauties on their arrival, and. In the Bather's Revue, just about everybody but the local gendarmes wore bathing suits to add color. If little else, to the occasion. Imagine that event in 1921 and compare It with the spectacle you are witnessing in 1951. , , , It has come a long way, you'll have to admit.
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SEND SOUVENIR YEAR BOOK TO SERVICEMEN
A copy of this Anniversary be mailed to any serviceman Send check or Money Atlantic City. I'liit or Company; of Post Office. edition of the Miss America Year Book zvill Hall, Number;


Q\

or woman anywhere

in the world for only 50 cents. Year Book, Convention Name; Serial

Order to Miss America or Comparable

Be sure to designate Regiment

clearly—Grade;

Unit; APO

if overseas and name order.

Books zi'ill be sent immediately

upon receipt of

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Page 19

,S FAMOUS FOR ITS
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'STEAKS
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CHOPS! LOBSTERS

mooD
SPECIALTIES COCKTAIL LOUHGE
MIKE J. FIORE, MSR-

V

SUPERB FOOD FINE LIQUORS ENTERTAINMENT.
Ct^J-^

Your trip to Atlantic City is not complete without

HACKMEYiS
Boardwalk at Maine Ave ^ " ' ' • ' " " ^ ^ • - " • - / - "="-9 Cha,>W;ce R'9''t To the Door

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Thirty years have made a lot of changes in women's fashions as Is evidenced by this picture of the first Miss America Pageant contestants. By way of Identifications they are—left to right: "Miss Washington". Margaret Gorman (who became Miss America 1921); "Miss Pittsburgh", Thelma Mathews; "Miss Harrisburg", Emma Pharo; "Miss Ocean City". Hazel Harris; "Miss Camden", Kathryn Gearon; "Miss Atlantic City", Ethel Charles (Official Hostess); "Miss New York", Margaret Bates; and "Miss Philadelphia". Nellie Orr.

Page 20

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C A R O L M I T C H E L L makes her home in IndianapoHs, where she was born 21 years ago. Now a Senior at Indiana U., her talent is quite different than any of the other Pageant contestants, combining a chalk-talk sketch with two dancing marionettes. She was picked by American Magazine as Coed of the M o n t h last March and is a veteran on T V shows. Carol is 5-5, weighs 115 and has brown hair and blue eyes. Miss Indiana P a g e a n t directed by Lafayette Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Top Right.) S H I R L E Y L O U I S E B R Y A N T gets her mail at Norfolk, where she was born October 6, 1929. H e r schooling includes a diploma from high school and two years at WilHam and Mary's N o r folk branch. Beyond that she has had private lessons in voice and piano, and tap, toe and ballet dancing. She'll sing in the talent competition. Shirley stands 5-8, weighs 126 and has brown hair and blue eyes. She hopes for a theatrical career via a Scholarship. Miss Virginia P a g e a n t directed by Alpha Rho Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi, Norfolk. (Center Right.)

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K A T H R Y N R O S E C L A R K was born in LaCrosse, Wis., where she graduated from high school in 1948. Now a resident of Minneapolis where she attended the MacPhail School of Music for three years, K a t h r y n will offer a lyric dramatic soprano solo in the talent division. H e r training includes more than three years of voice and nine piano. H e r hobbies are reading and composing. She stands 5-7, weighs 128 and has dark brown hair and hazel eyes. Miss Minnesota Pageant directed by Excelsior P a r k Co., Minneapolis. (Lozver Right.)

D A R L E N E S H A F F E R first saw the Hght of day in Mission, S. D., graduated from high school in Sand Point, Idaho, and now makes her home in Seattle. While she has had eight years of ballet, she's been sewing since three and will model and display gowns she designed and made when she competes in talent. Swimming and water skiing are her favorite sports, and designing her hobby. She's 5 - 4 ^ , weighs 116 a n d has brown hair and green eyes. Miss W a s h i n g t o n P a g e a n t directed by Miss Washington State Pageant, Inc. (Center Below.)

G L E N D A J A N E " J A N I E " H O L C O M B started her journey to Atlantic City when she won the preliminary contest in her home town of Odessa. H e r monologue from J o a n of Arc, plus her personality and beauty won the state title two weeks later. At 19, J a n e is one of the outstanding dramatic students at Texas U., and hopes to duplicate the feat of another Texas girl, Jo Carroll Dennison, of Tyler, who was Miss America 1942. Texas Pageant directed by Texas Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Left Belozv.)

Page 21

Meet The Judges Who Will Pick Miss America 1952
Judging talent is a daily routine for Norwood Baker, She is in charge of the Arts Program of the Association of American Colleges and is responsible for selecting artists who appear in colleges. This marks her fourth year as a judge. One of America's most talented designers and the creator of the official Pageant gown being worn by Miss America, Ceil Chapman is serving her second year as a judge. She is as adept at judging as she is designing fashions for women. Mr, Coste is one of the nation's top advertising executives, being identified for 21 years with the Coca-Cola Co,, and instrumental in creating " T h e Pause That Refreshes", Now is director of advertising and head of marketing.
FELIX W . COSTE

NORWOOD BAKER

WILLIAM SELDEN

Director of Admissions and Assistant Dean of Students is the job William Selden fills at Northwestern U. He will be 40 Armistice Day, is married, has two sons, and prior to his present post was an assistant dean at both Princeton and Brown, One of America's foremost music critics, composers and commentators, Deems Taylor is serving his second year as a judge. Long associated with the N. Y. Philharnionic and author of "Men of Music", his fame is world-wide.

r^MMi^^

CEIL C H A P M A N

D E E M S TAYLOR

DxRESS UP YOUR WINDOWS!!
A Super-Attraction Wherever Shown!

