Volume 1: Issue 1

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Proceedings of the Pondicherry Lodge

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Dedication

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Sherlock Holmes Society of India dedicates this first volume of “Proceedings of the Pondicherry Lodge” to all its members, all fans of Sherlock Holmes worldwide and above all, to the legendary man himself – Sherlock Holmes. Without you, Mr. Holmes, none of this could ever be.

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Preface
More than anything else, this e-magazine has been a labour of love for us. We adore Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson and all their adventures, and we spend a fair amount of time airing our views and discussing topics related to them. And given that the Sherlock Holmes Society of India turned twelve on May 28, 2013, some of us felt that it was time to have something more formal, more tangible, than online discussions. And thus, the idea of an e-magazine was born. We toyed with the name for a while. “The Three Pipe Problem” was suggested, but it was felt that an Indian connection would be more fitting. Ultimately, it was Sumal Surendranath (the founder and the head of everything to do with SHSI) who came up with the name “Proceedings of the Pondicherry Lodge”. We did run into obstacles, and at one point, we thought we would barely make it to ten pages. We were disappointed when people who had promised to write for us had to back out. We put up a couple of contests, which went unanswered. But then, Providence (or Sherlock Holmes, as we like to believe) came to our rescue. We have many, many people to thank for helping us muddle through the preparation of this e-magazine. First and foremost, we thank everyone who has written or contributed to this issue – this publication would not have been possible without you, and we thank you from the depths of our Sherlockian/Holmesian hearts for all your efforts and the lovely features you have given us to publish. Next, we thank Prajakta Hebbar (Indian Express, Pune) and Kakul Gautam (Brown Paper Bag, Delhi) for the media exposure – it brought us several talented youngsters. Aayam Banerjee (as the Unofficial Editor) deserves a special mention, too, as the receiver of panicked calls and messages at ungodly hours begging for advice on things ranging from a malfunctioning software to the usage of an archaic term. And last, but very, very importantly, we owe truckloads of gratitude to our long-standing member, Binand Sethumadhavan, who was roped in as a Technical Editor for the blog-migration to our very own website, a domain that he picked up and nurtured, and from where you have downloaded this e-magazine. This e-magazine is not meant to be a work of academic brilliance or erudite scholarship – perhaps, some day in the future, it might take that avatar. As of now, it is a work of passion, a work of fascination – a dedication, if you will, to the greatest detective the world has ever known, and his loyal admirers, ranging from nine-year-olds to seventy-year-olds from various walks of life. We apologise in advance for anything that may be deemed lacking, but we request you to be gentle and give us constructive criticism instead, for we are just amateurs and trying our hand at something totally new. We would love to hear from you – so please, do not hesitate to drop us a line at shsieditors@yahoo.in or at shsieditors@gmail.com. We will try our best to improve with each new issue. Have we mentioned yet that this e-magazine is to be published bi-annually? Next stop: December 1, 2013. – Jay, on behalf of SHSI Editors

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Table of Contents
Dedication ........................................................................................................................................................................ 2 Preface .............................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Disclaimer And Other Legalities ...................................................................................................................................... 5 Titbits – Newsflash .......................................................................................................................................................... 6 Primarii Lapidis - Editorial .............................................................................................................................................. 7 “A Neapolitan Society, The Red Circle . . .”..................................................................................................................... 9 Art................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Sherlock Holmes And The Case Of The Bulgarian Codex............................................................................................. 11 Sherlock Holmes: Poetry ................................................................................................................................................ 13 Critical Analysis: Sherlock Holmes ................................................................................................................................ 14 A Tribute To Sherlock Holmes ...................................................................................................................................... 17 The Detection Of Truth ................................................................................................................................................. 18 Titbits – Canon Abbreviations ........................................................................................................................................ 20 The Power Of Books ...................................................................................................................................................... 21 Sketch ............................................................................................................................................................................. 22 Sherlock Holmes: A Sudden Death ................................................................................................................................ 23 Titbits – Contests ........................................................................................................................................................... 24 The Clandestine Code .................................................................................................................................................... 25 Titbits – Snippets ........................................................................................................................................................... 28 Montage ......................................................................................................................................................................... 29 The Doctor’s Concern – Cocaine And Morphine ........................................................................................................... 31 The First Kiss Of Sherlock Holmes ................................................................................................................................ 33 The Five Orange Pips..................................................................................................................................................... 36 The Silk Tie .................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Sherlock Holmes Museum - London .............................................................................................................................. 42 Sherlock Holmes In Japan .............................................................................................................................................. 43 A Portrait Of The Modern Sherlock Holmes .................................................................................................................. 45 Summer Drinks .............................................................................................................................................................. 46 The Analytical Methods Of Sherlock Holmes ................................................................................................................ 48 Holmes And Watson Are Coming To India! .................................................................................................................. 49 Sherlock Holmes - Believe.............................................................................................................................................. 51 Titbits – Annual Meet..................................................................................................................................................... 55 Faithful To The Original: Comparing Sherlock And Sherlock Holmes .......................................................................... 56 Afterword ........................................................................................................................................................................ 59

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Disclaimer and other legalities
Sherlock Holmes Society of India (SHSI) owns nothing and claims nothing. While the SHSI logos we have used have been designed by us (with significant help from Microsoft Word, Paint and Clipart), we have liberally used the great Sidney Paget’s illustrations from the Strand. Sherlock Holmes, of course, belongs to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the various avatars belong to whoever created them. The pictures of the Sherlock Holmes actors are from various Wikipedia pages and associated links. We have cited the sources of original works and images that we have used. Other props, images, formatting tools we have used belong to Microsoft. If we have accidentally used something that does not belong to these acknowledged sources, we sincerely apologise for our transgression, and if you let us know, we will acknowledge the correct source (and forward our abject apologies to the creator). The views expressed by the authors in their articles or art-work are their own and we are completely neutral parties (well, we do like Sherlock Holmes, but other than that). Also, all copyrights (and whatever other intellectual property rights you can think of) belong with the authors. We do not claim anything (good or bad). Whatever we have published belongs to the author(s) of that particular work and comprises a part of this issue because the authors have been good enough to let us print their work. We are a free, bona fide, non-monetary and voluntary society for ardent admirers of Sherlock Holmes (in whatever form) and accordingly, this publication is completely free, non-commercial and non-profit. We make nothing from it except a sense of enjoyment, and the authors make no money out of it, either. This publication can be freely distributed, but if you are re-printing anything from this issue in any form, do have the courtesy to let the authors know (get in touch with us if you cannot locate the authors independently) and do not forget to acknowledge them. We are sure our contributors are generous of heart, and no one will take offence at re-prints if you seek permission and assure them that they shall be appropriately acknowledged. With that out of the way, we are as eager for you to read our publication as you would be to see it, so please continue. The game is afoot!

This is what happens when you have three lawyers on the editorial team!

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We have a brand new page on Facebook, and we are rapidly gaining “likes”. We have also interacted with some amazingly erudite Sherlockians over the world. Do check out our new Facebook page! We also have our very own blog-cum-website now, thanks to our Technical Editor, Binand Sethumadhavan, who has worked very, very hard in these last few days to make the site work. Our member, Prajakta Hebbar, a noted journalist who writes for the Indian Express, recently wrote a rather lovely and complimentary article for us. The article can be viewed online. We heartily thank Prajakta for her efforts!

The Sherlock Holmes Society of India is now a recognised “Scion Society” of the Baker Street Irregulars, thanks to Peter E. Blau (“Black Peter”) and Michael Whelan (“Wiggins”). A proud moment for us! Congratulations to SHSI members!

Did you know that we have four published authors of Sherlock Holmes books in SHSI? In no particular order, these are Tim Symonds (“Sherlock Holmes and the Dead Boer at Sc Scotney otney Castle” and “Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Bulgarian Codex”), Pinaki Roy (“The Manichean Investigators: A Postcolonial and Cultural Rereading of the Sherlock Holmes and Byomkesh Bakshi Stories”), Vasudev Murthy (“Sherlock Holmes in Japan”) and Partha Basu (“The Curious Case of 221B” and “The Secret Notebooks of John H. Watson, MD”). We hope we have many, many more in the coming days.

The Sherlock Holmes Society of India recently featured in the Brown Paper Bag, New Delhi on May 2, 2013 (thanks to Kakul Gautam) and in DNA, Mumbai on May 6, 2013. We are thankful, as we earned not only a fair number of cool new members – but some fantastic stuff to print as well! The Sherlock Holmes Society of London is organising a trip to India in February 2014 (To India with Sherlock Holmes). It promises to be an exciting tour. Ms. Louise Nicholson, the organiser, has put together a flyer for us. We also have a detailed itinerary available with us, with costs and the application form, so do feel free to call upon us for the same. The Sherlock Holmes: Past and Present Conference is being organised by the Institute of English Studies, University of London on the 21st and 22nd of June 2013. We will have notes from the conference in our next issue. As a special favour to us, Shanila Siddiqui, an HR professional, went off to explore the Sherlock Holmes Pub, Bangalore. Unfortunately, it turned out to be rather seedy and she was unable to stay on and review the place. We are collaborating with the Explorers at CalcuttaWalks to figure out a “Detective Walk” in the city of Kolkata and a play, “Sherlock Holmes in Calcutta”.

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Primarii Lapidis On behalf of Sherlock Holmes Society of India, and my coeditors, Jayantika Ganguly, Satyajit Gupta and Noufal Ibrahim, I am delighted to announce the publication of the inaugural issue of the Journal of the Sherlock Homes Society of India named “Proceedings of the Pondicherry Lodge.” This Journal had been conceptualized many years ago much on the lines of the esteemed publication of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London – The Baker Street Journal. It was a natural outgrowth of the expansion of the Sherlock Holmes Society of India, which has now around two hundred dedicated members. It was felt by the members of the Sherlock Holmes Society of India that a dedicated journal would be the ideal vehicle to build on the success of the Society as well as to capture the diverse scholarly interests of an ever more vibrant Holmesian community. In February 2013, a discussion was initiated among the esteemed members of the Sherlock Holmes Society of India to seek out ways and means to expand its outreach. The ensuing debate resulted in two proposals, i.e., to have a Facebook presence and to have a bi-annual Journal which will exhibit the creative and literary skills of Indian Holmesians to a wider audience. Accordingly, a Voluntary Committee (consisting of myself, Jayantika Ganguly, Satyajit Gupta as Editors, and Noufal Ibrahim and Binand Sethumadhavan as Technical Editors) was formed as an editorial team to bring out this Journal. Thus the “Proceedings of the Pondicherry Lodge” was born. The editorial team decided that the journal should be published as an e-zine journal with PDF/ Microsoft Word, as the underlying data format, so as to achieve economy, facile publishing and quicker dissemination amongst its members. It was also decided that we would endeavour to publish two issues a year: the summer issue in June and the winter issue in December focusing on a topics of relevance to the Holmesian community.

Sumal Surendranath is the founder, managing director, chief editor and chairperson – all rolled into one – of the Sherlock Holmes Society of India. In SHSI, he is the highest court of appeal. He tells us how this emagazine, “Proceedings of the Pondicherry Lodge” came into existence in this article.

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- Editorial
This inaugural issue consists of voluntary contributions by Holmesians, pursuant to an appeal in the SHSI Groups (both at Yahoo and Facebook). Our effort to reach out to as many Holmesians was given a shot in the arm by coverage of our Society’s activities in the Brown Paper Bag, Indian Express and DNA newspapers. A mere look at the table of contents, demonstrates just how wide-ranging and diverse the interests of the Holmesian community have become; these articles truly represent the broad tent that is Holmesian scholarship today. This inaugural issue owes much to many people. Thanks are due first to all the members of the Sherlock Holmes Society of India, where the idea originated and for supporting it so wholeheartedly. The editors of the Proceedings of the Pondicherry Lodge have benefitted immensely from all the contributors’ experience and expertise as well as their enthusiasm for the Sherlock Holmes Society of India and the Canon. My thanks are due to my co-editors, Jayantika Ganguly, Satyajit Gupta (Editors), and Noufal Ibrahim and Binand Sethumadhavan (Technical Editors) who have so generously given their time and expertise to make this project happen. No detail, large or small, has been beyond their notice. Their professionalism, attention to detail, and good humour has made seeing this issue from an idea to its fruition, a real pleasure. I also thank the guest contributors of this first issue who admirably and with good humour suffered through our teething process as we put in place this issue of Proceedings of the Pondicherry Lodge. On May 28, 2013, the Sherlock Holmes Society of India celebrated its 12th birthday, marking its growth from childhood to adolescence, a traditional rite of passage in India. Another rite of passage for the Holmesian community is this Journal, marking one of the many milestones in the SHSI becoming not only “a niche organization,” but a flourishing academic and intellectual community.

