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Home Office

BU I LD IN G A SAFE, JUST AND TOLERANT SOCIETY

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Security Standards for Laboratories
Subject of Part 7 of the Anti Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001

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Home Office
BUILDING A SAFE, JUST AND TOLERANT SOC IETY

Security Standards for Laboratories
Subject of Part 7 of the Anti Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001

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We all have a duty to protect the public and reduce the opportunity for terrorist activities.Foreword RES T RIC TED As Minister for Counter Terrorism I am very please to commend this security standard to all the laboratories who are subject to the Anti Terrorism Crime and Security Act 2001. we can reduce the ability of terrorists to carry out their threats. co-ordinated way. Beverley Hughes Minister of State for Citizenship. The security of pathogens and toxins in this country is of paramount importance. It is vitally important that everybody acts rigorously upon the standards in this document. we are far better equipped to meet our obligation of protecting the people of this country and our national interests. The key message of this standard is the need to improve physical security measures as well as ensuring good procedures and practice. Immigration and Counter-Terrorism RESTRICTED . By acting together in a concerted. By remaining alert but not alarmed.

Crime and Security Act 2001) Sections Section 1: Introduction Section 2: Responsibilities of Laboratories Section 3: General Advice Section 4: Critical Areas 5 7 9 13 Appendices Appendix A: Part 7 ATCSA 2001 Appendix B: Schedule 5 ATCSA 2001 Appendix C: Glossary of Abbreviations Appendix D: Useful References/Contacts 18 25 26 27 RESTRICTED 3 .Contents RESTRICTED Security Standards For Laboratories (In accordance with Part 7 of the Anti Terrorism.

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Feed back is welcomed and encouraged from all those working in the field. irrespective of how such a release might occur. 1. RESTRICTED 5 . RES T RIC TED 1.4 This document deals specifically with the provisions of ATCSA. It is important that the different agencies involved work together to promote security for all laboratories and the people who work within them.4.Section 1: Introd uction 1. This is to be achieved by improvements to the physical security of laboratory premises and by limiting access to those authorised to work with Schedule 5 substances. The National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO) is responsible for the police implementation of Part 7 of the ATCSA and for training all the CTSAs. In other cases it may be from a distant police station where the delay will be much longer.2 As part of the counter terrorist effort the Government introduced legislation under Part 7 of the Anti Terrorism. to ensure that the security advice being given is uniform across the country. 1.6 'Bio safety' and 'Bio security' are two different concepts with some similar features. The Department of Health (DOH). Crime and Security Act 2001 (ATCSA) . the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).3 The release of dangerous substances could have severe consequences for public health and safety. 1. use and disposal of dangerous biological material presents a challenge for the police and the wider biological and security communities. Details regarding your local CTSA and any enquires regarding this document should be directed to NaCTSO on 020 7931 7142 or nactso@btopenworld. This document also alerts laboratories to the potential threat from insiders. commensurate with the threat. taking into account the individual circumstances of the site.1 In the aftermath of the attacks in Washington and New York on September 11th 2001. It aims to assist laboratory managers to meet their responsibilities for the security of premises. personnel and materials. meeting their safety and security obligations. It aims to ensure that the storage and use of dangerous pathogens and toxins listed within Schedule 5 of the Act are as secure as practicable. This is highlighted in paragraph 4. Before you undertake any assessment or work. and cost efficient.5 The standards provided in this document are flexible and not necessarily appropriate in every case. the Department of Environment. Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) the Home Office (HO) and Government Security Advisers. real or perceived. Even a small scale bio-terrorist attack. including resisting an attack by physical force. They will work closely with Health & Safety Executive (HSE) inspectors to offer laboratories assistance in 1. this is a rapidly developing field and current advice may need to be updated accordingly. it is important that you contact your local Counter Terrorism Security Adviser. The requirements of the Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) guidance are aimed at protecting workers and others. In some cases this may be from local security guards who are on site. These standards are aimed at preventing theft of material from a laboratory. However. is likely to have a disproportionate effect on both business and public confidence. The idea is to delay an intruder for as long as it takes for the nearest response force to arrive. the Government has taken a number of measures to strengthen security in the UK.7 These standards have been prepared through the cooperation of the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO). Meeting this challenge means achieving a balance between protecting the public from terrorism and ensuring that the valuable work undertaken in laboratories across the UK continues with the minimum impediment. The police are responsible for the enforcement of the legislation: Counter Terrorism Security Advisers (CTSAs) in each UK police service will visit laboratories to provide additional help and more detailed advice on standards and security matters. Biological Safety Officers and other practitioners in the microbiological community have also been consulted. Improving security measures for the storage.com 1.

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Prevent access to these substances by those who seek to use them for terrorist purposes.Section 2: RESTRICTED Laboratories' responsibilities under ATCSA 2. Provide information to the police on the security measures in place and the personnel entitled to have access to Schedule 5 substances. Give the police powers to act to strengthen security and deal with failure to comply with the Act. Comply with advice given by the police to secure premises.3 In broad terms laboratories are required to: • Register with the Home Office their holdings of Schedule 5 substances. • • • • RES T RIC TED 7 . Failure to do so is an offence under the Act and may result in prosecution. A list of substances currently covered by the Act is attached at Appendix B. Ensure that access to them is authorised and controlled. 2. Ensure that Schedule 5 substances and the premises in which they are kept. stored.1 The main objectives of the legislation are to: • Ensure that the most dangerous substances listed within Schedule 5 of ATCSA are stored. • • 2. This list may change from time to time.2 Laboratory managers and Biological Safety Officers should familiarise themselves with the legislation in detail (copy is attached at Appendix A). worked on and destroyed in the most secure environment as possible . worked on and disposed of are secure.

