June 2013

The Tanner Trio
Siblings carry on the family business Mission ‘junkies’ journey to Africa Flycasters conserve fish habitat

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Janet Farris plays with musicians in the Northern California Accordion Society.
ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

4 14 17

Meet the Tanners

Close-knit family works, plays hard together.

Festival of Classical Masters
Brandon Yip, Di Wu, ‘nuff said.

Mission Possible

Catch and Release
Granite Bay fishers cast net on conservation efforts.

Husband and wife undertake humanitarian mission work in Rwanda.

27 29

et me put this right out there: I am not a camper. I had this revelation three years ago when a friend of mine decided she wanted her bachelorette party to consist of nine women gathered around a fire pit, freezing, in the mountains of Santa Cruz. This was my first camping trip, and one of those great bonding experiences I won’t soon forget. Oh, how the scandalous secrets came out! The s’mores weren’t bad either. But, the whole time — the longest day and a half of my life — I found myself posing a series of questions. It began with loading up the SUV: Wait, we need to bring all that? (As someone who prefers to pack light, almost problematically so, I was

L

I’ll Take the Cabin
Sena Christian Managing Editor

appalled at the amount of equipment involved in the endeavor). Then, once we’d arrived: We have to make our own food? I was supposed to bring mosquito repellant? Does anyone have an extra pillow? Or blanket? How in the heck do you set up this tent? Needless to say, I got out of doing a lot of the heavy labor. I love the great outdoors, and I definitely don’t mind being in a place where I can lean my head back and stare up at the stars in the night sky, far away from the city lights. But, usually, when

I’m done staring, I get to go inside a four-walled structure and sleep in a bed with a roof over my head. As summer approaches, I’m sure I’ll hear friends and relatives talking about plans for their annual camping trips. But I can’t help wondering why anyone would choose to be uncomfortable when they could stay in a lovely, cozy cabin down the road and be, uh, you know, comfortable? Before I get branded as a close-minded, spoiled brat, I’m vowing here and now to give camping another try. Because, after all, life is all about facing extreme adversity.
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @GraniteBayView.

Music to Our Ears

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Dining View Hot Property Professional View Things to Do Daytripper Back and Forth 12 22 45 48 49 50

Northern California Accordion Society shares love of ‘squeezebox.’

ON THE COVER:
Siblings Scott Tanner, left, Trisha Pollock and David Tanner at Douglas Ridge RV Boat Storage.
COVER PHOTO • ANNE STOKES

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JUNE 2013 Volume 23 • Number 6
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Publisher: Kelly R. Leibold, 916-774-7910, kellyl@goldcountrymedia.com Editor: Krissi Khokhobashvili, 916-774-7955, krissik@goldcountrymedia.com Managing Editor: Sena Christian, 916-774-7947, senac@goldcountrymedia.com Advertising director: Suzanne Stevenson, 916-774-7921, suzannes@goldcountrymedia.com Advertising information: Rebecca Regrut, 916-774-7928, rebeccar@goldcountrymedia.com Production supervisor: Sue Morin Circulation: 1-800-927-7355 or 916-774-7900

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• JUNE

3

Here Come the Tanners

Meet the family behind the family business
BY SENA CHRISTIAN

PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

David, center, and Scott Tanner talk to Breann Zweck, owner of StayFIT gym in the Douglas Ridge Shopping Center on Sierra College. The Tanners own and manage the center.

y the time she was 6 years old, Trisha Pollock was water skiing with her five older brothers on Folsom Lake. She was also jumping on a big backyard trampoline, and eventually riding quads and motorcycles, mud sliding, becoming an accomplished skeet shooter, like her siblings, and much of this outdoor fun happened on her family’s property off Cavitt Stallman Road in Granite Bay. “You learned how to do all the boy stuff,” Pollock’s dad, John Tanner, told her on a recent afternoon. The Tanner kids — five sons and two daughters — spent a lot of time

B

GRANITE BAY VIEW

“I like dealing with the tenants and property management and trying to find a fit for people. We like to bring (businesses) in that would benefit the community.”
Scott Tanner

together during their childhood: spending time outdoors, camping in the mountains of Santa Cruz and traveling. A couple of the sons also acquired their dad’s passion for flying planes and became pilots.
• SEE FAMILY PAGE A6

Sibling business owners Scott Tanner, left, David Tanner and Trisha Pollock interact with an employee at the Cheesesteak Grille in the Douglas Ridge Shopping Center.

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FAMILY: Three siblings work together to manage shopping center, office building, RV storage
continued from 4 But this close-knit family doesn’t just play hard together. Now, as adults, they also work hard together as owners of Tanner Industries, a construction and property management company based in Granite Bay, with commercial and industrial buildings also in Loomis, Nevada and Arizona. Additionally, they run a commercial roofing company called Western Single Ply and a solar company called WSP Solar LLC. Three of the siblings — Pollock, David and Scott Tanner — reside locally and play an active role in the family business, primarily serving as landlords of the 23,000square-foot Douglas Ridge Shopping Center and a 21,000-square-foot office building near the

Hanna, 14, and her dad, Scott Tanner, weed around the tomato plants in back yard of Scott Tanner’s parents’ house in Granite Bay.
PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

“Dad has these fun, interesting stories about people, because you have to work with different personalities. He’s taught me a lot about running a business.”
Trisha Pollock

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teak Grille, StayFIT, Rima Boutique and U.S. Cryotherapy, the first coldtherapy clinic in the United States. The Tanners also own the nearby property occupied by Dirt Busters Car Wash. “I like dealing with the tenants and property management and trying to find a fit for people,” said Scott Tanner, 46. “We like to bring (businesses) in that would benefit the community.” In May 2012, the family opened Douglas Ridge RV Boat Storage with 170 spots for renters to park their recreational vehicles and boats. A year later, the facility is about one-third full. The Tanners felt there was a need for this type of business, largely because of their own experiences. “We all had boats and trailers and no place to take them and we had space back here,” Scott Tanner said. The storage facility is on Sierra College Boulevard, tucked away behind the shopping center —

or, as some might remember the area, the former site of the Juke Box. “You tell anyone it’s over by the old Juke Box and they always know where the old Juke Box is,” Scott Tanner said. Like his siblings, Scott Tanner attended Greenhills School and Cavitt Junior High School in Granite Bay, and graduated from Oakmont High School in Roseville. He said the only local shopping when he was growing up in the 1970s was Roseville Square on Douglas Boulevard. The family moved from Southern Alberta, Canada, to California in 1968, when patriarch John Tanner was offered a job with an oil company. He later launched a construction company and development business. They built their home on that property off Cavitt Stallman, where the parents remain. Scott Tanner joined the family business a few years ago, after leaving

the area to attend college at Brigham Young University in Utah, where he majored in construction management. He and his wife, a vocalist, also lived in Nevada and Tennessee and back to Salt Lake City. For his second job, he does mobile marketing for real-estate companies. His brother David, 42, also graduated from Brigham Young University with a degree in technology management and met the woman who would become his wife of, so far, nearly 20 years. In his spare time from the family business, he runs a side business in roofing and maintenance. They have four children and live in Granite Bay. “We like the school district,” David Tanner said. “We like the community. We have friends and family here.” There’s definitely no shortage of family around, despite the fact that the other four siblings live in Idaho, Utah and Canada. But the “best three” siblings are here, Pollock jokes. Pollock, 35, has worked as a cosmetologist for the past 14 years. She said her home business has benefitted from her involvement with Tanner Properties.

“It’s always exciting,” Pollock said. “Dad has these fun, interesting stories about people, because you have to work with different personalities. He’s taught me a lot about running a business.” He also taught his children about a passion for outdoor adventure. As teenagers, the Tanner siblings went parasailing over Folsom Lake. As adults, they’re passing those hobbies onto their children— they have 13 among the three of them, from ages 2 to 21. Those local family members spend most Sundays together attending the Granite Bay Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and having dinner afterward. John and Barbara Tanner recently celebrated their 50th anniversary on a cruise

From top left, the grandchildren of Granite Bay residents John and Barbara Tanner: Matthew Pollock, Andrew Tanner, Johanna Pollock, Lily Tanner, Ella Tanner and Taylor Pollock. Front row: Colin Tanner, Hannah Tanner holding Owen Tanner and Molly Pollock.
with their grown children. But, for this trip, their 31 grandchildren stayed home.
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaC_RsvPT.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• JUNE

7

Bruce Ryhal checks the wind direction on Folsom Lake before setting sail on a May afternoon.
KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Folso ake Yacht Club mL
BY EILEEN WILSON

W

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

Put the Wind in Your Sails

e’ve all seen them: sleek-hulled sailboats dancing across San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz looming in the background. On high wind days, the small watercrafts seem to have wings. Terms like regatta, racing fleets and America’s Cup imply a sport of privilege — a sport only the wealthy can play. Well, Folsom Lake Yacht Club will gladly dispel the myth that “sailing is only for the rich.” The local club, comprising 35 members, offers plenty of opportunities for people who have not previously had a chance to sail. “You don’t actually have to own a boat.
• SEE YACHT PAGE 10

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YACHT: Sail on
continued from page 8 Some people just enjoy crewing and joining in the fun on other people’s boats,” said Mark Werder, the club’s commodore. The group has been around for more than 50 years, and members meet weekly at their clubhouse at Brown’s Ravine, on the El Dorado Hills side of Folsom Lake. Any Wednesday evening, if you see sailboats, large and small, skimming waves, canvas stretched aloft and catching the afternoon breeze, it’s likely a club member, doing what he or she loves best. Granite Bay resident Bruce Ryhal grew up in the Sacramento area and has owned a sailboat since the 1970s. He learned to sail at the University of California San Diego Aquatics Center. “I remember hearing about the Folsom Lake Yacht Club in the ’60s, and when I returned to Northern California, after the college years, I knew I would

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join,” he said. Ryhal said the club is a perfect introduction to the sport. “I see people coming to us with all different backgrounds,” he said. “We have people who had experience as a junior sailor, people from other clubs, people who were exposed to sailing in college — maybe they crewed for some friends. Some people love the team experience of crewing, or maybe they want to learn to sail, or maybe they want to meet other sailors or have an opportunity to race. There are a lot of different expectations.” Werder agrees. He said sailing is the perfect family sport. “Our 35 members actually mean 35 families, so our numbers are really much higher than that,” he said. “I joined the club when I got married and I bought a boat that was familyfriendly. We’re really building

As the sun sets on Folsom Lake in May, Bruce Ryhal and his sailing friend Jim Hurley head out for an evening trip.
KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

our members who have kids. People are interested in their kids learning how to sail.” One of Werder’s favorite club activities is a barbecue that takes place when members get together and anchor their boats in some pristine body of water.