The editorial team – we like to call ourselves the “SHSI Editors” consists of: Sumal Surendranath (Editor), Satyajit Gupta (Editor), Jayantika Ganguly (Editor), Noufal Ibrahim (Technical Editor) and Binand Sethumadhavan (Technical Editor). We are reachable at Yahoo as well as Gmail. If you are interested in joining the editorial team, please drop us a line.

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PETER E. BLAU (A.K.A. BLACK PETER), NEEDS NO INTRODUCTION. HE HAS GRACIOUSLY PERMITTED US TO REPRINT THIS ARTICLE OF APRIL 15, 2012 FROM BLACK PETER'S LOGBOOK (MAINTAINED WITH THE RED CIRCLE OF WASHINGTON, DC).

“A Neapolitan society, the Red Circle . . .”
“My poor Gennaro,” Emilia Lucca told Holmes and Watson, “had joined a Neapolitan society, the Red Circle, which was allied to the old Carbonari. The oaths and secrets of this brotherhood were frightful, and once within its rule no escape was possible.” That reference to the Red Circle, in the story from which our society proudly takes its name, puzzled Sherlockian scholars for many years, because while the Carbonari was indeed a secret society founded in the Kingdom of Naples, it was a political rather than a criminal organization and never had a branch in New York. The solution to the mystery was eventually discovered in the manuscript of the story, where the name of the society is stated as the Camorra. The Camorra was, and indeed still is, a secret and criminal organization based in Naples, and at the time of “The Adventure of the Red Circle” there were active branches in the Italian communities in Britain, the United States, and other countries. The reason why the Sicilian criminal organization the Mafia is so well known in the United States, and the Camorra is essentially unknown, is that from 1914 to 1917 there was a bloody argument between the Mafia and the Camorra in New York, and when the smoke cleared the surviving Camorristas joined the Mafia.

The Camorra is still to be found in Naples, where it is as active and powerful as the Mafia is elsewhere in Italy, and “The Camorra Never Sleeps” is an interesting article by William Langewische in the May issue of Vanity Fair, which has kindly made it available online. The Camorra is considered by many people in Naples as more powerful there than the national government of Italy. It is interesting to consider why the reference in the published story is to the Carbonari rather than to the Camorra. It certainly is tempting to suggest that an editor at The Strand Magazine, when the story was to be published in 1911, decided that it might be dangerous to offend members of the Camorra, and substituted the safer name Carbonari, since that organization had become inactive by the middle of the 19th century.

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Art

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The wonderfully talented Sitanshu Shukla, a new SHSI member from Mumbai, is a Geologist by qualification and a Designer by choice and profession, with 10+ years of experience in the field of Spatial & Communication Design. He brings us these brilliant creations from his arsenal.
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Sherlock Holmes And The Case Of The Bulgarian Codex

Sherlock Holmes And The Case Of The Bulgarian Codex moves at a fast pace. It is the latest novel by Tim Symonds, following last year’s Sherlock Holmes And The Case Of The Dead Boer At Scotney Castle. The story takes place in the year 1900, revolving around Balkan intrigues in the nostalgic preFirst World War period and a real-life Bulgarian Prince, ‘Foxy’ Ferdinand. The Bulgarian Codex is a yarn of duplicity, murder, marriage, vampires and greed for vast estates in Bulgaria and Hungary, with the fate of millions in Sherlock Holmes's hands. Prince ‘Foxy’ Ferdinand of Bulgaria summons Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson to travel across Europe post-haste to Sofia to recover a stolen, manuscript. The loss of The Bulgarian Codex, the most ancient and most sacred manuscript in the Old Bulgarian language, could lead to the outbreak of war between Russia, Austria-Hungary and the

Tim Symonds is not only a rather eminent Holmesian, but also a long-standing member of SHSI and the celebrated author of “Sherlock Holmes and the Dead Boer at Scotney Castle” as well as “Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Bulgarian Codex”. At our request, he has given us this feature on his latest book to publish.

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Ottomans.

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The Author brings alive the political machinations and intrigues of early twentieth century Europe. Events in The Bulgarian Codex are fictional, but the principal character, Prince Ferdinand, is based on the real Coburg Prince Regnant, later Bulgarian Tsar who ruled the Southern European country of Bulgaria from 1887 until his forcible abdication after joining the losing side in World War One. The Bulgarian Codex is written in classic Holmes and Watson style. This is a book for readers who appreciate and enjoy dry British wit. Holmes and Watson travel across Europe to meet their Royal benefactor in his personal Royal rail carriage: ‘The door handles on the toilets bore the Prince's coat of arms. The furnishings had been purchased in Vienna as a job lot at a sale of a bankrupt lady singer, giving the whole a raffish Biedermeier femininity’. Both books are available online:

Sherlock Holmes And The Dead Boer At Scotney Castle: at Amazon and Flipkart (India) Sherlock Holmes And The Case of the Bulgarian Codex: at Amazon, as an e-book, on Kindle, at Bookdepository and at Flipkart (India)
Just click on the links and you will be able to buy the books.

Here’s a quote from Britain’s former Foreign Secretary, Sir Malcolm Rifkind to the author: ‘Dear Tim Symonds, just to say that I have just finished reading your novel The Dead Boer at Scotney Castle. I greatly enjoyed it and found it a great yarn! It kept one guessing right to the end which all good crime novels should do. Sherlock Holmes (and Conan Doyle) would have been impressed!’

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Utkarsha Anwekar is all of sixteen and still at school, dreaming young of Sherlock pursuing Holmes research in Genetics. This admirer likes forensics, reads avidly and has dabbled in animation, spiritualism. Utkarsha presents to us her poetry, dedicated to our favourite detective, as well as a portrait of Irene Adler. journalism, TV reporting, logo-designing and

Sherlock Holmes: Poetry
Bright keen eyes, their focus supreme Concentrate on the case at hand, He thinks but of it, living as in a dream, No! Awake as an owl, sleep is banned. (His mind will not rest now.) Obsessive and quiet, he thinks and thinks His little grey cells churning tirelessly Thus, theories and deductions, as he blinks Arise, as if immediate, effortlessly. (Or so it seems, to strangers.) Calabash pipe and Deerstalker hat, Create a persona distinct His methods are enigmatic, such that He trusts only his own instinct. (He is a keen observer.) His minute observations will surprise you Immensely, for you are but an Ordinary mortal, not habituated to new Methods of study, like this man. (He is more than a man, though.) You may not understand the man, But he must know you well enough. Never met him, you say, so how can…? Because he is a force to reckon, smart and tough. (He is the best in the business.) He is Sherlock Holmes, yes, him The Greatest of the Great, He helps people in times that are dim, He carves his own fate. (He also plays the violin: multifaceted to the core. I Salute him, do you?)

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Critical Analysis: Sherlock Holmes
I have read several novels, all of which are Poirot. She manages to hoodwink and distinctive in their originality and style of befuddle her readers with her well-known presentation. All of them have directly or touch of surrealism. indirectly influenced me, but not equally or in As for Sir Arthur, he focuses more on the the same manner. As a rule, books tend to unravelling of the mystery rather than the create deeper impressions on us than any weaving of the plot. He justifies this through a audio or video stimulus, because they demand statement of Holmes: “Crime is common. our complete attention. Among them, those Logic is rare.” Thus, in his stories the method books which help us correlate with their of solving comprises more than three-quarters events and characters and place ourselves in of the content. the situations described naturally influence us more. In Let us now study the fictional Anwesha Goswami is a my case, a series of books in characters of most importance. this category is the entire very talented seventeenHere again, I shall take on a volume of Sherlock Holmes year-old from Mumbai. comparative approach so as to fiction by Sir Arthur Conan distinguish each character She describes herself as Doyle. clearly and help achieve a “an amateur painter, poet, thorough understanding of I have often met with people singer and a hardcore them all. who discard these stories as

bibliophile”. In this article, “dull” or “barely Starting with Poirot, he is a comprehensible”. Perhaps in she has employed a perfect example of virtues: their opinion, other more neatness, tidiness, cleanliness comparative approach and modern novels are technically and cool logic personified. On contrasted Holmes to better: in intricacy of plot and most occasions, he displays a characters. But I never Poirot to bring out their stoic nonchalance to his comprehend the fact that these neighbours or surroundings characteristic features. readers readily assimilate and prefers to be ‘disciplined’ intricate, complex novels but and extremely exact. He is fail to do so for much simpler ones. As for ‘prim’ and proper as described by his young dullness, it depends on how much they friend Hastings. He is conscious of his fame comprehend. and is most ridiculously disappointed whenever clients or case-linked people seem For instance, Agatha Christie’s novels ignorant of it. His speciality is: he never featuring Hercule Poirot are as tangled and physically fights with anyone, or engages in complicated as a labyrinth – she weaves plot any ‘action’ in the true sense of the term, but after plot, interconnecting the characters and crops up almost by chance in the midst of the dropping half-obscure hints so as to allow the mysteries to solve them. His clients do not reader to make random guesses about the always come to seek his aid: he often culprit. At the end, she unravels the whole intervenes and pays them surprise visits, thing so quickly and abruptly that one is anticipating the need for his presence. To mostly unable to find time to appreciate the almost everyone he is acquainted or intellectual brilliance of the main character – Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013

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But one can never be so familiar with Poirot’s personality. He prefers to keep it hidden from scrutinizers. Another side of Holmes which is absent in Poirot is music. Somebody who can appreciate and create music is certainly not robotic – he cannot be. Music requires the development of heart and a certain generous and open natural inclination that permits one to enjoy this lovely art which, in itself, is panoramic and great. Highly intelligent people often ignore this part of their mind and develop the brain’s thinking skills. As a result, their personalities are one-sided. Music brings out the expression of one’s deepest emotions – good, sound music is, as Watson says, “treat for the gods”. Holmes is also extremely averse to any publicity or fame, and prefers to stay out of the limelight. His nature is straightforward and he goes in for action whenever required. He is also an expert boxer, fencer and swordsman. He leads a ‘homely’ and ‘simple’ life as described by Watson that is almost ‘austere’ in its lack of luxury. He does not hesitate to disclose his methods to the professional detectives, Lestrade and Gregson, even though it could lead to loss of the number of his clients. The two detectives, Holmes and Poirot, also have different ways of observation and deduction. Holmes scans the place “like a bloodhound” with his magnifying glass. He also examines various samples of cigarette ash and can distinguish between them at a glance. Probably this interest of his has been born of his love for chemistry.

unacquainted with – he is practically a complete stranger – his real personality is unknown even to his close friend Hastings. Perhaps the last is due to the significant agedifference. Overall, Poirot is as tightly closed as a tortoise in a shell, and appears mechanical and slightly robotic. Owing to this nature of his, Hastings is repelled from being intimate enough with his friend to make him his confidante. But with Holmes, it is different. Like Poirot, he too shuns company, leads a quiet life and prefers to stay in familiar surroundings. His habits are messy and his drug-intake a most reprehensible quality in his character. He also receives his clients at his house, and they belong to various classes of society. Also, he entertains villains in his house to corner them in the best way, and besides maintains contact with all sorts of odd people who aid him unthinkably in his profession. Despite all this, Watson chose him as a roommate. Here comes the fact that Poirot is not easy to live with, firstly due to keenness on perfection in everything and secondly, his inscrutability. But Holmes, however inscrutable to strangers, opens up to Watson with no reservations or secrets. He confesses his faults to Watson before beginning to stay with him. And for all his strange mood swings and abruptness, there comes a time when Watson can read him like a book and even predict, at times, his next action. Although Holmes’ powers of deduction and analytical skills continue to amaze him, his personality and habits become as familiar to Watson as his own.