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3. where they are located and who has access to them? Is the critical area of robust construction. or access control may have to be extended to adjoining areas.the overt physical and electronic security measures that might provide a serious deterrent to a would-be intruder. Detect . The list of questions that follow are aimed at assisting in understanding the requirements of a good security regime. to allow a response force to attend. When assessing the security measures required for the critical areas.4 In many cases the measures that existing laboratories will be asked to undertake will be simple and inexpensive. The measures taken to achieve acceptable standards may vary from site to site. In some instances. it is essential to understand the 'Philosophy of Protective Security'. 3. especially where existing security at a basic crime prevention level is good. in particular the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSH H) regulations of the Health and Safety at Work Act. ceilings and floors may need reinforcement. transported or destroyed are designated 'critical' areas. Delay . the guidelines on restricting access to Containment Level 2 (CL2) and Containment Level 3 (CL3) laboratories are particularly relevant. Plans for new build laboratories should include standard security measures from the outset. to build in physical protection from the beginning.physical security measures that delay the intruder for a sufficient length of time.Deter. the environment of the laboratory and the security culture of the establishment. depending on the nature of the work undertaken. RESTRICTED 3. The various agencies will work to bring these into line in the future. Additional advice and clarification is available from CTSAs. stored. Detect and Delay. a) Physical Measures Do you have a full list of all the substances you possess. 3. The Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) publication "The Management. to detect the presence of an intruder. Security advice seeks to complement that provision. with visual (CCTV) verification. RESTRICTED 9 . All laboratories should ensure that they are fully compliant with this legislation. from their local CTSA or NaCTSO. Technical advice on security standards is contained in sections 3 and 4 of this document. ii. But more substantial improvements will require more detailed planning of funding. Section 4 provides detailed advice and specification to enable the development and installation of the required security measures. procurement and installation. the security standards specified in this document may exceed those recommended in other standards or guidelines. For the above philosophy to function effectively. Design and Operation of Microbiological Containment Laboratories" is also essential reading. sound procedures and the awareness and attitude of managers and employees. account should also be taken of the overall site security. at an early stage.8 Assessing the Security Requirement Laboratories may find the following questions useful in beginning to address their security requirements. it is essential that Detection precedes Delay.Section 3: General Advice 3.5 The areas where the substances are used.1 This standard is not intended to override existing legislation in related areas with which laboratories will be familiar. 3.2 Good security is a combination of physical measures. 3.7 The basis of all good physical security regimes is founded on the 3D principle . 3. i. and laboratories moving to new premises should seek advice. capable of withstanding an attack designed to gain access to a controlled area? Walls.3 It is much easier.alarm systems. Where measures are recommended and installed they should meet recommended standards for that type of installation. training. and usually more cost effective. Deter .6 In order to assess the security requirement for the laboratory and site.

b) Electronic Measures Electronic measures include such items as intruder detection systems (IDS). PhYSical security procedures b. RESTRICTED Are security logs and records easily available to CTSAs? Is there someone who has responsibility for security and who has ready access to senior personnel to alert them to security concerns and their responsibilities under the Act? Do senior managers regularly review their safety and security measures? What is the process for transferring scheduled substances between labs. computers and the data they hold secure? iv. vii.Section 3: General Advice iii. such as public access corridors that make the area vulnerable? What other perimeter measures are in place. Is the lighting and visibility adequate? ix. iii. does it comply with the recommendations of the Home Office's 'CC1V Operational Requirement' document? Does the AACS require both a Personal Identification Number (PIN) and token? If not. viii. and unauthorised movement between them prevented? vi. Is there an access control system in place? How is it monitored and for what parts of the day? Are protected and private areas clearly marked. Are there security and contingency plans. in safety and security practices and why they are important? v. d) i. Auditing procedures e. dual working. vii. i. Is there a procedure for controlling passes and recovering them when they are no longer valid? Are there frequent visitors to the premises? How are they handled and supervised? Are hard copy records. and are they regularly exercised? Such plans should include: a. flat roofs. whether temporarily or permanently employed. landscaping that might make the area easier to enter or attack? v. vi. on the wider site and in close proximity to the lab? Are there external factors. how is the alarm validated (i. Personnel security procedures c. Personnel Security Do your recruitment procedures meet recognised standards of Human Resources (HR) best practice? Are you sure that your employees are who they say they are and have the qualifications that they claim to hold? Has each employee's identity and employment history been thoroughly checked against relevant documents and references? Have you trained staff. iv. ii. viii. storage facilities and disposal sites? How is this movement tracked and recorded? Is there scrupulous adherence to existing measures such as wearing passes. a lost or stolen token or compromised PIN will permit access to an unauthorised person. windows and their frames substantial. was it a false alarm or did an intruder trigger the alarm)? Who is responsible for validating the alarm and summoning the appropriate response? Are the electronic measures regularly maintained and tested? If you have a CC1V system. password and access code protection. When an alarm is activated. v. COSHH regulations and the records that accompany them are a useful starting point for meeting the security standards expected under this legislation. iv. such as car parks. Record keeping procedures d. Information security ii. closed circuit television (CC1V) and automatic access control systems (AACS). iii. c) Procedural Measures iii.e. well fitted and is appropriate glazing protection in place? Are vents and other fixtures adequately fitted and secure? Where is the critical area located? If part of larger or multiple use premises. x. ii. are there any features of the surrounding building. i. 10 RESTRICTED . signing in and out. Are doors.