“People walk back and forth across the boats,” he said. “We stay a night or two on the boat, and everyone has a great time.” Another reason both men enjoy the club is it gives them the opportunity to race. “Racing gives you a real pur-

pose, a competitive edge,” Werder said. “And it definitely heightens the experience. It pushes you to learn what’s going on with your boat and how you can get faster.” Ryhal owns two boats, one of which is an HV-2 dinghy, a twoperson craft described as very high-performance. “On a howling wind day, it will keep up with a Jet Ski,” Ryhal said. Ryhal agrees that joining the yacht club is a must for enthusiasts who enjoy the competitive side of sailing. “A local yacht club is kind of a conduit to the global world of sailing,” he said. “I want to race, or at least be involved in recreational racing types of activities. I want to be part of the network.” The network can be described as one that gives many reciprocal privileges among yacht clubs around the world, and one in which you might meet someone who has won numerous races, or someone who just finished a race on the other side of the globe.

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Little Princess Gets Her Wish

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Granite Bay High students volunteer to build play structure for 4-year-old

KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Darin Grisham, far right, pushes daughter Autumn, 4, while Elizabeth Grisham pushes son, Calvin, 5. Autumn was granted her wish of a play structure in the family’s backyard through the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

utumn Grisham, 4, dreamed of a play structure built like a red barn in the backyard of her family’s Rocklin house. This would be a place where she could escape with her older brother, Calvin, 5, and forget about their lives with neurofibromatosis type 1, a rare genetic disorder in which nerve tissue grows tumors that can turn cancerous. Their father, Darin, also has neurofibromatosis. When Autumn was granted her wish through the Make-A-Wish Foundation, a group of volunteers, including seven students with the Make-A-Wish Club at Granite Bay High School, quickly constructed the surprise while the siblings were away overnight. Family friend Jesse Paiz moved all the mulch to place under the play structure and built the fence that surrounds the yard, while Granite Bay students Emma Graycyk and art teacher Myron Stephens painted small chicks on the barn — one of Autumn’s favorite animals. The play structure comes with a slide, swings, ladders, bells and a play garden Autumn can water. Other members of the club decorated for the reveal party to coincide with Autumn’s princess-themed birthday party May 4, which included a pony dressed like a unicorn.
~Kim Palaferri

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• JUNE

11

dining view

Come for the ambiance, stay for the food at Cabos Restaurant

¡ Muy Bueno!

Cabos Chef Jose Medrano keeps things lively in the kitchen.
PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

BY TOBY LEWIS

f you follow this column religiously, you might remember I wrote a review on Cabos Mexican Restaurant in Granite Bay a little more than one year ago. I recently decided to pay the restaurant another visit to find out what (if anything) has changed since then. I remember leaving after my initial visit feeling somewhat lethargic and ready to lie down for a nice long nap, preferably in a hammock on a beach in Mexico. But it wasn’t just the huge portions and hearty Mexican food that made me feel that way. In my opinion, one of the best things Cabos has going for

I

DINING VIEW

it is its décor and ambiance. The restaurant is housed in a very beautiful, classic two-story Spanish ranch-style building with a large water fountain out front and plenty of authentic decorations inside. The booths are comfortable and the atmosphere is welcoming — albeit the parking lot is a bit small for a restaurant of its size. A trip to Cabos is not unlike being whisked away to a bistro in Mexico where margaritas and fresh chips and salsa abound. Another positive note for the restaurant is the chips and salsa. Cabos serves two kinds of chips — flour and corn — along with a fresh salsa that co-owner Ezequiel Rodriguez whips up himself every morning.

On this my second visit, we were immediately greeted by Rodriguez, who also waits tables at the establishment. I was surprised to not see any drink prices on the margarita menu, which was a bit offputting. There were plenty of house margarita offerings, but it was hard to tell if I was ordering an $8 drink, $12 or more. (You never know in today’s restaurants – I’ve seen house cocktails go north of $20.) I decided to order the topshelf margarita, which on the menu was described as Sauza Hornitos reposado tequila with sweet and sour and a float of Grand Marnier. When the drink came out, the tequila was lost in the sweet and sour and the Grand Mar-

nier, if it was actually in there, was anything but visible. My date ordered the skinny margarita — Sauza Hornitos plata tequila with agave nectar and fresh lime juice. I could actually taste the tequila in this one and after a fly landed in my first drink, I ordered another round, this

Yucatan shrimp dish.
time the same as my date. Trying not to fill up on the delicious flour tortilla chips, we started with the sampler appetizer ($11.25) — a mixture of chicken sopitas (soft, thick corn tortillas with shredded chicken and a “red” sauce), steak tacos de plaza (which

12

JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

were actually just Mexican street tacos) and chicken taquitos. The plate, which came to our table less than five minutes after we ordered it, was also served with a generous portion of guacamole, sour crème and pico de gallo. From the very start of our meal, I suspected that not much has changed at Cabos since our last visit. In fact, I suspected that not much has changed in the 17 years it has been open. Rodriguez confirmed this suspicion in a later conversation, where he estimated that about 80 percent of his business is based on returning customers. That is a pretty good track record. “(With) a lot of them, we always joke because we already know what they want to eat and what they like to drink,” Rodriguez said. “Some of them have been eating the same thing for 17 years. They haven’t changed anything.” This certainly seemed true, as evidenced by some of the

CABOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT
What: Traditional Mexican cuisine Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily Where: 8570 Auburn Folsom
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Info: (916) 797-1996 or
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In the end, I’ll return to Cabos Restaurant for the atmosphere, the delicious skinny margarita and the fast, friendly service coowner Ezequiel Rodriguez and his staff provide.
from a hotline where it has been sitting — ahem, excuse me … marinating — for six hours. I’m not saying that is the case at Cabos. Perhaps the chefs know what sells and what doesn’t and they are able to rotate the food efficiently. Nevertheless, I’ve found this scenario to be the case in nearly every Mexican restaurant I have visited in Granite Bay, with very few exceptions. For our entrée course, I decided to put the kitchen to the test and order the Yucatan scallops (13.95) — marinated sea scallops sautéed in wine, butter, roasted tomatoes and mushrooms. Nothing, to me, seems more

patrons in the restaurant at the time of my recent visit. An elderly couple in the booth next to us, who were seated well after we arrived, were quickly greeted by Rodriguez and knew exactly what they wanted when he approached them. Their food was brought out not more than five minutes later. The couple quickly devoured their meal and was up and out of there before anyone even knew they were there. You don’t get service that fast at In-N-Out Burger, let alone a sit-down Mexican restaurant. This presents a problem for me: If I am paying more than $10 for an entrée, I expect my meal to be cooked fresh, ready to order, not scooped on a plate

indicative of a quality restaurant than the way it prepares scallops, as, in my opinion, there is only one way to cook them: the right way. You know what I mean — seared to perfection with a crispy, caramelized outer coating, soft and buttery on the inside. Buttery is indeed the right way to describe this dish. However, I need to back up here. Upon ordering my Yucatan scallops, Rodriguez suggested I try the Cabos shrimp and scallops ($14.95) — the same dish, but with the addition of shrimp — to which I reluctantly obliged. I really, really (really) wanted to like this dish. The presentation was beautiful. But the ever-present abundance of butter and oil was just too much. It overpowered the dish and all the wonderful flavors of the sea were lost in it. My date opted for the more traditional combo plate ($9.95) with a shredded beef burrito and cheese enchilada, served with rice and beans. Her dish

was delicious and had all the familiar flavors of what you would expect at a traditional Mexican restaurant. We finished off our meal with fresh, house-made churros and vanilla ice cream. In the end, I’ll return to Cabos for the atmosphere, the delicious skinny margarita and the fast, friendly service Rodriguez and his staff provide. I concluded, however, that this is not the place to go if you wish to venture outside of your comfort zone when it comes to Mexican cuisine. Next time, I will stick to the traditional Mexican comfort food that Rodriguez, as a chef for more than 40 years, has obviously come to perfect. Perhaps, I will even become part of the 80 percent.
Toby Lewis is a freelance writer with 30 years experience in the restaurant industry. Look to each month’s Dining View for his thoughts, insights and opinions about dining in and around Granite Bay. Follow him on Twitter, @TobLewis.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • JUNE 13

Karen Wilkes, left, helps women in a Rwandan refugee camp build latrines as part of a humanitarian mission trip.
COURTESY PHOTOS • KAREN WILKES

Husband and wife embark on mission trips
BY SENA CHRISTIAN

‘Mission Junkies’ Serve Others
GRANITE BAY VIEW

rad Wilkes isn’t an adrenaline junkie, but a self-proclaimed “mission junkie,” which might actually be one and the same. Just give him a worthy cause that involves those less-fortunate — doesn’t matter where and what this need might be — and he’ll at least give it some consideration. In fact, Wilkes and his wife, Karen, have already served on two mission trips for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Granite Bay. These missions are humanitarian-focused.

B

“You’re familiar with the young kids in the white shirts? Well, we’re the older version,” Brad Wilkes, 57, said. He served his first mission in the mid-1970s at 19 years old in the Bay Area and Central Valley and knew since then he’d do so again with his spouse, once he married. A few years ago, he retired from doing government financial and operational consultant work and his wife, Karen, retired as a school psychologist, so they could embark on a moresatisfying adventure. A friend had recently died in a plane crash, which inspired their desire to not wait, but to go immediately.

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“You always have these goals and you put them on the back burner, and they might be the most important goals of your life,” Brad Wilkes said. The Granite Bay couple first lived in Uganda and Ethiopia for 20 months, returning home in October 2009 before embarking for another 18 months in Rwanda. They returned home from that trip in January. Now, they plan to stick around Northern California, at least for a little while.

Life in Rwanda
In Rwanda, a country of 11 million people, the Wilkeses led multiple initiatives to improve the lives of residents, includ-

ing sanitation, water, vision, neonatal resuscitation therapy, wheelchair, food production and self-reliance projects. “Nothing we’ve done in our 34 years of marriage is more fulfilling — outside of raising our kids — than this,” Karen Wilkes, 56, said. Rwanda is located slightly south of the equator at a high altitude. While the Wilkeses considered Uganda and Ethiopia riddled with corruption, they found Rwanda to be a highly organized society with a stable government, and laws that are abided by and enforced. They describe Rwanda as safe and beautiful, with nice people. The couple lived in a rented duplex, for $1,300 a month, in the capital of Kigali. Following the Rwandan genocide of 1994, when more than 500,000 people perished, according to Human Rights Watch, dozens of nonprofit organizations and nongovernmental organizations moved into the country, eager to help. But, in the process, these good-hearted expats drove up housing costs.

