April 2009 Investor Presentation

April 2009 Investor Presentation

CHK Overview
● Leading producer of U.S. natural gas
– 4Q’08 natural gas p Q g production of 2.130 bcf/day; ~3.5% of U.S. p / y; production ● Most active driller in U.S. – on average, CHK drilled a well every 5 hrs in 2008 – ~110 operated rigs currently, down from 158 in 8/08 (-30%), considering a further 10% reduction;
~75 non-operated rigs & ~15 info only rigs; collector of ~20% of all daily drilling information generated in the U S (~25% in our areas of interest) U.S.

● Consistent production growth – 19th consecutive year of sequential production growth
– Increased production by 18% in ’08 to 2.3 bcfe/day and projecting increases of 5-10% in ’09 and
10-15% in ’10 to ~2.4 and ~2.7 bcfe/day, respectively, while staying within cash resources

● Best assets in the industry
– 12.1 tcfe of proved reserves at 12/08, targeting 13.5-14.0 tcfe by 12/09 and 15-16 tcfe by 12/10 – 57 tcfe of risked unproved reserve potential; >10-year inventory of ~36,000 net drilling locations – Only company with a Top-2 leasehold position in each of the Big 4 shale p y y p y p p g plays
(Haynesville/Marcellus/Barnett/Fayetteville); no other company is Top-2 in more than one play

● Unparalleled inventory of U.S. onshore leasehold and 3-D seismic
– 15.2 mm net acres of U.S. onshore leasehold and ~21.6 mm acres of 3-D seismic data
2
Data above incorporates: • CHK’s press release and Outlook dated 2/17/09 • Risk disclosure regarding unproved reserve estimates appears on page 32

April 2009 Investor Presentation

CHK’s Competitive Advantages
CHK has many unique competitive advantages in this tough economic environment

● High quality U.S. asset base; only producer with #1 or #2 position lit U S tb l d ith iti

in “Big-4” U.S. shale plays – #1 in Haynesville Shale; 460,000 net acres – #1 in Marcellus Shale; 1.2 mm net acres – #2 in Barnett Shale (Core and Tier 1 area); 310,000 net acres – #2 in Fayetteville Shale; 420,000 net acres – No other producer is #1 or #2 in more than one of the “Big 4” shale plays ● Advantageous joint venture arrangements – $8.6 billion of value captured vs. cost basis of $1.2 billion – $26 billion of remaining implied value f – $4 billion of joint venture carry receivables not on books

● 2009 & 2010 finding cost advantage ● Strong hedging track record

~2.5 tcfe of future no cost reserves from carries

– Able to add 2.0-2.5 tcfe per year at ~$1.25/mcfe in 2009 and 2.0 2.5 $1.25/mcfe
~$1.50/mcfe in 2010 – Maintenance cap-ex only ~15% in 2009 and ~20% in 2010

– ~$2.1 billion in realized gains 2001-2008 – ~$1.6 billi in open MTM value at 2/13/09 $1 6 billion i l t

3

April 2009 Investor Presentation

CHK’s Competitive Advantages, Continued
● Balanced cash flow plan ● Effective balance sheet
– Substantial liquidity – Long-term maturities – Low cost debt – CHK is seeking to build $2.0-3.0 billion of cash in 2009-2010 while still
growing production 5-10% per year 5 10%

Average debt maturity of 7.8 years; first maturity of senior notes in 2013 e age atu ty o 8 yea s; st atu ty o se o otes 0 3 6.1% average interest rate on senior notes Revolver currently at ~3% interest rate

– Targeting investment grade credit metrics by YE 2010 ● Asset values not reflected in share price(1) f – Proved PV10 @$6.00 = $17 billion – Unproved assets = $11 billion – Hedges and drilling carries = $7 billion – B k value of other assets = $5 billi Book l f th t billion – Net debt and net working capital = $(15) billion – Total NAV = $25 billion, or $42 per share after debt and working capital ● Conclusion: CHK is well prepared to ride out the recession with many distinctive and substantial competitive advantages 4
(1) Details of net asset value estimation appear on page 19

The Industry’s Cost Curve is Shifting Rapidly – Very Important to Understand p y y p
● Up until 5 years ago, most E&P companies in the U.S. owned an asset base that was more
or less the same as everyone else’s – not true anymore and significant implications! ● “Shale haves” will have very low risk F&D costs <$2.00/mcfe for decades to come (and decreasing over time as efficiencies increase and shale gas reservoir knowledge improves) while “shale have-nots” will have F&D costs >$3.00/mcfe and increasing over time as most drilling will be increased-density, rate-acceleration wells in existing fields rather than new discoveries
Pre-shale F&D Cost Curve Continuum
$3.00 $3.00

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Post-shale F&D Cost Curve Continuum
$4.00

In the Future…

F&D/mcfe

F&D/mcfe

F&D/mcfe

$2.00

$2.00

$3.00 $2.00 $1.00

$1.00

$1.00

25%

50%

75%

100%

25%

50%

75%

100%

25%

50%

75%

100%

Industry Quartile

Industry Quartile

Industry Quartile

5

Those that missed the “Big-4” shale land grab of 2004–2008 will pay the price for years, if not decades, to come…

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Efficiently Allocating Capital to Low-cost, Top-Tier Assets(1) , p
$3.25

● CHK has built the nation’s largest resource
West TX Delaware TX. Shales ~1%(2)

