KADOKA PRESS

The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 46
May 30, 2013
Memorial Day 2013
paying tribute to those who served
Memorial Day services were held in Belivdere on Monday, May 27. Presenting the colors at the cemetery are Glenn Freeman (L) who served in the US Navy, Bud Perault who servied in the US Navy, Ted Vobr who served in the US Army, Tojo Osborn who
served in the US Army, and while Bob Bork played “Taps.” Flags were also placed on the graves of the soliders who have passed on.
“Scrappy” returned to South
Dakota on Sunday, May 25 and will
now make his home at Discount
Fuel.
Sculptured by Brett and Tammy
Prang of Incredible Metal,
“Scrappy” has had quite a trip to fi-
nally.
He was commissioned by Gene
and Ruth Lehmann, who are from
near Kerrville, Texas. Gene’s inten-
tions were for “Scrappy” to be
placed at the Kerrville High
School, where he and several of his
family members graduated from.
“Scrappy” was the high school mas-
cot for the Kerrville Antlers.
Gene commissioned him from
the Prangs and donated him to the
school. The school chose to not
place him at the school because of
liability issues, so they decided to
put him up for auction. The Prangs
contacted some art investors who
might be interested in him and
traveled to Texas to attend the auc-
tion.
The Prangs were able to pur-
chase “Scrappy” for Discount Fuel
owners, Mark and Tammy Carlson.
“Scrappy” is 17 feet tall and like
several other large art pieces sculp-
tured by the Prangs, a South
Dakota license plate is included,
which they were fortunate enough
to find from a gentleman in the
eastern part of South Dakota, who
uses the name scrappy on his li-
cense plate. Also included is the
Frying Pan Ranch brand, which is
the name of Prang’s ranch and has
been in Brett’s family for four gen-
erations.
“Scrappy” comes home to South Dakota
Brett Prang adjusts “Scrappy” after arriving back home in Kadoka, who will now
make his home at Discount Fuel. --photo by Robyn Jones
Compiled of many items, “Scrappy” is one of the several large art scupltures cre-
ated by Brett and Tammy Prang of Incredible Metal. He has traveled many miles
and has found his way back to South Dakota.
What appears to be snow along I-90 west of Belvidere is really hail that came on
the evening of May 27. --photos by Robyn Jones
See the answers on page 9
Suduko
Church Page …
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
Letter to the Editor
Obituaries
Upcoming Area Events …
Jackson-Kadoka Econmic Development Corp. will hold their
monthly meeting on Tuesday, June 4 at 7 p.m. at the Gateway Apart-
ments Community Room.
June 1 Kadoka city wide rummage sales.
KCBA will meet on June 6 at 6:30 p.m. at Club 27.
Jackson County Commissioners will met on Monday, June 10 at
9 a.m.
Kadoka City Council will hold their monthly meeting on Monday,
June 10 at 7 p.m.
Read 1 John 5:13-15
The Father has provided the Holy Spirit to teach His
children about His will for their lives (John 14:26). Why,
then, do we have difficulty understanding what the plan
is?
We make decisions based on emotion. When life presses in on us, our instinct is to move away from the
source of stress or pain. At such times, our need to remove difficulties and turmoil from our life can take
precedence over the Lord’s plan. We figure He could not possibly want us to feel this way, so we take action
and then hope that we are in His will. Our emphasis is on ourselves rather than on God’s purposes.
We focus only on the immediate. Many times we come to the Lord troubled about the choices we or our
loved ones are facing. We do not see how this situation could possibly be His will. Our short-term focus pre-
vents us from seeing God’s long-term purposes.
We conduct a superficial search. In our desire for an answer, we can fall into a trap and treat finding
God’s will like a checklist—read the Bible, pray, fast, serve, worship, give. Then, satisfied with what we have
done, we press the Lord for His answer now. But we have neglected to give God the time and stillness needed
for us to hear from Him (Ps. 46:10). Investing time with our Creator is a necessity, not a luxury, and listening
to Him without distractions is essential.
How much Bible study is required to find out what our heavenly Father wants for us? What amount of
prayer? What quantity of time? The answer is simple: Whatever it takes to hear from God. He will answer.
The question is, Will we wait?
Why We Miss God’s Will
Inspiration Point
Kadoka Press
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Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
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PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Robyn Jones
Graphic Design/News Writing/Photography: Rhonda Antonsen
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
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the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
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Rosie Lejeune, age 94, of Philip,
S.D., died May 23, 2013, at the
Hans P. Peterson Memorial Hospi-
tal in Philip.
Rosie Plasschaert was born De-
cember 21, 1918, in Tracy, Minn.,
the daughter of Richard and
Pauline (Lee) Plasschaert. Rosie
grew up in South Dakota, where
she attended rural schools around
the Philip area, before attending
Philip High School, graduating in
1936.
Rosie was united in marriage to
William “Bill” Humphrey in Philip.
They made their home in various
places in South Dakota while Bill
worked on various ranches. In
1964, they moved to Bakersfield,
Calif., where Rosie had various jobs
throughout the years.
Her husband, Bill, preceded her
in death in 1967. Rosie continued
to remain in Bakersfield after his
death.
In 1981, Rosie was united in
marriage to Elgie Lejeune. They
made their home in Bakersfield,
where Rosie worked as a clerk for
the court systems. Elgie passed
away in 1998.
In 2009, Rosie moved to Philip to
be near her sister, Marie Hansen
and her family, where she has since
resided.
Survivors include her son James
“Jim” Humphrey and his wife,
Nancy, of Eureka, Nev.; three
grandchildren Scott Humphrey
and his wife, Teri, of Burnt Ranch,
Calif., Nancy Mondonca and her
husband, Ben, of Newman, Calif.,
and Jody Freitas and her husband,
Vic, of Newman; three great-grand-
children, Jenna Vanderziel and her
husband, Jeremy, of Bakersfield,
Calif., Jaimee Humphrey of Bak-
ersfield, and Clay Freitas of New-
man; several nieces and nephews;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
In addition to her first husband,
Bill, and her second husband,
Elgie, Rosie was preceded in death
by her parents; one brother,
Richard Plasschaert; one sister,
Marie Hansen; and one sister in in-
fancy, Alice Ruth Plasschaert.
Memorial services will be held at
2:00 p.m. Saturday, June 8, at the
United Church in Philip, with Pas-
tor Kathy Chesney officiating.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Rosie Lejeune___________________
Phyllis Kochersberger, age 59, of
Philip, S.D., died May 25, 2013, at
her home in Philip.
Phyllis Ann Eisenbraun was
born October 12, 1953, in Wall, the
daughter of Martin C. and Adella
(Schwarting) Eisenbraun. She
grew up in Wall, graduating from
Wall High School in 1971.
Phyllis was united in marriage
to Larry Kochersberger on April 24,
1971, in Wall. After their marriage
they made their home in Philip,
where she worked numerous jobs
in the area. She then began work-
ing at Dakota Case and later
Scotchman Industries, where she
worked for the last 24 years.
Family was most important to
Phyllis, and she also enjoyed work-
ing in the yard, puzzles, reading
and being home.
Survivors include her husband,
Larry, of Philip; one son, Alan
Kochersberger, of Philip; one
daughter, Amy Kittelson and her
husband, Scott, of Murdo; four
grandchildren, Rachel, William
“Willy” and Lane Kochersberger,
and Kamri Kittelson; one great-
grandson, Camo; two brothers,
Martin Eisenbraun of Webster and
Roger Eisenbraun and his wife, Va-
lerie, of Morrison, Colo.; two sis-
ters, Ida Neiffer of Custer and
Dorothy Jensen and her husband,
Dale, of San Antonio, Texas; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Phyllis was preceded in death by
her parents, Martin C. and Adella
(Schwarting) Eisenbraun; five
brothers, Bernard, LeRoy, Robert,
Alan and Leonard Eisenbraun; and
two sisters, Evelyn Fuerstenau and
Mary Ballistreri.
Memorial services were held
Wednesday, May 29, at the Ameri-
can Legion Hall in Philip.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
A memorial has been estab-
lished.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Phyllis Kochersberger______________
James “Jimmie” Dean, age 86, of
Rapid City, formerly of Philip, S.D.,
died Monday, May 27, 2013, at the
Hospice of the Hills in Rapid City.
James “Jimmie” Dean was born
May 26, 1927, in Philip, the son of
John “Jack” and Helen (Poste)
Dean. He grew up on a farm-ranch
in the Grindstone area northwest
of Philip. He attended Dean Rural
School in that area. He worked on
his parents’ farm-ranch until mov-
ing into Philip in the late 1940s.
While in Philip, he played the
drums for a local band. In the mid-
1970s he moved to Rapid City
where he worked and stayed at the
Black Hills Workshop, where he
has since resided.
Survivors include his brother,
Raymond Dean of Rapid City; his
sister, H. Lucile Peterson of Philip;
a sister-in-law, Florence Dean of
Philip; many nieces and nephews;
and a host of other relatives and
friends.
Jimmie was preceded in death
by his parents; and one brother,
Fay Dean.
Services will be held at 10:00
a.m. Friday, May 31, at the United
Church in Philip with Pastor
Kathy Chesney officiating.
Interment will be at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements are with Rush
Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
James “Jimmie” Dean______________
Laura Morgan, age 102, of
Philip, S.D., died Tuesday, May 28,
2013, at her son’s home in Billings,
Mont.
Survivors include five sons, Ger-
ald Glen Morgan and his wife,
Gladys, of Rapid City, Philip Dale
Morgan and his wife, Nanette, of
Billings, Mont., Edward Samuel
Morgan and his wife, Bonnie, of
Miller, Kent Homer Morgan and
his wife, Twila, of Billings, and
Keith Lauren Morgan and his wife,
Norlene, of Billings; two daughters,
Connie Mae Parsons and her hus-
band, Bill, of Milesville, and Kyle
Elaine Taylor of Gillette, Wyo.; sev-
eral grandchildren, great-grand-
children, and great-great-grand-
children; and a host of other
relatives and friends.
Laura was preceded in death by
her husband, Homer; her son, Paul
Allen Morgan; a great-grandson,
Kirk Michael Parsons; a sister,
Mabel Ireland; two daughters-in-
law, Mary Morgan and Lorraine
Morgan; and one son-in-law, Fred
Taylor.
Funeral services are pending
with Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
A full obituary will appear in
next week’s paper.
Laura Morgan__________________
Commoditization of the United
States cattle industry
I recently read a report by one of
our cattle market analysts, who
tried to identify what issues and/or
policies had damaged the cattle in-
dustry the most. Great question ...
with an exploding population that
needs to feed itself, one would cer-
tainly wonder why the United
States cattle industry is contract-
ing.
The analyst identified two such
issues, but he also exposed the ex-
tremes that such folks as himself,
certain industry groups, and some
of our more social media will go to
distort the facts and create smoke
screens to accomplish their social-
istic agenda. The article states that
“mandatory country of origin label-
ing (COOL) for fresh meat prod-
ucts” has “added billions of dollars
of costs to the livestock and meat
industry.” WOW – billions! Some-
body needs to tell him that COOL
has only been in effect since 2009
and that even the packers and re-
tailers couldn't come up with a fig-
ure that ridiculous.
Then he goes on to say that the
blame for COOL lies squarely with
a “tiny minority of livestock pro-
ducers.”
These are the same tactics used
by our monthly Beef Enquirer-like
publications that we get for free to
create public record to try and
show a lack of producer support.