Brad Wilkes clasps hands with a Rwandan woman whose village had been impacted by heavy floods.
The Wilkeses bought groceries from the neighborhood market and fresh produce from the back of a farmer’s truck. In Rwanda, there’s one main language and most people in the cities speak English. For these humanitarian trips, Mormon church leaders meet in Salt Lake City to determine where a missionary will go. Volunteers pay their own way. The church focuses much of its efforts in rural areas and United Nations refugee camps in war-torn countries. Rwanda has four refugee camps, primarily occupied by Congolese, according to Brad Wilkes. The biggest problem on
• SEE MISSION PAGE 16

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • JUNE 15

MISSION
continued from page 15 these sites: sanitation. At one camp of 17,000 people, on the top of a hill, no toilets existed — people would dig a hole in the ground to go to the bathroom, Brad Wilkes said. So, in the span of a few months, he and his wife became experts on dischargeable latrines. They hired an African contractor and camp people — mainly women, who earned $1 a day — to build the latrines. Each latrine cost $26,000 and will last for 20 years, and 26 will be built once the project is complete. Because each project has a self-reliance component, the couple hired a local person to train others on hygiene — how to properly wash hands, how germs are transmitted, how to prepare food. These people are then tasked with training others.

Karen and Brad Wilkes show off some of their souvenirs from their humanitarian trips to Africa.
ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Couple Leads Projects
There are two congregations of the Church of Latter-day Saints in Granite Bay called “wards,” each with about 500 members, according to local spokesman Jan Pinney. These wards are part

of a larger church unit of about 3,500 members, called a “stake,” which also includes five Rocklin wards. Pinney said several local couples have left their homes to serve mission trips for up to three

years in Ukraine, Brazil, Arizona and Sierra Leone, among other nations. One husband and wife are currently in Zimbabwe. “The Wilkeses are an inspiration to me,” Pinney said. “Brad retired early so he and Karen would be healthy enough to serve a rigorous service mission in Africa. A year after returning from their first African service mission, they decided to serve an additional 18 months helping make things better for the African people. This level of commitment is exemplary.” While in Rwanda, the couple also found time to help construct water fountains in a small village, so women and children would no longer have to travel long distances to watering holes. They made a water-capture system, and drilled 30 wells and put in pumps. They established a committee to assess

water fees to keep the wells functioning. “We don’t just want to build it, feel good and leave,” Brad Wilkes said. “We want it to be there in five years.” The couple next ran a neonatal resuscitation therapy workshop in which specialists from the United States taught local midwives and physicians how to create an airway to save babies struggling to breathe. Each participant left with a kit of equipment to take back to their clinics. Another project involved distributing 300 wheelchairs sent from the Mormon church. Local technicians were trained on the correct way to fit and fix wheelchairs. One woman with polio — who had lost her husband and three children in the genocide — had been walking on her hands for years until obtaining a wheelchair,

Brad Wilkes said. During Vision Project, 20,000 glasses were given to Rwandans and trained professionals conducted retinal laser surgery at the University Central Hospital of Kigali. He met one woman who hadn’t read for 15 years, because of poor eyesight. Throughout Brad and Karen Wilkes’ stay, they regularly saw indications of the genocide’s legacy on Rwanda and its people. “Everywhere you go, every person is affected by it,” Brad Wilkes said. But, his wife added, Rwandans as a whole have moved past this tragic past and are happy, hardworking people. She considers it a great honor to participate in doing what she could to alleviate their suffering.
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaC_RsvPT.

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JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Bandleader John Testa, of Antelope, leads a jam session with several members of the Northern California Accordion Society at their monthly meeting at the Lutheran Church of the Resurrection in Granite Bay.
ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Squeezebox’s Sweet Music
Accordion society pulls tunes, memories from instrument
BY LAURA O’BRIEN

embers of the Northern California Accordion Society break into a stirring rendition of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” on a warm May evening at the Lutheran Church of the Resurrection in Granite Bay. Like baseball’s anthem, the evocative accordion conjures nostalgia for bygone times. “It’s a unique instrument,” says Amy Siler, 14, of Rocklin. “No one else that I know, except these people, plays it.” Siler has received scholarships for accordion lessons from the

M

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

Northern California Accordion Society, which formed in 2002 and meets monthly. The society promotes educational opportunities and public awareness of the accordion. Group members perform various styles of music, including standards, classical pieces and ethnic music. Like many in the group, Siler took up accordion as a child, at around age 7. Her grandmother plays accordion, too. “I’d always heard her play when I was little, and so one summer when she was out on a trip, I started to play and then
• SEE ACCORDION PAGE 18

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• JUNE

17

ACCORDION
continued from 17 when she came home I surprised her,” Siler says. During a solo on this May evening, she plays “La Compagnola,” a piece in her grandmother’s repertoire. John Testa, 69, a former band teacher for the Roseville City School District, began playing accordion 60 years ago, and now teaches the instrument, fondly nicknamed a “squeezebox.” “It’s kind of the best of two worlds, where you have the melody, the harmony and the rhythm all together in the accordion,” Testa says. “That’s what makes it a solo instrument.” Testa, who also played clarinet in his youth, petitioned his high school band teacher to let him in her jazz dance band. “I asked her if I could play my accordion in it and at first she said (famous bandleader) Tommy Dorsey didn’t have an accordion,” he says. “But I talked her into it.”

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ACCORDION SOCIETY
When: Jam session at 6:30 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. first Wednesday of the month Where: Lutheran Church of the Resurrection, 6365 Douglas Blvd. in Granite Bay Cost: $3 for non-members; $2 for members Info: Call President Jerry Keifer at (916) 652-0836

Rocklin resident Amy Siler, 14, who has played the accordion since second grade, plays at the Northern California Accordion Society's monthly meeting in Granite Bay.
Before each monthly meeting, accordion society members may participate in a halfhour jam session, which included Irish music in March and “Easter Parade” in April. Then individuals and duets perform, both before and after a break for snacks and a raffle that funds scholarships. The society also recognizes members’ birthdays and wedding anniversaries, when couples dance to waltzes played in their honor. Among the group of about 50 people at the May meeting, several singles and couples

came without their instruments. Darleen and John Feller, both of Swiss ancestry, met at a polka dance. She and her husband travel from Sun City Roseville to hear accordion music, including trips to Oktoberfest in Oregon and the Ripon Swiss Club. “The Pacific Coast is rich with accordion music,” Feller says. Many in the society began playing accordion during the American heyday of the instrument in the mid-20th century. Jerry Keifer began accordion lessons about 60 years ago, when a person knocked on the door of his childhood home in Los Angeles. “Back in the ’50s and ’60s there were a lot of accordion students,” says Keifer, 69, who now lives in Loomis and recently took over as society president. “I guess it kind of died down with the guitars and the Beatles and Elvis.” Taffy Steffen, of Folsom, also began lessons thanks to a doorto-door salesman representing a music conservatory.

“I’m partial to the French and Italian and the classics,” says Steffen, who returned to the accordion after 35 years. “A lot of people (don’t think of) the accordion as classical.” Society members have appreciated the accordion’s accompaniment to their life stories. Vince Cukar founded the accordion society. Like Steffen, he returned to the instrument after a long hiatus — in his case, 34 years — “at my wife’s insistence.” Cukar didn’t begin lessons until age 15 because his father, an immigrant from then Yugoslavia, needed to save up money to buy the instrument. At one point, Cukar practiced up to eight hours a day. Keifer played accordion on the side while maintaining a job at the railroad in Sacramento. He thanks his mother for his accordion lessons later in life. “I knew I was going to do this for the rest of my life,” Keifer says. “That’s how much I like the accordion.”

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Bamboo Creative Takes on the World With ‘Snippet’
Granite Bay company sees blog-eBook hybrid as a revolution
GRANITE BAY VIEW

BY SCOTT THOMAS ANDERSON

n a clean row of cubicles, a group of fresh-face programmers is trying to break through the slumber of conventional thinking: The men behind Bamboo Creative don’t just want to be known as another tech start-up — they want to be pioneers who reinvent online publishing and the possibilities of fan-artist interaction in the digital age. The inventors of the new platform Snippet are thinking big and making no apologies for how high they’ve set their sights. Bamboo Creative’s office on Douglas Boulevard in Granite Bay may have the look of a college computer lab, but there is nothing green about the technology it’s churning out, which is an interactive world that combines current reading

I

trends with long-proven elements of fandom. In simple terms, Snippet takes the best parts of blogs and eBooks and fuses them together in a unique way that brings quality and gate-keeping devices back into the fold. A Snippet is a digital reading document that never runs longer than 1,000 words. It mirrors blogs in the sense that a Snippet typically includes photos and embedded video clips. “The content is always going to be limited to 1,000 words per chapter,” said C.J. Alvarado, Bamboo Creative’s CEO. “One of our authors can write as many chapters as they want, but, within each chapter, anything they can’t say with 1,000 words they can finish saying with photos and videos.” While Snippets may have the mixed media flare so commonly seen in the wild west of the blogosphere, they also tap into the nation’s growing obsession with eBooks in a very direct way. The writers creating

Snippets are reimbursed, according to sales, for their time, energy and intellectual stamina. But for readers, writers and potential investors, such claims about profit invoke an obvious question: In an era where newspapers and magazines struggle due to Americans’ reluctance to pay for online content, why will consumers hunker down and buy Snippets? To this, Alvarado responds with two simple words: incentive and affordability. Snippet prices will range from .99 to $4.99. More importantly, Snippet is battling to recruit contributors that bring undeniable value or fan bases to the table. “We’re bringing in musicians, artists and authors who already have a
• SEE SNIPPET PAGE 20

C.J. Alvarado is CEO of Bamboo Creative.
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• JUNE

19

SNIPPET
continued from 19 good connection with their fans,” Alvarado explained. “We’re also reaching out to popular and well-established bloggers. A lot of consistent bloggers have told us about how frustrating it is that some of their most profound work just gets buried. If we bring a blogger into Snippet, it allows him or her to pick, let’s say, their 10 best blogs of the year and represent them in clean, userfriendly way that’s monetized.” Bamboo Creative’s team believes the blogosphere has not been completely tapped of top-notch talent yet, pointing out there are a number of experts in certain fields who would be extremely popular if they blogged. “However, they end up deciding there’s just no return on the investment they’d put into it — Snippet has the potential for a financial return on that kind of time and energy. On

COURTESY • BEN DE RIENZO

Ben De Rienzo, left, C.J. Alvarado and Jake Elia are the team behind Snippet.
our end, this creates built-in marketing. It’s very viral, it’s very tribal,” Alvarado said. Snippet also aims to give musical artists a better way to reach out to fans as digital downloads reign supreme and traditional CD and record jackets go the way of the wind. Snippet’s mixed-media capability allows musicians to create a crisp package that includes written messages, lyrics, rare photos and studio work or live performances — all in a way that grabs revenue to help keep the creative endeavors going. “There’s the opportunity to take the reading experience into a community with other fans,” said Snippet Project