P A N O R A M A PHOTOGRAPHS 1 9 5 1 PAGEANT BEAUTIES
(Size 40 inches long by 10 inches high) $2.50
Special Combination of Panorama of all contestants plus beautiful portrait of Miss America 1952, only $3.00 sent postpaid anywhere in United States.

VINTON FREEDLEY

Vinton Freedley is a graduate of Harvard and U. of Penna. Law School and was Marine Corps Captain World W a r I. After five years as actor, he turned to producing such hits as " L a d y Be Good", "Girl C r a z y " and a dozen others and is producer-host of the ANTA TV "Showtime U.S.A.". You may not recognize her by her married name of Mrs. Lawrence Kenney, but you will remember her as Frances Marie Burke, Miss America 1940. She is serving her first term as a judge, and knows what requirements are needed to be Miss America. Recognized as one of America's greatest portrait photographers, Hal Phyfe is serving his third year as a judge. Not only is he regarded as an expert in the photographic arts but in picking beauties as well.

CENTRAL STUDIOS
15 SOUTH VIRGINIA AVENUE
Official Photographsrt for Mist America Pageant

M^ubiic Service

Buses
TO

...

Playground Express Buses
PHILADELPHIA
Buses leave Bacharach Boulevard and Tennessee A v e n u e at 6:20 A M , 9:20 A M , 10:20 A M , 11:20 A M , 4:20 PM, 5:20 PM, 6:20 PM, 7:20 PM.
(42 Regular Daily Trips between Atlantic City and Philadelphia)

NEW YORK
Buses leave Bacharach Boulevard and Tennessee Avenue at 6:30 AM, (Men, Only) 7:00, 9:00, 11:00, Noon, 1:00 PM, 2:00 PM, 3:00 PM, 4:00 PM, 6:00 PM, 8:00 PM, Sun. Only 3:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30,8:30 PM.

FRANCES KENNEY

»1.75

$4.50

(Plus Tax)

(Plus Tax)

HAL P H Y F E

4.DAY R O U N D TRIP

R O U N D TRIP $2,50 ONE WAY (Plus Tax)

Lee Price, Jr., president of the U. S. J r . Chamber of Commerce is a lawyer, 33, blonde, over 6-foot and father of three children, including twins. Served with FBI and OSS during War. He makes his home in Swainsboro, Ga.
L E E PRICE, JR. Page 22

FAST, C O M F O R T A B L E

SERVICE

PUBLIC SERVICE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY

Do You Want To Be a Judge?

Pick Your Own Winner

(Names and D a t a on All Contestants elsewhere in this Book) Vote five points for your first choice, four for your second, t h r e e for your third, t w o for your fourth and one for your fifth. W r i t e in names of t h e five best in each of t h e Judging divisions and vote for them accordingly. Tally each division, then add up your votes in the Final Tally t o see how your judgment compares with t h e actual judges.

TALENT
Name
F I R S T CHOICE ( S Points) SECOND CHOICE (4 Points) T H I R D CHOICE (3 Points) FOURTH CHOICE (2 Points) F I F T H CHOICE (1 P o i n t ) ,

BATHING SUIT
Name
F I R S T CHOICE (5 P o i n t s ) SECOND CHOICE (4 P o m t s ) T H I R D CHOICE (3 P o i n t s ) FOURTH CHOICE (2 Points) F I F T H CHOICE (1 P o i n t )

PERSONALITY
Name
F I R S T CHOICE (5 Points) SECOND CHOICE (4 P o m t s ) T H I R D CHOICE (3 Points) FOURTH CHOICE (2 Points) F I F T H CHOICE (1 P o i n t )

EVENING GOWN
Name
F I R S T CHOICE (5 P o i n t s ) SECOND CHOICE (4 Points) T H I R D CHOICE (3 P o i n t s ) FOURTH CHOICE (2 Points)

Fii-TH CHOICE (1 Point)

IS YOUR CHOICE THE ONE WHO WON?
(Total AU Your Votes and Tally Below) Name WINNER - - (Total Points (Total Points (Total Points (Total Points (Total Points ) ) ) ) ) v Home Tozm or City

