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INSIDE:

nPaulding Co.
Fair schedule
and preview
nJohn Paulding
Days schedule
and preview
nSenior
Spotlight
nLook inside!
Special sales
events from ...
Chief, Menards,
Rural King, AEP,
Ruler Foods,
Visit Fort Wayne
Around
Paulding
County
Closing early
PAULDING The main
historic Carnegie library
in Paulding will close at 6
p.m. Thursday, June 6 so
that staff can participate in
the John Paulding Days
Parade.
Blood drives set
PAYNE Two American
Red Cross blood drives are
scheduled in the next week
in Paulding County:
Thursday, June 6, from
11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. at the
First Christian Church, lo-
cated at 1233 Emerald Road
in Paulding.
Monday, June 10, from
noon-6 p.m. at St. Paul
United Methodist Church,
located at 312 S. Main St.
in Payne.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to donate, please call
1-800-RED CROSS (1-
800-733-2767) or visit red-
crossblood.org for more in-
formation.
Weather report
A summary of Mays
weather highs and lows, as
recorded at Pauldings
water treatment plant:
Maximum tempera-
ture: 90 on May 22 and
31.
Low temperature: 34
on May 13.
Most rain in a 24-hour
period: 0.97 inch on May
28.
Total rainfall for the
month: 1.56 inches.
Thanks to you ...
Wed like to thank Phil
Block of Defiance for sub-
scribing to the Progress!
P
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AULDING
AULDING
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OUNTY
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VOL. 138 NO. 41 PAULDING, OHIO 419-399-4015 www.progressnewspaper.org WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 2013 ONE DOLLAR USPS 423620
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See DOG WARDEN, page 2A
See BUILDING, page 2A
P
P
ROGRESS
ROGRESS
By DENISE GEBERS
Progress Staff Writer
PAULDING Following a
40-minute executive session
Monday morning, the Pau -
lding County commissioners
unanimously voted to rehire
Georgia Dyson as dog warden.
The three-man board passed
a resolution to appoint Dyson
as dog warden, under the au-
thority of the sheriffs office,
effective July 1. This move
was made due to a recent up-
date from the Ohio Ethics
Commission.
In May, the commissioners
had voted to transition the dog
warden office to the sheriffs
office and said Dysons last
day on the job would be June
30. It was initially thought she
was ineligible for the new job
because her spouse is already
employed at the sheriffs of-
fice.
Her starting pay will be
$14.94 an hour as a reflection
of her current salary. In four
months, around Nov. 1, she
will be subject to an evalua-
tion.
At that time it will be deter-
mined what her compensation
should be according to
changes in her responsibilities
due to also serving as a sher-
iffs deputy while filling the
role as dog warden.
When the vote was com-
plete, Commissioner Tony
Zartman told Dyson, We re-
ally hope this works for you.
Sheriff Jason Landers said
that since Dyson is already a
reserve officer with his depart-
ment, she will not be subject to
further training. She will, how-
ever, be accountable to depart-
ment policies and procedures.
There will be a learning
curve, I expect, said Sheriff
Landers, saying she will be ex-
pected to learn the operations
of the sheriffs office and do
required paperwork.
Landers said her number
one responsibility will be that
of dog warden with those of a
deputy sheriff around that.
The dog warden will wear a
deputys uniform, drive a vehi-
cle with a sheriffs office em-
blem, and keep regular hours.
She will be a commission-
ers employee managed by the
sheriffs office, he said.
At the same time, there have
been no new developments re-
garding proposed changes to
the county emergency man-
agement agency (EMA). The
commissioners are in the
process of getting approval
from a majority of the countys
townships and villages to dis-
band the current EMA board.
On Monday, EMA director
Randy Shaffer said the com-
missioners have not formally
made that offer for him to
stay in his present position.
But I understand it may be
happening, Shaffer added. It
still depends if on the villages
and townships formally agree
Jim Bowers/Paulding County Progress
Survivors, family and friends lit hundreds of luminarias around the track at the annual Relay
For Life on Friday evening. They are placed in honor of or in memory of a loved one.
Denise Gebers/Paulding County Progress
A group of volunteers have formed a Building for the Future Fund to make some extreme changes on the Paulding
County Fairgrounds. Looking over an architects drawing of the proposed project are, seated from left Lisa McClure,
executive director of the Paulding County Area Foundation; Mike Kauser, president of the Friends of the Fair project
committee; Lonnie Miller, member of the senior fair board and Friends of the Fair; back from left Steve Sukup and
Roy Klopfenstein, Friends of the Fair committee and 4-H parents; Mike Molitor, member of the fair board and Friends
of the Fair committee and Joel Parrett, fair board member.
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When you repair and old building it
By DENISE GEBERS
Progress Staff Writer
PAULDING Awesome news of an
extremely generous donation is gener-
ating excitement for members of the
Friends of the Fair and those who have
an interest in the Paulding County Fair.
Last Thursday word was received of
a $100,000 matching donation to go
toward building three new livestock
barns on the Paulding County fair-
grounds. This came just as members of
the Friends of the Fair were about to
announce a $250,000 project to demol-
ish the three old barns north of the
show arena and rebuild.
This shows the generosity of our
county, said Lisa McClure, executive
director of the Paulding County Area
Foundation, which will administer the
Friends of the Fairs Building for the
Future Fund.
Mike Kauser, president of the
Friends of the Fairs project commit-
tee, concurred. What better way to
start a project? he wondered.
It was noted that no time limit was
set for the match.
Plans are in the works to construct
two 60x90 and one 40x100 pole
barns. The smaller pair would house
the sheep and goats in one and poultry
in the other. Swine projects would go
in the longer barn.
The new layouts will open up 1,400
additional square feet for use.
These will replace the older wooden
barns, constructed around 1872 which
are all located north of the show arena.
The fair board and contributors have
been putting money into these build-
ings through the years to keep them us-
able, but donors were tiring of sinking
money into old buildings.
Lonnie Miller, longtime fair board
member, said when they last asked for
donations for upkeep and improve-
ments to the building certain folks said
they wouldnt contribute to old build-
Anonymous $100,000 match
jumpstarts fair building project
Dog warden
is rehired
See RELAY, page 2A
This is just totally awesome. So many peo-
ple worked so hard to make this happen, com-
mented Karen Saxton, who heads up the event.
We were talking as we were walking on the
victory lap a little while ago. We are just one
big Paulding County family working together
for a good cause.
One major unexpected hitch was a severe
storm that hit the fairgrounds about 11 p.m.
Friday, accompanied by a tornado watch.
Those present, with the help of the EMA and
fairground maintenance worker, Larry Colley,
were ushered into the facilitys storm shelter
for almost an hour.
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAULDING Over $115,000 had been
turned in for this years Paulding County Relay
For Life efforts as of Sunday, with other dona-
tions still pending. Thirty-one participating
teams raised over $105,000, plus corporate
sponsors donated over $10,000.
In addition, one major fundraiser was
rescheduled for 10 a.m. June 15 at the Paulding
County Fairgrounds, due to rain last Saturday
morning.
A 5K race, supported by EntouRog Team,
will begin taking registrations at 9:15 a.m. All
money raised through the event will still go to-
wards the 2013 Relay effort.
Relay For Life takes in
$115,000 and counting
2A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, June 5, 2013
n DOG WARDEN
Continued from Page 1A
n BUILDING
Continued from Page 1A
n RELAY
Continued from Page 1A
copyright 2013 Published weekly by
The Paulding County Progress, Inc. P.O.
Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding,
Ohio 45879 Phone 419-399-4015
Fax: 419-399-4030;
website: www.progressnewspaper.org
Doug Nutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . Publisher
Advertising - dnutter@progressnewspaper.org
Melinda Krick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor
Editorial - progress@progressnewspaper.org
USPS 423620
Entered at the Post Office in Paulding,
Ohio, as 2nd class matter. Subscription
rates: $36 per year for mailing addresses
in Defiance, Van Wert Putnam and
Paulding counties. $46 per year outside
these counties; local rate for Military per-
sonnel and students.
Deadline for display ad-
vertising 3 p.m. Monday.
News deadline 3 p.m.
Thursday.
Paulding County Progress
WHAT: Cleveland
Street Rib Fest & 5K
River Run
WHEN: Saturday, June
8, starting at 9 a.m.
WHERE: Antwerp
WHO: Coordinated by
Antwerp Community
Development Committee
(ACDC)
McMichael.
Relay means a lot to us,
observed Tommy Wanne -
macher. My grandmother,
Betty Roth of Belleview, was
an honorary chairman. My
wifes grandmother fought
cancer. It means the world
when you see survivors out
here.
The luminary service real-
ly gets to me, especially when
you realize all of the lives of
people represented by each
candle, added Wannemacher.
Everyone was such a help
in this, said Saxton.
Due to threatening weather
conditions, organizers decided
at midnight to suspend Relay
activities until 6 a.m.
One individual who was es-
pecially moved by the event
was Susie Sanderson, first-
year team captain representing
Country Inn of Latty.
Since I work in a health
care facility, I have seen how
cancer affects lives and resi-
dents and families, said
Sanderson. We are so happy
to support this cause.
Its touching to see how
everyone works together. We
want to continue doing this
every year, added Sanderson,
who noted that there were 18
team members on the facilitys
first effort.
One added dimension to
this years event was the cele-
bration of 20 years of involve-
ment in Paulding County. For
Jillene McMichael, who has
been actively involved with
much of the Relays energy in
recent years, it was even more
exciting because the American
Cancer Society is celebrating
its 100th year of involvement.
Paulding County and the
ACS get to celebrate mile-
stones together. That is an
awesome thing. To look at the
faces of the people in this
county, how much they love
and help each other, that is re-
ally special, observed
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
ANTWERP Cleveland
Street in the small village of
Antwerp in western Paulding
County will be home to the
fourth annual Rib Fest this
Saturday, June 8. A plethora of
activities including music, a
corn hole tournament, 5K run,
along with an array of food se-
lections will be made avail-
able to entice the summer
crowd.
Ribs will be the main event
on the menu complimented
with various organizations of-
fering everything from ham-
burgers to curly fries and ice
cream to the summer favorites
lemon shake-ups and corn-on-
the-cob.
There will be no shortage of
choices when it comes to find-
ing the ribs that fit ones style.
Five area rib joints will be of-
fering some of the best barbe-
cue ribs this Saturday from
11:30 a.m.-8 p.m., including
Nickersons from Defiance,
Shigs In Pit from Fort Wayne,
Stella Blue located in
Archbold, Timmys BBQ in
Garrett, Ind., and the
Brickhaus from Hicksville.
They will offer a variety of rib
selections to please any lover
of barbecue.
The fest will step off at 9
a.m. with the 5K River Run
with medals be awarded to the
top three male and female fin-
ishers in each age category.
Registration for the 5K can be
completed by calling Aimee
Lichty at 419-506-1228 or
prior to the run beginning at 8
a.m.
Age groups include 0-16,
17-21, 22-26, 27-31, 32-39,
40-49, and 50 and older.
Registration and the River
Run will begin at the Oasis
Bar and Grill parking lot lo-
cated at 111 N. Main St.
Live music featuring the
country rock sounds of the
Marshall Law Band will begin
at 6 p.m. The band, based out
of Fort Wayne, describes their
sound as country music with a
little kick to it. During the day,
from noon-6 p.m., local DJ
Larry Colley will be playing
music for the crowds enjoy-
ment.
Other activities during the
day include a corn hole tour-
nament at noon with registra-
tion at 11 a.m.; 50/50 raffle;
tumbling and gymnastics re-
view by the members of K&S
Tumblefit from 11 a.m.-1
p.m.; and train rides for the
kids sponsored by the
Antwerp Chamber of
Commerce.
In order to meet the taste
buds of those who may not
desire ribs, there will be plen-
ty of choices to consider. The
Antwerp Rotary will be offer-
ing ice cream; the ball associ-
ation will be serving pulled
pork sandwiches and slushies;
the Womens Fire Auxiliary
plans to offer hamburgers, hot
dogs and brats; the Boy
Scouts will be serving up
curly fries, corn-on-the-cob,
and lemon shake ups; the
Antwerp Athletic Boosters
will offer bottled water and
soft drinks. For adults, the
VFW will be sponsoring a
beer pavilion.
The Cleveland Street Rib
Fest is sponsored by and coor-
dinated through the Antwerp
Community Development
Committee. All proceeds from
the Fest are put back into the
overall well being of the com-
munity.
over $15,000) Crew 4 A
Cure, Marathon Moms and
Paulding Exempted Village
Schools.
Teams can still turn in
money and online donations
can be made on the website
www.relayforlife.org/paulding
until mid-August to be credit-
ed to the 2013 total.
Last year, Paulding County
Relay For Life netted
$122,597. This year the goal is
to raise $129,000 to fight can-
cer.
Top contributions included:
Bronze Teams (raised
over $2,500) Antwerp
United Methodist Church,
Paulding County Hospital,
Stahl Stoller Meyer Insurance
Center
Silver Teams (raised over
$3,500) Heitmeyer Funeral
Home
Gold Teams (raised over
$5,000) Wayne Trace Local
Schools, Woodbridge
Campers 4 A Cure
Sapphire Teams (raised
have expressed pleasure at the
news that Dyson will retain
her job, an update posted
Monday on the Recall the
Paulding Ohio Com mis -
sioners Facebook page indi-
cates that the group isnt plan-
ning to back down.
That just goes to show that
if we speak up loud enough,
they cant ignore us. Were
still going to be trying to re-
move them from office. We
shouldnt have to go to these
extremes to get the commis-
sioners to take our opinions
into account, the post stated.
For an interview with
Zartman, see Page 11A.
to disband the board.
Zartman on Tuesday said
that Shaffer has not met with
all three commissioners, but
has met with Commissioner
Roy Klopfenstein. Zartman
believes they seem to be in
agreement that Shaffer will
stay on.
The commissioners are still
going around to townships and
villages for signatures on the
agreement to dissolve the
EMA board; however, they are
waiting for an official resolu-
tion before proceeding. They
are confident they will get the
signatures needed.
Although many residents
is still old and no more usable
or efficient. Its an old building
with a lot of money in it, he
said.
The project began slowly,
but has gained momentum
rapidly. Kauser and other
members of the Paulding FFA
Alumni approached the fair
board in February to discuss
improvements to the current
barns.
As it became apparent that a
larger scale project of replac-
ing the buildings was possible,
fundraising ideas and volun-
teers were gathered. In March,
Friends of the Fair was estab-
lished.
It rolled from there rather
fast, said Kauser. It became
our goal to get plans in place
by fair.
Paulding FFA Alumni has
provided seed money to get
the project going. They have
paid for architectural render-
ings and printing of education-
al materials. Their entire
pledge amount will be an-
nounced during the livestock
sale at the fair.
Spencer Beckman, a
Paulding FFA alumnus and
former livestock showman,
has been drawn into the proj-
ect. His special skills as a
CAD designer with B.A.
Beilharz, an architect out of
Defiance, and knowledge of
state codes have assisted the
project tremendously.
Monetary goal for the proj-
ect is $250,000. Kauser ap-
proached McClure about start-
ing a fund within the Paulding
County Area Foundation to
administer the funds.
This will be an amazing
addition to the fairgrounds,
said McClure. We are excited
to be a part of this project.
Trustees of the Foundation
will have the final decision on
the distribution of resources in
the fund.
In addition to the barn struc-
tures, the money will pay for
site preparation and drainage,
cement for the hog barns in-
cluding four feet high walls to
eliminate rotting posts and
electrical requirements.
All updated electrical com-
ponents just purchased for the
poultry barn with funds raised
over the winter will be reused,
as will existing pens.
We are being very prudent
with pieces and materials that
can be reused, said McClure.
Originally, plans were for
demolition after fall fest in
2014 with construction to be
complete by the 2015 fair. But
news of the matching grant
has committee members opti-
mistic.
If this (donations totaling
$200,000) happens in three
months, we could start this
fall, said Roy Klopfenstein,
Friends of the Fair member, 4-
H parent and county commis-
sioner.
Realistically, once the funds
are collected, the committee
will need to draw up bid pack-
ages, let the bids and get onto
the contractor(s) schedule(s).
The Friends of the Fair proj-
ect committee sees this project
as a positive for the county as
a whole, effecting 4-Hers, FFA
members, community groups
who use the fairgrounds such
as Relay For Life and Flat
Rock Creek Fall Festival.
Fair board president Tim
Shafer said, This will really
improve the grounds for all
parties, including fall fest,
camper storage, and the fair.
All parties concerned
agreed that the new buildings
will be usable for a wide vari-
ety of purposes, not just live-
stock.
Displays are being prepared
for educational purposes for
use at the fair. The public will
be able to view these in the
small pavilion west of the
Midway Caf near the secre-
tarys office and in the
Foundations tent located near
the livestock barns at the west
end of the Midway.
Kauser will also address the
buyers and crowds during the
annual junior fair livestock
sale at the fair on Saturday,
June 15.
To make a donation, or to
learn more about this project,
contact any committee mem-
ber. On the committee are
Mike Kauser, Rusty Rager,
Spencer Beckman, Steve
Sukup, Mark Spangler, Dan
Howell, Tim Shafer, Mike
Molitor, Ryan McClure, Roy
Klopfenstein, Lonnie Miller
and Lisa McClure.
Checks should be made out
to Paulding County Area
Foundation with Friends of the
Fair on the memo line. They
may be dropped off or mailed
to the foundation at 101 E.
Perry St., Paulding OH 45879.
Jim Langham/Paulding County Progress
Tony and Nancy Burkley have been selected as grand marshal for this
years John Paulding Days parade. Tony is serving his first term as a state
representative. Here, the Burkleys are seen at the recent Relay For Life event
in honor of their daughter, Audrey, who passed with cancer this past
Christmas.
Burkleys to lead John Paulding Days parade
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAULDING When I think that
this honor of being grand marshal for
John Paulding Days this year has
been given to us, I feel very unwor-
thy, said Nancy Burkley recently.
For the last three years our
friends, family and co-workers in
this community, as well our church
family, have given more to our fami-
ly than we could ever repay.
This time is very hard for us, be-
cause last year at this time we still
had our daughter, Audrey. We were
still praying for a miracle. She
passed away of breast cancer at the
young age of 35 just before
Christmas, Burkley said.
Burkley said that outpouring of
love and support by the local com-
munity in ways they could not have
imagined has made it possible for
their family to endure the difficult
time of illness and loss.
In addition to bringing meals,
taking Audrey to treatments and
praying for us, we had friends and
family who were with us in the last
days, sometimes doing duties one
would think only a mother would be
able to do. Audrey was fortunate to
have a loving husband, Chad, and
two beautiful children, Dane and
Mallory, to make her last days happy
ones, added Burkley.
Tony Burkley said that he realizes
that the honor of being grand mar-
shal is a premier tribute any small
community can share with one of its
own. He is especially moved when
he thinks of grand marshals of the
past and what giants of the commu-
nity he considered them to be.
Burkley chuckled when he said
that traditionally, many of those who
are given the honor of being grand
marshal are honored late in their
lives. But he mentioned that he was
talking with last years honored cou-
ple, Dr. John and Karen Saxton of
Oakwood.
John and I were laughing that we
are glad they are giving that opportu-
nity to younger residents these days,
quipped Burkley.
Burkley still recalls the night that
he and Nancy met for the first time.
She had just graduated from the
eighth grade in the Catholic school
and there was a party celebrating the
graduation.
The boys were on one side and
the girls on the other. I stepped out
and asked that cute girl on the other
side to dance with me, Burkley said.
As it turned out, that was the begin-
ning of our relationship. We went to-
gether all through high school and
were eventually married in the
Catholic Church in Payne on on
April 19, 1974.
For much of his early married life,
Burkley worked in the NAPA store
that had originally been started in
Payne by his father, Marion Burkley.
Then, in 1996, he entered a different
time of life when he was elected as a
Paulding County commissioner. For
the next 16 years, he had the unique
privilege of serving out four terms,
longer than any other commissioner
in the history of Paulding County.
He also became a successful small
business owner. His NAPA/True
Value, which providing hardware
and automative parts service, recent-
ly celebrated a major expansion.
Nancy was serving as elementary
secretary and then special education
secretary in the Paulding Exempted
Village Schools. In addition to being
an active mother, Nancy also served
as the Republican Womens secre-
tary for six years and has been active
in her commitment to her local
church.
In the meantime, Tony developed
a growing fervor to enter the political
public life arena. Last November, he
was elected as a state representative
for the 82nd District, which includes
the counties of Defiance, Paulding,
Van Wert and the northern portion of
Auglaize.
Sometimes its easy to sit around
and complain about how the govern-
ment is run, said Burkley.
Sometimes there is a legitimate
concern for that. I have always been
one who has a mindset to attempt to
solve problems. When I look at
things, I look for solutions.
I do a lot of listening and try not
to jump into things, continued
Burkley. My mindset is not how I
benefit politically, but how to help
the people I come into contact with.
If you have a mindset for their hurt-
ing, you understand that there are
probably reasons why they are in the
situation that they are in.
Nancy said that living in a small
community, blessed by the love and
care of its residents, gives those with-
in its limits a sense of appreciation
for all that God gives His children.
Before Audrey entered inpatient
hospice, she asked me to bring her a
peanut butter sandwich, observed
Burkley. Feeling that I should have
made something better for her, I
turned around to ask her if there
was anything else that I could make
for her.
Her now-bald head was bowed
and her hands were folded in prayer,
thanking God for that silly sand-
wich, Nancy added. I think it was
Gods way of making me feel as
though we must have done some-
thing right as parents. I think of that
day when I need to be reminded to be
grateful for everything He gives us.
Leading the Survivor Lap for the Relay For Life of Paulding County were honorary survivors Richard Nickols, Roger Sierer and
John LaFountain. Photo courtesy Erika Pease. For more photos, visit www.progressnewspaper.org/
No bones about
it: ribs will star
in Antwerp fest
MARY SMITH
1917-2013
PAULDING Mary Fran-
cis Smith, age 96, died Fri-
day, May 31 at The Gardens
of Paulding.
She was born May 28,
1917 in Cecil, the daughter of
Conrad and Emma Fay
(Biggs) Winterhaulter. In
1934, she married John P.
Smith, who preceded her in
death on July 8, 2001. She
was previously employed as
an LPN for Paulding County
Hospital and was a member
of Cecil First Presbyterian
Church.
Mary was a devoted wife,
mother and grandmother. Her
family meant everything in
the world to her. She went
without many things in life so
that her family would not
have to endure all the hard-
ships she experienced
throughout her life. Marys
personality was one of being
strong, even tough when nec-
essary, but most of all, giving
of herself and whatever she
had in life to her family.
Mary loved babies and
children. She always enjoyed
having her grandkids visit
her. Marys passing leaves an
empty hole in our hearts and
she will be deeply missed by
her family and friends.
She is survived by a son,
Jerry L. (Robin) Smith, Per-
rysburg; a daughter-in-law,
Nancy Smith, Hicksville; a
brother, Bill (Ramona) Win-
terhaulter, Defiance; grand-
children, Greg, John, Sally,
Ryan and Matthew; and
seven great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; husband; son,
John Jack Smith; a brother,
Mike Winterhaulter; and four
sisters, Betty, Donna, and
Ruth Bud Winterhaulter,
and Helen Stratten.
Funeral services will be
conducted 11 a.m. today, June
5 at Den Herder Funeral
Home, Paulding. Burial will
follow at 1 p.m. in Riverview
Memory Gardens, Defiance.
Visitation will be one hour
prior to services today.
Her favorite charity was St.
Jude Childrens Hospital. She
was supportive of the services
they provide to all children.
Please send donations in
Marys memory to St. Jude
Childrens Research Hospital.
Online condolences may be
sent to www.denherderfh.com.
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 3A
Obituaries Updated weekdays at www.progressnewspaper.org
The
Church Corner
Sunday, June 23
Gospel concert
JUNCTION Junction Bible Christian
Church and the Eastern Paulding Ministerial
Association are pleased to be sponsoring
award-winning, southern gospel recording
artist, Jerry Garcia, for two limited engage-
ments in the area.
Garcia will be warming up for these events
by bringing his music to the worship service
at 10:30 a.m. June 23, at Junction Bible Chris-
tian Church, 18878 Road 111, in Junction.
There will be a coffee and donut fellowship to
follow.
Another event is a concert at 6 p.m. June 23,
at Woodbridge Campgrounds, 8656 Road 137.
Garcia will be singing on stage in the Com-
munity Hall.
Monday, June 24
Gospel concert
JUNCTION Jerry Garcias second en-
gagement will be at 7 p.m., Monday, June 24,
the New Thing Old Fashioned Tent Revival.
Jerry will bring his gifts of voice and music to
some old fashioned preachin and testifyin
as Sid and Mary McMillan bring back the tent
revival in Junction that lasts the whole week.
Youll find the tent at the intersection of SR
111 and CR 111 in Junction.
These events are free to the community, but
free will donations will be accepted and en-
couraged. Food and drink will be available at
both events as well.
Friday, June 28
Gospel Concert
DEFIANCE Triumphant Quartet is the
featured artist in the next event in the 2013 At
Home with The Tacketts Concert Series.
Everyone is welcome to attend this inspiring
night of gospel music. No tickets are needed
for this concert, however, a $10 suggested do-
nation with be collected at the door and a love
offering will be taken.
The concert will be held at 7 p.m., Friday,
June 28 at the First Church of God, 561 Carter
Road in Defiance. Please note this new loca-
tion for the event.
Church Corner listings are free. If your church
is having any special services or programs, please call
the Paulding County Progress at 419-399-4015 or
email us your information at progress@progress-
newspaper.org
The Amish Cook
By: Lovina Eicher
Daughters Elizabeth and
Susan will start following in-
structions in preparation for
baptism when church serv-
ices are here on June 2. Such
a joy it brings to us as parents
to see our children want to ac-
cept Jesus Christ as their Sav-
ior.
When a girl follows in-
structions, the custom is to
wear a black dress and a
white cape and apron each
church Sunday. Both girls
dresses are cut out, but not
sewn yet. My goal is to work
on that today. I enjoy sewing
more than cleaning, so my
birthday dream to myself is to
sew instead of clean today.
42 years ago, on May 22, I
was born to very loving par-
ents, Ben and Elizabeth
Coblentz. How I appreciate
all they taught me.
My 29th birthday was the
day before Dads funeral. I
was 31 years old when
mother died and so Joseph
was only 8 weeks old at that
time. God had other plans.
We will cherish the memories
of them always.
Jacob, Emma and family
are planning to come tonight
for supper in honor of my
birthday. Also daughter Eliz-
We are having a light rain
this morning which we are so
thankful for. Yesterday we
also had some rain and it sure
has made my garden perk up.
I think we will be having
radishes to use soon.
Daughter Lovina and her
friends were here for the
night on Monday. They had
lots of fun. Lovina wanted
cupcakes instead of cake. We
put nine candles on the cup-
cakes for her to blow out.
We had a thunderstorm in
the early morning hours
which woke up all the little
girls for awhile.
Our hearts go out to all the
people that lost loved ones or
their homes in the recent tor-
nadoes. I cannot imagine how
scary it must be to be in the
path of a tornado. May God
be their guide throughout this
trial.
Sister Emma and her
daughter, Elizabeth, assisted
us with our work yesterday. I
dont know what we would
do without their help. Neigh-
bor Susan and a few other
ladies from church offered to
help prepare for church serv-
ices. It seems I am more be-
hind this time in getting
ready.
abeths friend, Timothy, and
daughter Susans friend,
Mose.
My husband Joe gave me a
large laundry spinner for my
birthday. I was very happy for
it and used it Monday for the
first time. The clothes dried a
lot faster than usual. It will be
especially nice in the winter
months when we dry our
clothes in the basement. Until
next week.
