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ClearFlo

Marine Growth Prevention & Corrosion Mitigation System Installation & Operation Manual

Wilson Walton International, Inc. 3349 Route 138, Bldg. B, Suite B, Wall, NJ 07719 Phone: 732-681-0707 y Fax: 732-681-6118 www.wilsonwalton.com

Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.2 Purpose and Functions Types of Fouling 1.2.1 Slimes 1.2.2 Hard Fouling 1.2.3 Soft Fouling Effects of Fouling Effects of Corrosion

1.3 1.4 2.0

System Operation 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Background General Description Incrustation Protection (Marine Fouling) 2.3.1 Overview 2.3.2 In Detail Corrosion Protection 2.4.1 Overview 2.4.2 In Detail The Importance of Settings Safely Used with Evaporators Maritime Installations

3.0

Components 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 Controller Power Unit Remote Administration Display (RAD) Unit 3.2.1 Display Messages Antifouling Anodes Anticorrosion Anodes Cables Junction Boxes

4.0

Installation Instructions 4.1 4.2 4.3 Controller Power Unit Cable Connections Anode/Cofferdam/Flange

5.0

Commissioning

Wilson Walton International ClearFlo

6.0

Maintenance 6.1 Settings

7.0

Shipyard Installation Specification 7.1 7.2 7.3 Drydock Engine Room Other

8.0

Parts Lists 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 Two-Way Power Supply Four-Way Power Supply Remote Administration Display (RAD) Unit Junction Box Cofferdam Aluminum Anode Copper Anode Iron Anode

9.0

Drawings CF-0001 AA-8002 AA-8004 AA-8000 CF-7000 CF-3003 CF-9000 CF-1000 Anode Installation Two-Way Power Supply Four-Way Power Supply Remote Administration Display (RAD) Unit Junction Box Cofferdam Cofferdam Arrangement Anode Detail

10.0 Certificates of Approval 10.1 10.2 ABS Lloyds

Wilson Walton International ClearFlo

1.0 Introduction
Corrosion or deterioration of metals used in the construction of ships hulls and seawater circulation systems has posed a major problem to ship owners for many years. Of the various anticorrosion systems used by the shipbuilding industry, cathodic protection is one of the most efficient, providing an effective and economical solution to the multiple corrosion problems encountered on the underwater structures of ships. Another cause of major concern is biofouling or marine fouling of Seawater Cooling Systems because of the innumerable operating hours lost in cleaning marine growth. So far, all the systems used to combat biofouling have involved uneconomical maintenance costs and times. The Wilson Walton ClearFlo Corrosion and Fouling Protection System of seawater cooling lines eliminates all corrosion and marine fouling phenomena at a minimum of time and expense. This system incorporates the most up-to-date and advanced features in the field of corrosion and fouling engineering.

1.1 Purpose & Functions


The metals comprising a seawater circuit are affected by electrochemical corrosion. Such corrosive action occurs when current flows from one metal to another or within a single metal through an electrolyte. This phenomenon may be represented by a simple corrosion cell which comprises two different metals electrically connected and immersed in an electrolyte solution such as seawater. The electrochemical characteristics of the respective metals and their place in the galvanic series govern the direction of a resultant current flow. Current will flow in the electrolyte from the anode to the cathode. The current flow from the anode results in the loss of anodic metal, the process known as corrosion, while the cathodic metal receiving the current will remain intact and corrosion-free. These anodic and cathodic areas exist in the metallic structure of seawater circuits due to several conditions, which include the coupling of metals of different potentials, physical differences in the grades or compositions of the constituent metals, temperature gradients, and other factors. There may even be spontaneous formation of inseparable anodes and cathodes on an otherwise uniform metal surface. Corrosion currents can be produced by inconsistencies in the composition of the circulating seawater. It follows that the elimination of anodic areas on metallic components is of paramount importance to the successful control of corrosion. Moreover, corrosion appears together with a related phenomenon known as biofouling or marine fouling. This results from the growth of living microorganisms suspended in seawater, which develops wherever the ship provides a suitable environment. Favorable areas (temperature, etc.) include the interior of seawater circulation lines, where marine organisms adhere initially as larvae and then develop into adult forms. Among the many drawbacks of the existence of these marine animals is the blocking of pipes and the variation of heat transmission coefficient. Traditionally, these incrustations have been removed by adding biocides to the seawater circuits, resulting in the upset of vessel maintenance schedules, high power consumption, and other inherent problems of these methods.