FIRST R U N N E R - U P SECOND R U N N E R - U P THIRD R U N N E R - U P FOURTH RUNNER-UP

Here's How Judges W i l l Select Miss America 1 9 5 2
There are three nights of Preliminary Judging. All contestants appear each evening. However, they are divided into three groups and one-third of them compete for Bathing Suit honors t h e first night, another one-third compete t h e same evening for Evening Gown honors, a n d t h e remaining one-third compete for Talent honors. At the conclusion of t h e third preliminary contest, votes will be tallied. T h e fifteen contestants with t h e highest number of votes will win at least a $1,0(X) Scholarship. T h e top 10 will then become semi-finalists, a n d compete in bathing suit, talent, evening gown and personality Saturday night. The semi-final judging follows almost t h e pattern for the preHminaries, except t h a t t h e 10 semi-final contestants will also be judged for personality on t h e basis of their stage appearances and the Judges' two breakfasts with all t h e contestants during t h e week. As t h e successive competitions proceed Saturday evening, t h e Judges cast separate ballots for the five most outstanding contestants in bathing suits, evening gowns, talent and most outstanding for their personality. Following this, judges cast new ballots a n d the five highest become finalists and from that group Miss America will be chosen. SCORING—Each Judge's vote will be scored in each classification for the contestants he chooses, both in t h e preliminaries and in t h e semi-finals Saturday night, using five points for Page 23 first choice, four points for second, three points for third, two points for fourth a n d one point for fifth choice of each Judge. T A B U L A T I O N — T h e points awarded by all of t h e Judges are added up for t h e score of each contestant. Thus, on Saturday night, each of t h e 10 semi-finahsts will be credited with all these points, added together for each of t h e four classifications then used. T h e effect of this is to give t h e following value to each of t h e four classifications: B a t h i n g Suit 2 5 % ; E v e n i n g Dress 2 5 % ; Talent 2 5 % ; Personality 25%. DETERMINATION O F WINNER AND RUNNERSU P — W h e n t h e five finalists a r e chosen, as above, by t h e J u d g e s ' votes a m o n g the 10 semi-finalists, all of t h e five finalists make appearances before t h e microphone on the stage. Then t h e Judges take a final, well-considered ballot, each Judge n a m i n g all five of his choice, in order, for Miss America. T h e points a r e scored in the same w a y as above, and Miss America is t h e contestant with t h e largest number of points on this final ballot. T h e runners-up in order a r e the contestants with t h e successively next number of largest points on this final ballot. In case of a tie for winner for a n y place, t h e Judges will be requested to vote again for those t w o Finalists only. This vote t o be simply for first choice between t h e t w o w h o have tied.

1951 PAGEANT GUARANTORS
ABBOTTS DAIRIES, INC. MR. AND MRS. PAUL L, AIKEN ALGAR'S MEN'S SHOP DR. AND MRS. DAVID B. ALLMAN THE AMBASSADOR HOTEL F. W. AMSTUTZ AMUSEMENT PUBLISHING CO, ATLANTIC CITY CARPET CLEANING WORKS ATLANTIC CITY ELECTRIC COMPANY ATLANTIC CITY LUMBER CO, ATLANTIC CITY SEWERAGE CO. AUSTIN FUEL CO, BATEMAN MOT«^'H CO. RALPH W. BATES MR. AND MRS. MORRIS BATZER BELL & COPE WALTER E. BEYER M. E. BLATT CO. (Department Store) ALEX J. BOLDUC - PAINTING CO. WILLIAM C. BOYER BREAKERS HOTEL J. BENJAMIN BRICK THE BRIGHTON BROOKS & IDLER (Printers) DR, J. CARLISLE BROWN JAMES N. BUTLER MR, AND MRS. J. HOWARD BUZBY MAJOR WILLIAM F. CASEY CENTRAL PIER CO, CHALFONTE-HADDON HALL MAYOR FRED V/. CHAPMAN (Somers Point) CHARNEY-S CHELSEA HARDWARE CO. CHILDS RESTAURANT CLARIDGE HOTEL, INC, HENRY L. COHEN COLTON MANOR HOTEL DEALERS LIQUOR COMPANY HOTEL DENNIS DORLAND ADVERTISING AGENCY ELDREDGE STORAGE ENDICOTT, DOWLING & ENDICOTT HON. FRANK S. JrHRi.EY CHARLES E. FELL FERRY CONSTRUCTION CO, FRANK D. FIORE C. W. FISCHER BENJ. B. FOX (Electrical Contractor) FRALINGER'S ORIGINAL SALT WATER TAFFY GARDEN STATE CONSTRUCTION CO, THOMAS L. GLENN HARRY GODSHALL, INCORPORATED FRANK P, GRAVATT OLE HANSEN & doNS, INC, H, W, HEMPHILL F, W, HOFFMAN < S CO., INC, HOLMHURST HOTEL HERBERT HORN HURLEY JONES CO, SAMUEL W, IRELAND DR, v . EARL JOHNSON MRS. GEORGE H. KEATES KENTS RESTAURANTS & RETAIL SHOPS KENTUCKY HOTEL MR. AND MRS. ELWOOD F, KIRKMAN KOHR BROS., INC. LAFAYETTE HOTEL SAMUEL I. LEOPOLD MR. AND MRS. JOHN LLOYD. JR. MARY LOUISE MAJANE MR, AND MRS. ALBERT A, F. McGEE GEORGE W. MACK TEDDY MACK MAEDALE DAIRIES, INC, E. A. MANN M, B, MARKLAND CONTRACTING CO, MARLBOROUGH-BLENHEIM HOTEL MASON CO., INC. MAYFAIR HOTEL, 15 S. Delaware Ave, THE MAYFLOWER CHARLES SUMWiia MOORE H, G, MYERS & CO, NEW CLARION HOTEL OZONE WATER COMPANY PACKMAN BROS. HOTEL PENN-ATLANTIC PEPSI-COLA BOTTT.ING CO, OF ATLANTIC CITY PHILLIPS COMPANY DANIEL E. REARDON THE RITZ-CARLTON SEASHORE SUPPLY CO. HOTEL SENATOR THE SHELBURNE SHILL ROLLING CHAIR CO. JOHN R. SIRACUSA A. H. SKEAN MR. AND MRS, EARL SMITH MR, AND MRS. W. SHAFFER SMITH JOSEPH SOLTZ PAINT STORE SOUTH JERSEY TITLE INSURANCE CO. MR. AND MRS. VERNON F. STANTON CAPT, C. W, STARN STERLING HOTEL WALTER D. ULLRICH VIENNA RESTAURANTS JOSEPH WAGENHEIM WALLACE OFFICE SUPPLY CO. MR, AND MRS, HUGH L, WATHEN WILSON DAIRY CO, EDWARD A, WILSON CO,

