Day

3

Saturday
June 1, 2013
Publishers Weekly’s Show Daily is produced each day during the 2013 BookExpo in New York.
The Show Daily press office is in 4A Terrace. PW’s booth is #1252.

A L L

T H E

B U Z Z

O N

B O O K E X P O

A M E R I C A

By Louisa Ermelino
The Returned by Jason
Mott, about loved ones coming back from the dead, is
Harlequin’s upcoming megabook (long lines snaked at
Mott’s Friday signing) and
the sentiment of “returning” could be the buzzword
of this year’s BEA, with wellknown names back with
books, some of them after
years of silence, everyone
hoping for a repeat blockbuster.
Jayne Anne Phillips has a
new book, Quiet Dell
(Scribner), a historical,
which Linda Bubon of the
34-year-old bookstore
Women & Children First, in
Chicago, is looking forward
to reading. “It’s been a
while,” Bubon said, “so I’m
excited.” She’s also anxious
to read Someone (FSG) by
Alice McDermott, the
author whose name is associated with several prizes in
literature. Then there’s
Amy Tan, after a hiatus of
eight years. Her novel The
Valley of Amazement (Ecco)
is billed as an epic mapping
of “the lives of women connected by blood and history.”
Rebekah Farley, a bookseller from Farley’s Books
in New Hope, Pa., gave a
yelp of happiness when she
picked up Marisha Pessl’s
literary thriller, Night Film
(Random House). She’s just
reading Pessl’s bestselling
debut, Calamity Physics,
and so is “thrilled” that
there’s another one in the
wings. Andre Dubus III is
back to fiction (after
Townie) with Dirty Love
(Norton), set in his hood on
the coast north of Boston.
David Mallman, a bookseller at Books & Co,
Oconomowoc, Wis., said
about Dubus: “I love the way
he writes. It’s three stories
and a novella, which is different for him. The early

reads [other booksellers
who’ve read it already]
have been amazing.”
Bob Shacochis has a
novel, his first fiction in 20
years, The Woman Who Lost
Her Soul (Atlantic Monthly
Press), a doorstopper of a
novel at 700 pages, which
attempts to explain the origins of conflict between
East and West in the second
half of the 20th century. Jim
Harrison’s new book is his
36th, Brown Dog (Grove), a
collection of novellas set in
the American West.
Donna Tartt joked at the
Little, Brown lunch about
how long it took her to write
a book. It’s been over 10
years since her last, and
this novel, The Goldfinch, is
her first with Little, Brown.
Michael Pietsch, always
enthusiastic, said working
on Tartt’s book was a high

point of being in publishing.
Wally Lamb, who had two
Oprah book club novels in
rapid succession back in
the day, has a new novel, We
Are Water (Harper), sure to
tug the heartstrings.
Another anticipated novel,
a decade after his last, is
Local Souls (Liveright) by
Allan Gurganus, who
returns to Falls, N.C.
Another author back after
more than a decade is
Susan Minot, with Thirty
Girls (Knopf).
From master E.L.
Doctorow is a slim novel,
Andrew’s Brain (Random
House), his first since The
March, alongside Norman
Rush, another master, with
Subtle Bodies (Knopf). In
that same league is Ann
Patchett, with her novel
This Is the Story of a Happy
Marriage (Harper). Philipp

© stevekagan.com

Best in Show: Many Welcome Returns

Meyer returns with an
American history epic, The
Son (Ecco) as does Ishmael
Beah, the boy soldier from
Sierra Leone, whose memoir, A Long Way Gone, was a
surprise bestseller for FSG/
Sarah Crichton Books. This
time he’s written a novel,

When we say Harlequin,
what’s the first thing
you think of?
Is it Nonfiction?
Young Adult?
Bestselling Fiction?
Digital First?
Romance?

See the next page for Harlequin’s schedule of today’s signings.

Radiance of Tomorrow (also
Sarah Crichton) about the
after-effects of war. From
Pulitzer Prize–winner Doris
Kearns Goodwin comes The
Bully Pulpit (Simon &
Schuster), about Theodore
Roosevelt, William Howard
Taft, and American journalism. And another Pulitzer
winner, Paul Harding, for
his first novel, Tinkers, from
indie press Bellevue, is publishing his second, Enon,
with Random House, while
Bellevue Literary press is
pushing at this show
Melissa Pritchard’s
Palmerino.
Big buzz surrounded
Nicola Griffith’s big novel
set in seventh-century
Britain, Hild (FSG), and on
the bathroom line, there
was talk among booksellers
of “The New Devil Wears
Prada” book, Revenge
Wears Prada (Simon &
Schuster) by Lauren
Weisberger. Joshua Jason
of Mystery Pier Book in
West Hollywood, Calif., also
can’t wait: “I loved the first
one.” Helen Fielding is back
with Bridget Jones in Mad
About the Boy (Knopf).
Elizabeth Gilbert globetrots, this time in a novel:
The Signature of All Things
(Viking). On a sweet note is
the charming romance
Thursdays in the Park
continued on page 4

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13-05-14 2:42 PM

It should be.
Because we’ve got a book for you.

Think Nonfiction

Think Young Adult

Think Bestselling Fiction

Think Digital First

Think Romance

When you think of books for women…

Think Harlequin.
Visit the Harlequin booth to meet
your favorite authors!
Saturday, June 1 • Booth 1238
IN-BOOTH SIGNINGS
Time

Event

Author

Katie McGarry
Elizabeth Scott
Julie Kagawa
Amanda Sun
Andrea Kane
Susan Mallery
Pam Jenoff
Linda Lael Miller
Mira Lyn Kelly
Michelle Willingham
Rochelle Alers
Heather Graham

Dare You To
Heartbeat
The Eternity Cure
INK
The Line Between Here and Gone
Just One Kiss
The Ambassador’s Daughter
Big Sky Summer
Once Is Never Enough
To Sin with a Viking
Forever an Eaton
The Night Is Watching

12:00 p.m.—1:30 p.m.

Cosmo Red-Hot Reads
from Harlequin

Sylvia Day

Afterburn

2:00 p.m.—3:30 p.m.

So You Think You Can Write Panel

10:00 a.m.—11:30 a.m.

Harlequin Signing

Title

150 tickets
available for
SYLVIA DAY
starting at
9:00 a.m.

www.Harlequin.com • www.HarlequinForLibraries.com

13_151_PWDaily_BEA_Corp_Saturday_2.indd 1

13-05-14 2:55 PM

COME MEET OUR AUTHORS
T H E R A N D O M H O U S E P U B L I S H I N G G RO U P

TODAY’S SIGNINGS
SATURDAY, JUNE 1
ON SALE 2 .11.14

PHOTO: © BETSY BARNES

PHOTO: © JJO ELDREDGE MORRISSEY

ON SALE 7.30.13

Signing
9:00 AM

Signing
9:30 AM

Booth #2739
Table 1

Booth #2739
Table 2

THE DIAL PRESS

PHOTO: © DUSTIN AKSLAND

ON SALE 6.4.13

PHOTO: © DOUG WATKINS

ON SALE FALL 2013

Signing
11:30 AM

Signing
12:00 PM

Booth #2739
Table 2

Booth #2739
Table 1

The Random House Publishing Group

BOOTH #2739

www.AtRandom.com

4

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Strong Season Ahead for Children’s Publishers
Browsing the booths, booksellers
found plenty of titles to get excited
about. “I’m just ecstatic about the
children’s books I’ve seen,” said
René Kirkpatrick, owner of the
recently opened Eagle Harbor Book
Co., in Bainbridge Island, Wash.,
and a longtime children’s bookseller. “It looks like a great fall season. There’s a trend toward more
realistic books, and I’m thrilled
about how much good middlegrade there is—it’s been so hard to
find.”
This year’s show saw the launches
of several new ventures. It was the
first BEA for Ravenstone, a children’s imprint from Rebellion
Publishing. “We will publish one
title per season that we can really
get behind and support,” said Ben
Smith; the first title is a middlegrade novel from John Carter Cash,
Lupus Rex.
Lizzie Skurnick Books, the new
YA imprint of Ig Books, launches in
September with a reissue of
Debutante Hill by Lois Duncan, originally published in 1958. The plan is
to issue a book a month from a variety of authors, including Ellen
Conford, Lila Perl, and M.E. Kerr, a
mix of reissues and eventually more
originals (including one from
Duncan in spring 2104).
Author-turned-publisher Marissa
Moss was on hand to talk about the
debut of Creston Books, an illustrated line distributed by Publishers
Group West, debuting this fall with
four titles. And Akashic books
unveiled its Black Sheep imprint for
teens (“reflecting an offbeat sensibility,” according to Ibrahim
Ahman). The first two novels are by
Akashic authors: Changes, first in a
four-book series by T. Cooper and
Allison Glock-Cooper, and Game
World by C.J. Farley, an adventure
in a video game that turns into reality. Two Black Sheep books a season
are planned.
The YA category continues to

draw the most attention and buzz.
For HarperCollins, Veronica Roth’s
Allegiant, which arrives in October
with a two-million-copy first printing, is the publisher’s biggest fall YA
title, especially with the Divergent
movie arriving early next year. S&S

haven’t even seen galleys.”
Julie Kagawa was a star at
Harlequin Teen, with fans lining up
an hour and a half early for her signing of The Eternity Cure, book two in
the Blood of Eden series. Kagawa
launches a new series in 2014;

was handing out galleys for a highly
anticipated novel, The Lord of
Opium (Atheneum), Nancy
Farmer’s sequel to The House of the
Scorpion; there’s an announced
500,000-copy first printing. Three
Random House authors have new
YA trilogies launching this fall.
Lauren Kate has Teardrop (Oct.);
Brandon Sanderson has Steelheart
(Sept.), first in the Reckoners books;
and James Dashner has The Eye of
Minds (Oct.), kicking off the
Mortality Doctrine series.
Other YA titles from big-name
authors include Maggie Stiefvater’s
second Raven Boys novel, Dream
Thieves (Scholastic Press), and
Holly Black’s The Coldest Girl in
Coldtown (Little, Brown’s first vampire novel since Stephenie Meyer’s
Twilight books); Fangirl by Rainbow
Rowell (St. Martin’s Griffin); Lauren
Myracle’s The Infinite Moment of Us
(Abrams/Amulet). Champion, third
in Marie Lu’s Legend trilogy, comes
out in November; Penguin had posters and chapter samples, but when
Peter Glassman of Books of Wonder
stopped by to see about copies,
Shanta Newlin told him, “We

Universal Studios has optioned the
first title. Fans also lined up an hour
beforehand for Sarah J. Maas’s
signing of Crown of Midnight
(Bloomsbury), her follow-up to
Throne of Glass. “BEA staff said it
was the longest signing line they’d
seen,” said Bloomsbury’s Bridget
Hartzler.
YA debuts include Colleen
Gleason’s The Clockwork Scarab

(Chronicle); A Wounded Name by
Dot Hutchison and Sex and Violence
by Carrie Mesrobian (both
Carolrhoda Lab); Mindy McInnis’s
Not a Drop to Drink (which
HarperCollins’s Heather Doss
described as “Little House on the
Prairie meets The Walking Dead”),
and The Kingdom of Small Wounds,
adult author Susann Cokal’s first
book for teens. Algonquin Young
Readers, launching in the fall, had
two buzz picks at the show, including debut YA novel If You Could Be
Mine by Sara Farizan. Another title
to watch for from the new list:
Somebody Up There Hates You,
Hollis Seamon’s first novel for
young adults. Despite a premise
that Algonquin’s Kelly Bowen called
“a tough sell” (teens in hospice), “It’s
the one book that we’ve all talked
about the most.”
HMH’s The Testing, first in Joelle
Charbonneau’s new trilogy, is out
June 4; finished copies will be available at the show on Saturday.
Thanks to an accelerated publishing schedule, Charbonneau signed
galleys of book two, Independent
Study, which publishes next
January. And booth visitors who
said the word “knight” received a

Not Topo Gigio, but rather Geronimo Stilton, the
star mouse in a bestselling children’s book series
from Atlantyca of Milan, at the Italian Trade
Commission booth, with Ellie Berger, president of
Scholastic Trade.

Adult Big Books continued from page 1

www.bookexpoamerica.com

Facades, a debut by Eric Lundgren.
Amy Grace Loyd has a big debut
(and another official Buzz book) with
The Affairs of Others (Picador).
Another Picador title creating news
is Havisham by Ronald Frame, a sort
of prequel to the Charles Dickens
classic Great Expectations.
Women at the forefront of history
are featured in Hitler’s Furies by
Wendy Lower (Houghton Mifflin
Harcourt), about women Nazis. Hitler’s
Furies was a Buzz book and fascinates Janice Prytz of Barnes & Noble
in Murrieta, Calif., because, she said,
“It’s about women’s culpabilities.”
And from Annick Cojean, a French
journalist and bestselling writer in
France, comes the true story of a
Libyan woman who was conscripted
into Gaddafi’s Harem (Grove).
An exciting show with so many
books to look forward to, or as
Chelsea Handler’s latest book puts
it, Uganda Be Kidding Me. But we’re
not...