Pr drilling-carry targeted F&D costs ($/mcfe) re c

$3.00 $2.75 $2.50 $2.25 $2.00 $1.75 $1 75 $1.50 $1.25 $1.00

base through a #1 or #2 position in the “Big-4” premier shale plays – They account for >60% of the company’s

NW OK Sahara ~3%(2)

● Science and technology have transformed
South Texas ~1%(2)

proved and risked unproved reserve base

Barnett Shale ~23%(2)

these premier shale plays into predictable predictable, low-cost, high rate of return assets – Only 10 or so companies have captured

Fayetteville Shale ~13%(2) Haynesville Shale ~20%(2) Marcellus Shale ~8%(2)

● ~65% of CHK’s 2009 gross drilling capex 65%

meaningful positions in the plays – The remainder of the E&P industry is y challenged to generate acceptable returns in higher cost, less-efficient plays – Industry supply is determined by the marginal cost of the high-cost, not low-cost, plays

$0.75

will be directed to the Big-4 premier shale plays (~50% net of drilling carries) – ~$1.25/mcfe F&D cost with drilling carries
6

(1) (2)

Size of bubble corresponds to relative size of CHK proved and risked unproved reserves in each play Percent of 2009E gross drilling capital expenditures (before ~$1.2 billion of drilling carries)

April 2009 Investor Presentation

2009 Net Finding Cost Outlook
$3,000 Drilling carry $2,500 CHK capital cost

E&P Capital

2,500 2,000

Reserve Additions

$ in millions

bcfe

$2,000 $1,500 $1,000 $500 $0 Shale JVs
$2.50 $2 50 $2.00

1,500 1,000 500 0

Other CHK Plays

Total CHK

Shale JVs

Other CHK Plays

Total CHK

Drillbit F&D
<$2.00

$1.50 $1.00 $0.50 $0.00 Shale JVs Other CHK Plays

~$1.25 ~$0.65

~$4 billion of CHK carries represent ~2.5 tcfe of no cost future reserve adds to CHK and should give CHK one of the lowest finding costs and high t returns on capital in 2009 t d highest t it l i and 2010 (at least) in the U.S. E&P industry

$ $/Mcfe

Total CHK

7

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Haynesville Shale Summary
Prospective Area = ~3.5 Million Acres

● CHK discovered this play in 2007, potentially

Chesapeake Operated Rigs CHK Non-op Rigs CHK Acreage

~95 miles

Note: Risk disclosure regarding unproved reserve estimates appears on page 32

largest field in the U.S. (Marcellus Shale may possibly become #1 post 2020) ● 80/20 JV with PXP in 7/08; received $1.65 billion in cash and $1.65 billion in carry in a $3.3 billion deal ● Pl encompasses a ~3.5 million acre area in NW Play 3 5 illi i Louisiana and E. TX ● CHK is the largest leasehold owner in the core area of the play, ~460,000 net acres (after sale to PXP) ● 2009 planned activity – ~$825 mm budget (~50% funded by JV partner PXP) – Average of ~26 operated rigs – ~575 bcfe of reserve additions – ~$0.70/mcfe finding cost net to CHK $0.70/mcfe ● Two recent wells have tested >22 mmcf/day ● Entered into firm transportation agreements with CenterPoint and Energy Transfer Partners (Tiger Pipeline) p )
8

~110 miles

CHK found the Haynesville through its proprietary shale evaluation capabilities in its unique Reservoir Technology Center

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Marcellus Shale Summary
Prospective Area = 31 Million Acres

● CHK acquired leading position in this play in 2005

through $2.2 billion acquisition of CNR ● 67.5/32.5 JV with StatoilHydro in 11/08; received $1.25 billion in cash and $2.125 billion in carry in a $3.375 billion deal ● CHK is the largest leasehold owner in the Marcellus Shale play with ~1.2 million net acres of leasehold (after sale to STO) ● The Marcellus Shale may ultimately become the largest natural gas field in the U.S. – Will develop more slowly than other shale plays,
CHK Acreage CHK Operated Rigs

~360 miles

● 2009 planned activity

however, due to topography, infrastructure and regulatory bottle-necks

~300 miles

– ~$325 mm budget (~75% funded by JV partner STO) $325 ( 75% – Average of ~14 operated rigs (adding ~1 rig per
month in 2009) – ~260 bcfe reserve additions – ~$0.30/mcfe finding cost net to CHK $0 30/ c e d g et C

9
Note: Risk disclosure regarding unproved reserve estimates appears on page 32

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Fayetteville Shale Summary
● 75/25 JV with BP in 8/08;; $1.1 billion in cash / /

Prospective Area = ~1.7 Million Acres

Chesapeake Operated Rigs

CHK Non-op Rigs

CHK Acreage

~115 miles

received, $800 mm in carry in a $1.9 billion deal ● CHK is the second-largest producer in the Fayetteville Shale and second-largest leasehold owner in the Core area of the play with ~420,000 420,000 net acres (after 135,000 net acres to BP) ● 2009 planned activity – ~$600 mm budget nearly all funded by JV partner BP – Average of ~20 operated rigs 20 – ~350 bcfe of reserve additions – <$0.20/mcfe finding cost net to CHK ● CHK’s Fayetteville assets are approximately half the size of SWN’s Fayetteville assets SWN s – Valued at zero in CHK, but worth ~$4-5 billion based