or access by foreign students.gov. Does this scheme apply to anyone in your lab? For further details. are passed only to laboratories registered in compliance with ATCSA? When dealing with international contacts. Laboratories will need to introduce more secure and auditable methods of transfers among professionals.uk or call 020 7008 2248. iv.info@fco. look up www. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office administer a scheme called the Voluntary vetting Scheme (VVS). and to whom and for what reason? Is the carrier security aware? Would it be appropriate to use secure couriers with logistical tracking and end -user receipt? What procedures are in place to ensure that dangerous biological substances transferred within the UK. Can you say who has access to what materials and premises. xi. for example. are they passed only to known and reputable laboratories? Export control licences are required for international transfers outside of the EU for all pathogens and toxins on Schedule 5. laboratories will wish to consider the following: RESTRICTED 11 . security practices etc? Do they know how and to whom to report such concerns? Do managers and HR staff know people well enough to notice any changes in behaviour or attitude that might give rise to security concerns? Do they know what to do if concerns arise? Is security and good practice built in to appraisal systems or staff development discussions? a) v. students. properly checked and the sponsors or sources of their interest known and trusted? Are such individuals appropriately supeNised while in the lab? Is their access limited to what they need to pursue the agreed purpose of their project/visit? ix.fco. vii . e. iii. contractors. There is a requirement to obtain an individual export licence when exporting Ricin and Saxitoxin between member states. or even sharing passwords? viii. In the past Schedule 5 substances have been transferred in an informal manner. b) x. visitors. not only those directly working with schedule 5 substances but also cleaners.uk or contact vvs. for example letting people through access controls or doors that might not be entitled to be in a controlled area . Does the climate in your laboratory lend itself to staff being able to raise security concerns about colleagues.Security Standards for Laboratories RESTRICTED iv. between scientists at conferences or through the postal system. Are requests (from both UK nationals and overseas visitors) to visit the laboratory. or to undertake short-term projects.gov. porters and administrative staff? What details do you hold in respect of them? Do you know where to find such details if you do not keep them yourself? Could you identify who has access to a particular type of pathogen or toxin? Are your arrangements for storage and retrieval of this data resilient and accessible to those who need to know? ii . Have any habits developed among staff that override security measures. autoclave operators. This is aimed at students from certain countries who come to the UK to take part in certain types of study. i. Do you know who you are dealing with? Are they acting for someone else? Do you know what the material is being used for? Do you keep internal records of what is being transferred. Other Related Measures Although the Act does not specifically cover the transfer and transport of pathogens and toxins. vi.

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installation of door sets certified to ENV 1627 will require approval from NaCTSO. it will require only internal partition walls and openings to be protected. If located on upper floors. with each site being unique. that is. b) c) 4. Special provisions have been made to advise Containment Level 4 laboratories. 4. 4. Doors with integral air-vents must be carefully checked to ensure that the vent cannot be removed. NB: The new European standards (ENV 1627) may soon be published. iii. ii. v. iv. in other cases the first security measures will start with the access point to a particular building or even a corridor.5mm) and installed in accordance with BS 6262:1982. RESTRICTED For example: a) On the ground floor external walls will require both internal and external protection measures to walls and openings.5 Where possible. Glazing immediately adjacent to a security door must be laminated (minimum thickness 7. It is appreciated that. Physical security measures should be viewed from the outside working inwards with the emphasis centred upon the critical area. These issues will affect the physical security measures that will need to be put in place.3 In some cases a perimeter will be the fence around a large area of land .7 Doorsets i. such doorsets must meet the requirement at (i) above. where some security measures are lacking. It will be the responsibility of the site to demonstrate that alternative arrangements are sufficiently robust. 4 .18) 4. and the glazing retention system (frame) must be tested to either BS 7950 or LPS 1175: Issue 5 Security Rating 2. This is dependant upon the location of the laboratory and whether it is in a building that serves other purposes or is located in secure grounds. there may be measures in place that are not mentioned in this standard but which the CTSA considers appropriate in the circumstances. The walls will not be so important if the site has a sterile zone (see para 4. Doors allowing access to critical areas must be of robust construction and must be certified to meet LPS 1175: Issue 5 Security Rating 3. In some cases BSI PAS 24 may be acceptable subject to consultation with the CTSA. stored. laboratories subject of the ATCSA should not be located on a ground floor or where access may be assisted by physical elements such as flat roofs.6 Physical Measures It is necessary to identify the secure boundary of the 'Critical Area ' on which the physical measures will apply.4 Security measures should be viewed in a flexible light. RESTRICTED 13 .1 Areas where substances are used. the glazing must be protected by internal grills or an external roller shutter certified to LPS 1175: Issue 5 Security Rating 1/2. For Laboratories operating at Containment Level 4 a higher standard is required. transported or destroyed are designated critical areas. they may be compensated for by others. Alternatively.Section 4: Critical Areas 4.2 This section sets the standards for Laboratories operating at Containment Level 2 and Containment Level 3 working on Schedule 5 substances. Double doors must only be used where it is necessary to allow access for large pieces of equipment. 4. All doorsets must be adequately fixed to the fabric of the building in accordance with the manufacturer's speCifications.