The problem is that – when you
look at all the local and state Farm
Bureau, Farmers Union and cattle-
men's groups – you will find over-
whelming producer support for
mandatory COOL.
He then goes to say, “Surveys
showed consumers didn't care
about labeling.” WOW, I believe
what we have seen reported is just
the opposite with multiple surveys
showing consumer support for
COOL.
And then he finishes up by say-
ing that USDA (United States De-
partment of Agriculture) “changes
will only increase discrimination
against foreign born livestock.” Not
sure what changes he’s talking
about, but the ones submitted by
USDA to come into WTO (World
Trade Organization) compliance
are designed to reduce the discrim-
ination practice yielded by U.S.
packers in an effort to kill COOL. I
still think what the packers did
bordered on anti-competitive and
discriminatory practices ... a heck
of a thing to witness in this coun-
try.
I point this out on COOL not be-
cause I believe anyone really buys
into these distortions, as we all un-
derstand the extremes these folks
will go to and certainly they have
lost their credibility with the aver-
age U.S. cattle producers. Rather, I
point this out because these are the
same people and groups that told
you in the late ’80s and the ’90s
that you need to learn to compete
in a global market; however, they
oppose you identifying your prod-
uct. They also told you that your
competition was poultry and pork
and not imports.
That’s interesting, because it
was recently announced that the
National Pork Producers Council
and the Cattlemen's Beef Board
have been working in partnership
for nearly two years to provide
more “consumer-friendly” names
for 350 new and older cuts of beef
and pork under URMIS (Uniform
Retail Meat Identity Standards)
with some of the pork cuts adapt-
ing beef names. Now while some of
this appears good, other changes
have the potential to reduce and
confuse beef sales. For example, no
longer is it just pork chops; now it
will be ribeye chops, porterhouse
chops, and New York chops. So
when the young housewife walks
up to the meat counter to buy a
“ribeye” for her loved one, she will
be asked by the meat retailer, “pork
or beef?” She may then very well
ask the perceived professional,
“What do you suggest?”
I imagine the response by the re-
tailer will depend on which product
gives him the most profit, along
with his own biases.
I understand why the pork folks
went for this, but here’s the prob-
lem for U.S. cattle producers.
These meat cut names, while not
trademarked brand names, act
very much like brand names for the
beef/cattle industry. Consumers are
familiar with these terms in beef
and relate those names to such
things as flavor, tenderness and
quality. Historically, consumers
have made decisions based on
these names, they have become the
brand-like name of each cut, and
you don’t conspire to let your com-
petitor use your brand name!
It is well understood that brand
names simplify shopping and aid in
processing of information about
products; however, these types of
changes complicate meat buying
decisions for consumers and com-
promise beef ’s ability to separate
itself in the animal protein market
and promote itself. As the EBAC
noted, “People recognize brand and
attach a certain intrinsic value to
the product because of its name”
like ribeye, New York, porterhouse,
T-bone – those names kind of make
your mouth water, don’t they?
Another marketing expert goes
on to say, “Do NOT underestimate
the power of name brands. This
power can be so compelling to your
buyers that they may be blinded to
all other purchase considerations.”
But not now, not with beef. No won-
der Patrick Fleming of the Na-
tional Pork Board said it will aid
the consumer’s “decision-making
on pork by adapting beef nomencla-
ture for pork.” In other words, they
will sell more pork ... at beef ’s ex-
pense.
So, as we look to answer the
question of what issues and/or poli-
cies have done the most damage to
U.S. cattle herd, I would have to
say the destructionist trade policies
of some of our industry groups and
our social media, who have had no
problem sacrificing U.S. producers
for trade liberalization, as well as
the social commoditization and
standardization of our industry
and the fading product identity in
the animal protein domestic and
global market; instead of concen-
trating on differentiating between
our products, we are blurring the
lines.
/s/ Leo McDonnell
Note: Leo McDonnell ranches in
Montana and North Dakota and
helped to grow the family business,
Midland Bull Test at Columbus,
Mont., into the largest genetic cat-
tle performance test in North
America.
Monday, June 3
Pork chops in gravy, brown rice,
broccoli, cranberry juice, dinner
roll and mixed fruit in pudding.
Tuesday, June 4
Roast beef, mashed potatoes and
gravy, glazed carrots, bread and
strawberries and bananas.
Wednesday, June 5
Lasagna, green beans, coleslaw,
french bread and melon.
Thursday, June 6
Oven fried chicken, potato salad,
mixed vegetables, bread and apri-
cots.
Friday, June 7
Salmon loaf, oven browned pota-
toes, tomato spoon salad, bread
and pears.
Meals for
the Elderly
Kadoka Baseball Schedule
“B” Games at 5:30 p.m. “A” Game to follow.
Tues., June 11 at home with Philip
Thurs., June 13 at Murdo
Tues., June 18 at home with Wall
Thurs., June 20 at Philip
Tues., June 25 at Wall
Thurs., June 27 at home with Murdo
Tues., July 2 at home with Philip
Tues., July 9 at Murdo
Thurs., July 11 at home with Wall
Thurs., July 18 & Sat., July 20
League Tournament at Kadoka
Belvidere & Norris News …
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
Norris News
Marjorie Anne Letellier - 462 6228
Belvidere News
Syd Iwan • 381-2147
Email your news, photos
and classified ads to:
press@kadokatelco.com
editor@kadokatelco.com
BELVIDERE BAR
344-2210
ATM
Hours
Monday - Thursday
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
9 a.m. to Midnight
Sunday
1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Belvidere Store
Open Daily
7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
24/7 Credit
Card Pumps
Diesel • Gas
Farm Fuel
Pop • Snacks • Beer
Starting case lot specials.
344-2277
We will also hold our CASH
raffle drawing that night!
See any BVFD fireman for raffle tickets!
Street Dance to Country Rush
Belvidere Firemen’s
Feed & Dance
Burgers, Brats, Beans & Beer!
Saturday, June 8
at the Belvidere Fire Hall
Downtown Belvidere
Free-will offering Feed at 6 p.m.
Dance from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
“Courage is doing what you are
afraid to do. There can be no
courage unless you are scared.”
Eddie Rickenbacker
The Dakota Niners eighth grade
baskeball team won a tournament
recently in Omaha, Nebraska. The
Dakota Niners teams are made up
of basketball players from all over
the state of South Dakota and com-
pete with teams from all over the
Midwest. Justice Morrison of Nor-
ris is a member of the team. Con-
gratulations, we are proud of you.
Carol Ferguson worked at the
Post Office in Belvidere on Monday
and in Norris on Wednesday.
Wednesday the eighth grade
graduation and middle school
awards program was held at White
River. Those graduating from
eighth grade from Norris were
Loren Good Shield, Nate Huber,
Justice Morrison, Ashton Olson,
Jace Schmidt, and Morgan Taft.
Norris students received their
share of the awards given and
more. Morgan Taft received the
Student of the Year honor and
Susan Taft was presented a beau-
tiful star quilt in recognition for
her years of volunteer service to
the White River School District. We
are very proud of all of you. Several
receptions were held in their honor
following the program.
Samantha Taft surprised her
family when she arrived home in
time for her sister Morgan’s eighth
grade graduation.
The greatest news is all the
moisture we have received recently.
Norris area has gotten over three
and one-half inches at least and
perhaps more since some has been
hard to measure. It has done won-
ders for the countryside. It is lush
and green and still growing. The
lilac bushes and fruit trees are
loaded with blossoms, too. Chances
for a lot of plums, chokecherries
and other wild fruit this year are
really great. It is amazing how rain
can change our outlook on life and
especially the future. The Lord has
truly blessed us.
James and Marjorie Anne Letel-
lier were among the crowd attend-
ing the eighth grade graduation at
White River on Wednesday after-
noon.
Kristy and John WoodenKnife
hosted a reception in honor of their
grandson, Tanner Haukaas, who
graduated from eighth grade
Wednesday at the Norris Township
Hall. Tanner lives in White River
but wanted to celebrate at Norris
and that is fine with us.
Last day of school for Norris and
White River was Thursday with a
12:30 p.m. dismissal. Have a great
summer, students and teachers
alike. Folks remember to be drive
carefully because the kids are out
and about.
Thursday Ed Ferguson hauled
cows to Ft. Pierre and on Friday Ed
was among those friends and
neighbors helping Wes Schmidt
brand.
Thursday evening, Sue Larson
of Rapid City, Julie Letellier of Kil-
gore, Nebraska, Beaver Burma,
Andrea Beckwith and Grandma
Marjorie Anne Letellier traveled as
far as Mitchell on their way to the
South Dakota State Track Meet in
Sioux Falls.
Friday they spent cheering on
Marjories’s grandson, DJ Beck-
with, and the Sunshine Bible Acad-
emy team. Being West River South
Dakota is a thrill when it comes to
track; we can just about cheer for
someone we know in every heat in
every race and we did. White River
and Kadoka kept us busy, too.
We returned home on Friday
evening and were glued to the com-
puter all day Saturday for the re-
sults of the finals. Congratulations
to all the participants and winners,
they are a great bunch of kids and
make us very proud.
Jean Kary accompanied June
Ring to the Mellette County Cattle-
women meeting at the museum in
White River on Thursday after-
noon.
Dorothy Bligh brought Maxine
Allard in so she could decorate
graves at Norris on Friday.
The Norris Cemetery always
seems to have a lot of visitors for
such a little out of the way place.
Some folks come regularly from as
far away as Colorado and Rapid
City. We sure appreciate the hard
work from the local guys. The
cemetery looked very nice for Me-
morial Weekend.
Friday morning, June Ring
babysat at Bruce Rings’ while
Jessie took Reno to Rosebud for an
appointment. That evening June
visited at Maxine Allard’s home
and was a supper guest.
June Ring was among the sup-
per guests helping little Bradley
Huber celebrate his third birthday
on Saturday night at the home of
his parents David and Nicole
Huber.
Andrea Beckwith packed up
Sunday and left for the week with
her sister, Cassie. They will be the
missionary speakers for the Vaca-
tion Bible School at the St.
Lawrence Church telling of their
work and experiences in Honduras
last June.
Get well wishes go out to Robert
Ring this week. Robert received a
pacemaker at the Rapid City Re-
gional Hospital last week and came
home on Saturday. Hope you will
soon be feeling great and back to
being your jovial self.
Cora Brickman brought Moya
out on Saturday so she could spend
a few weeks with her grandpar-
ents, Ed and Carol Ferguson. Sun-
day they were Sunday dinner
guests at the Gene and Marjorie
Popkes home at Lakeview. Mar-
jorie’s son, Joe Grimshaw, and his
children from Omaha were also
there and are visiting for a few
days.
Don’t forget the slow pitch soft-
ball games at Norris. Richard and
Crystal Charging Hawk are host-
ing a tournament. Make up a team
and come and compete. A team
must consist of six guys and six
gals. The guys have worked real
hard to have the new ball field
mowed, fenced and ready for ac-
tion. guys have worked real hard to
have the new ball field mowed,
fenced and ready for action.
Sunday afternoon visitors of
Maxine Allard were Ken and Joyce
Koistenen of Pierre. Ken was busy
putting out his trail cameras for
the summer and fall seasons.
Sunday evening June Ring de-
livered cookies for the Utecht Min-
istries and attended church at the
Lord Warriors Lutheran Church in
Parmelee.