~40 mile es

on an implied value of Fayetteville assets within SWN

10
Note: Risk disclosure regarding unproved reserve estimates appears on page 32

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Barnett Shale Summary
Prospective Area = ~1.5 Million Acres

● CHK is the second-largest producer, most active

~82 miles

Core & Tier 1 Outline

CHK Acreage CHK Acreage CHK Operated Rigs CHK Rigs CHK Non-op Rigs

~67 miles

driller and largest leasehold owner in the Core and Ti 1 sweet spot of T d Tier t t f Tarrant, J h t Johnson and d western Dallas counties ● Industry leading urban-drilling expertise has become a significant competitive advantage ● 2009 planned activity l d ti it – ~$950 mm budget – Average of ~25 operated rigs – ~675 bcfe of reserve additions – ~$1 40/mcfe net finding cost to CHK ~$1.40/mcfe ● Remember all the excitement about the western and southern counties? That has all faded away and what remains as the two best counties are Johnson and Tarrant ● In shale plays, as in all others, it’s the core acreage that is the best and CHK always focuses on acquiring core acreage rather than fringe acreage

11

Note: Risk disclosure regarding unproved reserve estimates appears on page 32

April 2009 Investor Presentation

CHK’s Big-4 Shale Scorecard
● CHK was early to recognize shale gas would become the biggest game
changer in the past 50 years within the U S natural gas industry U.S. ● Initiated 2005-08 shale science analysis and subsequent land grab ● Emerged with the best assets in the industry and then sold off minority interests at a big profit
Shale
Barnett Fayetteville Haynesville Marcellus

Entry Date
2004 2005 2006 2006

Pre-JV Net Acres
310,000 540,000 540 000 550,000 1,800,000

Pre-JV Cost Basis
$4.0 billion $0.5 $0 5 billion $3.0 billion $1.1 billion

Pre-JV Cost/Acre
$12,900 $930 $5,450 $610

JV Partner / % sold
N/A BP / 25% PXP / 20% STO / 32.5%

Current Net Acres
310,000 420,000 420 000 460,000 1,250,000

JV Proceeds
N/A $1.9 $1 9 billion $3.3 billion $3.4 billion

(1)

Post-JV Cost/Acre
$12,900 -$3,330 -$3 330 -$650 -$1,840

Totals

3,200,000

$8.6 billion

$2,700

2,440,000

$8.6 billion

$0

12
(1) Cash and drilling carry

Financial Overview

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Successful Hedging Reduces Risk and Helps Secure Attractive Cash Margins p g
CHK’s natural gas and oil hedge positions for 2009-2010(1)(2)
NYMEX Avg. Price $7.79 $9.43 $9 43

Natural Gas Swaps 2009 Total 2010 T t l Total

(3)(4)

% Hedged 42% 35%

Natural Gas Collars 2009 Total 2010 T t l Total

(5)

% Hedged 40% 13%

NYMEX Avg. Nymex Avg. Floor Price Ceiling Price $7.30 $6.48 $6 48 $9.00 $8.77 $8 77

Oil

(6)

% Hedged 26% 37%

NYMEX Avg. Price $83.50 $90.25

NYMEX Strip Prices @ 3/31/09
Oil Oil 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 5-Year Average $ $ $ $ $ 49.64 49 64 61.92 67.24 70.12 72.17 $ $ $ $ $

Gas
4.44 4 44 5.93 6.67 6.96 7.11

2009 Total 2010 Total

$ 64.22

$ 6.22

2001-2008 realized hedging gains: ~$2.1 billion 2009-beyond MTM value at 2/13/09: ~$1.6 billion Total hedging g g g gains: ~$3.7 billion
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) Excludes written calls Includes CNR derivative liabilities assumed at MTM value upon closing. Assumes approximately the midpoint of company production forecast for each item and includes hedging positions as of 2/17/2009 Includes positions with knockout provisions for 1% of 2009 production at knockout prices of $6.00 - $6.50 and for 25% of 2010 production at knockout prices of $5.45 - $6.75/mcf Does not include calls written with average premiums of $1.05 at average strike prices of $9.08 in 2009 and $0.96 and $10.77 in 2010 Includes three-way collars Includes cap-swaps and knockout swaps

14

April 2009 Investor Presentation

2009 Financial Projections at Various Natural Gas Prices
As of 2/17/09 Outlook

($ in millions; oil at $47.66 NYMEX) O/G revenue (unhedged) @ 880 bcfe(1) ( Hedging effect(2)) Marketing and other (@ $0.15/mcfe) Production taxes 5% LOE (@ $1.15/mcfe) G&A (@ $0.46/mcfe)(3) Ebitda Interest (@ $0.33/mcfe) Operating cash flow(2)(3)(4) Oil and gas depreciation (@ $1.95/mcfe) Depreciation of other assets (@ $0.26/mcfe) $0 26/mcfe) Income taxes (38.5% rate) (1) Net income to common Net income to common per fully diluted shares Net debt/ebitda(5) Debt to book capitalization ratio Ebitda/fixed charges (including pfd. dividends)(6) MEV/operating cash flow(7) EV/ebitda(8) PE ratio(9)
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

$4.00
$3,200 2,190 2 190 130 (160) (1,010) (400) 3,950 (290) 3,660 (1,720) (230) (660) $1,050 $1.71 3.1 39% 5.4 3.0x 6.6x 10.5x 10 5x

$5.00
$3,910 1,770 1 770 130 (200) (1,010) (400) 4,200 (290) 3,910 (1,720) (230) (750) $1,210 $1.98 3.0 39% 5.8 2.8x 6.2x 9.1x 9 1x