BEHIND THE FOOTLIGHTS WITH THE MISS AMERICA PAGEANT
She didn't originate the Miss America P a g e a n t ! In fact, when the P a g e a n t was born thirty years ago, Lenora Slaughter was a little blonde lass learning her ABC's in a St. Petersburg, Florida, grade school That, however, has nothing to do with the story of how she did a man's-sized job for the St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce up until 1935, when the P a g e a n t Committee heard about her ability and persuaded her to go to Atlantic City. H e r long study of the Miss America P a g e a n t told her that while it was a tremendous spectacle, a crowd-pleasing program that brought people to Atlantic City, and got hundreds of pictures of bathing girls in the newspapers, it still lacked something. It was a crack by a critic back in 1944 about "beauty but no brains" that started the Slaughter brain working overtime and within the next six months she had sold the idea of adding talent and intelligence to the requisites for competing for the L E N O R A S L A U G H T E R Miss America title. She went to work on setting up a Scholarship Foundation, and solicited five national manufacturing companies to contribute $1,000 each to make up a $5,000 educational fund for the 1945 Miss America. W h a t the Scholarships have done for the girls who have gone to Atlantic City to compete since then has been fully covered elsewhere, but it is safe to say that Miss Slaughter has proved to the world that beauty, brains and talent really make up the typical American girl—the girl the Miss America P a g e a n t is proud to present. No, she didn't originate the Miss America Pageant, but she's the gal behind the scenes in what is now the top event of its kind in the country. J. H O W A R D BUZBY, vicepresident of the Hotel Dennis, has been producer of the Miss J. H O W A R D B U Z B Y America Pageant for the past five years. During this time his artistic ability has been evidenced annually by the magnificent stage productions he has created and executed. His quiet and unassuming manner, as well as his gracious charm, has won the hearts of the contestants who work under his supervision Pageant Week. Mr. Buzby has been on the Board of Directors of the P a g eant for 15 years. H e served as President for two years and throughout his entire association with the P a g e a n t has been the guiding genius of all the stage productions, with each year seeming to be better than the one before, thanks to his very special talent for creating elaborate sets. J A N E T E S T H E R BARAB is "Miss Atlantic City in 1951", and while she doesn't compete in the P a g e a n t she is the envy of all Atlantic City young girls for she is not only the official hostess to the 51 vis.ting beauties but is | also Atlantic City's official "AmJ A N E T B.Al^AB bassadoress". She won a $1,000 Scholarship with her title to help her with her studies at Endicott, Mass., Junior College. Statistically, she's 5-4, 19 years old, brown hair and eyes and dark-complexioned, with singing and horseback riding as hobbies. Page 24

J E S S I E W Y N N M O R G A N is a native of Newton, Miss., and a Sophomore at Millsaps College. Sketching and designing are her hobbies, and she hopes for a scholarship to further her study of dramatics and ballet dancing. Jessie will be 19, October 15th, has dark brown hair, hazel eyes and an olive complexion. H e r favorite sport is swimming. T h e Mississippi Pageant was directed by the Pilot Club of Oxford. (Top Right.) L U LONG O G B U R N was born in Smithfield, N. C , on May 31, 1932. Now 19, she has already completed one year at Salem College in addition to 11 years of piano study together with additional voice and choral training. H e r ambition is to get a B.M. degree in music and to then study abroad. Lu L o n g stands 5-8)4, has brown hair and hazel eyes and a fair complexion. T h e N o r t h Carolina P a g e a n t was directed by the N. C. Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) P E G G Y A N N G I L B E R T hails from Rutland, where she graduated from high school a year ago. She has had special training in dancing and will combine her talented feet with a fine soprano voice in the talent competition. Now 19, she has brown hair and blue eyes plus a light complexion. H e r hobby is collecting records and her favorite sports are swimming and football. T h e Miss Vermont P a g e a n t was directed by the Burlington N«ws. (Lower Right.) P H Y L L I S C H A R L E N E R A L S T I N was born in Nezperce, Idaho, on June 24, 1932. After graduating from high school in 1950, she enrolled at the University of Idaho, where she completed her freshman year in June. Standing 5-4y, with medium brown hair and blue eyes, she'll offer a soprano solo in the talent competition. She has had a wealth of singing experience including solo and choir work in high school and college. Miss Idaho P a g e a n t directed by Boise Lions Club. (Center Belozv.) M A R Y E L I Z A B E T H G O D W I N was born in Elmira, N. Y., 19 years ago last April, and now makes her home in Gainesville when she is not attending college at the University of Florida, where she is a Sophomore. H e r talent consists of an uncanny pantomime presentation to a phonograph record. She stands S-Sy, is blonde and blue-eyed, and has photography, including dark room work, as a hobby. Miss Florida Pageant sponsored by State Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lower Left.)

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The Silver Anniversary of the Miss Americas
(Continued from Center Spread)

For every

Miss Annerica

now, though, there are

an

the most notable of these being Cloris Leachman of Chicago, who took her Scholarship money in 1946 to study piano in New York, discovered she liked acting better, and has since been featured in a number of Broadway stage hits for the past two years. In addition t o the $133,000 t h a t the Miss America

estimated 25,000 single girls between the ages of 18 and 28 who annually connpete in the more than 1,000 contests t h a t precede the national finals in A t l a n t i c C i t y . Some 50 of the original 25,000, however, D O go t o A t l a n t i c C i t y in Sep+ember and each is representative of the best that the home area can offer. Girls from 44 states, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Canada and the three metropolitan cities of New York, Chicago and Philadelphia, as well as the District of Columbia, compete, not only in the hopes of awarded runners-up. The Scholarship idea was the brain-child of Lenora becoming Miss America, but t o also make a bid for the scholarships