Wilson Walton International ClearFlo

The growth of marine organisms in seawater pipes and heat exchangers has been a continuing problem. In situations when the seawater circuits are not in use or the flow velocity of the cooling water is relatively low, the marine organisms colonize in the seawater systems. Marine fouling can sometimes accumulate to such an extent that the use of the systems would be severely restricted or even completely prevented without water treatment. Even after marine organisms die, the shells frequently become detached, blocking pipes and pumps. Protection from marine growth is needed in the entire system (i.e., general engine room services, condenser and compressor cooling, circulating water in air conditioning systems, fire mains, evaporators, and other seawater piping throughout the ship). Corrosion similarly occurs on all surfaces, ferrous or non-ferrous, in contact with seawater, and usually the extent and rate of corrosion is increased by the presence of bacterial and hard fouling. Whereas corrosion of external surfaces of vessels is generally controlled by material selection, cathodic protection, and/or paint systems, the situation in seawater piping is far more complex and difficult to control. Variable factors influencing both fouling and corrosion in the seawater lines include water flow rates, temperature changes, salinity, areas of ferrous and non-ferrous surfaces, bimetallic contacts, local pH or oxygen variations, linings or coatings, etc. Considerable progress over historically favored methods of fouling and corrosion mitigation has been made by the introduction and proven performance of the ClearFlo system. ClearFlo is a single system of protection which combines modern developments in hardware with proven and established methods of corrosion and fouling prevention, based on sound scientific principles. This combination provides a cost effective automatic method of fouling protection with reduced corrosion rates in seawater circulating systems.

1.2 Types of Fouling


Fouling results from the growth of animals and plants on the surfaces of submerged objects. The severity of marine organism fouling tends to be seasonal and climatic. Heavier infestations occur in the warmer regions of the Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean, Arabian Gulf, Tropical Pacific and South East Asia. There is a general similarity in North European and American Atlantic fouling which is less severe in these colder waters. Although the range of fouling species is less numerous in colder waters, they can still pose considerable problems. Fouling will be less in ships actively trading than those spending considerable time in port and estuarial regions. The main categories of fouling can be arbitrarily distinguished, as follows: Slimes Hard Fouling Soft Fouling

1.2.1 Slimes This type of fouling is in the form of aerobic bacteria, anaerobic bacteria and other seawater micro organisms, usually single cells or diatoms. It is present in coastal waters at high levels, and may enter a vessels seawater system and colonize, where ideal growth conditions exist. There is an ever-plentiful supply of nutrients available in seawater, and together with the warmer on-board environment, it is an
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ideal place for colonization. These slimes influence heat transfer in exchangers, condensers, and coolers, and similarly in anaerobic conditions will modify corrosion behavior. 1.2.2 Hard Fouling This type of fouling is the main concern in seawater circuits. It is usually composed of dense-shelled organisms such as barnacles, mussels, tube worms, crabs, oysters, chitons and limpets. Hard fouling characteristically occurs where the organisms become attached to a surface, from which point their rate of growth can be relatively fast, in the ideal ship environment, namely lower water flow rates, reduced amount of light, adequate supplies of food (protein), oxygen and higher temperatures. Shellfish in the form of mussels and barnacles cause the most problems. Although an effective screen will prevent entry of many of the larger or fully grown types, such as fish and crabs etc., their eggs, larvae and spats, along with those of mussels and barnacles, enter the system in seawater in high numbers during the spawning season, then remain and develop in the system to become fully grown adults. Most barnacles, of which 39,000 species are known, are 1 to 5cm long, whereas mussels in the order of 100,000 living species of mollusks, can be considerably larger. It follows that providing a toxic environment to the larvae and establishing conditions where the fouling organism cannot settle and grow will inhibit fouling in the system. The ability of hard fouling to attach to a surface is therefore an important factor. Mussels are held in place by strong byssal threads, so this bond must be prevented from occurring, or broken. 1.2.3 Soft Fouling This includes all plant species as well as certain animal organisms such as sponges and anemones with a specific gravity close to that of water. Plants are photo synthetic, their survival dependent on adequate light, whereas sponges and anemones are found mainly in deeper water. In both cases they are less prevalent in seawater cooling systems.

1.3 Effects of Fouling


The main effects of fouling can be arbitrarily categorized as mechanical and physical, combined with accelerated corrosion. The effects of blockage of pipes, valves, pumps, and grids by fouling are well known and readily observed. It is probably less appreciated that fouling makes a very significant contribution to accelerating the rate of corrosion of metals and alloys in seawater circuits. Fouling entering seawater circuits as eggs and larvae becomes established and fully grown. As a result, blockage or decreased channel size or interference in flow in pipelines, pumps, grids, condensers and valves develops. Fouling also reduces efficiency in cooling or other heat transfer equipment, causes a risk to the operation of fire mains and other auxiliary machinery, and creates costly downtime and cleaning periods.