$6.00
$4,470 1,280 1 280 130 (220) (1,010) (400) 4,250 (290) 3,960 (1,720) (230) (770) $1,240 $2.02 2.9 39% 5.9 2.8x 6.1x 8.9x 8 9x

$7.00
$5,040 800 130 (250) (1,010) (400) 4,310 (290) 4,020 (1,720) (230) (800) $1,270 $2.07 2.9 39% 5.9 2.7x 6.0x 8.7x 8 7x

$8.00
$5,600 380 130 (280) (1,010) (400) 4,420 (290) 4,130 (1,720) (230) (840) $1,340 $2.19 2.8 39% 6.1 2.7x 5.9x 8.2x 8 2x

Before effects of FAS 133 (unrealized hedging gain or loss) Includes the non-cash effect of CNR hedges Includes charges related to stock based compensation Before changes in assets and liabilities Net debt = long-term debt less cash Fixed charges ($726mm) = interest expense of $702 million plus dividends of $24 million MEV (Market Equity Value) = $11.0 billion ($18.00/share x 609 mm fully diluted shares as of 12/31/08 EV (Enterprise Value) = $26.0 billion (Market Equity Value, plus $12.4 billion of net long-term debt plus $0.5 billion preferred stock treated as debt and $2.1 billion working capital deficit) Assuming a common stock price of $18.00/share

15

April 2009 Investor Presentation

2010 Financial Projections at Various Natural Gas Prices
As of 2/17/09 Outlook

($ in millions; oil at $70.00 NYMEX) O/G revenue (unhedged) @ 996 bcfe(1) Hedging ff t H dgi g effect(2) Marketing and other (@ $0.15/mcfe) Production taxes 5% LOE (@ $1.20/mcfe) (3) ( / ) G&A (@ $0.46/mcfe) Ebitda Interest (@ $0.38/mcfe) Operating cash flow(2)(3)(4) Oil and gas depreciation (@ $1.95/mcfe) Depreciation of other assets (@ $0.26/mcfe) D i i f h $0 26/ f ) Income taxes (38.5% rate) (1) Net income to common Net income to common per fully diluted shares / Net debt/ebitda(5) Debt to book capitalization ratio Ebitda/fixed charges (including pfd. Dividends)(6) MEV/operating cash flow(7) (8) EV/ebitda PE ratio(9) ti
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

$5.00
$4,600 950 150 (230) (1,200) ( (460) ) 3,810 (370) 3,440 (1,940) (260) (480) $760 $1.22 3.3 35% 5.3 3.2x 6.8x 14.8x 14 8

$6.00
$5,360 890 150 (270) (1,200) ( (460) ) 4,470 (370) 4,100 (1,940) (260) (730) $1,170 $1.88 2.8 34% 6.2 2.7x 5.8x 9.6x 96

$7.00
$6,130 1,100 1 100 150 (310) (1,200) ( (460) ) 5,410 (370) 5,040 (1,940) (260) (1,090) $1,750 $2.81 2.3 34% 7.5 2.2x 4.8x 6.4x 64

$8.00
$6,890 740 150 (340) (1,200) ( (460) ) 5,780 (370) 5,410 (1,940) (260) (1,240) $1,970 $3.16 2.1 34% 8.0 2.0x 4.5x 5.7x 57

$9.00
$7,650 230 150 (380) (1,200) ( (460) ) 5,990 (370) 5,620 (1,940) (260) (1,320) $2,100 $3.37 2.1 33% 8.3 2.0x 4.3x 5.3x 53

Before effects of FAS 133 (unrealized hedging gain or loss) Includes the non-cash effect of CNR hedges Includes charges related to stock based compensation Before changes in assets and liabilities Net debt = long-term debt less cash Fixed charges ($724mm) = interest expense of $702 million plus dividends of $22 million MEV (Market Equity Value) = $11.0 billion ($18.00/share x 609 mm fully diluted shares as of 12/31/08 EV (Enterprise Value) = $26.0 billion (Market Equity Value, plus $12.4 billion of net long-term debt, plus $0.5 billion preferred stock treated as debt and $2.1 billion working capital deficit) Assuming a common stock price of $18.00/share

16

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Cash Resource Plan ’09 - ’10
Net Cash Resources ($ in millions) Operating cash flow(1)(2) Leasehold and producing properties transactions Sales Acquisitions Net leasehold and producing properties transactions Midstream equity financings or asset sales Proceeds from investments and other Total: Net Cash Uses ($ in millions) Drilling Geologic and geophysical Midstream infrastructure and compression Other PP&E Dividends, capitalized interest, etc. Cash income taxes Total: Net Cash Change Production (bcfe per day) Proved reserves(3) (tcfe) Proved reserves per fully diluted share (mcfe) YOY % change in proved reserves per FD share Long-term debt, net of cash on hand ($ in millions) Long-term debt per mcfe of proved reserves 2009E $3,900 - $4,000 1,500 - 2,000 (350 - 500) 1,150 - 1,500 500 - 600 300 $5,850 - $6,400

(1)

2010E $5,000 - $5,400 1,000 - 1,500 (350 - 500) 650 - 1,000 500 - 600 $6,150 - $7,000

Total $8,900 - $9,400 2,500 - 3,500 (700 - 1,000) 1,800 - 2,500 1,000 - 1,200 300 $12,000 - $13,400