Therefore all walls adjacent to the public or semi public area must be of a substantial construction. 4. ii. 14 RESTRICTED . ii. If internal partition walls are not sufficiently robust they must be re-enforced to a standard equivalent to LPS 1175: Issue 5 Security Rating 3 or by a recognised government test authority.g. Critical areas should be examined to ensure that no access can be gained from any adjoining areas. Partition walls are not generally considered to be adequate unless the system has been tested to LPS 1175: Issue 5 Security Rating 3. Sliding sash. but should be avoided as a general rule (See Para 4. they should consult NaCTSO. v. Walls must be able to withstand a forced entry. e.9 Walls. (See section 4. All doors enabling access to the critical area. ceilings or floors in a critical area is not adequate. and must incorporate window security film. v.) Where a lobby is used within a laboratory. By passing through the outer door into the lobby area and securing it before the inner door is released. ceilings and floors.10 Critical Areas Accessed via a Public or Semi Public Corridor i.Section 4: RESTRICTED Critical Areas 4. installation of windows certified to ENV 1627 will require approval from NaCTSO. All door sets must be adequately fixed to the fabric of the building in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. iii. Should the CTSA or laboratory manager feel that the construction of walls. Ceilings and floors must provide a similar level of protection as the walls.5mm) to BS6206 and installed in accordance with BS 6262:1982. installation of windows certified to ENV 1627 will require approval from NaCTSO. staff can ensure that access can be strictly controlled to only those authorised. interlocking doors provide an increased level of security to ensure that any unauthorised person cannot follow a member of staff directly into the laboratory. There are two distinct methods of ensuring a controlled access/egress. All windows must be securely fixed to the fabric of the building in accordance with the manufacturers recommendations. 4. 4.g.8 Windows i. iii. iii. By the very nature of their location. must be certified to LPS 1175: issue 5 Security Rating 3.9. critical areas accessed via a corridor are difficult to secure to an acceptable level. If partition walls have been used in the construction of the laboratory and have not been externally evaluated. or via a manual system utilising security staff. pivot or fully reversible windows are not presently covered by BS 7950. If these are not built to a robust standard.4). either from the public corridor or from other areas of the building (including emergency egress doors). iv. Alternatively windows must be protected by internal grilles or external roller shutters certified to LPS 1175: Issue 5 Security Rating 3. ii. Equal emphasis should be placed on the security of walls. Additionally all glazing within the above windows must be laminated (minimum thickness 7. All ground floor external windows within the building that may allow access to the critical areas must be certified to BS7950: 1997. the security of doors and windows may be compromised. various electronic systems such as a proximity reader and PIN. then the CTSA will require additional measures be put in place to ensure the integrity of the wall. iv.11 Access Control i. An access control system/protocol is essential for the access to all 'Critical Areas'. therefore the management of laboratory buildings incorporating these window styles will be advised by the CTSA during the audit of the additional security arrangements required . Ceilings and Floors i. Push button combination locks may be appropriate in some circumstances. iv. NB: Th e new European standards (ENV 1627) may soon be published. these are either technology based e. Floor slabs or reinforced concrete construction. NB: Th e new European standards (ENV 1627) may soon be published.

ii. The system must be flexible enough to allow management of the establishment to track individuals throughout the site and log information such as access/egress times. xi.g. iv. for example. Storing substances falling under the Act is as important as working on them in the laboratory. Identification badges must be clearly worn and staff should be regularly reminded of the need to challenge strangers and challenge 'tailgaters' when passing through security doors. v. together with other relevant information. All data must also be password protected. sites utilising security staff during the day only. Establishments that have a 24-hour guarding system may be able to rely on a manual system. All emergency exit doors must be fitted with a warning device to alert staff when opened. x. and incorporated into any technology based access control system that is in operation. after normal working hours. reason for visit (if visiting). etc.13 Storage i. vi. it will be required to meet the same standards as those of the critical area.Security Standards for Laboratories RES T RIC TED ii. All movement of substances should be recorded for audit purposes. If. time. Substances falling within the remit of Schedule 5 of the Act should be disposed of within the critical area and in compliance with HSElACDP guidance/legislation. The information contained within the log should normally be stored on a computer system and be password protected . details of what has been destroyed. 4. iii. ii. These methods are not mutually exclusive. All storage facilities should be incorporated within the critical area. If the visitor's pass is by way of a carbonised paper pass. organisation (if visitors). name. The control computer should be protected by a physical protection device conforming to LPS 1214: Issue 2 Category I. RES T RIC TED 15 . There must be an audit trail to show who accompanied the substance. etc. magnetic card. prior to autoclaving. then an appropriate member of staff should escort the person taking the material to the autoclave point. paperwork to show that they witnessed the disposal . therefore the CTSA may accept two differing control protocols based on the operating hours of the laboratory. details of the delivery. date. or in a separate building. who will remain with the substance until receipt has been acknowledged by staff within the critical area. iv. iii. The computer hard drive should either be removed or placed in a secure storage facility complying with LPS 1183/ 8S EN 1143-1:1997 Security rating 0 (with confirmed fire resistance) or the whole PC should be protected by a physical protection device conforming to LPS 1214: Issue 2 Category I. will need an electronic system out of hours. they must be unique to each user. vii. viii. they must incorporate a personal identification number (PIN). 4. If the storage facility is located in a separate area within the building. Where technology based access control systems utilising proximity. All unauthorised staff. All movement of both staff and visitors in and out of the 'critical area ' must be comprehensively recorded e.12 Disposal of substances i. etc. visitors and contractors must be escorted whilst in the 'critical areas'. or biometric readers are used. If digital code panels are incorporated within an access control system. records should be securely retained and passes handed in at the end of a visit. as an additional security feature. together with other relevant information such as time and date. The audit trail must show who accompanied the substance. for whatever reason. All substances being transferred between the storage facility and the critical area must be escorted by two members of staff. substances under the Act are to be disposed of outside the critical area. staff number/designation. ix. iii. changed on a regular basis and incorporate a duress code facility.