Developer Jake Elia. “That alone appears to a variety of learning styles that are out there.” For Ben De Rienzo, the art director behind Snippet’s colorfully sleek look and feel, the possibilities keep revealing themselves. “We’re going for a beautiful, mobile reading experience,” De Rienzo said. “A lot of digital book offerings are pretty bland. Our design is to make people feel like they’re not a slave to what they’re reading. We’re making it a more social and energetic experience.” And that is exactly what drew Rocklin writer Genny Heikka to Snippet. Heikke has written a parenting blog since 2008. Now, she’s embarked on a series of Snippets that will act like a collective eBook called “Finding Mommy Bliss.” So far, Heikka has been thrilled with the different avenues Snippet allows for self-expression. “It’s such a cool, new platform,” Heikke said. “I’ve

launched my first chapter, and I was able to include photos and video of me speaking about the whole concept for what I’d be working on, and then tying that back into the chapter’s relevance … I also love how you can comment directly on social media from a Snippet. Things like that make you realize how exciting it is to be part of something new.” For Alvarado and his team, one of the biggest messages to get out is that Snippet is meant to strengthen the future of writing, not weaken it. “Reading can be extremely enriching,” Alvarado said. “But some people view it as being boring because it’s not interactive. We want to change that. We think this will get younger readers to connect with writers in a new way. We’re trying to solve a major problem — we’re trying to do something huge.”
Scott Thomas Anderson can be reached at scotta@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow him on Twitter, @ScottA_RsvPT.

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Granite Bay
GRANITE BAY VIEW • JUNE 21

hot property

Feels Like a World Away

COURTESY PHOTOS • EWALK TOURS

Peaceful surroundings and curb appeal make this Loomis home desirable.

Peaceful setting gives Loomis home added appeal
BY EILEEN WILSON

Where: 6148 Brace Road, Loomis Size: Four bedroom, three
bathroom. 3,380 square feet, 2.6 acres. Price: $825,000 Contact: Annie Cox, Penryn Loomis Real Estate, (916) 6529797 or www.penrynloomis realestate.com

HOT PROPERTY

he property at 6148 Brace Road might not be exactly what you’re expecting in the heart of Loomis. Take a Sunday drive down the rambling lane, and you will find a classic home filled with highend features and with curb appeal more often found in an upscale, gated community. The home’s modern approach begins with the exterior — a custom property with a Mediterranean flair, surrounded by nearly three acres of oaks, rock outcroppings and enough yard for a family to create a baseball diamond or a football field. Everything in the home says up-to-date, from the extensive crown moldings to the chef’s kitchen appliances. The home is flooded with sunshine and includes custom features such as ceiling fans — fixtures that clearly weren’t purchased at a big-box store.

T

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

All the hardware in the home is unique, as are the plumbing fixtures. “This isn’t your typical custom home. The builder paid attention to every detail,” said Annie Cox, of Penryn Loomis Real Estate. “Some custom homes can be overstated. This home is perfect.” The home’s entrance is a dramatic amalgam of 20-inch travertine tiles and smooth, decorative arches. From the formal dining room with arched windows to the kitchen and family room beyond, nothing beats the lush, oak-filled views. The kitchen’s beauty is a close second to its natural ele-

Natural light floods the family room inside the house at 6148 Brace Road in Loomis.
ments. The room includes granite slabs in neutrals that range from crème fraiche to peach to Sienna, and the room includes a Dacor oven, Dacor built-in microwave, Bosch dishwasher and a five-burner cook top with matching stainless hood. A large center island outfitted in granite includes a veggie sink, and the room is surrounded in a patterned granite backsplash. Double sinks, stainless fixtures, appliance caddies and an extradeep pantry complete the room that is adjacent to the breakfast room. The space also includes a built-in desk area with views to the glorious outdoors. Cabinets and built-ins are pale maple — the perfect complement to the
• SEE HOT PROPERTY PAGE 25

22

JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • JUNE 23

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HOT PROPERTY: Loomis home boasts a suite of a master bedroom, detailed garage space
continued from 22 bright white molding throughout. The family room includes plenty of luxury features, as well, starting with the boxed coffered ceiling. A custom ceiling fan and granite-fronted, maple-mantel fireplace take center stage in the room, with a wrap-around style porch just outside. The master bedroom is a true suite, offering a sitting room with granite-faced fireplace and coffered ceilings, his and hers closets with built-ins and a master bathroom that rivals that of any spa. The bathroom includes light hardwood and dual vanities outfitted in creamy travertine, as well as a makeup area. A raised, jetted tub takes advantage of views from a giant picture window, while the dual-head shower in cream-colored travertine also offers views. The room includes backyard access to the shady porch that runs the length of the back of the home. Meticulous detail was paid to

With birds singing and squirrels chasing, the home may only be five minutes from the freeway, but it feels like a world away.
other rooms in the home, too. The more than 1,100-square-foot epoxy-floored garage with extensive built-ins and workshop area is a tinkerer’s dream. An indoor laundry room includes plenty of storage and offers an extra-deep utility sink and travertine counters. A guest bath is outfitted in tumbled travertine, includes a separate water closet area and is easily accessible from the home’s bedrooms. But it might be the peaceful setting that future homeowners will love the most. With birds singing and squirrels chasing, the home may only be five minutes from the freeway, but it feels like a world away.

COURTESY • EWALK TOURS

It’s granite galore inside the kitchen at 6148 Brace Road in Loomis.

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A

Boy’s Idea Becomes Reality
ber Orchestra will perform. Three years ago, Austin was putting on the Champagne Concerto as a fundraiser for the Del Oro Caregiver Resource Center in Citrus Heights. He raised around $50,000. Austin, a pianist, imagined a music festival where musicians gather to gain inspiration and others become motivated to learn about music. According to his father, Edward Lee, Austin originally considered holding the event in his junior high school cafeteria. Then, at one of the Champagne Concertos, Austin ran into Dr. Thelma Scott-Skillman, then-president of Folsom Lake College. “We talked about starting a music festival,” Austin said. “I didn’t even know that she was the president at the time.” As a result, Skillman offered to open up Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, which was still under construction at the time. The first year the performing arts center opened, the Classical Masters Music

CLASSICAL MASTERS MUSIC FESTIVAL GALA CONCERT
When: 8 p.m. Saturday, June 8 Where: Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10
College Parkway in Folsom Tickets: $29 Info: www.classicalmastersmusicfestival.org

teen’s idea has spawned a festival of music. The Classical Masters Music Festival was conceived three years ago by 14-year-old Granite Bay boy Austin Lee. Now a reality, the capstone event of the festival, the gala concert, takes place Saturday, June 8, at Three Stages at Folsom Lake College. The concert will feature internationally known pianist Di Wu and local classical guitar master Brandon Yip. The Folsom Lake College Youth Cham-

Festival was held. Now 17 and a junior at Granite Bay High School, Austin still helps organize the event. Trained in Germany, Wu has appeared with the Philadelphia Orchestra, Hamburg Philharmonic, New York Pops, National Symphony Orchestra, Singapore Symphony and many others. Yip is also a featured per-

former. Yip has performed professionally since 1985. He started out with piano lessons when he was 7, and at 12 years old, he fell in love with the guitar. Classical guitar, though, began for him when he was in college. He is the pastor of worship ministry development at Bayside Church in Granite Bay.”
~Margaret Snider

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JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Granite Bay Flycasters do more than catch fish
BY TOBY LEWIS

The Scale of a Tall Tale
Granite Bay Flycasters Tom Pettey, left, and Frank Stolten cast away in the American River.
PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

ike Howes was thousands of miles away from home when he caught, and released, the biggest fish of his life. At least, that’s what he tells his friends. The fish: a 15-pound Golden Dorado, the freshwater cousin to the ocean-bound Dorado, which you might recognize more commonly as mahi mahi. Howes was in Uruguay on an excursion, a “fishout” so to speak, with a group of friends from the Granite Bay Flycasters fishing club. Much like a “camp out,” a “fish-out” is a group activity in which any member of the Granite Bay fly fishing club can tag along and go catch some fish. “We have 28 fish-outs this year,” Howes said recently over a cup of coffee at Peet’s Coffee & Tea in the Quarry Ponds Town Center. “That is a lot.” A fisherman all his life, Howes had never picked up a fly rod until he moved to Sacramento in 2003 to be closer to his kids. “I was retired and didn’t have any friends,” Howes said. “So, I was at the sportsman expo over at Cal Expo and Granite Bay Flycasters had a booth there. I talked to the guys and kind of liked them. I thought I needed someone to play with.” Howes is now in his fourth year as president of
• SEE FISH PAGE 30

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FISH: Cast away
continued from 29 the club and says if it weren’t for the club, he might never have learned how to fly fish. “I totally enjoy it — I feel like it’s my club now,” Howes said. “It’s fun to get together and see how everybody helps everybody else out. Even if you don’t know fly fishing whatsoever, everybody just helps. They are not selfish; they share what they know.” Tom Pettey has been part of the club for 10 years and agrees that members not only have the opportunity to learn how to fly fish, but can also learn about watershed protection, fish biology and much more. “I think that prospective members, when they come onboard, have a lot of opportunities to interact with more experienced members,” Pettey said. “That’s the way I learned.” In addition to providing education classes, club members have organized trips to many corners of the Earth to go catch

Granite Bay Flycasters Tom Pettey, left, and Mike Howes share a laugh in the American River.
PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

“I think that prospective members, when they come onboard, have a lot of opportunities to interact with more experienced members. That’s the way I learned.”
Tom Pettey, member, Granite Bay Flycasters

MORE ONLINE
For more information about the Granite Bay Flycasters, visit www.gbflycasters.org.

fish, including South America, Mexico and Alaska. But Granite Bay Flycasters does more than organize “fishouts” and teach people how to fish. The club also contributes every year to conservation groups and provides scholarships for students studying to protect important watersheds throughout the world. “(Watersheds) have to be carefully guarded and protected,” Howes said. “You always

have to want to take care of them. We have to protect them for our kids.” Last year, the Granite Bay Flycasters gave $7,500 in scholarships and to conservation groups, he said. The club raises money through membership fees and its annual dinner and awards banquet. At the annual dinner, Howes explained, the club also hands out what it calls its “Wet Fly” award, which goes to a mem-

ber who does some incredibly foolish or unfortunate thing, which ultimately turns out to be funny. “Last year, the guy who won it was fishing on the Delta and he just fell out of the boat,” Howes said. “Sometimes the line gets tangled, so he went down to pick it up and he just kept going.” The club, which was founded in 1986 with 20 people, is now 213 members strong and a

diverse group of men, women and children. They’re trying to get more women to join. Howes says the women rival many of the men at the craft, mainly because they tend to pick it up quicker and have a much lighter hand. “They are quite good,” he said. “Because they are more mechanical than we are, believe it or not. We try to overpower and they have the mechanics down. They outcast us any time.” Tall tales are not uncommon in the club, either. Just ask Howes. Regarding the giant Golden Dorado fish he caught in Uruguay, Howes said he is not beneath stretching the truth a little bit. “I was being modest saying 15 pounds,” he said. “It’s probably more like 20 or 25 pounds now that the story has been told.”
Toby Lewis is a freelance writer living in Sacramento. Follow him on Twitter, @TobLewis.