Rick Atkinson signing The Guns at
Last Light (Holt), the conclusion to his
WWI I Liberation series, already on
bestseller lists in its second week.

© stevekagan.com

(Quercus) by Hilary Boyd, in which a
60-year-old finds love unexpectedly.
Martha Grimes has a nonfiction
account of mother-son alcoholism,
written with her son, Ken Grimes,
Double Double (Scribner). As
always, there are the debuts with
the potential to send their authors
to the top of the lists, like Burial
Rites (Little, Brown) by Hannah
Kent, inspired by her time as a student in a small Icelandic town, about
the story of the last women in that
country to be executed. Or what
could be the next Gone Girl, the
Paula Daly debut, Just What Kind of
Mother Are You? (Grove), or The
Visionist (Little, Brown) by Rachel
Urquhart. And there’s Betwixt and
Between by Jessica Stilling (Ig
Publishing). “It’s an up-to-date fairy
tale, and Ig always publishes good
stuff,” said bookseller Brette
Weinkle, of Greenlight Books in
Brooklyn. An official Buzz (panel)
book from Overlook Press is The

Giada De Laurentiis signing her book
for kids, Recipe for Adventure, at the
Penguin booth.

Donna Tartt (l.), appearing at BEA in support of her new
novel, The Goldfinch (Little, Brown, Oct.), with PW ’s
reviews director, Louisa Ermelino.

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

copy of The Carpet People by newto-HMH author Terry Pratchett; the
publisher had spread the word via
Twitter. At Macmillan, YA attentiongetters included two realistic standalone titles: Tumble & Fall by
Alexandra Coutts and This Song
Will Save Your Life by Leila Sales (“a
lot of readers have likened its dry
humor to the TV show Girls,” Molly
Brouillette said).
Meanwhile, Deborah Bass at
Amazon Children’s Publishing said
that the Skyscape imprint will be
publishing New Adult titles in addition to YA, beginning with new
paperback editions of Rebecca
Donovan’s previously self-published Room to Breathe and Barely
Breathing; a new book from
Donovan, Out of Breath, follows in
July, as does another NA novel, Left
Drowning by Jessica Park.
On the middle-grade front, Kevin
Henkes has a new project due in
September, The Year of Billy Miller
(Greenwillow), described by
HarperCollins’s Sandee Roston as a
“younger, Clementine-ish book
that’s very accessible to younger
readers.” At Candlewick, Kate
DiCamillo’s Flora & Ulysses was in
the spotlight, and the author took
the stage Friday afternoon . James
Children’s Big Books continued on page 40

NBA Hall-of-Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was at
BEA promoting the first book in his Streetball Crew
series, Sasquatch in the Paint (Disney).

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

5

Audies All Around
Audible grabbed the two biggest
prizes at Thursday night’s Audies
Gala, with Graham Greene’s The
End of the Affair winning
Audiobook of the Year and Bram
Stoker’s Dracula taking home the
award for Distinguished
Achievement in Production.
Colin Firth narrated The End of
the Affair, which was part of
Audible’s A-List Collection, while
Dracula—read by Alan Cumming,
Tim Curry, Simon Vance,
Katherine Kellgren, Susan
Duerden, John Lee, Graeme
Malcolm, Steven Crossley, Simon
Prebble, James Adams, Nicole
Barber, and Marc Vietor—also won
in the Multi-Voiced Performance
category.
“It’s such an honor with so many
fine performances,” said Audible
executive vice-president and
publisher Beth Anderson. “It’s
wonderful to be singled out.”
In front of a packed house at the
New-York Historical Society, wildly
entertaining emcee Daniel
Handler, aka, Lemony Snicket, the
evening’s many presenters, and
the Audio Publishers Association
honored the very best audiobooks
of the past year.

The managing editor at Life Books, Robert
Sullivan, with The Day Kennedy Died
mockup and poster in the Time/Life booth.

Lodro Rinzler,
author of Walk
Like a Buddha
(Shambhala),
dispensed free
advice on dealing
with life’s woes
at the Shambhala
booth.

The award for
Beautiful Ruins
Narration by the
(HarperAudio).
Author or Authors
Industry
went to Janis Ian,
veterans Bob and
for her reading of
Debra Deyan of
Society’s Child: My
Deyan Audio
Autobiography
Services were
(Audible), while
honored with the
Katherine Kellgren
Special
won in the Solo
Achievement
Narration—Female
Award, and
category for her
Random House
reading of The Boy
Audio’s production
in the Suitcase
of E.L James’s Fifty
Narrators Xe Sands and Robert Fass
(AudioGO), and
Shades of Grey
celebrate at the annual Audies Gala.
Edoardo Ballerini
received an award
won the award for Solo Narration—
for Significant Achievement in
Male for his performance of
Sales. 
—Adam Boretz

Let’s Talk E-book Lending
Over the past six months the big six
publishers have all come to terms
with the idea that digital loans can
be good for business, and are now
on board with e-book lending at
libraries. In April, Simon &
Schuster, the last to launch a pilot
program, made its complete catalogue available to libraries for
unlimited checkout for a one-year
period, with e-books required to be
repurchased annually as well as
offered for purchase on the library
Web site. Thursday’s panel focused
its attention on the next question: is
e-book lending good for authors, or
does it lead to lost book sales?
The session kicked off with general agreement that e-book lending is not only good for libraries
but for authors and publishers, too.
“It leads to discoverability,” said
Jack Perry, owner of 38enso Inc.
Indeed, discoverability was seen as
one of the finer points of e-book
lending. Carolyn Reidy, president
and CEO of Simon & Schuster,
noted, “Trying to find a way to
make e-books available in libraries
was a challenge,” but she believes
“the library has to make the book
available for sale as well as for
loan.” Because when copies are
not readily available, chances are
greater the reader will go one click
further and buy the copy they are
so eager to read.
Steve Potash, president and CEO
of OverDrive, dismissed concerns
over piracy: “Fear should never be
associated with libraries in providing literary works.” He added that
e-books have been in circulation for
close to a decade, and the process
“isn’t a science project.” Amid
cheers he said, “This is the future of
connecting with the next generation of readers.”
Maureen Sullivan, president of
ALA, and Perry both addressed the
issue of ownership of e-book files.
“It’s a simple question with a complicated answer,” said Perry, while
Sullivan noted, “We want to see
that if a reader wants an e-book,
there is an opportunity for them to
get it. I worry most about children
growing up and being able to have
that access.”

Late arrival Paul Aiken, executive director of the Authors Guild,
said, “It’s a license. If it weren’t a
license, libraries couldn’t push out
multiple copies.” He understands
author frustration over lack of royalties with e-book lending, but
notes, “Library lending licenses in
other countries are nice, but
they’re really pennies on the
pound and don’t make up for royalties. I’m not sure that’s a path
through this thicket. Pricing rights
will be experimental until people
figure out what makes sense.”
Sullivan echoed Aiken, adding,
“We want to see options tested so
readers are able to borrow books
in the function they want when they
want it.” Touching base on windowing, or “embargoing,” as Sullivan
deemed it, the panelists appeared
to be in agreement that it wasn’t
the way. “Windowing is going the
way of dinosaurs,” said Perry. When
the product is easily accessible, all
believe piracy will be cut back—
much like it was in the music
industry.
Perry believes one glimpse of
the future may be OverDrive’s Big
Library Read pilot program, where
libraries worldwide offer a single
e-book to their patrons. The program spotlights a title for a set
time period for library patrons to
read simultaneously. Michael
Malone is the first author to participate in the program with his
novel The Four Corners of the Sky.
In two weeks 37,100 readers have
borrowed the book, the cover has
had 5.9 million impressions, and
visibility has increased 600%. Of
his company, Perry said, “We’re
here to help sell as many books as
possible.”
The bottom line is selling books
and connecting readers with
authors. Discoverability will lead to
increased author sales, publishers
believe. While it’s early yet, and the
future of e-book lending isn’t set in
stone, Sullivan summed up the
panel succinctly: “The goal of
libraries is to make content available to readers. We’re willing to
look at different options.”  

—Paige Crutcher

6

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

HIGHLIGHTS

Winner of the 2012 PROSE Award
for Biography & Autobiography

“ ThiS
REMARKABLE
BOOK MAy
ShOcK BuT
WiLL SuRELy
EnLighTEn.”

OF THE DAY

MEETINGS AND EVENTS
8–9:30 a.m. Adult Book and Author Breakfast: Helen Fielding, John Lewis,
Diane Gabaldon, with Chris Matthew as emcee

9 a.m.–4 p.m. Exhibit Hall
9 a.m.–4 p.m. International Rights Center

OF SPECIAL INTEREST
10–11:30 a.m. A q&a with Neil Gaiman on “Why Fiction Is Dangerous”
AUTOGRAPHS
9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Authors signing their new books in the Autographing Area
and in publisher booths, include Judith Anodea, Dawn Klehr, Kelsey Sutton,
Patricia Polacco, Lincoln Pierce, Maria Lennon, Rachel Carter, Jeff Hart,
David Wellington, Cheryl Ballantine, Kara Newman, Gennifer Albin, plus
many more.

CORRECTION

Author Mike Daugherty’s company, an Atlanta cancer detection facility
(“An Indie Author’s Battle,” Show Daily, May 30, page 100), continues to be
investigated by the FTC, but has never been fined. 

ALL PHOTOS © STEVEKAGAN.COM

— Professor Gerhard L. Weinberg,
author of A World at Arms

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Jim Carrey at a signing for his selfpubllshed picture book, How Roland Rolls,
which will be distributed by Perseus.

Foot-weary attendees take a break near the
Penguin booth.

“A hiSTORicAL dOcuMEnT
Of ThE gREATEST iMPORTAncE.”
— The NeW York Times

“An ALLiEd hERO.”

— Professor Norman Davies, author
of heart of europe and Vanished kingdoms

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Daisy Maryles
MANAGING EDITORS Sonia Jaffe Robbins, Michael Coffey
ART DIRECTOR Clive Chiu

“EARThShAKing. A book which
i hope will be widely read.”
— Dr. Zbigniew Brzezinski,
Center for Strategic & International Studies

PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Kagan
STAFF REPORTERS Andrew Albanese, Matia Burnett, Peter Cannon, Jessamine Chan,
Rachel Deahl, Dick Donahue, Louisa Ermelino, Rose Fox, Lynn Garrett, Gabe Habash, Mike
Harvkey, Carolyn Juris, Jim Milliot, Calvin Reid, Diane Roback, Mark Rotella, Judith Rosen,
Jonathan Segura, John A. Sellers, Samuel R. Slaton
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Leylha Ahuile, Joy Bean, Adam Boretz, Ann Byle, Ruby Cutolo,
Alex Crowley, Paige Crutcher, Lucinda Dyer, Donna Freitas, Karen Jones, Hilary S. Kayle,
Bridget Kinsella, Claire Kirch, Sally Lodge, Suzanne Mantell, Shannon Maughan,
Diane Patrick, Ada Price, Karen Raugust, Sarah J. Robbins, Seth Satterlee,
Genevieve Valentine, Wendy Werris

Visit us at National Book Network, Booth 1126
Watch the trailer on YouTube!
The Auschwitz Volunteer:
Beyond Bravery

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL Craig Morgan Teicher
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kady Francesconi
TECHNOLOGY EDITORS Alok Tanna, Gabe Coffey
PUBLISHER Cevin Bryerman
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SHOW DAILY Joseph Murray
BookExpo America is owned by Reed Exhibitions and any of its marks used herein are used
under license from Reed Exhibitions.

www.bookexpoamerica.com

NEIL GAIMAN
BELOVED STORY TELLER AND
WINNER OF THE NEWBERY MEDAL

Discusses “Why Fiction Is Dangerous,”
followed by an audience Q&A
and signed book giveaway*
Kimberly Butler

Today, June 1, from 10:00 – 11:00 AM
in Room 1E12/1E13
NEIL GAIMAN has two novels coming out this year:
an adult novel about a child and a children’s book about an adult.

Ava i l a b l e
June
2013

Ava i l a b l e
September
2013

Wo n d ro u s a n d i m a g i n a ti ve , a n d a t ti m e s
d e e p l y s c a r y, T H E O C E A N AT T H E E N D O F
TH E L AN E captures the ver y essence of
c h i l d h o o d f e a r a n d u n c e r t a i n t y.

F O R T U N AT E LY, T H E M I L K i s t h e h i l a r i o u s
stor y of a father who travels through time on
his way home from the grocer y store with
m il k fo r h is c h il d re n ’s b re a k f a s t ce re a l .