Memorial Day afternoon, James
and Marjorie Letellier, Julie Letel-
lier and Jakki and Jimmy met Sue
Larson in Scenic where they deco-
rated the Dexheimer graves. They
got in on a sudden downpour at
Cedar Pass Lodge so the kids
climbing badlands came to a sud-
den halt.
Jakki and Jimmy returned to
Rapid City with Aunt Sue while the
rest returned home to Norris. They
got home just in time to get in on
another thunderstorm that
dumped .55 of an inch of rain ac-
companied by horrific winds.
Reports from folks east of town
say they got less rain and some
hail. Hopefully the bright sunshine
this morning will give a brighter
light on the damage done.
Ethan Huber and his sister,
Amanda Fire Cloud, started out on
quite a trip Saturday night. They
left by plane at Rapid City en route
to Germany to visit their sister,
Tiffany, and her husband, Felix.
What better guide of Europe could
you have than a sister in the mili-
tary? Sounds like a trip of a life-
time to me.
When my family was all to-
gether for Mother’s Day my grand-
son started himself an account on
my computer. I knew, he liked to
put things in files, so I was afraid I
wouldn’t be able to find a thing.
Just when I thought, I should have
a talk with him (after all I had
never had anyone else on my com-
puter). He called me in to the com-
puter room and pointed out his icon
and said, “ Now Grandma, you stay
out of mine and I will stay out of
yours.” Yes, Jimmy is smart; after
all he just graduated from kinder-
garten!
Hope you remembered our
United States Military this Memo-
rial Day weekend.
They are always alert and on the
job so we can go about in freedom
like no other nation on the face of
the earth. Freedom isn’t free, our
Veterans pay the price.
Our thanks go out to each one of
you for wearing the uniform and
serving on our behalf. America is
great because she is safe. God Bless
America!
Have a great week!
Memorial Day services were
held as usual in Belvidere on Mon-
day. Things started at the cemetery
with the parade of colors by Bud
Perault, Glenn Freeman, Ted Vobr,
and Tojo Osborn. Bob Bork blew
Taps. A program followed at the
church hall. Greg Badure recited a
poem about the flag from memory.
Coleen Sprecher did a reading.
Larry Dolezal was the speaker. He
spoke of the many who gave their
lives in defense of our country and
continued with an assessment of
where we are now and what we
need to do and be careful of in the
future. Glenn Freeman spoke of
how the local Legion post was in
danger of being disbanded due to a
shortage of members. More mem-
bers were found last year from
those with ties to the community so
Post 144 can continue for a while at
least. Marlene Perault organized
the program as she often does. A
potluck dinner followed the pro-
gram. About 75 to 80 people were
present at the hall, and some oth-
ers were at the cemetery but could-
n’t stay for the program at the hall.
Phyllis Owens came from Rapid
City for Memorial Day services as
usual. She came with her youngest
son, Tracy. Phyllis was raised in
Belvidere and lived in the area a
number of years after she was
grown and married. Her folks ran
a café and pool hall for a time and
are both buried at the Belvidere
cemetery as are both sets of her
grandparents, both Carrico and
Pluta. She has her brother, Tom
Carrico, buried here as well along
with various cousins and other rel-
atives. Her living relatives in the
area are scarce now but she is re-
lated to Joe Leutenegger on the
Pluta side.
Larry Grimme was visited by
Art and Joyce Glynn of Rapid City
this weekend. The Glynns attended
church on Sunday and Memorial
Day services on Monday. Their
daughter was here as well with a
friend. Art and Joyce seldom miss
Memorial Day weekend in
Belvidere.
Dolores Obr had her daughters,
Keitha and Elaine, here for the
weekend. The family decorated
graves in several local towns on
Saturday, attended church in town
on Sunday, and services on Mon-
day.
Marie Addison had daughters
Dixie and Rena from Rapid City
with her this weekend and at serv-
ices in Belvidere on Monday.
Edward Kodet and his sister,
Janet Leitheiser, were both at the
family ranch this weekend. They
came to check on things at the
place and attend services on Mon-
day. Edward is from Minneapolis
and Janet from nearby Stillwater,
MN. Edward has always gone by
“Edward” to differentiate himself
from his father who went by
“Eddie” or “Ed.” The senior and
junior Edwards had the same
birthday but were born thirty years
apart.
Chuck and Merry Willard cele-
brated their fortieth wedding an-
niversary this weekend with a
family reunion of the Willard clan
that was held at the ranch. There
were 30 adults, 10 kids, and 7 dogs.
All three of Chuck and Merry’s kids
were there, namely Casey, Coleen,
and Niki. All five grandkids were
there as well. Tom DeVries came
with his horse and buggy and gave
rides to whoever wanted them.
There was horseback riding, fish-
ing, eating and visiting. Many of
those attending came on Friday,
and the main event was held on
Saturday. Gus and Terry Craven of
Wanblee catered the evening meal
on Saturday. Some people came
from as far away as Miami and Al-
buquerque. Merry noted that there
was some excitement when the
dogs drug a dead rabbit through
the grounds, and grandson Faron
had to show off a big catfish he’d
caught. On Sunday, Jerry and
Annie Stout came down for a visit.
Chuck and Jerry are related
through Chuck’s grandma, Myrt
Estes, and Jerry’s grandmother,
Hazel, who were sisters. Most of
the people left on Sunday, but
daughter Coleen and family plan to
stay on a few days and maybe at-
tend some brandings with Chuck.
Merry said they had good weather
for the event, and the whole week-
end was wonderful. Chuck and
Merry’s actual anniversary is on
June 2, but it was more convenient
to celebrate it on Memorial Day
weekend.
Sam and I were the best of bud-
dies for a number of years. He was
a big orange dog that was already
in residence at the ranch when I
got home from college and the
Navy. I know he was part husky,
but the rest of him was a mystery.
Whatever the mix, it was a good
one since you don’t find many dogs
as nice as Sam. The folks had
named him “Sandy” after he was
given to them by a cousin so, for
awhile, I called him “San” for
short. That later became “Sam”
which seemed easier.
This hound had several traits
that endeared him to me. For one,
he was a one-dog welcome-home
committee. When I’d been gone
and drove up the lane coming
home, I could be pretty sure Sam
would be lurking along the road
somewhere. As I drove past, an or-
ange streak would rise up and ac-
company me the last bit into the
yard. Then, when I opened the
door, his front feet would land on
my lap and a tongue might try to
give me a kiss. A hug was required.
A lapdog he wasn’t since he was
much too large. He didn’t necessar-
ily agree with that assessment,
however. When we were out walk-
ing on the prairie, he would range
far and wide around me but with-
out losing track of where I was. If
I sat down on a hillside, pretty
soon he’d be sitting there beside
me. If I stayed there very long,
he’d inch his rear closer and closer
to my lap until he was right beside
me. Then he’d lift his rear one
more time and nonchalantly drop
it on my lap as if I probably would-
n’t notice a big orange object
parked there. This always made
me chuckle. I’d tell him he was a
silly old thing, grab him around
the middle, and hold him for a lit-
tle while. That’s what he wanted,
and then he was ready to be off
again to carefully check all the old
holes in the ground and any
bushes that might harbor things of
interest.
At home, Sam was an early-
warning system of anything that
was suspicious or might be an in-
truder. He especially hated snakes
and wouldn’t quit barking at them
until someone arrived with a hoe
and removed the nasty thing’s
head. The body needed to be dis-
posed of in the burn barrel, and
then his job was done. You couldn’t
just throw it out onto the prairie,
though, since that wasn’t right ac-
cording to him. He’d bark at the
corpse until it was properly dis-
posed of in the burn barrel. This
hatred of snakes was even more in-
tense after he was bitten on the
nose by a rattler that had slithered
right in front of the dog house and
got in a strike when Sam was try-
ing to get out. Sam survived the
strike, but his nose was pretty big
for a number of weeks.
Porcupine quills did pose a
problem. Sam would not let you
pull them out until you’d doped
him up enough that he could
barely move. This was accom-
plished by sneaking pills into him
through cheese balls until you had
fed him enough that he could
barely drag himself around. He
adored cheese and ate it so fast
that he didn’t notice the pills. Even
then you had to proceed with cau-
tion, but you could get the quills
out if you worked at it.
Although Sam was probably my
favorite of all the dogs we ever
had, there were others that were
fine too. As a kid, we had a pair
called Corky and Rex. Rex was my
companion a good bit of the time,
but Corky was more standoffish.
They were a snake-killing duo. Rex
would find them and stand bark-
ing at them until Corky arrived on
the scene. Corky would then sneak
in without getting bitten, grab the
nasty old things, and shake them
to death. Their teamwork was ap-
preciated.
Later I had Rags who was a
black-and-white, medium-sized gal
that was a sweetie. More recently,
son Chance had a black dog he
named “Candy.” She was a good
friend to the whole family and
lived in the house quite a bit. She
was no small thing but wasn’t as
big as Sam. Wife Corinne had a
short round pooch named Noel
who was fairly frumpy but nice.
We’ve had a few dogs that were
more problematic than enjoyable.
One was a purebred beagle that
was cute as the dickens but who
had no real loyalty to anyone. He
visited neighbors far and wide and
wouldn’t bother to come back home
if we didn’t go get him. It was a re-
lief when he finally ran off never to
return. We also once got a yellow
Lab for Chance, but he was much
too busy for all of us. A neighbor
took a shine to him, and we were
very generous and allowed him to
keep him.
Right now we don’t have a dog
due to our somewhat unsettled ex-
istence. If we ever have another,
I’d like him to be a lot like Sam. He
was hard to beat. If you have a dog
at present or in the future, I hope
you luck out with him as much as
I did with Sam. He and I were bud-
dies and the very best of friends.
Sam
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
On Memorial Day flags are flown at half-staff until noon, when it is raised to the
top of the staff.
Locals …
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
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The South Dakota State Girls
Golf Tournaments have personally
touched the lives of Frances and
Bob Getz. They attended the high
school graduation of their grand-
daughter, Hallie Getz, in Pierre
and then went to Yankton where
Hallie and the Pierre Lady Govs
participated in the State AA Golf
Tournament beginning on Monday,
May 20. The Lady Govs won the
2013 tournament with a two-day
total of 691 over second place Sioux
Falls O’Gorman whose team total
was 694. Hallie’s rounds of 76 and
77 helped her win her second con-
secutive state title. She became the
first Lady Gov to ever win two
state titles, and helped Pierre win
their first state title, overcoming a
five-stroke deficit. Pierre’s golf
course was flooded in 2011, but the
team overcame that disadvantage
by hard work and a never give up
attitude, according to Coach John
Knox. He also said that Hallie’s
dad, Roger, pushes her and a lot of
the credit goes to his support. She
will attend South Dakota State
University in Brookings in the fall.
She finished eight strokes ahead of
her closest competitor, Abbie Grev-
los of Sioux Falls Lincoln. Hallie’s
second cousin, Cassidy Vollmer,
won Hot Springs’ first girls golf
title in Milbank at the Class A
State Tournament. She is the
granddaughter of Rudy and Laura
Vollmer, former local residents.
Laura Vollmer is Bob Getz’ sister.
Cassidy was runner-up to last
year’s champion and was deter-
mined to win top spot this year.
Congratulations to both girls.
Dixie Cadman of Rapid City
spent the Memorial Weekend in
Kadoka visiting her son, Josh. Josh
is an employee of the Jackson
County Highway Department.