Zucchini season will soon
be here. Try out this recipe:
SKILLET ZUCCHINI
1 zucchini squash, shredded
1 large onion, shredded
1/2 pound ground beef
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup margarine
2 eggs
1/3 cup milk
3/4 cup cracker crumbs
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
Heat margarine in a large
skillet, add onion and zuc-
chini squash. Fry ground beef
in a small skillet until
browned, drain. Add to zuc-
chini simmer until soft. Add
salt and pepper. Beat eggs.
Add milk. Blend at then add
cracker crumbs. Add this to
squash mixture. Turn with
spatula to stir. Squash will
shrink when cooked.
www.progressnewspaper.org
Want to see
more photos
of your
favorite
story?
Obituaries are
posted daily
The Paulding County
Progress posts obituaries
daily as we receive them.
Check our Web site at
www.progressnewspaper.org and
click on For the Record.
Would you like to work with
funeral directors who understand
how valuable it is for you and your
family to have a truly meaningful
funeral experience?
When the time comes to honor a
loved ones memory in a personal
way, give us a call.
Dooley
FUNERAL HOME
Antwerp
419-258-5684
41c1
Payne
419-263-0000
For a Life Worth Celebrating
SM
www.dooleyfuneralhome.com
HEITMEYER
FUNERAL HOME
610 Walnut Street
Oakwood, Ohio
419-594-3660
Monument Display on Site
Pre-Arrangement Specialists
41c1
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Your County.
Your
Newspaper.
Paulding County Paulding County
Progress Progress
Exclusive Paulding County News
SFSP to offer Paulding kids
free, nutritious lunches
The Summer Food Service Program is set to begin June 10 at
LaFountain Park, 700 Lincoln Ave. Free, nutritious lunches will
be served to children ages 1-18, and to 21 with IEP, from 11:30
a.m.-12:15 p.m. Monday-Friday, June 10-Aug. 9, except July 4.
Activities will be from 12-12:45 p.m. Here, Julio Garcia, of Pauld-
ing, enjoys a nutritious meal while attending the Summer Food
Service Program at the Kiwanis Community Center last year.
PAULDING LaFountain
Park will be the place to be
around lunchtime this sum-
mer. Northwestern Ohio
Community Action Commis-
sion (NOCAC) will again
sponsor the Summer Food
Service Program in Paulding,
but the location has changed
from last year.
This year all children ages
1-18, or to 21 with an IEP,
can enjoy a free, nutritious
meal, prepared by Paulding
County Senior Center, on
Monday-Friday, June 10-
Aug. 9, except July 4.
Lunch will be served from
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at
LaFountain Park, 700 Lin-
coln Ave., with activities
from 12-12:45 p.m.
Gerilyn Larson, of Pauld-
ing, is site supervisor, and
will be present at all SFSP ac-
tivities.
Mayor Greg White agreed
to allow use of LaFountain
Park as a site for the Summer
Food Service Program this
year. This site is a great
choice because it is next to
the swimming pool, making it
easily accessible to children
whose parents allow them to
swim after attending SFSP.
Last year, the Summer
Food Service Program was
held at Kiwanis Community
Center, which will serve as
the backup site in case of bad
storms with lightning or ex-
tremely hot temperatures this
summer.
Based on the latest MR81
report provided by Ohio De-
partment of Education, 777
out of 1,262, or 61.57 percent
of students attending Pauld-
ing Exempted Village
Schools, qualify for free/re-
duced lunches. With school
out for the summer, many of
these children may not re-
ceive a nourishing and well
balanced meal for a variety of
reasons.
To help fill this gap, the
USDA funds the Summer
Food Service Program, which
is administered by the Ohio
Department of Education. In
addition to the Paulding site,
NOCAC sponsors sites in
Defiance, Fulton, Henry and
Williams counties.
NOCAC, Paulding County
Senior Center and other com-
munity groups and members,
served 117 unduplicated chil-
dren and 628 healthy lunches
last summer at the local Ki-
wanis center. This year will
be the programs second year
in Paulding and NOCAC is
working to spread the word to
even more families to bring
their children for a free meal
and fun.
The SFSP still needs volun-
teers to help during mealtime
serving the food, or to pro-
vide activities. To date, the
following local organizations,
churches, schools and busi-
nesses are providing volun-
teers.
Volunteering to help with
food service are: National
Honor Society, First Christian
Church, Job and Family Serv-
ices-Childrens Services,
Huntington Bank, Free Chris-
tian Church of God, Nazarene
Church and Paulding Senior
Center.
Volunteers providing activ-
ities include Paulding Ex-
empted Village School
volleyball and football teams;
Girl Scouts of Western Ohio,
Paulding County Carnegie
Library, Anns Bright Begin-
nings Preschool, Free Chris-
tian Church of God, Job and
Family Services-Childrens
Services, and Paulding
County Senior Center.
Community organizations,
businesses and individuals in-
terested in volunteering, as
well as parents or anyone else
interested in learning more
about the program can call
Wendy Bryant Scheurich,
SFSP coordinator, at
NOCACs Defiance office at
419-784-5136, ext. 1120, or
send an e-mail to
wscheurich@nocac.org.
Meals will be provided in
accordance with federal law
and U.S. Department of Agri-
culture policy. In accordance
with federal law and USDA
policy, this institution is pro-
hibited from discriminating
on the basis of race, color, na-
tional origin, sex, age or dis-
ability.
Rug Hookrafters Guild plans events
WAUSEON The North-
west Ohio Rugkrafters Guild
recently met in Wauseon with
19 in attendance. The busi-
ness discussed was election
of 2013-14 officers, and a
fundraiser for advertising the
upcoming 40th anniversary
of the guild that will be held
Oct. 5.
It is titled Rubies, Rugs
and Rugmakers Anniversary
Show and will be held at
Wesley United Methodist
Church in Bryan.
The guild will have raffle
items at Barnfest on Sept. 28
in Bryan. Members can bring
items at June, July and Au-
gust meetings.
Items for display at the an-
nual Sauders rug show in
August will need to be regis-
tered prior to the show.
Upcoming events are the
June meeting in Holgate
hosted by Eileen Eis, Norman
Lusk and Liz Eberle. Check
e-mail for supply list for June
meeting. A day trip to King-
wood Gardens June 29 was
also discussed along with a
Magdalena class.
Lori Neff will be ordering
the guild aprons and Carla
Allshouse is collecting annual
dues and dues for McGowen.
The rug to be displayed at
The Heritage Inn is continu-
ally being worked on by guild
members. It is nearing com-
pletion.
Discussion of a larger
venue for monthly meetings
and perhaps having more
hook-ins are being considered
for the future.
Learn more about the art of
primitive rugkrafting by
going online or attending the
annual rug show in August at
the Sauder Village, where
guild members will be
demonstrating.
Be a Facebook fan
The Progress has a Face-
book page as a way for
readers to get more informa-
tion from its community
newspaper. Go to face-
book.com/pauldingpaper
then click the Like button.
4A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, June 5, 2013
County Court
FORUM Readers Opinion
Express your opinion
The Paulding County Progress provides
a public forum through FORUM Reader
Opinion Letters to the Editor for area res-
idents to express their opinions and ex-
change ideas on any topic of public
interest.
All letters submitted are subject to the
Publishers approval, and MUST include an
original signature and daytime telephone
number for verification. We wont print un-
signed letters.
Letters should be brief and concise.
Letters must also conform to libel law and
be in good taste. Please limit letters to no
more than 500 words. We reserve the right
to edit and to correct grammatical errors.
We also reserve the right to verify state-
ments or facts presented in the letters.
The opinions stated are those of the
writer, and do not necessarily reflect that
of the newspaper.
Where to write: Letters to the Editor,
Paulding County Progress, P.O. Box 180,
Paulding OH 45879; or drop them off at
the office, 113 S. Williams St. The deadline
is noon Thursday the week prior to publi-
cation.
Weather report weekly summary as recorded at Paulding Villages water treatment plant
Observations recorded for the 24 hours ending at 7:30 a.m. on the morning of:
DATE HIGH LOW PRECIPITATION
May 21 89 68 -0-
May 22 90 67 -0-
May 23 81 59 0.15
May 24 67 42 0.02
May 25 67 40 -0-
May 26 70 42 -0-
May 27 71 42 0.03
May 28 64 41 0.97
May 29 84 63 -0-
May 30 87 67 -0-
May 31 90 67 0.03
June 1 78 62 1.88
June 2 78 61 0.64
June 3 69 51 0.01
Terry Wehrkamp was the speaker at the Paulding Kiwanis
Club. Wehrkamp, who works for Cooper Farms headquartered
in Oakwood, says they have facilities in several counties around
the area. What started out as a turkey hatchery a few years ago
is now a very large operation. Recent expansions include breed-
ing pigs to raising chickens. They process their own feeds and
currently have 1,600 employees. The turkey processing plant at
Van Wert sends products all over the country which are pack-
aged under the name of the customer, such as Kroger and
Costco. Michelle Stahl was program chairman.
Holocaust
speaker to return
Dear Editor,
Thank you to Jim Lang-
ham for his emotional col-
umn in the May 29 edition,
about the Holocaust sur-
vivor, William Meyer. Over
400 attended this special li-
brary centennial celebration
event and if feedback is any
indication, his words
changed lives.
Some of his more memo-
rable quotes were, For I
have endured their hunger.
Listened to the cries of
mothers; listened to the
screams of families sepa-
rated; listened to the un-
speakable horror, torture,
slave labor and hangings.
Listened to the prayers of old
men and to prayers that were
not answered.
I surely do not want
vengeance, but moral educa-
tion. I want the world to know
that there was an attempt to
eradicate an entire race and
those who helped them.
Two things Corrie Ten
Boom (Williams neighbor)
told me: Annawilliam, do not
give up hope. Goodness al-
ways overcomes evil. The sun
always shines after a storm.
Hope and love will prevail.
For two hours this 81-year-
old, energized by what he
called, the most attentive au-
dience ever, spoke about the
atrocities he and others en-
dured. But, there is more to
tell.
I am privileged to announce
that we are able to bring
William Meyer back to Pauld-
ing on Aug. 14 for an evening
of reflection about his life
since fleeing his homeland.
He has shared some of his
stories with me and they are
incredible. William Meyer
represents a dark period of
history of our world that
should never be forgotten.
Again, thank you to Mr.
Langham for putting Meyers
story so eloquently to pen and
to the Paulding Coun-
tyProgress for providing the
space.
Susan Pieper, director
Paulding County Carnegie
Library
GET BANKRUPTCY RELIEF
EVEN IF YOU FILED CHAPTER 7
WITHIN THE PAST 8 YEARS
You Can Still File Chapter 13
GET YOUR LIFE BACK
STOP CREDITOR CALLS, GARNISHMENTS,
LAW SUITS & FORECLOSURES
ERWIN J. BANDY
ATTORNEY & DEBT RELIEF AGENT
108 E. JACKSON, PAULDING, OH 45879
419-399-2351
REASONABLE RATES
ALSO FAMILY LAW & REAL ESTATE
41c2
Civil Docket:
Paulding Mobile Home Park,
Paulding vs. Sharra Lehman, Pauld-
ing. Evictions, dismissed.
Charlene Grant, Defiance vs.
Steve Smith, Genoa. Evictions,
judgment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $11,880.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance
vs. Lisa A. Blankenship, Antwerp.
Small claims, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of $872.
Clyde-Findlay Area Credit Union,
Clyde vs. Chelsie R. Eagleson,
Paulding. Other action, judgment
for the plaintiff in the sum of
$2,412.41.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance
vs. Emily A. Jones, Payne. Small
claims, judgment for the plaintiff in
the sum of $1,666.92.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance
vs. Jennifer McAlexander, Antwerp.
Small claims, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of $505.53.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance
vs. Mereidith Davis, Paulding.
Small claims, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of $489.72.
Omni Health Services,
Brecksville vs. Brittany N. Jen-
nings, Oakwood. Other action,
judgment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $506.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance
vs. Connie L. Korney, Paulding.
Small claims, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of $1,041.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance
vs. Wade Bissell, Paulding. Small
claims, judgment for the plaintiff in
the sum of $617.74.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance
vs. James M. Schindler, Defiance
and Teresa J. Schindler, Defiance.
Small claims, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of $1,340.67.
Cross Roads Venture Group LLC,
Paulding vs. Brandon Saylor, Pauld-
ing and Amanda Roddy, Paulding.
Evictions, judgment for the plaintiff
in the sum of $,2081.48.
Defiance Regional Medical Cen-
ter, Sylvania vs. Laura Mesker,
Paulding. Other action, dismissed.
Criminal Docket:
Jason L. Fisher, Antwerp, assault;
$200 fine, $145 costs, pay all by
Oct. 9 or appear in court,180 days
jail suspended; pay restitution and
court-appointed counsel fees, no
contact with victim or property.
Tracy A. Wagner, Defiance, as-
sault; $188 costs, pay by Dec. 11 or
appear, 34 days jail with 146 days
suspended; complete evaluation at
Westwood, complete anger manage-
ment evaluation, no contact with
victim or residence, probation or-
dered.
Austin L. Ladd, Ohio City, disor-
derly conduct; $10 fine, $428.62
costs, make restitution, pay all by
Oct. 9 or appear.
Dillon D. Ankney, Paulding, un-
derage consumption; $104 costs,
pay by June 12 or appear, 180 days
jail suspended; defendant is re-
moved from diversion, 40 hours
community service.
Sheryl R. Crone, Payne, theft;
$200 fine, $208 costs, pay restitu-
tion, 90 days jail suspended; repay
court-appointed counsel fees, eval-
uation at Westwood completed
within 30 days or jail reimposed, no
contact with victim.
Edward M. Nieto, Grover Hill,
possession; $75 fine, $95 costs, six-
month license suspension to run
concurrent with another case; com-
plete Third Millennium program.
Donald L. Smith, Antwerp, men-
acing/stalking; defendant indicted
by Grand Jury, bound over to Com-
mon Pleas Court.
Traffic Docket:
Donald L. Hunter, Cecil, follow-
ing closely; $100 fine, $87 costs.
Archie Banks, Broadview, Ill., no
tail lights; $150 fine, $125 costs,
pay all by June 12 or appear.
Henry L. Clark, Holland, 78/65
speed; $48 fine, $77 costs.
David J. Miller, Edon, 65/55
speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Danielle C. Davis, Fort Wayne,
79/65 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Robert A. Dooley, Maineville,
67/55 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Daniel R. Maag, Columbus
Grove, seat belt; $30 fine, $50 costs.
Katherine R. Bauer, Downington,
Pa., 66/55 speed; $33 fine, $77
costs.
Michael S. Arend, Paulding,
OVI/under influence; dismissed.
Michael S. Arend, Paulding,
OVI/breath low; $375 fine, $95
costs, pay all by Oct. 9 or appear, 90
days jail with 87 suspended, six-
month license suspension; may at-
tend DIP program in lieu of jail,
ALS terminated.
Michael S. Arend, Paulding, turn
signal; dismissed at States request.
Edward M. Nieto, Grover Hill,
OVI/under influence; $375 fine,
$140 costs, pay $50 monthly, pay all
by Dec. 11 or appear, 90 days jail
with 87 suspended, six-month li-
cense suspension; ALS terminated,
community control ordered, com-
plete Thinking for a Change pro-
gram, 15 hours community service.
David L. Bolyard, Ramsey, Ill.
65/55 speed; $33 fine, $82 costs.
Michael G. Patrick, Haviland,
OVI/under influence; merged with
Count B.
Michael G. Patrick, Haviland,
OVI/breath low; $375 fine, $112
costs, pay $75 monthly, pay all by
Oct. 9 or appear, 180 days jail with
177 suspended, six-month license
suspension; may attend the DIP pro-
gram in lieu of jail, ALS vacated,
community control ordered, 20
hours community service, do Third
Millennium program.
Michael G. Patrick, Haviland,
changing lanes; $50 fine, pay by
Oct. 9 or appear.
Michael G. Patrick, Haviland,
seat belt; $30 fine, pay by Oct. 9 or
appear.
Michael A. Lewis, Cecil, seat
belt; $30 fine, $100.71 costs, pay by
Oct. 9 or appear.
Christopher A. McBain, Fort
Wayne, stop sign; $53 fine, $77
costs, vacated June 6 bench trial.
Troy Andrew Heffron,
Greenville, Mich., 81/65 speed; $43
fine, $77 costs.
Rajinder S. Sandhu, Sunnyvale,
Texas, 79/65 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Daniel A. Miles, Paulding, failure
to control; $68 fine, $77 costs.
Stacy Sue Ross, Haviland, seat
belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Samuel John Beregszazi,
Antwerp, OVI/under influence;
$375 fine, $112 costs, pay all by
Aug. 14 or appear, 90 days with 87
suspended, six-month license sus-
pension; may attend DIP program in
lieu of jail, ALS vacated, commu-
nity control ordered, complete
Thinking for a Change program.
Samuel John Beregszazi,
Antwerp, OVI/breath high; merged
with Count A.
Samuel John Beregszazi,
Antwerp, turn signals; $50 fine, pay
by Aug. 14 or appear.
Charlene K. Schlatter, Defiance,
stop sign; $53 fine, $80 costs.
Right person
for dog warden
Dear Editor,
Maybe it is time to rename
the position of dog warden to
a position entitled, Animal
Rescue and Welfare Author-
ity.
We have the right person
here in Paulding County.
How about Georgia Dyson?
Yes, let the lawbreakers be
dealt with by the sheriffs de-
partment. This will include
but not be limited to:
1. Mistreatment of any ani-
mal.
2. Lawbreaking such as re-
sisting relinquishment of an
animal for any reason in the
best interest of safety for any-
one as well as for the welfare
of the animal.
3. Neglect, any kind of tor-
ment or physical abuse to any
animal.
4. Lack of food or water,
malnutrition, bad cases of
worms or fleas from being
kept in a dark, unheated (in the
cold weather) basement or
other inappropriate place.
5. Disturbing the peace with
loud barking and the necessary
investigation for the reason for
the loud barking such a being
out in the cold or rain, too
short a leash, no water, no out-
side retreat, a large dog threat-
ening/injuring a smaller or
any dog or cat or whatever....
6. Dogfighting or any such
abusive training or instigation
of fighting.
7. Dogs chronically running
loose which is different from
an occasional jail break by a
really happy pup.
Do the people of Paulding
and the law authorities agree
that perhaps it is time to rede-
fine the job?
It is becoming evident that
the people on both sides of this
concern have very valid points.
Georgia Dyson should defi-
nitely not have to be dealing
with the kind of problems that
are a threat to her safety. We
are not talking about how to
capture a frightened animal.
She is highly qualified to do
that whereas probably a police
officer would not be the right
person to deal with such cir-
cumstances.
And while were at it, why
is not a cell phone paid for in
this job? There is no excuse for
disregarding the needs of any-
thing practical such as this, in
todays world.
Now that some of the con-
cern have been aired about the
dog wardens treating of cer-
tain situations, there needs to
be supportive back-up law en-
forcement in these cases where
the people are being difficult
and not letting her do her job.
Why criticize her, when proba-
bly it was the negligent or of-
fending dog owner who was to
blame?
Folks, please, publicly ex-
press your concern about this
issue before we lose this treas-
ure of a person. Lets get
Paulding County into the year
2013 and the years leading up
to this, leave them behind.
Nancy Morse
Payne
Taylor J. Reichert, Grover Hill,
80/55 speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Scott T. Brown, Grover Hill,
OVI/breath low; $375 fine, $112
costs, three days jail, six-month li-
cense suspension; may attend DIP
program in lieu of jail, community
control ordered, 20 hours commu-
nity service, complete Thinking for
a Change program, 87 days jail re-
served.
Scott T. Brown, Grover Hill, stop
sign; $50 fine.
Scott T. Brown, Grover Hill, seat
belt; $30 fine.
Gerald M. Jacobs, St. Henry, seat
belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Cynthia J. Slattman, Paulding,
70/55 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Joseph L. Thomas, Paulding, stop
sign; $53 fine, $77 costs.
Scott K. Lammers, Ottawa, dis-
play plates; $68 fine, $80 costs.
Shelby McMichael, Oakwood,
81/55 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Dean R. Vondeylen, Oakwood,
68/55 speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Karen L. Kelly, Van Wert, 68/55
speed; $48 fine, $80 costs.
Ariane Amelia Nelson, Fort
Wayne, 82/65 speed; $43 fine, $80
costs.
Charles W. Krauss, Wauseon,
82/65 speed; $43 fine, $82 costs.
Marcus Rasean Hayes, Madison,
N.C., 66/55 speed; $33 fine, $82
costs.
Jared H. Hogans, Payne, 71/55
speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Brian Douglas Cornell, Muncie,
Ind., 82/65 speed; $43 fine, $80
costs.
Mark Adam Lynch, Sterling
Heights, Mich., 81/65 speed; $43
fine, $77 costs.
Christian A. Comeau, Gardner,
Mass., 81/65 speed; $43 fine, $80
costs.
Amy L. Boyd, Defiance, failure
to yield right of way; $53 fine, $77
costs.
Cody L. Casey, St. Louis, 65/55
speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Jennifer Lynn Coldren, Wabash,
Ind., seat belt; $33 fine, $47 costs.
Dale Leith Dennis, St. Petersburg,
Fla., 68/55 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Sally Doster, Paulding, 67/55
speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Matthew W. Grant, Hicksville,
seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Margo J. Korb, Indianapolis,
77/65 speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Tyrone L. Poindexter, Indianapo-
lis, 76/65 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Jaswinder S. Banga, Brampton,
Ont., 66/55 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Patrick Scot Brown, Mason,
70/55 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Bobby K. Farrar, Sumerville,
S.C., failure to yield to emergency
vehicle; $68 fine, $80 costs.
Kyle C. Wallen, Fort Wayne,
90/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Jonathan M. Harrison, Fort
Wayne, 80/65 speed; $43 fine, $80
costs.
Lovejeet Singh, Bargersville,
Ind., seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Heidi D. Baer, Delaware, 72/55
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Sarah D. Craig, Paulding, 69/55
speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Brian P. Jackson, Lawrenceville,
Ga., 65/55 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Ryan N. Axt, Monroeville, Ind.,
66/55 speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Sessions to be held at DC
DEFIANCE, Ohio Special information sessions on Defiance College
graduate program offerings are planned for June and July.
Persons interested in obtaining a Master of Arts in Education or Master
of Business Administration degree are invited to learn more about these
distinctive graduate programs, and how they can earn their degree with
flexible and convenient course offerings.
Special information sessions will be held on Tuesday, June 26 and Friday,
July 19 from 5-6 p.m., in which both MBA and MAE information will be
discussed. The events will be held in Defiance Hall, room 128, located on
the corner of Sessions and North Clinton Streets.
To reserve a seat, contact Michelle Call, office coordinator for graduate
studies and professional development, at 419-783-2351 or gradstudies@de-
fiance.edu.
Reservations can also be made on-line at https://www.defiance.edu/In-
foSessionMAE.html.
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 5A
Property Transfers
Police Report
Sheriffs Report
5:30 am to midnight
419-782-1116
41c2
8
5

8
5

C
O
R
N
D
O
G
S
C
O
R
N
D
O
G
S
JUNE SPECI AL
Celebrating our
85
th
YEAR!
KISSNERS
Since 1928
Downtown Defiance
Items needed include:
- Baby supplies
- Non-perishable foods
- Cleaning products
- Personal hygiene products
All items are going to ISOH/Impact
to aid those in need.
Questions or Concerns 419-399-2000
Donations for the
Oklahoma Tornado
Victims are being
accepted at the
following locations:
Don and Perrys (Pldg.)
Chief Supermarket
(Pldg.)
Hometown Pantry (Atwp.)
Ice Cream Depot (Atwp.)
41c2
The term et al. refers to and others; et vir., and husband; et ux., and wife.
Auglaize Township
Rita Brittig to Bernard John and Barbara J. Brittig; Sec. 27,
80 acres. Warranty deed.
Benton Township
Maurice A. and Linda K. Thornell to Maurice A. and Linda
K. Thornell Life Estate, et al.; Sec. 35, 19.759 acres and Sec.
36, 17.154 acres. Quit claim.
Carryall Township
Wesley R. and Heather A. Taylor to Joshua Fish; Sec. 18,
1.56 acres. Warranty deed.
Crane Township
George H. Pike Jr. to John P. and Robin G. Imm, trustees;
Sec. 2, 10.001 acres. Warranty deed.
Harrison Township
Jessica L. Sheedy to Dean J. Sheedy; Sec. 15, 5.102 acres.
Quit claim.
Latty Township
Virchow E. and Ettie E. Ridings, trustees, dec. to A. Ben
Ridings and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees; Sec. 15, 70 acres and
Sec. 36, 19 acres. Affidavit.
A. Ben Ridings and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees to A. Ben Ridings
and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees; Sec. 15, 70 acres. Warranty deed.
A. Ben Ridings and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees to A. Ben Ridings
and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees; Sec. 15, 70 acres. Warranty deed.
A. Ben Ridings and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees to A. Ben Ridings
and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees; Sec. 36, 19 acres. Warranty deed.
A. Ben Ridings and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees to A. Ben Ridings
and Ann M. Sutschek, trustees; Sec. 36, 19 acres. Warranty deed.
Paulding Township
Jason D. and Cynthia L. Endicott to Eric L. and Brandy A.
Coyne; Sec. 31, 5.011 acres. Warranty deed.
Sheila Jo and David V. Moore to Sheila J. and David V.
Moore; Sec. 15, 1.915 acres. Survivorship deed.
Washington Township
Phyllis A. Porter and Judy R. Moore to Phyllis Ann Porter
and Judy Rae Moore, trustees; Sec. 18, 15.891 acres. Quit
claim.
Antwerp Village
Jill M. Ptak to Richard Eugene and Angel Lynn Sproles; Lots
20-22, Kauffmans Addition, 0.374 acre. Warranty deed.
Grover Hill Village
David James Baker to Scott T. Brown; Lot 23, Kinkades
Second Addition, 0.2 acre. Warranty deed.
Haviland Village
Craig A. and Ruth E. Stoller, trustees to Blane A. and
Melinda M. Stoller; Lots 193-199, Original Plat, 1.155 acres.
Warranty deed.
Paulding Village
Dawn N. Keeler to Rex A. Gray Sr. and Pamela S. Gray;
Lots 141 and 148, Original Plat, 0.034 acre. Warranty deed.
Federal National Mortgage Association to True Grit LLC;
Lot 11, Nonemans Subdivision, 0.165 acre. Warranty deed.
Payne Village
Secretary of Veterans Affairs to John J. Wobler; Lots 114 and
115, Gibsons Addition, 0.207 acre. Quit claim.
Young Brothers Farms LLC to Brian R. and Kristy L. Vest;
Lot 9, Young Subdivision, 0.277 acre. Warranty deed.
Common Pleas
Civil Docket
The term et al. refers to and others; et vir., and husband; et ux., and wife.
Cach, LLC, Denver vs. Roxanne M. Rodman, Paulding. Money
only.
Teresa L. Ankney, Paulding vs. John R. Ankney, Paulding. Di-
vorce.
Christina M. Steele, Paulding vs. Steven W. Steele, Antwerp.
Divorce.
Paulding County Treasurer, Paulding vs. William A. Carpenter,
Scott and Jeannie A. Carpenter, Scott and Bankone, N.A., Colum-
bus and Beneficial Ohio, Inc., Virginia Beach, Va. Foreclosure of
real property tax.
First Federal Bank of the Midwest, Defiance vs. William
Moore, Payne and Shandonn Moore, Payne. Foreclosures.
Marriage Licenses
Michael Allen James, 33, Payne, laborer and Ann Marie Elston,
38, Payne, homemaker. Parents are Walter James and Robin Lil-
liedahl; and Paul Wannemacher and Virginia Grey.
Ian Michael Gochenour, 29, Paulding, laborer/police officer and
Amber Kay Dohoney, 23, Paulding, RN. Parents are Kip
Gochenour and Jane Grove; and Eric Dohoney and Victoria Ger-
schutz.