Pageant has poured into Scholarships through its sponsors during the past five years, an estimated $250,000 more has been contributed In State, district and local contests by sponsors who likewise feel if their winner has ambitions for a career—and it runs the gamut of all phases of the entertainment business and professional field — she should be given the chance t o realize those ambitions. A c t u a l reward for being Miss A m e r i c a , other than the year of reigning as the nation's t o p "queen", depends largely on the individual's ability. Some Miss Americas have made anywhere from $5,000 to $35,000 during their " t e r m in o f f i c e " , so t o speak. 21-year-old Yolande However, the current title-holder, Mobile, Alabama, who Betbeze, of

Slaughter, who was associated with the Pageant since its revival in 1935 and became its executive director in 1940. If a girl, she reasoned, had ambitions of furthering herself beyond the crown and gold-plated trophy t h a t goes with the title, something should be done about it. In 1945, her efforts t o make the t i t l e mean something more than just a title was rewarded when five manufacturers contributed $ 1,000 each to a $5,000 Scholarship for Miss America in return for endorsement privileges. First of the Scholarship winners was a tall brunette from New York C i t y — i n f a c t the tallest of all the Miss Americas to date, standing five-foot-ten. a pianist. The 1952 Miss America, who will succeed Yolande, will In 1946, the Scholarship Fund was upped t o $25,000, with Miss America still g e t t i n g $5,000, but the other four finalists g e t t i n g scholarships amounting to $3,000, $2,500, $2,000 and $1,500 respectively, with the next 10 finalists each receiving $1,000 scholarships. Another $1,000 Scholarship has been a d d e d and is f i n d t h a t if one were t o build a composite from the 23 young ladies who have worn the crown since Margaret Gorman first donned i t in 1921, she would be 5 ' - 6 ' / 2 " tall, weigh 124 pounds, have brown hair and blue eyes and be just 18 years and six months o l d . A n d , if she looks a t the record, she'll see t h a t 17 of the 23 have married, have a t o t a l of 18 children, and are even more beautiful today than when they were crowned Miss A m e r i c a . O n e thing seems certain—Miss America and beauty contests are here to stay—and, t o the average man who marFew of the Miss Americas have ever become great ries, the O N E he picks Is the most beautiful In the whole world. A n d what judge would dare argue that point with him? stars, but many of them have continued in the entertainment field even after marriage. Likewise many o f the most talented finalists continue their pursuit of stardom, one of She was Bess Myerson, a graduate of Hunter College at 2 ! and highly talented as

possesses a better-than-average voice and has the beauty and charm t o back it up, will probably t o p them all by the time she relinquishes her crown September 8th. Her regal jackpot has already reached the $50,000 mark In personal, appearance fees and gifts, carrying out a schedule that kept her on the go right up until September Ist, when she returned t o A t l a n t i c C i t y to reign over Pageant Week.

given annually but the Miss America judges cast no ballots. It is for Congeniality, and is v o t e d by the contestants themselves to the girl, who, in their combined been the most congenial during the week together in A t l a n t i c C i t y . opinions, has they spend

Page 26

G E R A L D I N E M A R I E E L S E M A N is 19, and a native of Omaha, where she graduated from South High in 1949. H e r favorite hobby is correspondence and favorite sport horseback riding. She stands 5-6, weighs 123 and has brown hair and blue eyes with medium dark complexion. H e r ambition is to become an accomplished actress and will give the P a g e a n t audience a sample of her dramatic ability. Miss Nebraska Pageant directed by the Baker Agency of Omaha. (Top Right.) S H E I L A M A R I E M U R P H Y was born in Mason City, Iowa, on Feb. 9, 1933, and now makes her home in Marshfield, Wis., where she graduated from high school last June. Standing 5-7, with blonde hair and green eyes. Sheila has ambitions for a career in either radio, television or merchandising. Swimming, horseback riding and skiing are her favorite sports. Miss Wisconsin Pageant directed by Milwaukee Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) C H A R L O T T E R O S A L I E S I M M E N is a native of Little Rock, Ark., the State Capital, and at 18 has already completed high school and a year at Little Rock Junior College. Painting and singing are her two hobbies, and she hopes for a Scholarship and more study in art and voice. She stands 5-7, weighs 130 pounds and has dark brown hair and eyes. Miss A r k a n s a s Pageant directed by East Arkansas Young Men's Club. (Lozifer Right.) P A T R I C I A J O A N M c G I N T Y was born in Sandpoint, Idaho, on May 9, 1930, and now makes her home in Great Falls, Montana. She attended Colorado W o m e n ' s College for two years and then returned to Montana and a diploma at Montana U. W i t h six years of voice training she will pit her mezzo-soprano voice against the other 50 contestants in the talent division. She's 5-7 with brown hair and blue eyes. Miss Montana Pageant directed by Montana State U. (Center Belozv.) B E R N I C E D O L O R E S M A S S I is only 18, and a graduate of Camden Catholic High, but she has already had two m o n t h s of singing experience in the Music Circus at Lambertville this Summer. H e r training includes three years of piano, two years organ and two years of dramatics. She stands 5-6, has dark brown hair and brown eyes and has swimming as her favorite sport and organ playing as a hobby. Miss New Jersey P a g e a n t directed by "Miss N. J. Pageant", Ocean City. (Left Belozv.)