Many out-of-town relatives were
in Kadoka for the weekend of May
18 and 19 to attend the wedding of
Tim Sanftner and Carrie Bergen,
and the graduation of Ryder Sanft-
ner. Among those attending were
Tina and Randy Long from Robbins
Air Force Base in Georgia; Terry
and Julie Sanftner of Minneapolis;
Mark and Cindy Fiecke and Matt
and Sandy Stiftner, all of Winstead,
MN.; JoAnn and Ed Safort of New
Ulm, MN.; Marvin and Mary Bux-
cel, Laurie and Dan Beck, and
Brady Beck and family, all of
Pierre.
Audra and Harold Moran of
Mitchell are proud parents of a
baby girl, Adriana Ra, born on
Wednesday afternoon, May 22. She
weighed eight pounds 1 1/2 ounces
and was 20” long and joins two big
brothers. Local great-grandmother
is Thesa Ireland and great great-
grandfather is Shorty Ireland.
Holly Clements of Kadoka and
Charles Clements of Wessington
are her grandparents.
Callie and Tim Rhead and girls
of Alcester arrived in Kadoka on
Saturday to spent the weekend vis-
iting her mom, Thesa Ireland.
Holly Clements joined them and all
went to the Ireland Ranch. They
also came to attend Shorty Ire-
land’s 90th birthday celebration on
Sunday. A large crowd of friends
and relatives greeted Shorty at his
party at the Masonic Temple.
Bonnie Madsen and Connie Hill
went to Valentine, NE, on Friday to
decorate family graves. On Sunday
Marjorie Brookens and daughter,
Glenda Orin, of Sioux Falls, Bonnie
and Bruce Madson went to ceme-
teries in Wanblee, Interior and
Kadoka to decorate graves. They
had dinner at Cedar Pass with
Alice Grooms of Gordon, NE, that
day.
Brett and Kieth Prang and
Colton Doney of Valentine, NE, left
on Thursday for Kerrville, TX, and
brought home the metal deer that
Brett and Tammy Prang had sculp-
tured and sold to a Texas man, who
had moved and could not take the
deer with him. The deer having a
few repairs done and will then find
its new home at the Discount Fuel
complex having been purchased by
Mark and Tammy Carlson. The
guys arrived home on Sunday and
had stayed in Abilene, TX, on the
way down to Kerrville and on the
way home, so each day was a long
drive.
Wanda Swan and Sydne Lenox
drove to the Black Hills National
Cemetery near Sturgis on Satur-
day to decorate family and friends
graves. The cemetery was very
busy with four funerals and lots of
people decorating the graves of
loved ones. It is a beautiful ceme-
tery and well taken care of. The
ladies returned home ahead of
some severe storms that came later
in the afternoon, with large hail-
stones in both Sturgis and New
Underwood.
Dave Seiler of Gillette, WY, ar-
rived on Wednesday of last week to
visit at the Larry and Jan Miller
home. Larry and Dave spent lots of
time fishing and went to Ft.
Thompson a couple times where
they caught some nice walleyes.
Dave returned to his home on Me-
morial Day.
Jim Plaggemeyer and son of
Waverly, MO, stopped one day last
week and spent the night at the
home of his dad, Jim and Venessa
Plaggemeyer. They were moving to
Washington state where Jim will
be stationed. He is a member of the
Air Force and will soon be going to
Guam. They had a breakdown of a
truck near Belvidere but were soon
on their way to the west coast.
Linda and Steve Rave of Rapid
City and Bonnie Riggins went to
Bradshaw, NE, on May 18 to visit
and spend the night with Doug and
Electa Preslicka. On Sunday, they
went to Norton, KS, to attend the
high school graduation of Alexan-
der Riggins, son of Bradley Riggins
of Fountain, CO, and Christina
Riggins of Almena, KS, that was
held that afternoon. They arrived
early enough to get some visiting
done prior to the graduation. Doug
and Electa returned their home
after graduation. The South
Dakota trio stayed until Monday
and then returned home.
Will end this column with an-
other golf story. My nephew, Chris
Starkjohann of California golfed in
the Senior PGA Championship golf
tournament in St. Louis, MO, this
past week. He didn’t make the cut
but two of my sons were able to
take in the tournament on Thurs-
day and Friday and follow the ac-
tion as Chris golfed - Bruce of
Chesterfield, MO, and Michael of
Greenwood, IN. The cousins en-
joyed being together for a couple
days. Chris is the son of June and
Floyd Starkjohann of Windsor, CO.
Local News
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faith, from spiritual faith to great
courage, from courage to liberty, from
liberty to abundance, from abundance
to selfishness, from selfishness to com-
placency, from complacency to apathy,
from apathy to dependence, from de-
pendency back to bondage.” It is very
troubling when we look at where we
are today in Tylers study of the se-
quence of the world’s civilizations.
Jonathan Edwards, a theologian
who lived in the 1700s, had a saying,
“hanging by a thread from a spider’s
web”
Today, freedom as we have known
it, is “hanging by a thread from a spi-
der’s web”. The American military has
defended our freedom from tyrants
from outside America, but we have be-
come indifferent and apathetic from
within.
Over the last 237 years there are
lessons that we should have learned if
America is to remain free. There has
always been, there is now, and there
will always be a tyrant some place in
the world whose only goal is greed and
power. He cares nothing about his own
people. His agreements are useless.
The only way to deal with tyrants like
that is with overwhelming strength.
President Reagan said, “Peace thru
strength”.
If we are protect freedom in Amer-
ica, we must always have the best
paid, the best equipped, the best
trained military in the world. This has
proved to save lives. There is another
lesson America needs to learn and that
is when it comes time to deploy Amer-
ican troops, that decision must be
made by the American military leader-
ship and the elected American political
leadership; leadership that is account-
able to the American people and that
decisions NOT be made by some ap-
pointed ambassador from the United
Nations.
If American freedom is to be pre-
served, then there is another lesson to
be learned. Trial by jury has done a
good job in keeping lawlessness and
anarchy under control. Here is a les-
son to be learned and that is when you
have 12 law abiding, common sense,
tax paying citizens serving as jurors,
and they examine the evidence, espe-
cially now with advances in forensic
science, and those jurors come back to
the court and say, “The evidence is so
overwhelming the defendant is guilty
beyond a shadow of a doubt.” When
those same 12 law abiding, tax paying,
common sense jurors come back to the
court and say “this crime was so vis-
cous, so vile, so violent, that the defen-
dant must be sentenced to death” the
complacency, from complacency to ap-
athy, from apathy to dependence, from
dependency back to bondage.” It is
very troubling when we look at where
we are today in Tylers study of the se-
quence of the world’s civilizations.
Jonathan Edwards, a theologian
who lived in the 1700s, had a saying,
“hanging by a thread from a spider’s
web”
Today, freedom as we have known
it, is “hanging by a thread from a spi-
der’s web”. The American military has
defended our freedom from tyrants
from outside America, but we have be-
come indifferent and apathetic from
within.
Over the last 237 years there are
lessons that we should have learned if
America is to remain free. There has
always been, there is now, and there
will always be a tyrant some place in
the world whose only goal is greed and
power. He cares nothing about his own
people. His agreements are useless.
The only way to deal with tyrants like
that is with overwhelming strength.
President Reagan said, “Peace thru
strength”.
If we are protect freedom in Amer-
ica, we must always have the best
paid, the best equipped, the best
trained military in the world. This has
proved to save lives. There is another
lesson America needs to learn and that
is when it comes time to deploy Amer-
ican troops, that decision must be
made by the American military leader-
ship and the elected American political
leadership; leadership that is account-
able to the American people and that
decisions NOT be made by some ap-
pointed ambassador from the United
Nations.
If American freedom is to be pre-
served, then there is another lesson to
be learned. Trial by jury has done a
good job in keeping lawlessness and
anarchy under control. Here is a les-
son to be learned and that is when you
have 12 law abiding, common sense,
tax paying citizens serving as jurors,
and they examine the evidence, espe-
cially now with advances in forensic
science, and those jurors come back to
the court and say, “The evidence is so
overwhelming the defendant is guilty
beyond a shadow of a doubt.” When
those same 12 law abiding, tax paying,
common sense jurors come back to the
court and say “this crime was so vis-
cous, so vile, so violent, that the defen-
dant must be sentenced to death” the
message the court must hear is this
“Stop the retrial after retrial. Stop the
appeal, after appeal, after appeal.
Carry out the execution and let justice
be swift and sure”.
If the youth of this nation are to ex-
perience freedom like we have known
it, then they must be prepared for free-
dom.
They must learn that freedom is
not an entitlement but a responsibility,
a blessing, and a privilege. A privileged
that has come at a very high cost. On
May 12, 1962, General Douglas
MacArthur spoke to the cadets at West
Point. A speech that the youth of today
need to hear. He began that speech
with the motto of West Point, and I
quote “Duty, Honor, Country. Those
three hallowed words reverently dic-
tate what ought to be, what you can be,
what you will be. They are your rally-
ing points to build courage when
courage seems to fail; to regain faith
when there seems to be little cause for
faith; to create hope when hope be-
comes forlorn.” That is just the open-
ing sentence of that speech. Today, the
youth of this nation need to learn
about the history of America, what it
means to be a free nation, a free peo-
ple, and the cost of that freedom.
And lastly, if freedom is to prevail,
we must be told and know the truth.
Today, when we watch the news and
listen to the television commentators,
when we read the editorials on the in-
ternet, in the newspapers, and maga-
zine articles, when we get all done, we
stop and think about what we have
just watched or read, we end up asking
ourselves the question “what is the
truth?” If freedom as we have know it
is to survive then we must return to a
Bible based truth. Not truth as defined
by an intellectual elitist, but truth as
it is set down in the Bible. This is the
only real source of truth, and we must
return to this standard of truth.
Our founding fathers understood
this. Listen to the first sentence of the
second paragraph of The Declaration
of Independence, “We hold these
truths to be self evident, that all men
are created equal, that they are en-
dowed by their Creator with certain
unalienable rights, that among these
are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of
Happiness”. Notice the words truths,
created and creator Thomas Jefferson
said, “ The Bible is the cornerstone of
liberty.” Andrew Jackson said “ The
Bible is the rock on which our republic
rests.”
Today, it is time to leave behind the
falsehoods of political correctness and
return to the truth of Biblical correct-
ness.
If we do not turn from the apathy of
today and turn to the truth, in a gen-
eration, freedom will be but a memory.
Let us close with the last sentence
of The Declaration of Independence,
“And for the support of this Declara-
tion, with a firm reliance on the pro-
tection of Divine Providence, we
mutually pledge to each other our
Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred
Honor. If we today are to remain free
Americans, then we must have that
same resolve and courage of our fore-
fathers.”
The speech written and delivered by
Larry Dolezal on Memorial Day 2013.
Memorial Day is a day set apart in
the United States for the decorating of
the graves of members of its military
forces and, also, to remember those
who have served and those who are
now serving in the military of the
United States
The observance began when South-
ern women began placing spring flow-
ers on the graves of fallen soldiers
during the Civil War. In 1868, General
John Logan, then commander-in-chief
of the Grand Army of the Republic, is-
sued an order to members of his organ-
ization to decorate the graves of their
comrades with flowers on May 30. The
practice was later extended to honor
soldiers of all wars.
Memorial Day is a very important
part of our small community here in
Belvidere. Let us remember, not just
today, but everyday that freedom is not
free, but that it has come at a tremen-
dous cost to the American military.