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JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Displaced VFW seeks permanent meeting place in Granite Bay
BY SENA CHRISTIAN

O

GRANITE BAY VIEW

nce a month, local veterans gather to talk about sleeping in the jungle, that time one of them barely missed being shot, the dangers of combat, the fun they had living overseas. One man in his 90s relays his experience in the Battle of the Bulge — the bloodiest battle fought by the Americans during World War II — and another gentleman talks about being a prisoner of war in Korea. Among their ranks, there are also younger men who served in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. Many of the tales involve heroics, although plenty simply recall daily life, as the men converse during their meetings of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9869 in Granite Bay. “We like telling our stories. That’s what it is: a brotherhood,” said Bill Grove, 65. But this brotherhood — 300 members strong on

paper, 20 of whom regularly attend monthly gatherings — are without a permanent meeting place. They hope to raise money to build a Veterans Memorial Hall in Granite Bay, or will gratefully ac-cept the donation of a building. “We’ll take everything from cash to nickels and dimes. The thing is, they add up,” said Post 9869 Commander Gary Murawski. The nonprofit group will also accept tax-deductible donations of cars, recreational vehicles and boats they can sell and put into a building fund. Typically, to make money, veterans sell poppies outside grocery stores and put out flags in front of Raley’s on Douglas Boulevard and Auburn Folsom Road for a donation. The poppies are symbolic: During World War I, fallen soldiers were buried right where they died and upon their graves, bright red poppies grew. VFW Post 9869 usually makes about $5,000

Wayne Parker, in white, served in World War II in the U.S. Air Force. These days, Parker and his service dog, Rumor, visit other veterans as part of their service with VFW Post 9869.
KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

through the poppies — not quite enough to fund an expensive building project. Local veterans have met for the past six months out of a small trailer at the South Placer Fire Station No. 17 on Eureka Road. Before that, they met for five years in a much larger space in the shopping center on Douglas and Sierra College boulevards. But then Walmart moved in, the center grew in popularity and a pool supply business leased the space where the veterans met. “We had to give up our suite,” Grove said. “We understand that, because business is business.” VFW Post 9869 formed in 1994, and two years ago consolidated with Orangevale’s post and acquired their ladies’ auxiliary. Current members are from Granite Bay, Citrus Heights and Orangevale primarily,
• SEE VETERAN PAGE 32

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• JUNE

31

VETERAN: VFW supports local vets
continued from 31 but can come from all over the Sacramento area. The purpose of the group is to perpetuate the memory of veterans, and to help those who are struggling — whether that be, for instance, through paying for funeral expenses, installing a water heater, helping with a rent payment, sending care packages overseas or visiting VA hospitals. “We’re not political,” Murawski said. “We don’t care what party you belong to. We care that you care about veterans. And when I say veterans, I mean all veterans.” VFW posts also stand up for veterans’ rights. Upon retiring a

few years ago, Murawski became a veterans counselor for the state of California to assist them in receiving their benefits and accessing services. Murawski said there are now a lot of services available for veterans, and one of the most important ones is spending time with other military personnel who shared similar experiences. “It’s the camaraderie that

we share, because we all had that experience of being away from our family and having been in the stress of combat,” he said. Murawski spent 22 years in the U.S. Army, traveling to Vietnam, Saudi Arabia and several other locales around the world. He suffers hearing loss from the time he got too close to an explosive and his ear drum blew out. But he

remembers the good stuff, too, such as his trips to Rome, Paris and Japan. “You take all the combat you’ve been in, and it doesn’t amount to all the fun stuff you’ve done,” Murawski said. Grove also recalls many of his experiences serving in Vietnam with fondness. “I enjoyed being in the Army — the people I met, the places I got to go,” he said.

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PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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Granite Bay named among nation’s top high schools
BY SENA CHRISTIAN
GRANITE BAY VIEW

Among the Elite
structors,” McGuire said. “This is both gratifying and humbling.” Public schools with 12thgrade enrollment and what judges considered sufficient data from the 2010-11 academic year were evaluated. Schools from 49 states and the District of Columbia were analyzed, and the top schools were awarded gold, silver or bronze medals. Nebraska was the only state that didn’t report enough data to be included. A three-step process was used to determine the best high schools. The first two steps incorporated performance on state proficiency exams, and the third step assessed the degree to which schools prepare students for college-level work by using Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate test scores. Only 15 high schools achieved the maximum 100 percent college-readiness index. Granite Bay High School earned a 51.6 index score. Out of 2,173 students, 59 percent took an Advanced Placement exam and 49 percent passed. West Campus is the only school in the greater Sacramento region to rank higher than Granite Bay High School on the U.S. News & World Report list. “Granite Bay High School epitomizes the academic rigor the Roseville high school district strives for in every classroom,” said board trustee Linda Park. “We are proud of Granite Bay students and faculty and their continued success and recognition.” The four other comprehensive schools in the Roseville Joint Union High School District — Antelope, Oakmont, Roseville and Woodcreek — all earned national silver medals.

ranite Bay High School has been named among the top public schools in the United States, in the 2013 rankings by U.S. News & World Report. Released April 23, the rankings factor in student performance and college-readiness metrics. U.S. News & World Report placed Granite Bay High School as 355th in the nation — out of 21,035 campuses — and 67th in the state. Principal Mike McGuire calls the recognition “extraordinary.” “This honor validates a community who values public education and understands that learning won’t stop after high school. It validates world-class teaching and it validates dedicated, highly competent in-

ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Granite Bay High School junior Kelsey Haag studies for her upcoming Advanced Placement calculus test.
Not to be outdone by U.S. News & World Report, Newsweek also recognized Granite Bay High School through its annual rankings of America’s best high schools, with the local campus placing 289 — or within the top 15 percent — of 2,000 schools selected as finalists, and in the top 2 percent of all schools nationwide.
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaC_RsvPT.

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Granite Bay grad to major in astrophysics, clarinet performance
BY SENA CHRISTIAN

Shooting for the Stars
ly, the closer you get, the more you want to focus on having an amazing experience in high school.
What activities were you in?

L

GRANITE BAY VIEW

ike most high school seniors, Kimberly Sinclair had a very busy academic year. But, for her last semester at Granite Bay High School, Sinclair, 17, made time to go to athletic games, hang out with friends and enjoy home life. She graduated June 1, and after a month in Peru volunteering at a children’s orphanage, she’ll be off to the University of Michigan.
How’s your senior year been?

I had a lot of focus on college applications in the fall and getting ready for the idea of leaving home. Then, going into spring, was a different outlook. In the fall, you’re totally thinking about going to college and starting a new life, and ironical-

I (played clarinet) in the Granite Bay High School Emerald Brigade marching band. It’s been a life-changing experience for me. I’ve been in band since fifth grade and (my) older brother went through the same system four years ahead of me, and he inspired me to get into marching band in the first place. It’s funny when people ask me, “have you ever considered not doing band?” and I can’t even consider that because it’s such an innate part of my lifestyle. I was really involved with the Sacramento Youth Symphony for three years. I didn’t do it last year, mostly because I have such a busy schedule and going into senior year, I didn’t want to be so stressed out, so I took one thing off my plate.

Kimb erly S incla ir

You have to audition every year and I was very excited when I found out I made it into their intermediate orchestra, which is a great privilege for me and then just over the years, getting to develop my passion for music and discover what playing in a symphony is like. I’m actually going to college to double major in clarinet performance and astrophysics.
Astronomy?

don’t actually know. I just know that I’ve always had a passion for stargazing. Starting in junior high school, I subscribed to some science magazines and started reading all about quantum mechanics and cosmology and all these intense concepts that just come easy to me. Sophomore year, I applied to a camp in Arizona for high school students where (we) did research for a week. Junior year, I started the Astronomy Club. We’ve done small-scale research around campus … and we go to local observatories, to firsthand observe the sky.
What has been your best memory from high school?

What are you going to miss most about high school?

What I’m going to miss most is being able to see my closest friends on a daily basis. Just because when you’re going off to college you don’t know what to expect, and I know the people around me and I associate myself with people I know love me, and I’m going to miss that sense of security.
After college, what do you hope to do?

Yes. People always ask me how I got interested in it, and I

Sophomore year when our concert band in the spring traveled to the Kennedy Center and performed there as part of an international festival — just being there with the people I consider to be my family. I had a clarinet solo, and played one of my favorite pieces.

I think I’d like to (go to grad school) and earn a doctorate in astronomy because it’s really hard to get a good research job unless you have a Ph.D. Or, I could start working my way up in a symphony. It takes a lot of years to work your way to the top. So, those are just some things I have in my mind.
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaC_RsvPT.

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Granite Bay parliamentary debaters win championship
BY SENA CHRISTIAN

G

GRANITE BAY VIEW

ranite Bay High School debate partners Justin Habashi and Nicolas Ontiveros won the California High School Speech Association’s state championship tournament in parliamentary debate April 21 in Santa Clarita. The association includes some 300 schools, and students compete in 17 different events during the annual tournament.

Habashi and Ontiveros faced dent and relaxed going into the Claremont High School’s team tournament and the final round. Waiting to hear the in the finals. They argued against the reso- result of the final round was a lution: “On balance, the Key- little nerve-racking, but Justin stone XL pipeline will be benefi- and I were elated after we got cial.” The pair earned a 6-1 decision, emerging as champions. “Winning the state championship was Justin exhilarating,” said Habashi Ontiveros, who will be a senior this fall. “After competing in (several) invitationals this year, I felt confi-

And the Winner is …

our trophies.” Habashi and Ontiveros became debate partners in January 2012. Ontiveros also holds the title of champion for the western region in the Ronald Reagan Great Communicator Debate Series. The duo has parted Nicolas ways, as Habashi Ontiveros graduated June 1. The parliamentary win is only the second state championship

since Granite Bay High School’s speech and debate team formed in 1997, according to the coach, English teacher Robert Prichard. The school won in public forum in 2010. This is Prichard’s first year coaching the speech and debate team, having taken over for his mom, Rita Prichard, upon her retirement. “I am just so proud of these guys,” Prichard said. “They really worked hard and went to tournaments all over the state to hone their skills in order to win this award.”