Nathan Charles Maloney, 25, Harlan, Ind., engineer and Chris-
tine Marie Fowler, 25, Harlan, teacher. Parents are Craig Maloney
and Donna Durbin; and Charles Fowler and Catherine Arend.
Brendon Conrad Schlosser, 20, Paulding, lumber yard em-
ployee and Lindsey Taylor Hitchcock, 20, Paulding, cashier. Par-
ents are Larry Schlosser and Jennifer Lee; and Kent Hitchcock
and Kimberly Parkerson.
Administration Docket
In the Estate of Robert L. Belau, last will and testament filed.
In the Estate of Richard E. Luginbuhl, last will and testament
filed.
Criminal Docket
Travis A. Dix, 26, of Paulding, had charges of nonsupport of
dependent (F5) dismissed without prejudice upon a motion of the
State. The paperwork indicated the defendant is substan-
tially current after a payment of $5,300 He is to pay $145
costs.
Joshua K. Clark, 27, of Scott, has been permitted to wear
civilian clothing at all court appearances after his attorney filed
a motion requesting such on May 24. He is accused of theft
(F4).
Jonathon E. Maxwell, 26, of Oakwood, who is charged with
illegal assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufac-
ture of drugs (F2), had his case joined with those of Somer B.
Bullinger and Kevin W. Carlisle for trial on June 24.
Donald L. Smith, 57, address unavailable, was arraigned for
menacing by stalking (F4). A not guilty plea was entered; bond
was set at $250,000 with no cash privilege. Court dates were
made for a July 8 pretrial conference and an Aug. 6 jury trial.
His attorney filed a request for an evaluation and a motion for
a change of plea the following day.
Raymond L. Webster, 73, of Payne, had his felonious assault
(F2) case with a firearm specification continued until July 3
for pretrial due to a scheduling conflict.
ACCIDENT REPORTS
None.
INCIDENT REPORTS
Wednesday, May 15
2:21 p.m. Police received a
copy of a domestic civil protec-
tion order for Kimberly A. Gar-
rity against Ronald P. Garrity
III.
4:45 p.m. Dog barking com-
plaint was lodged from John-
son Road.
5:05 p.m. A rural Ney resi-
dent reported the theft of a wal-
let from a vehicle while it was
on South Summit Street.
4:58 p.m. Henry County Ju-
venile Court issued a pickup
order for a girl who may be at
an Emerald Road location. Of-
ficers did not find her there.
5:52 p.m. The dog warden
told officers about three calls
about a neglected dog on West
Perry Street.
6:05 p.m. Officers investi-
gated a complaint about a dog
running loose on West Perry
Street. The owner denied the
accusation.
6:45 p.m. A North Williams
Street resident told officers
about a previous theft of wal-
let.
10:10 p.m. Officers were
called to a West Perry Street es-
tablishment for an unwanted
subject.
Thursday, May 16
7:50 a.m. Unauthorized use
of a vehicle was reported from
South Cherry Street. It was lo-
cated in Antwerp.
8:52 a.m. Flat Rock Drive
resident reported speeders in
the area.
11:54 a.m. Threats by text
were handled on North Dix
Street.
3:50 p.m. Theft from Pauld-
ing County Hospital is under
investigation.
6:20 p.m. Officers assisted
the probation department at a
West Perry Street location.
8:10 p.m. An ongoing tele-
phone harassment issue was
noted on North Dix Street.
Friday, May 17
1:15 a.m. Officers were un-
able to locate a suspicious ve-
hicle on North Cherry Street.
2:15 a.m. Assistance was
provided Post 81 by witnessing
a BAC test.
5:49 a.m. Junk notices were
prepared for locations on West
Jackson, South Dix, South
Coupland and West Harrison
streets.
3:56 p.m. Family distur-
bance on Nancy Street was in-
vestigated.
7:23 p.m. Theft complaint
on North Williams Street re-
sulted in no charges.
9:11 p.m. Vandalism was
looked into on Robert Street.
10:52 p.m. Neighbor prob-
lems involving loud music
were handled on Nancy Street.
11:35 p.m. Intoxicated minor
on Emerald Road was
processed. Charges for under-
age consumption and disor-
derly conduct were sent to the
prosecutors office.
Saturday, May 18
10:20 a.m. A West Wayne
Street resident reported a car
stolen. It was later located
along West Jackson Street.
1:51 p.m. Rural Archbold
owner of property on North
DeWitt Street told officers it
had been vandalized.
2:45 p.m. Trespassing com-
plaint came in from Tom Tim
Drive.
Sunday, May 19
12:47 a.m. Officers were
called to West Perry Street for
a loud party complaint. It
proved unfounded.
1:38 a.m. Officers witnessed
a BAC test for Post 81.
3:58 a.m. Sheriffs deputies
had officers witness a BAC
test.
9:09 a.m. Suspicious activity
on West Wayne Street involv-
ing an open door and damage
to an empty building was in-
vestigated.
4:52 p.m. Three teens were
warned following a complaint
about four-wheelers at the
reservoir.
7:58 p.m. Property line is-
sues caused neighbor problems
on Nancy Street.
Monday, May 20
8:08 a.m. Ever Rios Cruz of
Defiance obtained a solicitors
license to sell educational ma-
terials door-to-door.
Tuesday, May 21
1:40 p.m. Family distur-
bance was looked into on West
Perry Street.
6 p.m. Violation of a no con-
tact order was reported from
South Williams Street. A report
was sent to the prosecutor.
6:30 p.m. Possible email
scam was called in from Kay
Street.
9:50 p.m. A Van Wert resi-
dent complained that a local
resident was texting them after
being told to have no contact.
Wednesday, May 22
4 a.m. Junk notices were
prepared for locations on Helen
and West Caroline streets and
Partridge Place.
8:43 p.m. Officers were
called to the intersection of
Harrison and Coupland streets
where a woman was showing
pictures of three children, in-
quiring about their where-
abouts.
Thursday, May 23
12:10 a.m. Suspicious activ-
ity report from East Perry
Street proved to be unfounded.
3:50 a.m. Suspicious activity
complaint from East Perry
Street was unfounded.
6:20 a.m. Another suspicious
activity call to East Perry Street
was deemed unfounded.
1:15 p.m. A West Jackson
Street resident reported some-
one slit their pool.
4:08 p.m. Theft of copper
tubing and wire from an air
conditioning unit on North
Williams Street was investi-
gated.
10:04 p.m. Northwest Ohio
Juvenile Detention Center
called the department regard-
ing an alleged incident in 2005.
It was discovered the com-
plaint was investigated at that
time by the sheriffs office.
Friday, May 24
1:22 a.m. Suspicious activity
complaint from East Perry
Street was deemed un-
founded.
12:32 p.m. Property dam-
age motor vehicle accident at
the intersection of Williams
and Perry streets was docu-
mented.
4:04 p.m. Suspicious activ-
ity reported on East Perry
Street was unfounded.
5:05 p.m. Welfare check of
a child was turned over to Job
and Family Services.
5:19 p.m. A West Perry
Street resident reported being
assaulted on North Williams
Street.
5:24 p.m. Alleged assault to
a North Williams Street resi-
dent while on North Water
Street is under investigation.
8:33 p.m. Shoplifting com-
plaint came in from a North
Williams Street business.
Saturday, May 25
1:55 a.m. Officers assisted
Post 81 by witnessing a BAC
refusal.
3:15 a.m. Officers witnessed
a BAC test for Post 81.
11:28 a.m. Threats by phone
were looked into on Emerald
Road.
4:43 p.m. An unwanted
subject at a North Main Street
location was handled.
7:58 p.m. Suspicious activ-
ity at LaFountain Park was
called in.
9:50 p.m. Assistance was
given Post 81 by witnessing a
BAC test.
Sunday, May 26
12:57 a.m. Officers as-
sisted the Sheriffs office with
a traffic stop then witnessed a
BAC test.
6:52 p.m. Investigation of a
report of a break-in on Nancy
Street resulted in the arrests
of John Bowman and Corey
Davis on theft charges and
Catherine Trowbridge for re-
ceiving stolen property.
Tuesday, May 28
2:30 p.m. A fraudulent
website was reported by a
North Dix Street resident. A
suspect admitted to posting it.
3:15 p.m. Officers handled
a telephone scam complaint
on East Perry Street.
7:50 p.m. A North Williams
Street resident told officers a
childs picture appears on a
fraudulent website without
the parents permission. A re-
port was sent to the prosecu-
tor.
10:28 p.m. Investigation of
a possible fight in the 100
block of West Perry Street re-
sulted in two females being
warned to have no contact.
Wednesday, May 29
12:25 p.m. A backing
mishap in a North Main
Street business drive-through
was documented.
6:15 p.m. No contact warn-
ing violation was noted on
West Wayne Street.
Thursday, May 30
12:15 a.m. A rural Paulding
subject complained for no
contact from another person.
12:39 a.m. Tires were
found slashed on a vehicle
along North Summit Street.
ACCIDENT REPORTS
Saturday, May 25
7:21 p.m. William A. Bostain,
24, of Fort Wayne, was cited for
failure to control following a
single-vehicle motorcycle acci-
dent on Ohio 55 east of Road 17
in Benton Township. Reports
say he was driving a 2007
Harley motorcycle east on the
highway when he veered off the
right side of a curve and rolled.
He was not injured.
INCIDENT REPORTS
Thursday, May 23
6:05 p.m. Theft of a cell
phone was investigated on Road
48 in Latty Township.
7:15 p.m. Deputies arrested
Donald J. Rowlands on a war-
rant from Allen County, Ind.
Friday, May 24
12:30 a.m. Assistance was
provided to Paulding police by
checking on a subject in Scott.
12:35 a.m. Deputies arrested
an unidentified subject.
7:39 a.m. One Paulding fire
unit responded to a commercial
fire alarm on Gasser Road. They
were on the scene less than 10
minutes.
9:43 a.m. Phone scam was re-
ported from Road 95 in Pauld-
ing Township.
3:39 p.m. Theft of items from
a barn was investigated on Road
95 in Paulding Township.
4:07 p.m. Brush fire at
Rochester Cemetery along Road
424 was put out in less than 30
minutes by two Cecil/Crane
Township fire units.
4:31 p.m. A car/deer accident
on Road 138 in Brown Town-
ship was documented.
7:49 p.m. The deliberate strik-
ing of one vehicle by another
was investigated on Road 171 in
Brown Township.
8:08 p.m. A Washington
Township resident came on sta-
tion to report an assault.
8:46 p.m. Violation of a no
contact order in Melrose was
handled.
10:02 p.m. Deputies assisted
Payne police with an assault ar-
rest.
11:18 p.m. Theft from Road 7
in Carryall Township was re-
ported.
Saturday, May 25
5:09 a.m. A suspicious vehicle
at the church in Grover Hill was
handled.
10:21 a.m. Threats from the
previous evening were reported
from Road 133 in Emerald
Township.
11:52 a.m. Deputies docu-
mented a minor fender-bender
on Road 171 in Brown Town-
ship.
2:47 p.m. Four Cecil/Crane
Township fire units along with
one each from Antwerp and
Auglaize Township, fought a log
jam fire at Cecil Bridge off Road
105 in Crane Township. They
were there nearly 2-1/2 hours.
Antwerp EMS assisted at the
scene.
3:20 p.m. Van Wert County
Sheriffs office advised of a
motor vehicle accident on Ohio
114 in Washington Township.
Post 81 OSHP investigated.
Samaritan flew. Assisting at the
scene were the Grover Hill EMS
and two fire units.
9:50 p.m. Vandalism to head-
stones at the Prairie Chapel
Cemetery on Road 209 in
Auglaize Township was investi-
gated.
10:41 p.m. A call came in
from Ohio 66 in Washington
Township where two cars that
had been drag racing struck one
another.
11:21 p.m. Deputies assisted
a Cecil resident with an un-
wanted person.
Sunday, May 26
6:02 p.m. Drive-off theft of
gas was reported from Grover
Hill.
6:36 p.m. Mailbox damage
was looked into on Road 43 in
Carryall Township.
8:42 p.m. Deputies assisted
Paulding police serve a search
warrant.
11:18 p.m. A Melrose resident
reported someone broke a win-
dow out of their house.
Monday, May 27
8:18 a.m. Motor vehicle on
Road 108 east of US 127 in
Jackson Township was docu-
mented. No further information
was available.
12:03 p.m. Domestic dispute
in Grover Hill was handled.
12:16 p.m. A two-vehicle ac-
cident on U.S. 24 at Road 133 in
Emerald Township was handled
by Post 81. Four people were
hurt. Samaritan flew and Pauld-
ing EMS made a transport. Two
Paulding fire units and the sec-
ond EMS unit assisted at the
scene. No further information
was available.
1:41 p.m. Deputies assisted
Defiance Police Department by
delivering a message on Road
143 in Emerald Township.
Tuesday, May 28
1:28 a.m. A Crane Township
resident of Road 216 told
deputies of suspicious activity.
3:21 a.m. An explosives alarm
went off at a Latty Township lo-
cation north of Grover Hill along
Ohio 637. Both Grover Hill
EMS units and three fire units re-
sponded. They were on the scene
less than 45 minutes.
6:48 a.m. Domestic com-
plaint was lodged from Road
181 in Brown Township.
10:11 a.m. Trespassing at
Stoneco on Road 179 in
Auglaize Township was investi-
gated.
1:32 p.m. A deputy was
flagged down on Road 140 in
Brown Township regarding a
theft of steel.
6:25 p.m. Deputies arrested
Brad Carpenter.
11:28 p.m. An unwanted sub-
ject in Scott was handled.
Wednesday, May 29
1:50 a.m. Deputies assisted a
Scott resident with an unwanted
subject.
3:53 a.m. An unwanted sub-
ject on Road 126 in Jackson
Township was removed.
6A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, June 5, 2013
Anniversaries
Birthdays
(The Paulding Progress maintains
a file of birthdays and anniversaries. To
make any changes, please call our of-
fice at 419-399-4015 during business
hours, email to progress@progress -
newspaper.org, or drop us a note to
P.O. Box 180, Paulding.)
June 8 Mary Messer-Ad-
kins, John Ankney, Rick Baker,
Sharon Enz, Dalton Lee,
Brenda Riggenbach, Ashleigh
Stallkamp, Mike Tapia.
June 9 Velma Albert,
Donna Aufrance, Anna Em-
rich, Joseph Haines Jr., Maxine
Reinhart, Anna Myles, Steve
Offerle.
June 10 Jayden Daniels,
Devan Gamble, W.C. Meek,
Ralph Roughton, Ron Sierer,
Joe Strom ski.
June 11 Tony Ankney, Jor-
dan S. Childs, Nickie Crabtree,
Matt Doll, Inella Finnegan,
Darnell Goings, Alexia Lester,
Mary Matson, Pat Meyer,
Kendric Robinson, Eric Seslar.
June 12 Tony Butler II,
Tyler Carlisle, John Hartman,
Ken Jay, Fannie Long, Ivy
Puckett.
June 13 Robin Adkins,
Marty Hopkins, Alexia Lester,
Margaret Phlipot, Jacob
Roughton.
June 14 Charlotte Banks,
Evelyn Claymiller, Diana Karl-
stadt, Kyle Mohr, Greg Parker,
Cody Schlegel, Hailey Stahl,
Evelyn Wirts.
In The
Garden
By
Kylee Baumle
Choosing plants for your garden
My mom and I had a day of
what we call nursery hopping
last week. It was really my
first time out shopping for
plants, although that wasnt
the impetus for the trip to
Toledo and back.
I wanted a bent willow
chair and one of my Face-
book readers told me a certain
garden center there had a lot
of them. They did and I pur-
chased one.
Well, you cant go to a gar-
den center and not look at the
plants. And few die-hard gar-
deners have enough will
power to walk out of such a
place without at least one or
ten of them. I may or may not
have been on the high end of
the plant count.
I knew that there were a
couple of other nearby garden
centers, so hey, while were
in the area, we might as well
visit those too, right?
Each place carried a little dif-
ferent assortment of plants so
I took advantage of the spare
space in the minivan to take
some new things home to Our
Little Acre.
This is generally my modus
operandi when shopping for
plants for the garden. Seldom
do I have a specific plant in
mind when I begin, although
I do have a running list of
things that I keep my eyes
open for each season.
If I find them, great. If not,
there are plenty of other won-
derful things that grab my at-
tention and manage to jump
into the shopping cart.
When you are plant shopping,
there are some things you
should keep in mind:
Choose healthy plants.
Inspect the stems and foliage
for problems. If you see ex-
cessive yellowing, spots on
the foliage, dead areas, or
signs of insects, pass it up for
a plant that doesnt have these
things. Beware of wilted
plants. Some will bounce
back if they get too dry and
wilted. Many wont.
Consider the stage of the
blooms. While its tempting
to pick the plants that look the
prettiest because theyve got
so many beautiful flowers,
look for plants that have more
buds than blooms. That way
youll get to enjoy them
longer in your garden.
Check the number of
plants in the pot. Often there
will be an extra plant or two
in a pot. I cant tell you the
number of times Ive gotten
bonus plants just by checking
all the pots to see.
Inspect the bottom of
the pot. If you see a lot of
roots coming out the drainage
holes in the bottom of the
container, it could mean the
plant has spent too much time
in the pot (or at least a pot of
its size). Inside the container,
you could find roots that have
circled the bottom of the pot
because they had nowhere
else to go.
This may or may not be a
problem. If you choose a
plant that has become root
bound like this, be sure to
loosen the roots before plant-
ing.
Read the tags with cau-
tion. Im a little distrustful of
plant tags these days when it
comes to zones. With the new
USDA Zone map putting most
of our area in Zone 6, garden
centers are stocking more
plants that need Zone 6 condi-
tions to survive the winter.
Experienced gardeners
know that regardless of what
the USDA says, Zone 6 rated
plants can be iffy here. At best,
we may now be firmly in Zone
5, but just because theres a
new map doesnt mean you
can now plant things you
couldnt plant before.
Of course, each garden will
still have microclimates that
allow you to overwinter some
things that normally would
succumb to winters cold, but
as a general rule, I still stick to
the Zone 5 (and colder) plants.
As you gain experience as a
gardener, these things will be-
come second nature to you
when youre looking for plants
to buy. Until then, keep them in
mind as you fill your shopping
cart.
Read Kylees blog, Our Little
Acre, at www.ourlittleacre.com
and on Facebook at www.face-
book.com/OurLittleAcre. Contact
her at PauldingProgressGar-
dener@gmail.com.
If you dont advertise,
you are not likely to get cus-
tomers! Learn how your com-
munity newspaper can help
you call the Progress today
at 419-399-4015.
June 8 Paul and Margie
Hill, Mike and April Krouse,
Mike and J.J. McClain, Calvin
and Dorothy Myers, Larry and
Jeannine Sinn, George and
Helen Spitnale, Brian and
Kristy Vest.
June 9 Robert and Cynthia
Crist, Chuck and Debbie
Kipfer, Kevin and Sally Wan-
nemacher.
June 10 Terry and Terri
Overmyer, Ed and Amy
Thrasher.
June 11 Fred and Susan
Pieper.
June 12 Frieda and Bill
Cole man, Jason and Stephanie
Dockery, Ross and Karla
Laukhuf, Earl and Marilyn Pe-
ters, Earl and Altha Reighter,
Larry and Cindy Switzer, Glen
and Mary Lou Vance.
June 13 John and Lillian
Betz, Darwin and Carol Cline,
Ben and Alisha Manz, Darrold
Jr. and Deb Scott.
June 14 Mike Farmer and
Jane Taft.

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Anniversary
MR. and MRS.
HARLEY DUNAKIN
PAULDING Harley and Jacki
Dunakin will be celebrating their
40th wedding anniversary on June
2.
Harley Dunakin and Jacki
Huebner were married on June 2,
1973, at the St. Paul Lutheran
Church by the Rev. Dave Everton.
Harley is retired from General
Motors and Jacki worked in a
cafeteria.
They are the parents of six chil-
dren, Harley Dunakin Jr., Dioni-
cia Webster and April Dunakin,
all of Paulding, Shawn of Detroit,
Erin of Maumee and Storm
Dunakin of Fort Jackson, S.C.
The couple have 10 grandchil-
dren and five great-grandchildren.
The couple went on a cruise out
of Port New Orleans for seven
days to celebrate the occasion.
Card shower
for Holocaust
survivor
William Meyer, the last
known Holocaust survivor in
Indiana and a recent speaker
here Paulding, will be cele-
brating his 82nd birthday on
July 4. The Paulding County
Carnegie Library staff invites
everyone to bring a birthday
card for Mr. Meyer to the main
library in Paulding by June 22
and staff will mail them to this
special man.
There are days when Mr.
Meyer feels very alone. He
misses his wife of 60 years so
much and lives always with
the horror of his past, said li-
brary director Susan Pieper.
We know that a package of
cards from his Paulding
friends will brighten his day.
Thank you in advance.
Also, Meyer will be return-
ing to Paulding to share the
rest of the story on Aug. 13.
Call the library at 419-399-
2032 to reserve a seat for this
free special event.
Librarys summer reading
program: Dig Into Reading
PAULDING The main
historic Carnegie Library in
Paulding announces its 2013
Summer Reading Program.
Children will really dig this
years theme!
The 2013 program is open
to children in preschool
through fourth grade. Partici-
pants will dig the cool pro-
grams, prizes, story times and
much more. Kooky Kirk and
the entire youth services staff
will lead the program through
a summer of digging adven-
tures. All events are free.
Register today.
The fun begins with three
sessions at the main library
on June 25, July 2 and July 9.
The Grand Finale will be held
on July 16 at the Youth Lead-
ership Building at the fair-
grounds. Dont miss this fun
summer event, part of the Li-
brary Centennial Celebration.
To register, stop by the
childrens department of the
main historic Carnegie Li-
brary in Paulding. For more
information, contact the chil-
drens team at 419-399-2032.
The librarys summer read-
ing program has been a pop-
ular event for over 50 years.
Many parents and grandpar-
ents who bring their grand-
children today participated in
the librarys summer reading
program when they were chil-
dren.
Statistics prove that when
children stay plugged in to the
library and reading over the
summer months, they are better
prepared to enter school in the
fall ready to learn.
Dig Into Reading is the theme for the free summer reading
program at Paulding County Carnegie Library. Register now; the
fun begins June 25.
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 7A
A Penny For
Your Thoughts....
By: Nancy Whitaker
BOO!
Do you remember telling
ghost stories when you were
young? We used to gather
around a fire at night, watch-
ing the fire and seeing who
could either make up or tell
the scariest story.
One of the favorite fright-
ening tales we all loved to tell
was that of Little Johnny.
Of course, even though we
knew the ending of the story,
the element of surprise at the
end never failed to make us
scream.
I dont know if kids even
tell this Little Johnny story
anymore, but it is really a
classic. Of course, the story is
always told better in the dark
shadows with a full moon
shining above.
The child in the story is
Little Johnny. He was a little
fellow and had just got tucked
in his bed for the night.
Johnny was not really scared
of ghosts because he had
never seen one and besides he
didnt believe in them.
That night was especially
dark and an eerie moon cast
shadows across Johnnys
wooden bedroom floor. He
sighed and snuggled down in
his warm feather bed and was
thinking about what he was
going to do tomorrow.
All of a sudden, loud foot-
steps echoed on the stairs out-
side his room. He heard a
loud breathing and a deep
thunderous voice said,
Johnny, I am coming to get
you. Johnny, Im on the first
step.
Johnny covered up his head
and peeked out just a little.
The ghastly voice then said,
Johnny, Im on the second
step. Johnny again covered
up his head, only this time he
did not peek out.
The footsteps were getting
closer and louder. Johnny
could hear the creature
breathing. The voice said,
Johnny, I am on the fifth
step.
Finally, the big monster
said, Johnny, I am on the last
step. I am going to get you
and eat you. I am very hun-
gry.
By this time all the kids lis-
tening to the story around the
fire were huddled together
waiting for the finale!
Oh no, cried little
Johnny. Please dont.
As the monster gets into
Johnnys room. Johnny is
shaking when all of a sudden
without warning the eerie
creature says....... BOO! Got
cha!
Just as it was years ago, we
all have some type of super-
stition and fears of the un-
known. Another story that is
always scary is Hansel and
Gretel.
The poor kids who were al-
most starving to death found
a house in the forest made of
candy and goodies. An old
witch lived there and she took
the children, locked them up,
fed them to fatten them up
and was planning to eat them.
I am sure you know the end
of the story and it has a happy
ending, however, that is not
one of my favorite fairy tales.
Rumor has it that there are
multiple ghosts right here in
Paulding. The old jail is one
of the places that is said to
have a ghost roaming around.
People also say there may be
a ghost at the library and at
the site of the old childrens
home.
Everyone has fear of the
unknown. Your fear may be
ghosts, monsters, werewolves
or chupacabras ... and that,
my dear, is a whole other
story.
Do you like to tell scary
stories? Have you ever seen
or heard a ghost? What scares
you and makes you scream?
Let me know and Ill give
you a Penny for Your
Thoughts. BOOOOOO!
By Mark Holtsberry
Education specialist
Paulding SWCD
Warmer weather is finally here and with the
rising temperatures comes the emergency of
ticks that may carry dangerous diseases, and
now are looking to feed.
People need to understand there is a risk of
getting sick from tick bites when they are out-
doors, and that there are things they can do to
keep themselves, their families and their pets
safe.
Ticks are small arachnids that hang out
along woodland edges, in woods, tall grass,
weeds and underbrush. Like mosquitoes, ticks
feed on the blood of birds, reptiles and mam-
mals, including humans and pets. In doing so,
ticks can transmit a variety of diseases, such
as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme
disease, which is rare in Ohio, but has been on
an increase statewide in recent years. Lyme
disease is transmitted by the blacklegged deer
tick, whose first established population was
discovered in Coshocton County in 2010.
Glen Needham, an entomologist and tick
expert who Ohio State University Extension,
states, Blacklegged deer ticks have been
found in 56 counties in Ohio and are now
likely established in 23 of those counties.
Lyme disease causes flu-like symptoms
such as fatigue, fever, headache and muscle
and joint aches. It also produces a distinctive
large, circular red rash that looks like a bulls-
eye. If caught early, the disease can be suc-
cessfully treated with antibiotics. Though not
known to be fatal, the disease can progress to
chronic arthritis, neurological symptoms and
cardiac problems if left untreated.
There are preventive ways to help make you
and your pets secure.
1. When going into wooded areas, wear
long pants and tuck them into socks, and tuck
shirts into pants, to keep ticks on the outside
of clothing where they are more easily visible.
2. Apply repellent containing permethrin to
pants, socks and boots and allow them to dry,
or use DEET-containing repellants with at
least 25 percent active ingredients.
3. Use anti-tick products on pets, ask your
veterinarian about Lyme disease vaccines for
pets where backlogged deer ticks are found.
4. Ticks have to feed for more than a day be-
fore they may transmit disease. If you are in a
tick infested area, check yourself, children and
pets daily.
5. If you find a tick, grasp it as close to the
skin as possible with a pair of tweezers, a
commercially design tick remover or pro-
tected thumb and finger, slowly pull the tick
out.
At the Nature Center, I try to clear back trail
paths to help prevent the possibility of a
walker catching any wood ticks. But this is not
always true, so as a suggestion, always follow
these five steps as mentioned to insure a safe,
possible wonderful experience at the Black
Swam Nature Center.
Also, still raising funds for the repaving
project. We are 80% complete, any donation
will be helpful..
If considering any donation, please write a
check to the Paulding SWCD paving project,
we can be reached at the OSU Extension
Building.
Ticks are out for blood
HOMESPUN
By
JIM LANGHAM
18 hours symbolizes
cancer journey
of the Relay, a huge crowd
joins the survivor celebration
lap and they all cross the finish
line together, as winners and
overcomers. This year they cel-
ebrated a fund-raising of
$115,000 and counting.