“A s t o r y [G a i m a n] t e l l s m o r e g r a c e f u l l y
th a n a ny h e ’s to l d . . . . A l ove ly ya r n .”
— B o o k l i s t (s t a r r e d r e v i e w)

“ T h is is li ke T h e H itc h h i ke r ’s G u i d e to
D r. W h o ’ s F l y i n g C i r c u s ! W h o o p e e ! ”
— Daniel Pink water

* L i m i t e d q u a n t i t y o f s i g n e d a d v a n c e c o p i e s o f F O R T U N AT E LY, T H E M I L K a n d s i g n e d f i n i s h e d c o p i e s o f M A K E G O O D A R T

w w w. h a r p e r c o l l i n s . c o m • w w w. n e i l g a i m a n . c o m • w w w. h a r p e r c o l l i n s c h i l d r e n s . c o m • w w w. m o u s e c i r c u s . c o m

8

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

It’s All About the Readers

© STEVEKAGAN.COM

Even though the speakers
ing food. There are also
included a movie star and
children who write her askthree bestselling authors
ing her for books they can’t
whose books have sold a
afford to buy. Access to
grand total of 146 million
books, which builds up
copies, it was the readers for
child literacy, is essential,
whom they write that took
Osborne noted, declaring,
center stage at yesterday
“We can change the world if
morning’s Children’s Book
we can get all third-graders
and Author Breakfast.
to read at grade level.”
“I am thrilled to become a
Osborne and her family
part of this community,”
have developed a Magic
Octavia Spencer, the event’s
Tree House classroom and
emcee, told the packed
mentors program, which
All four speakers at the Children’s Breakfast praised their readers as a
room full of booksellers,
source of inspiration: (l. to r.) Mary Pope Osborne; Rick Riordan;
provides books for children
Octavia Spencer, who emceed; and Veronica Roth.
publishers, young bloggers,
in Title I schools. It recently
and media. “You all are the
donated 120,000 books to
rock stars of books.” Spencer, who
noted that the series features a
Newark, N.J., school children;
won an Oscar for her role as Minny
Latino boy who wears hearing aids,
“Every third-grader [at Title I
in The Help, disclosed that as a
an African-American boy, and
schools] got a box of 28 books each
child she was a “fan of children’s
“Randi herself, [who] is a redhead,
to take home.”
books,” especially of historical clasa minority in her own way.”
If anyone could follow as beloved
sics and junior sleuth series. More
“What joy it is to write for sevenand prolific a writer as is Osborne,
recently, she’s become a fan of kung
and eight-year-olds,” declared
it would be Rick Riordan, who
fu movies. “These elements came
Mary Pope Osborne, who is at BEA
joked as he stood at the podium, “I
together,” she explained, in writing
to promote her 50th Magic Tree
taught eighth grade: nothing scares
The Case of the Time-Capsule
House novel, Hurry Up, Houdini!
me.” Reflecting upon his first
Bandit (S&S, Oct.), the first novel in
(Random House, July). “There’s
appearance as a BEA breakfast
her Randi Rhodes: Ninja Detective
nothing sweeter, more authentic,”
speaker eight years ago, before the
middle-grade series about three
she added. To prove it, she read
release of his first Percy Jackson
children who use their wits and
some of her favorite letters from
novel, Percy Jackson and the
martial arts skills to solve mysteryoung fans, praising her writing,
Lightning Thief, Riordan pointed
ies. Explaining that diversity in stomaking suggestions for future novout that much has changed since
ries “is essential” to her, Spencer
els, even sending her gifts, includ2005. His background as a teacher

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

has helped him a great deal in writing middle-grade novels inspired
by mythology, he said, as he knows
how important it is to “see things
from the reader’s point of view.”
Unlike Osborne, he doesn’t receive
food gifts from his fans, but “middle
schoolers are brutally honest,” and
he has received critiques from
them. Describing the fourth novel
in the Heroes of Olympus series,
The House of Hades (DisneyHyperion, Oct.) as focusing upon
Percy and Annabel, Riordan disclosed that they “struggle to survive
and support each other as they literally go through hell.”
Veronica Roth, who at 24 was the
youngest author to speak, moved
the audience with her presentation, even though she hardly mentioned the heavily promoted last
installment in her Divergent series,
Allegiant. Recalling how she had
been a voracious reader as a child,
but went through a period of not
reading as a young adult, because,
in her arrogance, she refused to
allow herself to read the books that
would most excite her, such as
Harry Potter, Roth praised young
readers for caring so much about
what they read. “They care about
the story, the story is real for them,
because they’re able to immerse
themselves completely,” she said.
—Claire Kirch

Introducing the
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bea3.indd 1

5/3/13 9:52 AM

10

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

Welcome, Power Readers
Today is Consumer Day. Introduced
in 2012, Consumer Day is expanding its footprint this year. The day
allows a limited number of people
from the general public into the
trade show to receive free books,
meet authors, and attend other
publisher-sponsored events. This
year BEA hopes as many as 2,000
people, dubbed Power Readers,
will attend Consumer Day for an
entrance fee of $49. BEA reported
that, by early May, more than 700
people had signed up. Below is a
snapshot of some giveaways and

Visit Booth

#1021

events various publishers have
planned for the day. (For a full list of
events and exhibitor giveaways, go
to www.bookexpoamerica.com/
Power-Readers/Welcome.)
Chronicle Books (booth 739): In
addition to limited-edition tote bags,
tie-ins will be given for the following books: Prospect Park by David P.
Colley and Elizabeth Keegin Colley
(flower seeds), The Filmmaker Says
by Jamie Thompson Stern (popcorn),
From Russia with Doubt by Adam
Lerner (magnets), and Southern
Makers by Jennifer Causey (candy).

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Galley giveaways include Colleen
Gleason’s The Clockwork Scarab
and Ellis Weiner’s The Templeton
Twins Make a Scene.
Da Capo Press (1402) has galleys for
a number of titles, including The
Turk Who Loved Apples by Matt Gross,
The Shadow King by Jo Marchant,
Poseur by Marc Spitz, and A Funny
Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven
by Corey Taylor.
Grand Central Press (1929) will be
giving away several books and galleys, as well as hosting various signings. Among others, author Jeffery
Deaver will sign The Kill Room at 10
a.m., and Jami Attenberg will sign
The Middlesteins at 11 a.m. The

Inspire

TRUE STORIES That Will
Your Readers

Angels in the Fire

Touching Heaven

by Dann Stadler

by Leanne Hadley

The riveting true story of a miraculous, harrowing rescue—and how it sparked ongoing angelic
interventions in the lives of everyday people.
ISBN: 978-0-7642-1114-0 • $14.99p
• July 2013 •

The Long Awakening
by Lindsey O’Connor

A former children’s hospital chaplain shares
the stories of remarkable children she knew,
their faith, and comforting glimpses into life
beyond death.

A compelling memoir of a woman waking
from a two-month coma after childbirth and
struggling to put the pieces of her new life together. She had no idea it would take so long.

ISBN: 978-0-8007-2171-8 • $12.99p

ISBN: 978-0-8007-1876-3 • $17.99c

• June 2013 •

• October 2013 •

The Artist’s Daughter

Nowhere but Up, teen ed.

Taylor’s Gift

by Alexandra Kuykendall

by Pattie Mallette with A. J. Gregory

by Todd and Tara Storch

A poignant memoir of a woman’s struggle to
deal with the wounds left by her absent father
and the realization of how that loss ultimately
does—and does not—define her.

Pattie Mallette now shares her story in a way
that specifically appeals to teen girls, encouraging them and answering their questions about
life and being Justin Bieber’s mom.

A thirteen-year-old girl’s tragic death gives new
life to five other people in this heartbreaking
and inspiring story of grief and redemption told
by her parents.

ISBN: 978-0-8007-2205-0 • $13.99p

ISBN: 978-0-8007-2200-5 • $14.99p

ISBN: 978-0-8007-2188-6 • $21.99c

• April 2013 •

X

Y

• July 2013 •

• April 2013 •

To order call 1-800-877-2665
To order in Canada call David C. Cook 1-800-263-2664

publisher is also hosting a morning
scavenger hunt with prizes of
advance reading copies of
Nicholas’s Sparks’s forthcoming
novel, The Longest Ride. (Only five
ARCs will be given away through
the scavenger hunt.)
HarperCollins (2038) is offering
Power Readers the chance to sign
up for advance looks at upcoming
HarperCollins titles. The publisher
is hoping to get feedback from Power
Readers about the books—which
will cross various genres and subject matters, and be written by both
established and new authors—
before pub date. HC also offers various giveaways, including Amy Tan’s
The Valley of Amazement, Robyn
Schneider’s The Beginning of
Everything, and Sherry Thomas’s
Burning Sky.
Macmillan (1557): The first 1,000
Power Readers who arrive at the
show will receive a free bag from
the publisher, containing 10+ books
from its various divisions, in a wide
variety of genres; among the titles
are Lars Kepler’s The Nightmare
and Linda Castillo’s Her Last Breath.
The publisher is also hosting a party
in its booth to celebrate its new
crowdsourced romance imprint,
Swoon Reads.
Penguin (1520): Among the titles the
publisher is giving away are the latest from Eat, Pray Love’s Elizabeth
Gilbert, The Signature of All Things;
Terry McMillan’s Who Asked You;
and Nicholas Baker’s Traveling
Sprinkler. Authors doing in-booth
signings include Margot author
Jillian Cantor (11:45–12:45 p.m.) and
SYLO author D.J. MacHale (11 a.m.–
noon). The publisher is hosting a
book club lunch with Gilbert and
Wally Lamb, 1:30–3 p.m., in Room
1E12/13.
Random House (2739): A number of
authors will be doing signings,
including Chris Raschka (Daisy Gets
Lost), 12:30–1:30 p.m.; Tad Hills
(Rocket’s Mighty Words), 1–2 p.m.;
and Robin Wasserman (The Walking
Dark), 1:30–2:30 p.m. The Random
House Publishing Group division will
have authors like Colum McCann
(the forthcoming Transatlantic),
Diana Gabaldon, Alexander Maksik,
and Kelly Corrigan on hand, and also
plans on giving away a sample of the
new cookbook from Paula Deen.
Scholastic (1638): Galleys and giveaways include Train by Elisha Cooper,
Star Wars: Jedi Academy by Jeffrey
Brown, The 39 Clues: Unstoppable
Book 1: Nowhere to Run by Jude
Watson, Seeing Red by Kathryn
Erskine, and Marie Antoinette:
Serial Killer by Katie Alender. The
publisher will also be giving away I
Read YA buttons and tote bags.
Simon & Schuster (2638): Authors
signing in its booth include Chris
Matthews (Jack Kennedy), 10:30 a.m.;
Jamie McGuire (Walking Disaster),
9:30 a.m., and Mary Higgins Clark
(Daddy’s Gone a Hunting), 11 a.m. 

www.bookexpoamerica.com
259450_BEA_DailyAd.indd 1

3/13/13 1:11 PM

—Rachel Deahl

for licensing opportunities
(818) 954-5609
TM & © DC Comics. WBGP LOGO: TM & © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
(s13)

12

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Kids Must Read About War

© claire

kirch

Children’s book authors Suzanne
Collins, author of the Hunger
Games trilogy, and Walter Dean
Myers, 2012–2013 national ambassador for young people’s literature,
participated in a discussion about

sized that they write about war to
educate young people about its
realities. “I feel driven to make war
real to kids,” said Myers, the author
of Fallen Angels and Sunrise over
Fallujah. Invasion, an October
release, is set in WWII Europe.
Not only did Myers spend time
in the military as a young man,
but his son also served in Iraq.
“I kept seeing romanticized
versions of war,” he explained.
“I want young people to know
what war is really about.”
Collins, whose picture book,
The Year of the Jungle:
Memories from the Home
Front, is based upon her sixth
year, when her father went to
Vietnam, talked about its
impact. For instance, her iniSuzanne Collins, with illustrator James Proimos, signtial perceptions of the jungle
ing books at Scholastic.
being filled with friendly aniwriting about war for young readmals changed into fear for her
ers Thursday evening. The discusfather as time passed. James
sion, which was moderated by
Proimos, who illustrated The Year
Scholastic editorial director David
of the Jungle, used for inspiration
Levithan, drew about 300 booksellobjects Collins saved from that
ers and librarians to Scholastic’s
year, including postcards and letheadquarters in Soho.
ters, such as a card from her father
Both Collins and Myers emphathat ended with the chilling words,

“Pray for me.” Collins also interviewed her siblings in writing the
book, including her older sister,
who was 12 at the time.
“A lot of things I kept from that
year, because [it] was so intense. I
felt I had to hold on to [them],”
Collins said, disclosing she also
kept jewelry her father gave her
that year and other objects.
Collins said that, while there are
many excellent books about war in
print, such stories must be
“refreshed” for each generation of
readers.

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

“A realistic sense of what war is
about is essential on so many levels,”
she said. “If kids don’t understand
conflict, how can we expect them to
know how to resolve conflicts?”
Such literature serves another
purpose. she said: the necessity to
question authority. “If you have no
idea what propaganda is, how do
you know to question what the government is telling you?”
“Young people, it will become
their time to make decisions about
war,” Myers pointed out.
“People should read Myers’s
books before enlisting,” Collins said.
“It should be mandatory reading.”  