1.4 Effects of Corrosion


Corrosion rates will be accelerated in most areas of the seawater system in which fouling occurs. Seawater on its own is an aggressive corrosion medium, primarily since it retains approximately 3% by weight of sodium chloride. The chloride ions, in addition to their role in precipitation of complex salts, have a more damaging influence, resulting in pitting attack and breakdown of protective oxide films on carbon steel. Superimposed on this basic attack, the fouling adds to the range and rate of the numerous

Wilson Walton International ClearFlo

corrosion processes for ferrous and non-ferrous sections. Slime bacteria will lead to rapid localized corrosion as a result of the formation of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anaerobic conditions. Corrosion rates are enhanced in two ways: By depolarization of the cathodic regions of local corrosion cells; and by production of hydrogen sulfide by reduction of naturally occurring sulfur compounds in seawater. Hydrogen sulfide rapidly attacks metals, and other types of bacteria oxidize sulfur compounds to produce areas of sulfuric acid, particularly beneath deposits. They may also be conducive to hydrogen embrittlement, which in turn enhances corrosion fatigue. The presence of adherent hard fouling will accelerate corrosion by giving rise to differential aeration cells and accelerated corrosion in the vicinity of the fouling, and turbulence which in turn can cause impingement erosion or cavitation of non-ferrous tubes. It also gives rise to localized pitting attack which is more detrimental than general oxidation and scaling over the entire surface, and destruction of paint films and associated local rapid attack where the metal is exposed. Since metabolic products of fouling promote acidic conditions, it follows that prevention of fouling will greatly reduce the susceptibility and incidence of corrosion in seawater circuits.

2.0 System Operation


ClearFlo system has been specially developed to: Control biofouling in seawater lines. Reduce corrosion of metals in contact with seawater.

Each Wilson Walton ClearFlo system is custom designed for maximum performance, however, it should not be regarded as a panacea to all problems requiring no further attention. A small amount of supervision and maintenance is required and we therefore ask the user to strictly adhere to the instructions in this manual to ensure satisfactory operation.

2.1 Background
In the last few decades, marine fouling and seawater-induced corrosion have become major concerns to ship owners and industries in the maritime sector. ClearFlo is a single system that solves both problems. With ClearFlo, vessels and industrial facilities can substantially reduce their costs of operation, maintenance and periodic replacement of worn out parts. The system is fabricated from the most up-todate and sophisticated electronic components to guarantee precision, safety and robustness.

2.2 General Description


ClearFlo is an Impressed Current Cathodic Protection System and Marine Growth Prevention System employing special aluminum, iron and copper alloy anodes for excellent efficiency in combating corrosion and fouling. ClearFlo eliminates marine biofouling and considerably reduces corrosion (by more than 90%) in seawater circulation systems (e.g. sea boxes, grilles, suction scoops, piping, tanks, heat exchangers, condensers, etc.). ClearFlo assures continuous, low maintenance protection and is easily mounted in both new facilities and those already in service.

Wilson Walton International ClearFlo

2.3 Incrustation (Marine Fouling) Protection


2.3.1 Overview The elimination of biofouling is achieved by the use of copper anodes. Electrolytically-generated ions combine with the ions in seawater to form an adverse environment for the survival and growth of larvae and other organisms that may be sucked into lines, thus preventing adherence in areas previously favorable to development. 2.3.2 In Detail Marine incrustation occurs when certain sedentary organisms, ranging from fungi and bacteria to simple plants and animals, attach themselves to underwater structures, impacting their operation and maintenance. The adhering organisms may alter corrosion processes and block condensers, piping, valves, etc. Biofouling greatly increases frictional resistance, fuel consumption and loss of performance while considerably raising cleaning bills. Until the introduction of ClearFlo, many methods were tried to combat biofouling, always with undesirable side-effects. Chemical methods produce high intensity localized pitting and considerably increase the risk of contamination. For this reason, the methods called for must be able to inhibit primary incrustation organisms, must be insoluble, must have low pipe pitting aggressiveness and must be compatible with existing equipment without risk of contamination. ClearFlo easily meets these requirements because it functions through the slow dissolution of special alloy anodes in electrolytic products to create a medium that is hostile to colonization by marine incrustation larvae. Moreover, it considerably reduces corrosion. Owing to the action of the Impressed Current, the anticorrosion anodes generate aluminum hydroxide (alumina) while the antifouling anodes release copper ions into solution. The aluminum hydroxide maintains the copper ions in suspension and the resultant highly gelatinous compound spreads to the areas of low turbulence in sea boxes where the larvae responsible for incrustation are most likely to adhere. Where Cupronickel piping is fitted, iron anodes are used which deposit an iron film in place of the aluminum hydroxide. The treatment product concentrates in these areas before penetrating into service lines through the movement of seawater, which acts as a mixing agent: The seawater flow eventually carries the suspension throughout the whole system. Use of ClearFlo means that organisms are carried from inlet to outlet with the assurance that no water is left untreated at any point in the circuit. The absence of biofouling is assured. Anticorrosion anode action is not limited to the production of a colloidal suspension, as this component also acts as a current-dispersing anode, protecting the structure from the adverse reaction resulting from copper ion deposition. This double ClearFlo system ensures the absence of marine bioincrustation, substantially reduces corrosion, does not cause pitting in pipes, and is also a safe non-contaminant.