As is the case of life, this
years event was sprinkled with
some unexpected challenges;
at 11 p.m., the crowd of walk-
ers were ushered into the fair-
ground shelter as a severe
storm bearing a tornado warn-
ing passed over the event.
Like life, there were unex-
It was an 18-hour allegory of
all that mixes into a cancer
journey at this years Relay for
Life event held at the Paulding
County Fairgrounds this past
weekend.
Sunshine, rain, storms, light,
darkness, fluctuating emotions,
a walking journey and personal
support from those surround-
ing us all combined to repre-
sent an allegory of life for a
cancer victim.
Jillene McMichael, member
of the Relay Advisory Com-
mittee, gave a heartfelt com-
parison of the ingredients that
make up a Relay event with the
journey of cancer survivorship,
noting that the 18 hours of a
Relay event is symbolic of life
of a cancer victim.
It all begins with the bright
sunshine of the 6 p.m. hour; all
appears well, people are ex-
cited and there is a lot of energy
to life. But as the evening
wears on, darkness begins to
descend and by the time of the
10 p.m. luminary memorial
service, the mood has com-
pletely changed from the
brightness of the beginning to
the solemnness of recalling the
pain. Light has turned to deep-
ening darkness.
As night wears on, the
crowd lessens and eventually,
at the darkest hour, few are
around, the earth is silent and a
sense of loneliness and being
all alone sets in. There are very
few to converse with; like the
Garden of Gethsemane, the
disciples have gone to sleep
and there is a sense of bearing
it all alone.
Then, near the 6 a.m. hour,
there is a glimmer of light in
the eastern sky, then the sky be-
gins to brighten and the world
around us seemingly comes to
life. Our friends and relatives
are by our side once again and
the sun rises; there is the hope
of a new day and a new oppor-
tunity.
The walking journey re-
sumes and spirits brighten, it
seems like hope is gaining mo-
mentum. Then, at the 18th hour
By Jim Lopshire
OSU Extension educator
With the spring rain comes
the time for the Juniper to
flower. From a distance it
looks as if the blooms are
large and orange. Yet wait a
minute. Doesnt the juniper
produce cones?
On closer inspection, unease
turns to horror. Large, alien
looking, carroty gelatinous
tentacles seem to have sprung
up all over the tree. This is a
cedar rust fungal disease.
There are a number of
cedar rust diseases in which
the fungus alternates its life
cycle on two plant hosts. One
host plant is the cedar or ju-
niper species and the second
host can be an apple, crabap-
ple, or hawthorn. In many
cases these diseases are minor
problems, although the orange
colored fungal structures pro-
duced are highly visible in the
landscape.
One of the cedar rust dis-
eases is called Cedar-Apple
Rust. The gelatinous stage of
cedar apple rust occurs in the
spring. Most of the year, the
cedar stage of the fungi will
appear as a growth the size of
a golf ball on the branches.
The galls really do not harm
the cedar tree and will drop off
after a couple of years. These
galls are not very noticeable
except when they bloom in
the spring and it does not re-
ally harm the cedar trees.
For the rest of the year, the
cycle is spent on apple trees.
On the apple trees, the disease
does cause damage to the fo-
liage and the fruit. The dam-
age shows up as blotches on
the leaves and on the skin of
the apple fruit. Symptoms
of the Cedar-Apple Rust on
Trees and cedar rust disease
flowering crab and apple
trees are easily identified. In
late spring or early summer,
bright, yellow-orange spots
approximately 1/8 to 1/4 inch
in diameter form on the upper
surface of the leaves. These
spots gradually enlarge and
turn orange.
Leaves with numerous
spots drop during the sum-
mer. Premature defoliation
weakens the tree and reduces
fruit set and yield the follow-
ing year. Trees with severe
defoliation also are suscepti-
ble to other diseases. Cedar-
Apple Rust may cause fruit
lesions. Diseased fruits de-
velop deep pits or become
distorted and usually drop be-
fore harvest.
Removing and disposing of
the orange galls will improve
the appearance of the red cedar
and reduce the spores that
would in turn infect apple trees.
There is no need for fungicidal
sprays on cedar. The best way
to control the fungus on apples
is with timely applications of
the proper fungicide.
pected challenges with equip-
ment, in certain organizational
aspects and in other surprise
moments that occurred. But in
the end, it all blended into an
emotional finish of joy and re-
alization that another stride in
supporting research to defeat
one of the worlds most
dreaded series of illnesses.
The entire analogy is a re-
minder of the words of Psalm
23, Yea, though I walk
through the valley of the
shadow of death, I will not fear,
for your rod (designed to beat
away unexpected threats) and
staff (symbolizing rest while
working in the garden) are with
me.
You prepare a table (of
good food) before me in the
presence of my enemies (like
cancer) until my cup over-
flows.
Your goodness and love
will follow me all the days of
my life and I will dwell in the
house of the Lord forever (18
hours and beyond).
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Librarys adult summer
reading program begins
PAULDING Why should the kids have all the fun? The his-
toric Paulding County Carnegie Library (main branch) is spon-
soring the fourth annual summer reading program for adults.
Groundbreaking Reads: Uproot a Great Book! is the theme for
this program that will encourage adults to read and keep track of
books theyve read during the program.
Participants who keep a reading log (provided by the library)
will be eligible for fun prizes each week. For every library visit,
the reader may add one entry for the prize drawings. Three prizes
will be drawn each week from the entries received.
Readers will be encouraged to recommend their favorite authors
and titles. There will also be opportunities to write book reviews
for fellow readers.
The library has a limited number of special edition T-shirts
available for sale at the main library to commemorate this reading
program.
This event will be hosted by the main historic Carnegie library
in Paulding. Registration is open now through Aug. 30. The read-
ing program is free and the first 25 people signing up receive a
free book bag and reading journal. The next 25 receive a free book
bag.
This is a Library Centennial Celebration Event. For more in-
formation regarding the Paulding County Carnegie Library, call
419-399-2032 or visit the website at
www.pauldingcountylibrary.org.
Alzheimers group to meet
PAULDING The Alzheimers Associa-
tion, Northwest Ohio Chapter is hosting a
Caregiver Support Group at 1 p.m., Wednes-
day, June 12, at the Paulding County Senior
Center. The senior center is located at 401 East
Jackson. The facilitator is Rita Gross, 419-
770-0355.
The caregiver groups are free and open to the
public.
8A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, June 5, 2013
David A. & Harvey D.
Hyman and Families
Compliments of
Baughman
Tile Company
Ohio Gas
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The Antwerp
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Bank Company
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Cleaning Service
Payne 419-263-2211
Den Herder Funeral
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1-800-399-3522
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Red Angel Pizza
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Scott Variety Shop
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If you would be interested
in helping to sponsor our
church directory, please
call us at the
Paulding County Progress
at 419-399-4015. This
directory is made possible
by our advertisers!
Mara Mart
Paulding
Member FDIC
The Church Directory Is Proudly Sponsored By The Following Businesses:
Paulding County Church Directory
Paulding United Methodist Church, 321 North Williams Street,
Paulding, church telephone number is 399-3591, Rev. Ben Lowell, Wor-
ship service at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 11:15 a.m.; Wed. worship at
6:00pm. Our church office is located at 308 N. Main St.
Pentecostal Church of God, 601 W. Caroline St., Paulding, Elder
George Robinson, Sunday school at 10 a.m., worship service at noon,
prayer services Monday at 6 p.m. and Thursday at noon, Bible study
at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Pioneer Christian Ministries, County Road 108 and Ohio 637, Paulding,
Rev. Chuck Oliver, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30
a.m., and Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. including a youth service on at
least three Wednesday evenings.
Rose Hill Church of God, corner of SR 637 and Charloe Trail, Paulding,
399-3113, Pastor Ron Hofacker, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday service from 7-8 p.m. with childrens hour.
St. John Lutheran ChurchELCA, 7611 Road 87, Briceton, Pastor
Karen Stetins, church telephone number is 419-399-4962 or 419-399-2320.
Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, 601 Flat Rock Drive (P.O. Box
156), Paulding, Pastor Kare Stetins, church telephone number is 399-2320,
Sunday Worship at 10:15 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
PAYNE AND OUTLYING AREAS
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 203 W. Townline, Payne, 399-2576, Pas-
tor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 4:00 p.m.
Edgerton Wesleyan Church, 1717 Bertha St., Woodburn, (Edgerton)
Ind. 46797, Pastor Dave Dignal, church telephone number is 260-632-
4008, Sunday school at 9 a.m., childrens church at 10 a.m., worship at 10
a.m., home groups at 6 p.m., Wednesday evening services at 6:30 p.m.
(Indiana time).
Living Water Ministries, Contemporary worship service Sunday nights
at 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m., The Well church for kids, Sunday mornings from
10-11:30 a.m. The church is currently in the process of relocating. For lo-
cation information, contact Pastor Rich Phelan, 419-263-2728.
Payne Church of Christ, 220 West Merrin Street, Payne, Pastor Mikeal
George. Sunday worship at 9:30 am. 419-263-2092; 419-574-2150 (cell).
Payne Church of the Nazarene, 509 E. Orchard St. (Ohio 500) Payne,
Pastor Mike Harper, 263-2422, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m. Sunday night service at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday prayer
meeting at 7:30 p.m.
St. Jacob United Church of Christ, southwest corner of Oak and Hyman
streets, Payne, Rev. Jim Langham, 263-2763. Sunday School-9:00 am,
Church service-10:00 am.
St. James Lutheran Church NALC, West Townline Street (P.O. Box
42), Payne, 263-2129, Pastor Fred Meuter, 260-492-2581. Sunday School
at 9:00 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:00 a.m.
St. Paul United Methodist Church, (P.O. Box 154) 312 South Main
Street, Payne, Rev. David Rohrer, church telephone number is 263-2418,
parsonage telephone number is 263-2017, Sunday school at 9 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Editors Note: If your church doesnt have service times listed, please
contact the Paulding County Progress office to notify of Sunday service
times.
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m., evening worship
at 6 p.m., Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.
PAULDING AND OUTLYING
Bethel United Methodist, Forders Bridge, Cecil, Pastor Kevin Doseck
(419) 899-4153, worship service at 10:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
Bethlehem Temple Pentecostal, 818 West Jackson Street, Paulding,
399-3770, Rev. Burpo, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 12
p.m.
Calvary Bible Church, Ohio 111 West across from Paulding County Hos-
pital, 399-4919, elders John Mohr, 260-632-4356, Bob Fessel 419-399-
3398, Brad Sisson 419-263-3108, Don Baer 419-399-5805. Sunday school
at 9 a.m., morning worship at 10:15 a.m., Bible Study at 7 p.m. Wed.
Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., Cecil. Pastor Ted Ramey.
Sun. school 10:00 am, Worship service 11:00 am, Sun. eve. 6:00 pm,
Wed. eve. 6:00 pm.
Cecil First Presbyterian Church, Main Street, Cecil, Sunday worship
at 8 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
Christian Fellowship Church, Paulding High School Auditeria, 10
a.m. Sunday. Pastor Greg Cramer.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 417 N. Main, Paulding, 399-2576,
Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 6 p.m.; Sunday
at 10:30 a.m.
Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1275 Emerald Road, Paulding, 419-399-
5061, Sunday School at 9:30 a.m., worship services at 10:45 a.m. and
6 p.m. Sunday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Pastor Drew Gardner.
First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 1233 Emerald Road,
Paulding, 419-399-4576, Sunday school 9:00 a.m., Worship service
10:00 a.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 114 West Caroline Street, Paulding, 399-
2438, Rev. David Meriwether, 9:00am Sunday school, 10:15 a.m. praise
singing, 10:30 a.m. Sunday worship.
House of Love Ministries, 220 N. Williams St., Paulding. Pastor Pre-
dest (Dwayne) Richardson or Sister Brenda Richardson, 419-399-9205
or 419-796-8718, Sunday worship at 3:00 p.m. Jail Ministry, Food Min-
istry, Outreach Ministry. Overcomer Outreach - a Christian 12-steap
meeting, Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
New Beginnings Church (Church of God), Cecil, Pastor Roy Burk,
399-5041, Sunday worship at 11 a.m.
Paulding Church of Christ, East Perry Street, Paulding, Minister
Christopher Reno, 419-399-4761. Bible school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m.
Paulding Church of the Nazarene, 210 Dooley Dr., Paulding, 399-
3932, Revs. Kim and Cindy Semran, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening at 6:00 p.m.: Kids Summer
Jam (ages 4-4th grade), Preteen class (5th-6th grade), Teen group (7th-
12th grade), and adult service. Wednesday at 7:00 p.m.: Teen group
(7th-12th grade), adult bible study and prayer. Nursery available for all
services.
Paulding Family Worship Center, 501 West Perry Street, Paulding,
399-3525, Rev. Monte Moore, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Grover Hill Church of the Nazarene, Maple and East Jackson streets,
Pastor Jonathan L. Hoagland, 587-3376, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Morn-
ing worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening gospel hour at 6 p.m., Wednes-
day evening service at 7 p.m.
Grover Hill Zion United Methodist Church, corner of First and Harrison,
587-3941; Pastor Mike Waldron, 419-238-1493 or 419-233-2241 (cell). Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:20 a.m., nursery available
during all services.
Mandale Church of Christ in Christian Union, Ohio 66, Pastor Justin
Sterrett, 419-786-9878, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., Wednesday prayer meeting at 7 p.m.
Middle Creek United Methodist Church, County Road 24, Grover Hill,
Pastor William Sherry, Sunday worship at 9 a.m., Sunday school at 10:15
a.m., Sunday evening Bible study at 7 p.m.
Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Grover Hill, County Road 151, Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Pastor David Prior, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.,
Wednesday evening prayer meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Roselms Christian Church, Ohio 114, Pastor Gary Church, 594-2445,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
HAVILAND/LATTY/SCOTT
Apostolic Christian Church, 12867 Road 82, Haviland, 399-5220, wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m.
Country Chapel United Methodist Church, Haviland, 419-622-5746,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:15 a.m.
Latty Zion Baptist Church, Latty, Pastor Levi Collins Jr., 399-2748, Sun-
day school at 10 a.m., worship service at 11:15 a.m.
Harvest Field Pentecostal Church of God, 13625 Road 12, Scott, Pastor
Terry Martin, 419-622-2026, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday morning
worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday Evening worship at 6:00 pm, Wednesday
evening worship at 7:00 pm, Wednesday Youth Group at 7:00 pm.
Friends United Methodist Church, Latty, Pastor Ron Johnson. Sunday
worship at 9 a.m., Wednesday Bible Study at 7 p.m.
OAKWOOD/MELROSE AREAS
Auglaize Chapel Church of God, rural Oakwood, 3 miles south and half
mile west on County Road 60, Pastor Stan Harmon, 594-2248, Sunday
worship at 9:00 a.m. Sunday school at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday services for
children, youth and adults at 7:00 p.m.
Melrose United Methodist Church, Melrose, 594-2076, Pastor Eileen
Kochensparger 399-5818; Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m., Wednesday Bible study and prayer at 7:00 p.m.
Twin Oaks United Methodist Church, corner of Harmon and Second
streets, Oakwood, Pastor Eric Dailey. 419-594-2992. Sunday worship at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school at 10:45 a.m., Bible Study Wednesdays at 10:00
a.m.
Prairie Chapel Bible Church, one mile east and a half-mile north of Oak-
wood on the corner of roads 104 and 209, Pastor Earl Chapman, 594-2057,
ANTWERP AND SURROUNDING
Antwerp Community Church, 704 S. Erie St., SR 49, Antwerp; Pastor
Ricky L. Grimes 419-258-2069. Bible Study Fellowship 9:30 am; Contem-
porary Worship 10:30 am, Wednesday Discipleship Study, 7:00 pm
Antwerp United Methodist Church, East River Street, Rev. Pastor Mike
Schneider, church telephone number is 258-4901, Comtemporaty service
Sunday 8:30a.m., Sunday school 9:30a.m., Traditional Service 10:30a.m.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 303 S. Monroe, Antwerp. Office: 417 N.
Main, Paulding, 399-2576, Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Sun-
day at 8:30am.
First Baptist Church, 5482 CR 424, Pastor Todd Murray, 258-2056, Sun-
day school at 9 a.m., Sunday worship 10 a.m.; evening service 6 p.m.,
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 126 W. River St., Pastor Mike Pennington,
258-2864, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:35 a.m.
Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses, 2937 US 24, 258-2290. Public
talk 10 a.m. Sunday, Congregation Bible Study, Theocratic Ministry School
& Service Meeting, Theocratic school 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, Pastor Robert Becker. Sunday school at
9 a.m., Sunday worship at 10 a.m.
Riverside Christian Church, 15413 St. Rt. 49, (corner Ohio 49 and Road
192), Antwerp. 258-3895, Pastor Regan Clem.
ARTHUR/FIVE SPAN AREA
Apostolic Christian Church, 13562 Road 147, Defiance (Junction), 399-
3121, William Schlatter, Elder, Sunday services at 10:15 a.m. and 12:30
p.m., Sunday school at 1 p.m., Wednesday services at 8 p.m.
Bethel Christian Church, Ohio 66, Defiance (Arthur), Pastor Christopher
Baker, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Church of Christ, corner of County Roads 166 and 191, Evangelist Lon-
nie Lambert, 399-5022, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Bible
study at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Junction Bible Christian Church, County Road 111, Defiance (Junction),
393-2671 or JunctionBible@copper.net, Rev. C. Joseph Fifer, Sunday
school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship follows at 10:30 a.m & Bible Study on
Wed. at 7pm.
Pleasantview Missionary Baptist Church, County Road 180, Defiance
(Junction), Rev. Alan Ray Newsome, Sunday worship at 11 a.m., evening
service at 6 p.m.; Wednesday evening services at 7 p.m.
Rock Church, SR 637, Five Span-Arthur area, Pastor Bobby Branham
393-2924, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:45 a.m., Sunday
evening worship at 7 p.m., Wednesday evening worship at 7 p.m., Youth
Service Wednesday at 7 p.m.
GROVER HILL AND OUTLYING
Bible Baptist Church, corner of Cleveland and Perry streets, Grover Hill,
Pastor Pat Holt, 587-4021, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at
11 a.m., Sunday evening worship at 6 p.m.; Wednesday prayer meeting at
7 p.m.
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ACADEMIC HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES John DeWitt, DPT,


(Class of 1992) and Melissa (Ward) Bowman, DVM, (Class of
1988), were inducted into the Paulding High School Academic
Hall of Fame on Sunday, May 26 at the graduation ceremony.
VETERAN RECEIVES DIPLOMA Congratulations to John A.
Willitzer, who received his Paulding High School diploma on May
26. Willitzer left high school in 1949 during his senior year to
serve in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War and wasnt able to
graduate with his Class of 1950. He was honored by being the
first graduate of the Class of 2013.
Antwerp CIC meets to discuss
economic development activities
ANTWERP The Antwerp
Community Improvement
Corporation (CIC) held a meet-
ing May 28.
Present were president
Randy Derck, secretary/trea-
surer Sue Derck, Mayor Tom
Van Vlerah, village administra-
tor Sara Keeran, Ray DeLong,
PCED director Tony Langham,
Councilman Larry Ryan,
Benny Wyckoff, John Kobee,
and consultant Larry Dillin.
The upcoming auction of the
CICs 47 acres of land east of
Antwerp was discussed. The
object of selling the ground is
to help fund improvements to
the interchange development at
24/49. The auction will take
place at the VFW on June 20
by Gorrell Realty.
Also discussed were
sewer/water, drainage and road
construction at the site to better
serve the area. Discussion is
ongoing with Dollar General,
which has an interest in locat-
ing at the interchange. Keeran,
DeLong and Kobee are making
arrangements to hold a meeting
of the 24/49 land committee
and Poggemeyer Design
Group regarding the details of
the new road leading back to a
64-acre development.
Dillin, reported that his
group has contacted a hotel
chain, a fast food chain, and a
retail store about locating at the
24/49 interchange. No obliga-
tions have been made by any of
these businesses.
Keeran reported that she is
working on a grant for a side-
walk to connect the downtown
with the new proposed inter-
change development.
Events were reported upon;
all agreed that the chamber,
ACDC and the Vancrest
McLaughlin Gymnasium are to
be commended on their activi-
ties of holding events that are
bringing new people and in-
come to Antwerp.
Langham discussed the need
for local investor involvement
for development of the town.
One asset that the community
doesnt want to lose is the
wildlife mounts of Dr.
Brickers. There may not be a
place to house it and the money
to secure the collection, but it is
a real attraction.
All the committee agreed it
would be good to hold another
public meeting to inform the
public of progress that has been
happening in Antwerp and so-
licit volunteers to serve on deci-
sion-making committees. A
notice will be published when
that meeting will be held.
If anyone has any questions
or input regarding the develop-
ment of Antwerp, contact
Randy Derck 419-258-5511, or
Tony Langham 419-399-8282,
or other of the meeting atten-
dees.
New companies and old
companies creating jobs
There is, of course, much celebration
when a new company comes into a com-
munity, as well there should be. However,
history has shown that year in and year
out it is the existing companies that are al-
ready located in a community that pro-
duce the most new jobs, according to
Paulding County Economic Development
director Tony Langham.
Information was collected from Jobs
Ohio on 300 projects across the state in
2012. According to a Cincinnati Enquirer
article, this data showed that state sup-
ported projects helped retain about 55,000
jobs from companies already in Ohio and
helped them add 13,000 more new jobs
through expansion. That is about nine
times the 7,700 jobs created in 2012 by
new businesses coming to a community.
The return on investment to market, ad-
vertise, and find new businesses for a
community is much less than to keep in
touch and offer incentives to local already
existing businesses that invest new money
to retain and/or expand jobs. The Cincinnati
USA Regional Chamber, which covers
southwest Ohio and northern Kentucky, es-
timates that as many as 80 percent of new
jobs come from existing companies.
Paulding County Economic Develop-
ment has been forced to market all within
the county for several years because of a
lack of funds to market outside the county.
However, much effort goes into staying in
touch with local businesses through an an-
nual banquet, newspaper articles, phone
calls, email and personal visits.
For information regarding starting or
expanding a business in Paulding County,
call 419-399-8282.
ARMED FORCES DAY WINNER Paul Flint, a combat veteran
with 13-1/2 months of service in Vietnam, was one of the vets
honored at United Way of Paulding Countys Armed Forces Day
event May 18. Flint said, Thank you, United Way, for recognizing
us veterans. He was the winner of a duffle bag filled with good-
ies that was donated by Baughman Tile. Here, Sonya Herber,
United Way director, presents the prize to Flint.
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 9A
Downtown Antwerp 419-258-2068
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PEVS RETIREES Paulding Exempted Village Schools honored retiring staff members at their
staff breakfast on May 23. From left are Chris Slattery, Tillman Karl, Bonnie Weller, Cindy Iler,
Judy Mumma and Bev Bertwell. Not pictured are Charlene Grant, Sandi Leslie, Dave Manz, Mark
Wooton and Ted Wunderle.
EMPLOYEES HONORED
Paulding Exempted Village
Schools honored two 30-year
employees at a staff breakfast
on May 23. Jerry Yoh (above)
was honored, as well as Mark
Wooton (not pictured.)