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Poirot, however, scoffs at such procedures saying that the ‘magnifying glass’ and nosing in the soil for footprints are not for him. He prefers to stay tidy. Perhaps we wouldn’t have got Holmes as we have, if we hadn’t seen him through the looking glass of Dr. Watson. It is said that as great men do not speak of their qualities themselves, they are best expressed through a comparatively ordinary observer. Watson’s steady friendship, constant queries and curiosity are fuel to Holmes’s powers. Thus he once acknowledges in an affectionate remark, “I’m lost without my Boswell”. The latter part of his remark refers to the fact that Watson encapsulated the duo’s adventures in writing. Holmes’s personality, his bouts of action, his physical appearance and his life, all seem so realistic that several people had been known to write to the fictional address in Baker Street. Agatha Christie’s novels featuring Poirot mainly consist of narratives from different individuals in the plot. Sometimes, the narratives from different individuals in the plot end as the narrator himself or herself gets killed. This creates a demoralising effect on the reader – a sort of negative feeling. It also

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makes an impression that the story is unrealistic. For such narratives, the writer can only know of their thoughts if she can read their minds at those moments, which is absurd. Besides, such weird narratives give an eerie, uncomfortable feeling to the reader. In Conan Doyle’s fiction, there is such robustness and life that there is no space for eeriness or phantom feelings. Our minds are too occupied with the firm, unwavering presence of the two main characters to accommodate any other-worldly presence. Coming to Sir Conan Doyle himself, it is said that all creations of a person reflect a side of his or her personality. Thus, Holmes is a part of his creator himself, with his generosity, sharp wit and sense of justice. Above all – Conan Doyle has made Holmes humane; that is why, with all his faults, he is so endearing to the readers and has been quoted, admired and wondered at for generations. This nature of Holmes has made his stories refreshing and not demoralising, inspiring and not discouraging; and this, combined with the kindly, generous, warm-hearted presence of Dr. Watson has made the duo immortal – and therein lies the genius of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

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A Tribute to Sherlock Holmes

Shashidhar Pamarthi, a final year B.E. (Computers) student from Mumbai, is a Sherlockian who loves singing, gaming and working out creative things like this particular sample. He pays a tribute to some of his favourite actors who have portrayed the role of Sherlock Holmes.

Can you identify them? Answers are given below.

Basil Rathbone - The Hound of Baskervilles/The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939) and many more Ronald Howard - Sherlock Holmes (TV Series) 1954-1955 Douglas Wilmer - Sherlock Holmes (TV Series) 1964-1965 Robert Stephens - The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970) Jeremy Brett - The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and many more Robert Downey Jr. - Sherlock Holmes/Sherlock Holmes: The Game of Shadows Benedict Cumberbatch - Sherlock (2010 and continuing)

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The Detection of Truth
As I entered our lodgings at 221B Baker “Watson, my friend, a very peculiar Street, my compatriot shot me a piercing matter has arisen in my mind that needs look. I could see that he your conviction,” he was deep in thought informed me quietly. Vandit Panvelkar is a even before I arrived, a “What is the matter copywriter by profession and sort of a meditative state works in a digital agency in that begs my that he would usually Mumbai. He is fascinated by attention?” I asked put himself in, and Sherlock Holmes and his curiously. emerged from the selftrue passion lies in telling induced cocoon at “Do you remember the stories through various precisely the same time night we caught John media. as my ingress. It was not Baptist while he unlikely for Holmes to absconded?” keep manipulating “Yes! The rapscallion reality as he entered the jumped over the rooftops of England to recesses of his own mind. But I have seen make a daring escape. I, for one, can never the man in stranger states of trance than this forget the coup de grâce when you leapt 10 to say otherwise. I deduced (being in the feet in the air to nab him.” constant company of the World’s Greatest Detective, you learn a thing or two) that “Is it humanly possible to achieve this feat he could just be preoccupied with any of of marvel?” the following matters, to my knowledge: 1. The resolution of the final few loose ends in the John Baptist Killings, a strange case that was masterfully solved by my companion a while ago. The secrets of mystical Hindu sages who could harness the power of their ‘Kundalinis’ for masterful feats and caught the fancy of the detective. The duplicitous schemes that a particular professor was conjuring up to plot the ultimate doom of my friend… again. His words were laced with reason. I wondered for a moment and recollected the events of the night. Being a sceptic myself, I would have disregarded the event. But I have seen the man perform even more remarkable feats than this to say otherwise. “I would have not believed it had I not seen it with my own two eyes. From my vantage point on the street, I could not have been mistaken,” I confessed. He nodded thoughtfully. “Hmm… but it is quite remarkable that a man of my age and physicality could successfully attempt

2.

3.

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He smiled slightly in remembrance and continued his narrative, “May the 4th, a date that both you and I shall never forget for its bearing on our lives. Professor Moriarty succeeded in murdering me, yet I survived unscathed. I was born again so as to say and returned to our quarters in a matter of time. What Godman can cheat death on occasion?” “I do not know what to make of it,” I confessed. “We have battled an enormous hound, foiled the plans of a deranged intellectual and brazed travails that no ordinary individual could ever boast in a multitude of lifetimes.” It was too much to take in. “Holmes, I am warning you, any more of this drivel and I am stepping out.” “Watson, do you not see? The clues were in front of us all long; the reason and logic in plain sight. We have been too preoccupied with the ruddy investigations to piece the puzzle together. I have been contemplating my conclusion for a while but…” His tirade lingered on. I did not know what to say; I had seen enough twists and turns of fate in a single lifetime. If the World’s Greatest Detective tells you that your life has no true meaning and you are a figment of imagination, you tend to think twice about all of your encounters. But I have seen the man utter even more bizarre insinuations than this to say otherwise.

the jump and still live to tell the tale. It can’t be a matter of pure luck.” “What are you hinting at, Holmes?” At this moment, there was a brief pause as the cold, steely eyes of Sherlock Holmes took cover under their lids and a long puff from the pipe was drawn. Holmes breathed out the dense fog and completely obfuscated his face. The air cleared out to reveal a glint of enlightenment in the man’s eyes. The pageantry was not lost on me. “Watson, my words may sound absolutely incredulous but I would want you to hear me out first. I am to believe, based on our previous uncanny adventures, that we are not real. We are actually characters in a work of fiction.” “What the devil do you mean?” “We are not real Watson. Can you not see it? Have you not noticed it? Look at me; I am a polymath who can answer any question beyond normal reason, venture into the murky depths to reveal the truth and solve the most befuddling cases of mystery.” I remained silent and Holmes continued, “As a learned man myself, I have witnessed quite a few noble gentlemen that possess the mental prowess gifted only to a handful by the Almighty.”

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The conventional abbreviations (as listed below) were 1 2 devised by Jay Finley Christ and use four letters . S. No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Abbreviation ABBE BERY BLAC BLAN BLUE BOSC BRUC CARD CHAS COPP CREE CROO DANC DEVI DYIN EMPT ENGR FINA FIVE GLOR GOLD GREE HOUN IDEN ILLU LADY LAST LION MAZA MISS Story The Adventure of the Abbey Grange The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet The Adventure of Black Peter The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle The Boscombe Valley Mystery The Adventure of the BrucePartington Plans The Adventure of the Cardboard Box The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton The Adventure of the Copper Beeches The Adventure of the Creeping Man The Adventure of the Crooked Man The Adventure of the Dancing Men The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot The Adventure of the Dying Detective The Adventure of the Empty House The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb The Final Problem The Five Orange Pips The Gloria Scott The Adventure of the Golden Pincenez The Greek Interpreter The Hound of the Baskervilles A Case of Identity The Adventure of the Illustrious Client The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax His Last Bow The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter

S. No. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60.

Abbreviation MUSG NAVA NOBL NORW PRIO REDC REDH REIG RESI RETI SCAN SECO SHOS SIGN SILV SIXN SOLI SPEC STOC STUD SUSS THOR 3GAB 3GAR 3STU TWIS VALL VEIL WIST YELL

Story The Musgrave Ritual The Naval Treaty The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor The Adventure of the Norwood Builder The Adventure of the Priory School The Adventure of the Red Circle The Red-Headed League The Reigate Squires The Resident Patient The Adventure of the Retired Colourman A Scandal in Bohemia The Adventure of the Second Stain The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place The Sign of the Four Silver Blaze The Adventure of the Six Napoleons The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist The Adventure of the Speckled Band The Stockbroker’s Clerk A Study in Scarlet The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire The Problem of Thor Bridge The Adventure of the Three Gables The Adventure of the Three Garridebs The Adventure of the Three Students The Man with the Twisted Lip The Valley of Fear The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger The Adventure of the Wisteria Lodge The Yellow Face

1

Jay Finley Christ, An Irregular Guide to Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street, New York: Argus Books, 1947. 2 Source: The Best of Sherlock Holmes

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Ronald E. Lies, of “The Sherlock Holmes Social Network” fame, who likes to sign off as “Ron in Denver”, is a brand new member of SHSI. He shares his experience with his favourite books on Sherlock Holmes and the story behind each of his copies – an inspiration for every Sherlockian/Holmesian around the world.

The Power of Books
I have always been addicted to the writings of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. For me, he has created magic with his word pictures. I have been thinking about the books that brought me to Holmes. After finding copies of the covers through Google, I wanted to share my experiences through these pictures. The first book was a paperback edition of William S Baring Gould’s, “Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street". It had a red cover with two figures swirling around as if in tobacco smoke. A friend in high school showed me his copy and let me read the book. I had to find out about the Sherlock Holmes who had all these adventures. Who was the Irene whose name was on the lips of the old man who passed away on a park bench? I found that volume created a little controversy since its release. I then purchased a paperback with stories from the Canon that transported me from a house in Wichita, Kansas in the 1950s to a Victorian world of Holmes and Watson. The Doctor is the one I imagined myself to be. I could picture him be the loyal, intelligent companion who became a close friend as well. The great stories in the book started with; The Thor Bridge, and ended with The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place. By then I had to know more. There had to be more. Postscript: I lost the original copy I had. Years later, a dear Sherlockian special friend Chuck Hansen passed on and left me his copy. I treasure it as much I would a Beaton’s Christmas Annual. I saved my allowance and money made mowing lawns and doing odd jobs around my neighbourhood. I was able to buy a copy of the one volume that would bring so much delight and enjoyment to me. I had the Doubleday complete one volume. I wore out two copies of the book by journeys on the city buses, bikes, family vacations. There were stops at swimming pool decks and wherever I worked through high school and college. After several years, I no longer had a copy of the one volume with dust jacket. I bought a copy of the 2-volume set but it did not have the memories as my first. They say that you never forget your first love.

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Through the aid of close Sherlockian friends, I put together another copy. Larry Feldman gave his old copy, no dust jacket, with his interesting underlined notes. Karen Murdock sent me a laminated copy of the dust jacket. These gifts allowed me to put together a copy of the complete one volume. I now carry my copy protected in a zippered book cover case. It means so much. The books above have led me through the years, good times, bad times and continuing health challenges to my own Shangri-La. I have met and made so many interesting, aggravating, unique and loyal Sherlockians and Holmesian friends. Thank you all. I hope this article and the above pictures bring back good memories for you also.

Sketch
Sawri Madkaikar is a 16-yearold student from Mumbai who plans to pursue Psychology. She adores Sherlock Holmes and has given us this beautiful sketch of hers to publish.