—Claire Kirch

Booth 966: Where Indie
Authors Meet Fans
Among the rows of booths for
publishers and digital companies on
the BEA show floor, Booth 966 stands
out for the camera crew and the
lines of attendees, all of whom seem
a bit more excited than the routine
show-goer. The reason? The presence
of six bestselling indie authors:
Stephanie Bond, Tina Folsom,
Barbara Freethy, Hugh Howey, CJ

Lyons, and Bella Andre.
Wearing buttons that read, “Ask
me how I sold over 1 million
e-books,” the authors treated BEA
much like a traditional publisher
would: growing their brand and
talking with distributors and foreign
publishers. And much like how they
write and sell their books, the move
continued on page 14

Get
g
n
i
k
l
a
T
Where Do Great
Conversations Start?
There’s No Place
Like Home.

We are located at Booth # 677 and BEA Visitors are encouraged
to drop by and submit their name for our BEA $500 Giveaway.
www.excelovate.com § Email: info@excelovate.com § Phone: 416 619 5309
www.bookexpoamerica.com

14

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

continued from page 12

to come to BEA came about
organically and independently: the
six authors talked through Yahoo!
and then spread the word through
blogs and social media (as well as
some help from the likes of Porter
Anderson and Jane Friedman).
By the first day of the show, the
effort had paid off. Under a banner
that touted “10 million books sold
and counting,” the authors signed
physical copies of their books
donated by CreateSpace and took
names for an iPad giveaway.
Talking with the authors, there was
one topic that kept coming up: the
readers. Folsom, a huge bestseller
in Germany, also attends the

www.bookexpoamerica.com

LoveLetter conference in Berlin,
and partially attributes her success
in that country to her ability to
communicate with fans in German.
“It’s about keeping our readers
happy, no matter how they’re
reading our books,” said Lyons, who
went on to talk about the different
formats—as well as movie and TV
deals—that the six have in the
works. “You feel like you’re running
a multimedia business,” said Bond,
whose Two Guys Detective Agency
has just been optioned for TV. At
one point, a reader asked for a
digital autograph on an e-book
edition and Lyons brightly said, “We
can do that!”
—Gabe Habash

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Shanghai’s New Children’s Book Fair
The inaugural
China Shanghai
International
Children’s Book
Fair (CCBF), to
be held at the
Shanghai Mart Exhibition Center, is
set for November 7–10, with the first
two days dedicated to trade, and the
remaining days open to the public.
Managed by Reed Exhibitions and
supported by the Chinese government’s General Administration of
Press and Publications, the fair is
dedicated to the publishing, rights

acquisition, and
distribution of
content for those
up to the age of
16.
Home to more
than 230 million people under the
age of 16, China has a bustling children’s publishing sector currently
valued at $5 billion, of which $340
million comes from licensing. The
children’s book industry in China is
growing. Between 2011 and 2012,
the number of children’s publications grew by 35%, while 20% of the
total rights sales in the book industry came from this segment.
“The purchasing power of young
Chinese parents is huge, with more
than 52% preferring to buy books
than borrowing from libraries. In
fact, 70% of these parents purchase
books for their kids every month,”
says Reed Exhibitions senior project manager Randy Wang, who
points out that 90% of the children’s
books in China are imports. “The
statistics from China’s biggest
online retailer, Dangdang.com,
show that 80% and 90% of the top 10
children’s bestsellers in 2012 and
2011, respectively, were imported
titles. On the other hand, teachers
and educators are in dire need of
new educational materials, while
parents and their children are looking for imported titles to add variety
to their reading list and broadening
their understanding of world cultures.”
Adopting “Content Without
Borders” as its slogan, “CBFF is
focused on facilitating closer interactions between industry players
local and international,” adds
Wang, “between publishers and the
reading public, and between
authors and their fans. Exhibitors
and attendees will discover a huge
range of content—books, e-books,
educational software, and other
edutainment products—and we
hope they will go away wanting
more and looking forward to the
next CCBF. Having this event in bustling Shanghai makes perfect
sense. This is China’s digital publishing hub as well as its innovation
and financial center.”
Around 200 exhibitors, with 30%
from overseas, are expected to attend
CCBF. Jon Malinowski, president of
Combined Book Exhibit and founder
of Pubmatch.com, will be among
them. One aspect of the show, the
Shanghai New Title Showcase, is a
collaboration between CCBF and
Combined Book Exhibit (booth 1247
at BEA). The showcase provides
publishers, including self-publishers, with a low-cost way to explore
the Chinese children’s market and
to have their books “front and center in one of the most active rightsbuying markets in the world,” says
Malinowski. 
—Teri Tan

Visit Booth C885
for a live demo
Augmented Reality Powered by

Edutainment Systems provides digital services to the
children’s book industry. Please call or visit us on the
web to learn more about augmenting your books.

Ph: (855) 790 - 0008 www.edutainmentsystems.com

16

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

ME ET
9:30-10:30 a.m.
Macmillan Booth
#1557

and receive a free book stamped with
Kittyʼs signature paw print!

A Neal Porter Book

Roaring Brook Press | badkittybooks.com

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Online Communities
Upward Bound
A survey sponsored by Publishing Technology on the role online communities are playing in the marketing efforts of U.S. and U.K. publishers found
that 69% of publishers host at least one reader community, with that figure
expected to rise to about 94% in 2015. Online communities are much more
likely to be used by trade publishers compared to academic/professional
publishers. The survey, conducted this March, found that 86% of trade publishers are already using online communities, while less than half of academic/professional publishers are. By 2015, all but a tiny minority of trade
publishers expect to have online communities, and 90% of academic/professional publishers expect to be hosting communities. In 2015, 24% of all
publishers expect to be operating seven or more communities, up from 12%
in 2013. The average of communities hosted per publisher is projected to
rise to 5.0 in 2015 from 2.1 this year.
Social networking is the most important aspect of using online communities for trade houses, followed by the interaction between authors and readers. For academic/professional publishers, online communities are seen
most useful for fostering collaboration and for professional networking. To
date, all publishers believe increased engagement with their audience and
a better direct relationship with customers are the two most important benefits of online communities, followed by increasing a publisher’s knowledge
of its customers. Online communities provided publishers with a way of
striking up more rapport with their audiences, noted Jane Tappuni, business development director at Publishing Technology.
While 62% of surveyed publishers said they sell products through their
communities, only 16% viewed online communities as a viable direct sales
channel. E-books were seen as the format benefiting the most from online
communities, although online resources were the biggest beneficiaries for
academic/professional publishers.
The majority of publishers, 64%, reported that their investments in creating
online communities have already paid off. Only 12% of publishers said they
aren’t sure if creating online communities will pay off over the long term.
Publishing Technology commissioned the research to quantify its observation of a growing trend, to further understand the reach and commitment
among publishers to online communities, and whether it reflects an experiment or viable business model. The survey, originally released at the
London Book Fair, was conducted by Bowker Market Research and based
on responses from 49 trade and academic publishers in the U.S. and U.K. 

—Jim Milliot

Zen Nonidentity
Toast the upcoming launch
of swoonreads.com
11:00 a.m. – noon
Macmillan Booth
#1557

Champ
a
will be s gne
erved to
the first
100
arrivals

Find out more
about this crowdsourced teen
romance imprint!

mackids.com

BEA showgoers won’t find author Shozan Jack Haubner at any autographings or book signings. His book, Zen Confidential, is however, being given
away at the Shambhala booth (2946). It seems that Shozan learned while he
was living the transcendental life at a Buddhist monastery that giving it
away was the only way. “In terms of pursuing
career goals, I wasn’t having much luck. And
the more I tried to chase after things, the
more they escaped my grasp. You negate
your ego on this path, but the self is going to
arise in the next moment,” he says. And
sometimes his self isn’t the most manageable
person to be around—one of many things
that comes to light in this wry memoir about
struggling with life the namaste way.
Shozan, who uses a pseudonym, came to
practice Zen Buddhism after difficulties with
identity. “I lived in Hollywood for a while and
had all sorts of ideas about being a Western
individualist, a writer, the way I dressed. And
I just took these things for granted. This was
my identity. And after I became a monk,
shaved my head, put on my robes, and got a new name—and began sinking
into this new identity—that old me, I realized, was just as much of a costume
as this new one. It was as much of a role, and I took it completely for granted
before.”
Such circuitous, self-negating thinking is at the core of these clever stories. After all, you can never tell what they’re thinking, those with minds
open to enlightenment. Asked about the ego-negating goals of selling a
book, Shozan responded: “There’s a long history in Zen literature of Zen
masters denigrating the whole process of writing and getting things down
into words.” 
—Seth Satterlee

www.bookexpoamerica.com
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18

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

How do
you give
an e-book
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Introducing:
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The easiest way to bulk deliver
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W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

SONpotlight
CHILDRE N
It Takes Three for Arte Kids
The folks from Trinity University Press have arrived
at BEA from San Antonio, Tex., eager to acquaint
booksellers with the house’s Arte Kids series of bilingual English-Spanish board books. A special collaboration among the press, the San Antonio Museum of
Art, and the San Antonio Public Library Foundation,
the series introduces basic concepts and is illustrated with artwork from the museum’s collection.
Arte Kids launched in 2011 with 1,2,3, Si!, which has
sold more than 70,000 copies. Colores Everywhere!
and Hello, Círculos! followed in 2012, and Animal
Amigos! and Black & Blanco! (both in June) finish off
the series.
The triple-organization collaboration had several
inspirations, says Tom Payton, associate director of
Trinity University Press. “The San Antonio Public
Library Foundation has one of the country’s largest
Born to Read programs, a nonprofit organization
promoting early literacy. They send more than 30,000
local parents of newborns home from the hospital
with a bag full of educational materials and books.”
Payton reports that Kaye Lenox, the foundation’s former president, “loves
using art as a teaching tool and had been buying board books from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to include in these bags. Kaye started talking to
friends at the San Antonio Museum of Art, which has a deep collection, and
they came up with the idea of custom publishing books using that museum’s
artworks, which could be used in the Born to Read distributions.”
The next logical step was contacting the press, which has a trade publishing program, and Payton eagerly embraced the project. Given the San
Antonio area’s heavily Hispanic population, the notion of pairing the art
with text in both English and Spanish was a natural. “So after we formed this
triumvirate, Arte Kids came together quite smoothly,” says Payton. “We’ve
had a lot of feedback about how colorful and lively the illustrations are,” he
adds. “The books feature art from all periods and places, but is slanted a bit
more toward Latin American and Hispanic art. And we hear over and over
how appealing the bilingual component is to educators and parents.”
The publisher reports that the books have been well received in a variety
of markets, including independent bookstores, Barnes & Noble outlets, and
museum shops. Payton says that the press had “some nice bulk sales” to
H-E-B, a large southwestern grocery chain that “is very active in promoting
childhood literacy.”
Visitors to Trinity University Press’s booth (1230) can peruse samples of
Arte Kids titles and pick up a promotional poster and book bags promoting
the series.
—Sally Lodge

MEET WITH US TODAY
Contact Phoebe at
213-792-2855
bea@livrada.com
Follow us at BEA:

@livrada

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The self-confident yet clueless young detective
Stephan Pastis, introduced in Timmy Failure:
Mistakes Were Made, will return in a second misadventure, Timmy Failure: Now Look What You’ve
Done, whose title and cover are revealed here for
the first time. Candlewick will release the illustrated middle-grade novel in February 2014.
Young readers clearly took a shining to this bumbling hero, who runs the Total Failure detective
agency with a 1,500-pound polar bear named Total.
The first book, released by Candlewick in February, Stephan Pastis
sold more than 130,000 copies in the U.S. alone during its first two months on sale, and immediately moved onto the New York
Times bestseller list and the national Indie bestseller list. Rights to the novel
have been sold into 28 countries.
Mistakes Were Made was the debut children’s book from Pastis, the creator of Pearls Before Swine, a syndicated comic strip that appears in more
than 600 U.S. newspapers. Pastis is gratified by the positive response to the
novel from readers across a broad age range. “It was such a thrill and
5/10/13 2:02 PM

© susan young

Timmy Failure Is Back

Bella & Harry
T h e

A d v e n t u r e s

o f

A Children’s Picture Book Series

20

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Spotlight

on children

Booth #2848

Quirk Books
is excited to
meet you!
Our prize patrol is walking the show floor and
randomly giving away prizes to attendees carrying
the Quirk Books tote bag.
Stop by booth #2848 for a Quirk Books tote bag,
author signings, and other great giveaways.