must be protected by an alarm linked to an Alarm Receiving Centre (ARC) complying with BS 7042 :1988 Specification for High Security Intruder Alarm Systems in Buildings. All Pathogens and Toxins stored within the establishment must be labelled in a way that allows them to be identified to authorised persons only. iii. iii. CCTV can be used to verify alarm activations and record staff/contractor movement. for whatever reason .e. Recording facilities and protocols must be acceptable for production during court proceedings should there be a need to do so . The CTSA will advise on the location and type of system and whether additional detectors or other equipment are needed to ensure complete coverage (this does not include technical advice).14 Storage of Information/Databases i.16 CCTV i. 4. ii. Staff/students must be fully briefed by the laboratory management regarding the correct use of this facility. and considered to be 'at risk' by the CTSA. i. telecommunications and alarm monitoring equipment which is essential for the safety and security of the critical area must be secured in the appropriate housings with access covers meeting LPS 1175: Issue 5. Security rating 4. The management and maintenance of the CCTV system is of paramount importance and should comply with BS 7958:1999 Codes of Practice for CCTV or PSBD Guidelines and the Data Protection Act 1998. electricity. a responsible person must be notified via a suitable alerting system and appropriate action taken to restore the supply.17 External Utility Facilities Any utility. 16 RES T RIC TED . RESTRICTED 4. All critical areas of the site must be alarmed. and therefore must comply with the Association of Chief Police Officers Security Systems Policy. 4. An audit system must be in place so that records are maintained on what types of substances are kept where and in what quantities. gas . or that the PC is secured utilizing a physical security device conforming to LPS 1214: Issue 2 Category I.Section 4: Critical Areas 4. All CCTV systems within establishments with laboratories registered under the Act should record and/ or monitor 24 hours per day. oil . iii. If there is any utility equipment outside the area controlled by the laboratory establishment. CCTV coverage may assist if the establishment does not have dedicated security staff 24 hours per day. the system should comply with the requirements of LPS 1224: Issue 2. ii.17 (i). iv. iii. Alternatively the CTSA may accept a less secure database. based on either paper or PC. iv.15 Alarms i. in a fire resistant cabinet conforming to LPS 1228: Issue 1 (Paper) . In the event. Documents and software media must be disposed of in a secure and approved manner. seven days a week from a secure location. Personal attack alarm facilities should be available within all areas of risk within the critical area. If necessary the CTSA will consider requesting an audit of an existing system to ensure it is meeting the operational requirements. the utility company should be contacted to discuss how the facilities can be secured in line with the requirement outlined in 4. ii. of any essential utility failing. All recordings must also comply with the Data Protection Act 1998. all establishments must have a police response to alarm activation via the ARC. All sites where substances are held or stored under the Act. Additionally. It is not viewed as a deterrent under most circumstances. The CTSA will advise laboratory management of the requirements if necessary. if the officer is satisfied that the information contained within the database is secured in a safe location i. ii. Further advice can be obtained from the CTSA. iv. If this data is maintained on an electronic database with backup facility.

18 Sterile Zones i. Some laboratories may be housed on secure sites where a sterile zone already exists. There must be no landscaping offering concealment within the area.Security Standards for Laboratories RESTRICTED 4. This method of physical protection may be appropriate at other sites.com If you require any further advice or would like details of your local CTSA. A sterile zone is a strip of open space that surrounds a building or establishment with fences on either side. © NaCTSO/ACPO RES T RIC TED 17 . iii . iv. please do not hesitate to get in contact. It should be in the order of 2 metres in width and should be established around the perimeter of the laboratory building where appropriate. The National Counter Terrorism Security Office can be contacted on 020 7931 7142 or at nactso@btopenworld. The CTSA will advise management of the need to light any areas around the building. ii.

or anything which is infected with or otherwise carries any such substance. or a notice has been given may withdraw the notice if no dangerous substance is kept or used there. (3) The Secretary of State may not add any pathogen or toxin to that Schedule unless he is satisfied that the pathogen or toxin could be used in an act of terrorism to endanger life or cause serious harm to human health. (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to premises in respect of which a notice has previously been given under that subsection (unless it has been with drawn) .Appendix A: Part 7 SECURITY OF PATHOGENS AND TOXINS RESTRICTED (4) A notice under this section must(a) (b) (c) identify the premises in which the substance is kept or used. (2) The Secretary of State may by order modify any provision of Schedule 5 (including the notes). (6) Wherea substance which is kept or used in any premises becomes a dangerous substance by virtue of a modification of Schedule 5. but no other dangerous substance is kept or used there. (a) (b) (b) (5) But something otherwise falling within subsection (4) is not to be regarded as a dangerous substance if(a) (b) it satisfies prescribed conditions. 18 RESTRICTED . (3) The occupier of any premises in respect of which (a) any dangerous substance kept or used in the premises. 58 Pathogens and toxins in relation to which requirements under Part 7 apply (1) Schedule 5 (which lists the pathogens and toxins in relation to which the requirements of this Part apply) has effect. (4) In this Part "dangerous substance" means(a) anything which consists of or includes a substance for the time being mentioned in Schedule 5. identify any building or site of which the premises form part. 60 Information about security of dangerous substances (1) A constable may give to the occupier of any relevant premises a notice requiring him to give the chief officer of police such information as is specified or described in the notice by a time so specified and in a form and manner so specified. (b) the measures taken (whether by the occupier or any other person) to ensure the security of any such substance. (2) The required information must relate to- 59 Duty to notify Secretary of State before keeping or using dangerous substances (1) The occupier of any premises must give a notice to the Secretary of State before any dangerous substance is kept or used there. or it is kept or used in prescribed circumstances. and contain such other particulars (if any) as may be prescribed. the occupier of the premises must give a notice under this section before the end of the period of one month beginning with the day on which that modification comes into force . (5) The occupier of any premises in which any dangerous substance is kept or used on the day on which this section comes into force must give a notice under this section before the end of the period of one month beginning with that day.

the occupier of the premises for the time being must secure that persons mentioned in that list do not have the proposed access relating to them until the end of the period of 30 days beginning with the day on which that list is given.Security Standards for Laboratories RESTRICTED (3) In this Part references to measures taken to ensure the security of any dangerous substance kept or used in any relevant premises include(a) measures taken to ensure the security of any building or site of which the premises form part. or (b) in respect of which a notice under section 59 is in force. but may give a supplementary list to the chief officer of police of other persons to whom it is proposed to give access. and contain such other matters (if any) as may be prescribed. (7) Any list under this section must(a) (b) (c) identify the access which the person has. 61 Information about persons with access to dangerous substances (1) A police officer of at least the rank of inspector may give to the occupier of any relevant premises a notice requiring him to give the chief officer of police a list of(a) each person who has access to any dangerous substance kept or used there. the occupier of the premises for the time being(a) must secure that only the persons mentioned in the list are given the access identified in the list relating to them. (3) Where a list under subsection (1) is given. (c) each person who. (d) each person who. RES T RIC TED 19 . 62 Directions requiring security measures (1) A constable may give directions to the occupier of any relevant premises requiring him to take such measures to ensure the security of any dangerous substance kept or used there as are specified or described in the directions by a time so specified . (2) A list under subsection (1) must be given before the end of the period of one month beginning with the day on which the notice is given. state the full name of that person . in such circumstances as are specified or described in the notice. (6) The Secretary of State may by order modify the period mentioned in subsection (4). and measures taken for the purpose of ensuring access to the substance is given only to those whose activities require access and only in circumstances that ensure the security of the substance. (b) (b) (4) In this Part "relevant premises " means any premises(a) in which any dangerous substance is kept or used. or is proposed to have. (5) The chief officer of police may direct that a person may have such access before the end of that period. has access to any building or site of which the premises form part. has access to such part of the premises as is so specified or described. or (4) Where a supplementary list is given under subsection (3)(b) . his date of birth. in such circumstances as are specified or described in the notice. his address and his nationality. (b) each person who. in such circumstances as are specified or described in the notice. has access to the premises.