Wilson Walton International ClearFlo

2.4 Corrosion Protection


2.4.1 Overview As mentioned above, the dramatic reduction in corrosion is achieved by aluminum, or alternatively iron, anodes. They act as small Impressed Current Cathodic Protection anodes generating ions which suppress the corrosive environment in the internal areas of the sea chest. Aluminum is used when piping material is ferrous, whereas iron is used in all other types of piping systems, such as Cupronickel and aluminum brass. 2.4.2 In Detail The corrosion of metals is an electrochemical reaction taking place in an electrolyte, in this case seawater, between two electrically coupled zones: an anode and a cathode. The principle on which the ClearFlo Protection System operates is the introduction into a galvanic circuit of a metal that is more electronegative than the existing anodic and cathodic areas. The protective current needed to convert the cathode structure is obtained by rectifying the on-board alternating current supply. This AC current is fed into a transformer rectifier that supplies continuous DC current to the special alloy anodes. As described in the previous section, ClearFlo deposits a fine film of gel over the whole inner surface of the cooling system. This film forms a protective, though not thermally insulating, coating throughout the whole system. In practice, the pipes look like their inner surface has been newly painted. This coating acts in unison with the galvanic action to effectively inhibit corrosion in seawater circulation systems.

2.5 The Importance of Proper Settings


ClearFlo is designed to give continuous, trouble-free protection against marine biofouling and corrosion with a minimum of maintenance. It will provide full protection throughout anode life, provided that the current through anodes is properly set. Excess current increases the rate of anode consumption, resulting in reduced anode life and the attendant risk of leaving seawater lines unprotected until new anodes can be installed. Insufficient current allows marine organisms to adhere to surfaces because the adverse environment preventing biofouling cannot be established. Wilson Walton programs anode output prior to installation using a proven formula that considers: Flow Rates through pumps Anode Mass Desired Anode Life (usually drydock interval)

Pre-programming eliminates the need for adjustments by the user, simplifying system operation and avoiding erroneous modifications that would adversely affect performance. Should it be determined that a change in anode output is necessary, it can be made by simply exchanging

Wilson Walton International ClearFlo

the TP/FT-10 control modules with modules pre-programmed by Wilson Walton to the new optimal settings. The microprocessor-based TP/FT-10 control modules ensure against the tendency of analog meters and digital control modules to drift, thus eliminating the need for calibration.

2.6 Safely Used with Evaporators


If the treated seawater is fed afterwards into evaporators to produce drinking water, the electric current flowing through the anodes at the seawater suction scoop is limited to the point at which the water enters the evaporators. The level of the copper ion concentration is well below the maximum allowable values established by the World Health Organization (WHO) and will not contaminate the water.

2.7 Maritime Installations


ClearFlo is compatible with a wide range of vessels, offshore platforms and related structures. The anodes located in sea boxes treat the water before it is distributed to the plant services. Components receiving protection include sea boxes, tanks, shaft trunks, piping, condensers, heat exchangers, valves, fire pumps, etc. Each ClearFlo system that is installed must therefore be specifically configured for the system and service to be protected. By eliminating marine bioincrustation and corrosion, ClearFlo ensures free circulation of water and the maintenance of initial operating conditions. ClearFlo is also applicable to coastal facilities that use seawater as a coolant. The main applications are: Generating plants Cement works Paper industry Marine air conditioning equipment, etc.

Owing to the large number of systems used in industrial seawater circulation circuits, each project must be studied individually to determine the most suitable design.

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3.0 Components
3.1 Controller Power Unit
The ClearFlo controller power unit is state-of-the-art switch-mode type, utilizing the same sophisticated computer-controlled, network-based intelligence as the acclaimed Aquamatic III ICCP system. Each unit is capable of controlling four (4) anodes. The continuous current capacity ranges from 0 amps to 2 amps output per channel (or anode), at 0-12 volts. AC input requirement is 85-264 VAC, 1-phase, 47-63Hz, 17 amps. The power supply is bulkhead-mounted, small (5 x 10 x 12), and lightweight (20 lbs). The internal power supply is fully conformal coated within a Type 316 stainless steel enclosure for enhanced corrosion resistance. All components are modular for simplified service. The controller regulates to 100th of an amp to each anode, and it provides continuous diagnostics for fault detection. The computer-controller monitors the anode consumption rate, and indicates the number of days life remaining for each anode, to eliminate user uncertainty. The controller automatically detects flow and no-flow conditions via auxiliary contacts on pumps. This significantly increases anode life, and relieves the crew of the responsibility of manually adjusting anode outputs at-sea and in-port.