Author Signings & Events
10:00 am
Ben H. Winters, author of
Countdown City

Buddhist Principles
For Kids

Booth #2848

11:00 am
Ransom Riggs, author of
Miss Peregrine’s Home for
Peculiar Children
Booth #2848

1:00 pm
Star Wars Reads Day Celebration,
which includes a reading from
William Shakespeare’s Star Wars ®
Uptown Stage

© LFL Ltd

2:00 pm
E. B. Hudspeth, author of
The Resurrectionist
Booth #2848

quirkbooks.com

facebook.com/quirkbooks

remains a thrill,” he says of readers’ reactions.
“The biggest surprise for me is to hear adults
say they love the book. And the response from
kids has been truly amazing.”
Before trying his hand at children’s fiction,
the author received some good advice from
Wimpy Kid creator Jeff Kinney. “He visited my
studio and said, ‘Just be funny,’ ” recalls Pastis.
“That sounds simple, but it’s so easy to get
caught up on plot. But I took what Jeff said to
heart. In my parlance, I try to make each chapter its own comic strip, with an opening, a funny ending, and jokes in the
middle. Kids have so many distractions that I know I have to work to keep
their attention. I guess I have an advantage, having done my comic strip for
12 years. When you’re in the newspapers every day, you get immediate feedback, and you get a sense of what works and what doesn’t.”
Pastis is finishing up revisions on Now Look What You’ve Done, in which
Timmy sets out to win a schoolwide competition to determine who stole a
globe from the superintendent’s office. “Timmy’s insulted that they’d even
have a contest, since he knows he’s not only the best detective in the school,
but in the whole world,” says Pastis. “Of course he starts out on the wrong
foot and does an absolutely miserable job with the case.”
The author, who’s hoping to write a third Timmy Failure novel (“I’m starting to collect notes for it and the pile is getting bigger and bigger, so that’s
always a good sign”), is happy to be attending BEA for the first time as a children’s book author. “It’s an exciting scene, and I’m looking forward to seeing booksellers I’ve met over the years while touring for my Pearls Before
Swine collections,” he says.
Old and new fans can meet Pastis today when he signs copies of Timmy
Failure: Mistakes Were Made at the Candlewick booth (C1575), 10–11:30 a.m.  

—Sally Lodge

twitter.com/quirkbooks

Wisdom Publications has seen
increased interest in books for children that teach Buddhist principles.
The nonprofit publishing house,
based in Somerville, Mass., has upped
the number of books that meet that
need, with its newest featured at BEA.
No Ordinary Apple: A Story About
Eating Mindfully (June) encourages
children (and adults) to slow down
and really savor what they’re eating.
Written by musician and teacher Sara Marlowe and illustrated by Philip
Pascuzzo, the book uses an apple to teach mindfulness. Marlow encourages
a child to look closely at the color of the apple; feel its different parts; toss it
in the air and listen to it land; smell it; and chew slowly to really taste it.
“The book is about slowing down,” says Lydia Anderson, Wisdom’s marketing and promotions manager. “It’s not about never eating sweets, but
encouraging children to find ways to discover new things about food, to
appreciate everything on their plate, to slow down and savor it.”
Marlowe and Pascuzzo sign copies of the finished book, printed early for
BEA but not available in stores until June 11, today at Table 3 in the
Autographing Area. No Ordinary Apple will also be available at the Wisdom
booth (1322B).
For the older crowd, Wisdom is passing out galleys for two new publications: How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and
Sorrow (Sept.) by Toni Bernhard, author of How to Be Sick: A BuddhistInspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers (2010), as well as
Nothing Is Hidden: The Psychology of Zen Koans (Oct.) by Barry Magid,
author of Ordinary Mind: Exploring the Common Ground of Zen and
Psychoanalysis (2005).
While the three books are very different, each touches on Buddhism in
some way, which fulfills Wisdom’s mandate. “Our mission is to produce the
best Buddhist books of all kinds,” says Anderson. “We’ve been attending
BEA for years,” she adds. “BEA is a good way to meet with agents, new
authors, people in the trade, and it is a great way for book buyers and sellers
to learn about us and us to learn about them.”
—Ann Byle

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Authors

intention of showing it to anybody. It only became an ongoing series, she
recalls, after her agent sold Outlander to Random House, and also promised
that there was much more to Claire and Jamie’s time-tripping love story.
Since then, the Outlander franchise has practically become a cottage
industry: the novels, a spinoff series of four Lord John Grey novels, short stories, novellas, a graphic novel, and The Outlandish Companion, Vol. I.
There’s even a prequel about Jamie’s parents in the works. And, of course,
there’s Outlander: The Musical, plus a television miniseries currently under
development by producer Ronald Moore.
Despite the millions of words Gabaldon’s written for the past 20 years
about Claire, Jamie, the ancestors, and the descendants they encounter during their time travels, she says it all boils down to telling a simple, age-old
tale—a story about two people involved in a long-term relationship, in love
and married for 50 years, give or take that two-century travel time.
Gabaldon is one of the speakers at today’s book and author breakfast,
8–9:30 a.m., in the Special Events Hall. 
—Claire Kirch

AT THE S H OW

Diana Gabaldon
Wrinkles inTime

elenna loughlin

Neil Gaiman

©

Each of her Outlander novels, Diana Gabaldon
emphasizes, contains enough backstory that it
can be read either as a stand-alone or as part of
the series—which she recommends, however,
is best read in chronological order. Written in
My Own Heart’s Blood (Delacorte, Dec.), the
eighth volume in what Gabaldon promises is a
nine-book series, continues the epic saga of
Claire and Jamie Fraser, time-crossed lovers,
who for the past seven novels have been ricocheting between his world in the 18th century
and hers in the 20th.
The story, which began in the Scottish Highlands in 1945 and moved back to 1743 after
Claire stepped through a circle of magic stones in Outlander (1991), has
taken her and Jamie from Scotland to Paris, London, and even North America. While close-mouthed about Written in My Own Heart’s Blood, Gabaldon
reveals that it opens in Revolutionary War–era Philadelphia in 1778. The
story picks up with the triple cliffhangers that concluded An Echo in the
Bone (2009), but she adds only an enigmatic “we’ll continue from there.”
Most authors writing a series, Gabaldon says, maintain the same tone, style,
and structure in every book they write, but she doesn’t. “I just don’t like doing
things I’ve done before,” she insists. In fact, she adds, Outlander originally
was conceived as a “practice” novel, to see if she could write one; she had no

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Fortunately, Making
Good Art

Neil Gaiman is scheduled to speak this morning, 10 a.m.–11 a.m., on why he thinks fiction is
dangerous, but since he’s an old hand at
attending BEA, he knows he’ll have a “captive
audience of booksellers” in conference room
1E12–1E13. So, he says, he “might as well” also
talk up the three books he’s got coming out this
spring: Make Good Art (Morrow, May), the full
text of a commencement speech he gave at
Philadelphia’s University of the Arts in 2012,
during which he urged the graduates to “make
fantastic mistakes” in creating their art; Ocean
at the End of the Lane (HarperCollins, June), an

© kimberly butler

24

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OT 26
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BEA 2013 Show Daily June 1.indd 1

5/10/2013 10:39:34 AM

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

Authors
AT THE S H OW

adult novel with a seven-year-old protagonist; and Fortunately, the Milk
(HarperCollins, Sept., ages 8–up), a children’s book with an adult protagonist
that is illustrated by Skottie Young.
While he praises Make Good Art as being an “amazing Chip Kidd–
designed” book, and describes Fortunately, the Milk as “easily the silliest
book I’ve ever written,” it’s Ocean at the End of the Lane—which lays down
on June 18—that he most wants to discuss. “It’s the adult novel of which I’m
most proud,” declares Gaiman, who’s already written five adult novels, as
well as more than a dozen novels for children and YA readers. Even people
who “think they don’t like Neil Gaiman books” who’ve read Ocean at the End
of the Lane “like it,” he says. It’s probably, he muses, “because I wrote it for
my wife.” According to Gaiman, he didn’t plan at the time to start work on
another novel: he started writing Ocean at the End of the Lane last year as a
short story while his wife, the lead singer and songwriter for the alternative
rock band Amanda Palmer and the Grand Theft Orchestra, was away for
four months, recording a studio album. “I missed her,” he recalls, “and it kept
going.” Describing Ocean as “grounded in reality” and “filled with feelings
and emotions and weird memories,” he says that it’s “almost a mainstream
novel, except for all the magic and the weirdness.” It also includes autobiographical elements. “It’s a book about what it was like to look out of my eyes
when I was seven years old.” It caught HarperCollins by surprise, he says,
laughing, when he submitted the manuscript to his editor last summer.
“They didn’t mind—I thought they would.” 
—Claire Kirch

the adult novel of which I am most
“ It’s
proud.

—Neil Gaiman

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Gennifer Albin
Weaver of Stories

Gennifer Albin explains that her inspiration
for Crewel, the first novel in her YA Crewel
World trilogy (2012), was sparked by the painting Embroidering the Earth’s Mantle by the
Spanish-Mexican surrealist artist Remedios
Varo. The author describes an “ethereal” scene
of half a dozen girls sitting in a tower sewing
cloth, which cascades out of the windows and
covers the world below them.
“They’re creating an entire world,” Albin
notes. “I was fascinated by this image, so I sat
down and started writing about a girl in a tower
who didn’t want to be there.” Farrar, Straus and
Giroux pitched Crewel, set in the dystopian
world of Arras, as “Mad Men meets The Handmaid’s Tale and Hunger Games.”
Against her parents’ wishes, 16-year-old Adelice is tapped to become a Spinster—one who works the looms for the all-powerful and mysterious Guild
that rules Arras—weaving the very fabric of life for its inhabitants: determining what people eat, where they live, how many children they will have, and
even when they will die. But there is a dark underside to being a Spinster,
which causes Adelice to rebel against the Guild and everything it stands for.
Altered—the sequel to Crewel, due in October from FSG—is “progressively
more science fictiony,” says Albin. The story picks up after Adelice has fled
Arras and is headed toward Earth with the two teenage boys she is torn
between. Albin wrote Altered to “explain how this world came to be,” she
says. “I thought it was important.”
The author, who holds a master’s degree in 18th-century women’s literature, says that the memories of her years in academia have had a significant
impact on her fiction writing, particularly in conceptualizing the Guild. “I’m
not very good with bureaucracy,” she explains, describing the Ph.D. program
she once was enrolled in as a negative experience of “going through ridicu-

© tessa elwood

26

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

Authors

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Sarah Dessen
Summertime Is the
BestTime

AT THE S H OW

Ah, summer. It’s Sarah Dessen’s favorite season. “I’m all about shrimp burgers, reading,
and going to the beach,” she says. Not surprisingly, summer is also the backdrop for several
of Dessen’s YA novels, including her latest, The
Moon and More, a June release for which
Viking plans a 500,000-copy first printing.
In the story, Emaline struggles with whether
to leave her small beach town for college or
stay close to home and all that’s familiar to her.
Her longtime, perfect boyfriend hopes she’ll
stick around, while a guy in town for the summer from New York encourages her to follow a bigger dream. Dessen says
that this time she was inspired to
write about “what it’s like to be permanent in a place that’s temporary
for a lot of people, and what it feels
like to not be on vacation in a vacation town.”
Real-life dilemmas like Emaline’s
are what Dessen’s fans—mostly
teen girls—repeatedly say they love
about her work. And it’s clear that
the author feels comfortable tackling that turf. “I love writing about
Simplicity
is the glory
the summer between high school
of expression.
and college,” says the author. “It’s
the last gasp of really being a teen. I
suppose that one of these days I
MFA in Creative Writing at Rosemont College MFA in Creative Writing at Rosemont College
should push forward and write
MFA in Creative Writing at Rosemont College
Suburban Philadelphia
Suburban Philadelphia
about college, but I keep coming
Suburban Philadelphia
back.”

lous channels” and “jumping through hoops” held by “people who knew
nothing about teaching.”
She notes that life on 22nd-century Arras isn’t all that different for teenagers from life on 21st-century Earth. “People are always telling teenagers
what to do and what they can’t do,” she points out. “That’s why they can relate
to dystopian literature: they live it every day.” If there’s one lesson Albin
hopes that teens will take away from her novels, it’s that “we dictate the
course of our lives, how we perceive reality, and the world about us.” Even
with all the restrictions placed on them, she says, teens still “can change the
world—they just have to go out and do it.”
Albin signs ARCs of Altered today, 11 a.m.–noon, at Table 11 in the
Autographing Area.
—Claire Kirch

© elenna loughlin

28

In a mood of faith and
hope my work goes on.
A ream of fresh
paper lies on
my desk
waiting for
the next
book. I am
a writer and
I take up my
pen to write.

f
ust be more t o l i
ere m
“Th

av
an h
e th

ing everything
.”

Come Write. ePublish.
poetry, creative nonfiction, short-story, novel,
dramatic writing, or writing for children and young adults

MFA in Creative Writing at Rosemont College
Suburban Philadelphia

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dramatic writing, or writing for children and young adults

Rosemont College offers
M.F.A. in Creative Writing
Graduate Certificate in ePublishing
M.A. in Publishing

love writing
“ Iabout
the
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summer between
high school and
college. It’s the
last gasp at really
being a teen.