(2) The Secretary of State may by order modify any provision of Schedule 5 (including the notes). (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to premises in respect of which a notice has previously been given under that subsection (unless it has been withdrawn). (a) any dangerous substance kept or used in the premises. or it is kept or used in prescribed circumstances. or (3) The occupier of any premises in respect of which (b) the measures taken (whether by the occupier or any other person) to ensure the security of any such substance. (4) In this Part "dangerous substance" means(a) anything which consists of or includes a substance for the time being mentioned in Schedule 5.Appendix A: RESTRICTED Part 7 SECURITY OF PATHOGENS AND TOXINS (4) A notice under this section must(a) (b) (c) identify the premises in which the substance is kept or used. but no other dangerous substance is kept or used there. identify any building or site of which the premises form part. and contain such other particulars (if any) as may be prescribed. the occupier of the premises must give a notice under this section before the end of the period of one month beginning with the day on which that modification comes into force. a notice has been given may withdraw the notice if no dangerous substance is kept or used there. (a) (b) (b) (5) But something otherwise falling within subsection (4) is not to be regarded as a dangerous substance if(a) (b) it satisfies prescribed conditions. (5) The occupier of any premises in which any dangerous substance is kept or used on the day on which this section comes into force must give a notice under this section before the end of the period of one month beginning with that day. or anything which is infected with or otherwise carries any such substance. 58 Pathogens and toxins in relation to which requirements under Part 7 apply (1) Schedule 5 (which lists the pathogens and toxins in relation to which the requirements of this Part apply) has effect. 60 Information about security of dangerous substances (1) A constable may give to the occupier of any relevant premises a notice requiring him to give the chief officer of police such information as is specified or described in the notice by a time so specified and in a form and manner so specified. RESTRICTED . (3) The Secretary of State may not add any pathogen or toxin to that Schedule unless he is satisfied that the pathogen or toxin could be used in an act of terrorism to endanger life or cause serious harm to human health. (2) The required information must relate to- 59 Duty to notify Secretary of State before keeping or using dangerous substances (1) The occupier of any premises must give a notice to the Secretary of State before any dangerous substance is kept or used there . (6) Wherea substance which is kept or used in any premises becomes a dangerous substance by virtue of a modification of Schedule 5.

but may give a supplementary list to the chief officer of police of other persons to whom it is proposed to give access. the occupier of the premises for the time being(a) must secure that only the persons mentioned in the list are given the access identified in the list relating to them. (5) The chief officer of police may direct that a person may have such access before the end of that period. his date of birth. (6) The Secretary of State may by order modify the period mentioned in subsection (4). or is proposed to have.Security Standards for Laboratories RES T RIC TED (3) In this Part references to measures taken to ensure the security of any dangerous substance kept or used in any relevant premises include(a) measures taken to ensure the security of any building or site of which the premises form part. (c) each person who. or (b) in respect of which a notice under section 59 is in force. has access to the premises. has access to any building or site of which the premises form part. 61 Information about persons with access to dangerous substances (1) A police officer of at least the rank of inspector may give to the occupier of any relevant premises a notice requiring him to give the chief officer of police a list of(a) each person who has access to any dangerous substance kept or used there. in such circumstances as are specified or described in the notice. 62 Directions requiring security measures (1) A constable may give directions to the occupier of any relevant premises requiring him to take such measures to ensure the security of any dangerous substance kept or used there as are specified or described in the directions by a time so specified. RES T RIC TED 19 . his address and his nationality. in such circumstances as are specified or described in the notice. (d) each person who. and measures taken for the purpose of ensuring access to the substance is given only to those whose activities require access and only in circumstances that ensure the security of the substance. (b) state the full name of that person. and (c) contain such other matters (if any) as may be prescribed. (7) Any list under this section must(a) identify the access which the person has. has access to such part of the premises as is so specified or described. the occupier of the premises for the time being must secure that persons mentioned in that list do not have the proposed access relating to them until the end of the period of 30 days beginning with the day on which that list is given. (b) (b) (4) In this Part "relevant premises" means any premises(a) in which any dangerous substance is kept or used. (2) A list under subsection (1) must be given before the end of the period of one month beginning with the day on which the notice is given. or (4) Where a supplementary list is given under sUbsection (3)(b). (b) each person who. in such circumstances as are specified or described in the notice. (3) Where a list under subsection (1) is given.