3.2 Remote Administration Display (RAD) Unit


This unit monitors and displays readings from each and every power unit of the system, up to four (4) power units. The display is an intelligent scrolling alphanumeric type which provides a snapshot of system status for quick and easy assessment by the crew. This is the default display which reports if all anodes and all power supplies are working properly, or, if not, which component has malfunctioned. Any faulty item is reported on the summary display, with a brief description of the fault accompanied by suggestions for repair. The Log Display reports the basic operational data for daily logging by the crew, including the following: Sea chest or strainer location Anode type (copper, aluminum, or iron) Anode output current Anode output voltage Anode life remaining in days

The Service Anode reports detailed operational and programming data for diagnostic purposes, including the following, in addition to the above Log Display data: Anode program current regulation set point Controller D/A drive voltage Flow contact program usage

The Remote Administration Display (RAD) unit is the same physical size as the Power Unit cabinet, but

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weighs less (15 lbs), and it will monitor all of the systems readings in a single convenient location, such as the control room or bridge. Other features include a Version Display which reports the embedded software version number, and Global Reset which invokes an entire system re-initialization and self-test cycle. Also, more than one display can be connected to a system for identical readouts to be available at several locations. AC input requirement is the same as the power supply: 85-264 VAC, 1-phase, 47-63 Hz, 4 amps. 3.2.1 Display Messages The two-line display will always show the system name on the first line. In Normal Mode, the second line is reserved for the following status messages: Message System Stabilizing System Working OK Both Channels Conducting Desired Current Explanation Shown only at system power on / startup Indicates normal operation Current output equals the programmed current set point If Flow Contacts are used, the controller will reduce the anode output to minimum when the pumps are de-energized. If vessel is not in fresh or brackish water, check anode, anode cable, anode splice, and fuse Check anode, anode cofferdam, anode junction box, and anode cable Contact Wilson Walton International when this message appears

Output Reduced - No Seawater Flow

[Al/Fe/Cu] Anode Low Output [Al/Fe/Cu] Anode Possible Short Circuit [Al/Fe/Cu] Anode Limited Life Remaining Will Require Replacement Soon

From the default scrolling status messages above, Tap (short press) the Data Select button to view: [AL/FE] Anode [AL/FE] Anode CU Anode CU Anode [AL/FE] Anode CU Anode x.xx Amps x.xx Volts x.xx Amps x.xx Volts xxxx Days (remaining) xxxx Days (remaining)

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Press & Hold (long press) Data Select button to display: Service Mode Normal Mode Self Test Version Exit Menu

In Service Mode, the second line is reserved for the following status messages: Channel 1 Anode Type Channel 1 Set [AL/FE/CU] Anode [AL/FE/CU] Anode Channel 1 D2A [AL/FE/CU] x.xx Amp x.xx Amp x.xx Volt x.xx Volt

Similar messages follow for Channel 2.

3.3 Antifouling Anodes


The antifouling anode consists of a copper alloy rod. Always used in conjunction with the anticorrosion anode, it combines with seawater to create an adverse environment to the spread of encrusting organisms (e.g. balanus barnacles, mussels, etc.). Lengths vary from 8 to 30 according to the pump flow rates and time between drydockings. Only in exceptional circumstances will anode weight be such that it surpasses the handling capabilities of one man. In addition to the anode, components supplied for installation are the mounting ring, cofferdam, insulating sleeve, washers, nuts, terminals, etc. Anode stainless steel studs and cross-linked polyolefin shrink sleeves have been lengthened to reduce the risk of metal chunks breaking off at the neck of the anode and becoming lodged in the strainers. Anode insulation has been improved with the addition of double neoprene O-rings in between rigid PVC washers, to prevent shorting out of anodes.