—Sarah Dessen
Dessen has begun work on a new
novel, which she believes is good
therapy during the lag times in the
publishing process. However, she’s
keeping details about her developing project under wraps. “I’m
famously secretive about my work,”
she notes. “Nobody reads my books
till they’re finished.”
After BEA, she’ll be hitting the
road for a national tour to promote
the novel. And later in the summer,
she’ll meet up with family for a
Cape Cod vacation. “The book
release and tour are wonderful, but
I’m really looking forward to not
being so busy,” she says. “I want to
get back to cutting the crust off peanut butter and jelly sandwiches,
going to the park with my kid, and
getting to the beach. My summer
will be made if I see people reading
my book on the beach.”
Dessen signs finished copies of
The Moon and More today, 10–11
a.m., at Table 5 in the Autographing
Area. 
—Shannon Maughan

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

29

Chris Matthews

Kris Miller

You can hear longing for the old days when
MSNBC Hardball anchor Chris Matthews talks
about his latest book, Tip and the Gipper: When
Politics Worked (Simon & Schuster, Nov.). A top
aide to Speaker of the House Representative
Tip O’Neill for six years, Matthews was an eyewitness to the contradictory relationship
between his boss and President Ronald Reagan. He explains why he was inspired to write
this book now. “I wanted to write about two men
who were completely convinced of their opposing political philosophies who could find ways
[to] make the system work, consistent with the
fact that they didn’t agree. The book shows how
two leading political figures avoided the kind of
mess we’re in now where people
don’t talk to each other and can’t
find common ground.”
Even though their rivalry was legendary, O’Neill and Reagan were
also good friends. Matthews shares
a personal story. “They had a civility
about them where they would make
a point of letting everybody know
they got along. Reagan told me that
himself when I met him for the first
time. He came to give the State of
the Union address and the holding
room for that is the Speakers
Ceremonial Office, right off the
House floor. I went into the room
where the president was drinking
his hot tea getting ready to give the
speech. I said, ‘Welcome to the
room where we plot against you,’
and Reagan said, ‘Oh, no, not after
six—the Speaker says we’re friends
after six.’ ”
The busy newsman, who hosts
Hardball five nights a week and has
a weekend news show on NBC,
shares his writing advice with Show
Daily. “I have a four-step way to
write, and I’m not going to brag
about it, but it works for me. First
you collect—you just dig and dig
and knock out the wall—news clips,
transcripts, everything. Among
other things, I read Tip O’Neill and
the Democratic Century by John A.
Farrell and President Reagan: The
Triumph of Imagination by Richard
Reeves. Second, you organize large
sections, basically chronologically,
but I call them ‘strategic hamlets.’
You get an event like January 28,
1986, which is the morning Tip and
Reagan had a big row over the budget and joblessness, and that afternoon Reagan gave the speech of his
life about the Challenger. So I
focused on that day. Third, you organize within the section. And then
you rough it out. You get to the word
processor and you move it. I keep
saying to myself, speed the plow,
don’t let this thing stop, keep it moving—even late into the night. And
fourth, you go back over everything
you’ve written and clean it up. You
don’t sit there trying to figure out
your first sentence for two weeks.”
Matthews is master of ceremonies at this morning’s Book &
Author Breakfast.  —Hilary S. Kayle

There are things about money that Kris Miller
wants you to know. She put it into her book
Ready for PREtirement: 3 Secrets for Safe
Money and a Fabulous Future (Morgan James
Publishing, 2012), explains it on her Web site
(krismillermoneymaestro.com) and happily
expounds on it when asked. Her main concern
is letting people know how they can invest their
assets smartly and protect them wisely—from long-term care and catastrophic illness expenses, from probate and from the recession.
Miller, who is 58, lives in Hemet, Calif., and is nowhere near retirement
herself, spent 22 years as an estate planning specialist and a legal document
assistant—“a paralegal, but in California, there is a special designation, so
it’s like an attorney”—and, through volunteer work at a senior center, saw
how old people were being taken advantage of. “When I learned about living

The Clash of PoliticalTitans

© msnbc

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publishers@copyright.com

30

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Authors

Meet best-selling author

AT THE SH OW

ELINOR LIPMAN

trusts, I did some research and pulled some wills. I started drilling down and
saw all the fees and extra charges when estates were going through probate.
Probate wasn’t even necessary. I saw that the average middle-class person
could create their own living trust. That’s how I started.”
Nowadays she lectures almost exclusively on the benefits of living trusts to
people thinking of retiring and tries to get younger people to listen. “There
may not be any Social Security in the future. Younger people have to be proactive, instead of just giving it to someone else to do. It’s never too late. You
just don’t get as good planning if you start late.”
The money path came rather late to Miller, who was a missionary for 20
years, traveling all over North and South America to spread the word of
Christ. “I came into the financial world from another point of view,” she says.
“I really had the sense of wanting to help people.” At one point she started
writing songs and heard God tell her to go make a record. “This was not
something I knew how to do,” she says. “It was insane. But I had a group of
seven sisters and we sang together, and we knocked on doors in Hollywood
and got a record deal.”
Singing and songwriting is still one of Miller’s favorite things, including
taking chapters from other people’s books and turning them into songs,
something she has yet to do for her own book.
Today, Miller autographs Ready for PREtirement, 1–2 p.m., at Table 4 in the
Autographing Area. 
—Suzanne Mantell

as she signs copies of

The View from Penthouse B
and

I Can’t Complain

Jim Gaffigan

“Reading Elinor Lipman is like sitting
down over coffee with your favorite
friend, and fans now have the pleasure of
enjoying two books from this delightful
writer: a comic novel and a collection of
short essays that are reliably smart and
witty...It’s all wonderful fun.”
—Washington Post

Š

Today from 12 – 2 PM
HMH booth 1657

www.hmhco.com

Lipman.indd 1

Jim Gaffigan has a wildly successful career as a standup comic, more than a
million Twitter followers, and his just released first book, Dad Is Fat (Crown),
offers his take on everything from cousins (“celebrities for little kids”) to
growing up in a big family (“I always assumed my father had six children so
he could have a sufficient lawn crew”) and changing diapers in the middle of
the night (“like The Hurt Locker, but much more dangerous”).
Being a father was never on Gaffigan’s to-do list. Happy with the nomadic,
nocturnal life of a standup comedian, Gaffigan always imagined his future as
“that weird uncle who lives in an apartment by himself in New York and
everyone in the family speculates about.” But all that changed when he married “someone who gets pregnant looking at babies.” His wife, Jeannie, is
now his partner not only in parenthood but comedy. “We write everything
together. Not only can she fill in the holes in my knowledge of grammar, she’s
really funny.”
Gaffigan and his family live in a two-bedroom fifth-floor walkup in
Manhattan—a story in itself. “We don’t plan to stay forever. But it’s hard to
move with kids, and you don’t want to move when
someone’s pregnant, and my wife’s been pregnant
for about eight years.”
With five kids, it’s not surprising Gaffigan has
what he calls “an unnecessary knowledge of good
children’s books—I’ve read way too many Fancy
Nancy and Angelina Ballerina books. You’re always
so excited when a kid’s engaged by a story, but
once you’ve read something a thousand
times... I can now recite Good Night Moon
from memory. I used to read a book a
week, but at this point I’m just thrilled
to get through an episode of Damages
on Netflix.”
When it came to writing his own
book, Gaffigan was “terrified I would
hate the process of writing—I’d
heard stories about people who
found it so hard they wanted to give
their advance back. But I really
enjoyed it. There was a sense of
accomplishment in completing it
and doing it for the right reasons.
And the fear of doing a bad book
was really motivating for me.”
Today at noon, Gaffigan is doing a
q&a and signing copies of Dad Is Fat
at the Downtown Stage. 

—Lucinda Dyer

5/16/13 3:23 PM

© nigel parry

Writing While Standing

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Peter Lerangis

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

31

MEET THE AUTHORS
OF THE BOOK EVERYONE
WILL BE TALKING ABOUT

Enjoys His Craft and Fans

© elenna loughlin

Peter Lerangis may be a bestselling author with more than 160 books under
his belt, but he’s still ecstatic about being a writer, especially one for children. “I can’t contain how enthusiastic I am about working on books for
kids,” he says. Lerangis, who contributed to Scholastic’s 39 Clues series, particularly loves making history come alive for
young readers. “With the 39 Clues, we were
making history jump out of the page for the
readers, so they don’t know they’re learning,”
he says. “The kids can’t put the books down—
it’s so exciting.”
His fans are just as enthusiastic about reading his books as Lerangis is about writing them.
Case in point: on his way to a school in San
Diego, he got a call from the school telling him
to drive around for a bit and go to the lower
parking lot. When he complied, he got quite a
surprise. “As the car drove in, the lot was completely lined with screaming
kids,” he recalls. “I didn’t know that kind of reception was possible. Some
teachers make it like you’re a rock star.”
It’s not only in person that the author connects with fans. “When I set up my
Web site, I made a guestbook so kids can write to me there, and that’s
become one of the most popular parts of the site,” he says. “I love hearing
from them, because it’s not because a teacher told them they have to write a
letter to an author and it has to be a certain length. It’s just kids who love
your books, and kids who want to be writers.”
The New York City resident is at BEA promoting Lost in Babylon, the second book in the Seven Wonders series (HarperCollins, Oct.). Among book
conferences, BEA is special for Lerangis because it’s home. “Since I know
where things are, I like being the big brother who knows stuff,” he says. “I like
helping other writers who don’t know what to do or where to go in New York.”
Lerangis signs galleys of Lost in Babylon today, 11 a.m.–noon, at Table 9 in
the Autographing Area. 
—Joy Bean

© Olaf Hajek

© Luís Alves

© Roberto Parada

© Roberto Parada

© Roberto Parada

© Luís Alves

LEGENDS

John Lewis

ICONS&

A Graphic March

REBELS
© eric etheridge crop. 1800

A longtime congressman and legendary civil rights veteran, John Lewis is at
this morning’s Book and Author
Breakfast to talk about his new graphic
autobiography March, the first of a
three-volume work to be published by
Top Shelf in August.
Lewis notes the book was originally
planned to be a single volume, but after
“we tried cutting it here and there,
there was just so much to tell. We decided to do three volumes so we could
tell the whole story.” The “we” includes Andrew Aydin, a member of Lewis’s
staff who co-wrote March, and award-winning cartoonist Nate Powell, who
did the illustrations.
Lewis hopes the book will serve as reminder of how far African-Americans
and the country as a whole have come from the days of racist segregation.
And the book will also document the contributions of civil rights veterans
who may not be as well-known today. “This book is not just my story, it’s the
story of what I witnessed with a lot of people who may not be known to this
generation. For instance, a lot of people think Martin Luther King was the
only person to speak at the 1963 March on Washington.”
Although Lewis is enthusiastic about producing the graphic autobiography, he acknowledges he was skeptical at first. “Andrew had the idea and I
said, ‘maybe,’ but he kept asking me about it, so I finally said let’s do it.” But
Lewis is also quick to note that he was inspired by a comic book many years
ago. Lewis said he first read Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story,
a much acclaimed 1956 comic book from the period that was commissioned
by the pacifist organization Fellowship of Reconciliation with permission
from Martin Luther King, that outlined King’s nonviolent philosophy and
its application to the boycott to protest the segregated bus system in Montgomery, Ala.
“I read the Montgomery Story,” Lewis said, “and it was moving. I followed
the drawings, and it made it all real and explained the philosophy of nonviolence. I talk to thousands of kids every year, and I think the graphic novel I’m
doing can be used to get that message out to people.”
Top Shelf is bringing a 24-page booklet excerpt of March to distribute to all
Breakfast attendees. Lewis and Aydin will sign them at the publisher’s booth
(1005), 1–3 p.m.
—Calvin Reid

© Dan Brown

© Yuriy Shevchuk

MUSIC THAT CHANGED THE WORLD

© Luís Alves

© Yuriy Shevchuk

SATURDAY, JUNE 1
ROBBIE ROBERTSON and
SEBASTIAN ROBERTSON
10:30 AM DOWNTOWN STAGE
BEA FLOOR

11:30 AM BOOTH #2856
TUNDRA BOOKS

TUNDRABOOKS.COM

32

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

AUTHORS
AT THE S H OW

Randi
Zuckerberg

© DELBARR

When Randi Zuckerberg decided to become a
writer, she didn’t shy away from the challenge.
She signed to do not one but two books with
Harper Collins—Dot, a picture book for children with illustrations by Joe Berger, and Dot
Complicated, a nonfiction book for adults.
Both are set for a November 5 release.
“It’s like I decided to run a marathon before I
ran my first 10k,” Zuckerberg says. She didn’t
plan on being a debut author twice over, at
least not at first.
“After I left Facebook, I did a lot of public speaking,” Zuckerberg notes.
“What really fascinated me was how people would ask me personal questions about how technology was affecting their lives. Why won’t their kids
friend them on Facebook? How do you get your husband to stop texting at
the table? It made me realize there isn’t a Dear Abby for how technology is
changing every aspect of our lives.”
Many of the questions people asked Zuckerberg were really about the
role of technology in their kids’ lives. “Parents are wondering how much
screen time they should give their children and how to monitor it,” she says.
“They want to know when to give them an iPad and an iPhone. I realized it

MORADI

Social Media World’s
Dear Abby

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

was a topic not only relevant to kids, but it should be the topic of a book for
kids, too.”
Zuckerberg’s picture book tells the story of Dot, a little girl learning how
to divide her time between technology and the exciting world outside her
house.
She compared writing her picture book to composing a tweet. “You have
to be able to say a lot in very few words. It’s kind of like Twitter, where you
only have 140 characters. The children’s
book forced me to be really disciplined.
My hope is that people will give it as a gift
to their kids for graduations, kind of like
they give Oh, the Places You’ll Go.”
On the promotion front, Zuckerberg
plans to capitalize on her extensive social
media connections, Facebook included.
She is well connected there; former marketing director (she left August 2011) and
sister of Mark Zuckerberg, cofounder
and CEO. She has a companion Web site
for her books called invites.dotcomplicated.co that is up and running, but she’s doing plenty of television and
magazine interviews, too—Zuckerberg arrived Thursday at BEA fresh off an
appearance on the Today Show. Covers for both books are featured at the
Harper booth (2038) as well as postcard giveaways.
As for what’s next? “If you had asked me a year ago, I never thought I’d be
a children’s book author,” Zuckerberg says. “But I want to keep bringing Dot
to life. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that I can do another one. Dot could
get her first cellphone, for example. There are so many lessons Dot could
—Donna Freitas
teach kids about technology.”