From July 4, 1776 to May 30, 2013,
237 years, tens of thousands in the
American military have made the ulti-
mate sacrifice so that we might be and
live a free people.
Jesus said it best “Greater love has
no one than this, that one lay down his
life for his friends.”
Today, in order that we might gain
a deeper and greater understanding of
the phrase “the ultimate sacrifice” let
us have a brief lesson on the cost of
freedom. A cost that has been carried
by the American military.
From the time of the American Rev-
olution when the minutemen fired the
shot “heard round the world” at Con-
cord where eight minutemen died and
ten were wounded, then on to Bunker-
hill and when the American Revolu-
tionary War ended in 1783, when at
Yorktown, where British General
Cornwallis surrendered, “Americans
were free” but the cost of freedom to
the American militia was 25,000 dead
and 25,000 wounded. The dead in-
cludes those killed in combat, those
who died from disease and those who
died aboard British prison ships. Free-
dom is not free but comes at a tremen-
dous cost.
When the War of 1812 ended, the
number of dead and wounded was
20,000.
We remember the Civil War, the
battles at Vicksburg, Antedem and
Gettysburg. When the war ended at
Appomatox, 625,000 soldiers had died
so that all men might be free.
Remember the high cost of freedom.
We remember World War I where
chemical warfare was used. Tank war-
fare was new, and the air war was re-
ally new. From 1914 to 1918 when the
Peace Treaty was signed and World
War I ended, the American military
had lost 116,516 killed and another
204,000 wounded.
Remember the high cost of freedom.
We remember World War II, the air
war, the war on the seas and under the
oceans with submarines, the land bat-
tles, the Battle of the Bulge, Omaha
Beach, D-Day, Normandy, the war in
the Pacific, Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima
and so many more. When the Peace
Treaty was signed on the Battle Ship
Missouri, the combat deaths were
291,557, and the non-combat were
listed as 113,842 for a total of 405,399
and the wounded numbered 670,846.
There is another number we must
never forget and that is the ones listed
as missing, that number from World
War II is 30,314.
Remember the high cost of freedom.
From 1950 to July 27, 1953, Amer-
ica was in the Korean War when the
cease fire was signed 36,516 Ameri-
cans had died, 92,134 were wounded
and 4,759 were listed as missing.
In the Vietnam War, 58,209 Amer-
icans died. Another 153,303 were
wounded and 2,489 are listed as miss-
ing.
In the combined Iraq and
Afghanistan War on Terror 6,518 have
died. 41,936 have been wounded and
three are listed as missing.
Let us always remember “Freedom
is not free but has come at a very high
cost.”
Now, when we hear the phrase “the
ultimate sacrifice”, we have a deeper
understanding and greater reverence
for the number of Americans who have
died, so that we might live free.
In the late 1700s, Professor Alexan-
der Tyler wrote this,”the average age
of the world’s great civilizations has
been 200 years. These nations have
progressed through the following se-
quence; from bondage to spiritual
The high cost of freedom
South Dakota’s Highway Patrol
used the Memorial Day travel
weekend to kick off “Obey the Sign
and Avoid the Fine,’’ a summer
long, safe travel campaign.
The campaign is an initiative to
reduce highway crashes and in-
crease safety on South Dakota’s
roadways, said Colonel Craig Price,
superintendent of the Highway Pa-
trol. The kick off weekend included
a high visibility saturation patrol
on Memorial Day.
“Our statistics show that speed-
ing, impaired driving and other
hazardous moving violations are
major contributors in crashes, in-
juries and deaths on our high-
ways,’’ Price said. “We’re kicking off
our safety campaign on Memorial
Day weekend to get the maximum
public awareness of the need for
safety on the roadways.’’
Speed and alcohol will be the top
two targets for the enforcement
campaign this summer, Price said.
The Highway Patrol believes that
focus will have the largest impact
on reducing fatal crashes.
“Obviously, we will be enforcing
all the other traffic laws,’’ he said.
“That’s the reasoning behind the
‘Obey the Sign and Avoid the Fine’
campaign slogan.’’
Highway patrol troopers will
work in teams and will partner
with other law enforcement agen-
cies when opportunities arise, Price
said. Monday’s saturation patrol
had virtually all uniformed troop-
ers on the highways.
In addition to enforcement, the
summer safety campaign will use
social media for public education
and will partner with the State De-
partment of Transportation for per-
manent and portable message
boards with safe driving messages
on the interstates and other high
traffic areas in South Dakota.
Highway patrol,
“Obey the Sign,
Avoid the Fine”
Sports …
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
WANTED
Dam Repair
or other
dirt work
Tom DeVries
Belvidere • 605-891-8022
Kougar track team performed strong at the state track meeet that was held in Sioux Falls on May 24 and 25.
KAHS results: Chandlier Sudbeck 2nd in 300 hurdles and 8th in 110 hurdles; Boys 4x4 8th place; Boys medley
8th place; Logan Ammons 3rd in discus and 4th in shot put; Myla Pierce 9th in triple jump and 9th in 100 hur-
dles; Boys 4x8 10th place; Girls 4x8 13th place; Scout Sudbeck 12th place in 2 mile; Bobby Anderson 13th place
2 mile; Clint Stout 10th place 1 mile.
KAHS track team performs strong at state meet
Myla Pierce
Bobby Anderson
Chris Anderson
Marti Herber
Sam Pretty Bear Tori Letellier
Shaley Herber Emily Knutson Scout Sudbeck
Clint Stout Chandlier Sudbeck Logan Ammons
Email Photos or News to
press@kadoktelco.com
editor@kadoktelco.com
Community …
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd
Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DDS CÞevg 1mpo1o LS
Vb Auto, Kc¸ícss Ent¡¸
CD ¡íu¸c¡ und no¡c!
| lat¡ | 1a¡as kaat|
Two-year-o|d Angus bu||s for sa|e!
8ons & grandsons of:
8 A V 004 Trave|er 4412 & N ßar Pr|me T|me 080ô
- 3erer Tesled & 3crola| Veasured
- Ca|v|rg Ease & Valerra||y 8red
- 3e|||rg Pr|vale Trealy
ßob Fortune: (ô05} 488-1003
6huck Fortune: (ô05} 891-8197
SAV004 TraveIer 4412
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
The Kadoka second grade did a living wax museum. The class was busy
writing report papers, making posters, and memorizing three facts for the
big day. They worked hard at home to create a costume that best describes
their historical figure. They made history come alive for the elementary
by becoming someone that means something to them.
The Kadoka/Wanblee 21st CCLC Summer Program will be starting on
Monday, June 3 and go until Thursday, July 25. The program will run
Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. Lunch will be
served to children participating in the program. There will also be a bus
going to Wanblee to pick up students from that area. It should arrive in
Wanblee around 7:45a.m.
The Kadoka/Wanblee Summer Program will be offering academic en-
richment activities throughout the summer for students going into Kinder-
garten-8th grade. Enrollment forms for summer program were sent home
with students earlier this month. If you would like your child to partici-
pate, please fill out the forms and return them to the school. If you have
any questions, please call Annette VanderMay at 837-2299 (after-school),
462-6233 (home) or 488-0188 (cell). We look forward to a fun summer.
Second grade presents living wax museum
Betsy Ross • Felicity Keegan Pocahontas • Tia Has No Horse
Julia Child • Brisa Badure Harriet Tubman • Corie Schutterle
Kadoka/Wanblee 21st CCLC Summer Program
2013 Kadoka Area School 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster & Essay participants tree
recipients group picture. Back row (L-R): Jarred Hicks, Gabriel Sitting Up, Landon
Schofield, Lavin Bendt, Kaylor Finn, 5th Grade Teacher Arlene Hicks. Middle row:
l to r: Kaite Reddest, Arthur Conroy, Richard Lamont, Luke Keegan, Greyson De-
Vries. Front row: Seth Addison, Eve Patterson, Adie Patterson, CeeCee O’Daniel,
Pasha Fawcett, Joey O’Daniel.
2013 Kadoka Area School 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster/Essay participant tree re-
cipient Landon Schofield.
Mayola Horst, Jackson County Conservation District Manager, making a presen-
tation to 5th Grade Kadoka School Teacher, Arlene Hicks.
2013 Kadoka Area School 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster & Essay participant, tree
recipient and recognition event was held on May 16, 2013 at Kadoka School.
2013 Kadoka Area School
Arbor Day poster & essay contest
SD Regional High School Rodeo…
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
SDHS Regional Rodeo
May 31, June 1 & 2, 2013
Klay O’Daniel
Herbie O’Daniel
Brendon Porch
Katie Lensegrav
Aage Ceplecha
Lane Patterson
Austin Thayer
Marti Herber
Dylan Riggins
True Buchholz
Logan Christensen
H & H Restaurant
& Rodeway Inn
Ken & Cindy Wilmarth:
837-2287
Miller’s Garbage &
Laundromat
Larry & Jan Miller:
837-2698
Badlands
Beauty Salon
Jan Miller: 390-4591
BankWest
Gene Christensen:
837-2281
BankWest
Insurance
Lori Waldron: 837-2277
Kadoka Gas & Go
Grant Patterson: 837-2350
Peters
Excavation
Brent Peters:
837-2945
Midwest
Cooperative
Rod Knutson, Mgr:837-2600
Kadoka Clinic
Phone:
837-2257
America’s Best
Value Inn
Phone:
837-2188
Discount Fuel
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Phone:
837-2271
People’s
Market
Rich & Shawna Bendt:
837-2232
Stadium Sports
Shelly Young • Mission, SD
1-888-502-3066
Dr. B.L. Porch, DVM
Dr. Boyd Porch:
837-2697
Hogen’s
Hardware
Don & Randi Oyan:
837-2274
Rush Funeral Home
Philip • Wall • Kadoka
Jack & DJ Rush:
859-2400
Double H Feed
& Supply
Ted & Arlene Hicks:
837-2976
Hildebrand Steel
& Concrete
Rich, Colleen & Haven
Hildebrand
Off: 837-2621
Rich/Cell: 431-2226
Haven/Cell: 490-2926
Kadoka Press
Robyn & Rhonda:
837-2259
Club 27
Lonny & Carrie Johnston:
837-2241
Kadoka
Booster Club
Promoting Spirit
State Farm
Insurance
Jan Hewitt:
859-2559
Headlee
Vet Clinic
Drs. Bill & Norma Headlee
Kadoka: 837-2431 Philip: 859-
2610
Groven’s Chemical
Rick: 837-2550
J&S Restore
John & Sue Kaiser:
837-2376
West River
Excavation
Craig & Diana Coller:
837-2690
Sauntee & Heidi Coller
Jigger’s Restaurant
Jerry & JoAnne Stilwell:
837-2000
Badlands Petrified
Gardens
Bill Fugate:
837-2448
Midland
Food & Fuel
Clint & Brenda Jensen:
843-2536
Farmer’s Union Ins.
Donna Enders:
837-2144
Public Notices…
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
Public Notice
Publication
Deadline
is Friday
at NOON!
KADOKA CITY COUNCIL
REGULAR MEETING
MAY 16, 2013
7:00 P. M.
Mayor Weller called the regular meeting
of the Kadoka City Council to order at
7:00 p.m. with the following members
present: Ryan Willert; Colby Shuck; Brad
Jorgensen; and Dick Stolley. Member
absent: Kieth Prang. Others present:
Patty Ulmen, Finance Officer; Forrest
Davis; Jackie Stilwell; Arne Lund; Tina
Williams; Joyce Hicks; Nona Prang; and
Nathan Riggins.