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Take a deep breath and remember this isn’t a race. This is your life, and it’s you against yourself. Start out slow and steady and gradually build as you progress toward your goal.
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abound, making it easy to fall off track. This brings us to the classic Henry Ford quote, “Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.” In order to stay the course, it’s vital to keep your eyes on the goal. To do so, follow these five steps.
Step No 1: Only One at

When you’re feeling motivated and decide to set a goal, it’s tempting to become over-ambitious by setting multiple goals. While it’s great that you want to improve many things about yourself, the pressure of trying to achieve more than one goal at once will cause you to drop all the goals and go back to status

quo. Focus on the one goal you really want to achieve first, and focus all of your efforts onto this goal with laser-like force. There will be plenty of time in the future to attempt your other goals, but for now, see your No. 1 goal all the way through to completion.
Step No. 2: Start Slow

Another

pitfall

that

often results in dropped goals is the act of starting out too fast and too strong. If your goal in fitness is to drop six pant sizes and exercise five times a week, do not (I repeat, DO NOT) go out and hit the gym hard for the next five days in a row. You’ll be so sore I guarantee you’ll stop all progress the following week and your goal will be put back on a shelf. Take a deep breath and remember this isn’t a race. This is your life, and it’s you against yourself. Start out slow and steady and gradually build as you progress toward your goal. Don’t allow self-induced fatigue to get in your way.
Step No. 3: Know Your Reasons Why

it’s also helpful to focus your mind on how you’ll feel once you’ve finished. Dedicate some time each day to picture your new post-goal life. How awesome are you going to feel when you’ve accomplished this goal that’s been on your mind for so long? Pretty amazing. Visualize that feeling of accomplishment well before you’ve finished the work. The more you feel connected to the end of the race, the more likely you’ll make it through.
Step No. 5: Put It All On the Line

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Why is this goal so important to you? There are probably many reasons, and you should know every single one of them. Write down each and every possible reason you can come up with as to why your goal needs to be met. Intimately get to know the reasons why this goal is so important to you. You should have them memorized and should recite them every single day. Remember what Ford said — when you take your eyes off your goal, you’ll see loads and loads of obstacles. Keep your eyes locked onto that goal by filling your mind with all the reasons you’re going to see this thing through.
Step No. 4: Think About Your Goals

It’s time to put your money where your mouth is. Invest in something that will help propel you toward your goal. When you shell out some of your hard-earned money to aid in your progress, then you are going to take this process seriously. As a trainer, I have organized different groups and some were open training groups (no charge) and others were fee-based. The groups without fees showed low attendance compared to fee-based groups, hands down. In our busy dayto-day world, it’s very hard to stay committed, as something will always come up that seems a little more important than your workout. If you have invested money in your commitment, you are more likely to stick to your program and, in turn, reach your goal.
Debra Skelton is a certified fitness consultant, a licensed nurse and owner of Motivative Health and Fitness. She can be reached at deb@gotatrainer.com.

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Along with thinking about your reasons for accomplishing your goal,

40

JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

family in view

K

Do Your Kids Know These Practical Lessons?
Sheri Hitchings

ids use their instincts by nature. In their repertoire, they are curious, usually happy and eager to learn. School may be an important place to learn, but parents and other adults also play a critical role in educating a child on how to live a happy and productive life. Remember: Be appreciative of a child’s acute cleverness and don’t treat them as little adults. Teach them these practical lessons — and, be open to discovering the lessons children have to teach you, too.

feelings, which means a child may have a hard time figuring out how we really feel. Setting a good example is important: If adults are more open with their emotions and less critical, kids can learn to be the same.

firsthand experience, conversing with others is probably the second-best source of learning. Educators know the importance of asking questions and encourage their students to ask questions in class. If your child doesn’t ask questions, learning becomes much more difficult for him or her. Discussions are not effective if the child seems inattentive, sensitive or angry.

ways of doing things, some adults may find spontaneity difficult. So fun doesn’t get in the way of completing responsibilities, like schoolwork, scheduling out our calendars may be needed. Don’t forget the common saying of our parents: “Work before play!”

Be Positive
Be a role model for different kinds of exercise. Participating in varying outdoor and indoor games and enjoying nature are ways to keep the family healthy. With your positive attitude and renewed spirit, you will notice an improvement in family dynamics.

Live Spontaneously
Most adults like to plan. In fact, we often overplan. Kids, on the other hand, are more spontaneous, reacting with gusto to each moment in their lives. They can easily be deferred from course, which gives them the chance to discover fun and exciting things adults may miss. Remember, a little spontaneity in the lives of adults is important, too. But having developed our own

Express Your Feelings
As adults, we don’t usually have to guess how kids feel — they wear their emotions on their faces. We can also hear how they feel by listening to their comments and watching their actions. As adults, we are often guilty of hiding our own

Encourage Questions
Teenagers usually don’t hold back; they have confidence to ask and probe. When teenagers don’t understand something and are open to communication, make sure to take advantage of this time to work together. Outside of having a

be perfectly amused. Give the family dog or cat a piece of wood and watch the action — animals know the joys of life. Using imagination and discovering new things helps children see themselves and the world from a different perspective. When we’re curious, we are more interesting. For a dream to come true, we usually have to pursue it. As parents, we need to embrace a child’s curiosity. Best of all, don’t miss an opportunity to record the experience of your child discovering something new, so the memory can be viewed on special family nights and saved for future generations.
Sheri Hitchings, married for 47 years, has two children and four grandchildren. As an elementary teacher, learning coordinator, principal, GATE director and student teacher supervisor, she has written articles for 25 years.

Innate Abilities Lead to Discoveries
Children have an innate ability to discover things all by themselves. They can play for hours with a stick or a rock and

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • JUNE 41

financial view

hen our kids were young, they insisted we go to the machine outside the bank with the $20 bills, get as much money as we needed and then we’d be able to buy them all the toys from Toys R Us! Then there was, “Oh, just write a check, Mommy!” they’d say, not realizing that’s actually money, too. Today, a large percentage of our population is unprepared to meet the rising cost of living expenses. In this postrecession era, where the new norm no longer includes easy credit, inflated home prices or full employment, our children need to fully com-

W

Here’s How to Raise Money-Savvy Children
MORE LATER
Rashida Lilani

Read the second part on raising money-savvy children in July’s View.

prehend financial fundamentals to lead a successful and financially independent life. Learning to effectively manage money at a young age is a critical part of a successful adult life. As money habits develop at a very early age, you — the parent or grandparent — play a fundamental role in influencing your child’s financial freedom. Leanda Kayess in her

book, “Money Bags: What Rich Parents Teach Their Kids to Be Happy and Avoid Debt,” says, “Children should be introduced to handling actual cash from an early age so as to involve all of their senses, before progressing to learn how to handle money electronically in our increasingly cashless society.” Dealing with cash helps with problemsolving abilities and basic mathematic skills, and boosts the child’s confidence. In most households,

children receive an allowance for simple chores. Mary Hunt in her book, “Raising Financially Confident Kids,” discusses the methods she and her husband applied with their two boys. Instead of paying for their entertainment and extracurricular activities, they gave the amount to the kids and guided them in prioritizing their spending to make sure the money lasted the entire month. When the children got into trouble or didn’t finish their chores, they were given a “citation,” to be paid by a due date. The idea was to simulate real-life situations so the

children would get acclimated with a system and adjust relatively easily in the real world when the time came. Here are three basic categories for your child’s allowance: Savings: To begin, 10 percent or more should go in the savings bucket. The concepts of interest and stock-market investing can be introduced later when the child is ready. Giving: Another 10 percent can go to a charity of the child’s choice. Helping the less fortunate firsthand promotes a feeling of gratitude and appreciation for what’s being provided for them at home. Spending: The rest can go in the child’s spending bucket. Learning to live within one’s means must start early in life. Understanding the difference between a want and a

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need is critical in achieving balance in one’s financial life. Children should be able to prioritize their wants based on the funds available to them. If they run out of money, so be it. As in real life, some harsh lessons may need to be learned. While saving and giving may be easier concepts to understand and follow, I believe spending money in a meaningful way is the most difficult. We are living in an age of over-consumption. While you’re trying to enforce sound financial habits with your child, advertisers are busy figuring out more ways to get to them. According to iMediaConnection, your child receives up to 4,000 messages from various media sources every day. A 2-year-old can recognize more than 200 brands. After all is said and done, children will be children and may forget good saving and spending habits the minute they are outside of your influence. Have a consistent approach and lead by example. There are many free resources you can find online. One such website, The Mint (themint.org), is a great site that provides useful tips, games, worksheets and calculators for parents and children. Making it fun, interactive and inclusive usually works better for children of all ages.
Rashida Lilani is the owner and principal of Lilani Wealth Management in Roseville. She can be reached at info@lilani weathmanagement.com or (916) 782-7752.

916-791-8585
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42

JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

WINNERS
of the Cutest Critter

Pet Photo Contest

Willow & Sierra

Maya & her kittens

1st PRIZE: $100 (store credit) Provided by: Douglas Feed and Pet Supply

2nd PRIZE: $75 Gift Card Provided by: The Doggie Bag

Oliver the possum

Dixie

3rd PRIZE: $50 Gift Card Provided by: Douglas Feed & Pet Supply

4th PRIZE: Years Supply of Dog Washes Provided by: Douglas Feed and Pet Supply

Hosted by

The Granite Bay View • Douglas Feed and Pet Supply • The Doggie Bag
GRANITE BAY VIEW • JUNE 43

Spring In To
Bakery & Boutique
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44 JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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professional view

he Standard American Diet of processed foods high in sugar and carbohydrates has wreaked havoc on the health of Americans. These nutrient-devoid foods are partly to blame for the abundance of chronic disease in this country, such as heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, asthma, cancer, autoimmune diseases and obe-sity. As a nutritional therapy practitioner, I help clients prevent or reverse chronic disease and dysfunction in the body, because how you eat, move, sleep and the supplements you take profoundly impact your health. How many of you have been on a restricted-calorie diet to lose weight or know someone who has? All hands should be up. Weight loss revolves around your daily appointment with the bathroom scale and cardio machine. Most people can lose weight for short periods of time during a calorie-restrictive diet, but sadly, it’s all too often