Parents are wondering how much screen
“ time
they should give their children and
how to monitor it.

—Randi Zuckerberg

o
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ist

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e
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us
Dr. Susan Brandenburg

Booth C781
Javits Center
May 30 - June 1, all day

ffatbook.com
www.bookexpoamerica.com

ffptbook.com

PUBL I SHERS

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Liaden Universe Turns Silver
Writing and life partners
Sharon Lee and Steve
Miller, who have written
21 novels in 25 years and
whose science fiction
books have sold 250,000
print copies, will have a
Meet and Greet as well
as an autographing at
BEA as they celebrate
the 25th anniversary of
their Liaden Universe
series.
The popular series began in 1988
with the authors’ first book, published by Del Rey. When the Del Rey
contract expired, Lee and Miller
took a break from publishing for
several years. As e-book technology
developed, the authors began
releasing their books exclusively in
a digital format. Miller and Lee
found a home at Baen Books six
years ago and have been published
in simultaneous paper250 and digital editions since then. “The series
goes from strength to strength,” says
Baen publisher Toni Weisskopf.
There are currently 16 titles in the
Liaden Universe series. The latest,
Necessity’s Child, was published in
February.

The couple believe the
reason for their books’
success is that the stories mix comedy of
errors, action adventure, and romance with
psychic power, among
other elements of fantasy. “We were among
the first to deliberately
incorporate love and
romance into a ‘goshwow!’ adventure story,”
Lee says, “and to insist that human
beings, no matter how strange their
cultures, would still want connection, relationships, and family.”
Their fans include both romance
and science fiction readers, and
those fans are clearly devoted to
Miller and Lee. In 2007 the authors
created an early version of the
crowdsourcing campaign model
when fans were asked to contribute
to a book Miller and Lee were writing live on the Web. “A chapter
would post every Monday by noon,”
says Lee, “if the chapter earned $300
in pre-publication donations.” That
book, Fledgling, was eventually finished, and donations for the project
exceeded $50,000.

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

“We consistently get great sellthroughs on Sharon and Steve’s
books because of their rabid fan
base in both print and e-books,”
says Corinda Carfora, who heads
sales and marketing at Baen Books.
“Their e-book sales are particularly
strong due to their longtime presence online.”
Miller and Lee have won several
literary awards, including the Hal

33

Clement Award for Best YA Science
Fiction; the Prism Award–Futuristic
from the Romance Writers of
America; and the Skylark Award,
given by the Science Fiction and
Fantasy Writers of America.
Today, from 11 a.m.-noon, Miller
and Lee are autographing copies of
Necessity’s Child at Table 10 in the
Autographing Area.
—Wendy Werris

Focus on Battle of Gettysburg
In honor of this summer’s 150th
anniversary of the Battle of
Gettysburg, Stackpole Books (booth
2149) will highlight three of its newest Gettysburg titles. Stackpole has
published books on Civil War and
military history for more than 75
years, and has more than 50 Civil
War titles on its backlist.
The three new books include
Guide to Gettysburg Battlefield
Monuments by Tom Huntington.
Pubbed in May, the guide (and companion smartphone app) features
35 maps, GPS coordinates, and photos of the location and details of
more than 800 monuments and tablets on the Gettysburg battlefield.
The second featured title is
Gettysburg: The Story of the Battle
in Maps by the editors of Stackpole

Books, M. David Detweiler and
Dave Reisch. Detweiler, who conceived the book idea, is also
Stackpole’s president and the
grandson of Gen. Edward J. (E.J.)
Stackpole, the company’s founder.
In 1956, he wrote the book They Met
At Gettysburg,
which is still in
print, selling
thousands per
year.
The third book,
150 Things to
Know: The Battle
of Gettysburg by
Sandy Allison
(June), is an introduction to the Gettysburg campaign
that relates 150 fascinating facts
—Diane Patrick
about the battle.

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wanted to know about
self-publishing but didn’t
know who to ask

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34

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

No Spitting Here—Maybe
There will most likely be no actual
spitting, but since City Lights’ new
imprint, Sister Spit, is a spinoff from
the eponymous literary roadshow,
which has been showcasing the writing and artwork of “irreverent, flagrantly queer, hilariously feminist,
tough-talking, genre-busting ruffians” since the early 1990s, editor/
curator/author Michelle Tea does
not make any promises. She does
promise that those who drop by the
City Lights booth (1103) today, 2–3 p.m.,
will meet one of her first authors,
Beth Lisick, who is signing a sampler
of her personal essays to be published in Yokohama Threeway: And

Other Small Shames in October. Ali
Liebegott signed her newly released
novel Cha-Ching on Thursday.
Tea is the acquiring editor for the
imprint, which produced its first
book, Sister Spit: Writing, Rants and
Reminiscence from the Road, last
fall. “It will be 20 years for Sister Spit
next year and there has never been
an anthology before,” says Tea. City
Lights thought it would be a good
way to launch the imprint, which
will publish two or three books a
year, both original work and
reprints like Liebegott’s The
Beautifully Worthless, which won a
Lambda Award in 2006. Tea says she

was not sure why she
and cofounder poet
and filmmaker Sini
Anderson called
their San Francisco
open mic series
Sister Spit, but over
the years it has
evolved as a not-onlyfor-the-girls event
Michelle Tea
that remains as provocative and risk-taking as it was in
the ’90s.
City Lights publisher Elaine
Katzenberger says she never really
gave the name Sister Spit much
thought. Tea has had a long relationship with City Lights as an author (A
Mermaid in Chelsea Creek) and lit-

nothing is as powerful as a

Wish

Meet the Author Duo behind
the magical new series, Faerieground

BETH BRACKEN
and KAY FRASER
Saturday
9:30–10:30am
Booth #C975

ONEWORLD | WWW.ONEWORLD-PUBLICATIONS.COM
Find us at BEA booth #1233

What do you buy the children of the
terrorist who tried to kill your wife?
David Harris-Gershon seeks out the
Hamas bomber who forever changed
his family’s life in an unflinching,
mesmerizing literary debut

10 September 2013 | 9781851689965 | $17.95

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

erary event tour
organizer in San
Francisco, and
Katzenberger says
the press was very
eager to bring Tea
and her Sister Spit
imprint on board. “I
thought it was a great
idea because of who
Michelle is, and the
literary landscape of San Francisco,
and our dedication to marginalized
audiences,” says Katzenberger.
—Bridget Kinsella

Publerati Unveils
E-Book Lineup
When Publerati’s founder, Caleb
Mason, recently returned to book
publishing after a 25-year break, he
was greeted by an industry nearly
unrecognizable from the one he left
after being managing editor at
Little, Brown, when e-books didn’t
exist and reading digitally was a science fiction fantasy.
Mason went on to forge a career
in the photography industry just as
it was beginning to leave film processing for digital cameras. This
mirrored what later happened in
the book business. Because Mason
learned the digital technology of
photography, he felt comfortable
making the transition to publishing
quality fiction e-books. “I wasn’t
sure where to begin finding authors,
though,” he says,
“so I tried posting
on the Amazon
Book Awards
forum page. I said
that I was looking
for quirky, quality
fiction. A few writers contacted me,
and then word of mouth started
moving things along quickly.”
Four of the seven fall 2013 titles
Publerati is releasing are by novelists who teach creative writing at
universities, including Ellen
Cooney (Thanksgiving, Sept.), most
recently writer in residence at MIT.
Other novels include Michael
Fargo’s Epistle by Daniel Westover
(Oct.), and John Flynn’s Dreaming
Rodin (Sept.). Each title will be
available in all popular e-book formats, including Kobo.
Publerati (www.publerati.com)
focuses not only on literary fiction
but also on Mason’s belief in sharing
e-books in a socially responsible
way. To that end, he has partnered
with the nonprofit organization
Worldreader (www.worldreader
.org) to donate each title and a portion of every sale to less fortunate
readers in developing nations. “I’m
aware of the power of expanding literacy using e-books and e-readers
provided by sharing of funds,”
Mason says. “One person pays,
another person gains access.”
—Wendy Werris

www.bookexpoamerica.com

Meet Author

JZ Bingham
All Day Book Signing | Booth #1049

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Visit, Tex t, Call or Em ail us at the show info@balcony7.com | 805-975-9 199 | Bo oth #1049

36

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Abingdon’s Many Categories
Abingdon Press (1064) is providing BEA attendees with a good look at its
newest products and using the event to learn a few things. “Discoverability is
changing so much,” says Sonua Bohannon, senior marketing manager. “It’s
great to hear from retailers how they’re reaching audiences, and to learn how we can help them.”
The Christian publisher is enthusiastic about its new
book, Moving Miss Peggy: A Story of Dementia, Courage
and Consolation by Robert Benson, an intimate look at
the journey of helping aging parents and what dementia means for a family. Benson has published nine works
on the contemplative life including Living Prayer (1999),
Between the Dreaming and the Coming True: The Road
Home to God (2001), and Digging In: Tending to Life in
Your Own Backyard (2007).
Other featured products include The CEB Study
Bible, which releases in October and is the first study edition of the proprietary Common English Bible translation, launched in 2010. Abingdon will give
away a sampler containing the biblical book of Mark, complete with introduction, notes, maps, images, and sidebar articles, as well as excerpts from
the Old Testament books of Leviticus and Exodus. “The CEB Study Bible is a
readable, reliable, and relevant invitation to grow in God,” says Bohannon.
Another Bible resource, Consider the Birds: A Provocative Guide to Birds of
the Bible by Debbie Blue, will be available as an ARC. Blue is founding pastor
of House of Mercy in St. Paul, Minn., once named “the Best Church for NonChurch Goers.” Says Bohannon, “Debbie is a Bible scholar, and her scholarship and writing are interesting and provocative.”
Fiction lovers will not go away empty-handed either. ARCs of A Marriage
Made in Middlebury by Anita Higman (Nov.) and The Soul of the Rose by Ruth
Trippy (Oct.) and finished copies of The Threads of Hope by Christa Allen, the
latest in the Quilts of Love Series, will also be given away while supplies last.
Finally, those seeking inspiration to face life’s challenges can snap up an
ARC of Five Stones: Conquering Your Giants (Aug.) by pastor/author Shane
Stanford and business and former state legislator R. Brad Martin.
“Abingdon is a Christian publisher, so we have a lot of time to engage with
Christian retailers. But some of our books stand out as perfect for a broader
audience, and we engage with librarians and ABA booksellers whenever we
can,” says Bohannon. “We’ve been attending BEA for more than 30 years. The
—Ann Byle
biggest benefit is a chance to do that.”