Antwerp Elementary honor roll
Antwerp Elem. honor roll all year
Antwerp Elementary
School has announced the
honor roll for the fourth
nine weeks. They include:
THIRD GRADE
All As Alex Lehman,
Emerson Litzenberg, Gaige
McMichael, Allison Reinhart,
Bradley Shroades, Emma
Shuherk, Kennedy Trabel,
Ilse Zijlstra
All As & Bs Alex Ade,
Mia Altimus, Kristine Boy-
lan, Olivia Campbell, Nathan
Dunstan, Kate Farr, Summer
Franklin, Breanna Fulk,
Jaidis Getrost, Brady Hatle-
vig, Grace Jones, Zachary
Jones, Morgan Kniceley,
Luke Krouse, Jagger Lan-
ders, Zachary Lockhart, Cade
Lothamer, Faith Maynard,
Shaelin McCrea, Luke Mc-
Dorman, Jonathan Meyer,
Faith Nestleroad, Megan O-
Donnell, Kaden Phares, Jared
Phillips, Draven Raens,
Samantha Rigsby, Grace
Schuette, Lauren Schuller,
Madison Smith, Hunter Spro-
les, Mason Steel, Hayden
Wagner, Trinity Wieland
FOURTH GRADE
All As Rylan Brooks, Car-
men Cruz, Kadi Donat, Austin
Lichty, Logan McKeever, Chet
Miller, Katie Oberlin, Siera
Octaviano, Molly Reinhart,
Madison Ruen, Emily Sanders,
Grace Tuttle
All As & Bs Morgan
Boesch, Heaven Bruce,
Johnathon Buehrer, Jordan
Buerkle, Lydia Butzin, Chase
Clark, Maycee Contreraz,
Halie Davis, Landon Dockery,
Mallory Ehrhart, Jason Geyer,
Hunter Grant, Aaron Hawley,
Dylan Hines, Asa Humes, Ali-
cia Maag, Laura Miller, Eli
Molitor, Landyn Reyes, Eric
Thornell, Joshua Timbrook,
Ryan Van Vlerah
FIFTH GRADE
All As Alyssa Fuller,
Chloe Saul, Blake Schuette,
Elyse Steury, Melanie Wann
All As & Bs Madison
Boesch, Sayge Bonifas,
Karsyn Brumett, Aleyah
Cline, Alyvia DeVore, Boston
Dunderman, Chase Friend,
Izik Garrett, Carlie Hanes,
Adison Hindenlang, Nicole
Kashner, Jayvin Landers,
Garrett Laney, Nicholas Mc-
Creery, Sydney Miller, Ash-
ton Minck, Heather Oberlin,
Hannah Rettig, Holly
Sanders, Julia Steiner, Timmy
Taylor, Kenzie Timbrook,
Ellie Wolf
Paulding High School honor roll
Paulding High School
honor roll for the fourth
nine weeks:
SENIORS
4.00 Abbey Edwards,
Tyler Hayner, Mikayla Pieper,
Macey Provines, Savannah
Roughton, Steven Strayer,
Julia Suck, Maggie Wilhelm,
Zane Wilhelm
3.5-3.9 Tyler Ash, Eliza-
beth Chandler, Logan Doster,
Sydney Early, Sarah Myers,
Samantha Owens, Catlyn
Pavel, Kaitlyn Radel, Neil
Roehrig, Alexis Rue, Breana
Schmidt, Trey Schroeder,
Kayla Simon, Elaine Smith,
Courtney St John, Dalton
Thomas, Elizabeth Young
3.0-3.49 Josh Boes, Austin
Carlisle, Ashley Justinger,
Samantha Martinez, Destiny
Starry
JUNIORS
4.0 Emily Albert,
Stephanie Baldwin, Jerika
Bland, Megan Coak, Taylor
Dangler, Gerod Harder, Guy
Harder, Ashley Johanns, Kay-
lyn Rager, Chelsea Rose, Kait-
lyn Roughton, Jaclyn Schlatter,
Kaley Varner
3.5-3.9 Sarah Bales, Sean
Bentley, Melissa Durham,
Javier Gonzales, Nick Hitch-
cock, Joe Kauser, Ashlyn
Laney, Kandee Manson, Kelsi
Manz, Brad Matson, Janey
McCourt, Sierra McCullough,
Michael Mott, Rachel Nicelley,
Abby Pease, Julian Salinas,
Sidney Salinas, Chelsie
Schoepflin, Kayla Shaffer,
Alyssa Shelmadine, Alesha
Simon, Alli Singer, Andi
Singer, Tiffany Spangler,
Shelly Stafford, Victoria
Stephens-Vazquez, Jenifer
Switzer, Jade VanCleve, Ce-
cilia Weidenhamer, Meagan
Weller, Bailey Zeller
3.0-3.49 Dylan Carnahan,
Taylor Deatrick, Chase
Gideon, Paige Hawkins, Cody
Jarrell, Kyle Kauser, Rachael
Kesler, Andrew Layman, Seth
Mattocks, Ryan Schindler
SOPHOMORES
4.0 Katie Carnahan,
Kathryn Clapsaddle, Kayla
Deitrick, Claudia Foltz,
Amanda LoCastro, Ellie
Miller, Isaac Nice, Shayla
Shepherd, Ashlyn Strahley,
Malayna VanCleve, Laurel
Wehrkamp
3.5-3.9 Taylor Ankney,
Hannah English, Alexis How-
ell, Erin Johanns, Jacob Long,
Melissa Martinez, Morgan
Riley, Haley Schlegel, Bill
Smith
3.0-3.49 Christian Burtch,
Lydia Clemence, Lyndi Clin-
ton, Adam Deatrick, Ashley
Flynn, Kyle Gardner, Preston
Gross, Felita Guyton, Ben
Heilshorn, Emily Pastor, Jes-
sica Schroeder, Monica Shaw,
Michael Tope
FRESHMAN
4.0 Lucas Arend, Kelsey
Beck, Victoria Bradford, Alli-
son Harpel, Lauren Johanns,
Taylor Manz, Matthew Mar-
tinez, Kim Matson, Branson
Minck, Bridgett Moore, Emily
Moore, Emiliee Ringler, Taylor
Schooley, Mei TenWalde, Jay-
cie Varner
3.5-3.9 Kasandra
Cogswell, Kynsie Etzler,
Nathan Gee, Lucas Hanenkratt,
Kacie Karlstadt, Cynthia Mc-
Court, Victoria Meadows,
Krista Mullins, Megan Rei-
neck, Sky Schooley, Jordan
Shull, Cullen Wenzlick,
Drayson Wenzlick
3.0-3.49 Hailey Brittig,
Sierra Bullard, Corbin Ed-
wards, Damon Egnor, Megan
Fife, Taylor Gambler, Henry
Hohenberger, Luke Jackson,
Victoria Johanns, Sam Ladd,
Sabrinah Leaman, Darren
Manz, Devin Sanchez, Kristen
Schilt, Gina Schmitt, Jarrett
Sitton, Andrew Stafford, Nick
Warnimont
Payne Elementary honor roll
The Payne Elementary honor roll for the
fourth nine weeks grading period:
GRADE 1 Anastacia Adkins, L o g e n
Bland, Dylan Hildebrand, Kyren Karhoff, Lucas
Kennedy, Brooks Laukhuf, Emma Lyons, Rhae-
gan Marshall, Joy Moran, Meara Rager, Tori
Stoller, Meg Thompson, Emily Thrasher,
Graiden Troth, Caden Tumblin, Cooper Wen-
zlick, Ava Zartman, Breven Anderson, Eliza An-
derson, KatieAnna Baumle, Connor
Blankenship, Devon Egnor, Hannah Dunham,
Melanie Dunham, Kemper Forrer, Adrian
Laukhuf, Emma Laukhuf, Caleb Merritt,
McKennzie Monroe, Eliyahs Oberlin, Brenna
Parker, Jude Stoller, Caitlyn Thomas, Brenna
Thomas, Cale Winans, Zachary Wobler
GRADE 2 Martin Alejo, Lilli Anderson,
Zerika Burkley, Ian Clevenger, Arin James,
Elizabeth Mohr, Isaac Munger, Race Price,
Morgan Riebesehl, Nyle Stoller, Jacob Banks,
Mackenzie Blankenship, Evan Crosby, Emily
Manz, Mallory Moore, Samuel Moore, Lane
Morehead, Jared Pierce, Kirstynn Roddy, Gra-
cie Shepherd
GRADE 3 Corbin Daulton, Raydyn
Egnor, Morgan Hefner, Brenna Moore, Joel
Reinhart, Malia Wittwer, Iszabel Anderson,
Therin Coyne, Kate Laukhuf, Brookelynn
Lee, Jude Marshall, Jeremiah Molitor,
Cameron Stoller, Rylee Troth
GRADE 4
All As Natalie Schultz, Ryan Wenninger,
Chloe Parker, Jacob Stouffer
All As & Bs Joey Munger, Sam Rager,
Waylon Smallwood, Riley Stoller, Emma
Crosby, Owen Manz, Carlee Mead, Eli Moore,
Gage Tinlin
GRADE 5
All As Nathan Gerber, Brianna Putman,
Sydney Coyne, Gage Waltmire
All As & Bs Cale Crosby, Maddy
Laukhuf, Austin Pierce, Jordan Speller, Libby
Wenzlick, Zoey Wright, Brittney Bauer, Max
Laukhuf, Zach Now, Kylie Pfeiffer, Kiera
Roddy, Zane Shaffer, Kaitlin Vest, Richard
Williams, Reed Zartman
GRADE 6
All As Madison Coyne, Anne Eklund,
Alli Hefner, Carissa Laukhuf, Clark Laukhuf,
Matthew Stouffer
All As & Bs Alec Anderson, Madi
Brigner, Caden Bland, Reese Etzler, Brooke
Greulach, Olivia Klinker, Cassidy Knott, Gra-
cie Laukhuf, Josiah Linder, Levi Manz, Evan
Mohr, Preston Moore, Noah Reel, Julianne
Roop, Kaylee Shepherd, Wyatt Stabler,
Haleigh Stoller, Reece Thompson, Ashley
Thrasher
Wayne Trace honor roll
Wayne Trace Junior High/High School
honor roll for the fourth nine weeks:
SENIORS
4.00 Lyndsay Combs, Sarah Nickols,
Adrean Ross, Andrew Moore, Emily Whitman
3.67-4.0 Staci Wenninger, Yifan Cheng,
Graden Gudakunst, Haleigh Garner, Andre
Spinner, Courtney Seffernick, Jared Eklund,
Kylee Wenninger
3.3-3.66 Taylor Campbell, Gary Mielke,
Derek Langmeyer, Marisa Jones, Brian
Myers, Chelsea Critchfield, Mackenzie Camp-
bell, Jonathan Harper, Natalie Sinn, Ryan Ko-
rtokrax, Kaleigh Young, Kyle Clark, Denise
Smith, Emma Schmidt, Mackenzie Fleagle,
Eric Maassel
3.0-3.29 Tyler Ruiz, Nickolas McClain,
Audrey Greear, Rylee Zartman, Karla Mosier,
Dalton Sinn, Nathan Holtsberry, Zachary
Proctor, Tanya Sinn, Krystal Wannemacher,
Karena Egnor
JUNIORS
4.00 Madison McClure, Abigail Shepherd,
Mackenzie Haney, Haley Linder, Rachael
Kreischer, Sylvia Young, Madeline Baumle,
Janelle Johnson, Matthew Klopfenstein,
Madison Poling, Kendall Germann, Jared
Sherry, Libby Stabler, Brock Worden
3.67-4.0 Austin Conlon, Jacob Gerber,
Logan Fast, Sean Durre, Janey Janka, Arlen
Stoller
3.3-3.66 Dustin Taylor, Emilie Linder,
Alec Kuhn, Danielle Kortokrax, Brenda
Feasby, Brooke Wilcox, Jordan Elick, Devin
Shaffer-Wenzlick
3.0-3.29 Katelynn Back, Matthew Lam-
bert, Colby Speice, Wesley Goings, Treanna
Bidlack, Alexis Flores, Andrew Ludwig
SOPHOMORES
4.00 Blair Baumle, Erin Jewell, Kayla
Zuber, Hunter Martin, Addison Baumle
3.67-4.0 Rebecca Hamrick, Jacob Dingus,
Sarah Young, Isaiah Ross, Jehane Hoagland
3.3-3.66 Cassidy Hilkey, Elizabeth
Brown, Jacob Arend, Hank Sinn, James
Weaver, Haley Saylor, Molly Crosby, Grant
Gillett, Corbin Linder, Latasha Rivera, Daron
Showalter, Jenny Holbrooks
3.0-3.29 Mackenzie Swary, Courtnie
Laney, Jill Ross, Nicholas Mansfield, Saman-
tha Hinchcliff
FRESHMAN
4.00 Sydney Critten, Cole Shepherd, Estie
Sinn, Scott Wenninger
3.67-4.0 Victoria Ryan, Brianna Sinn,
Stacy Flint, Erin Mohr, Mikayla Anderson,
Nicholas Durre, Hollie Wannemacher, Shayna
Temple, Jayson Nowak
3.3-3.66 Nathanael Roop, Brooke Lud-
wig, Corey Davis, Christopher Davis, Lucas
Sinn, Taryn Homier, Noah Stoller, Arlyn
Cooper, Shad Ream, Luke Miller, Sydney
Hofmann, Emilee Colgan
3.0-3.29 Clint Sinn, Zachary Sinn, Alec
Vest, Blair Ludwig, Edwin Van Den Hengel,
Gabriel Wobler, Jessica Offerle, Brenna
Baker, Carley Wright, Justin Speice, Austin
Fast, Robert Rivera, Quinton Harper, Kelsey
Fleagle, Liam Marihugh, Austin Winebrenner
GRADE EIGHT
4.00 Emil Stoller
3.67-4.0 Daniel Sinn, Brady Stabler,
Brooke Lelonek
3.3-3.66 Danae Myers, Ethan Dunham,
Korene Shelton, Sarah Dyson, Gabrielle Gu-
dakunst, Blaine Jerome
3.0-3.29 Seth Saylor, Julie Holbrooks,
Kacey Reinhart, Colin Doerr, Ethan Linder,
Joseph Schmidt, Jonathan Sinn
GRADE SEVEN
4.00 Sara Sinn, Lily Sinn
3.67-4.0 Joel Johnson, Megan Moore,
Leah Maassel, Adam Stoller, Gracie Gu-
dakunst
3.3-3.66 Aden Baker, Kalin Gerber, Con-
nor Baumle, Erica Mohr, Celia Baker, Gabe
Sinn, Jacob Kuhn, Madison Chastain, Alisa
Elliott, Garrett Silance
3.0-3.29 Elias Sinn, Quinton Stabler, We-
ston Sinn, Marissa Huebner, Jaydon Edwards,
Kaitlyn Harris, Jordan Saylor
The all-year honor roll for
Antwerp Elementary:
THIRD GRADE
All As Alex Lehman,
Gaige McMichael, Bradley
Shroades, Ilse Zijlstra
All As and Bs Alex
Ade, Mia Altimus, Kate Farr,
Summer Franklin, Breanna
Fulk, Brady Hatlevig, Grace
Jones, Zachary Jones, Mor-
gan Kniceley, Luke Krouse,
Jagger Landers, Emerson
Litzenberg, Zachary Lock-
hart, Cade Lothamer, Luke
McDorman, Jonathan Meyer,
Faith Nestleroad, Megan O-
Donnell, Kaden Phares, Jared
Phillips, Allison Reinhart,
Grace Schuette, Lauren
Schuller, Emma Shuherk,
Mason Steel, Kennedy Tra-
bel, Trinity Wieland
FOURTH GRADE
All As Rylan Brooks,
Kadi Donat, Katie Oberlin,
Molly Reinhart, Madison
Ruen, Emily Sanders
All As and Bs Morgan
Boesch, Heaven Bruce,
Johnathon Buehrer, Jordan
Buerkle, Lydia Butzin, Maycee
Contreraz, Carmen Cruz, Halie
Davis, Mallory Ehrhart, Jason
Geyer, Hunter Grant, Aaron
Hawley, Dylan Hines, Austin
Lichty, Alicia Maag, Logan
McKeever, Chet Miller, Laura
Miller, Eli Molitor, Siera Octa-
viano, Eric Thornell, Joshua
Timbrook, Grace Tuttle
FIFTH GRADE
All As Alyssa Fuller,
Chloe Saul, Blake Schuette
All As and Bs Madison
Boesch, Sayge Bonifas,
Karsyn Brumett, Aleyah Cline,
Alyvia DeVore, Boston Dun-
derman, Izik Garrett, Carlie
Hanes, Adison Hindenlang,
Nicole Kashner, Jayvin Lan-
ders, Garrett Laney, Sydney
Miller, Ashton Minck, Heather
Oberlin, Holly Sanders, Julia
Steiner, Elyse Steury, Timmy
Taylor, Kenzie Timbrook,
Melanie Wann
For the Record
It is the policy of the Paulding County
Progress to publish public records as they
are reported or released by various agencies.
Names appearing in For the Record are
published without exception, to preserve the
fairness and impartiality of the Progress and
as a news service to our readers.
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
P.O. Box 180, Paulding 419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
419-399-4015
419-399-4015
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
P.O. Box 180, Paulding 419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
P.O. Box 180, Paulding 419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
P.O. Box 180, Paulding 419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
THE PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
The Classifieds Can Help!
The Classifieds Can Help!
10A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, June 5, 2013
College Notes
Its a short road that has no
advertising signs Anony-
mous. Learn how your com-
munity newspaper can help
you call the Progress today
at 419-399-4015.
CONGRATS!
2013 Graduates
www.chiefsupermarkets.com
Bryan Chief
Josiah Gerencser
Northwest State
Mattea Prekop
Northwest State
Tara Glasgow
Northwest State
Celina Chief
Tony Sutter
Celina High School
Coldwater Chief
Emily Kahlig
Coldwater High School
Jake Fink
Coldwater High School
Deance Chief
Alvin Grime
Deance High School
Anthony Andonegui
Deance High School
Carrie Sondergaard
Deance High School
Kyle Wank
Ayersville High School
Laura McLaren
Deance High School
Mason Bowen
Ayersville High School
Delphos Chief
Angel Cummings
Ottoville High School
Napoleon Chief
Angie Sleigh
Northwest State
Amber Reed
Deance College
Brad Lutz
Napoleon High School
Robyn Corron
Deance College
Paulding Chief
Anthony Stetler
Wayne Trace High School
Cody Thompson
Paulding High School
Nick Clippinger
Paulding High School
Sarah Nardone
Paulding High School
Scott Donnell
Paulding High School
Lima Chief
(S. Cable Rd)
Nicole Sreenan
Findlay University
Lima Chief
(W. Northern Ave)
Brad Barbadaes
Bath High School
Jarren Crawford
Lima Central Catholic HS
Josh Brinkman
Rhodes College
Larenz Mays
Elida High School
Lima Chief
(Harding Hwy)
Andrew DeVita
Bath High School
Alex Tone
ECOT
Benjamin Wassink
Elida High School
Drew Swaney
Allen East High School
Shakiyla Buckmon
Shawnee High School
Trenton Carey
Allen East High School
Wauseon Chief
Allyson Mahan
Taylor University
Caleb Delauter
Northwest State
Jean-Luc Robinson
Wauseon High School
Joy Ellerbrock, OD
formerly of Paulding Eyecare Clinic
is now seeing patients at
102 W. Ash Street, Continental, OH 45831
419-596-3062
www.moderneyecareonline.com
41c1
Carols
Main Street
Makeovers
105 N. Main, Payne
419-263-2030
41c1
Regional Track
Archers sending two to Columbus
Tear pulls resignation
from school board agenda By KEVIN
WANNEMACHER
Sportswriter
Antwerp will represent
Paulding County at the state
track and field meet this
weekend as the Archers will
send two runners to compete
in Columbus.
Freshman Sam Williamson
moves on after running a
9:57.50 in the 3200 run to fin-
ish second and clinch his
ticket to the state capital.
On the girls side, freshman
Audrie Longardner also will
make the trip after posting a
time of 59.46 to take fourth in
the 400 dash.
Senior Cameron Huss just
missed making a trip to
Columbus, finishing fifth in
the 400 dash with a time of
52.37.
Wayne Trace saw its boys
and girls track season come to
a close at the regional meet as
no Raiders qualified in the
top four to move on to the
state meet next weekend.
Wayne Traces 3200 relay
team of Abbey Shepherd,
Haley Saylor, Rylee Zartman
and Madison Poling took
15th place in 10:53.21 and
the quartet of Zartman, Stacy
Flint, Taylor Grant and Carri-
gan Critten placed 13th in
1:51.68.
Zartman also placed sev-
enth in the 800 run, complet-
ing the race with a time of
2:22.99. Shayna Temple tied
for 12th in the high jump fol-
lowing a leap of 4-8.
On the boys side, Ryan Ko-
rtokrax finished ninth in the
discus with a toss of 135-9
while the 1600 relay team of
Kenny Ganter, Korbin
Showalter, Cole Shepherd
and Josh Reel placed 14th in
3:40.31.
Alec Kuhn took seventh in
the 110 hurdles with a time of
15.85 and Arlen Stoller just
missed a trip to Columbus
after taking fifth in the 1600
run, posting a time of
4:30.61.
Pauldings Sidney Salinas
was 10th in the 400 dash with
a time of 1:01.10. The Lady
Panther junior also tied for
seventh in the pole vault with
a leap of 9-0.
PAULDING The Paulding Village Ex-
empted School board met on May 21 with all
members present.
Kristen Cheslock, the new director of spe-
cial education was introduced and the elemen-
tary school music teacher, Dawn Sloan
directed members of the Paulding Elementary
musical in signing a song from their recent
performance.
Regular financial items were read and ap-
proved and included making the Key Bank
and Fifth Third Bank the depository of the
school.
Nine scholarships were approved for the
class of 2012-13.
Ten employees received transfer approvals
and 31 one-year contracts for extracurricular
activities were approved. Four employees re-
ceived the nod to be custodians.
The approval of Stephanie Tear to resign as
Paulding Elementary principal was pulled
from the agenda at the request of Tear and her
staff in hopes they can work out a solution to
keep her at Paulding.
The board also approved sending three stu-
dents to Nashville for the FCCLA National
Leadership Conference, handbooks for middle
and high school, the use of the 2013 poverty
guidelines for determining fees for pre-school
classes and to award a veteran diploma to John
Willitzer.
A resolution was passed to renew an existing
tax levy which will be on the ballot on Nov. 5.
Board members then went into executive ses-
sion to consider the employment of public em-
ployees and to consider the investigation of
charges or complaints against a public employee,
official licensee or a student.
BLUFFTON Former Paulding standout
Shelby Erford just finished her junior season
for the Lady Beavers. Erford hit .328 on the
season, posting 40 hits while also include
three doubles, two triples and a home run. Er-
ford also has added eight stolen bases and a
dozen walks. The Beavers are 17-19 on the
season overall while finishing 9-5 in the
HCAC.
DEFIANCE Wayne Trace graduate
Kelsey Heck is a sophomore on the Lady Yel-
low Jackets and played in three games at the
varsity level. The Yellow Jackets were 16-22
overall and 6-10 in the HCAC.
HEIDELBERG A.J. Stuck has posted six
hits, including one triple, for the Student
Princes and wrapped up the season batting
.182. Stuck, a graduate of Antwerp, also has
walked twice and stolen a base. Heidelberg
completed the season 12-24 in all games and
2-16 in the OAC.
HUNTINGTON Marcie McDougle, a for-
mer Raider, helped lead Huntington to a 23-
18 season overall while the Lady Foresters
were 10-8 in conference play. McDougle com-
pleted the season 7-7 overall with a 3.07
earned run average while striking out 46 in 86-
2/3 innings. McDougle walked only three on
the season, leading the country in walks per
game at .31 per contest.
LIMA Derrick Pease (Paulding) and Ryne
Jerome (Wayne Trace) are both sophomores
on the OSU Lima Barons baseball squad.
Pease hit .360 on the year, totaling 32 hits that
included nine doubles, two triples and a home
run. Pease also scored 20 runs and drove in an
equal 20 runs this past year with four stolen
bases. Pease was 1-4 on the year with a 3.70
earned run average, posting 16 strikeouts in
24-1/3 innings. Jerome played in 15 games,
scoring five times and driving in a pair of runs.
Jerome also had three hits, one of which was
a double.
DEFIANCE Hayden Krick (Antwerp)
took 14th place in the 5,000 meter run at the
Grand Valley State Second to Last Chance In-
vitational with a time of 15:22.78.
Ashley Saylor (Wayne Trace) placed 25th
in the NCAC Invitational hosted by Ohio Wes-
leyan at Oakhaven Golf Course. Saylor carded
a 194 to help the Battling Bishops to a fifth
place finish in the tournament.
Crews progress on sewer separation
PAULDING The Village
of Paulding sewer separation
project mainline crew and lat-
eral crew are working in a lot
of different places.
Michael Karafa from Jones
& Henry Engineers provided
an update on the project.
Main Line Crew
With the high water eleva-
tion in Flat Rock Creek at the
commencement of work, the
mainline crew could not begin
the project where it was sup-
posed to. So, in order to main-
tain the schedule, the mainline
contractor mobilized further
upstream to install the mainline
sewer.
Since he was unable to start
where intended, he could not
tie in the lateral services, from
the main sewer to the right-of-
way, because there was no
place to empty the new sewer.
Recently, the high water ele-
vation has subsided in Flat
Rock Creek, and the mainline
sewer has been completed. The
crew is now moving upstream
connecting the lateral sewers.
Lateral Crew
In order to cure-in-place
sewers, all the sanitary laterals
have to be replaced from the
main line sewer to the right-of-
way. Once the laterals have
been completed, the manholes
will be replaced. Upon com-
pletion of the manholes, the
main line sewers will be cured-
in-place.
Chief has donated over $191,000
to area food pantries since 2009
DEFIANCE Chief Su-
permarket has held Good
Neighbor Day each spring
since 2009 and has donated a
total of $191,000 to local
food pantries over five years.
The $64,224 donated this
year was made possible by
customer food and monetary
donations, vendor support, a
percentage of sales from
Tuesday, May 7 and a food
donation from Chief.
Annette Hoeffel, Chief Su-
permarkets director of mar-
keting, said, Good Neighbor
Day was a total success.
Since 2009, Good Neighbor
Day has allowed Chief to do-
nate over $191,000 to local
food banks and pantries. We
had excellent participation
from all of our communities
and these donations will
make a difference for many
families that are facing diffi-
cult situations.
According to the West
Ohio Food Bank:
45% of clients served by
the West Ohio Food Bank re-
port having to choose be-
tween paying for food and
paying for gas for a car.
44% had to choose be-
tween paying for food and
paying for utilities or heating
fuel.
36% had to choose be-
tween paying for food and
paying their rent or mortgage.
35% had to choose be-
tween paying for food and
paying for medicine or med-
ical care.
Funds donated will allow
local food pantries to pur-
chase staple food items, in-
cluding produce, meat and
frozen foods, at greatly re-
duced prices from the West
Ohio Food Bank, which
serves more than 200 pro-
grams in 11 counties through-
out West Central Ohio.
Each dollar donation to West
Ohio Food Bank will provide
25 pounds of food that will
make 19 meals, enough to feed
two people for three days. Se-
lected local food pantries that
are not part of the West Ohio
Food Bank group will also
benefit directly from the do-
nated funds.
Bagged groceries ready for customers to buy and donate.
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 11A
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Sales & Service
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Accepting
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DONATE TO NEW PARK Jack and Marie Moore have donated $500 to the Herb Monroe Community
Park project sponsored by the Paulding Chamber and its Leadership In Action program. Marie stated,
Herb and his wife were great friends of ours and he was a wonderful person. Accepting the donation
is Ron Williamson (left), LIA fundraising chair and food service program director with the Paulding
County Senior Center. The park will be located at the corner of Jackson and Main streets with ground-
breaking scheduled for June 6 after the John Paulding Days parade.
Commissioner discusses dog warden, EMA decisions
On Wednesday, May 29,
Paulding County Commis-
sioner Tony Zartman sat down
for an interview with Paulding
Progress publisher Doug Nut-
ter and staff writer Denise
Gebers to discuss the contro-
versy surrounding the com-
missioners decisions
regarding plans for the dog
wardens office and the county
emergency management
agency (EMA). This was prior
to Mondays decision to offer
the dog warden her job back.
Part 1 of 2
Paulding Progress: First
question. This is what people
want to know. Why do you
want to put the EMA and
the dog warden under the
sheriffs jurisdiction?
Tony Zartman: Doug I think
Id respond to that as far as
lets discuss the dog warden
first. Ive been a commis-
sioner for five years and it has
been my experience that the
dog warden position is the
least respected position in the
county. No matter what the
dog warden goes out and takes
care with either the persons
making the the complaint or
the person whose dog it is, one
of those people is going to call
and complain, guaranteed.
And Ive watched this for
years and Ive discussed this
with the dog wardens and we
had situations where the dog
warden has been threatened,
with physical harm.
And, talking with other
counties, and with the sheriff
the simple question was, if we
made the dog warden a sher-
iffs deputy, the respect comes
with that badge and the au-
thority that comes with that
badge, does it make a differ-
ence? And in the other coun-
ties who have already gone
down this road it has made a
huge difference for them. The
dog warden position is then
seen totally different. People
respect that position much
higher. Theyre not nearly as
belligerent to the dog warden
and it just opens up the possi-
bilities of, of how the call can
be handled much differently.
So it would be our choice or
our wish, to remove all of that
from the dog warden position,
all of that negativity and try to
overcome that and we hon-
estly, we feel that the commu-
nity is going to be better
served by that. That aside, the
other thing is if we put it under
the sheriffs department we
dont have a dog warden and a
deputy dog warden, were
going to have an entire sher-
iffs department able to re-
spond to calls. Whether it be
be the middle of the night or
weekends or the dog warden is
out out on another call, a
deputy will be able to go out
and respond, assess the situa-
tion and if they can handle it,
theyre going to handle it; if
they cannot handle it they will
be in contact with the dog
warden.
One of my chief concerns
with Georgia when she started
this job was, dont burn your-
self out. Because she was
working 24/7. She was not
getting days off and I told her
and been been telling her for
months, if your budget will
allow, you need to get to get a
deputy, which she was finally
able to do that, to find one to
fit the need. Not that she
couldnt have done it sooner,
but she finally found one that
fit the need. That was another
of our concerns. Because lets
face it, as a dog warden, its
Saturday night ... Sunday
morning, three oclock in the
morning you get a call and
youve been out how many
other times are you going to
respond in a timely manner? I
dont know that I would. But
with this new structure, a sher-
iffs deputy will respond ...
and assess the situation and...
PP: It is open to the whole
department then?
TZ: Yes. Then ... Jason
[Sheriff Landers] is looking
into putting dog snares in all
the vehicles. I mean, its not
just going to be one individ-
ual. That individual will have
set hours in the sheriffs of-
fice, five days a week.
PP: Go ahead with the
EMA.
TZ: We want to put that
under the sheriffs jurisdiction.
Originally our desire was ...
well, lets back up. The current
system we have with the EMA
board simply isnt working.
There is a tremendous lack of
oversight in that position. The
board officially met that I
know of only twice since Ive
been commissioner. And some
of those board members have
told us that they were never
even notified of the meetings.
So, we see that position as a
very necessary position but we
also see there are issues taking
place that arent being done
the way they should.
PP: Is there a commis-
sioner on that board?
TZ: There is. And since that
changed because Mr. [Tony]
Burkley was on that board.
When that change took place
with Fred [Commissioner
Pieper], thats when things
started becoming more an
issue. Its not that we didnt
have issues in the commission-
ers office before with the
board, its just the way I think
in which that board member,
the commissioner, handled it
from our aspect.
PP: Okay.
TZ: So, going back, origi-
nally, well our desire was to
make some changes, and with
the EMA board weve dis-
cussed this with several people
as far as how can we, what can
we do, you know. But, we be-
came aware that according to
the O.R.C. [Ohio Revised
Code] that I believe was passed
in 99, Im not sure, we have the
ability to organize under the
commissioners name, which
would then give us direct over-
sight over that position. At the
time when all this was talked
about, we were in discussions
with Jason as far as communi-
cation problems we were hav-
ing in the county because we
have first responders who can-
not respond back with 911 dis-
patch on their handheld radios
and its a issue for safety. We
were in the middle of dis-
cussing with, we had a meet-
ing with first responders to
discuss all this. And in our
mindset, it makes sense to put
it under the sheriffs office, to
give him oversight over it,
simply because he is in charge
of 911 dispatch. He knows the
calls that are going out. and it
would be easiest for him then
to activate the EMA when the
EMA is in his office. The EMA
personnel. So, is it an absolute
necessity? No. We felt that we
would gain efficiencies through
it.