$2,800 - $3,000 100 - 125 600 - 700 300 - 350 600 - 800 175 - 200 $4,575 - $5,175 $1,225 - 1,275 2.41 13.5 21.7 12% ~$11,500 ~$0.84

$3,500 - $3,800 100 - 125 400 - 500 200 - 250 500 - 600 100 - 200 $4,800 - $5,475 $1,350 - 1,525 2.73 15.5 25.0 15% ~10,000 ~$0.65

$6,300 - $6,800 200 - 250 1,000 - 1,200 500 - 600 1,100 - 1,400 275 - 400 $9,375 - $10,650 $2,625 - 2,750

17
(1) (2) (3) From Outlook as of 2/17/09 and assumes NYMEX prices of $6.00-$7.00/mcf and $47.66/bbl in 2009 and $7.00-$8.00/mcf and $70/bbl in 2010 Before changes to asset and liabilities. Reconciliations to GAAP measures appear on pages 15-16 Under existing SEC proved reserve definitions – likely to increase beginning 12/31/09

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Senior Note Maturity Schedule
$4,000 $3,600 $3,200 $2,800
$ in MM

Total Senior Notes: $11.5 billion(1) Average Rate: 6 1% 6.1% Average Maturity: 7.8 years
$2,476(1)

$3,313( $3 313(2))

$2,526(2)

$2,400 $2 400 $2,000 $1,600 $1,200 $800 $400 $0
Rate:
'08 '09 '10 '11 '12
7.5% 7.5% 7.625% 7.0%

$1,270 $864
$3.5 billion bank credit facility matures November 2012

$600

$500

'13

'14

(1) (2)

Pro forma for recent combined offerings of $1.425 billion 9.5% Senior Notes due 2015 Recognizes earliest investor put option as maturity

6.625% 2.75% 6.625% 6.875% 9.5% 6.375%

'15

'16

2.5% 6.25% 6.5%

'17

2.25% 7.25% 6.25%

'18

'19

'20
6.875%

18

Staggered long term debt maturity structure with no senior notes due for five years; cash flow of >$30 billion likely before first payment

April 2009 Investor Presentation

CHK = Exceptional Value
December 31, 2008 (1) NAV @ various NYMEX gas prices Average NYMEX Natural Gas Prices ($ in millions, except per share d t ) i illi t h data) Proved reserves (2) Unproved reserves (3) Value of CHK hedges Value of CNR hedges (4) Other assets PXP, BP and STO future drilling cost receivables Less: long-term debt (net of cash equivalents) Less: preferred stock (when not dilutive) Less net working capital S a e o de a ue Shareholder value Fully diluted common shares (in millions) NAV per share Potential % upside
(5) (5)

$5.00 $5 00 $ 12,800 $ 5,700 2,900 5,300 5 300 4,250 (12,500) (500) (2,100) 15,850 $ 5,850 609 $ 26.03 $ 45% 2.3x

$6.00 $6 00 16,800 $ 11,500 2,600 5,300 5 300 4,250 (12,500) (500) (2,100) 25,350 5,350 609 41.63 131% 3.0x $ $

$7.00 $7 00 20,900 $ 17,200 2,500 5,300 5 300 4,250 (12,500) (2,100) 35,550 621 57.25 218% 3.8x $ $

$8.00 $8 00 25,100 $ 22,900 1,600 (100) 5,300 5 300 4,250 (12,500) (2,100) 44,450 $ , 50 621 71.58 298% 4.6x $

$9.00 $9 00 29,300 28,700 700 (100) 5,300 5 300 4,250 (12,500) (2,100) 53,550 621 86.23 379% 5.3x

$

Asset value to long-term debt

NYMEX Strip Prices @ 3/31/09
Oil Oil 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) NYMEX natural gas price scenarios and NYMEX oil price held constant at $44.61 per bbl 57 tcfe of unproved reserves valued from $0.10-$0.50/mcfe As of Outlook issued on 2/17/09 Buildings, drilling rigs, midstream gas assets at net book value and investments at market value Based on common stock price of $18.00 per share

Gas
$ $ $ $ $ 4.44 5.93 6.67 6.96 7.11

$ $ $ $ $

49.64 61.92 67.24 70.12 70 12 72.17

19

5-Year Average

$ 64.22

$ 6.22

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Why Buy CHK?
● Great Assets
– Only company with a Top-2 leasehold position in each of the Big-4 shale plays – 12 1 t f of proved reserves all onshore iin th U S east of th R ki 12.1 tcfe f d ll h the U.S., t f the Rockies – 57 tcfe of risked unproved reserves ● Innovative Shale Joint Ventures – $4 billion of joint venture carry receivables not on the books that can add ~2.5 tcfe of future

● Low Maintenance Cap-EX

reserves at no cost to CHK

– ~15% in 2009 and ~20% in 2010 – By far the lowest in the industry ● Well Hedged Well-Hedged – 78% of 2009 and 48% of 2010 production hedged at average prices of $7.71 and

● Attractive Valuation

$9.02 per mcfe, respectively

– Trade at a substantial discount to estimated NAV ● Still Growing Strong – Total production growth of 18% in 2008 – Projecting production growth of 5-10% in ’09 and 10-15% in ’10 to ~2.4 and ~2.7 bcfe/day,
respectively, while staying within cash resources
20