T

Fat Loss is Not a Numbers Game
Kristy Corah

CALLING ALL PROFESSIONALS
Are you a professional working in Granite Bay? The View would like to hear from you. Our monthly Professional View column gives local professionals a chance to share what’s going on in their industry. We’re looking for mortgage lenders, financial advisers, health care experts and others to write on topics that would interest our readers. Columns must be original and written by local professionals (not produced by a corporate entity). It must be informative. It cannot contain sales pitches or ask readers to call. Professionals must also submit a head shot. Length is 750 words maximum. Submit your column to Managing Editor Sena Christian at senac@gold countrymedia.com for consideration. The View is not obligated to publish submitted material.

gained back — with a few extra pounds to boot! Fat loss is not a numbers game. It’s not about calories in, calories out, fat grams, scales or exercising more, and it’s definitely not about willpower. The addictive foods in the Standard American Diet will beat you down and cravings will eventually overpower you. So what is the answer? Let’s get back to how you eat, move, think, sleep and supplement to answer that question. A properly prepared, nutrient-dense whole food diet is the foundation of nutritional therapy. A good starting point is the 40/30/30 diet for life. Carbohydrates should comprise 40 percent of your diet, mostly in the form of raw or lightly cooked low-glycemic vegetables and one to three

pieces of fruit per day. Protein should make up 30 percent of your diet. Properly sourced, wildcaught fish, free-range chicken and eggs and grass-fed beef are wonderful choices. Fat, which should also comprise 30 percent of your diet, is the most misunderstood macronutrient in our diet. Fat does not make you fat and is necessary for numerous bodily functions: regulating the absorption of glucose in the blood stream; absorption of fatsoluble vitamins A, D, E and K; and cell membrane integrity, which allows nutrients in and waste out. Fat also produces our stress and sex hormones. Fat makes food taste good and triggers our hormones of satiation and fullness. Quality fats are essential to optimal health: coconut oil, grass-fed butter and ghee, extravirgin olive oil, nuts and seeds and, by all means, leave the skin on your chicken and enjoy this

nutritious and tasty fat. Exercising vigorously with the goal of burning off extra calories from poor food choices is not exercising smart. Exercising smart means a variety of movement — some low impact, such as yoga and walking, along with more vigorous cardio a few times per week. Adequate sleep is a foundation of good health. It fights off infection, supports the metabolism of sugar to prevent diabetes and helps people perform at school and work. Sleep affects a number of endocrine, metabolic and neurological functions. Poor sleep can lead to an increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. I’m often asked to evaluate supplements. When selecting supplements, I first turn to the research and science behind it. I recommend both “healing” supplements, such as digestive enzymes, and prophylactic supplements that support systemic, opti-

mal health. The foundations of good health have a direct impact on hormones, which have a direct impact on metabolism. There are two hormones I’d like to mention, insulin and leptin. Most everyone has heard of insulin and understands it is a fat-storage hormone used to lower blood sugar when carbohydrates are consumed. Few people have heard of leptin, yet it plays a profound role in your metabolism. Leptin keeps you from starving to death by monitoring how much fat you have stored. So when you go on a calorie-restrictive diet, leptin senses famine and downregulates metabolism. People wonder why reducing calories over time is ineffective — leptin is the reason why. You cannot outsmart leptin.
Kristy Corah is a nutritional therapy practitioner and runs Healthy Living Nutritional Therapy in Granite Bay. She can be reached at kristy.corah@gmail.com.

Sarah Whitcomb
Antiques & Restoration

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Over 40 Years Experience
GRANITE BAY VIEW • JUNE 45

SEE THE VIDEO – THEN DECIDE

19 Years Serving Roseville, Granite Bay & Rocklin

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MATH MASTERS • 1120 Douglas Boulevard • Roseville
46 JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

eyes on granite bay

Ready, Set, Raise Money!

Ethan Scifres, 9, finishes the 100-yard dash at the Eureka Schools Foundation’s fifth-annual Fund Run.

ore than 1,000 volunteers and runners laced up their sneakers to participate in the Eureka Schools Foundation’s fifth-annual 5K and 10K Fund Run and pancake breakfast at Granite Bay High School on May 19. The fundraiser benefits the nonprofit foundation, which supports enrichment programs in the Eureka Union School District, including libraries, technology, junior high athletics, band, choir and foreign language. Event cochair Jessica Keefe said many of those valuable programs would likely have been eliminated due to budget cuts, if not for the foundation. The event raised about $40,000.

M

Amy Basca, 7, stretches with mom Belinda Basca before starting the kids 1-mile fun run.

Euan Clark, left, 11, lines up at the 5K starting line at the Eureka Schools Foundation’s Fund Run.

PHOTOS AND TEXT BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW
GRANITE BAY VIEW • JUNE 47

things to do
WHAT’S HAPPENING BY SENA CHRISTIAN

A WHOPPING GOOD TIME
The theme of this year’s Placer County Fair: Country Days and Racin’ Ways, which means attendees will be in for a whopping good time. Check out the exhibitions, pinch your nose in the livestock area, try your skill at some carnival games and win a goldfish or take a spin on rides in the midway. The fair also features live music all four days, pageants and old-fashioned family fun.

Downtown Tuesday Nights
From 5-9 p.m. Tuesdays through July 30 on june Vernon Street in downtown Roseville. Farmers market, mobile food trucks, music, beer garden, arts and crafts vendors, kids fun zone, classic car show. Free admission and parking. (916) 787-0101 or www.2025events.com.

4

Dylan Robinson and Adrianna Eaton take a carnival ride at last year’s Placer County Fair in Roseville.
FILE PHOTO

From 5-8 p.m. the second Thursday of Classical Masters Music june every month year-round on Vernon Street in downtown Festival presents a gala Roseville. Live music, food trucks june concert with Di Wu, include Squeeze Inn Roseville, Brandon Yip and Folsom Lake College Youth Chamber Orchestra Volkswaffle, Krush Burger, Chanat 8 p.m. Saturday at Three Stages, do’s Tacos, OMG Yogurt, Simply 10 College Parkway in Folsom. $29 Southern Food, Cajun Wagon and general admission. (916) 608-6888 Drewski’s Hot Rod. Visit http://sactomofo.com. or www.threestages.net.

Classical Gala Concert

8

Fountains First Fridays Food Truck Fest “Unbeatable: A Bold New Musical” 7 14 30 13
june june

20 23
to

What: Placer County Fair When: 3-10 p.m. Thursday, June 20, and Friday, June 21; 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, June 22, and Sunday, June 23 Where: Placer County Fairgrounds, 800 All America City Blvd., Roseville Cost: $5 general, $3 kids, seniors and active military. Parking $5. Info: (916) 786-2023 or www.placercountyfair.org

Presented by Stand Out Talent with 7 p.m. shows Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. matinees Sunjune june days at Tower Theater, 417 Vernon St. in Roseville. Directed by original “Unbeatable” lyricist and co-music writer Todd Shroeder. $20 general admission, $15 senior, $10 student/child. $5 of every ticket sold and 50 percent of profits will benefit nonprofits Sierra Forever Families and Healing Journeys. (916) 8377469 or www.standouttalent.org.
to

From 6-10 p.m. the first Friday of every month june through Sept. 6 at The Fountains, Galleria Boulevard and Roseville Parkway in Roseville. Live music, car show, kids zone, beer and wine garden, special guest appearances by Disney princess characters. Free. (916) 786-2679 or www.fountainsatroseville.com.

Classics, Cats and Cabernet Gala 15
Fifth-annual event is from 4:30-8 p.m. Satjune urday at FieldHaven Feline Center, 2754 Ironwood Lane in Lincoln. Emcee Kitty O’Neal, live and silent auctions, classic cars, beverages, hors d’oeuvres. Tickets cost $45. Visit www.fieldhaven.com.
The Classics, Cats and Cabernet Gala in Lincoln features felines and classic cars.
COURTESY • FIELDHAVEN FELINE CENTER

15

From 7-10 p.m. in downtown and Old june Town Roseville. Visit local galleries and businesses including Shady Coffee & Tea, Blue Line Gallery, Beatnik Books and the Downtown Roseville Library. Free. www.3rdsatartwalk.com.

Saturday Art Walk

Begins at 1 p.m. Friday at the Granite Bay june Library, 6475 Douglas Blvd. Games, fun and food that will be out of this world. Come dressed in a costume and possibly win a prize. Free. (916) 7915590 or www.placer.ca.gov/ departments/library.

Star Wars Party 28

Hey kids, put on the stormtrooper costume and attend the Star Wars Party.

21

Entourage of Exotic Animals

Begins at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Friday at the Granite Bay Library, 6475 Douglas Blvd. Staff from the Wild Things wildlife rescue in Weimar will visit with their entourage of exotic animals. Free. june (916) 791-5590 or www.placer.ca.gov/departments/library.

48

JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

daytripper
Sierra foothills full of great food, wine and … frogs?
KRISSI KHOKHOBASHVILI

Hop on over to Calaveras County
Angels Camp takes its frogs seriously year-round, but especially in May, when the Jumping Frog Jubilee pits competitive “frog jockeys” against each other to see whose amphibian has what it takes to break the record.
COURTESY • JEFF WHITE (CALAVERAS ENTERPRISE)

his is the time of year that Calaveras County starts jumping — literally. In May, the foothills county held its annual Jumping Frog Jubilee — yes you heard that right. In honor of Mark Twain’s short story “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” residents and out-oftowners converge on the Calaveras County Fairgrounds in Angels Camp every spring to see if their frogs can hop their way to glory. It’s an event I covered for five years with the Calaveras Enterprise, the county’s twice-weekly paper. Every year, the crew would head out to the sizzlinghot fairgrounds, make their way to the main stage and watch the action. Don’t think frog jumping sounds exciting? Think again. I was skeptical at first, too. But I quickly found myself caught up in the action as the “frog jockeys” urged their jumpers on, slapping the ground and yelling at the top of their lungs to get their green guys to jump. The Frog Jump isn’t the only exciting thing happening in Calaveras County. I find myself heading down Highway 16 quite often, passing through Sacramento and Amador counties heading for my home away from home. The first town you enter on your drive is Mokelumne Hill, where the historic Hotel Leger is definitely worth a stop. The Gold Rush-era building was once the county jail — you can even check out the “hanging tree” out back. Past Moke Hill, enter San Andreas, where — if it’s a weekday — the Pickle Patch Deli is my favorite spot for a sandwich. The cute and always busy restaurant has a wide selection of deli sandwiches, including the Peter Piper Pickle, piled high with cheddar cheese and pickles, which I miss dearly. Most days are sunny enough to