Unfolding in New Directions

Origami holds sway as the premiere craft line at Tuttle Publishing, but the
Vermont-based (and Japan-founded) house is spinning its list out in new
directions, with such titles as Happy Homemade: Sew Chic and Happy
Homemade: Sew Chic Kids (both in English for the first time) and Itty Bitty
Crocheted Critters. The crochet book is based on amigurumi, the Japanese
art of knitting or crocheting small stuffed animals and anthropomorphic
creatures. “We’re bringing the latest Asian trends and aesthetics to a
Western audience,” says sales and marketing director Christopher Johns,
happy to be pitching toward the sew-your-own crowd.
Johns notes a couple of other new directions for the house, including an
expansion of its YA and kids lines. Continuing a project rolled out last year
at BEA is the second installment of Benjamin Martin’s shape-shifting YA
novel, Revenge of the Arkuma Clan (the first in the series, Samurai
Awakening, was the first YA book from the house). Also coming is Jet Black
and the Ninja Wind, the initial book in a projected trilogy by poet Leza
Lowitz. “Jet Black is the last living female ninja—and the first teenage ninja
protagonist in a YA novel,” notes Johns.
Also in the kids line is My Awesome Japan Adventure, a story about a fifthgrader’s trip to Japan as an exchange student. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid goes to
Japan is the fun premise behind the book,” says Johns.
Tuttle (booth 2051) invites everyone to stop by at 2 p.m. for dessert treats
based on recipes from its cookbook line, including Thai-spiced cashews and
Thai basil lemon soda from Katie Chin’s Everyday
Thai Cooking and chocolate truffles and mocha truffles from Kelly Bronzyna’s The Paleo Chocolate
Lovers Cookbook. Also at
the booth: an origami display of selected extraordinary projects, ARCs of
the new YA books (while
supplies last) and “our
famous” (to quote Johns)
tote bags.
—Suzanne Mantell
www.bookexpoamerica.com

DAY_3_AD_Layout 1 5/23/13 7:02 PM Page 1

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38

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Brandon Stanton, a Brooklyn-based
photographer, is one of the most popular Web
photographers in the world, that accolade based
on the fact that his Web site, Humans of New
York, has more than one million unique visitors.
His work has earned praise from print media,
including Vogue, the New York Times, and the
Wall Street Journal, among others. St. Martin’s
Press is publishing a collection of his works this
October. At BEA, he took some candid shots of
booksellers pictured here.

© BRANDON STANTON

Brandon on
Booksellers

Music Legends for the Young
The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Joni
Mitchell, Chuck Berry, James
Brown are artists whose innovations changed the landscape of
music for generations to come. But
these names may rate only a blank
stare from anyone under the age of
13. Robbie Robertson, Grammy
Lifetime Achievement Award winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Inductee; his son, Sebastian; and
music managers Jim Guerinot and

Jared Levine intend to remedy
this lack of cultural knowledge.
Their Legends, Icons & Rebels:
Music That Changed the World
(Tundra Books, Oct.) is geared to
young readers and profiles 27 of
the music world’s most influential
artists.
The genesis for the book, says
editorial director Tara Walker, was
“Robbie’s son, Sebastian’s observation from working with children

that kids respond much more
strongly to really good songs performed by exceptional artists than
to typical children’s music. As
Robbie tells it, if you lay a little
Marvin Gaye or the Beatles on kids,
they light up.”
Compiled like a kid-friendly
playlist, the Legends lineup features
originators, rebels, and risk-takers
across diverse musical genres and
provides short profiles and littleknown facts about each musician
and their respective musical era.
It’s filled with full-color illustra-

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BEA_Culture.indd 1

13-05-10 2:20 PM

tions—many by illustrators whose
work has been featured in Rolling
Stone—and includes two CDs of
original songs by the musicians featured in the book.
And while its target audience
may be young readers, Legends
doesn’t dodge the difficulties these
recording artists faced and the
very human foibles that sometimes
led to their tragic end. “Robbie,
Jim, Sebastian, and Jared have an
incredible passion and reverence
for music,” says Walker. “Their
intent with Legends, Icons & Rebels

PUBL I SHERS

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

Getting Behind the Common Core

is to share that passion and their
musical discoveries with kids, and
introduce them to some of the
greatest musicians of all time. The
powerful and moving stories
behind these musicians and the
stunning artwork and design make
this a truly universal book that will
speak to all ages—kids, parents
and grandparents.”
Today, at the Downtown Stage at
10:30 a.m., Robbie and Sebastian
Robertson will participate in an
onstage interview with music journalist Alan Light. Immediately following there will be a poster signing at the Tundra Books/Random
House of Canada booth (2856).
—Lucinda Dyer

At a Friday morning panel titled
“Common Core: Insights from
Industry Touchpoints,” Melissa
Jacobs-Israel, library services coordinator for the New York City
Department of Education, created a
mantra for those questioning the
goals of the Common Core educational standards about to roll out
across the country: “We’re teaching
kids to think.” The Common Core is
moving beyond “the cut-and-paste”
methods of previous generations,
she stressed, placing a focus on
reading, building and applying analytical skills, and creating the kind
of “reading stamina” that will be
required of students by the time
they reach college. That, she said,
was an exciting opportunity.
And while she touted the opportunities for publishers, booksellers,
and librarians as the standards
emphasize more trade books in
classrooms, she also stressed what
was not needed. “We don’t need
golden stickers on books,” she said,
denoting “Common Core” worthiness. Publishers also don’t need to
reissue their entire nonfiction back-

list based on the much discussed
“Appendix B.” What is needed, she
said, is greater communication
between educators, librarians,
booksellers, and publishers, as well
as from “professional review
sources,” who should go beyond
simply describing a book’s content
and whether it is “age-appropriate.”
In addition to Jacobs-Israel, the
well-attended, 80-minute panel,
moderated by Turtleback Books’
Richard Buthod, represented a wide
range of interests—including booksellers Becky Anderson, outgoing
ABA president, and co-owner of
Anderson’s Bookshops (Naperville,
Ill.), and Kenny Brechner, owner of
DDG Booksellers (Farmington,
Maine); distributor Cheryl Dickemper
from the Booksource; and publishers Phoebe Yeh (HarperCollins) and
Victoria Stapleton (Little, Brown).
Each perspective agreed the Common
Core represents an uncommon
opportunity, but needs support, participation, and information if, as
Brechner noted, this initiative is to
escape the tradition of failure that
plagues educational initiatives.

39

“The Common Core is not perfect,”
Brechner observed, but it gives educators “plenty to work with,” and its
focus on reading is important. What
it requires most of local booksellers
is for booksellers “to do what booksellers do best: filter.”
Anderson agreed that the
Common Core represents a great
opportunity and urged local booksellers to engage their communities
with teacher talks and other events
to let teachers and administrators
“pick your brain.” But she asked the
audience, what often happens after
booksellers share their expertise?
“They buy the books from Amazon!”
responded an audience member.
Anderson urged booksellers to
keep in mind polite ways to ensure
that sales stay with the bookseller.
Both Yeh and Stapleton discussed
publisher efforts to evaluate their
books, create new titles and promotional offerings, and to get more
books into classrooms. “We should
see this as an opportunity to
embrace constructiveness in education,” Stapleton concluded, “and
not freak about jargon or numbers.
We should help get kids excited
about reading.”
—Andrew Richard Albanese

Discover

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Books!
Booth 1584

Author Carol Roth signing
Little Bunny’s Sleepless Night
in the autographing area 11:30 on Friday, 5/31.
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Portfolio reviews with our editor
2pm on 5/31 and 6/1.

www.tughrabooks.com

40

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Children’s Big Books continued from page 5

OTHER PRESS
booth # 2839

ELIZABETH COHEN

GABI GLEICHMANN

JAMES ROBERTSON

MERETHE LINDSTRØM

Patterson is launching his third
middle-grade series in September
with Treasure Hunters. “Middlegrade is [Patterson’s] sweet spot,”
said Little, Brown’s Melanie Chang.
“He’s found an incredible readership that loves his stories.”
Patterson will be in good company this fall with
the eighth Diary of a
Wimpy Kid book,
due in November, as
well as new titles
from Rick Riordan,
Lemony Snicket,
and Tom
Angleberger. Susan
Cooper returns with
Ghost Hawk in
August; “it’s the best
thing she’s written
since The Dark Is
Rising,” said S&S BFYR
publisher Justin
Chanda.
A few celebrity picture books attracted
attention, as they tend
to do. Julianne Moore
was signing copies of
My Mommy Is a
Foreigner, But Not to Me
(Aug.), illustrated by
Meilo So (Chronicle). Meanwhile,
actor Jim Carrey has just signed
with Perseus Distribution for a selfpublished picture book called How
Roland Rolls, illustrated by Rob
Nason; his new company, Some
Kind of Garden, will release the
book on September 23.
Suzanne Collins’s Year of the
Jungle, illustrated by James Proimos,
was perhaps the most prominent
picture book at the Scholastic
booth, while Little, Brown was looking forward to The Tortoise & the
Hare, another “nearly wordless”
story from Caldecott Medalist Jerry
Pinkney, as well as Peter Brown’s
Mr. Tiger Goes Wild. The Click,
Clack, Moo franchise takes a
spooky turn with a Halloween picture book: Click, Clack, Boo!: A
Tricky Treat by Doreen Cronin, illus.
by Betsy Lewin (Atheneum). And
David Wiesner’s Mr. Wuffles
(Clarion) attracted a lot of attention;
“People were saying, ‘This is vintage
Wiesner,’ ” said HMH’s Karen Walsh.
Picture book talk at Disney
begins with two letters: “M-O” as in

Willems, at BEA to promote the 10th
anniversary edition of Don’t Let the
Pigeon Drive the Bus, as well as the
19th and 20th Elephant & Piggie
books. Big draws at Penguin
included The Day the Crayons Quit
by Drew Dawalt; illustrator Oliver
Jeffers was on hand for a ticketed
signing. Another
crowd gathered for
John Bemelmans
Marciano, who
signed Madeline
and the Old House
in Paris for two
hours. In August,
Groundwood Books
will release Read Me
a Story, Stella, MaryLouise Gay’s first new
Stella title in four years;
sales of the books have
topped two million
internationally.
American Girl unveiled
Bitty Baby, a new series
for the company’s
youngest readers yet
(3+), written by Newbery
Honor author Kirby
Larson and illustrated
by Sue Cornelison.
In nonfiction, notable
titles included Tundra’s Legends,
Icons, & Rebels: Music That
Changed the World by Robbie
Robertson (of the rock group The
Band) et al.; the late Leon Leyson’s
memoir about surviving the
Holocaust as a boy, The Boy on the
Wooden Box (S&S/Atheneum); and
“The President Has Been Shot!” by
James L. Swanson (Scholastic),
timed to the 50th anniversary of the
Kennedy assassination. All three
books are aimed at middle-grade
readers.
Macmillan’s Molly Brouillette
said Bedtime Math, which encouraged families to treat math problems as bedtime stories, was a big
hit. Of author Laura Overdeck, she
said, “She was here for two and a
half hours answering questions—
she actually taught one lady long
division.”
For more big books and children’s
news from BEA, be sure to read
next week’s editions of Children’s
Bookshelf.
—John A. Sellers,
Diane Roback, Carolyn Juris, and
Matia Burnett

SAM TOPEROFF

OTHERPRESS.COM
twitter.com/otherpress • facebook.com/otherpress

www.bookexpoamerica.com

Sex crimes prosecutor Alexandra Cooper has only
become tougher with age. Now in her 15th
bestseller, author Linda Fairstein’s fictional
doppelgänger and long-running heroine has gotten
her hands dirty working in many of New York City’s
most intriguing locales—gourmet restaurants,
churches, specialty bookstores. Fairstein’s 15th
Cooper installment, Death Watch (Dutton, July),
introduces “Coop” to the vast inner workings of Central Park. When a body
is found near a mysterious statuette, Coop proves a fierce tour guide as she
collects the tenuous clues to find the culprit—digging through the Park’s
diverse history and strange landscape to piece it all together. Intricate
descriptions and snapshot histories of many historic park locations provide
off-the-beaten-track aspects of the New York landmark. Having overseen
high-profile Central Park cases during her former career in the Manhattan
DA’s office, the author offers sleuthing skill par excellence. —Seth Satterlee

© peter simon

Cooped in Central Park

42

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 3

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 , 2013

Offical BEA On-Site Addendum
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4D Cityscape
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ABOUT LIBRIFY
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The African American
Guide to Divorce and
Drama
283
Alfred Music
907
Angel Farms Cleansing &
Rejuvenation Center
W472
APG Sales & Distribution 1646
Art Union Author’s
Manuscript books
1511
AST
1511
Big & Small Publishing
C1082
Bindworx
DZ1779C
Bookmark Remainders
Ltd.
276
Booksicals and The Coffee
Bean & Tea Leaf
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Boris Yeltsin Presidential
Center
1511
Bowker
DZ2063
Breathing Silent Soldiers 386
The Business of Me:
Your Job..
Your Career..Your Value 378
Chidopi Co., Ltd.
DZ1771C
De Marque Inc.
DZ2071B
Debut Prize Foundation 1511
Department of media and
advertising of the city
of Moscow
1511
Eksmo
1511
Elwin Street Productions RC16
Europe Publishing House 1511
Extension of Life
W467
Firebrand/Netgalley
DZ1774
Ffat: food for adolescent
thought
C781
Flipick
DZ1979B
Gaydar Institute Press
1511
General Egyptian Book
Organization
810
Glas New Russian Writing 1511
Glasshouse Balloon
Company, Inc.
2951
Gutenberg Technology
DZ2268
Hannecke Display
Systems
1349
Hellenic Federation of
Publishers and
Booksellers
1565A
Hurix Systems Private
Limited
DZ2079B
Independent Book
Publishers Assn
2259
The Inner Healing Center 281
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Translation
1511
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Publications
648
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Agency
RC28
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for International Book
Exhibitions
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Kalem Agency
RC29
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RC26
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1511
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