PP: Okay. Good. So, when
it first appeared you implied
that was a safety issue with
the dog warden, then it was
about the oversight, then it
was complaints, and a person-
nel matter. Which of these are
the correct and true story, is it
all of them, or none of them?
TZ: Well, lets go back to the
complaints and the personnel
issue. When we held at meeting
that Denise and Melinda [Krick,
editor] were at along with the
other newspapers, Freds state-
ment, opening statement, never
said anything about personnel
issues. Never said anything
about complaints, it was more
about efficiencies and respect.
We were asked, someone asked
Fred if there had been com-
plaints or personnel issues in-
volving the dog warden. Out of
an honest answer, Fred looked
at me cause he really wasnt
100 percent sure were good
with this, he looked at me and I
said yes, there have been. Yes
there have. With any employee,
youre going to have com-
plaints.
PP: Right.
TZ: And they asked how
many. Honestly, there are nu-
merous. Was it our desire to do
this to make this change simply
to replace Georgia? Absolutely
not. Our desire was to make this
change to gain respect and effi-
ciencies in that office by being
able to utilize the other deputies.
The downfall which I explicitly
told Georgia when we talked to
her previously when we had her
come in and we met with her
before we finally made our de-
cision, that the only downfall in
our eyes was that she wouldnt
be able to fill this position be-
cause of nepotism. Because we
were under the opinion from
what wed been told that it
would have to be a sheriffs em-
ployee and with her husband
being there in management she
could not be an employee.
PP: And in the meantime
that has changed?
TZ: And That has changed.
Weve just gotten that ruling.
So, this was, had nothing to do
with disciplinary actions or per-
sonnel issues.
PP: So, also, with the
deputy dog warden [Ken
Huckabaa], same case? In
other words, you havent had
issues with the deputy dog
warden?
TZ: Absolutely not. He just
came on board. In fact, we had
discussed, I think I had said
something to Jason way back
when he was running for sheriff.
So this was back, October or
November, he and I were to-
gether and I said you know I
said we really have these issues
with the dog warden and its all
lack of respect. And I dont
know how this would work if
we could ever put it under the
sheriffs office to make some
changes there. Well, he got back
to us after we had hired Ken
Huckabaa as the deputy dog
warden. And said you know this
is what I found out. This is what
we can do. And he honestly
wants to oversee that position to
make it more efficient for
everybody. Does he have to do
that? Absolutely not. Is his of-
fice going to gain from it? Ab-
solutely not. The dog kennel,
the dog warden fees will remain
in the dog warden fund to be
used explicitly for the dog war-
dens salary, and the deputy dog
wardens salary and any equip-
ment and that they need to run
it and do it, for their job and to
maintain the shelter. Thats it.
PP: Theres widespread
speculation from many in the
county that somehow money
from the dog warden and
EMA will be directed to the
sheriffs department to open
up the jail. Is this true?
TZ: Absolutely not. They will
remain, well they currently are
special funds and they will re-
main special funds solely for the
purpose of maintaining those
agencies.
PP: According to a 21 News
report, the Paulding County
commissioners indicate they
are openly discussing the idea
of moving some money
around in the current budget
to come up with the cash
needed to staff the local jail
once again.
TZ: We had that discussion
quite a while ago with Jason. If
the numbers came in low
enough as far as the difference
between out-housing and open-
ing the jail we would certainly
try to make it work because its
going to serve our community
much better to have our own fa-
cility. But if the numbers are too
large, its not feasible for us.
Which, at this point in time, all
the indicators are that the spread
between those two options is
too great. Theres no way we
could cover that. So, I mean we
havent made a final determina-
tion, but all indicators are point-
ing to that scenario that we
would not be able to reopen.
PP: I know another thing
people are concerned about is
the cost and I know that the
commissioners are always
looking at costs. What cost
savings as far as moving the
EMA and the dog warden to
the sheriffs department, are
we looking at a cost saving? Is
it going to cost more money?
I know thats something that
the citizens of Paulding
County are looking at.
TZ: The dog warden will not
cost any more money because
actually we anticipate that with
the ability of all deputies being
able to cite people for not hav-
ing dog tags when they respond
to calls, we expect the dog tag
sales to go higher. I mean, thats
just one of the perks. In doing
that its going to give us the
ability to compensate the dog
warden the way they should be
compensated, and compensate
the deputy dog warden the way
they should be compensated.
Which right now is very ques-
tionable.
EMA? Is that going to cost
more? Under the new structure,
it will be a countywide program
where previously all entities
were responsible for their own
program whether they were
township, village or county. So
they were mandated to help to
compensate for the program.
And which all villages and
townships paid a certain amount
into the EMA fund, which we
supplemented that fund also,
and then they were able to re-
ceive a match from the state
EMA fund equal to all of our
compensation together. Under
the new plan, since its county-
wide, under the county commis-
sioners, these other entities are
not mandated to contribute to
this fund. It really falls entirely
on the countys shoulders to
fund this department. We had
discussions with townships and
villages and weve expressed
that to them, at least I have with
the ones that Ive met with, and
Ive said, you know, we cant
mandate you to continue but we
would certainly ask that you
contribute voluntarily because
you see that, that the program is
going to continue, were going
to seek improvements in the
program over what we currently
have and if we think its going
to be better and thats important.
PP: Will there be an EMA
director?
TZ: Yes, there will be. Ab-
solutely. Currently, it was our
desire to put this EMA director
under the sheriffs oversight be-
cause of 911 coordination out
there. This morning we pretty
much decided that, well we did
decide, that the EMA director
will remain a county commis-
sioner employee and our office
will have direct oversight over
that position. And the sheriffs
department will not be in-
volved.
PP: In the Ohio counties
that have switched their dog
warden to the sheriffs office,
most, if not all, have a hu-
mane society in place to pro-
vide assistance. We do not.
How do you think that could
effect how our shelter oper-
ates? I think what people
want to know, from what I
understand, the dog warden
now has a very low kill rate
and has been able to save the
animals since last August.
TZ: Shes had no kills since
August.
PP: Okay. I think a lot of
citizens are worried that
thats going to go way up, that
the sheriffs department isnt
going to have the same com-
passion to try to get animals
adopted, that -
TZ: Its not our desire as
commissioner nor the sheriff
desire to put dogs down. We
also recognize the responsibili-
ties set for the dog warden in the
O.R.C. We know that those re-
sponsibilities are going to be
met, at a much higher rate than
they were previously, with the
sheriffs supervision. We antic-
ipate that the dog warden will
be involved with a rescue group
and we would hope that the cit-
izens see that the responsibility
of that rescue doesnt fall
squarely on the countys shoul-
ders, that it really needs to be a
volunteer group that oversees
the rescues. The dog warden is
primarily responsible for taking
care of strays as far as picking
them up and peoples safety, not
taking a dog in as rescue in and
rescue out-
PP: Thats more of a hu-
mane society-
TZ: Thats more of a humane.
Thats not dog warden. So its
our desire, which Jason has
talked to several people about
this, that a volunteer group be
formed, friends of the Paulding
County Dog Shelter, if you will,
to oversee that rescue. Are they
responsible for day-to-day op-
erations at the kennel? Ab-
solutely not. The sheriffs de-
partment is still going to oversee
that. If it comes down the road
that theres enough volunteers
and they want to start helping
with taking care of animals at
the shelter, as long as they have
the sheriffs blessing thats fine,
but as far as actual rescue, were
hoping that individuals will be
able to see the benefit that were
going to gain with that badge
being worn by the sheriff, er-
the dog warden to overcome
their animosity and be willing to
bond.
PP: Lets talk a little bit
about the EMA. I know that
the commissioners, Joe
Burkard and other have gone
around to the townships and
villages to get them to sign a
paper to dissolve the EMA
board. How many townships
and villages have signed the
paper to dissolve that?
TZ: We have 11 signatures.
PP: I understand you need
to have 51 percent? Is that
correct?
TZ: We need to have 13 sig-
natures before we can officially
reform. We have currently, Im
thinking four signatures, four
entities that have taken it under
advisement, theyre waiting for
us to get back with them with
some additional information
and then they will act. Will we
get our 13 signatures? Ab-
solutely. Because as weve ex-
plained the situation to these
entities they see the benefits that
they are going to receive. And,
we are, we want to provide the
best service we can to the citi-
zens. And we feel that the cur-
rent organization has not been
able to.
PP: Because that was a
question from a reader, what
services and what degree of
services will be provided as a
result of these changes?
TZ: We personally see that
trainings that are offered to first
responders - the number and
quality of those trainings is cer-
tainly, its our desire to make
them go higher. And if we have
to invest a few more dollars to
make sure it happens, were
willing to, to ensure the safety
of our first responders, the vol-
unteers. They need to be taken
care of.
PP: Who will be responsi-
ble for hiring an EMA direc-
tor, will that be the
commissioners or the sheriff?
TZ: That will be the commis-
sioners.
Part 2 of the interview will be
published in next weeks
Progress. It is also available on
our website www.progressnews-
paper.org
12A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, June 5, 2013
Dear Friends of the Paulding Exempted
Village Schools,
We completed our year on May 23 with a
staff appreciation breakfast. Mark Wooton
and Jerry Yoh were honored for 30 years of
service to our school district. We also hon-
ored the following staff members and wished
them well in retirement: Bev Bertwell, Char-
lene Grant, Cindy Iler, Tillman Karl, Sandi
Leslie, Dave Manz, Judy Mumma, Chris
Slattery, Bonnie Weller, Mark Wooton and
Ted Wunderle. These employees have made
a difference in the lives of our children and
we appreciate the service to our district.
Thanks to the community for a great school
year. Have a wonderful summer and look for
our next newsletter in August . The first day
of school for students this fall is August 20.
John Basinger
Superintendent
We extend our congratulations to all students
who participated in the following events:
Three hundred and sixty-one awards were
presented to 166 students in grades 9-11 at
their awards program held on May 7.
The Middle School presented approximately
494 awards to 193 students at the May 20
program. Receiving the Archie Griffin
award were Estee Miller and Matthew Karia.
One hundred twelve students graduated
from the 8th grade on May 22, 2013.
The Varsity Engineering Team ranked 12th
in our division and 15th in the National rank-
ing, and the JV Team ranked 11th in our di-
vision and 15th in the National ranking.
FFA members receiving state degrees were
Oliva Cramer, Justin Carnahan, Taylor Dan-
gler, Tiffany Spangler and Bailey Zeller.
Jacob Luderman was the District 4 Winner
for the Star State Farmer award. He earned a
gold rating and was a top 10 finalist in the
state, and he was also selected for the Ohio
FFA Choir. New officers for the 2013-2014
school year are Justin Carnahan (President),
Bailey Zeller, Olivia Cramer and Tiffany
Spangler (Vice Presidents), Alexis Howell
(Secretary), Katie Carnahan (Treasurer),
Emily Albert (Reporter), Tyler Fry (Student
Advisor), Bailey Combs (Chaplain), Taylor
Dangler (Historian), Adam Deatrick
(Sentinel).
Competing at the FCCLA National Confer-
ence this summer will be Kelsie Manz with
her National Program in Action Community
Service STAR Event, Blessing in a Bag,
and Haley Schlegel and Kristin Schilt with
their Chapter Service Project Display STAR
Event Pretty in Pink.
The Paulding High School Senior Class of
2013 received the following awards and
recognitions:
Paulding Elementary PTO Scholarships
MacKenzie Hanenkratt, Mikayla Pieper
Oakwood Elementary PTO Scholarships
Savannah Roughton Paulding Education
Assoc. Scholarships Abbey Edwards, Sa-
vannah Roughton, Courtney St. John, Dalton
Thomas, Zane Wilhelm PEVS
Board/Administration Scholarships Kara
Burak, Abbey Edwards, Savannah Roughton,
Courtney St. John, Maggie Wilhelm, Zane
Wilhelm Retired Teachers Assoc. Scholar-
ship Abbey Edwards, Catlyn Pavel
Oakwood Alumni Assoc. Scholarships
Logan Adkins, Alexis Rue, Savannah
Rougthon, Julia Stuck Paulding County
Hospital Foundation Scholarships Marlee
Pease, Steven Strayer Paulding Chamber
of Commerce Scholarship MacKenzie
Hanenkratt Paulding County Area Foun-
dation Scholarships Abbey Edwards, Dal-
ton Thomas Lafarge Scholarship Zane
Wilhelm Systech Award Savannah Rough-
ton Insource Technologies, Inc. Scholar-
ship Zane Wilhelm Independent Insur-
ance Agents Scholarships Savannah
Roughton, Zane Wilhelm Zachary Arend
Memorial Scholarships Courtney St. John
Dr. Bruce Atkinson Scholarship Marlee
Pease Russell Bauer Scholarships Alexis
Rue, Patrick Troyer Virgil Cooper Scholar-
ships Savannah Roughton, Destiny Starry,
Maggie Wilhelm, Zane Wilhelm JP Crain
Scholarships Abbey Edwardes, MacKenzie
Hanenkratt, Catlyn Pavel, Savannah Rough-
ton, Courtney St. John, Steven Strayer, Mag-
gie Wilhelm, Zane Wilhelm Iris Gallagher
Scholarships Kara Burak, Catlyn Pavel
Gorman Family Trusts Scholarships Cat-
lyn Pavel, Savannah Roughton, Courtney St.
John, Zane Wilhelm Ira Hamman Scholar-
ships Elizabeth Chandler, MacKenzie
Hanenkratt, Mikayla Pieper, Maggie Wil-
helm Jacob Scholarships Elizabeth Chan-
dler, Mikayla Pieper, Maggie Wilhelm Lela
McGuire Jeffery Scholarships Catlyn
Pavel, Mikayla Pieper, Steven Strayer Mon-
roe Family Scholarship Mikayla Pieper
Jerald Rodriguez Memorial Scholarships
Kara Burak, Courtney St. John David A.
Verfaillie Memorial Scholarship/PHS
Class of 1971 Contribution Elizabeth
Chandler Franklin B. Walter All-
Scholastic Recipient Savannah Roughton
Rosemary Young Book Scholarship Abbey
Edwards Melrose Area Book Scholarship
Alexis Rue Pepsi Cola Company Scholar-
ships Elizabeth Chandler, Mikayla Pieper
GenFed Credit Union Scholarship Savan-
nah Roughton Peony Pageant Scholarship
Savannah Roughton PHS Scholar Athlete
Awards Abbey Edwards, Sarah Nardone,
Steven Strayer Archie Griffin Sportsman-
ship Awards Logan Doster, Courtney St.
John OHSAA Scholar Athletes Sarah Nar-
done, Steven Strayer NFHS Award of Ex-
cellence Abbey Edwards, Lance Foor
Other College/University Scholarships:
Defiance College-Elizabeth Chandler, Abbey
Edwards, Catlyn Pavel, Eryn Watson North-
west State Community College Scholarship
MacKenzie Hanenkratt Bluffton University-
Savannah Roughton Horace Mann full-
tuition at Atioch College-Austin Miller
Office Assistants Abbey Edwards, Austin
Carlisle, Logan Doster, Tyler Hayner, Sa-
mantha Martinez, Sarah Myers, Macey
Provines, Katie Radel, Savannah Roughton,
Kayla Simon, Courtney St. John, Destiny
Starry, Maggie Wilhelm Band Director-
John Phillip Sousa Award Jacey Schroeder
Band Booster Scholarships Breana Schmidt
Choral Awards-Barbershop Quartet Trey
Schroeder, Julia Stuck Art Awards Out-
standing Art Logan Adkins, Macey
Provines, Julia Stuck, Emily Thielbar. Stage-
craft Award-Cody Thompson Engineering
Team Awards Savannah Roughton, Dalton
Thomas, Zane Wilhelm Science Olympiad
Awards Tyler Hayner, Mikayla Pieper, Sa-
vannah Roughton, Maggie Wilhelm, Zane
Wilhelm Spanish Awards Spanish IV
Tyler Hayner, Sarah Myers, Samantha Ow-
ens, Breana Schmidt, Steven Strayer; Span-
ish III-Jacey Schroeder, Elaine Smith, Desti-
ny Starry Drama Production Most Out-
standing Performance Emily Thielbar; Out-
standing Perfomance-Logan Adkins, Olivia
Hoisington, Savannah Rougthon, Trey
Schroeder, Destiny Starry, Julia Stuck FFA
Alumni Scholarships Kara Burak, Jacob
Luderman, Dalton Thomas, Patrick Troyer,
Elizabeth Young Mercer Landmark Schol-
arships Jacob Luderman, Patrick Troyer
Becks Hybrid Scholarship Patrick Troyer
Student Council/Class Officers Sr Class
President Steven Strayer; Co-Vice-
PresidentsMikayla Pieper, Marlee Pease;
Secretary-Alexis Rue; Social Chrm. Kara
Burak; Student Council-Mikayla Pieper,
Zane Wilhelm, Kara Burak, Oliva Hoising-
ton, Alexis Rue, Steven Strayer, Maggie Wil-
helm Americanism Test Winners Savan-
nah Roughton, Steven Strayer Yearbook
Awards Logan Doster, Samantha Owens,
Mikayla Peiper, Katie Radel, Alexis Rue,
Destiny Starry, Courtney St. John, Steven
Strayer, Maggie Wilhelm, Elizabeth Young
Exemplary Attendance Awards Michael
Bauer, Steven Strayer, Julia Stuck National
Honor Society Kara Burak, Abbey Ed-
wards, MacKenzie Hanenkratt, Catlyn Pavel,
Marlee Pease, Mikayla Pieper, Macey
Provines, Savannah Roughton, Alexis Rue,
Jacey Schroeder, Courtney St. John, Steven
Strayer, Patrick Troyer, Kayla Warnimont,
Maggie Wilhelm, Zane Wilhelm Honors
Diploma Savannah Rougthon, Zane Wil-
helm, Steven Strayer, Marlee Pease, Catlyn
Pavel, Dalton Thomas, Courtney St. John,
Maggie Wilhelm, Jacey Schroeder, Austin
Miller, Patrick Troyer, Alexis Rue, Sarah
Nardone, Mikayla Pieper, Kara Burak
Award of Merit State of Ohio Savannah
Roughton, Zane Wilhelm, Steven Strayer,
Marlee Pease, Catlyn Pavel, Dalton Thomas,
Courtney St. John, Maggie Wilhelm, Jacey
Schroeder, Austin Miller, Patrick Troyer,
Kayla Warnimont, Alexis Rue, Macey
Provines, Sarah Nardone, Mikayla Pieper,
MacKenzie Hanenkratt, Kara Burak, Abbey
Edwards
Presidents Award for Educational Excel-
lence Savannah Roughton, Zane Wilhelm,
Steven Strayer, Catlyn Pavel, Courtney St.
John, Maggie Wilhelm, Jacey Schroeder,
Austin Miller, Macey Provines, Sarah Nar-
done, Kara Burak Kiwanis Student of the
Month Awards Steven Strayer, Zane Wil-
helm, Mikayla Pieper, Dalton Thomas, Tyler
Hayner, Caitlyn Pavel, Courtney St. John,
Breana Schmidt

Vantage Senior Awards
Perfect Attendance 2 yrs Victoria Acevedo
Admin Team Award of Distinction Mac-
Kenzie Hanenkratt Award of Distinction
Eryn Watson NTHS Kayla Warnimont
Seniors Graduating with Highest Honors:
4.0 or higher after 7 semesters Savannah
Rougthon, Zane Wilhelm
Seniors Graduating with Honors: 3.5
3.99 after 7 semesters
Steven Strayer, Marlee Pease, Catlyn Pavel,
Dalton Thomas, Courtney St. John, Maggie
Wilhelm, Jacey Schroeder, Austin Miller,
Patrick Troyer, Kayla Warnimont, Alexis
Rue, Macey Provines, Sarah Nardone, Mi-
kayla Pieper, MacKenzie Hanenkratt, Kara
Burak, Abbey Edwards
The following juniors and seniors have
earned induction into the National Honor
Society: Abbey Edwards, MacKenzie
Hanenkratt, Macey Provines, Eric Busch,
Taylor Dangler, Melissa Durham, Javier
Gonzales, Guy Harder, Gerrod Harder, Nick
Hitchcock, Ashley Johanns, Joseph Kauser,
Andrew Layman, Kandee Manson, Kelsi
Manz, Brad Matson, Sierra McCullough,
Rachel Mourey, Rachel Nicelley, Abby
Pease, Sydney Provines, Kaylyn Rager, Kait-
lyn Roughton, Julian Salinas, Sidney Salinas,
Jaclyn Schlatter, Chelsie Schoepflin, Kayla
Shaffer, Alyssa Shelmadine, Alesha Simon,
Tiffany Spangler, Kaley Varner, Meagan
Weller and Bailey Zeller.
Conditioning has started for high school boys
interested in playing football next year. The
session starts at 8:00 a.m. in the Wellness
Center on Emerald Rd, every Monday-
Thursday. Contact Coach Coleman with any
questions or concerns at 614-483-2776.
Conditioning will be held for any 7th or 8th
grade boy interested in playing football next
year, on Monday's and Wednesday's all sum-
mer, at the track from 9:00 10:00 a.m. If
there is any inclement weather, conditioning
sessions will be cancelled.
FOOTBALL SKILLS CAMP
The Paulding High School football coaches
and players will be hosting the Future Pan-
thers Football Camp on August 1
st
, 2
nd
and
3
rd
. Times for the camp are 9 a.m.- noon
each day, with competitions on the last day,
open to all family members. Coaches and
players with a vast knowledge of each posi-
tion will offer guidance to players of all skill
levels. Cost of the camp is $30 and will in-
clude a Paulding Panther T-
shirt. Registration forms can be found on the
PEVS website (www.pauldingschools.org)
under the Athletics tab. Registration dead-
line is July 12. If you have any questions,
feel free to contact Coach Coleman at 614-
483-2776.

VOLLEYBALL CAMP
Paulding High School and Middle School
Volleyball coaches will be hosting a volley-
ball camp for students going into grades 4-
12. The camp will be held Jun 17-20 in the
High School gym. Grades 9-12: 8:00-
10:30a.m., Grades 7-8: 11:00a.m-12:30p.m.,
and Grades 4-6: 1:00-2:30p.m. The cost is
$45 which includes snacks, prizes and a
camp t-shirt. Applications may be picked up
in the high school office.
Physicals for athletic participants will be
held on Tuesday, June 18, 2013 at the high
school. The cost of the physicals will be
$15, payable to Paulding County Hospital.
The schedule of physicals is as follows; HS
Boys 8-9:30a.m, MS Boys 9:30-11:00a.m,
HS Girls 12:30-1:30, MS Girls 1:30-
3:00p.m., however, if any student cannot
come at the scheduled time, or would like to
come with a sibling, they can come anytime
from 8:00-11:00 a.m. or 12:30-3:00 p.m.
The ACT test will be given in the high
school on June 8 from 8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
The schedule for high school OGT tutoring
on June 10-14 is as follows: Reading and
Math8-10 a.m., Science and Social Studies
10 a.m.-12 p.m. The tests will be given the
week of June 17-21. Students will be in-
formed of their testing day during tutoring.
If there are any changes with your student's
address over the summer, a PARENT or
GUARDIAN must complete a new transpor-
tation form as soon as possible. Please call
the building office to make arrange-
ments with the building principal. For all
other transportation questions, please con-
tact Rick Varner (or Rocky Dangler after Au-
gust 6).
Summer is quickly approaching, let the fun
begin! Although summer is a great time to
relax and wind down from the demands of
the school day and homework assignments, it
is also a time to catch up on your reading.
This is a great opportunity to try something
new. You can pick up a magazine, try a
graphic novel, or a new book series. Your
public library is a great spot for summer.
You can borrow books, magazines, music,
and movies.
INFOhio has a wide range of products from
preschool to adult. World Book Kids has ani-
mal articles, puzzles and games. Learning
Express offers online tests, resume builders
and professional information. eBooks are
available through our online catalog, just
click on eBooks when doing your search.
eBooks are also available on World Book
and Learning Express at www.infohio.org.
You can access these and more at the Media
Center page www.pauldingschools.org
through the Departments menu at the top)
or my teacher page. Ellen Williams, District
Librarian.
SCRIP is fund raising for nonprofit organiza-
tions. Instead of selling frozen pizza or mag-
azines, gift cards are sold at face value, and a
percentage is given to PTO by the retailer.
You pay no extra money and PTO raises
money. SCRIP is an excellent idea when gift
giving, shopping, traveling, buying gas or
eating out.
The Paulding Elementary PTO will continue
the SCRIP program during summer vacation.
SCRIP order forms are available on the
school website (under Parents tab/PTO). To
view a complete list of retailers, please visit
www.glscrip.com.
The Oakwood Elementary will continue their
SCRIP program through the summer. Orders
will be placed the 15th of each month by
calling Deedi Miller at 419-594-3548. The
PTO keeps some cards in stock, so call if you
need something.

Summer office hours for the administration
building are 7:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Monday-
Thursday and 7:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. on Fri-
day.
The Board of Education meetings during the
summer will be held on Tuesday, June 25
and Tuesday, July 16 in the Administration
Office Board Room beginning at 7:00 p.m.

HAVE A GREAT SUMMER!
~~~~~~
PAULDING EXEMPTED VILLAGE SCHOOLS
JUNE 2013 NEWSLETTER
SUPERINTENDENTS MESSAGE
CLASS OF 2012 AWARDS
CONGRATULATIONS CORNER
PTO SCRIP PROGRAM
ADMINISTRATION OFFICE
TRANSPORTATION NOTE
ATHLETIC PHYSICALS
ACT TEST/OGT TUTORING
SUMMER CAMPS
ACADEMIC HONORS RECOGNITION
NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
FOOTBALL CONDITIONING
SUMMER READING
Lifetime
FREE car
washes w/ any
New or Used
purchased
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Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Paulding County Progress 13A
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The Antwerp Swing Choir performed for senior day this year.
Approximately 300 people attended the annual Senior Day held May 21 at the Paulding coun-
ty Extension building. The theme this year was, Its a Jungle Out There.
Those celebrating birthdays at the Paulding County Senior Center were, front from left Averill Gottke, Marilyn Ladd and Bob
Tarleton; back Dorothy Hornish, Mary Rhoad, Ida Mae Mielke, Martha Strahley and Bernard Slattman.