Shuck made Motion 13-05-16:54 to ap-
prove the minutes of the regular meeting
of April 8, 2013 and the special meeting
of April 19, 2013. The motion was sec-
onded by Willert, with all members voting
yes and the motion carried 4-0.
The bills were presented for approval.
Shuck made Motion 13-05-16:55 to ap-
prove the bills as submitted. The motion
was seconded by Stolley. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 4-0.
BILLS TO APPROVE AT THE
MAY 16, 2013 MEETING.
SD Dept of Revenue Sales Tax
$1,408.63; AFLAC, Monthly Premium
$85.82; Delta Dental, Monthly Premium
$482.30; Verizon Wireless, Cell Phone
$78.07; SD Retirement Monthly Contri-
bution $3,221.14; Jackson-Kadoka
Econ. Dev. Corp. Contribution $5,000.00;
Davis, Forrest, Reimburse/Conference
Expenses $60.27; Discount Fuel Vehicle
Fuel $25.37; Ecolab Pest Control $
202.50; Electro Watchman Security Sys-
tem $25.00; Galls Vehicle Supplies
$51.48;
Golden West, Telephone/Cable $702.24;
Heartland Paper Supplies $387.71;
Hogen's Hardware, Supplies/Repairs
$266.52; John Deere Credit, Monthly
Payment/Front End Loader $2,023.03;
Kadoka Area School District, El ect i on
Board Payment $187.70; Kadoka Oil,
LLC Heating/Vehicle/Equipment Fuel
$1,907.10; Kadoka Press, Publishing
$638.95; Northwest Pipe, Supplies
$97.17; Oien Implement, Supplies
$15.59; Pahlke, Alvin, Legal Services
$150.00; Parke, Clifford, Backhoe/Trans-
fer Station $50.00; Peoples Market, Sup-
plies $198.60; Peter's Excavation, Snow
Removal/Auditorium $102.04; Pierre
Landfill, Tipping Fees $650.26; Riggins,
Nathan, Reimburse/Travel Expenses
$81.40; SD Dept. of Revenue, Sales Tax
$1,534.34; SD One Call, Message Fees
$14.43; Servall Laundry $364.02; Team
Laboratory, Chemical Supplies
$2,106.00; United States Postal Service,
Postage $30.40; USA Blue Book, Sup-
plies $23.46; Verizon Wireless, Cell
Phone $78.07; West Central Electric,
Electricity $5,640.64; West River Exca-
vation, Solid Waste Transporation/Back-
hoe $709.90; West River Lyman Jones,
Water Payment $4,435.00; Chamberlain
Wholesale, Liquor Supplies $1,457.70;
Coca Cola, Liquor Supplies $62.00;
Dakota Toms, Liquor Supplies $66.46;
Eagle Sales, Liquor Supplies
$10,109.41, Jerome Beverage, Liquor
Supplies $3,516.76,; Johnson Western
Wholesale, Liquor Supplies $4,777.75;
Republic Liquor Supplies $2,914.34;
ACH Withdrawal for Taxes, Federal Em-
ployment Taxes $7,183.34; ACH With-
drawal for Dakota Care, Health
Insurance Premium $6,922.03; Total Bills
Presented: $90,972.61
The financial statement, along with a re-
port listing the breakdown of revenue, ex-
penses, and bank balances for the
month of April was distributed. After a re-
view of the information, Willert made Mo-
tion 13-05-16:56 to approve the financial
report. The motion was seconded by Jor-
gensen. A roll call vote was taken, with
all members voting yes and the motion
carried 4-0.
City of Kadoka Financial Statement
as of 4-30-13:
Revenue: General Fund - $27,736.18; 3
B’s Fund - $1,300.18; Street Fund -
$3.85; Liquor Fund - $31,677.80; Water
Fund - $9,376.47; Sewer Fund -
$2,476.00; Solid Waste Fund -
$5,043.74.
Expense: General Fund - $36,784.32;
3B’s Fund - $3,355.62; Liquor Fund -
$31,285.02; Water Fund - $11,144.47;
Sewer Fund - $1,224.18; Solid Waste
Fund - $2,917.18.
Payroll: Mayor/Council - $1,830.00; Ad-
ministration - $4,585.50; Streets -
$3,786.06; Police - $3,942.69; Audito-
rium/Parks - $3,568.80; Liquor -
$9,720.61; Water/Sewer – $4,421.53;
Solid Waste - $1,073.52; Group
Health/Dental - $7,404.33; Retirement -
$3,221.14; Social Security/Medicare -
$7,183.34.
Bank Balances: Checking Account -
$826,334.89; ATM Account - $3,248.06;
Certificates of Deposit - $769,643.15.
Council Resignation: A letter of resigna-
tion from Kieth Prang, council member
for Ward 2 was presented. Willert made
Motion 13-05-16:57 to accept Prang’s
resignation with regret. The motion was
seconded by Shuck, with all members
voting yes and the motion carried 4-0.
Mayor Weller thanked Prang for his
years of service.
Shuck made Motion 13-05-16:58 to ad-
journ the outgoing council. The motion
was seconded by Willert, with all mem-
bers voting yes and the council ad-
journed.
Mayor Weller reconvened the meeting.
Due to the previous resignation of council
member Micki Word, a vacancy exists on
the council. Jorgensen made Motion 13-
05-16:59 to appoint Arnold Lund to fill the
vacant seat. The motion was seconded
by Stolley. A roll call vote was taken with
all members voting yes, and the motion
carried 4-0.
Finance Officer, Patty Ulmen, adminis-
tered the oath of office to Mayor Harry
Weller. Mayor Weller administered the
oath of office to council members Dick
Stolley, Ryan Willert and Arnold Lund.
Shuck made Motion 13-05-16:60 to nom-
inate Brad Jorgensen as Council Presi-
dent. The motion was seconded by
Willert who moved that nominations
cease and a unanimous ballot be cast for
Brad Jorgensen. This was seconded by
Shuck and the motion carried 4-1.
Jorgensen made Motion 13-05-16:61 to
nominate Ryan Willert as Council Vice
President. The motion was seconded by
Shuck who moved that nominations
cease and a unanimous ballot be cast for
Ryan Willert. This was seconded by Jor-
gensen and the motion carried 5-0.
Commissioner/Committee Assignments:
Mayor Weller made the following com-
missioner appointments: Water/Sewer –
Colby Shuck; Streets – Ryan Willert;
Public Safety – Arnold Lund; Liquor –
Brad Jorgensen; Auditorium/Park – Dick
Stolley and Solid Waste – Vacant. The
Mayor also made committee assign-
ments to assist the commissioners on
their respective committees.
NEW BUSINESS:
A. Street Request/Rich and Colleen
Hildebrand: This item was tabled with no
action taken.
B. Museum: Joyce Hicks and Nona
Prang have volunteered to be in charge
of the museum this summer. They stated
that they were unable to find the vacuum
cleaner at the museum and asked per-
mission to purchase a new one. Lund
made Motion 13-05-16:62 to authorize
the purchase of a new vacuum cleaner.
The motion was seconded by Shuck.
Further discussion was held, and Hicks
and Prang stated that they would like to
be paid for the initial cleaning of the mu-
seum and they estimated that the labor
would take between 8 and 10 hours.
Shuck then amended the motion to in-
clude payment at minimum wage
($7.25/hr.) for 8-10 hours of cleaning.
The amended motion was seconded by
Jorgensen. A roll call vote was taken:
Willert-no; Shuck-yes; Jorgensen-yes;
Lund-yes; Stolley-yes. The motion car-
ried 4-1.
COUNCIL REPORTS:
A. Water/Sewer: The maintenance on
the water tower is underway. The dis-
charge application has been completed
and is ready to be submitted to the State
for approval.
B. Streets: The asphalt work on the
street by the nursing home is scheduled
to begin within the next two weeks, de-
pending on weather and the work sched-
ule of Hills Material Company.
C. Solid Waste: Clean up week was dis-
cussed and it was determined to hold the
annual clean up from May 28, 2013
through June 8, 2013, during regular
hours of operation.
D. Liquor: Discussion was held on the
sidewalk located on the front side of the
bar.
E. Auditorium/Park: Brian Fromm has
been contacted regarding the sewer lines
in the bathrooms and he will camera the
lines to assist in determining the prob-
lems and solutions. Billie Jo Eisenbraun
stated the locker room doors need to be
replaced. She will get estimates to sub-
mit to the council.
F. Public Safety: The monthly report was
distributed.
G. Mayor’s Report: The mayor attended
the SDML district meeting held in Murdo.
Preliminary worksheets for the 2014
budget were distributed.
Executive Session per SDCL 1-25-2
(1)/Personnel: Shuck made Motion 13-
05-16:63 to go into executive session for
personnel. The motion was seconded by
Jorgensen, with all members voting yes
and the council, along with Tina Williams
and Patty Ulmen went into executive
session at 7:45 p.m.
The council was declared out of execu-
tive session at 8:26 p.m.
Willert made Motion 13-05-16:64 to hire
Ann Fugate as a part time bartender at a
salary of $7.25/hour. The motion was
seconded by Jorgensen. A roll call vote
was taken, with all members voting yes
and the motion carried 5-0.
Willert made Motion 13-05-16:65 to hire
Anita Riggins as the manager of the
swimming pool at a salary of $8.75/hour,
pending lifeguard certification training.
The motion was seconded by Stolley. A
roll call vote was taken: Jorgensen-no;
Lund-yes; Shuck-no; Willert-yes; Stolley-
yes. The motion failed 3-2.
Shuck made Motion 13-05-16:66 to hire
Anita Riggins as the manager of the
swimming pool at a salary of $8.00/hour,
pending lifeguard certification training.
The motion was seconded by Jorgensen.
A roll call vote was taken, with all mem-
bers voting yes and the motion carried 5-
0.
Willert made Motion 13-05-16:67 to hire
Shelby Uhlir, Emily Schlabach and Myla
Pierce as lifeguards at a salary of
$7.25/hour, pending lifeguard certifica-
tion training; and, Aubrey Schnee and
Mackenzie Word as lifeguards at a salary
of $7.50/hour. The motion was seconded
by Shuck. A roll call vote was taken, with
all members voting yes and the motion
carried 5-0.
Willert made Motion 13-05-16:68 to ad-
journ. The motion was seconded by
Shuck, with all members voting yes and
the meeting was adjourned at 8:32 p.m.
Harry Weller, Mayor
ATTEST:
Patty Ulmen,
Finance Officer
City of Kadoka
[Published May 30, 2013, at the total ap-
proximate cost of $105.59]
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
April 12, 2013
CALL TO ORDER:
The West River Water Development Dis-
trict convened for their regular meeting at
the West River Water Development Dis-
trict Project Office in Murdo, SD. Vice-
Chairman Casey Krogman called the
meeting to order at 10:43 a.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Vice-Chairman
Krogman declared a quorum was pres-
ent. Directors present were: Casey Krog-
man, Veryl Prokop and Lorne Smith.
Absent: Joseph Hieb and Marion Matt.
Also present: Jake Fitzgerald, Manager;
Kati Venard, Sec./Bookkeeper; Dave
Larson, Larson Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA:
None
APPROVE AGENDA:
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Smith to approve the agenda.