or (a) (b) search the premises. require any person who appears to the constable to be in charge of the premises. the dangerous substance must be disposed of. in such circumstances (if any) as may be specified or described in the directions. and require the occupier to give a notice to the chief officer of police before any other dangerous substance specified or described in the directions is kept or used in the premises. (4) A constable who has entered any premises. building or site to facilitate any such inspection. 65 Powers of entry (1) A constable may. access to the premises. building or site by virtue of subsection (1) may for the purpose mentioned in that subsection - (b) 64 Directions requiring denial of access (1) The Secretary of State may give directions to the occupier of any relevant premises requiring him to secure that the person identified in the directions(a) (b) is not to have access to any dangerous substance kept or used there. at a reasonable time for the purpose of assessing the measures taken to ensure the security of any dangerous substance kept or used in the premises. in such circumstances (if any) as may be specified or described in the directions. building or site. (d) is not to have. (2) The directions must be given under the hand of the Secretary of State. (3) The Secretary of State may not give the directions unless he believes that they are necessary in the interests of national security. at least 2 working days before the proposed entry. in such circumstances (if any) as may be specified or described in the directions. on giving notice under this section. or require the occupier to produce the dangerous substance to a person specified or described in the notice in a manner and by a time so specified for him to dispose of.Appendix A: RESTRICTED Part 7 (2) The directions may(a) (b) specify or describe the substances in relation to the security of which the measures relate. (2) The direction must(a) specify the manner in which. he may give a direction to the occupier of the premises requiring him to dispose of the substance. or (as the case may be) the occupier of the building or site of which the premises form part. (c) (5) The powers of a constable under this section include power to take with him such other persons as appear to him to be necessary. access to any building or site of which the premises form part. and require any such person to answer any question. 63 Directions requiring disposal of dangerous substances (1) Where the Secretary of State has reasonable grounds for believing that adequate measures to ensure the security of any dangerous substance kept or used in any relevant premises are not being taken and are unlikely to be taken. and time by which. is not to have. access to such part of the premises as is so specified or described. (c) 20 RESTRICTED / . is not to have. (2) The notice must be given to the occupier of the premises. (3) The notice must set out the purpose mentioned in subsection (1) . enter any relevant premises. or any building or site of which the premises form part.

as well as the body corporate. he may issue a warrant authorising a constable to enter the premises . (b) that it is practicable to communicate with a person entitled to grant entry to the premises but it is not practicable to communicate with any person entitled to grant access to any substance which may be a dangerous substance. means(a) (b) any director. this section applies in relation to the acts and defaults of a member in connection with his functions of management as if he were a director of the body corporate . to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum (or both). is guilty of the offence and liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingly. RES T RIC TED 21 . (2) In this section "officer". (c) that entry to the premises will not be granted unless a warrant is produced. (a) that it is not practicable to communicate with any person entitled to grant entry to the premises. if necessary by force. in Scotland. if necessary by force. on an application made by a constable a justice of the peace is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for believing(a) that a dangerous substance is kept or used in any premises but that no notice under section 59 is in force in respect of the premises. manager. on an application made by the procurator fiscal the sheriff is satisfied as mentioned in subsection (1). he may issue a warrant authorising a constable to enter the premises. (3) Where the affairs of a body corporate are managed by its members. (2) If. and to search them. in relation to a body corporate. and that any of the conditions mentioned in subsection (4) apply. (b) 68 Bodies corporate (1) If an offence under this Part committed by a body corporate is shown to have been committed with the consent or connivance of. he. or (b) that the occupier of any relevant premises is failing to comply with any direction given to him under section 62 or 63 . 67 Offences (1) An occupier who fails without reasonable excuse to comply with any duty or direction imposed on him by or under this Part is guilty of an offence. knowingly or recklessly makes a statement which is false or misleading in a material particular is guilty of an offence . or to be attributable to any neglect on the part of(a) (b) any officer. (3) A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable(a) on conviction on indictment. and to search them. to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years or a fine (or both). in England and Wales or Northern Ireland. (3) A constable may seize and retain anything which he believes is or contains a dangerous substance. secretary or other similar officer of the body corporate.Security Standards for Laboratories RESTRICTED 66 Search warrants (1) If. or any other employee of the body corporate who is in charge of any relevant premises or the access to any dangerous substance kept or used there. and on summary conviction. (d) that the purpose of a search may be frustrated or seriously prejudiced unless a constable arriving at the premises can secure immediate entry to them. in giving any information to a person exercising functions under this Part. 4) The conditions mentioned in subsection (1) are- (2) A person who. or any person purporting to act in any such capacity.

if the first appeal was heard in England and Wales. (2) A fine imposed on the partnership or association on its conviction of an offence is to be paid out of the funds of the partnership or association. sections 70 and 143 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.)) and Schedule 4 to the Magistrates' Courts (Northern Ireland) Order 1981 (S . (3) Rules of court relating to the service of documents are to have effect as if the partnership or association were a body corporate .Appendix A: Part 7 69 Partnerships and unincorporated associations (1) Proceedings for an offence alleged to have been committed by a partnership or an unincorporated association must be brought in the name of the partnership or association (and not in that of any of its members). (2) Any person aggrieved by directions given under section 64 may appeal to the Commission . means(a) (b) any officer of the association or any member of its governing body. or (c) the Court of Appeal in Northern Ireland. 15 (N. or any person purporting to act in such a capacity. if the first appeal was heard in Scotland. is guilty of the offence and liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingly. is guilty of the offence and liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingly. or (b) any employee of the partnership who is in charge of any relevant premises or the access to any dangerous substance kept or used there. or to be attributable to any neglect on the part of(a) (b) any officer. RESTRICTED (6) If an offence under this Part committed by an unincorporated association is shown to have been committed with the consent or connivance of.I. 43) (procedure) apply as they do in relation to a body corporate. (4) In proceedings for an offence brought against the partnership or association(a) section 33 of the Criminal Justice Act 1925 (c. or to be attributable to any neglect on the part of(a) a partner or a person purporting to act as a partner. I. 46) (procedure) apply as they do in relation to a body corporate. to be known as the Pathogens Access Appeal Commission. (7) In subsection (6) "officer". (b) (c) (5) If an offence under this Part committed by a partnership is shown to have been committed with the consent or connivance of. he. (3) The Commission must allow an appeal if it considers that the decision to give the directions was flawed when considered in the light of the principles applicable on an application for judicial review. section 18 of the Criminal Justice (Northern Ireland) Act 1945 (c. as well as the partnership. as well as the association. 1981/1675 (N. in relation to any association. 26)) (procedure) apply as they do in relation to a body corporate. if the first appeal was heard in Northern Ireland. or any employee of the association who is in charge of any relevant premises or the access to any dangerous substance kept or used there. 86) and Schedule 3 to the Magistrates' Courts Act 1980 (c . (5) An appeal under subsection only with the permission of- 0 may be brought 22 RESTRICTED . he.I. (4) A party to any appeal under this section which the Commission has determined may bring a further appeal on a question of law to(a) the Court of Appeal. 70 Denial of access: appeals (1) There shall be a commission. (b) the Court of Session.