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Sherlock Holmes: A Sudden Death
Holmes and Dr. Watson were travelling in a plane going to Beijing as they were going to meet an old friend of theirs. His name was Mr. Yang Lee. He, his wife and his mother lived together on the outskirts of Beijing. His widowed mother had shifted with him after his father’s death. After a few hours, Holmes and Dr. Watson reached Beijing. Holmes rang the door bell. Mrs. Karma Lee, Mr. Yang Lee’s mother opened the door. She looked surprised. “Oh! Hello Mr. Holmes and Watson, I suppose Yang forgot to tell me. Do come in.” Inside the house, Holmes and Watson were warmly greeted by Mr. Yang Lee and his wife Mrs. Sue Lee. Yang told them that Sue was a model and was going for a MRS. CHINA contest the day after. Holmes and Watson wished her good luck and then dispersed to their rooms to take a nap. In the evening, all of them had a talk. Then, Mrs. Karma Lee went to their neighbour’s house for a chat. At night every one slept like a log, being so tired. But Sue and Yang slipped out for a quiet walk. They went to their neighbours’ garden to talk. “Your mom will usurp all the property and most of the money we have,” said Sue. “This is always the topic,” complained Yang and went to the house to sleep. Sue decided on a plan to kill their mother-in-law. But their neighbour, Miss Chang guessed her intentions and decided to tell Karma secretly the next day. The following evening, when Mrs. Karma Lee went for tea to Miss Chang's house she got a shock on hearing the secret from Chang. “Well, if Sue really wants to kill me I should kill her first.” So, when Sue asked for a glass of water, Karma bought one mixed with slow acting poison that strikes you after six hours of drinking it. And soon it was the end of Sue. Holmes calmed down Yang and promised that he would solve the case. Holmes’ and Watson’s main suspect was Mrs. Karma Lee as she had been acting very strange after Sue’s death and had been least interested. “But who cares?” he in were started pain. her to Now

This story has been written by a very special Sherlockian – Tvisha Mehta, all of 9, studying in Grade 3 at Aditya Birla World Academy. The submission was made to us on her behalf by her Class Teachers, Tulika and Palak.

surprising words to Yang when grieve Holmes

started

suspecting Karma Lee even more. That day, Holmes gave Karma such a serious stare that she was sure that Holmes was suspecting her. “I know he

doesn't have any proof,” thought Karma, “but I better run away to my house in Hong Kong.” So that night she packed her bag and set out, only to find the police, Watson and Holmes waiting at the door step. “I found the poison in your drawer, nothing to hide Mrs. Karma and I suspected you were going to run away.” Karma surrendered and handed herself over to the police. Watson and Holmes went back to London, happy in the knowledge that they had helped their best friend in his quest for his wife’s murderer.

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Story-writing Contest
•Write a short story featuring Sherlock Holmes based on the following: “My name is Sherlock Holmes. It is my business to know what other people do not know.” •We don't really like to impose word-limits, but try and keep it roughly between 500-2500 words. Please try to use MS Word or a similar wordprocessing program. •The best three will win prizes SHSI goodies, yes! •All stories that we like will be published in our next issue. •Last date for October 20, 2013. submission:

Artwork Contest
•Create a pictorial feature - a sketch, a painting, digital art, photograph, collage - anything that catches your fancy. No videos or presentations or audio files, please. Whatever you do, send it to us as JPEG or PNG or bitmap image. •Requirements - a nexus with Sherlock Holmes and the context: "There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact." •The best three will win prizes SHSI goodies, yes! •All artwork that we like will be published in our next issue. •Last date for October 31, 2013. submission:

Pucca Holmesian Contest
•Turn to "The Five Orange Pips" section of this e-zine on page 36. •Solve each puzzle and collect each pip as instructed. •Once you have solved all five, email your answers to us as instructed. •The first three correct answers will win prizes - SHSI goodies, yes! •Everyone who gets the answers right will be awarded the "Pucca Holmesian" title. •Last date for submission: August 31, 2013.

Hurry! Rush in your entries to us to claim your prizes! Remember to mention which contest it is for in the subject-line of your email!

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The Clandestine Code
It was a hot, sunny afternoon and Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson were discussing an article in the newspaper when a woman arrived at their doorstep. She appeared timorous and was sweating profusely. “Sirs, please accompany me to my apartment as soon as possible,” she pleaded. Dr. Watson attempted to calm her down, but in vain. Ultimately, they agreed to accompany her. On the way, Holmes asked her to narrate her story. of the entire scenario. Holmes and Watson both checked the room and the dead body. The dead body had a cut near the stomach. Holmes examined the wound thoroughly. “Holmes, take a look at this bit of paper. This was hidden,” said Dr. Watson, extracting a crumpled sheet from the dead woman’s fist. Holmes examined the paper and they returned to Baker Street.

“So, what do you say, Holmes? Did you get any clue to the culprit?” asked Watson. Neha H. Shetty is a 22-year-old She began, “My name is Chartered Accountant from Rochelle Hunter. I stay in Fiddling with the note, the an apartment at detective answered, Mumbai. She is a great admirer Featherstone Street. The “Watson, I do not have of Sherlock Holmes’ adventures, adjacent flat belongs to Ms. supernatural powers yet. and in true C.A. style, she brings Blake, who is a working There is a lot of work to be us a modern adventure story of woman. She stays alone done before we reach any Sherlock Holmes and Dr. and is my good friend. conclusion. As you Watson with numbers and Today, at around 11 observed, the note reads – calculators. o’clock, I went to her flat to Mr. Gilchrist- 773855178. borrow a newspaper. The I feel that Ms. Blake was door was open, so I went in and nearly unconscious when she was murdered and she stumbled over her dead body on the floor. knew the murderer.” There was so much blood and it was terrible! “How did you conclude that?” asked Watson. So I came straight away to beg your assistance.” Holmes replied, “The wound makes it clear “Do you suspect anyone? Did you hear any noise while this murder took place?” asked Holmes. “No,” she replied. that the murder was executed using a sharp knife. A normal individual would naturally cry out at the immense pain. But Ms. Hunter said that she didn’t hear any noise which means that Ms. Blake wasn’t conscious when she was murdered. Further, the flat of Ms. Blake was intact; not even a single thing was out of place. This reveals that Ms. Blake knew the murderer. She didn’t have any idea that the person had come to kill her, so she didn’t take any move to defend herself and the murderer easily completed the task.”

All three reached the apartment and the investigations began. The floor had five flats. Ms. Hunter said only three rooms of the five were occupied. On further enquiry, Holmes came to know that the owner of third flat, named Mr. Wilson, had just been back from his office trip to Sunbury and he wasn’t aware Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013

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Dr. Watson said, “From my medical examination, I can tell you that she was rendered unconscious using chloroform. I think the number on the note may be a contact number.” “No, it’s not. I already tried that.” replied Holmes. Their conversation broke when the door flew open and a sergeant rushed in. He said, “A man has been found dead at the Whitecross Street at the footpath.” Holmes and Dr. Watson, without delay, reached the crime scene and enquired about the dead man. They came to know that his name was Gilchrist and he lived at Whitecross street itself. Holmes and Watson realized that he may be the same Gilchrist whose name was written on the note found in Ms. Blake’s fist. On reaching Gilchrist’s home, they met his mother, informing her of her son’s death, and asked her whether she knew about Ms. Blake, which she denied. On inspecting the house, Holmes found Gilchrist’s personal diary secretly hidden. On one of the pages something was written in small letters at the corner of the page. Through a magnifying glass Holmes discovered that it was the same number again, i.e. 773855178. But this time there was no name around. Gilchrist’s mother didn’t know about the number. Back in their home, Dr. Watson said, “Gilchrist was poisoned for sure.” He attempted to solve the mystery of the number in vain, and Dr. Watson grumbled, “I’m irritated at this number now. It is neither a contact number nor can it be any vehicle

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number, God knows what this number means!” Holmes replied, “A famous author once said that ‘Patience is bitter but its fruit is sweet’. Be patient, Watson; we shall soon unravel the enigma behind this number.” Watson pulled out a calculator and summed up the digits of the number. But nothing seemed to work out. Fed up completely he typed the digits in a row on the calculator screen and started tapping his fingers on the table. Opposite to him Holmes was sitting busy thinking on the case, when his eyes fell on the calculator on which the number was typed. Holmes roared with joy, “Eureka! Eureka!” Watson was taken aback by his voice and asked him what happened. Holmes answered, “The number mystery is solved. Quickly, tell me there is any place named Blissbell.” “Wait a minute. What is this Blissbell?” Watson asked. Without explaining, Sherlock left to enquire about his finding and a confused Watson followed. They learnt that Blissbell was a recently inaugurated hotel in London. They reached the hotel and enquired about any suspicious event in last two-three days. The receptionist said that two days ago a waiter named Harry was sacked for misbehaving with a guest. Sherlock obtained his address and went to his home. Harry was perplexed at the entry of unknown visitors.

Sherlock asked him, “What illegal activity are you involved in? Look, we have not informed Police yet, but if we do so, you know where you will land up. If you don’t want to be Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013

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in my business. But over the years he had becoming very greedy and demanding. He asked for a higher share in our profits. So I killed him, too. I thought I was running a safe business but you ruined everything.” “Wrong doing never escapes. Its life-span is very short,” retorted Holmes. The Police arrested Wilson and left. Sherlock and Watson returned to Baker Street by late evening. But Watson was still discontented. He couldn’t restrain himself any more and asked, “Holmes, how did you know about the Hotel Blissbell? Please unlock the mystery.” Sherlock laughed and replied, “My dear Watson, when you were typing the number 773855178 on the calculator screen, I saw the screen from the opposite direction, since I was facing you.” He took the calculator, typed the code and turned it around. 7 7 3 8 5 5 1 7 8 ->as it appeared on calculator screen B L I S S B E L L-> as it appeared from the other side Dr. Watson exclaimed in admiration, “Blissbell. Whoa! What a genius you are! So this is how you got a link to the Hotel Blissbell. Really, you have such talent!” “Thank you, Watson, and your support was commendable, too. Your medical talents also came to my aid, my friend,” Sherlock smiled and replied before picking up the newspaper.

behind the bars, confess the truth as early as you can.” Completely petrified Harry said, “I am the right hand of a drug dealer who has a drug racket spread across London. Every customer used to consult me for drugs. I used to operate through Hotel Blissbell in the disguise of a waiter i.e. first accepting orders and then supplying drugs. I used to take orders from only those who gave the correct code i.e. 773855178.” Watson was surprised and looked at Sherlock and Harry. Sherlock further asked, “So, young man, will you now reveal the name of your Boss?” Harry took them to an old disheveled building which was somewhat distant from Hotel Blissbell. Sherlock and Dr. Watson were accompanied by Police to avoid missing this chance to trap the culprit. With light footsteps, they entered the building and found some young boys and girls who were drug addicts. Successfully, they spotted the Boss who was talking on phone and got baffled on seeing Police entering his premises. The boss was none other than Mr. Wilson i.e. Ms. Blake’s neighbor. On being questioned he confessed, “I killed Ms. Blake and Gilchrist. Ms. Blake was my customer but she never paid for drugs on time. A heavy amount was due from her. Instead of paying, she blackmailed me that she would tell about my business to Police. So I had to kill her. I had returned to my home from Sunbury previous night at around 1.00 am. I first rendered her unconscious and then killed her with the knife. Gilchrist was my helping hand

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The snippets below are just teasers – trailers, if you will, to the kind of discussions the Sherlock Holmes Society of India usually indulges in. We have ongoing arguments on such topics in our SHSI forum pretty much all the time, thanks to our almost two hundred experienced and erudite members. While it is not actually possible for us to list out all our eminent members here, we would not really be exaggerating much if we say that most are scholars in their own right. Want to join us? We would be glad to welcome you on board. Drop us a line and you can be a part of SHSI as well!
•Sherlock Holmes, Consulting Detective •Sherlock Holmes is widely believed to have been born on January 6, 1854. (We really do not think we need to elaborate further on the Master.) •He turns 160 on January 6, 2014, and grand plans for celebration of his birthday are underway, not only in London, but in various parts of the world.