3.4 Anticorrosion Anodes


Depending on its place of application, the anticorrosion anode will be an aluminum alloy rod or, for copper alloyed piping systems, iron. It combines with seawater to form a product which is deposited on the structure. This deposit creates a physical barrier which is electrochemically more negative than underlying material and thus either acts as a sacrificial anode or reinforces the passivating layer covering the structure. Lengths vary from 8 to 30 according to the pump flow rates and time between drydockings. Only in exceptional circumstances will anode weight be such that it surpasses the handling capabilities of one man.
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In addition to the anode, components supplied for installation are mounting ring, cofferdam, insulating sleeve, washers, nuts, terminals, etc. Anode stainless steel studs and cross-linked polyolefin shrink sleeves have been lengthened to reduce risk of metal chunks breaking off at the neck of the anode and becoming lodged in the strainers. Anode insulation has been improved with the addition of double neoprene O-rings in between rigid PVC washers, to prevent shorting out of anodes.

3.5 Cables
Anode cable tails are supplied by Wilson Walton (as an option) or the shipyard. They are type LSDSGU-4, two-conductor, low-smoke, cross-linked polyolefin insulated, non-halogenated thermoplastic jacketed, unarmored, and flame retardant. Size is AWG #14, nominal outer diameter is 0.29 inches, and weight is approximately 62 lbs. per 100 ft. Cable is USCG, ABS and DNV approved, and U.L. listed for Marine Shipboard Cable. Anodes are supplied complete with cable tails to enable electrical connection between the anode and the junction box. Anode feeder cables are supplied by Wilson Walton (as an option) or the shipyard, to enable electrical connection between the junction box and the power supply. This cable should be low smoke, 2conductor, unarmored and size AWG #14 to conform with junction box glands. AC input cables are supplied by Wilson Walton (as an option) or the shipyard, to enable electrical connection between the ships distribution panel and the power supplies. This cable should be low smoke, 3-conductor, unarmored, and size AWG #10. Power ground cables are supplied by Wilson Walton (as an option) or the shipyard, to provide a ground between each power supply and the hull. This cable should be low smoke, 1-conductor, unarmored, and size AWG #10. No ground is required at junction box or anode cofferdam. The Remote Administration Display (RAD) unit does not require separate ground cable. However, one core of the 3conductor AC input cable should be used as the ground. Data transmission cables are supplied by Wilson Walton (as an option) or the shipyard, to enable electrical connection between the Power Unit(s) and the Remote Administration Display (RAD) unit. This cable should be unshielded, bonded twisted pair, size AWG #16. Unshielded cable exhibits better capacitance than armored cable, which is especially important over longer distances. Bonded cable possesses better strength and signal integrity characteristics. Uniform conductor-to-conductor spacing is maintained, providing consistent electrical performance. The twisted pair configuration reduces Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). Using cable with different properties may have an adverse effect on data performance, up to and including communication failure. Wilson Walton recommends Belden 8471 for optimal performance.

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3.6 Junction Boxes


Wilson Walton supplies special junction boxes, upgraded to heavy duty Pauluhn marine bronze type, with special marine grade bronze cable gland bodies and nuts. An intermediate junction box facilitates the separation of anodes from the supply, thus avoiding interference with the remainder of the installation during inspection or anode replacement periods. It is also necessary where anode assemblies are provided as a separate unit complete with pre-connected cable. Precisely-sized neoprene grommets are designed to grip the cable and create a watertight seal into the junction box. Each box is also supplied complete with a 4-point terminal block, and three (3) pieces of N.P.T. cable glands. The gland nut is hex-shaped for easy tightening. Each box with cover measures 4 x 4 x 2-3/16 and weighs 4 lbs.

4.0 Installation Instructions


Three separate stages are involved: 1. Installation of the Power Control Unit 2. Connecting Cables/Junction Box 3. Installation of Anode/Cofferdam/Flange

4.1 Power Control Unit


The control panel should be located as near as possible to an AC power supply and the anode locations (to minimize the DC cable length and voltage drop). The control panel location should meet the following requirements: Maximum ambient temperature of 50 C (unit rated to 55 C) Adequate space around unit to ensure proper ventilation Mounted at head height (max) to facilitate reading and output adjustment or servicing Easily accessible location Safe, non-hazardous environment Bulkhead mounted and/or secured to a suitable base

4.2 Cable Connections: Power Control Unit, Junction Box, Anodes


Input AC cable connection points and earthing cable connections are clearly marked in the power control unit. Similarly positive output terminals on each module are evident with a common negative cable connection. Cable sizing and specification for AC input and DC output are described in Section 3.5. The DC supply cable to the anodes should be connected to the intermediate junction box. A junction box is provided with shrouded gland (DC) inputs and anode/sea chest output connections. Anode cables and negative return should be connected to the DC supply in the junction box.

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4.3 Anode, Cofferdam, Flange


Anodes should be installed in the position specifically shown or advised for each vessel. The anodes are installed in the selected compartments, namely sea chests, or injection strainers. The agreed positions for the 135-140mm apertures for the cofferdam entry points should be marked and burnt/cut out. Vertical installation of anodes is required. Horizontal or angled installation is prohibited. Take precautions to protect surrounding equipment with heat resistant blankets, etc. A standby fire extinguisher should be provided.