Motion carried unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES:
The minutes of the March 19, 2013,
meeting were previously mailed to the
Board for their review.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Prokop to approve the March
minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS:
Casey Krogman . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.41
Veryl Prokop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.41
Lorne Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.41
West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,000.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82.20
Lyman County
Herald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62.56
Murdo Coyote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76.89
Pennington County
Courant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65.66
Pioneer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70.18
Todd County
Tribune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76.26
United States Treasury . . . . . . .110.16
Haakon County Conservation
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON
APPLICATION FOR
SALE OF ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES OUTSIDE
OF MUNICIPALITIES
FOR 2013 - 2014
Notice is hereby given that the Board of
County Commissioners in and for the
County of Jackson in the City of Kadoka,
South Dakota, on the 10th day of June,
2013 at the hour of 11:00 a.m. at the
Jackson County Courthouse in the Com-
missioner’s Room, will meet in special
session to consider the following new ap-
plication for Retail (on-off sale) Malt Bev-
erage License & S. D. Farm Wine to
operate outside of a municipality for the
2013 – 2014 licensing period, which has
been presented to the Board of Jackson
County Commissioners and filed in the
County Auditor’s Office.
Badlands Inn, Circle 10
Campground, Lot 1 & Lot J ex.
Lot K, NW4, Section 31, T 2
S, R 19 E

Notice is further given that any person,
persons or their attorney may appear
and be heard at said scheduled public
hearing who are interested in the ap-
proval or rejection of any such applica-
tion.
Vicki D. Wilson
Jackson County Auditor
[Published May 30, 2013 at the total ap-
proximate cost of $14.81]
District, previously approved . . .500.00
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Smith to approve the District
bills. Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT:
The financial status of the District to date
was previously sent to the Board. A copy
of the March Financial Report is on file at
the District office in Murdo.
Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by
Director Smith to approve the March Fi-
nancial Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT:
Manager Fitzgerald presented his April
report to the Board.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Prokop to approve the Man-
ager’s Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
B. OTHER REPORTS:
None
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:50 A.M.
(CT).
Casey Krogman, Vice-Chairman
ATTEST:
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
[Published May 30, 2013 at the total ap-
proximate cost of $34.11]
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON
APPLICATION FOR
MALT BEVERAGE LI-
CENSES
Notice is given that the Town Board of
Belvidere in the Town of Belvidere, South
Dakota on the 10th day of June, 2013 at
the hour of 7:30pm local time in the city
office will meet in regular session to con-
sider the following applications of Retail
(on and off) Malt Beverage License to
operate inside the municipality for the
2013-2014 licensing period:
Dakota Trail Gas Mart: Peters
Sub-Division Lot A & C
John L Rodgers, dba,
Belvidere Store: North
Belvidere Addition Lot C of Os-
born’s Sub-Division of Outlot
A-4 Kimball’s Division (.58
acres) and North Belvidere
Addition Kimball’s Sub-Divi-
sion No 1 all of Outlot A-3
(2.49 acres).
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any
person(s) or his/her attorney may appear
and be heard at said scheduled public
hearing who is interested in the approval
or rejection of any such application.
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
Published May 30 & June 6, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $29.24]
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 9
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
HIGH-PROFIT PET GROOMING
BUSINESS-Aberdeen, SD. Want to
own your own business? Well-estab-
lished 38-year pet grooming busi-
ness for sale. Owner retiring. Begin
making $$ on your first day. Training
with some financing available. Seri-
ous inquiries only. 605-225-5726.
CABLE/SATELLITE/INTERNET
DISH NETWORK. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Instal-
lation! CALL Now! 1-800-308-1892.
SAVE ON CABLE TV-Internet-Digital
Phone-Satellite. You`ve Got A
Choice! Options from ALL major
service providers. Call us to learn
more! CALL Today. 888-337-5453.
HIGHSPEED INTERNET every-
where By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.)
Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW &
GO FAST! 1-888-518-8672.
EMPLOYMENT
BRITTON-HECLA SCHOOL, K-12
SP ED teacher. Closes 6/5/13.
Kevin Coles, PO Box 190, Britton,
SD 57430; kevin.coles@k12.sd.us,
605-448-2234.
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
CAREER! 3 Week Hands-On Train-
ing School. Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Excavators. National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Placement Assisance.
VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-
6497.
BUILDING TRADES INSTRUCTOR
opening for 9TH – 12TH grade pro-
gram in Northwest South Dakota.
Competitive wage, excellent bene-
fits, car provided. For more informa-
tion contact Cris Owens, Northwest
Area Schools, 605-466-2206 or
Christine.Owens@k12.sd.us.
LARGE COOPERATIVE SEEKS In-
formation Systems Manager to man-
age company computer network.
Degree is required with network ad-
ministration experience. For more in-
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
formation contact Gene Lueb CHS at
gene.lueb@chsinc.com.
ALEXANDER, ND, SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT is seeking 1 elementary
teacher, 1 Pre-School teacher, and a
Title 1 Teacher. Send a letter of ap-
plication and resume with refer-
ences: Alexander Public School,
Lynn Sims, PO Box 66, Alexander,
ND 58831, or
lynn.sims@sendit.nodak.edu. EOE.
ACE READY MIX - is looking for
Ready Mix truck drivers. Competitive
wages and benefits. Stop by the cor-
ner of Rice Street & N Bahnson Ave,
Sioux Falls, or call 605- 338-0405
www.acereadymix.com. EEO/AA.
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online www.sdwork.org.
#constructionjobspaybetter.
MYRL & ROY’S PAVING now hiring
CDL drivers. Competitive wages and
benefits. Stop by the corner of Rice
and N Bahnson Ave, Sioux Falls, or
call 605-334-3204 www.myrlan-
droyspaving.com. Women and mi-
norities encouraged to apply.
EEO/AA.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION
is taking applications for full- time
Douglas County Highway Superin-
tendent. Must have valid Class A Dri-
ver’s License. Experience in
road/bridge construction/mainte-
nance. For application contact: Dou-
glas County Auditor (605) 724-2423.
DIRECTOR OF POLICY AND
LEGAL SERVICES – Associated
School Boards of South Dakota
(ASBSD) seeks a person to serve as
Director to handle legal and policy
services. Qualifications – Law De-
gree. Experience in education, public
policy, adjudication of worker’s com-
pensation claims, public sector labor
laws, human relations and health in-
surance is preferred. Application
deadline, Noon, June 14, 2013. Con-
tact Katie at: Katie@asbsd.org, 605-
773-2502, or ASBSD, PO Box 1059,
Pierre, SD 57501 for complete appli-
cation materials or
http://www.asbsd.org/page190.aspx
Salary and benefits competitive. An
equal opportunity employer.
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online www.sdwork.org.
#constructionjobspaybetter.
SMART SALES AND LEASE seeks
bookkeeper. Work from home.
Hourly wage based on experience.
M-F 8-4, Degree/management expe-
rience a plus. Resume, questions:
careers@smartsalesandlease.com.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL
has full time Occupational Therapist,
RN and LPN or Medical Assistant op-
portunities available. We are located
in the beautiful southern Black Hills
of SD - just a short distance from
Mount Rushmore, Wind Cave Na-
tional Park, Custer State Park, Jewel
Cave National Park and many other
outdoor attractions. Call 605-673-
2229 ext. 110 for more information or
go to www.regionalhealth.com to
apply. EOE.
THE ROAD TO THE RIGHT CA-
REER - STARTS HERE! Statewide
construction jobs, $12.00 - $18.00
OR MORE. No experience neces-
sary. Apply online www.sdwork.org.
#constructionjobspaybetter.
FINANCE OFFICER: FAULKTON,
full time, accounting experience nec-
essary. Responsible for city account-
ing system: budget, reports, payroll.
Salary DOE, qualifications. Informa-
tion contact City of Faulkton, 605-
598-6515, EOE.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
NOTICES
SEARCH STATE-WIDE APART-
MENT Listings, sorted by rent, loca-
tion and other options.
www.sdhousingsearch.com South
Dakota Housing Development Au-
thority.
WANTED
WANTED: HUNTING LAND for
Pheasant, quality Mule Deer 170”
class+, Whitetail Deer 150” class+
and Merrium Turkey. Call 605-448-
8064.
Peters Excavation
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
WBackhoe WTrenching
WDirectional Boring
WCobett Waters
WTire Tanks
WDozer
WVacuum
Excavation
Brent Peters
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Blg, 8tout Yearllng Angus Bulls
F0R 8ALE
· Iebruary & March Year|ìng Angus ßu||s
· Most|y ca|vìng ease bu||s
· 5emen checked & ready to go!
Bulls located 3 mlles SL
of 0owntown Rapld 0lty
0ontact· 0an (605) 39l-7090
1amle (605) 39l-6399
Rapid City
• 1100 6th Ave., Multi-Family Yard Sale, Renee
Schofield and Aimee Block 8 a.m. - ?: Boys
clothes to sz 12, girls clothes to sz 4, teen girls cloth-
ing, women’s (2x) CJ Banks clothes, adult clothing,
toys, games, Boyd’s Bears, Scrapbooking supplies:
punches, ideas (DK designs), 2-TV’s, VCR, com-
puter hutch, 2-glider rockers (dark green with foot-
stools), bikes and lots of miscellaneous.
• 1010 Maple St. behind 1000 Maple-yellow
house off alley way in garage- Shoemaker Resi-
dence, Sat. 6 a.m. - 1 p.m., Sun 6 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Mon. 6 a.m.-3 p.m., Rain date will be June 16:
Dell XPS-600 Media center computer with 20” wide
flat screen monitor and computer desk, Queen size
captain platform bed has 8 drawer and 3 cubbies
with Queen size tempurpedic type 11” memory foam
matress-almost new, 2010 Dutchmen travel trailer-
sleeps six-used once, white, metal full size futon bed
with upper twin frame-clean twin matress and new
full matress, dresser/computer desk combo with
bookshelf top, 5x7x6 walk -in Aviary; xl double parrot
cage; 5 double flight cage-Breeder birds to breeders
only please!, large fold up dog crate, 11’ counter top
with blue sink and spray faucet, air floor nailer & sta-
pler with case of over 5000 staples, electric neuton
push lawn mower, 3 old doors, electric fence with
wire spools and accessories, deck stain stripper-
deck stain, spindles- wire shelving, old 5 drawer
dresser, lg. DVD/CD storage unit (holds over 500
DVD’s & video movies), NEW MP3 player, wireless
headphone, emerson switch board for phone-fax-
PC, Lingo 6 language translater, electric waterfall,
old 33 records, Coleman portable camp TV-lantern
& lamp combo, nostalgic theater style popcorn
maker, crank wall phone with modern wiring, antique
Ricohflex camera, glass train X-mas music box, lg.
case of over 200 new egg cartons, Dremel tool set,
lots of Ladies clothes sz. 8-22 only-some new, lots
of odds and ends.
*Come check out all the great deals!
• 1112 6th Ave. 3 blocks south of the pool, Kay
Reckling, 8 a.m. - ?: Ab lounger, EZ shaper, enter-
tainment center, baby swing, baby stroller, baby
convertible crib with mattress, antique baby crib,
baby bouncy seat, printers, small desk & chair, small
chairs, window air conditioner, holiday decorations,
Americana decorations, dishes, curtains, sheets,
blankets, clothes, shoes, coats.