SH

JHW

•Dr. John H, Watson, Captain, Fifth Northumberland Fusiliers, Royal Army Medical Corps •The canon introduces us to "John H. Watson", and then we find that his wife is addressing him as "James"! •The "H" is never revealed. Several hypotheses exist - some claim it stands for "Hamish", some say it's just an "H", and others propose it stands for something else altogether. We do know, however, that Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss (BBC Sherlock) take it as "Hamish".

JM

•Professor Moriarty, Professor of Mathematics, Criminal Mastermind •Professor Moriarty's first name is not referred to in "The Final Problem" - but in another instance in the canon, it is said to be "James". •Professor Moriarty seems to have two brothers - a Colonel James Moriarty and a station master.

MH

•Mycroft Holmes, British Government •Mycroft Holmes is seven years senior to Sherlock Holmes, and the only known brain superior to Sherlock Holmes. His powers of observation exceed that of our favourite Consulting Detective. •Mycroft is known to be unsocial - he is a founder-member of the Diogenes Club, where the members are forbidden from speaking with or acknowledging other members.

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Senjuti Das is known to her friends, acquaintances and the rest of the world as an ace photographer. Currently based in the USA, she is a lawyer and is fantastically creative – as shown by this compilation done by her – on a special request.

Montage

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Senjuti’s Disclaimer: I do not own any rights to any of the pictures, I have sourced them from the internet and this creation is not meant to be used for any unauthorised purposes.

Edited by - Senjuti Das

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Dr. Shalini Sharma, currently based in Lucknow, has always been an ardent admirer of Dr. Watson for successfully weaning someone as strongwilled as Sherlock Holmes from his drug addiction to cocaine and morphine. She

Cocaine
Cocaine is a natural alkaloid from leaves of Erythroxylum coca, a South American plant growing on the foothills of the Andes which was known to the natives as khoka. The natives of Peru and Bolivia habitually chew these leaves. Khoka, which meant the plant, quickly became

gives us the medical side of these drugs to keep all Sherlockians off them.

necrosis. Cocaine intoxication can result in life threatening cardiovascular, pulmonary, and CNS complications due to increased level of catecholamines in the body. Many features of cocaine intoxication are shared with amphetamine toxicity and management is similar. Both substances are commonly coingested with alcohol which may complicate management. Clinical presentation can be quite varied. Hyperthermia (rise in body temperature), hypertension (rise in blood pressure), tachycardia (rise in heart rate) are common. Neuropsychiatric manifestations may include agitation, delirium, confusion and seizures. It can also cause acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) or arrhythmias. It also causes nausea, vomiting and mydriasis (dilatation of pupil). Management depends on presentation. Diazepam 5 to 10 mg every 5 minutes as needed function as first line therapy for agitation and most manifestations of toxicity. Treatment of hyperthermia includes sedation and external cooling. Hypertension and other cardiac manifestations are best treated with sedation and if necessary calcium channel blockers, sodium nitroprusside or phentolamine.

known as coca in Europe. In 1860, German scientists isolated the main alkaloid and named it cocaine. Cocaine is a good surface anaesthetic. It is rapidly absorbed from the buccal mucous membrane. It produces prominent central nervous stimulation with marked effect on mood and behaviour. It induces a sense of well being, delays fatigue and increases the power of endurance. In susceptible individuals, it produces strong psychological but little physical dependence. Cocaine is unique among drugs of abuse in not producing significant tolerance on repeated use. Cocaine should never be injected. It is a protoplasmic poison and causes tissue

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Morphine
The dark brown, resinous material obtained from poppy Papaver somniferum is opium. Opium has been known from the earliest times. It is mentioned in the Eber’s papyrus (1500 BC), in the writings of Theophrastus (300 BC) and Galen (2nd century AD). Opium eating became a social custom in china in the 18th century. Serturner, a pharmacist isolated the active principle of opium in 1806 and named it morphine after the Greek god of dreams Morpheus. Morphine is a strong analgesic. Though dull poorly localised visceral pain is relieved better than sharply defined somatic pain, higher doses can mitigate severe paindegree of analgesia increasing with dose. The associated reactions to intense pain apprehension, fear ,autonomic effects are also depressed. Sedation, drowsiness and indifference to surroundings as well as to own body occurs without motor coordination, ataxia or apparent excitement. Higher doses produce sleep and coma. Mood and subjective effects are prominent. Morphine has a calming effect, there is loss of apprehension, feeling of detachment, lack of initiative, limbs feel heavy and body warm, mental clouding and inability to concentrate. Rapid intravenous injection by addicts gives them a kick or rush which is intensely pleasurable - akin to orgasm. It depresses the cough centre. Depresses the temperature regulating centre, decrease in body temperature occurs in cold surroundings. Causes nausea and vomiting, constriction of pupil, convulsions may occur in morphine poisoning. Constipation is a prominent feature. Acute morphine poisoning is accidental, suicidal or seen in drug abusers. In the non tolerant adult mg of intramuscular morphine produces serious toxicity. The human lethal dose is assumed to be around 250 mg. Stupor or coma, flaccidity, shallow and occasional breathing , cyanosis, pin point pupil, fall in blood pressure shock, convulsions may be seen in few. Death is due to respiratory failure. Treatment consists of respiratory support and maintenance of blood pressure. Gastric lavage should be done with potassium permanganate. Specific antidote is naloxone. High degree of tolerance can be developed to morphine if the drug is used repeatedly. Addicts tolerate morphine in grams; lethal dose is markedly increased. Morphine produces pronounced physical and psychological dependence, its abuse liability is rated high. Concern about abuse has been a major limitation in the use of morphine for chronic pain when repeated doses have to be given. Withdrawal of morphine is associated with marked drug seeking behaviour. Physical manifestations are - lacrymation (watering of eyes), sweating, yawning, anxiety, fear, restlessness, gooseflesh, tremor, insomnia, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, dehydration, rise in blood pressure, palpitation and rapid weight loss. Treatment consists of withdrawal of morphine and substitution with oral methadone followed by gradual withdrawal of methadone. Relapse rate among post addicts is high. 50

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
Aayam Banerjee is an investment banker by profession, and excels at pretty much everything that requires brain-work. After a fair amount of pleading and nagging by his wife, Aayam took two precious hours out of his busy day and sent us two stories. We liked them both too much to publish just one – so here we are. This is the first story. The second one follows after the puzzles section.

The First Kiss of Sherlock Holmes


"Mister Holmes." Sherlock Holmes, the brilliant consulting detective, lifted his head in acute interest; I, sitting next to him, glanced up…and stayed in that attitude for a long time. The entering party was a woman, in perhaps her mid-twenties, who, as was the fashion at the moment, had her hair cut asymmetrically and hanging perfectly straight around her face, parted untidily and jagged at the ends. Only the exceptional loveliness of the girl's smooth face and her dazzling smile saved it from being extraordinarily revolting; on another it would have been hideous. I could never understand the fads of the young people these days; they seemed to go out of their way to make themselves hideous and unpresentable. The frock she wore, however, rather rectified the matter of her hair, highlighting her physical beauty—and all in all she was an extremely pretty thing, appealingly attractive and doe-eyed. Holmes, for his part, seemed a little astonished; pretty girls rarely came to him, or at least not to his private quarters. "Good evening, madam. Come and take a seat." She obliged, and her slim white hands toyed with her dress, even as her large grey eyes fixed imploringly on Sherlock, who was, at the moment, puffing away in his pipe, creating a "poisonous atmosphere" of tobacco smoke in the room. "Mister Holmes, I came to ask you for— for a favour." she murmured, her light body leaning forward, the picture of innocence.

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Now Sherlock, in his long and illustrious career, had been asked for many, many favours; cautiously, he replied: "Please proceed, I will definitely help you if it is within my powers." "Well, I-I need your assistance in a very important matter." Her voice became impossibly soft and girlish; with her eyes cast down so that her lashes whispered against her cheek, she continued: "My uncle died last week, Mister Holmes, and I – I … I'm determined to find out who the killer is. You simply have to help me…I can't spend the rest of my life—not knowing…" She would have been, I thought, watching this touching little scene, quite the actress; her histrionic powers were indeed quite inspiring. Quite unmoved, Holmes nodded kindly and murmured: "Understandable, of course. Pardon, I did not quite catch your name…" "Isabella," she replied. "Isabella Adams, but you must call me Bella. Now, Sir, will you help me?" "Ah, but Miss Adams, is there not the Scotland Yard? The local police? Why do you see me as your saviour?" She leant in a little further, until her face was quite close to poor Holmes’; stroking his sleeve, she replied softly:

"Why, Mister Holmes, they say you're terribly clever at solving these crimes …" I do not know which tickled Sherlock more: this stroking of his already unmanageable ego or the fact that a beautiful female was mere inches from him, her hand caressing his arm. Recalling his disposition, I decided in favour of the former. "Rubbish!" purred Holmes. "This is pure balderdash." "Now, don't be so modest," she insisted, aiming those eyes directly at him — a devastating weapon, I was sure. "Everyone knows how brilliant you are; all I hear is Holmes this and Holmes that…and of course as Dr. Watson chronicles, you are the best detective in the whole wide world … ", her fingers creeping up his arm. The girl, this Isabella Adams, had really done her research; at her words Holmes beamed and purred like a schoolgirl complimented on a new dress. "So Mister Holmes, do

you think you could do it? Please? It would be ever such a favour…and I'd remember it forever and ever…"

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leaving a blushing, rather flustered Holmes in her wake; this had certainly been a singular experience. He turned, and, for a bare moment, met my eyes, staring over the rim of my cup and alight with laughter as they observed the soft red lipstick left on his mouth. His eyes narrowed, and grew stern. "Not a word, my dear Watson," he said firmly. "Not a word. The girl, she has made a fool of me." And yet, as we continued our tea in silence, I thought I heard him murmur wistfully: "Ah—women …"

Even Sherlock, the sharp and emotionallydetached analytical machine, was overwhelmed by this dexterous combination of flattery and physical attention; no doubt his old blood was pumping fresh again with excitement. "Well, madam … if it must be, it must be…" "Oh, thank you, Mister Holmes!" cried Bella, and punctuated her statement by kissing the startled Holmes quickly on the lips; I choked into my tea with a mixture of keen amusement at his expression and deep shock. "You're the most marvellous man on earth! Thank you, thank you!" She nearly danced out of the room, kissing her lovely hand to him once more and

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The Five Orange Pips

“He took an orange from the cupboard, and tearing it to pieces he squeezed out the pips upon the table. Of these he took five and thrust them into an envelope.” The Five Orange Pips

THE PUZZLES How well do you Sherlock Holmes? know

How many words can you figure out from the word wheel given below? The letter in the centre (S) must be used in each word. Ordinary English words, please.

This section has five puzzles, each a “pip”. Needless to say, each is designed to test your knowledge of our favourite detective.

h k c o e

THE PRIZE When you solve one puzzle, you earn a “pip”. If you earn all five, we award you the title of “Pucca Holmesian” and put up your name on our Facebook page for the world to see, as well as in our next issue.

S
l

r

So, rush in your entries to us at shsieditors@yahoo.in or shsieditors@gmail.com by August 31, 2013. We shall release the solution on September 1, 2013 on our SHSI page on Yahoo and Facebook. The first three people to get the right answers will win Sherlockian goodies as well! Good luck!

We will consider you a winner if you can get twenty or more. Remember, the other puzzles are absolute, so more you score here, the better. Have you earned your first pip?

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How well do you know the characters in the Sherlock Holmes stories? Find out if you can answer each clue...if not, maybe it is time to re-read the canon... Have you earned your second pip?