Looking up from sea chest through aperture. Notice aperture diameter is slightly (5-10mm) larger than inside diameter of mounting ring (shown). This disparity allows room for a weld bead securing the underside of mounting ring to sea chest that does not interfere with the insertion of the anode through the aperture.

Looking down at mounting ring through aperture and into the sea chest.

The mating flange to receive the anode and cofferdam flange should be welded in position with welding on both inside and outside joints. All weld scale should be removed and any damaged paintwork reinstated. The anode cofferdam screw cap should be removed and the anode cable disconnected. Remove the compression gland and screw the anode cap back onto the cofferdam. Hand-tighten only. Carefully lift the anode/cofferdam/flange assembly by means of the eyebolts provided and lower the anode onto the sea chest or strainer mating flange, making sure that the rubber gasket is in position. Evenly tighten down the anode flange bolts. This process is repeated for all anodes. Note: All threaded sections of nuts, bolts and the cofferdam lid, including the anode connection, must be lightly coated with WWI Marine Guard.

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After installing the anode assembly, feed back the anode cable and compression gland. Reconnect the anode cable to the anode bolt. Replace the cofferdam cap, securing tightly onto the uppermost O-ring. Finally, tighten the cable compression gland and fit the gland shroud. Secure anode cables and take back for connection in the junction box. When vessel is afloat, carryout leakage tests by checking for ingress of water into the cofferdam.

Looking up from sea chest at installed anode.

Looking down at completed assembly.

Note: When anodes are installed in a treatment tank, a bleeder valve should be fitted to vent gases, water and back pressure.

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5.0 Commissioning
Note: Only to be carried out when the vessel is afloat. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Check all cable connections at power control unit, terminal box and anodes. Identify each positive output and relevant anode, and record the same. Switch on AC supply and then the panel on/off switch. Switch on all power supplies then switch on Remote Administration Display (RAD). Record all status messages and record all system readings.

6.0 Maintenance
Maintenance requirements are minimal. The system operates at constant current output and therefore does not require adjustment. A weekly recording of current outputs on each anode is recommended (a log sheet is provided). This provides a record of the systems operation, an indication of any changes in function, and a reminder when anode replacements are scheduled. A complete loss of current on any anode should be investigated by checking all cable connections and power panel fuses.

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7.0 Shipyard Installation Specification


7.1 Drydock
7.1.0 Yard to burn two (2) x 5.1 diameter holes through top plate of port and starboard sea chests. 7.1.1 Yard to center and fit mounting boss (ring) over each hole, and fillet weld inside and outside. Total 30 linear inches of fillet weld per boss. Each boss weighs 11 lbs. 7.1.2 Yard to drop in two (2) anode/cofferdam assemblies through mounting bosses of each sea chest. Each aluminum assembly weighs 60 lbs., and each copper assembly weighs 130 lbs. Total: 4 pcs. 7.1.3 Yard to secure each anode/cofferdam assembly to each mounting boss by tightening eight (8) x M16 bolts per boss. Total: 4 pcs.

7.2 Engine Room


7.2.0 Yard to bulkhead-mount 5x10x12 power supply cabinet in convenient location between P+S sea chests. Cabinet weighs 20 lbs. 7.2.1 Yard to bulkhead-mount 5x10x12 remote administration display (RAD) unit in convenient location in control room or engine room. RAD weighs 15 lbs.

7.3 Other
7.3.0 Yard to install 3-conductor AWG#10 AC-input cable from ships distribution panel to ClearFlo power unit. 7.3.1 Yard to install Belden data transmission cable from ClearFlo power unit to RAD unit. 7.3.2 Yard to install 5 ft. of power ground cable from ClearFlo power supply to deck.

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8.0 Parts Lists


8.1 Two-Way Power Supply
(Drawing #AA-8002)

Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Description Auxiliary Power Supply Main Circuit Breaker (On/Off Switch) Control Board Drive Board Controller Node TP/FT-10 Input Terminal Block AC Input Terminal Block Graphic Overlay Control Board Standoff Control Board Mounting Screw TP/FT-10 Mounting Screw Driver Board Mounting Screw Steel Enclosure (Cabinet) Cable Gland

Qty 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 4 8 3 6 1 6

Part Number CF-CP3-1000 AQ-CP3-1201 CF-CCB-300 CF-CCB-301 AQ-CCB-302 CF-CP3-118 CF-CP3-103 CF-CP3-106 CF-CP3-136 AQ-CP3-137 AQ-CP3-108 AQ-CP3-138 CF-CP3-119 AQ-CP3-135