T

GRANITE BAY VIEW

enjoy ample outdoor seating in the beautiful garden, and even when it’s cold outside there’s a covered seating area on the patio kept toasty by a fireplace. Head up Highway 49 to Angels Camp, where you can find all those jumping frogs. It’s this town where I’d recommend you stay — any of the bed-andbreakfast establishments or hotels are good choices, but my suggestion for a fun night away is The Cooper House Bed & Breakfast Inn. The quaint B&B, while pricey, is right downtown, just a stroll away from Angels Camp’s historic Main Street that includes thrift and antique stores, restaurants and a treasure-hunter’s delight at Calaveras Coin & Pawn. Inside the small shop, you’ll find gold, silver, rare coins, jewelry and even mining tools. I’m going to play favorites, though, and highly suggest you turn left at the Highway 4/49 intersection in Angels Camp and head up the hill to Murphys. Like most Calaveras towns, it’s a small, Gold Rushera village — but there’s something special happening in Murphys. Despite its small size and not-too-convenient location, the town is always bustling on the weekends. Numerous wineries work together to

KRISSI KHOKHOBASHVILI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Crowds fill Murphys for the Grape Stomp, in which teams of two try to get as much juice as they can out of one of Calaveras County’s most popular agricultural commodities.
draw tasters on group tours, from small Main Street tasting rooms to larger establishments like Ironstone Vineyards, home to a popular summer concert series in the amphitheater, and Stevenot Winery, where theatergoers flock each summer to Shakespeare under the stars by Murphys Creek Theatre. Quirky boutique shops and casual eateries make this the perfect place to spend an afternoon anytime, but if you’re going in October, don’t miss the Grape Stomp. Teams of two line up with half-barrels in various “heats” throughout the day, one (the “stomper”) doing her darndest to crush grapes into juice while the other (the “mucker”) clears the grape skins from the side of the barrel so the juice can flow into the spout. At the end of the heat, the team with the most grape juice progresses to the finals, and the team that wins there gets the glory — until next year’s fierce competition. As both a former mucker and stomper, I can tell you that I’m a shame to the sport of competitive grape-stomping, and I now stick to helping design team costumes for the annual contest that has seen Marilyn Monroe, Vikings and plenty of

“MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING” What: Murphys Creek Theatre under the stars When: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, Friday, June 21, through Saturday, July 20 Where: Cornelia B. Stevenot Memorial Amphitheater, 2690 San Domingo Road, Murphys Info: www.murphyscreek theatre.org CALAVERAS GRAPE STOMP When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 Where: Murphys Community Park, 505 Algiers St., Murphys Info: www.calaveras wines.org

grape-stomping Lucille Balls strolling the park. Murphys knows how to do a street fair, from the Grape Stomp to Irish Day, when the town turns green for a whole day of fun. But really, Calaveras as a whole knows how to have a good time. This space barely touches on the wealth of activity in the foothills, including exploring recreation further up the hill in Arnold and Bear Valley. Calaveras can’t be done in a day, but after one visit you’ll see that it’s worth a return trip.

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• JUNE

49

back and forth

BY TOBY LEWIS

Get to Know Your Nevaeh Hairstylist
your clients?

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

Trevor Schweitzer came to Roseville three years ago after spending the majority of his life in Lincoln, Neb. Today, Schweitzer is the salon manager and a stylist at Nevaeh Salon in Granite Bay. When his wife, who works for KCRA as a digital advertising manager, transferred to Sacramento, Schweitzer felt it was time for a career change. He left behind a management career in the commercial glass industry and enrolled in cosmetology school. We pick up his story from there:
How do you make the transition from the commercial glass industry to wanting to go to cosmetology school?

I always talk about my family. It’s easy because I have a picture of my wife sitting on my station and then they go, “Oh, is that your wife?” And then they start talking about their kids and their sports. That’s how I relate to a lot of my clients, because I’m 35 years old, I have two daughters, I’m married. But yet I can talk to anyone, anywhere.
Is there some sort of code of client/hairstylist confidentiality?

This was something I’ve been wanting to do since I was about 14 years old. I had an aunt who was in the profession when I was a kid. I watched her do our whole family’s hair. And I used to go to hair shows with my wife when she modeled for salons. It was just something that fascinated me.
What do you like about working in Granite Bay?

Sure, yeah. They will tell you their life story if they want to. They are going to tell you things that you might not necessarily want to hear, but they tell you anyway. But it’s OK, because they come back in and the next time you see them, you pick right back up where you left off.
Do you sometimes feel like a therapist?

People out here are really friendly, really down to earth. Plus, it’s close to my house. It’s easy to take my kids to school and pick them up. Our owner (Coleen Weeks) is amazing, that’s another reason why I like this salon.
What are some of the crazier hairstyles you’ve seen?

Oh yeah, definitely. Even with people that you work with, when they sit in the chair, they relax and just pour it all out to you, too. Stylists carry a lot of people’s baggage on their shoulders.
Do you ever get tired of hearing about other people’s lives?

I’ve seen a lot of the pastels. You know, the light blues, the pinks, everything from whites to pinks to greens. Anything that has to do with color right now is pretty good. Half-shaven heads are also a big deal.
Do you get a lot of people doing that?

Out here in this area, no, not at all. Something crazy out here would be an Ombre from one of the high school girls.
What’s an Ombre hair style?

No, not at all. Because if I have a bad day and I walk in here kind of bummed out, somebody tells you a really good story that kind of picks you up. Or vice versa — if they have a really bad story then I think, “OK, my world is not that bad.” … And you are doing a service for them, to make them feel 100 percent better about themselves when they walk out the door. That’s what they are here for and that’s what we try to provide.
If you were stranded on a deserted island and could have one person to accompany you, who would it be and why?

It goes from either darker to light or the reverse from light to dark.
So, it’s mainly the younger generations that are getting a little more experimental?

It’s always the younger generations. When I was 18 years old, I had 8 inches of hair that was braided up and over, spiked to the ceiling as far as I could get it, which is a lot of fun. Every now and again, you’ll get a random 30- or 40-year-old that wants to go a little bit out of the box. So, it’s there — it’s just whether you can pull it out of them or not.
Going into summer, what kinds of hairstyle trends do you typically see?

It would definitely be my wife. She is my best friend. We can laugh together, we can bicker and banter together and poke fun at each other and just let it go and have a blast. And she is my best and worst client.
She’s your best and worst client?

She is. She’s my billboard. She’s my promoter who walks around with my color and my cut on her hair, my extensions that I put in for her. But she is also the worst one because she is very, very picky. And I get to see it every day, so it’s right in my face.
Toby Lewis is a freelance writer living in Sacramento. Follow him on Twitter, @TobLewis.

In the summer, everybody wants to be blonde again. They want to have that platinum blonde look, or transition from the winter/fall colors, from the reds and browns, to come back to summer, which is bright. Something fun. That’s a term I like to use a lot, is just to have fun. You can have your brown hair, that’s OK. But you know, when you’re into summer, you’re going to be out at the lake or at the pool. You’re going to go on vacations and you’re going to want fun hair.
What do you most commonly talk about with

LET US KNOW
Know of an interesting local person to feature in Back and Forth? Email senac@goldcountrymedia.com.

Trevor Schweitzer is the salon manager and a stylist at Nevaeh Salon in Granite Bay.
KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

50

JUNE • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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MEETING ROOM
Eve Fenstermaker 916-791-6761 granitebayprop.com Our new Meeting Room is now located in the Market Hallway and available to local business groups and private parties. Have your next event at Quarry Ponds and have it catared by one of our center’s restaurants! Visit quarryponds.net for more details.

FARMER’S MARKET
(916) 791-2529 theclaycorner.com The Farmer’s Market is back each Sunday morning starting June 2nd. Stop by for some fresh vegetables and support your local farmers!

916.791.6200 hawksrestaurant.com

Quarry Ponds Partnering with Placer SPCA Quarry Ponds will host the Pet Mobile on Saturday, June 15 from 10am to 1pm in the parking area. Stop by to adopt a pet or to just see the adorable animals and learn more about supporting your local SPCA.
Visit the Quarry Ponds mobile site by scanning our QR code with your smart phone app.

(916) 797-4992 petesrandb.com

916-791-4111 mythaitable.com

QUARRY PONDS
5520~5550 DOUGLAS NOW LEASING B LV D . , GRANITE B AY
Spaces are available for lease from 1125 sf and up. If you are interested in becoming a part of Quarry Ponds, contact us today!

CA

Capital Pacific Company, 7110 Douglas Blvd., Granite Bay CA 916-782-8777 email: info@quarryponds.net

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Address 9801 Villa Francisco Ln 8190 E Granite Dr 8040 Barton Rd 1202 Muirfield Dr 8410 Lakeland Dr 9447 Treelake Rd 7505 Red Bud Rd 231 Crenshaw Ct 5240 Fenton Way 4915 Bentwood Way 8320 Auburn Folsom Rd 4310 Whispering Oaks Cir 5030 Grosvenor Cir 6015 Paseo Villena 8740 Los Lagos Cir 6025 Paseo Villena Bd 2 3 3-4 3-4 3 5 3 3 5 4 4 4-5 4 5 5-6 6 Bth 2 (2 0) 2 (2 0) 2 (2 0) 2 (2 0) 3 (2 1) 3 (3 0) 2 (2 0) 3 (3 0) 3 (3 0) 3 (3 0) 3 (2 1) 4 (3 1) 3 (3 0) 6 (5 1) 5 (5 0) 7 (6 1) SqFt 1,439 1,260 1,789 2,004 1,807 3,554 2,686 2,816 2,712 2,367 3,213 3,958 3,367 5,026 4,730 6,054 LotSz 0.1220ac 0.2240ac 1.3000ac 0.1940ac 0.2320ac 0.2360ac 0.4560ac 0.2350ac 0.1640ac 0.1920ac 0.4980ac 0.9300ac 0.5280ac 1.4000ac 0.9390ac 1.7000ac

$1,500,000 CallBryars Dellaat &723.0888 Reuben Call Cindy
Year 1999 1976 1980 1994 1988 1991 1959 1999 1996 1995 1990 1988 1989 2005 1988 2006 Date 4/18/13 4/23/13 4/17/13 4/26/13 4/12/13 4/30/13 4/19/13 4/15/13 4/24/13 4/22/13 4/22/13 4/12/13 4/18/13 4/5/13 4/19/13 4/24/13

at 337.5233
List Price 315,000 299,900 399,000 414,990 410,000 376,500 515,000 499,999 499,000 639,500 689,000 575,000 795,000 999,999 1,179,000 1,695,000

LIC#00895098

RECENT GRANITE BAY HOME SALES
DOM 13 7 10 15 58 7 27 12 10 8 36 5 80 50 142 352 Sale Price 315,000 320,000 390,000 405,000 415,000 450,000 506,500 515,000 524,000 639,500 672,500 695,000 750,000 1,000,000 1,125,000 1,550,000

Information deemed to be reliable but not verified. Home sales are based in information from MetroList Services, Inc.

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Call Cindy Bryars at 723.0888

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