Wednesday, June 5
Pepper Steak w/Rice, Scandanavian Blend, Apple Juice,
Tropical Fruit, Dinner Roll
Thursday, June 6
Brd. Pork Cutlet, Mashed Potatoes, California Blend,
Grapes, Cookie, Dinner Roll
Friday, June 7
Spahetti with Meat Sauce, Tossed Salad, Hot Fruit, Cheesy Garlic
Bread
Monday, June 10
Smoked Sausage, Mashed Potatoes, Sauerkraut, Banana,
Tomato Juice, Dinner Roll
Tuesday, June 11
Turkey & Cheese on Rye, Chicken Vegetable Soup, Coleslaw,
Cinnamon Diced Apples, Crackers
Wednesday, June 12
Tuna Salad Plate w/ Lettuce & Tomato, Cottage Cheese, Peaches,
Grape Juice, W.W. Bread
Thursday, June 13
Meatloaf, Augratin Potatoes, Peas, Strawberry Shortcake, W.W. Bread
Friday, June 14
Roasted Chicken, Redskin Potatoes, Creamed Peas, Mixed Fruit,
Cake, W.W. Bread
Monday, June 17
Goulash, Lima Beans, Apricots, Apple Jice, Garlic Bread
Tuesday, June 18
Baked Pork Chop, Sweet Potatoes, Brussel Sprouts,
Applesauce, W.W. Bread
Wednesday, June 19
Chicken & Noodles, Mashed Potatoes, Mixed Vegetables,
Orange Juice, Biscuit
Thursday, June 20
Cubed Steak/Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Green Bean Casserole,
Mandarin Oranges, Tapioca Pudding, Dinner Roll
Friday, June 21
Baked Fish, Macroni & Cheese, Broccoli, Pineapple/Strawberries,
Grape Juice, W.W. Bread
Monday, June 24
Cheeseburger, Baked Beans, Spanish Green Beans, Blushing Pears
Tuesday, June 25
Ham Loaf, Augratin Potatoes, Winter Blend, Grapes,
Cornbread, Cookie
Wednesday, June 26
Chicken Penne Pasta, Broccoli, Apricots, Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp,
W.W. Bread
Thursday, June 27
Beef Stew, Betty Salad, Orange Juice, Chocolate Pudding, Biscuit
Friday, June 28
Beef Lasagna, Brussel Sprouts, Cinnamon Applesauce,
Fruit Crisp, Cheesy Garlic Bread
Paulding County Senior Center
401 E. Jackson St., Paulding
Served 11:30 a.m. Mon.Fri. Reservations: 419-399-3650
This Menu Is Sponsored
By Ohio Gas.
Professional Chefs Prefer
Cooking With Natural Gas.
GALA MENU
June 2013
Getting
connected
First of all, lets define sen-
iors as anyone over the age of
50. Why? Simply because
you can join AARP at age 50.
But no matter your age, using
a computer for the first time
can be very frightening and
intimidating. So, what is the
benefit of going the process of
learning a computer and what
can a senior do online?
1. Connect. Social network-
ing websites like Facebook
allow you to connect with all
the people you care about, no
matter the physical difference
that divides you.
This is a free way (doesnt
cost money) to stay in touch
and update each other about
your lives. Plus you can share
photographs and even movies
online.
There is no need to miss
your grandkids birthday.
While you may not be there
physically, you can see the
video of your grandkids blow-
ing out the candles on their
cake or opening the present
you sent them. This is a great
way to stay in touch.
2. Find Hobbies. Did you
ever want to try something
new? There are millions of
websites dedicated to every
possible subject so no matter
what your interests are its
easy to find all the informa-
tion you need.
3. Blogging. You have a
lifetime of experience, ideas
and opinions. So why not
share those with the world
or just your family. A blog can
be public or private and can
be a great way to express
yourself. Give it a try!
4. Shopping. Have you ever
wanted something thats
either hard to find or not
available locally. If it was ever
made chances are you can
find it online.
Whether its collecting coins
or ordering a new TV, there
are great discounts online and
often free shipping or no sales
tax. Plus you can compare
items, which mystery book
has the best reviews or which
power drill is most reliable?
Find all this and more online.
Most local libraries now
offer free Internet access and
computers. So if you are nerv-
ous about learning or wonder
how much youll actually use
a computer, start at the library.
You can always decide to pur-
chase later on if you really
enjoy it.
These are just a few of the
many reasons you should take
the time to learn the computer
and Internet. The possibilities
are endless and will help you
engage in more activities. No
matter what your interests or
passions are in life you can
find it online.
New Paulding County
Progress Subscribers
New subscribers in May
Introducing
Name ________________________
Address_______________________
City/State______________Zip_____
Phone( )____________________
Email_________________________
Send payment to:
Paulding Progress
P.O. Box 180,
Paulding, Ohio 45879
Your source for
award-winning exclusive
Paulding County news!
Clifford Elston
Janis L Nickols
First Federal Bank -
Paulding
Bruce Mohley
Darryl Leatherman
(E-Edition)
Gary Janney (E-Edition)
Stan Mansfield
Amy Thompson
Sandra J Sanders
Flo Handy
Dori Vogel (E-Edition)
Sharon Daniels
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(E-Edition)
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(E-Edition)
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John Porter
Carrie Mesker
(E-Edition)
Mary Hinschlager
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PLUS e-Edition and website access
Rates: $36.00 per year
(Paulding, Van Wert, Defiance & Putnam Counties)
$46.00 per year all others
e-Edition only at www.progressnewspaper.org
$26.00 per year
S & S SANITATION
Serving Northwest Ohio
Roll-off containers available, Commercial
and Residential Clean-up
1-888-596-3805
41c9
100 East Jackson St., Paulding, Ohio
419-399-4444
www.straleyrealestateinc.com
STRALEY REAL ESTATE
PLEASE CALL
Carolyn Straley @ 419-769-1352 or 419-399-3721,
Matt Straley @ 419-785-5161 or Rudy Straley @ 419-769-8996
for information concerning buying, qualifying for loan or selling
ONE STORY 2 BEDROOM
HOME in Paulding with
attached garage. This home
would be great for a starter
home or as a rental invest-
ment property. #322
3 BEDROOM 2 bath L shaped
home that's in very good con-
dition with an attached
garage at each end. Location
is on a corner lot in Latty.
#346
3 BEDROOM 1 1/2 bath home
in Paulding with new central
air & heat, easy care low
maintenance exterior and a
24x30' modern garage. #328
QUALITY CONSTRUCTED BY
JOHN HERZIG. 11833 Road
132 near the Paulding
Hospital. The 2800 sq. ft. 3
bedroom, 3 bath home and a
1200+ sq. ft. attached garage
for vehicle and storage space
has many features for those
who appreciate quality. The lot
measures 2.555 acres with a
pond that's behind the home.
Also, there's more acreage
available. Listing #344
"A FRAME" 2 bedrooms up,
1 down, large attached
24x40' garage and large rear
yard. #345
3 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 bath
home, fireplace, attached
garage and a 16x24' storage
building, all on 1.5 shaded
acres. Location is west of
Antwerp. #325
1131 EMERALD ROAD,
Paulding- 3 bedroom 2 bath
home 13 years of age with 1500
feet of living area, equipped
kitchen and central air. #316
APARTMENT BUI LDI NG
has 5 units, 3 up, 2 down.
The tenants pay their own
utilities. Location is on
North Williams Street in
Paulding. #340
NEW BUI LDI NG SI TE
(108 x 132) on the NE
Corner of Perry and
Coupland Streets in
Paulding. #350
2 BUI LDI NG SI TES; a
2.296 acre parcel and a
1.928 acre parcel near the
Paulding Hospital. #348 &
#349
3 BEDROOM one story
home and attached
garage, located on Helen
Street in Paulding. #330
3 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 baths,
separate laundry room,
attached garage and a
storage shed out back
located in Paulding. #347
3 OR 4 BEDROOM, 2 bath
home with lots of rooms,
basement and a 30x65'
garage/storage building
located in Paulding. #339
2 OR 3 BEDROOM HOME,
attached garage and a
pond on 1 3/4 acres on the
north edge of Cecil with an
option of more land with a
building. #319
#1577 Move-in Condition!
3 bdrm, 2 bath, family
rm, C/A, 32 x 24 garage,
1,624 sq. ft., newer
kitchen, baths, flooring,
roof, windows, etc.,
$67,900! Call Sandra/
Tamyra 419-506-1015
NEVER OCUPPIED
VILLA!! PRICED
BELOW ITS COST!!
$99,900!! 1229 sq. ft.,
2 bdrm, 2 bath, handi-
cap accessible, appli-
ances, C/A, 90% effi-
cent gas furnace, Pella
windows, city water &
sewer, Call Sandra/
Tamyra 419-506-1015
#1572 Newer 3 bdrm, 2
bath home C/A, newer
roof & patio door, Great
location... $89,000. 805
Meadowbrook Dr., Pldg.
Call Don Gorrell 419-
399-7699
To see nice color pictures & interior shots of properties offered
by Gorrell Bros. go to: www.gorrellbros-paulding.com
Multiple Listing
Service
Call Gorrells to get your home sold TODAY!
New Listing #1576... Commercial building for lease or sale, 260 Dooley Dr.,
Paulding, Call Don Gorrell 419-399-7699
#1574... Large 3-4 bdrm.,
home, detached garage,
original hardwood floor-
ing, must see, corner of
Caroline &Williams,
Paulding, $85,000 Call
Don Gorrell 419-399-
7699
New Listing #1575... 3
bdrm, 2 bath home,
C/A, corner of Baldwin
& Cherry, Paulding.
$80,000 Call Don
Gorrell 419-399-7699
#1571 12688 Farmer
Mark Rd... Mark Center,
Nice 3 bdrm home,
many updates, older
barn. $109,000 Call
Joe Den Herder
#1568 Riverfront! 4
bdrm, 2 baths - 1.78
ac., 2 miles E of
Antwerp. Lg. rear deck,
in-ground pool & pond;
lg. family room, bsmt.
manibloc water lines.
Call Sandra/ Tamyra
419-506-1015 $119,900.
#1521 Impressive 2400
sq. ft. 3 bdrm home.
Formal dining, kitchen w/
Harlan cabinets, office,
bsmt. w/ finished room.
Paulding. $129,900 Call
Sandra/ Tamyra 419-
506-1015
FOLTZ REALTY
Donald K. Foltz, II - Broker: 106 N. Williams St. Paulding
www.foltzrealty.com 419-399-2347
REALTORS: Tim Boss 419-769-0823, Maurie Wannemacher 419-769-9090
Christine Hartman 419-506-1017
#2817 121 W. Wayne
St. Paulding: Very nice
& well maintained
home offering 4BR., 1
3/4 BA., large living
room, dining room, den
and modern kitchen w/
appliances. 2 car de-
tached garage. A real
"Must See" priced at
$60,000. Call Maurie
#2814 312 S. Laura
St. Payne: 4 Br., 1 Ba.,
2 story home w/ vinyl
siding, C/A, natural
gas furnace & water
heater. Finished 26' x
24' 2 car detached,
heated garage. Appli-
ances remain with
home. Priced to sell.
$49,900 Call Maurie
# 2812 2232 SR 114
Payne: Country home
features 7+
acres,3BR, 1BA, New
Roof, vinyl siding, re-
placement windows
with room on 2nd floor
for a 4th bedroom.
Morton Building.
$90,000 Call Maurie
#2821 7705 Front St.
Broughton: Factory built
home offering 3 BR., 2
baths and nice family
room w/ fireplace. 40' x
60' Morton Building all
insulated, concrete
floor, 220 electric, 12' x
16' and 16' x 18' over-
head doors. $129,900
Call Maurie
#2806 NEW LISTING!!
105 N. Water St. Pauld-
ing: Nice all steel build-
ing in a great location
with parking at rear
door of building. The
building is 40'x 100' with
the front of building fac-
ing S.R.127 south.
$79,000 Call Tim
#2822 620 W. Townline
Payne: Very nice vinyl
sided 11/2 story home
w/ 36'x 60' morton
building w/ concrete
floor & 2 nine foot over-
head doors. 3 BR., 1
1/2 BA., full basement,
replacement windows
and new patio area.
Call Maurie $79,900
CHECK OUR NEW WEBSITE @ foltzrealty.com
Auction Of 10
Lima, OH
Investment Properties
Sat, June 8, 11:00 A.M.
Investors - Speculators
Rents from $400 per month to $550 per month
- Multi parcel bidding with bidding on one, all or
combinations. $500 earnest money, closing 30
days..... Call for free brochure or visit Gorrell
Bros. web site @ www.gorrellbros-
paulding.com for inspection, auction &
property information with photos - Gorrell
Bros. Auctioneers; Larry Gorrell, Broker; Don
Gorrell Mgr., Nolan Shisler, Aaron Timm,
Sandra Mickelson
Auction
Wed., June 12 @ 5:00 P.M.
Household - Glassware
Collectibles - Dolls - Knives
Glassware & Collectibles including 2 qt. Glass butter churn....
Wagner Cast Iron Dutch Oven..... Oster single head milk shake
machine with 10 SS cups..... Ice cream scoop..... Tins...... Old
Singer sewing machine...... Small balance scale, egg scale &
other scales...... several 70+Hicksville Hixonian Yearbooks
from 1917 thru 1981 ...... 1916 Edgerton Yearbook...... 16
Antwerp Archer Yearbooks mostly 60s & 70's & some other
old yearbooks...... Milk Glass pieces...... Avon, Dickens &
Other Villages and related...... Fiesta Ware...... Bowl set...... De-
pression...... Crock...... Wash bowl and pitcher...... 10 Danbury
Mint Norman Rockwell Collection figurines...... Porcelain yarn
holder...... Afew old Xmas items...... 9 Danbury Mint Plates &
other decorator and collector plates...... 3 NASCAR items......
Cleveland Browns model car...... 100+other figurines and col-
lectable items...... 20+- newer clowns & dolls plus other related
items...... Corning Ware...... Meito China Tea Cups...... Sets Of
Dishes...... Porcelain bells...... Avon bottles, steins, etc...... Sil-
ver plate tea set...... 5 quilts, comforters, bedding, etc...... Wire
egg basket...... Oil Lamps...... 8 Track Tapes, LP Records, Reel
to Reel tapes...... Hats...... "Boys Life" magazines (mostly
60s)...... Boy Scout Leader Books & Other Boyscout items......
2 Display Cases Of Knives of varied descriptions including
New Remingtons, New Marbles, Kutmaster, Sheath Knives,
Germany Novelty Co., Etc.... Bedding, linen, etc...... Many
Xmas decorations including figurines, Xmas train, etc., etc.
Tableware...... Goblets...... Pitcher & Glass set...... Antwerp and
Hicksville Year Books including...... Collector plates...... Cook
Books & Many Other Books...... Cameras...... Poker chips and
table cover...... Figurine & small display items from china cab-
inets including glass angels, colonial figurines, rose bowl, glass
bell, vases, candles and many small "pretties"...... Center Pieces
and many more related items...... Household, Furniture &
Related including Twin size bed frame with matching dresser
and night stand...... Cedar chest...... Curved glass secretary
(glass missing)...... Buffet...... Baby bed...... Sofa & hide a
bed...... Sony stereo...... Wagon full of pots, pans, kitchen items
and related including granite roaster, thermos, Sunbeam mixer,
crock pots, food dehydrator, blender, toaster, etc., etc., etc.,......
Wagon full of wood decorator and craft items including wall
shelves, etc...... Kirby and Kenmore upright sweepers......
Portable fans...... Entertainment center with TV, VCR, etc. and
small entertainment centers including one with turn table, cas-
sette, 2 tall Pioneer speakers ...... Cabinets...... Microwave
cart...... Electro Hygiene console sewing machine...... End &
Coffee tables...... Several Lamps...... Several Mirrors of varied
sizes and descriptions ranging from very large wall with heavy
ornate frames to smaller accent mirrors ...... Nice picture frames
of varied sizes and descriptions...... Electric fireplace...... Ham-
mond electric organ...... Sears refrigerator..... Card tables......
Chairs of various descriptions ...... Humidifier...... Many nice
Interior decorator items ...... VHS and casette tapes and records
...... 2 Wheel chairs...... Several Plastic storage tubs & contain-
ers...... Bushnell binoculars...... Newer Children's toys......
Misc office supplies...... Metal Shelving...... 2 & 4 drawer file
cabinets...... Gray metal desk...... Office supplies ...... Very
Partial Listing - 2 Auction Rings...... Inspection beginning
Monday prior to the auction from 9:00 A.M. until 4:00 P.M....
Terms: Cash or approved check day of auction; VISA, Mas-
terCard or Discover Card... For photos & more detailed list visit
our web site @ www, gorrellbros.com ...Tony R. Billman
Trust, Judy Billman, Trustee, Floyd Ramsier, Attorney - & -
Dee Huston- & - other consignors...... Gorrell Bros. Auction-
eers - Don Gorrell, Larry Gorrell, Matthew Bowers, Aaron
Timm, Sandra Mickelson, Nolan Shisler
LOCATION: Gorrell Bros. Auction Facility -
1201 N. Williams St., Paulding, OH
Land Auction
47+- Acres
Antwerp, OH
Thurs. - June 20 - 6:00 P.M.
Farm Location: East edge of Antwerp, OH on Rd.
176. - Frontage on Rd. 176 and Rd. 180 - watch-
for Auction signs........ 47 1/2 +- Acres with Latty
soil...... For Survey and FS A information & bidder's
packet call the office or visit our web site at
www.gorrellbros.com ........ Auctioneers Note: The
Antwerp CIC purchased this farm in 1998 for future
development to benefit the Antwerp, Ohio area. The
CIC is selling the farm so the proceeds can be used
to enhance commercial development near the Rt. 24
& Rt. 49 Interchange - be ready to bid your price.
Terms: $5,000 earnest money with closing on or
before Aug. 1, 2013. Auction Location: Antwerp
VFW Post 5087, 105 Railroad St., Antwerp, OH
(1 block southwest of downtown Antwerp)..... Gor-
rell Bros. Auctioneers; Sandra Mickelson, Sale
Mgr; Larry D. Gorrell, Broker; Don Gorrell -
Joe Barker - Aaron Timm - Nolan Shisler -Auc-
tioneers
Seller
Community Improvement Corporation
Of Antwerp, OH
41c3
Paulding County Hospital
1035 W. Wayne Street
Paulding, OH 45879
Email: pchhr@saa.net
JOB OPPORTUNITY
Home Care Equipment Specialist -
Assures clients receive home medical equipment
or supplies as ordered or requested by the physi-
cian or patient. Prior home health care equipment
experience. Valid Driver's License and insurance.
Prior experience working with health insurance,
Medicare, Medicaid, Worker's Comp, private
insurance, etc.
Paulding County Hospital offers a variety of in-
surance benefits, including State of Ohio PERS
Pension Benefits. To apply, please submit a re-
sume to: pchhr@saa.net or online at www.pauld-
ingcountyhospital.com 41c1
M.L. Zehr Construction
The quality of our work speaks for itself and
will remain long after.
Metal Frame Buildings
Pole Barns
Commercial & Residential,
30+ years experience
Free Estimates
25720 Notestine Rd., Woodburn, IN 46797
(260) 433-5628 Mon.-Fri. 6:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Pet Grooming
Large & Small
We do them all
Cats &
Dogs
*Bathing, Nails,
Glands & Grooming
Phone: 419-399-3389
SHERIFFS SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
THE STATE BANK &
TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THERESA M. GRUN-
DEN, ET AL., Defen-
dants,
Case No. CI 13 061.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 27th day of June,
2013 at 10:10 oclock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
16584 Road 156,
Paulding, Ohio 45879
Parcel Number 20-03S-
010-00
Said premises appraised
at Ninety Thousand and
No/100 ($90,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriffs Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Erin R. O'Malley, At-
torney for Plaintiff 39c3
SHERIFFS SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
THE HUNTINGTON
NATIONAL BANK
SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO SKY
BANK, Plaintiff,
vs.
AARON T. POWELL,
ET AL., Defendants,
Case No. CI 12 054.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 27th day of June,
2013 at 10:00 oclock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
20842 Road 60, Pauld-
ing, Ohio 45879
Parcel Number: 32-
17S-002-00
Said premises appraised
at Fifteen Thousand and
No/100 ($15,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriffs Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Robert H. Young, Attor-
ney for Plaintiff 39c3
SHERIFFS SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA,
ACTING THROUGH
THE
RURAL DEVELOP-
MENT,
UNITED STATES DE-
PARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LARRY A. WOL-
FORD, JR., ET AL.,
Defendants,
Case No. CI 12 185.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 27th day of June,
2013 at 10:05 oclock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
13176 Nancy Street,
Paulding, Ohio 45879
Parcel Number: 23-
51B-099-00
Said premises was ap-
praised at Thirty-six
Thousand and No/100
($36,000.00) Dollars
and will be sold starting
with a minimum bid of
Fourteen Thousand Six
Hundred Fifty and
No/100 ($14,650.00).
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriffs Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Stephen D. Miles, At-
torney for Plaintiff 39c3
SHERIFFS SALE
OF REAL ESTATE
General Code, Section
11681 Revise Code,
Section 2329.26
THE STATE OF
OHIO, PAULDING
COUNTY:
GMAC MORTGAGE,
LLC, Plaintiff,
vs.
BRADLON L. GRIB-
BLE, INDIVIDU-
ALLY AND AS
EXECUTOR OF THE
ESTATE OF
VERLIN D. GRIB-
BLE, ET AL., Defen-
dants,
Case No. CI 12 177.
Pursuant to an Order of
Sale in the above enti-
tled action, I will offer
for sale at public auc-
tion, at the East door of
the Courthouse in the
Village of Paulding, in
the above named
County, on Thursday,
the 11th day of July,
2013 at 10:00 oclock
A.M., the real estate lo-
cated at:
202 East First Street,
Grover Hill, Ohio
45849
Parcel Number: 26-
02S-007-00; 26-02S-
004-00; 26-02S-005-00;
and, 26-02S-006-00
Said premises appraised
at Eighteen Thousand
and No/100 ($18,000.00)
Dollars and cannot be
sold for less than two-
thirds of that amount.
The appraisal of this
property was completed
without an interior in-
spection. Neither the
Sheriffs Office nor the
appraisers are responsi-
ble for the condition of
the property at the time
the purchaser takes pos-
session.
TERMS OF SALE:
Ten percent down on
day of the sale and bal-
ance before deed is to
be issued.
Sheriff Jason K. Landers
Paulding County, Ohio
pauldingohsheriff.com
Mark P. Herring, Attor-
ney for Plaintiff 41c3
LEGALS
LEGALS
LEGALS
14A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, June 5, 2013
PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
QUICKLY...EASILY...
JUST PHONE 419-399-4015
2011 JOHN DEERE 8235R -
new rubber, still under war-
ranty. 419-771-9422. 38c5
$125 QUEEN PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET. New in
plastic, can deliver 260-493-
0805. 41p4
YEARS AGO ANTIQUE
MALL, 108 W. Main Street,
Van Wert (419) 238-3362,
30+ Dealers. Closed Tues-
days. Buy & Sell. 27ctf
CARNAHAN PAVING: Over
14 years experience. Locally
owned, paving, stone haul-
ing, backhoe work, free esti-
mates. 419-399-9126. 41p2
P&H MASONRY RESTORA-
TION & REPAIR Specialist.
Foundation, basement and
chimney repair or replace.
Fully insured, Free Estimates
419-438-2101. 34ctf
AL GRIFFITHS CONSTRUC
TION: Windows, light electri-
cal, drywall, siding, doors
and more. Call Al for your re-
pair or contruction needs.
419-506-2102 51ctf
2 BDRM. GROUND LEVEL
apartment - 1 mile west of
Antwerp. Quiet country set-
ting, laundry facility included
in rent. 260-385-8799. 41ctf
1 BDRM., DOWNSTAIRS,
apt for rent in Payne. 419-
263-4700 or 419-786-
0991. 41c2
4 BDRM HOUSE IN PAYNE
for rent. 419-786-0991, 419-
263-4700. 40c2
IN PAULDING - Whispering
Pines - 2 bdrm. Call 419-
506-2102, 419-670-4024 or
419-399-2419 8ctf
3 BDRM. 2 BATH HOME
$450 rent or own in Brentwood
Community next to Vagabond
Restaurant 419-388-9977. 43ctf
PAULDING STORAGE CEN-
TER: Now renting storage
units. Different sizes available.
Call 419-399-2419 for info.18ctf
NOW LEASING: ONE &
TWO BEDROOM APART-
MENTS. Deposit & lease re-
quired. No pets. Please call
Straley Apts. at 419-399-
4444 or 419-399-3721 35ctf
PAULDING MINI STORAGE
UNITS. Located at south side
of Paulding on US 127. Various
sizes. Please call 419-399-
4444 or 419-399-3721 20ctf
REPLACING FOOTER AND
FOUNDATION - basement
repair floor leveling, roofing,
cement work. Call Bill Miner
419-596-3018 34c8
BOYD AUTOMOTIVE LTD.
Auto technician. Experience
required. Send resume or
apply at 221 W. Perry St.,
Paulding, Ohio 41c1
COME AND JOIN OUR
TEAM! We need you to make
a difference in the lives of indi-
viduals with developmental dis-
abilities. Services include
personal care assistance, com-
munity activities, and daily liv-
ing skills for varying levels of
disabiilties. We are offering
flexible schedules, overnights,
24 hour shifts, and/or some
weekends. Must have a high
school diploma or GED, valid
drivers license, and clean
background record. Due to
company vehicle insurance re-
quirement, applicants must be
21 years old. The job openings
are in Paulding, Putnam, and
Van Wert counties. Please call
Mindi at 419-523-5810.
EOE/DFWP 41c1
DRIVER/YARD POSITION,
LOCAL CLASS A CDL, DE-
LIVERY DRIVER NEEDED.
Duties include delivery to cus-
tomers, loading and unloading
truck. Must be able to lift
100lbs. Full benefit package
included. Must apply in person
at Midwest Tile and Concrete
Products, Inc. 4309 Webster
Rd., Woodburn, In 46797 35ctf
MOVING SALE - THURS-
DAY, 9-6PM. 5825 SR 500.
New items, 1/2 price on some,
everything must go. Lg. dog
cage and ramp, furniture, nice
clothes, artificial tree, dvds,
computer monitor, etc. 41p1
JUNE 6, 7, 8, THURSDAY,
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 9-
5PM. Mens clothing, plus
size womens, boys 2-3, girls
4-5, junior girls, shoes,
household decor, various
misc. 13208 HELEN ST.,
PAULDING. 41p1
FRI. & SAT., JUNE 7 & 8,
9AM-5PM 621 W. GASSER
RD, Paulding. Mens L-2XL,
jeans 40x32, womens 8-12,
nice dress suits size 8, framed
Sonny Bashore prints, dishes,
some antiques and vintage
collectibles, lots of misc. 41p1
FRI., JUNE 7, 9-4; SAT.
JUNE 8, 9-2. Our annual
garage sale. Manual lawn
mower, clothes, table &
chairs, purses, household &
misc. items. Stop by & check
us out! Friends, 103 BUF-
FALO ST., ANTWERP. 41p1
Books, clothing, file cabinet,
desk, TV, tiller 5 hp, furniture,
household items, misc. JUNE
6, 7, 8. 9-5PM. Crossland,
940 W. WAYNE ST. 41p1
Town-Wide Garage Sales and
Sidewalk Sales. ANTWERP,
OHIO. JUNE 7 & 8. 41c1
Huge Antique Sale. Toys,
hump-back trunks, radios,
books & advertising, Indian
relics, pictures, signs, etc.,
etc. June 7, 9-5pm; June 8,
9-3pm. 103 E. Woodcox,
Antwerp. 1st street north
of city hall. 41p1
JUNE 6, 7, 8; 9AM-? 806
CENTERFIELD, PAULD-
ING. Just moved, many
household items, nborn-adult
clothing. 41p1
Huge Sale. 9-5PM. WED
JUNE 5-7. Help TABLES
ARE FULL. Jewelry, jr. cloth-
ing sizes 5-9, jr. dance cloth-
ing, ladies 10-14,
hosueware, seasonal, craft
items, material, ladies shoes
size 9, beanies, stuffed ani-
mals, toys. Take 111 w to
Rd. 87 turn left, 7th house
on left. Slattmans. 41p1
MANS GARAGE SALE. 174
BITTERSWEET DR.,
PAULDING, OH. Fishing -
Rods & reels, tackle boxes,
many lures, Nascar memora-
bilia, leaf blower, 2-5ft. oak
shelves, OSU red leather
chair with stool, nice tools,
many more items. Sale date
Thurs. & Fri. 6 & 7; 9-5. 41p1
NEW ITEMS - BREAKING
NEWS, web exclusives, read
news items before theyre
published in the newspaper!
Unlimited access to the
Progress website www.pro-
gressnewspaper.org is free to
subscribers. Call 419-399-
4015 or email subscription
@progressnewspaper.org for
password. ctf
WANTED: RESPONSIBLE
BABYSITTER FOR 2ND
SHIFT. My home or yours.