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8.2 Four-Way Power Supply


(Drawing #AA-8004) Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Description Auxiliary Power Supply Main Circuit Breaker (On/Off Switch) Control Board Drive Board Controller Node TP/FT-10 Input Terminal Block AC Input Terminal Block Graphic Overlay Control Board Standoff Control Board Mounting Screw TP/FT-10 Mounting Screw Driver Board Mounting Screw Steel Enclosure (Cabinet) Cable Gland Qty 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 8 16 3 12 1 8 Part Number CF-CP3-1000 AQ-CP3-1201 CF-CCB-300 CF-CCB-301 AQ-CCB-302 CF-CP3-118 CF-CP3-103 CF-CP3-106 CF-CP3-136 AQ-CP3-137 AQ-CP3-108 AQ-CP3-138 CF-CP3-119 AQ-CP3-135

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8.3 Remote Administration Display (RAD) Unit


(Drawing #AA-8000) Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Description Auxiliary Power Supply Main Circuit Breaker (On/Off Switch) Display Node Motherboard VF Display Display Node TP/FT-10 Display Node PROM Data Select Button Input Terminal Block Graphic Overlay / VF Display Window TP/FT-10 Mounting Screw Steel Enclosure (Cabinet) Display Node Motherboard Mounting Screw Display Node Motherboard & Standoff Auxiliary Power Supply Standoffs Auxiliary Power Supply Mounting Screw Data Select Switch Capacitor Cable Gland 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 4 4 4 8 1 3 Qty Part Number AQ-CP3-1000 AQ-CP3-1201 AQ-CCB-301 AQ-CP3-305 AQ-CCB-302 AQ-CP3-201 AQ-CP3-102 AQ-CP3-118 CF-CP3-106 AQ-CP3-108 AQ-CP3-119 AQ-CP3-130 AQ-CP3-131 AQ-CP3-132 AQ-CP3-133 AQ-CP3-134 AQ-CP3-135

8.4 Junction Box


(Drawing #CF-7000) Item 1 2 Description Brass Box with Terminal Board Cable Gland Qty 1 3 Part Number CF-701 CF-702

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8.5 Cofferdam
(Drawing #CF-3003 and #CF-9000) Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Description Cofferdam Cofferdam Lid Cofferdam Neoprene Gasket Cofferdam Neoprene Mounting Ring M16 x 2.0 Stud M16 x 2.0 Nut M16 Washer Cable Gland Qty 1 1 1 1 8 8 8 1 Part Number CF-901 CF-902 CF-903 CF-904 CF-905 CF-906 CF-907 CF-908

8.6 Aluminum Anode


(Drawing #CF-1000 and #CF-0001) Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Description Anode (_____in. Diameter x _____in. Long)* M30 x 3.5 Jam Nut M30 x 3.5 Full Nut M30 Lock Washer M30 Flat Washer Rigid PVC Upper Washer Neoprene O-Ring Neoprene Gasket M8 x 15 Brass Bolt M8 Brass Flat Washer Ring Lug Qty 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 Part Number CF-300 CF-101 CF-102 CF-103 CF-104 CF-105 CF-106 CF-107 CF-108 CF-109 CF-110

*Specify anode dimensions when ordering.

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8.7 Copper Anode


(Drawing #CF-1000 and #CF-0001) Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Description Anode (_____in. Diameter x _____in. Long)* M30 x 3.5 Jam Nut M30 x 3.5 Full Nut M30 Lock Washer M30 Flat Washer Rigid PVC Upper Washer Neoprene O-Ring Neoprene Gasket M8 x 15 Brass Bolt M8 Brass Flat Washer Ring Lug Qty 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 Part Number CF-200 CF-101 CF-102 CF-103 CF-104 CF-105 CF-106 CF-107 CF-108 CF-109 CF-110

*Specify anode dimensions when ordering.

8.8 Iron Anode


(Drawing #CF-1000 and #CF-0001) Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Description Anode (_____in. Diameter x _____in. Long)* M30 x 3.5 Jam Nut M30 x 3.5 Full Nut M30 Lock Washer M30 Flat Washer Rigid PVC Upper Washer Neoprene O-Ring Neoprene Gasket M8 x 15 Brass Bolt M8 Brass Flat Washer Ring Lug Qty 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 Part Number CF-400 CF-101 CF-102 CF-103 CF-104 CF-105 CF-106 CF-107 CF-108 CF-109 CF-110

*Specify anode dimensions when ordering.

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9.0 Drawings

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10.0 Certificates of Approval


10.1 ABS

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10.2 Lloyds

ClearFlo Manual ver0304.doc(pdf) Wilson Walton International ClearFlo 33