Appendix

April 2009 Investor Presentation

#1 Independent Producer of U.S. Natural Gas in 2008
Daily U.S. Natural Gas Production (a,b) 2008 Average Daily Production 2,157 (f) 2,119 (f) 2,091 2,049 1,982 1,905 1,633 1,501 1,241 1,163 1,094 1,040 683 681 587 526 472 448 416 396 24,183
(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)

Company (c) BP Chesapeake ConocoPhillips Anadarko Devon XTO EnCana Chevron ExxonMobil EOG Williams Shell El Paso Apache Occidental Southwestern Newfield Marathon Questar Noble Totals / Average

Ticker BP CHK COP APC DVN XTO ECA CVX XOM EOG WMB RDS EP APA OXY SWN NFX MRO STR NBL

2007 Average Daily Production 2,174 1,793 2,292 1,913 1,739 1,457 1,344 1,699 1,468 971 913 1,131 705 770 594 301 531 468 334 412 23,006

2008 vs. 2007 % Change (0.8%) 18.2% (8.8%) 7.1% 14.0% 30.7% 21.5% (11.6%) (15.5%) 19.8% 19.8% (8.0%) (3.1%) (11.6%) (1.2%) 74.8% (11.0%) (4.1%) 24.6% (3.9%) 7.5%

2008 Reported U.S. Net Proved Natural Gas Reserves 14,532 11,327 10,920 8,105 8,369 11,803 5,831 2,709 11,778 4,889 4,339 2,392 2,091 2,537 3,153 2,176 2,110 1,085 2,018 1,859 114,023

RP Ratio (d) 20 15 14 11 12 17 10 5 26 12 11 7 12 10 15 11 12 7 13 13

Proved Natural Gas Reserve Ranking 1 4 5 7 6 2 8 12 3 9 10 14 17 13 11 15 16 20 18 19

U.S. Rigs Drilling on 3/27/09 (e) 27 104 30 28 29 64 30 12 12 45 11 18 21 4 12 24 24 8 17 10 530

Based on company reports In mmcf/day Independents in blue, majors in black, pipelines in green Based on annualized 2008 production Source: Smith International Survey (operated rig count) CHK sold BP 92 mmcf/day in two different transactions in 2008

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April 2009 Investor Presentation

Location of CHK Properties
● ● ● ● ● ●
Gas-focused Well-diversified All onshore U.S. Not in the GOM (high and dry) Not in the Rockies (fewer political/environmental hassles, better natural gas prices) Not international (lower political risk)
Anadarko A d k Basin Fayetteville Shale

Marcellus Shale

Counties with CHK leasehold Mississippian & Devonian black shales
Barnett and Woodford Shale Plays Permian Basin
Delaware Basin

Barnett Shale Haynesville Shale Ark-La-Tex

Thrust Belt CHK field offices CHK OKC headquarters CHK operated rigs (~110)

Scale: 1 inch = ≈275 miles

CHK non-operated rigs (~75)

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April 2009 Investor Presentation

America’s #1 Gas Resource Base
● CHK is exceptionally well positioned for
long-term profitable growth l fi bl h ● Largest combined inventories of leasehold and 3-D seismic data in the industry ● 2 3 bcfe of daily production 92% gas 2.3 production, ● 12.1 tcfe of proved reserves, 93% gas ● 57.3 tcfe of risked unproved reserves – 165 tcfe of unrisked unproved reserves p ● 15.2 million net acres of leasehold ● 21.6 million acres of 3-D seismic data ● >10-year inventory of ~36,000 net drillsites
Conventional gas resource Unconventional gas resource

Net Acreage
15.2 million acres
4.6 10.6 10 6

Drillsites
~36,000 net drillsites
5,000

31,000

Proved Undeveloped p Reserves
4.0 tcfe
0.8

Risked Unproved p Reserves
57.3 tcfe
4.4

3.2

52.9

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• As of 12/31/08 • Risk disclosure regarding unproved reserve estimates appears on page 32

April 2009 Investor Presentation

CHK’s Drilling Inventory
CHK Industry Play Area Conventional Gas Resource Sub-total Unconventional Gas Resource Haynesville Shale Marcellus Shale Barnett Shale Fayetteville Shale Other Unconventional Unconventional Sub-total Sub total Total #1 #1 #2 #2 Top 3 460,000 1,250,000 310,000 420,000 8,160,000 10,600,000 10 600 000 15,200,000 80 80 60 80 Various 3,400 3,900 2,800 4,000 17,100 31,200 31 200 36,200 6.50 3.75 2.65 2.20 Various 595 45 2,935 660 4,395 8,630 8 630 12,050 16,400 12,400 4,900 7,100 12,100 52,900 52 900 57,300 16,995 12,445 7,835 7,760 16,495 61,530 61 530 69,350 27,500 49,700 6,600 8,900 49,000 141,700 141 700 164,900 70 10 610 180 780 1,650 1 650 2,355 22 6 25 20 26 99 112 Position Top 3
(1)

CHK Net Acreage 4,600,000

Est. Drilling Density (Acres)

Risked Net Undrilled Wells 5,000

Est. Avg. Reserves Per Well (bcfe)

Total Proved Reserves (bcfe) 3,420

Risked Unproved Reserves (bcfe) 4,400

Total Proved and Risked Unproved Reserves (bcfe) 7,820

Unrisked Unproved Reserves (bcfe) 23,200

Current Daily Production (mmcfe) 705

2/17/09 Operated Rig Count 13

Advances in horizontal drilling completion technologies have allowed a fundamental shift towards shale and unconventional resources in the past 3 years – CHK’s portfolio contains the best assets in the most prolific resource plays, within the U.S., which will enable us to excel in providing clean-burning natural gas for many years to come clean burning
• As of 12/31/08 • Risk disclosure regarding unproved reserve estimates appears on page 32