Across
8. The Greek Interpreter 10. First victim of Lion's Mane 11. Holmes' disguise as a plumber 12. Sherlock's favourite canine 14. Dr. Watson's wife 15. The cabbie in "A Study in Scarlet" 16. Thief of the Blue Carbuncle 20. Colonel Moran 23. Big brother 25. The banker holding the Beryl Coronet as collateral 29. The Inspector in "The Dying Detective" 30. Sherlock's Norwegian alias 31. Mr. Pike, Gossipmonger 32. The Noble Bachelor 33. Irene Adler's husband 15. 17. 18. 19. 21. 22. 24. 26. 27. 28. 29. Who was the Crooked Man? He introduced Holmes and Watson Holmes' fake fiancée He saved Dr. Watson's life in Afghanistan The murderer of Charles McCarthy The inspector Jones from Scotland Yard who is "tenacious as a lobster" The Norwood Builder Commissionaire who found the goose with the stone Professor Coram's wife The Veiled Lodger Holmes' client in “The Yellow Face”

Down
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Professor Moriarty's brother The doctor fascinated with Sherlock's skull He smashed the Napoleons Black Peter Baron Gruner's nemesis The twins who found the Agra treasure hidden by their father 7. Dr. Watson 9. The third Garrideb 13. The Inspector in "The Blue Carbuncle"

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Image 1

“You see but you do not observe,” Sherlock Holmes taunts. Or do you? There are ten differences between Image 1 and Image 2. Can you spot them all? Image 2 Have you earned your third pip?

The clue is in the canon itself – surely you can recognise it? We shall give you another clue to crack the cipher: “What one man can invent another can discover.” Have you earned your fourth pip?

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Identify the sixteen actors– all of them have been Holmes avatars. Have you earned your fifth pip?

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11 1

12

13

14

15

16

Once you have collected your five pips, send us an email with your answers by August 31, 2013 at shsieditors@yahoo.in or shsieditors@gmail.com to earn your “Pucca Holmesian” title and prize!

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
The second story by Aayam Banerjee – “Consulting Encyclopaedia”.

The Silk Tie
It is a truth universally acknowledged, that it is impossible to keep a secret from Sherlock Holmes. However, I, Dr. John H. Watson, beg to differ. I have one secret from him and I am proud to say he suspects nothing.

It started accidentally. Mrs. Hudson had packed Holmes’ bags in a hurry when he was summoned to who-knows-where for some matter of national importance and had left out one of his silk ties. This was rather unusual for Mrs. Hudson, who is usually a lady of great order and method, hence her value to Holmes. I found the tie just as I was heading to bed that evening and was about to put it away when I caught the scent of it. It smelt exactly like my friend, and before I knew what I was doing I was in my room, in bed, still clutching Holmes' tie. I slept better that night than I had done in years. It isn't often that Holmes leaves without me; more often than not I accompany him and attempt to be helpful. I know that I will never make as great a detective as he is, but I like to think that my observations and casual remarks about a case serve some purpose. He certainly thinks so, or I would not still be here. After that first occasion, I was not left by myself for nearly a year and had almost forgotten all about it. We were sitting in our customary fashion in the sitting room, with Holmes on the sofa and myself in the comfortable chair when my friend put down his post and regarded me across the room. He informed me that he needed to go away for a night and that he would be leaving me here as he was expecting a very important caller. I agreed, somewhat half-heartedly – life was always more exciting wherever Holmes was. Quickly, while he was busy in the kitchen, I stole into his rooms and slipped a tie out of his bag. He left not long after, and I took his tie to bed with me again that night. The months and years passed. I was not often away from Holmes, but whenever we were forced apart I managed to sneak a tie that had his unique flavour to it out of his bags to keep with me while he was gone. He never commented on it, and I surmised that as Mrs. Hudson always packed his bags for him he would not necessarily notice the absence of a certain item unless it was one he had specifically requested. I was careful to choose different ties each time so that my friend did not get suspicious. I mused on this incident that had somehow become Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013

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a habit as I walked home. As I rounded the corner and caught sight of our building I quickened my step. Holmes was due to leave this evening on a trip up north and had requested I stay behind. I was anxious to get home before he left as I had had no opportunity earlier to select a tie from the ones he proposed to take with him. As I let myself into the flat, Mrs. Hudson emerged from the office. "Oh, Dr. Watson, there you are!" she said with relief. "I was just about to go home but didn't want to leave until you were back. Mr. Holmes's just left I'm afraid, he had to catch an earlier train." My heart sank; I had missed my chance. I saw her out and then glumly turned back to the interior of the flat. My friend was gone for two nights, possibly three and I had nothing to remind me of him in his absence. I checked his rooms in the vain hope of finding something, but everything was clean and crisp and smelt of starch. I resigned myself to a couple of lonely days on my own and wandered the place aimlessly, eating my dinner without really tasting it and reading a dull book. I stayed up late, not wanting to go to bed knowing my friend was not in the flat. When it was past midnight and I felt tired enough to fall sleep immediately without lying awake dwelling on matters, I made my way to my rooms. I had brushed my teeth and made all my preparations before I noticed something on my bed and a note pinned to the pillow. Opening it, I found a short missive in my friend's hand. "My dear Watson, I regret that I had to leave before you were back from your errand. I hope you have a good few days and are not too bored on your own. As you did not have time to make ample provision for my absence, I have taken it upon myself to make sure you will be comfortable during my time away. Ever yours, Sherlock Holmes" Underneath the note was a neatly folded silk tie.

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Kritika Kumar is an economist working for a credit rating agency. She had visited the Sherlock Holmes Museum, London with her family, and she narrates her adventure, spiced up with plenty of pictures!

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Sherlock Holmes Museum - London
I had visited the Sherlock Holmes Museum on Baker Street in London in June last year with my family. I have written about my experience there.

I was introduced to the world of Sherlock Holmes at the age of 14 by my father. It was a very fascinating world. Adventures of Sherlock Holmes- I remember there were 3 volumes. Once I started reading them, I couldn’t put the books down. The experience was a treat for the mind! My father and I share the passion for the genius Sherlock Holmes is. Then, on a family visit to London in June last year, while travelling on the tube, we decided to get off at Baker Street; just got excited by the name and we had to visit Abbey Road which was just close by. The adventure starts at the tube station itself. We discovered unique tile-work in this station which commemorates Sherlock Holmes's association with Baker Street. My father and I were super kicked with this discovery. At the exit, we saw a finger pointing toward 221B baker street, Aha! As we started walking on Baker Street, yes Baker Street! We spotted another Sherlock clue: a cafe asking “What’s this? Sherlock Holmes’ Food and Beverages”. And on the opposite side of the road, was 221B Baker Street and a Sherlock Holmes museum!! We all were jumping with joy to say the least. We crossed over and started taking photos. There was a man dressed up as a policeman standing at the door, absolutely authentic! And we could pose with him for a photo in front of 221B and we were supplied with a deerstalker and a pipe, Sherlock style. We then entered the door! Into that mysterious place. There it was, as imagined, Sherlock’s residing place. It was a delightful experience – everything was stored just as one would think. The living room, the layout of the house, maintained beautifully. A separate section honouring some of the finest books, special designated area for The Hound of the Baskervilles. It even had statues of various characters out of the books and even a visiting card tag board, in case you want Sherlock to contact you! And most importantly, a compilation of all the letters received at this address from people across the world, looking for the Sherlock Holmes! After this section, we moved to the merchandise shop, it was another paradise. Cannot describe what all I picked up from there. Overall, a great experience for us and one that I will never forget!

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VASUDEV MURTHY IS THE AUTHOR OF THE FORTHCOMING BOOK “SHERLOCK HOLMES IN JAPAN” UNDER THE PSEUDONYM AKIRA YAMASHITA. HE IS A NEW MEMBER OF SHSI AND BASED IN BENGALURU.

Sherlock Holmes in Japan
Sherlock Holmes will continue enthralling people generation after generation. What does it matter that he never actually existed, that the language and setting of the original stories were Victorian and culturally alien to most of us? There is something about a strong and magnetic personality, with some human frailties (like cocaine!) and interests (the violin) and a remarkable intelligence that appeals to all of us. Perhaps he represents an *ideal* of perfection in many ways.

Japanese , apart from the unlikely cultural and geographical context. The narrative is in Watson’s voice for the most part, with him reporting various other voices too – Holmes, Moriarty, a Japanese female intelligence agent, a Chief Priest and so on. What SHSI members might like is that there is plenty of action in India too as the duo race against time to get to Japan!

Many years ago, I tried my hand at writing under an assumed Japanese Thanks to Mr. Murthy, The Missing Years or name. Why, you ask. HarperCollins is willing to give a the Great Hiatus, the Actually, just for fun. I special discount to the members of period between 1891 like the country, the the Sherlock Holmes Society of and 1894, gives Arthur culture, the language India on purchase of the book. We Conan Doyle imitators and the people. And plenty of leeway. My writers like Mishima are in the process of working out book, Sherlock Holmes and Murakami. I have the details of the same with in Japan, being written plenty of short HarperCollins. published in June by stories under the name HarperCollins India, of ‘Akira Yamashita’. It uses this period gainfully as well. made sense to have a book with the title Without revealing too much of the story, Sherlock Holmes in Japan seemingly perhaps it would do to say that Holmes written by a Japanese, instead of some and Watson unravel a large conspiracy Indian chap sitting in Bangalore! Many with players in Tokyo, Shanghai and better authors have used this technique because it somehow liberates them and Paris. allows them to write in a different voice. I It would be a futile effort to imitate Arthur can’t explain it any better – you need to Conan Doyle beyond a point. I have not try it to understand. done so; except to try my hand at Victorian English. What I have attempted But back to the book. I’d like to believe it’s is to have plenty of humour, introduce a a complex plot and that you will enjoy it. slight tension between Holmes and Sure, many things are unbelievable and Watson and give some additional straight audacious fiction of course, and attention to music, both Indian and perhaps an amusing attempt to get my Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013

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own views woven into the plot somehow – for example, Holmes turns vegetarian and takes to the Indian Classical violin too. That sounds suspiciously like me! There are digressions addressing science in Calcutta, a train journey through India, a few murders, plenty of disguises and so on. I thoroughly enjoyed writing it and also had the pleasure of working with excellent editors who had a sense of humour too. Calvert Markham, the Treasurer of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London, has been generous in his Foreword. The cover

is very classy – some very brilliant artist has come out with something that is both ’Sherlocky’ and Japanese. And the beginning is quite unconventional, with Watson expressing irritation with his editor! I have also included a map of the journey laid out in the book and tried my hand at calligraphy – there is an ideogram with relevant words from Akira Yamashita at the beginning of each chapter. I hope this piques your interest enough to visit the Facebook page of the book, and acquire it when it is released shortly!

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What happens when a particle physicist with a penchant for art meets the consulting detective? This! Suprabh Prakash has given us this gorgeous sketch to print.

A Portrait of the M odern Sherlock Holmes

The sketch is based on BBC’s “Sherlock” where the spectacular Benedict Cumberbatch plays the great detective.

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Summer Drinks
Watson’s Wish
Sunshine Mango (Alcoholic Beverage) – or as we like to call it – “Watson’s Wish” Ingredients 30 ml Whiskey (my favourite: Chivas Regal) 150 ml Mango Nectar Ice Equipment Cocktail Shaker Martini Glass Process Blend Whiskey and Mango Nectar with Ice in the Shaker. Serve Chilled. Optionally, serve in glass with the rim dipped in salt & lemon juice mixture. Pritesh Y. Chothani, a consumer-marketing professional is also one of India’s top Amateur Chefs. Pritesh has worked on world’s biggest brands including Coca-Cola, Sprite, Whirlpool and Dunkin Donuts. He has been India’s top 10 Amateur Chefs at MasterChef India 2010. He currently works as the CEO of Boardroom Chefs, a food conversations company. He loves travelling and exploring food. As a special favour to us, Pritesh has created these two unique drinks in honour of Sherlock Holmes! Image courtesy: Michael Swamy Chef

The idea of having our own drinks dedicated to Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson was sparked by a group discussion led by the inimitable Tim Symonds.