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96 GIRLS HAVE RECEIVED MISS AMERICA PAGEANT SCHOLARSHIPS AT NATIONAL FINALS. OVER 500 GIRLS HAVE BENEFITED FROM SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED IN PRELIMINARY LOCAL AND STATE CONTESTS.
.Since 1945, when the Miss America Pageant inaugurated its scholarship program, ninety-six American girls have received educational scholarships amounting to $143,250.00 at the National Finals in Atlantic City. Each year these scholarships total $26,000, and at least seventeen national finalists benefit from the Miss America P a g e a n t Scholarship Foundation,
DR. GUY E, SNAVELY Exec, Director Assn, of American Colleges

Scholarships awarded annually at the National Finals include: MISS AMERICA 1st Runner-Up 2nd R u n n e r - U p 3rd Runner-Up 4th R u n n e r - U p Next Ten Finalists (each) Most Talented Non-Finalist Miss Congeniality $5,000 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 1,000 1,000

Scholarships range

from

The following Rules and Regulations govern the Scholarships: 1. Miss America and the other scholarship winners shall submit to the Scholarship Committee a statement of the type of education or training they wish to pursue and of the qualifications which fit them for such education or training. The statement of qualification shall be diplomas, certificates or letters from private teachers or school authorities. 2. Miss America and the other scholarship winners shall con-

$5,000 to $1,000 each.

Recipients of the

scholarships have been students at the leading colleges and universities in the Americas, as well as abroad.

Civic organizations, directing local and state contests over the Americas are today responsible for awarding another $75,000 annually in scholarships. These are distributed to winners and In 1950 alone, two preliminary scholarships in runners-up in local and state pageants. hundred American girls received

fer with the Scholarship Committee to discuss their plans and to receive guidance in the choice of schools or private teachers. 3. The Scholarship Committee shall approve of the schools They shall submit evidence that they will

contests a m o u n t i n g to $75,000 thus swelling the total scholarships in one year awarded Miss America contestants to over $100,000, with 218 girls benefiting from same. Today, the Miss America P a g e a n t and its cooperating civic organizations sponsoring local and state contests, can proudly claim the largest scholarship foundation for girls in the world. T h e reigning Miss America, Yolande Betbeze, formerly Miss Alabama 1950, was the winner of the State contest which awarded the largest number of scholarships in local and state contests in the country. $12,500 in scholarships to leading Alabama colleges and universities, as well as conservatories of music and dramatic schools were made available to Alabama girls competing for the Miss Alabama title. As Miss America was the 6. The use of the Scholarships must begin within six months from the date of the award, with the exception of Miss America, vfho must begin the use of her Scholarship within one year from the date of the award. ScholarAny vrinner who does not use the Scholarship within above designated time shall forfeit her T h e guiding genius of the Miss America Pageant claim to the Scholarship and shall receive, in cash, one-fifth of the amount of her Scholarship in full payment. 7. Miss America and the other scholarship winners shall If a ship Foundation is Dr. Guy E. Snavely, Executive Director of the Association of American Colleges, who serves as National Counselor of the Foundation. H e has served in this capacity since the inauguration of the Foundation in 1945, and is ever ready and willing to assist civic leaders directing state pageants, as well as the national directors of the Miss America Pageant. His untiring work in assisting scholarship winners with plans for their education and his loyalty to the ideals upon which the Miss America P a g e a n t is operated, are largely responsible for the success story the pageant represents today. recipient of a $5,000 scholarship from the national foundation, she graciously released her Alabama scholarship to a runnerup in her state contest, thus opening the door for a college education to a less fortunate Alabama girl. or private teachers chosen by Miss America and the other scholarship winners. be accepted by the schools or private teachers selected, 4. The Scholarships shall be expended for tuition, room, The allowance for room and board will be

board and supplies.

discontinued if the recipient marries. 5. The money is to be paid in accordance with the needs of

the recipients of the Scholarships based upon the type of education they pursue, and at the discretion of the Scholarship Committee.

submit quarterly reports to the Scholarship Committee. ship is automatically cancelled.

period of six months elapses without such reports the scholarTraining under the scholarship must b.<; continuous, and completed within four years from the date of entering upon the courses, 8. Any unused portion of the Scholarships shall revert t o the

Miss America Schclarship Fund.

Page 28

R U T H D I A N E H O W E L L was born 22 years ago in Apple Creek, O., and still makes her home there. Before graduating from Baldwin-Wallace College, she appeared in a number of school plays, has had eight years of piano study and two of voice and will be a high school teacher this Fall. She's 5-5, weighs 114 and has brown hair and eyes. H e r hobbies are piano playing and singing. Miss Ohio P a g e a n t directed by Mentor Beach Business Assn. (Top Right.) M A R L E N E M A R G A R E T R I E B is the 19-year-old daughter of Dr. and Mrs. William Rieb of Parkston, S. D. While she's had nine years of piano training her main interest is baton twirling, at which she's both expert and likewise a teacher. She's 5-7, blonde and brown-eyed, and hopes to become a physician like her illustrious father. Following her Sophomore year at S. Dakota U., will take a pre-med course. Miss S. Dakota Pageant directed by Hot Springs C. of C. (Center Right.) D O T T Y E N U C K O L S , is a native of Bowling Green and last Fall reigned as queen of the E a s t - W e s t All S t a r Football game. A Junior at W e s t e r n State, Dottye is 5-4, has brown hair and blue eyes and weighs 115. H e r hobbies are art and horseback riding, and she has ambitions of a singing career, aided by completion of her college studies. Miss Kentucky Pageant directed by Owensboro Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lozver Right.) G E O R G I A R E E D claims Baltimore as her birthplace and home. Besides graduating from Seton H. S. in 1949, she has had three years of vocal training, 12 years of dancing and a year of dramatic training. H e r hobby is writing poetry and her favorite sport ice-skating. She is 5-6, weighs 122 and has light brown hair and blue eyes. Miss Maryland P a g e a n t directed by Maryland Jr, Chamber of Commerce, (Center Belozv.) A U D R E Y A N N M I S T R E T T A was born in Long Beach, Cal., but has spent most of her 18 years in Astoria, Ore., where she graduated from high school last June, H e r ambition is to become a voice teacher via study in voice to help further develop her contralto voice. She is 5-8, weighs 129 pounds and has dark hair and eyes. P h o t o g r a p h y and swimming are her hobbies. Miss Oregon P a g e a n t directed by Seaside Chamber of Commerce. (Left Below.)