•9th Ave. (Former Hemmingsen residence), Jody
Stout, 8 a.m. - ?: Boy’s clothes sz. 4-6, Girl’s
clothes sz. 6-8, toys, bikes, household items and
much more.
• 1001 5th Ave., Katie Hicks, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.:
Scentsy bar stock. Over 200 bars. Lots of Scentsy
variety. Will be taking orders as well.
• 400 12th Ave., Carmen Huffman, 8 a.m.-?: Full
sized bed with headboard, loveseat, college futon,
end tables, boys clothes, Avon table and other mis-
cellaneous items.
• I-90 Storage Unit #2 (across from Discount
Fuel), Tashia Porch, Early sales starting Friday
May 31, 2 p.m. and Saturday opening at 6 a.m. :
Clothes for the whole family, Household items,
shoes and coats.
• 408 Chestnut St., Renate Carson, 8 a.m. - 4
p.m.: water heater, double bed, hide-a-bed, sheets,
matress covers, kitchen table & chairs, microwave,
toaster oven, sewing machine, convection oven,
dishes, pots & pans, entertainment center, plus
much more.
• Gary and Ruth McCubbin, 7:30 a.m. - ?: Love
seat, rocker, chest of drawers, night stand, file cab-
inet, 2-tents, bikes, dishes and household items.
• Patty Groven Residence, 8 a.m. - ?: Several fam-
ilies, Exercise bike, bicycle, lots of stuff. Come and
see!
• Plant Exchange, Patty Groven’s Carport, 8 a.m.
- ?: Bring or take plants for your yard or both
Kadoka Citywide Rummage Sales
Saturday, June 1st
SOFTBALL/BASEBALL FIELD
work day, Saturday, June 1 and Sat-
urday, June 8 at 2 p.m. All volunteer
help needed. Any questions call
837-2609. K46-2tc
GI RLS SOFTBALL MEETI NG:
Wednesday, June 5 at 10 a.m. at the
softball field. K46-1tc
HELP WANTED: House keepers
and laundry personnel at America’s
Best Value Inn and Budget Host
Sundowner in Kadoka. Call or apply
in peron 837-2188 or 837-2296.
KP46-tfn
OFFICE POSITION: The position
requires the ability to effectively co-
ordinate available resources and pri-
oritize multiple projects and meet
deadlines, communicate with others,
both orally and in writing, and main-
tain accurate records. Working
knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel,
Outlook and PowerPoint is required
along with excellent mathematical
skills and ability to read and write
legal descriptions. Duties will include
lifting, sorting, cataloging and filing
of documents, and other general of-
fice duties as required. Must be able
to learn and use proprietary soft-
ware. Must have or be able to obtain
a valid South Dakota driver’s li-
cense. Position will be located at
Murdo, S.D. An application form
may be completed online at
www.wce.coop or sent to Steve
Reed, CEO, West Central Electric
Cooperative, P.O. Box 17, Murdo,
SD 57559. Email
steve.reed@wce.coop EOE. Appli-
cations will be accepted until posi-
tion is filled. KP46-2tc
BUS DRIVER POSITION: Kadoka
Area School is accepting applica-
tions for a bus driver on the Long
Valley bus route. Applications may
be obtained from the school or on
the school district’s website;
kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please feel free
to contact the school with further
questions about this position. Com-
pleted applications may be dropped
off at the school or sent to: Kadoka
Area School 35-2, Attn: Jamie Her-
mann, PO Box 99, Kadoka, SD
57543, 837-2175 ext. 100.
KP45-2tc
ACCEPTING BIDS: Kadoka Area
School District 35-2 is accepting
bids to provide the school lunch pro-
gram at the Midland School. The bid
will include ordering, preparing,
serving, and clean up after lunch
each and every day school is in ses-
sion. Student milk and free com-
modities will be available to the
successful bidder and these fluctu-
ate on a monthly basis. Please sub-
mit bids on a per plate basis to:
Kadoka Area School 35-2, Attn:
Jamie Hermann, PO Box 99,
Kadoka, SD 57543, 837-2175 ext.
100. Application deadline is June 10,
2013. The Kadoka Area School Dis-
trict reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all bids.
KP46-2tc
FOR RENT: 1,600 sq. ft. space for
rent which includes 2 offices, 1
meeting room, large front room.
Utilites included in rent. Main Street
Plaza on Main Street in Kadoka. Call
Richard 431-2226 or Colleen 431-
6485. KP45-2tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Weed Sprayer. Seasonal
part-time employment spraying
county highway right of way. Com-
mercial herbicide license required or
to be obtained before start of work.
Pre-employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, fax 837-2447.
KP45-4tc
POSITION OPEN: The Kadoka
Area School District is accepting ap-
plications for a certified teacher for
MS/HS business and computers.
Certified applications may be ob-
tained from the school or on the
school district’s website;
kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please feel free
to contact the school with further
questions about this position. Com-
pleted applications may be dropped
off at the school or sent to: Attn:
George Seiler, High School Princi-
pal, PO Box 99, 800 Bayberry
Street, Kadoka, SD 57543 or call 1-
605-837-2172. K45-2tc
POSITION OPEN: The Kadoka
Area School District is accepting ap-
plications for a MS/HS secretary. Ap-
plications may be obtained from the
school or on the school district’s
website; kadoka.k12.sd.us. Please
feel free to contact the school with
further questions about this position.
Completed applications may be
dropped off at the school or sent to:
Attn: George Seiler, High School
Principal, PO Box 99, 800 Bayberry
Street, Kadoka, SD 57543 or call 1-
605-837-2172. K45-2tc
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Department Worker. Expe-
rience in road/bridge construction
/maintenance preferred. CDL Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information 837-
2410 or 837-2422, Fax 837-2447
KP45-4tc
SERVICE: Need a plumber? Li-
censed plumbing contractor for all
your indoor plumbing and outdoor
water and sewer jobs call 441-1053
or leave a message at 837-0112.
K44-4tp
LAWN AND YARD MOWING
SERVICE call 837-2320 or 515-
0616 or contact Dick Stolley.
K41-10tp
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
is accepting applications for full time
Deputy Director of Equalization. Se-
lected applicant may be required to
become certified as per SDCL.
Must work well with the public, and
have clerical and computer skills.
Jackson County benefits include
health insurance, life insurance,
S.D. Retirement, paid holidays, va-
cation and sick leave. Position open
until filled. Beginning wage $9.00
per hour. Applications are available
at the Jackson County Auditor’s of-
fice or send resume to Jackson
County, PO Box 280, Kadoka, SD
57543. Ph: 605-837-2422
KP45-4tc
EARN A FREE TV: Apply now at the
Gateway Apartments and if you
qualify for one of the apartments,
you could be eligible for a free 19”
flat screen TV. Please call 1-800-
481-6904 for details on how you can
earn your free TV. K26-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: Will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and we will
give you a quote. Office 837-2621,
Rich’s cell 431-2226, toll free 877-
867-4185. K45-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Agriculture …
May 30, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 10
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
This Ad will
disappear
in seconds
if we put it on
the radio.
~~~
SEEING
is
BELIEVING
~~~
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
Kadoka
605-837-2259
Managing Alfalfa Weevils
A producer recently called to
ask when was the best time to
spray alfalfa weevil adults. There
are a few alfalfa producers who
seem to have discovered that
spraying the adults reduces the in-
cidence and feeding damage of the
larvae.
While there may be some truth
to it, there are some inherent prob-
lems with this practice. SDSU Ex-
tension Entomologist, Ada
Szczepaniec, reports that a num-
ber of things can happen to ad-
versely affect the adults laying
eggs, the eggs hatching, the larvae
surviving, etc. Warm and wet
springs promote the growth of
pathogens that attack the larvae
so weather conditions and soil
moisture play a role in the severity
of alfalfa weevil infestations.
There are also several predatory
insects that offer a bio control al-
ternative.
These natural controls can re-
sult in larval populations being
low enough that insecticide appli-
cations may not be economical. If
you apply insecticides with the in-
tention of controlling the adult
weevils, you will never know if the
population of larvae would have
justified insecticide treatments or
not. The larva is the damaging life
stage and the target for control, if
needed. Routine insecticide appli-
cations are detrimental to the
predatory insects that are typically
abundant in alfalfa fields. There is
also concern that consistent, rou-
tine insecticide applications may
lead to resistance of alfalfa weevils
to insecticides.
SDSU Extension’s recommen-
dation is to scout for alfalfa weevils
and make management decisions
based on numbers of weevils, the
growth stage and/or height of the
alfalfa, and other factors. The gen-
eral threshold (and least precise) is
to treat if 30-40% of tips are dam-
aged by the weevils, larvae are
present, and early harvest is more
than one week away. The bucket
method is a more precise sampling
method and is the preferred tech-
nique to sample alfalfa weevils to
determine whether pesticide appli-
cations are warranted. An expla-
nation of the bucket method, along
with other good information about
alfalfa weevils can be found in the
iGrow article, “Entomology Up-
date: Alfalfa Weevil Scouting
Notes” at: http://igrow.org/agron-
omy/other-crops/entomology-up-
date-alfalfa-weevil-scouting-notes/
.
Early cutting can be a highly ef-
fective strategy in managing al-
falfa weevils if the weather
cooperates. Ideal conditions for
early cutting in alfalfa weevil man-
agement are good drying condi-
tions, i.e. warm temperatures, low
humidity, sunshine, and wind. The
idea is to cut the alfalfa and get it
baled and out of the field to expose
the larva to the drying conditions,
which will lead to a lot of mortality.
With early cutting, producers need
to monitor the regrowth after the
first cutting to make sure enough
larva didn’t survive to keep the
second cutting from regrowing.
Regular scouting is crucial in mak-
ing sustainable management deci-
sions.
Calendar
6/3/2013: HOSTA, 10:00 a.m.,
C&B Operations John Deere Deal-
ership Gettysburg, SD
6/11/2013: Wheat Walks, Del-
mont and Winner, SD
6/12/2013:Wheat Walks, Dakota
Lakes Research Farm and Gettys-
burg, SD
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Have you ever wondered about
the forage value of certain plants
in your pasture? Considered an al-
ternative grazing system, but need
more information about what ef-
fect it will have on the land and
productivity in your area? Do you
just want to learn to identify
plants in your range? If you an-
swered yes to any of these you
should plan to attend a pasture
walk at Brett Strain’s on Wednes-
day, June 12, hosted by SDSU Ex-
tension, Mellette County NRCS,
Mellette/Todd County Conserva-
tion District and South Central
RC&D. The White River Annie’s
Project Group requested the pas-
ture walk so that they could gain a
better understanding of plant
identification and grazing systems
and better understand what is
happening on the land and how
management decisions affect the
natural resources. The pasture
walk is open to the public and
everyone is invited to participate.
The pasture walk begins at 5:30
p.m. CDT and will conclude by
7:30 CDT. Participants will gather
on location. To get there travel four
miles north of White River on Hwy
83, East of the Moran Auto Sal-
vage or 19 miles south of Murdo on
Hwy 83, East of the Moran Auto
Salvage. Light snacks and refresh-
ments will be available for the par-
ticipants.
There will be a registration fee
for the pasture walk, but SDSU
Extension programs are open to all
South Dakota residents regardless
of their ability to pay registration
fees or other program fees as iden-
tified.
For more information about the
pasture walk, contact the Mellette
County NRCS Office at 605-259-
3252 or Adele Harty with SDSU
Extension at adele.harty@sd-
state.edu.
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Mellette County
Pasture Walk

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