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Sherlock’s Stupor
Berry Tea On The Rocks (Non-Alcoholic Beverage) – or as we like to call it – “Sherlock’s Stupor” Ingredients 20 grams Granular Tea Leaves 6-7 pieces (assorted) of fresh berries

Lemon Juice Concentrate 15-20 grams of individual taste) sugar (per

Hot Water to brew tea Ice Equipment Small Sized Strainer Cocktail Shaker Blender Serving Glasses Process Brew Fresh Tea by pouring hot water through the strainer filled with loose granular tea leaves. Blend the fresh berries and strain the puree to discard the seeds. Mix the Fresh Tea, Lemon Juice Concentrate, Sugar, Berries Puree and Ice in a Cocktail Shaker. Serve Chilled in the Glass and garnish with berries.

Image courtesy (for both recipes): Chef Michael Swamy

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Professor Bradley T. Jones of Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) offers this seminar course – “The Analytical Methods of Sherlock Holmes” – to his freshmen class1. “Please remember that college freshmen wrote all of the stories2 (one story per student). We have now written many more than Conan Doyle! ” the good Professor wrote to us. “The stories are submitted to me anonymously and we review them in class (like an editorial board). The author remains anonymous until the Professor Bradley T. Jones teaches Chemistry last day of class (last Tuesday this at Wake Forest University. He offers a unique semester3). I do not go back and insert course – “The Analytical Methods of Sherlock the names of the authors in the Holmes” to his freshmen students. We got in volumes, so they still appear to be touch with him, and he told us a little more anonymous.” about his course. We, of course, have been perusing the fifteen volumes produced by this class since the year 2000 with great interest. The class has been talked about in the media (with as much wistfulness as we felt when we learnt about it). It has been covered notably in the local newspaper, The Winston-Salem Journal (November 19, 1998), and the Chronicle of Higher Education (November 22, 2002) – copies of which were generously provided by Professor Jones. The class is a mix of experiments and writing assignments (results of which we are greatly enjoying). Students read the canon and learn Holmesian analysis. Sometimes they learn to identify different types of tobacco or solve abtruse cryptograms or prepare their very own seven percent solutions (of sugar). Interestingly, the Professor thinks the possibility of success (and duplication) of Holmesian methods in real life is significant, though his students are a little more skeptical. We wish we had this course in our colleges, too!

1 2 3

Further details of the course can be viewed at the university website. There are 15 volumes available at the moment. You can download these here. Highly enjoyable! ‘Last Tuesday’ being April 30, 2013

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HOLMES AND WATSON ARE COMING TO INDIA!

VERY HONESTLY, LOUISE NICHOLSON REQUIRES NO INTRODUCTION. SHE IS THE ORGANISER BEHIND THIS LOVELY TRIP, AND SHE HAS KINDLY PUT TOGETHER THIS LOVELY FLYER-CUMINVITATION FOR US. THE FLYER IS SEPARATELY AVAILABLE ON THE BLOG AND THE FACEBOOK PAGE AS WELL.

And Holmesians living in India are warmly invited to take part. Get involved at any level, help us plan special events, join us as we sightsee and celebrate – just email Louise, indianicholson@nyc.rr.com

THE TRIP

To India with Sherlock Holmes
In the footsteps of Sigerson with the Sherlock Holmes Society of London Monday 17th February – Sunday 2nd March 2014

The Taj Mahal in Agra, whose fort is a key location in The Sign of Four

EXPLORE at first hand the many references to India found in Sherlock Holmes’s great adventures, written when India was the greatest jewel in Queen-Empress Victoria's crown! FOLLOW in Dr. Watson’s footsteps as you land in Bombay! RELIVE the drama of the Raja’s treasure being stolen and hidden in Agra Fort! SPECULATE on where Holmes roamed during those lost years – did he visit the great Hindu mystics? CONSIDER Conan Doyle’s inquiries into eastern philosophies . . . It will be the journey of a life-time – and this is why!
 This 14-day bespoke trip to India, tailored for the Society, promises to be an experience like no other.  As we visit Mumbai, Kolkata, Lucknow, Agra and Delhi and see their great sights, we shall also bring together the Holmesian references to India. To do so with Indian Holmesians would heighten the fun!  We shall travel in style with fellow Holmesians and meet Indian Holmesians wherever we go – did you know that Conan Doyle is published in India in a dozen Indian languages as well as English and has inspired many Indian mystery writers? Thus, importantly, we hope to meet many Indian Holmesians.

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 We are setting up a string of specially created events, often with privileged access to private buildings – running a story competition, going to the races in Kolkata, staging a ‘Just a Minute’ quiz with Holmes and Watson, playing games of cricket and croquet, a Victorian bathing party, cocktails at a traditional gentlemen’s club, a Holmesian picnic. Perhaps Indian Holmesians can help realise our dreams?  As on all our adventures abroad, we shall each travel as a character in the Stories and participants will be invited to wear Victorian costume on some occasions, with careful consideration given to weather.

You can just enjoy – everything is taken care of by professionals!
Our trip organiser is Louise Nicholson, known for her knowledge, experience and good connections in India, and author of the National Geographic Traveler Guide to India. * This is not standard upmarket tour of India! Each day will benefit from Louise’s extra personal touches and also have Holmesian relevance to make it especially memorable. * We shall stay in deluxe hotels starting with Mumbai’s legendary Taj Mahal hotel and ending with The Claridges in New Delhi. We shall travel in comfort and experience the great sights, good food (both Indian and European) and, of course, India’s colourful bazaars. * Louise and her local Tour Manager will be with us throughout, handling all the practical arrangements and caring for each traveller’s needs. * If 14 days is too short for you, there will be a group extension to visit Amritsar and Shimla/Simla, two important Holmes locations. And Louise can make your private arrangements for additional pre and post-trip days in India and neighbouring countries.

Booking is now open to members and their guests and friends
For the full itinerary, simply email Louise Nicholson: indianicholson@nyc.rr.com

This very special trip to India with fellow Holmesians is unmissable!

Agra Fort, the mighty double-walled fortress built by Mughal emperor Akbar, was taken by the British in 1803. It became a centre of their administration and commerce and a key communications centre during the 1857 upheavals – hence its appropriate choice in Conan Doyle’s The Sign of Four

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Sherlock Holmes - Believe
It is doubtful that there would be too many English-speaking people in the world who have never heard of Sherlock Holmes. I am willing to bet my life that the possibility of detective-fiction lovers being unaware of the name, regardless of their native tongue, would be either nil or negligible.
Jayantika Ganguly (a.k.a. Jay) is one of the SHSI Editors. She has been Sherlock-crazy since she was twelve years old. This article is just an attestation.

To be honest, Sherlock Holmes needs no introduction. He is THE detective. Technically, he is a ‘Consulting Detective’ – the only one in the world. He invented the job. Sherlock Holmes was created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Doctor, author...and in his later days, paranormalist – Sir Arthur was a man of many talents. His greatest contribution to mankind, to posterity (and to forensic science, one might say), came in the form of the best and the wisest man whom most of us will ever know – Sherlock Holmes. Sherlock is no saint, of course. Cold, dispassionate, barely more than a reasoning machine at times1 – he is far from perfect. He is vain about his gifts2 and tolerates no fools3. He has no qualms about using people in general4 – sometimes even friends5 and acquaintances6 – as experiments7 or tools8 in his quest for a solution. He has a penchant for melodrama9 and yet he accuses his chronicler of ‘romanticism’10.

1 2 3

In words of Dr. Watson in The Sign of Four, “You really are an automaton — a calculating machine!” As observed by Dr. John Watson in A Study in Scarlet.

Sherlock quotes Nicholas Boileau in A Study in Scarlet with reference to police detectives, “Un sot trouve toujours un plus sot qui l’admire.” Remember Agatha the maid in The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton? Sherlock wooed her under false pretences and even got engaged to her – all to get to Milverton.
4 5 6 7

We all sympathized with Dr. Watson in The Adventure of the Dying Detective. Scotland Yard would swear to it.

The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot, where he nearly poisons himself and Dr. Watson…we remain eternally grateful to Dr. Watson for the rescue! The Adventure of the Dying Detective, where poor Dr. Watson labours under the belief that his friend is on his deathbed.
8 9

The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone – of course, Lord Cantlemere had it coming.

“Detection is, or ought to be, an exact science, and should be treated in the same cold and unemotional manner. You have attempted to tinge it with romanticism, which produces much the same effect as if you worked a lovestory or an elopement into the fifth proposition of Euclid,” S herlock Holmes says to Dr. Watson in The Sign of Four.
10

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Sherlock is hardly a paragon of virtues. He makes mistakes11. He is outsmarted12. Sometimes, he is baffled13. He is somewhat of a misogynist14 and teases his companion for liking women15. He is selfish and self-absorbed at times16, forgetting basic kindness17. He is macabre18. He is a drug addict19. He often cares more for the puzzle and its solution than bringing the criminals to justice20. He is condescending21. He pretends to be unaffected, but sometimes we see that he is still a man, sad to see his friend going away22, concerned about his clients23 and capable of great self-sacrifice24. Knowing his end is imminent, he seeks solace and the company of
11 12 13 14

The Adventure of the Five Orange Pips A Scandal in Bohemia, where Irene Adler outsmarts him. The Adventure of the Crooked Man

“Women are naturally secretive, and they like to do their own secreting,” Sherlock observes, in A Scandal in Bohemia.
15 16

“Now, Watson, the fair sex is your department,” said Holmes, in The Adventure of the Second Stain.

“My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence,” he complains in The Redheaded League.
17 18

The brilliant yet hurtful deduction of Dr. Watson’s watch in The Sign of Four is an example.

“It is my belief, Watson, founded upon my experience, that the lowest a nd vilest alleys in London do not present a more dreadful record of sin than does the smiling and beautiful countryside,” he says in The Adventure of the Copper Beeches.
19 20

The Sign of Four

“This looks like one of those unwelcome social summonses which call upon a man either to be bored or to lie,” he says in The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor. He states in The Adventure of the Red-headed League, “He is not a bad fellow, though an absolute imbecile in his profession. He has one positive virtue. He is as brave as a bulldog and as tenacious as a lobster if he gets his claws upon anyone.”
21

Don’t you feel your heart breaking when Sherlock refuses to congratulate Dr. Watson in The Sign of Four and yet pays him a backhanded compliment and conveys his approval? I quote:
22

"Well, and there is the end of our little drama," I remarked, after we had set some time smoking in silence. "I fear that it may be the last investigation in which I shall have the chance of studying your methods. Miss Morstan has done me the honor to accept me as a husband in prospective." He gave a most dismal groan. "I feared as much," said he. "I really cannot congratulate you." I was a little hurt. "Have you any reason to be dissatisfied with my choice?" I asked. "Not at all. I think she is one of the most charming young ladies I ever met, and might have been most useful in such work as we have been doing. She had a decided genius that way: witness the way in which she preserved that Agra plan from all the other papers of her father. But love is an emotional thing, and whatever is emotional is opposed to that true cold reason which I place above all things. I should never marry myself, lest I bias my judgment."
23He

is distraught when he thinks Sir Henry has been killed (it turns out to be Selden) in The Hound of Baskervilles, he swears to avenge Hilton Cubitt in The Adventure of the Dancing Men and he shows a glimpse of filial affection for Violet Hunter in The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist. “…if I were assured of the former eventuality I would, in the interests of the public, cheerfully accept the latter,” he says to Professor Moriarty, choosing his own destruction for the greater good.
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his best friend25. And yet, even as he bemoans the sloth of London criminals and the unoriginality of the criminal classes subsequent to the demise of Professor Moriarty26, he never strays from the path of justice. How easy it would be for a prodigious, manically-active mind27 like his to be led astray, just to find some peace. Genius comes with its own price, loneliness, desolation, depression not being the only costs. And yet, Sherlock pays it all.