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Page 29

FIRST...

IN HEALTH and PLEASURE TOPS. , , IN FINEST HOTELS

For more than 96 years Atlantic City has been serving the peoples of not only America but the world at large as a health spa, a haven for rest, on unexcelled vacation center. Behind its unexcelled beach , , , its famous Boardwalk , , , its wonderful climate , , , stands an elaborate monument to the comfort and service of the millions who come here each year to work in convention, to recuperate their health, to enjoy hundreds of unsurpassed vacation hours. This monument, dedicated to the service of these millions, is the hotel industry of Atlantic City, exemplified by the hotels listed here now, and always, AT YOUR SERVICE!

AMBASSADOR
Boardwalk at Stenton Place

DENNIS
Boardwalk at Michigan Ave.

NEW BELMONT
1317 Boardwalk

BELVEDERE
157 S. South Carolina Ave. BREAKERS at New Jersey

DRAKE
S. Carolina and Pacific Aves. FLANDERS 127 St. J a m e s Place HOLMHURST 121 S, Pennsylvania Ave, JEFFERSON 136 S. Kentucky Ave, KENTUCKY 126 S. Kentucky Ave, LAFAYETTE 109 S. N o r t h Carolina Ave. LEXINGTON New Y o r k Ave. near Boardwalk MADISON 123 S, Illinois Ave. MARLBOROUGH-BLENHEIM Boardwalk at Ohio Ave, MAYFAIR 15 S. Delaware Ave. MAYFLOWER Boardwalk at Tennessee Ave, MONTICELLO 131 S. Kentucky Ave. MORTON 150 S. Virginia Ave.

NEW CLARION
151 S. Kentucky Ave.

PENN-ATLANTIC
1219 Bacharach Blvd.

Boardwalk

Ave.

BRIGHTON Boardwalk at Indiana Ave. BOSCOBEL S. Kentucky

PRESIDENT
Boardwalk at Albany Ave.

PRINCESS
Ave. 144 S. South Carolina Ave,

125

BYRON 120 S. Kentucky Ave. CAROLINA CREST 134 S. N o r t h Carohna Ave. C H A L F O N T E - H A D D O N HALL Boardwalk at N o r t h Carolina Ave. CHELSEA Boardwalk at Morirs Ave, CLARENDON 118 S, Virginia Ave. CLARIDGE Boardwalk at P a r k

RITZ-CARLTON
Boardwalk at Iowa Ave,

ROYAL PALMS
126 S. Maryland Ave.

SENATOR
S. South Carolina Ave. at Boardwalk

SHELBURNE
Boardwalk at Michigan Ave.

ST, CHARLES
Boardwalk at St. Charles Place

STERLING
144 S. Kentucky Ave.

Place

COLTON MANOR 110 S. Pennsylvania Ave. COSMOPOLITAN 3850 Atlantic Ave. CRILLON Pacific & Indiana Aves.

STRAND
Boardwalk at Pennsylvania Ave,

WATER GAP
127 S, South Carolina Ave,

WORTHINGTON
2200 Pacific Ave,

Page 30

MISS

J E A N N E V A U G H N T H O M P S O N is a native of Opclousas, Miss., and now lives in Baton Rouge. She'll be 20, December 7th while a Senior at Louisiana U. Jeanne stands 5 - 7 ^ , has brown hair and eyes and will offer an inspirational dance of the Louisiana swampland in the talent part of P a g e a n t competition. Her special training includes piano, modeling and French and Modern Art. T h e Miss Louisiana P a g e a n t was directed by the Northeast Louisiana Sports Carnival Association. (Top Right.) D O R I S M A E K I N G is a product of Harvey, Illinois, and will be 19 on December 15th. H e r special training has been in writing, modeling and drama, with 12 years of dancing in addition. W i t h brown hair and eyes, she stands 5-4 and tips the scales at 115. Swimming and horseback riding are her favorite pastimes, and she hopes for a scholarship to further her dance and drama studies. Miss Illinois P a g e a n t directed by Illinois Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Center Right.) C O L L E E N K A Y H U T C H I N S was 25 last May 23rd, and claims Los Angeles, Calif., as her birthplace. Now living in Salt Lake City, she is a scholarship student at the Graduate School of the University of Utah, where she played the lead role in two college plays this year. Standing 5-10, blonde and blue-eyed. Colleen hopes to further her education at the American Academy of Music. T h e Miss U t a h P a g e a n t directed by Utah State Fair Assn. (Center Right.) B E V E R L Y R O S E M A R Y B U R L A N T was born in Bridgeport, J a n u a r y 8, 1932. For the past two years she has been a student at Bridgeport U., to add to her five years of piano, eight years of dancing, two years of modeling and a year of drama study. She's S-Sy, has black hair and brown eyes, weighs 118 and has sewing and designing as hobbies. H e r favorite sport is football Miss Connecticut P a g e a n t directed by the Alfred Agency. (Center Below.) B O B B Y J E N E S I M M O N S calls Oklahoma City home, and at 18, has had eight years of voice and music, which fits her ably for the lyric soprano solo she'll offer in the Pageant talent competition. Bobby stands 5-5, weighs 120 and has brown hair and eyes. H e r favorite sport is swimming and her hobbies include oil painting. Will be Sophomore at Oklahoma U. this Fall. Miss Oklahoma P a g e a n t directed by Oklahoma State Jr. Chamber of Commerce. (Lower Left.) Page 31