the court to which the appeal would be brought. 72 Giving of directions or notices Any direction or notice under this Part may be given by post. (7) A further appeal shall lie(a) to the sheriff principal from the decision of the sheriff. "prescribed " means prescribed in regulations made by the Secretary of State. (6) The appeal to the sheriff is by way of summary application. "notice" means a notice in writing. having regard to all the circumstances of the case. means any person entitled to occupy the premises. or (b) regulations under section 58. it is unreasonable to be required to do that act. the chief officer of police for the area in which the premises are situated. "occupier" includes a partnership or unincorporated association and. or (b) where the Commission refuses permission. shall be subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of either House of Parliament. may appeal to a magistrates' court against the requirement on the ground that. 11). "dangerous substance" has the meaning given in section 58. (b) (8) In the application of this section to Northern Ireland references to a magistrates' court are to a court of summary jurisdiction. or (b) any directions under section 62 or 63. 59 or 61. 71 Other appeals (1) Any person who is required to do any act in response to(a) any notice under section 60. (5) Subsections (1) to (3) apply to Scotland with the substitution for references to the magistrates' court of references to the sheriff. and (b) with the leave of the sheriff principal.Security Standards for Laboratories RESTRICTED (a) the Commission . (3) A statutory instrument containing(a) an order under section 61. to the Court of Session from the decision of the sheriff principal. and in relation to any premises in Northern Ireland. (4) An appeal shall lie to the Crown Court against any decision of the magistrates ' court. (2) An appeal may not be brought after the end of the period of one month beginning with the day on which the notice or directions were given. or (b) make such modification of the requirement as it considers appropriate. (6) Schedule 6 (constitution of the Commission and procedure) has effect. (3) If the magistrates' court allows the appeal. RES T RIC TED 23 . "chief officer of police" means(a) in relation to any premises in Great Britain. the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland. and "relevant premises" has the meaning given in section 60. in relation to premises that are unoccupied. (2) A statutory instrument containing an order under section 58 shall not be made unless a draft of it has been laid before and approved by a resolution of each House of Parliament. 73 Orders and regulations (1) The power to make an order or regulations under this Part is exercisable by statutory instrument. it may(a) direct that the required act need not be done. "direction" means a direction in writing. 74 Interpretation of Part 7 (1) In this Part"act of terrorism" has the same meaning as in the Terrorism Act 2000 (c.

24 RESTRICTED . or making provision corresponding to. any provision of this Part. and pests. make different provision for different purposes. with or without modifications. and make such incidental. significant disruption to the public. in relation to anything to which this section applies. (3) The power under this section may be exercised in relation to any chemical only if the Secretary of State is satisfied that the chemical could be used in an act of terrorism to endanger life or cause serious harm to human health . 75 Power to extend Part 7 to animal or plant pathogens. (2) This section applies to(a) toxic chemicals (within the meaning of the Chemical Weapons Act 1996 (c. 6)) . (5) An order under this section may(a) provide for any reference in the order to an instrument or other document to take effect as a reference to that instrument or document as revised or re-issued from time to time. or significant alarm to the public. make an order applying. (b) animal pathogens. supplementary and transitional provision as the Secretary of State thinks fit.Appendix A: RESTRICTED Part 7 (2) In this Part references to measures taken to ensure the security of any dangerous substance are to be construed in accordance with section 60. (b) (c) (6) A statutory instrument containing an order under this section shall not be made unless a draft of it has been laid before and approved by a resolution of each House of Parliament. (4) The power under this section may be exercised in relation to any pathogen or pest only if the Secretary of State is satisfied that there is a risk that the pathogen or pest is of a description that could be used in an act of terrorism to cause(a) (b) (c) widespread damage to property. pests or toxic chemicals (1) The Secretary of State may. (c) (d) plant pathogens.

Appendix B: Schedule 5 PATHOGENS AND TOXINS (VIRUSES) RESTRICTED Chikungunya virus Congo-crimean haemorrhagic fever virus Dengue fever virus Eastern equine encephalitis virus Ebola virus Hantaan virus Japanese encephalitis virus Junin virus Lassa fever virus Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus Machupo virus Marburg virus Monkey pox virus Rift Valley fever virus Tick-borne encephalitis virus (Russian SpringSummer encephalitis virus) Variola virus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus Western equine encephalitis virus Yellow fever virus RICKETTSIAE Burkholderia pseudomallei (Pseudomonas pseudomallei) Chlamydophila psittaci Clostridium botulinum Francisella tularensis Salmonella typhi Shigella dysenteriae Vibrio cholerae Yersinia pestis TOXINS Aflatoxins Botulinum toxins Clostridium perfringens toxins Conotoxin Microcystin (Cyanginosin) Ricin Saxitoxin Shiga toxin Staphylococcus aureus toxins Tetrodotoxin Verotoxin Notes 1 Any reference in this Schedule to a micro-organism includes- Bartonella quintana (Rochalimea quintana. 2 Any reference in this Schedule to a toxin includes- Bacillus anthracis Brucella abortus Brucella melitensis Brucella suis Burkholderia mallei (Pseudomonas mallei) (a) any genetiC material containing any nucleic acid sequence for the coding of the toxin. and (b) any genetically modified organism containing any such sequence. and (b) any genetically modified organism containing any such sequence. Rickettsia quintana) Coxiella burnetii Rickettsia prowazeki Rickettsia rickettsii BACTERIA (a) any genetiC material containing any nucleic acid sequence associated with the pathogenicity of the micro-organism. RES T RIC TED 25 . 3 Any reference in this Schedule to a toxin includes subunits of the toxin.