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April 2009 Investor Presentation

U.S. Gas Market – CHK’s View
● Higher production levels and lower demand will keep natural gas prices low in 2009 ● However, the fix is already in, gas directed rig counts are now at the lowest level y g g
since early ’03 and headed lower, fast ● Industry first year depletion rate of ~25-30% will fix supply/demand in balance by YE’09, just as the economy likely begins to recover ● CHK sees U.S. natural gas market as oversupplied in 2009, but balanced thereafter – CHK sees U.S. natural gas prices at Henry Hub averaging $4-6/mmcf in 2009 and $7-9 in
2010 and beyond – Natural gas prices not likely to stay permanently low because of great success of the “Big-4” Shale plays (Barnett, Fayetteville, Haynesville and Marcellus). Instead, it will be the g y y y highest cost one-third of U.S. production that will set out-year natural gas prices, not the lowest cost one-third – CHK sees greater and greater bifurcation between the 10 or so “shale haves” of the U.S. natural gas industry (CHK is #1 “have”, we believe) vs. the 10,000 or so “shale have-nots.” The “ h l h Th “shale haves” asset bases will continually improve while the “shale h ” tb ill ti ll i hil th “ h l have-nots” asset t ” t bases will continually degrade – Those that missed the “Big-4” Shale land grab of 2004-08 will pay the price for decades to come…

26

April 2009 Investor Presentation

The Fix is Underway for U.S. Natural Gas Markets
● Against unrelenting pessimism about U.S. natural gas prices in
early 2009, there is emerging evidence that market forces are creating the conditions for a strong natural gas price recovery in 2010 and 2011 ● What is that evidence? It’s plunging rig counts (40-50/week lately) and accelerating decline curves (the “dark side” of technology) ● What do we know today? – First year U.S. decline rate is ~25-30%, i.e. ~15-18 bcf/day – 2008 U.S. gas production YOY increase of ~7%, or ~4 bcf/day – 2008 natural gas rig count averaged ~1,500 rigs – this overcame first
year depletion of ~25% and generated growth of ~7%, for a combined 25% 7%, ~32% addition rate – If natural gas rig count went to zero, then all would agree this ~32% number would also become zero – So, if natural gas rig count goes down by 50% in 2009, CHK believes industry will lose nearly 40% of this ~32% production capacity increase, through which ~7% growth disappears and ~7% production declines appear by 2010. So, YOY growth of ~4 bcf/day in 2008 will soon give way to a decrease of ~4 bcf/day, setting up a big price rebound in 2010 and 2011 if U.S. economy does not materially weaken from here

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April 2009 Investor Presentation

Total U.S. Decline Rate
Historical Natural Gas Production
60

50

Daily Marketed Productio (bcf/d) on

40
2007

30

2006 2005

20

2004 2003 2002

Nearly half of U.S. production comes from wells drilled in the last three years… ~25-30% from wells drilled in the past year alone

10

2001 2000 Base

0

Base Decline First Year Decline
Source: IHS Energy

27.2% 50.1%

24.6% 41.8%

24.0% 43.6%

25.5% 46.5%

25.5% 48.8%

24.8% 45.5%

24.5% 44.1%

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Note: Data represents ~95% of U.S. marketed natural gas production

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Strong Depletion Rates Require High Drilling Levels to Maintain & Grow Production
62 60

● 2008 average gas rig count: 1,491 (1,606 peak in 8/08) ● 3/13/09 gas rig count: 884, down 38% vs. ’08 average & 884 vs 08
44% vs. ‘08 peak

Daily Mark keted Production (bcf/d)

58 56 54 52 50 48 46 44 42 40

3.5 bcf/day ~7% YOY growth rate

13.3 bcf/day ~25% decline rate
2008 2007 and prior

Source: IHS Energy and EIA

29

•If rig count declines by 50%, new production adds will decline by 35 - 40% •If rig count declines by 33%, new production adds will decline by 20 - 25%

April 2009 Investor Presentation

The Fix Is Underway – Reduced Drilling Activity Will Quickly Reduce Supply y Q y pp y
Gas Directed Rig Count Scenarios
76 74 72 70 68 66 64 62 60 58 56 54 52 50 48 46 44 42 40 38 36 34 32 30 28 26 24 1,800 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800
1,500 rigs 1,100 rigs 1,000 rigs 750 rigs Base Rig Count 1,500 Rig Count 1,100 Rig Count 1,000 Rig Count 750

1,500 rig count scenario

Daily Mark keted Production (bcf/d)

1,100 rig count scenario
1,000 rig count scenario

750 rig count scenario (CHK’s most likely case)

600 400 200 0

0 rig count scenario i

Source: IHS Energy, Baker Hughes, EIA and Chesapeake estimates

30

April 2009 Investor Presentation

Corporate Information
Chesapeake Headquarters 6100 N. Western Avenue Oklahoma City, OK 73118
Web site: www.chk.com

Contacts:

Jeffrey L. Mobley, CFA
Senior Vice President – Investor Relations and Research (405) 767-4763 jeff.mobley@chk.com
Ticker CHK13 Executive Vice President CHKJ13 CHK14 Chief Financial Officer CHKA14 CHKJ15 (405) 879-9232 CHK15K marc.rowland@chk.com CHKJ16 CHK16 CHK17 N/A CHK18 CHK18A CHK20 CHK35 CHK37/CHK37A CHK38

Common St k – NYSE CHK C Stock NYSE:
Other Publicly Traded Securities 7.5% Senior Notes Due 2013 7.625% Senior Notes Due 2013 7.5% Senior Notes Due 2014 7.0% Senior Notes Due 2014 6.375% Senior Notes Due 2015 9.5% Senior Notes Due 2015 6.625% Senior Notes Due 2016 6.875% Senior Notes Due 2016 6.50% Senior Notes Due 2017 6.25% S i Notes Due 6 25% Senior N t D 2017 6.25% Senior Notes Due 2018 7.25% Senior Notes Due 2018 6.875% Senior Notes Due 2020 2.75% Contingent Convertible Senior Notes Due 2035 2.50% Contingent Convertible Senior Notes Due 2037 2.25% Contingent Convertible Senior Notes Due 2038 CUSIP #165167BC0 #165167BY2 #165167BG1 #165167BJ5 #165167BL0 #165167CD7 #165167BN6 #165167BE6 #165167BS5 #027393390 #165167BQ9 #165167CC9 #165167BV0 #165167BW6 #165167BZ9/165167CA3 #165167CB1

Marcus C. Rowland

and

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April 2009 Investor Presentation

Certain Reserve & Production Information

The Securities and Exchange Commission has generally permitted oil and gas companies, in their filings with the SEC, to disclose only proved reserves that a company has demonstrated by actual p production or conclusive formation tests to be economically and legally producible under existing y g yp g economic and operating conditions. We use the terms “unproved” reserves, including both “risked” and “unrisked” unproved reserves, reserve “potential” or “upside”, “ultimate recovery” and other descriptions of volumes of reserves potentially recoverable through additional drilling or recovery techniques that the SEC’s guidelines may prohibit us from including in filings with the SEC. To estimate unproved reserves the company uses a probability weighted statistical approach to estimate reserves, probability-weighted the potential number of drillsites and potential unproved reserves associated with such drillsites. These estimates are by their nature more speculative than estimates of proved reserves and accordingly are subject to substantially greater risk of being actually realized by the company. The company's methodology for estimating "unproved" reserves is different from the methodology and guidelines used by the Society of Petroleum Engineers for estimating "probable" and "possible" probable possible reserves. Our production forecasts are dependent upon many assumptions, including estimates of production decline rates from existing wells and the outcome of future drilling activity. Also, our estimates of reserves, particularly those in our recent acquisitions where we may have limited review of data or experience with th properties, may b subject to revision and may be different from those estimates i ith the ti be bj t t i i d b diff tf th ti t at year end. Although we believe the expectations, estimates and forecasts reflected in these and other forward-looking statements are reasonable, we can give no assurance they will prove to have been correct. They can be affected by inaccurate assumptions and data or by known or unknown risks and uncertainties.
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April 2009 Investor Presentation

Forward-Looking Statements

This presentation includes include “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements give our current expectations or forecasts of future events. They include estimates of future natural gas and oil reserves, expected natural gas and oil production and future expenses, assumptions regarding f t ti g di g future natural g and oil prices, planned asset sales, budgeted capital expenditures for drilling and acquisitions t l gas d il i l d t l b dg t d it l dit f d illi g d i iti of leasehold and producing property, and other anticipated cash outflows, as well as statements concerning anticipated cash flow and liquidity, business strategy and other plans and objectives for future operations. Disclosures concerning the fair value of derivative contracts and their estimated contribution to our future results of operations are based upon market information as of a specific date. These market prices are subject to significant volatility. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expected results are described under “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of our Risk Factors 2008 Form 10-K filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on March 2, 2009. These risk factors include the volatility of natural gas and oil prices; the limitations our level of indebtedness may have on our financial flexibility; unanticipated adverse effects the current financial crisis may have on our business and financial condition; declines in the values of our natural gas and oil properties resulting in ceiling test write-downs; the availability of capital on an economic basis, including through planned asset monetization transactions, to fund reserve replacement costs; our ability to replace reserves and sustain production; uncertainties inherent in estimating quantities of natural gas and oil reserves and projecting future rates of production and the amount and timing of development expenditures; exploration and development drilling that does not result in commercially productive reserves; expiration of d l t dit l ti dd l t d illi th t d t lt i i ll d ti i ti f natural gas and oil leases that are not held by production; hedging activities resulting in lower prices realized on natural gas and oil sales and the need to secure hedging liabilities; uncertainties in evaluating natural gas and oil reserves of acquired properties and potential liabilities; the negative impact lower natural gas and oil prices could have on our ability to borrow; drilling and operating risks, including potential environmental liabilities; transportation capacity constraints and interruptions that could adversely affect our cash flow; adverse effects of governmental and environmental regulation, and losses possible from pending or future litigation. Our production forecasts are dependent upon many assumptions, including estimates of production decline rates from existing wells and the outcome of future drilling activity. Although we believe the expectations and forecasts reflected in these and other forward-looking statements are reasonable, we can give no assurance they will prove to have been correct. They can be affected by inaccurate assumptions or by known or unknown risks and uncertainties. We caution you not to place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this presentation, and we undertake no obligation to update this information.

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