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MISS

Two Great Leaders in Industry Sponsor Miss America Scholarship Fund
T h e Miss America Pageant, and its local and state contest sponsors, are proud to have the support and endorsement of two stalwart leaders of American Industry, who have made possible the 1951 Miss America Scholarship Fund of $26,000. W . R. M a c l n t y r e heads the great Bancroft Corporation, creators of the famous "Everglaze" as well as scores of other crease-resisting fabrics. Back in 1945 Mr. M a c l n t y r e joined the Scholarship P r o g r a m because he was convinced that the ambition for education and personal advancement by young American girls is a program that should be furthered. George W . Mason, President of Nash-Kelvinator Corp., who manufacture the popular Nash line of automobiles, joined the Scholarship Foundation in 1948. H e has enthusiastically supported the program for four years, in addition to awarding Miss America a custom-made Nash each year.

W. RALPH MacINTYRE President Joseph Bancroit & Sons, Co. Wilmington, Del,

GEORGE W. MASON President Nash-Kelvinator Coip, Detroit, Mich,

ATLANTIC CITY HOSTESS COMMITTEE CHAPERONE CONTESTANTS AT NATIONAL HNALS
Sixty-five of Atlantic City's most prominent and gracious women put aside their private lives P a g e a n t week, to serve as official chaperones to the visiting Miss America Contestants, They also serve as hostesses to mothers and appointed state visiting cha})erones. An Atlantic City hostess accompanies each contestant every time she walks out of her hotel, whether to keep a reheasal date, to make a civic appearance, meet the press and newsreel, or to perform in the world famous Convention Hall. She protects her charge from all annoying contacts, which might hinder her progress or distract her attention from the primary objective she is seeking—a scholarship or the title of Miss America. No one is permitted an interview with a contestant without her hostess present to protect her interest, and at no time is a contestant permitted to enter a cocktail lounge or partake of an intoxicating beverage. It is also a "manless week", for members of the male sex are not permitted to talk to contestants except with the permission, and in the presence of their hostesses. This includes relatives, sponsors, even fathers and brothers. And, who approves most of these rules? The contestants and their parents, who form lasting friendships with their hostesses during P a g e a n t week.

The Miss A mericas
0
1921—Margaret Gorman. Washington, D. C 1922-23—Mary Campbell, Columbus, Ohio 192-^—Ruth Malcolmson, Philadelphia, Pa 1925—Fay Lamphier, Oakland, Calif 1926—Norma Smallwood, Tulsa, Okla 1927—Lois Delander. Joliet, III 1933—Marion Bergeron, West hiaven. Conn 1935—Henrietta Leaver, Pittsburgh, Pa 1936—Rose Coyle, Philadelphia, Pa 1937—Bette Cooper, Bertrand Island, N. J 1938—Marilyn Meseke, Marion, Ohio • 1939—Patricia Donnelly, Detroit, Mich |940_Frances Marie Burke, Philadelphia. Pa 1941—Rosemary LaPlanche, Los Angeles, Calif 1942—JoCarroll Dennison. Tyler, Texas 1943—Jean Bartel, Los Angeles, Calif 1944—Venus Ramey, Washington, D. C 1945—Bess Myerson, New York City 1946—Marilyn Buferd, Los Angeles, Calif 1947—Barbara Jo Walker, Memphis. Tenn 1948—BeBe Shopp. Hopkins, Minn 1949—Jacque Mercer, Litchfield, Ariz 1951—Yolande Betbeze, Mobile, Ala COMPOSITE

in

R eview
30 35 34 35 33 33 32 33 34 32 34^ 36 34 34 34 36 36^ 35^ 35^ 35 37 34 35 35^ 25 26 25 26 25 25 26^^ 23 23^ 26 26 25 23 24 22 23 25 25 25^ 25 27 22 24 25% 32 36 34 37 34 34 37^ 35i/4 34^ 36 35^ 34 35 36 34^ 35 37^ 35 36 35 36 34 35 35 y 13 13 13^ 13 13 13 y 13 13 13 13 13 14 13^ 13 13 14^ 13^ 13 I4J^ I3>:+ 13^ 13^^

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Page 32

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September 3td to 8tli

MISS

AMERICA

1951

and

the

fabulous

EVERGLAZE* Cotton

Satin

Miss America's j e w e l e d m e d a l l i o n was c r e a t e d by M . Balmain f o r the 2,000th birthd a y o f Paris. It was presented t o her by M . Balmain to commemorate her appointment as Special Envoy from the United States by the Bi-Millenaire Committee.
* A trade-mark signifying fabric finished and tested occording to processes and standards controlled and prescribed by Jdsepti Bancroft & Sons C o .

The 1951 Pageant Gown was especially designed and created in Paris for Miss America, Yolande Betbeze, by the famous designer, Pierre Balmain. The luxurious fabric is white cotton satin, hand-stencilled in j * gold—"Everglaze"—one of a broad group of fabrics distinguished for
r

/

their lasting beauty, washability and wrinkle-resistance.

- -

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