Yes, he indulges his own sense of morality28 and he disregards legalities29 when it suits him – but in the end, he always remains, to the core, a good man. His greatness is never in question, but his casual disregard for ordinary human values30, his almost-obnoxious arrogance31, his deliberate vagueness32, his childish selfishness33 and his hedonistic self-indulgence34 often cast a shadow on his goodness35. However, as he bedazzles us with his brilliance and brings yet another scoundrel to justice, we applaud and hail him as a hero. We feel his distress and panic when his best friend is injured36.
25 26 27

The Adventure of the Final Problem The Adventure of the Norwood Builder From The Sign of Four, in words of the great detective himself: "My mind," he said, "rebels at stagnation. Give me problems, give me work, give me the most abstruse cryptogram or the most intricate analysis, and I am in my own proper atmosphere. I can dispense then with artificial stimulants. But I abhor the dull routine of existence. I crave for mental exaltation. That is why I have chosen my own particular profession, —or rather created it, for I am the only one in the world."

28 29 30 31 32

He lets Ryder go in The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle. The burglary in The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton. Our jaws drop as he saunters in, dripping blood, in The Adventure of Black Peter. Remember how he dismisses Dupin and Lecoq in A Study in Scarlet?

How can we forget the reference to the curious incident of the dog in the night time in The Adventure of Silver Blaze?
33 34

“The good Watson deserted me for a wife,” Sherlock says, in The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier.

Don’t you feel like snatching away the syringe and the bottle of cocaine with the seven percent solution in The Sign of Four? Even Stamford, who can be thanked for bringing together the legendary pair of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson in A Study in Scarlet, remarks on the odd nature of Sherlock and is wary of him.
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The Adventure of the Three Garridebs

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We appreciate his commitment to his clients even in the face of grave personal danger37. But he is so much more than just a man or just a hero, isn’t he? Even in the face of looming insanity38, he remains an honourable man. Sherlock Holmes is an icon...of divine proportions. Eccentric, imperfect, sometimes pompous...and yet absolutely logical, undoubtedly great and ultimately virtuous – if you believe that the ends justify the means, then Sherlock Holmes is your god. If you don’t, he is still a beacon of nobility. “But he is not real,” the ‘realists’ cry. “He is a work of fiction.” Why should that make him any less real39? Sherlock Holmes has had more of an impact on the world than most ‘real’ people. That makes him real, as I understand reality. If life is ascertained by your thoughts, your affections and the regard you gain from others – Sherlock Holmes is more alive than anyone I know. “When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth,” Sherlock tells us40. And he is right – well, he mostly is. Lex parsimoniae? Cogito ergo sum41. And what could possibly be a better example of thinking than the science of deduction? I believe in Sherlock Holmes. Do you?

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The Adventure of the Illustrious Client

“My mind is like a racing engine, tearing itself to pieces because it is not connected up with the work for which it was built,” confesses Sherlock, in The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge. In words of Albus Dumbledore (from Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows): “Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?”
39 40 41

The Sign of Four René Descartes

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Annual Meet Agenda
1. Seminar on Sherlock Holmes 2. Adopting a Charter 3. Determining future roadmap 4. Appointing Governing Body 5. Allocating responsibilities 6. Discussions on formalisation 7. Welcoming London guests 8. Planning Meiringen pilgrimage 9. General discussions 10.Fun Date: 24 August 2013 (Saturday) – 25 August 2013 (Sunday) Venue: Voting is on!

It is high time the inaugural meeting of the Sherlock Holmes Society of India is held. To make it convenient for everyone, and to ensure that everyone can have fun, let us have a family gathering rather than a business meeting – and have an adventure of our very own.

The purpose of a family gathering is to ensure that while we hold a conference/seminar/ discussion session on Sherlock Holmes, which, of course, would be for a few hours over the course of one or two days, we can spend the rest of our day(s) off having fun. Of course, all spouses, significant others, children, family members, friends – SHSI member or not, would be welcome to join our discussions. We are running a poll on our Facebook page, as well as on our website to determine the venue. Mumbai, Kolkata and New Delhi are competing, at the moment. If you have not yet voted, please do so at the earliest. We are keeping the poll open till June 30, 2013. And then, of course, we need speakers for the seminar. Please let us know if you are interested, and what topic you would like to address – the medium is not restricted; feel free to use whatever you are comfortable with. We aim to have a few keynote speakers, and the floor will mostly be open for discussions. Please send in your topics and proposals to us by July 31, 2013 so we can include it in the agenda to be circulated before the actual meet. More importantly, we need volunteers for the SHSI Annual Meet Organisation Committee. The more, the merrier! Let us know! So, let us have our Annual Meet, finally!

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Ravi Bhoraskar is a CS Graduate Student from the University of Washington. He wrote this piece some time back on his blog.

F aithful to the Original: Comparing Sherlock and Sherlock Holmes
This question often comes up in my Shakespearean Afterlives course. (Don’t worry, this post isn’t about Shakespeare!) What does it mean for an afterlife, or a contemporary work that derives from some past work, to be faithful to the original source? Film and television has had a revival of interest in Sherlock Holmes in the past few years. To be honest, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes has never quite been out of public gaze (see the numerous Sherlock Holmes adaptations over the years), but a revival of interest for the mainstream and big-budget media is recent. In particular, Guy Ritchie came out with his interpretation of Sherlock as a spunky, funny, action-packed hero, played by the inimitable Robert Downey Jr, fighting villains and saving the world in the 1890s. And then there is the BBC TV series Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss that has received accolades from fans and critics alike. Benedict Cumberbatch plays a savant like Sherlock who is quick to embrace gadgets and modern technology – anything that can help him get closer to catching the bad guys.So which of the two works is closer to the revered and canonized Doyle version of Sherlock Holmes? The Setting Ritchie’s Holmes lives in Doyle’s times. The horse-drawn carriages, old-fashioned clothes and hats and the sepia tones paint the picture of Doyle’s London – surprisingly similar to what I imagined the setting to be when I read the short stories. Moffat’s Sherlock, on the other hand, lives in the fast, upbeat London of 2012. The characters travel in taxis, wear jeans talk on their iPhones – more of a setting for Doctor Who than Sherlock Holmes. However, recall that when Doyle wrote his Sherlock Holmes stories, he did not intend it to be a historical piece or a costume drama. Doyle’s Holmes is based not in the past, but in the present, and is in fact shown to be a man of science, gleefully using any new invention or discovery that may help him solve a case, including the recently discovered fingerprints, in a story whose title I don’t remember at the moment. Incidentally, this is picked up by both Ritchie – with his Sherlock shown driving the Ford Model T in a scene – and Moffat – with his Sherlock using SMS, GPS navigation and any other technology that can help. However, while forensics might have seemed cutting edge to the readers of 1890, Holmes driving the Model T is merely a funny scene in Game of Shadows. The horsedrawn carriages are seen as quaint and cute in 2012; they were a way of life in 1890 just like GPS and mobile phones are in 2012. The 2012 audience reaction to Moffat’s Sherlock, then is perhaps closer to what the 1890 audience reaction to Doyle might have been. Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013

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Note, however, that the modern reader (you and me) also reads Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The charm of the old that the book presents for us is perhaps robbed in the Moffat and Gatiss version. Also, not all plot elements can work as well in a new setting. The photograph in A Scandal in Bohemia becomes a cellphone in A Scandal in Belgravia on the BBC show, since a digital photograph is so much easier to duplicate than a physical photograph of the 1890s. The change in the plot was done smoothly and brilliantly, in my opinion, but the fact that a change was required itself says that the plot wasn’t entirely faithful to Doyle. Or perhaps, since it is merely changing the plot to fit naturally into the contemporary setting, one could argue that it is in fact a faithful adaptation. Holmes vs Holmes

Robert Downey Jr and Benedict Cumberbatch, as Sherlock Holmes Coming to the characters, both Cumberbatch and Downey Jr. play the same role – the role of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes. The character portrayed, however, is entirely different for both. Robert Downey Jr’s Sherlock is an eccentric detective, clever, but ever ready to jump into a brawl. “Holmes is such a weirdo”, commented Downey Jr in an interview with the BBC once, and a weirdo is exactly what his Bohemian, comic Sherlock is. Comic is exactly what the Cumberbatch Sherlock is not. While he has his eccentricities, they tend to accentuate the intensity of the character rather than his funny side. The Bohemian Holmes is very much from Doyle’s text, but making him a comic character is takin g it too far, in my opinion. While I thoroughly enjoyed watching The Game of Shadows, Downey doesn’t quite remind me of the short stories that I read so fondly as a child. Benedict Cumberbatch does. Though he uses nicotine patches instead of his pipe and lives in 2012 instead of 1890, he is in essence the Sherlock out of the pages of Arthur Conan Doyle’s books.

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Moriarty vs Moriarty

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Andrew Scott and Jared Harris, as James Moriarty Moriarty features only twice in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s work. Sherlock Holmes’s respect and fear for him, however, make him a formidable opponent, and is often shown as an archenemy by contemporary works. Jared Harris plays the Moriarty of the Doyle books in The Game of Shadows. The master criminal, the mathematical genius – complete with a beard. Jim Moriarty of the BBC series, played by Andrew Scott is markedly different. He isn’t a professor, for one. “Moriarty is usually a rather dull, rather posh villain so we thought someone who was genuinely properly frightening. Someone who’s an absolute psycho”, Steven Moffat said, in an interview for The Guardian. As in the books, Jim Moriarty commands absolute power in the criminal underworld. An unhinged genius with infinite power – Scott’s Moriarty is truly frightening. Perhaps he is a more relevant villain in 2012. But then, Jared Harris’s Moriarty is fairly frightening. Both Harris and Scott play formidable opponents to their respective Sherlocks, and are probably as clever as him. That, I believe, is the essence of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Moriarty, which both characters capture well. Concluding Remarks Perhaps faithfulness to the original isn’t a very relevant question. Indeed, I tremendously enjoyed watching both the movies and the TV show, irrespective of the liberties they take with the canonized text. Nonetheless, the differences are interesting to compare and contrast the differences between the three media (book, television and cinema) and the differences between Hollywood and British television. What do you think of the two versions? Which Sherlock did you like better? Which Moriarty did you like more? What about the two Watsons? Let’s discuss this. Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013

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Afterword

Satyajit Gupta is a Delhi-based lawyer and, of course, a Sherlockian at heart. He is a part of the editorial team of SHSI.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes has been part of my life since I can remember. I still recall reading the abridged version (with illustrations!) of the Hound of the Baskervilles, given to me by a doting uncle. It gave a purpose to the summer vacations - I quickly moved on to more Holmes and Watson. As I finished school, I had finished the body of Doyle's work and read and reread the stories many times. I distinctly remember being shocked when Sherlock fell at Reichenbach; even though I knew well enough that Doyle had resurrected Holmes after public outcry! The way Doyle built up his mysteries took it from the realm of fiction to reality - I had a tough time sleeping after reading The Adventure of the Speckled Band and always checked the windows/ ventilators before retiring for the night. While I have read and continue to read other detective/ crime fiction, none can match the wondrous world created by Doyle. I have read a number of Holmes pastiches, and can say that only one caught my attention - Jamyang Norbu's The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes. I must admit that some of the TV shows/ movies based on Doyle's Holmes have interested me these range from House, M.D. to Elementary. I find that certain screenwriters have done a better job of adapting Holmes than the pastiche authors. As I pen the last words in this very first edition of the newsletter of the Honourable Sherlock Holmes Society of India, I must thank Jayantika for being the rallying force which has woken this organization up from near-hibernation. Indeed, she has whipped up so much interest in this newsletter that we have had to stop the press many a times after May 15, 2013 (the deadline for submissions)! Needless to mention, Sumalji has the honour of establishing this organization and keeping it alive through many years of Yahoo! List days. Reading some of the posts on the Yahoo! group, I salute Sumalji for not disbanding immediately. And finally, thanks are also due to the many enthusiastic Holmes fans who have contributed to this newsletter. I hope we can all meet soon at the first meeting of the SHSI - I know a poll for the location is up on Facebook even as I write this. I would urge each one of you to vote. I also hope you keep on contributing to the newsletter enthusiastically and eagerly as ever. "Hope for the best, prepare for the worst!" Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013

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Sherlock Holmes Society of India | June 1, 2013