References required. Must
provide your own transporta-
tion. For more details call
419-670-3568. Located in
Paulding. 41p2
CERTIFIED DAY CARE
PROVIDER HAS OPEN-
INGS. Call 419-542-0273
Antwerp School district. 40p2
COINS, ANTIQUES, OLD
KNIVES, postcards, OLD
toys, jewelry, watches,
stamps, estates. Ausin White
419-399-3353 36p7
WHITE CHIHUAHUA MIX -
1 year old. Name Whitey.
Lost in Flat Rock area in
Paulding. Lost 5-25-13.
Missed greatly! 419-769-
1041 41c2
THE BENTON TOWNSHIP
REGULAR MONTHLY
meeting for June has been
changed from Monday June
10 to Thursday June 13 at
8:00 p.m. Julie Dinger, Fiscal
Officer. 40c2
KITTENS - ASSORTED
COLORS. 419-594-3411 41k3
FOR SALE
SERVICES
ANTIQUES
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
GARAGE SALES
CHILDCARE
WANTED TO BUY
WORK WANTED
LOST
FREE
NOTICE
To see more newsphotos
from our photographers go to
www.progressnewspaper.org.
You can order prints and photo gifts
of your favorite photos there too.
HUGE GARAGE SALE
1, 2, 3 & 4X womens clothes,
many brand name & Brand
New! Small boys clothes, books,
2 yr. old 20 TV, ($40), Home In-
teriors, nic nacs, dishes, snow
blower, furnture & bedding.
Also: wood trailer
June 5, 6, 7 & 8 9 to 5:00.
Rd. 180 (Canal) 1 1/2 miles
west of 127 - Grimes, Woodring
10651 41p1
GARAGE SALE
Wed., Thurs. 8-5; Fri. 8-12,
June 5-7.
12147 Rd. 216 Cecil
(US-24 & SR 127 overpass)
Nice items priced to sell
including John Deere! Nb-3t
clothing, baby/toddler toys,
highchair, pack-n-play, Weight
Watchers, Jr. - misses & mens
clothing, Home Decor, baskets,
household (curtains, ceiling fan
w/lights, medicine cabinet,
sweeper, lg. wardrobe cabinet,
desk) screen room, bike carrier,
yard dump cart, lots of misc.
41p1
WANNEMACHER
5816 SR 500 - Payne - Multi Family Garage Sale
1 mile east of Payne just across railroad tracks, June 5-7,
8:30a-6p - Bookcase, Microwave Stands, Wok, Bread Maker,
Pizza Baking Stone, Grill Machine, Blender, Golf Clubs w/OSU
bag, Crock Pot, Coffee Pot, Carousel Rotisserie, Cookie Cutters,
Glass Jars, Dishes, Pans, Vases, Baskets, Children's Safety Bed
Rail, Porcelain Dolls, Golf Balls, Jewelry Box, Jewelry, Sesame
Street Quilt (Twin), Blankets, Picture Frames, Christmas Tree,
Christmas Decorations, Cookbooks, Toys, Movies, Stuffed Animals,
Clothes (3-6 mo. thru XXL)
41c1
www.progressnewspaper.org and click the
Facebook or Twitter link
Follow The Progress
on Facebook and Twitter!
Search for
Paulding County Progress
Newspaper
Then become a fan by
clicking LIKE
Search for pauldingpaper
or go to our website at
BLUE STREAM DAIRY, INC.
Is looking for:
MECHANIC/UTILITY
Must be 18 years old
Have a valid drivers license
Experience with tractor operation
Apply in person from 8am to 6pm at
3242 Mentzer Church Rd.
Convoy OH 45832 41c2
LEGALS
Public Notice
The Antwerp Local
School Board of Edu-
cation hereby gives no-
tice in accordance with
section 3307.353 of the
Ohio Revised Code
that Cathy Barnett,
currently employed in
the District as Technol-
ogy Coordinator, will
be retired and is seek-
ing employment with
the District in such po-
sition following retire-
ment. The Antwerp
Local School Board of
Education will hold a
public meeting on the
issue of Cathy Barnett
being employed in the
District at 5:00 p.m. on
July 18, 2013, at the
Antwerp Local School
District Board of Edu-
cation room. 41c1
PUBLIC NOTICE
Ohio Department of
Agriculture
Date of Public Notice:
June 5, 2013
Name and address of
applicant: Van Erk
Dairy, LLC, 8789 St Rt
114, Haviland, OH
In accordance with
OAC rule 901:10-6-
01, public notice is
hereby given that the
Ohio Department of
Agriculture has issued
a final Permit to Oper-
ate and Permit to In-
stall for Van Erk Dairy.
The final Permit may
be appealed. The no-
tice of Appeal and the
filing fee as may be re-
quired must be sent to:
The Environmental
Review Appeals Com-
mission (ERAC), 77
South High Street,
17th Floor, Columbus,
Ohio 43215, (614-466-
8950) by July 5, 2013
at 5 p.m. Questions re-
garding the appeal
process may be di-
rected to ERAC. A
copy of the appeal
must be served on the
director of agriculture
within three days after
filing the appeal with
ERAC. 41c1
PROBATE COURT
OF PAULDING
COUNTY, OHIO
JOHN A. DEMUTH,
JUDGE
IN RE: CHANGE OF
NAME OF Angel
Spencer Reutter (Pre-
sent Name) Spencer
Angel Reutter (Name
Requested).
Case No. 20136018
NOTICE OF
HEARING ON
CHANGE OF NAME
[R.C. 2717.01]
Applicant hereby gives
notice to all interested
persons that the appli-
cant has filed an Appli-
cation for Change of
Name in the Probate
Court of Paulding
County, Ohio, request-
ing the change of name
of Angel Spencer
Reutter to Spencer
Angel Reutter. The
hearing on the applica-
tion will be held on the
10th day of July, 2013,
at 8:30 oclock a.m. in
the Probate Court of
Paulding, County, lo-
cated at 115 N.
Williams Street, Pauld-
ing, Ohio. 41c1
Kirby Reutter
422 East Canal Street
Antwerp, Ohio 45813
COUNTY : PAULDING
The following applica-
tions and/or verified
complaints were re-
ceived, and the follow-
ing draft, proposed and
final actions were is-
sued, by the Ohio En-
vironmental Protection
Agency (Ohio EPA)
last week. The com-
plete public notice in-
cluding additional
instructions for sub-
mitting comments, re-
questing information
or a public hearing, or
filing an appeal may be
obtained at:
http://www.epa.ohio.g
ov/actions.aspx or
Hearing Clerk, Ohio
EPA, 50 W. Town St.
P.O. Box 1049,
Columbus, Ohio
43216.
Ph: 614-644-2129 email:
HClerk@epa.state.oh.us
FINAL ISSUANCE OF
RENEWAL OF NPDES
PERMIT
BRENTWOOD MHP
8959 AIRPORT HWY
HOLLAND OH
ACTION DATE :
07/01/2013
RECEIVING WA-
TERS: MAUMEE
RIVER
FACILITY DESCRIP-
TION: MOBILE
HOME PARK
IDENTIFICATION
NO. : 2PY00044*CD
This final action not
preceded by proposed
action and is appeal-
able to ERAC.
WAYNE TRACE JR
& SR HS
4915 US RTE 127
HAVILAND OH
ACTION DATE :
07/01/2013
RECEIVING WA-
TERS: BLUE CREEK
FACILITY DESCRIP-
TION: SCHOOL OR
HOSPITAL
IDENTIFICATION
NO. : 2PT00039*CD
This final action not
preceded by proposed
action and is appeal-
able to ERAC.
WO O D B R I D G E
CAMPGROUND LLC
8656 ROAD 137
PAULDING OH
ACTION DATE :
07/01/2013
RECEIVING WA-
TERS: UNAMED
TRIB TO BLUE
CREEK
FACILITY DESCRIP-
TION: SEMI-PUBLIC
IDENTIFICATION
NO. : 2PR00248*BD
This final action not
preceded by proposed
action and is appeal-
able
to ERAC.
FINAL ISSUANCE
OF REVOCATION
OF NPDES PERMIT
DANA COMPANIES
LLC
5278 US RTE 24 E
ANTWERP OH
ACTION DATE:
06/01/2013
RECEIVING WA-
TERS: MAUMEE
RIVER
FACILITY DESCRIP-
TION: METAL FIN-
ISHING
IDENTIFICATION
NO. : 2IC00004*MD
This action was pre-
ceded by a proposed
action. 41c1
RESOLUTION
1275-13
Resolution 1275-13 was
passed by Paulding Vil-
lage Council on May
20, 2013, and goes into
effect and shall be in
force immediately. The
summary of this legisla-
tion is as follows:
A RESOLUTION RE-
QUESTING THE
COUNTY AUDITOR
TO CERTIFY TO THE
VILLAGE OF
PAULDING THE
TOTAL CURRENT
TAX VALUATION OF
SAID VILLAGE AND
DOLLAR AMOUNT
OF REVENUE THAT
WOULD BE GENER-
ATED BY ONE (1)
MILL FOR A RE-
NEWAL LEVY FOR
RECREATI ONAL
PURPOSES, INCLUD-
ING THE PAULDING
VILLAGE POOL IN
ACCORDANCE TO
REVISED CODE
5705.19 (H), AND DE-
CLARING AN EMER-
GENCY.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
RESOLUTION
1276-13
Resolution 1276-13 was
passed by Paulding Vil-
lage Council on May
20, 2013, and goes into
effect and shall be in
force immediately. The
summary of this legisla-
tion is as follows:
A RESOLUTION RE-
QUESTING THE
COUNTY AUDITOR
TO CERTIFY TO THE
VILLAGE OF
PAULDING THE
TOTAL CURRENT
TAX VALUATION OF
SAID VILLAGE AND
DOLLAR AMOUNT
OF REVENUE THAT
WOULD BE GENER-
ATED BY ONE (1)
MILL FOR A RE-
NEWAL LEVY FOR
THE PURPOSE OF
PROVIDING AND
MAINTAINING FIRE
APPARTATUS, AP-
PLIANCES, BUILD-
INGS OR SITES
THEREFORE, AND
THE PAYMENT OF
PERMANENT PART-
TIME OR VOLUN-
TEER FIREMEN OR
FIRE FIGHTING
COMPANIES TO OP-
ERATE THE SAME,
INCLUDING THE
PAYMENT OF THE
FIREFIGHTER EM-
PLOYERS' CONTRI-
BUTION REQUIRED
UNDER SECTION
742.34 OF THE OHIO
REVISED CODE
(ORC 5705.19(1)),
AND DECLARING
AN EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
RESOLUTION
1277-13
Resolution 1277-13 was
passed by Paulding Vil-
lage Council on May
20, 2013, and goes into
effect and shall be in
force immediately. The
summary of this legisla-
tion is as follows:
A RESOLUTION RE-
QUESTING THE
COUNTY AUDITOR
TO CERTIFY TO THE
VILLAGE OF
PAULDING THE
TOTAL CURRENT
TAX VALUATION OF
SAID VILLAGE AND
DOLLAR AMOUNT
OF REVENUE THAT
WOULD BE GENER-
ATED BY A 2.0 MILL
RENEWAL LEVY
FOR CURRENT EX-
PENSES IN ACCO-
RANCE TO REVISED
CODE 5705.19(a),
AND DECLARING
AN EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
ORDINANCE
1452-13
Ordinance 1452-13 was
passed by Paulding Vil-
lage Council on May
14, 2013, and goes into
effect and shall be in
force immediately. The
summary of this legisla-
tion is as follows:
AN ORDINANCE TO
PROVIDE FOR THE
ISSUANCE OF NOT
TO EXCEED
$122,000 NOTES IN
ANTICIPATION OF
THE ISSUANCE OF
BONDS FOR THE
PURPOSE OF MAK-
ING IMPROVE-
MENTS TO THE
VILLAGE'S WATER-
WORKS SYSTEM,
AND DECLARING
AN EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text
of this legislation may
be obtained at the Fi-
nance Director's Of-
fice, 116 South Main
Street, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
ORDINANCE
1453-13
Ordinance 1453-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
May 14, 2013, and
goes into effect and
shall be in force imme-
diately. The summary
of this legislation is as
follows:
AN ORDINANCE TO
PROVIDE FOR THE
ISSUANCE OF NOT
TO EXCEED
$260,000 NOTES IN
ANTICIPATION OF
THE ISSUANCE OF
BONDS FOR THE
PURPOSE OF IM-
PROVING THE VIL-
LAGE'S SEWER
SYSTEM, AND DE-
CLARING AN
EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text
of this legislation may
be obtained at the Fi-
nance Director's Of-
fice, 116 South Main
Street, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
ORDINANCE
1454-13
Ordinance 1454-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
May 14, 2013, and
goes into effect and
shall be in force imme-
diately. The summary
of this legislation is as
follows:
AN ORDINANCE TO
PROVIDE FOR THE
ISSUANCE OF NOT
TO EXCEED $23,000
NOTES IN ANTICI-
PATION OF THE IS-
SUANCE OF BONDS
FOR THE PURPOSE
OF IMPROVING N.
CHERRY ST, NORTH
DRIVE, AND OTHER
ROADS AND
STREETS IN THE
VILLAGE, AND ALL
NECESSARY AP-
P URT E NANCE S
THERETO, AND DE-
CLARING AN
EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text
of this legislation may
be obtained at the Fi-
nance Director's Of-
fice, 116 South Main
Street, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
ORDINANCE
1455-13
Ordinance 1455-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
May 14, 2013, and
goes into effect and
shall be in force imme-
diately. The summary
of this legislation is as
follows:
AN ORDINANCE TO
PROVIDE FOR THE
ISSUANCE OF
$32,000 NOTES IN
ANTICIPATION OF
THE ISSUANCE OF
BONDS FOR THE
PURPOSE OF IM-
PROVING THE VIL-
LAGE'S SEWER
SYSTEM, TOGETHER
WITH ALL NECES-
SARY APPURTE-
NANCES THERETO,
AND DECLARING
AN EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text
of this legislation may
be obtained at the Fi-
nance Directors Of-
fice, 116 South Main
Street, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
ORDINANCE
1456-13
Ordinance 1456-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
May 14, 2013, and
goes into effect and
shall be in force imme-
diately. The summary
of this legislation is as
follows:
AN ORDINANCE TO
PROVIDE FOR THE
ISSUANCE OF NOT
TO EXCEED $134,000
NOTES IN ANTICI-
PATION OF THE IS-
SUANCE OF BONDS
FOR THE PURPOSE
OF MAKING IM-
PROVEMENTS TO
THE VILLAGE'S WA-
TERWORKS SYS-
TEM, AND
DECLARING AN
EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text
of this legislation may
be obtained at the Fi-
nance Director's Of-
fice, 116 South Main
Street, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
ORDINANCE
1457-13
Ordinance 1457-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
May 14, 2013, and
goes into effect and
shall be in force imme-
diately. The summary
of this legislation is as
follows:
AN ORDINANCE TO
PROVIDE FOR THE
ISSUANCE OF NOT
TO EXCEED $469,000
NOTES IN ANTICIPA-
TION OF THE IS-
SUANCE OF BONDS
FOR THE PURPOSE
OF PAVING AND
OTHERWISE IM-
PROVING N. CHERRY
ST, NORTH DRIVE,
AND OTHER ROADS
AND STREETS IN
THE VILLAGE, AND
ALL NECESSARY
APPURTENANCES
THERETO, AND DE-
CLARING AN EMER-
GENCY.
Copies of the full text of
this legislation may be
obtained at the Finance
Director's Office, 116
South Main Street, be-
tween the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
ORDINANCE
1458-13
Ordinance 1458-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
May 14, 2013, and
goes into effect and
shall be in force imme-
diately. The summary
of this legislation is as
follows:
AN ORDINANCE TO
PROVIDE FOR THE
ISSUANCE OF NOT
TO EXCEED $45,000
NOTES IN ANTICI-
PATION OF THE IS-
SUANCE OF BONDS
FOR THE PURPOSE
OF CONSTRUCTING
AND RECON-
STRUCTING CURBS
ALONG N. CHERRY
STREET AND
NORTH DRIVE IN
THE VILLAGE, AND
ALL NECESSARY
APPURTENANCES
THERETO, AND DE-
CLARING AN
EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text
of this legislation may
be obtained at the Fi-
nance Director's Of-
fice, 116 South Main
Street, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
ORDINANCE
1459-13
Ordinance 1459-13
was passed by Pauld-
ing Village Council on
May 14, 2013, and
goes into effect and
shall be in force imme-
diately. The summary
of this legislation is as
follows:
AN ORDINAN1CE
TO PROVIDE FOR
THE ISSUANCE OF
NOT TO EXCEED
$30,000 NOTES IN
ANTICIPATION OF
THE ISSUANCE OF
BONDS FOR THE
PURPOSE OF AC-
QUIRING A VEHI-
CLE FOR USE BY
THE VILLAGE'S
WATER DEPART-
MENT, SANITARY
SEWER DEPART-
MENT AND ROAD
DEPARTMENT, AND
DECLARING AN
EMERGENCY.
Copies of the full text
of this legislation
maybe obtained at the
Finance Director's Of-
fice, 116 South Main
Street, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Melissa S. Tope,
Finance Director 41c2
LEGAL NOTICE
The annual election of
the Directors for the
Paulding County Agri-
cultural Society will be
held on Saturday, June
15, 2013 between the
hours of 12 noon and
4:00 pm. Said election
will be held in the Sec-
retary's Office on the
Paulding County Fair-
grounds. Only those
persons holding a 2013
Paulding County Agri-
cultural Society mem-
bership will be allowed
to vote in said election.
Susan Miller
Paulding County Agri-
cultural Society
Secretary 40c1
Wednesday, June 5, 2013 Paulding County Progress - 15A
16A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, June 5, 2013
Paulding Countys
Original Recycler!
Buying all Scrap Metals
Container Service for TRASH,
Scrap, Construction Debris, etc.
Sizes are 10-40 Yards
Spring Clean-up Special on 10, 15 & 20
Yard Container
1-419-399-4144
15360 St. Rt. 613, Paulding
Kohart Surplus & Salvage
40c4
OPEN HOUSE
June 7th, 2013
Refreshments and Grand Prize Drawing!
9AM - 3PM
Please come and join us in the fun!
1251 N. Wllllams, Pauldlng, OH
419-399-3136
5ummer Hours:
Mon-5aI. 7:30-7:30
CRFFNHOU5F
Come see our nice selection of
perennials, herbs, vegetable plants,
bulk & packaged seeds,
mulch, flowers & fertilizer
ALL
4 1/2" POT5
10%
OFF
Cooper Farms celebrate 75 years
Jim Cooper, Dianne Cooper and Gary Cooper the three children of founders, Virgil and Vir-
ginia Cooper, are the primary managers of Cooper Farms.
OAKWOOD It was 1938
when Virgil Cooper set out to
raise his first flock of just 500
turkeys for the holidays and
started what is now Cooper
Farms. As they celebrate their
75th anniversary, the Cooper
family is humbled by the
growth they have seen and
thankful to all those who have
helped them reach this amaz-
ing milestone.
I doubt my parents could
have ever imagined the com-
pany being what it is today,
said Gary Cooper, COO. We
have learned that through
hard work and commitment
to your word, opportunities
can come your way and you
can become more than you
ever dreamed. Our small
town turkey farm has now be-
come the 12th largest turkey
producer in the U.S., and is
also one of the largest hog
producers in Ohio.
Though the company has
grown, the Cooper family
will always remember the
core values of a family that
have brought them to where
they are today, ones which in-
clude more than just blood
relatives.
The contributions everyone
has made as individuals and
as a team are what have
brought Cooper Farms such
success. The Cooper family is
proud to share that success
with both the team members
and the communities.
Family was always impor-
tant to Mom and Dad and it
remains important to all of
us, said Jim Cooper, CEO.
Dad always made sure that
his employees were happy
and felt like they were a part
of the Cooper Hatchery fam-
ily and we work to do that
still today. We try to take the
time to show them how much
we appreciate what they do
through special events, appre-
ciation lunches and our bene-
fits programs.
Not only are the team
members recognized as vital
to the success of Cooper
Farms, but so are the commu-
nities where they are located.
Each year Cooper Farms and
the Cooper Family Founda-
tion provide thousands of dol-
lars of support to local
schools, fire departments,
boy/girl/cub scouts, 4-H and
many other organizations that
help the communities and
children thrive.
My dad was always one
who gave back to the com-
munity, said Dianne Cooper.
When I was a kid in Girl
Scouts, if we went on a trip
Dad would always show up
with treats for all the girls and
he did the same for the boys.
And as a whole we like to do
that today too; we like to give
to the local groups and help
our community however we
can.
Cooper Farms is now run
by Virgil and Virginia
Coopers children, Jim, Di-
anne and Gary, and is still pri-
vately owned by the Cooper
Family. Several of the third
generation family members
also work for Cooper Farms
in various positions through-
out the company, with some
of fourth generation recently
joining the company.
Over the years, Cooper
Farms grew and diversified.
What started as a simple
hatchery has grown to four
locations. The Live Animal
Division encompasses two
locations; in the Oakwood
area are the turkey and hog
breeding farms as well as the
hatchery which hatches 15
million poults (baby turkeys)
a year. In the Fort Recovery
area are the nearly 300 family
contract farms which grow
the turkeys and hogs to mar-
ket weight and house chick-
ens for table eggs. The Food
Processing Division has the
processing plant in St. Henry
and a cooked meats plant in
Van Wert, where deli prod-
ucts are made.
A BRIEF HISTORY
Virgils operation grew
quickly during World War II,
in an attempt to meet the
large demand for meat. In
1944, he and his wife, Vir-
ginia, acquired one of the
hatcheries that had been sell-
ing him poults (baby turkeys)
for the past six years. Eventu-
ally growing out of that small
facility in downtown Oak-
wood, Virgil went on to build
a new state-of-the-art hatch-
ery in 1948. He built it in a
rural area next to his home;
allowing him to know there
would be room for growth
and expansion over the years.
After more than 42 years,
Virgil retired in 1980 and
handed over day-to-day man-
agement of the company, then
hatching about 4 million
poults a year, to his sons, Jim
and Gary, and daughter, Di-
anne.
The new generation has
continued to maintain Virgils
focus on quality and innova-
tion raising turkeys in a low
stress environment and grow-
ing Cooper Farms into one of
the largest family-owned
turkey processing companies
in the country.
ABOUT COOPER FARMS
Growing healthy live
turkeys, chickens, egg layers
and hogs and producing great
food products has been a tra-
dition for the Cooper family of
northwest Ohio for three gen-
erations. Founded in 1938 by
Virgil and Virginia Cooper,
Cooper Farms is still family
owned and operated.
Today, with the help of its
team members, Cooper Farms
is a leading food supplier, sell-
ing a variety of delicious fully
cooked and ready-to-cook
turkey, ham and chicken prod-
ucts to customers throughout
North America.
Visit www.cooperfarms.com
or www.facebook.com/cooper-
farms for more information.
Spring clean-up
scheduled in Payne
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
PAYNE The Payne Vil-
lage Council met in regular
session last Tuesday, May 28.
The meeting was scheduled a
day later due to Memorial
Day.
The council tabled its deci-
sion concerning the proposed
changes with the County
Emergency Management
Agency until additional infor-
mation detailing the new plan
is heard. Right now, none of
us are sure whats going on,
said Mayor Terry Smith.
In other business, three
Benton Township trustees
and three Harrison Township
trustees approached council
concerning the lack of a fire
and EMT contract between
the townships and village.
There has been no contract
since the first of the year.
When asked why the contract
has not been finalized, Mayor
Smith reported how some of
the verbiage needs to be clar-
ified.
Smith went on to say, This
is something that our lawyers
will need work through.
There is a meeting scheduled
at 8 p.m., Monday, June 3,
with both sides and hopefully
this will get ironed out then.
Deputy Fiscal Officer
Cheryl Halter emphasized
that even without the contract,
all fire and EMT services have
continued uninterrupted.
The motion to accept the res-
ignation of reserve police offi-
cer Caleb Miller was
unanimously approved.
In other business:
the EMS departmentre-
placed the heater core on squad
54
a new village lawn mower
has been leased and is being
used at this time
In police business, Chief
Rodney Miller sited two prop-
erties with a high weed notice.
The spring village clean up
will be held June 6-8. Dump-
sters will be located at the ele-
vator for residents use.
Council meetings are held
on the second and fourth Mon-
day of each month with the
next meeting scheduled for 7
p.m. June 10.
Tumblin 5K run, cleanup day
both set June 8 in Oakwood
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
OAKWOOD Oakwood
Village Council met May 28
with all council members
present. The meeting was one
day later than normal due to
the Memorial Day holiday.
Resident Kelly Tumblin
was granted permission to use
the Oakwood Fire Station for
the start/finish line and other
activities associated with the
Four Years Out of Heaven
5K run being held June 8 in
memory of Taylor Tumblin.
Registration for the run will
start at 9 a.m. with the race
starting at 10 a.m.
EMS coordinator Chad
Brown requested an execu-
tive session to discuss person-
nel issues. Upon returning to
regular session, council ap-
proved the appointment of
Jenna Kipp to run as an EMT
with a six-month probation-
ary period.
Village administrator John
Keyes informed council that
the villages spring clean-up
day is scheduled for 9 a.m.-2
p.m. on June 8. Boy Scout
Troop 19 will be helping
monitor trash disposal and
collecting recyclable material
at the dumpster site.
The Scouts have requested
that a councilman or village
official also be at the dump
site to prevent people from
taking the scrap metal they
collect from the trash. The
Scouts plan to use the money
raised from the scrap metal
sales for Scouting activities.
Keyes told council that the
dumpsters will be picked up
at 3 p.m.
Keyes said he mowed a lot
owned by Mary Branham and
it was noted that a $100 fee
would be assessed on the
property taxes.
Keyes advised Fire Chief
Kenny Thomas that the fire
department could use the
power washer as needed.
Thomas told council that
the air compressor has been
repaired.
Thomas reported that four
candidates Dalton Thomas,
Eric Elston, Allen Sharp and
Jonathan Leatherman have
completed fire classes.
The replacement fire truck
will be ready late June or
early July. The seller will re-
duce the cost of the truck by
$2,000 if it is picked up and
driven back to Ohio by some-
one from the Oakwood Fire
Department. Some of the
Oakwood firefighters have
volunteered for the assign-
ment. Thomas is checking
cost.
Police Chief Mark Figert
reported to council that the
following calls had been re-
ceived and cleared for the
month of April: assault (1)
domestic (1), unwanted per-
son (1), keys locked in vehi-
cle (2), suspicious vehicle (1),
theft (2), menacing (1), motor
vehicle accident (1), fire (1),
alarm (1), assist EMS (1), in-
formation (1), miscellaneous
(2), reckless operation (1),
criminal damaging (1), crim-
inal mischief (2), telephone
harassment (1), and unclassi-
fied criminal complaint. A
total of 23 incidents were re-
ported and cleared for the
month,
Councilwoman Vicky
Long reported that a red car
has been parked at a house on
North Second Street for a
number of months with no li-
cense plates. Chief Figert will
check and advise.
Council voted unanimously
to suspend the rules, declared
an emergency and then unan-
imously passed Ordinance
13-04 accepting an annexa-
tion agreement for territory to
the village consisting of two
tracts of land. Tract 1 consists
of 40.285 acres of land and
Tract 2 consists of 19.683
acres of land.
The next regular meeting is
scheduled for 6:30 p.m. June
10.
The Progress ...
is Paulding Countys
newspaper of record.
NURSING GRADUATE
Twenty students completing
Northwest State Community
Colleges registered nursing
associate degree program
were recently pinned in a spe-
cial ceremony held for the
graduates. Among them was
Dawn Smith of Oakwood.
Graduates are eligible to take
the National Council Licen-
sure Exam and enter directly
into the workforce, or they
may transfer their credits into
a bachelors degree program.