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Abby Bolling was last years

winner Delhi Rising Star


Competition. FILE PHOTO
Local singers are picking
songs, practicing their pitch
and prepping their wind pipes
for the secondDelhi RisingStar
Contest hosted by the Delhi
Skirt Game Committee and the
Delhi Civic Association.
The singing competition
challenges anyone interested in
singing to step up to the mic,
compete for cash and recogni-
tion and raise money for the
nonprofit organizations.
First prize is $250, second is
$100 and third is $50. People
whowant tocompeteneedtoau-
dition at 7 p.m. Thursday, June
20, at Shiloh United Methodist
Delhi
Rising
Star
auditions
set for
June 20
By Monica Boylson
mboylson@communitypress.com
See RISING, Page A2
DELHI DELHI
PRESS
75
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 2013 BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS
Your Community Press
newspaper serving Delhi
Township and Sayler Park
Vol. 86 No. 22
2013 The Community Press
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
The Delhi Press,
5556 Cheviot Rd
Cincinnati, OH 45247
For the Postmaster
Published weekly every Wednesday
Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnatil, OH 45247
ISSN 10580298 USPS 006-879
Postmaster: Send address change to The Delhi Press,
5556 Cheviot Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45247
$30 for one year
News ...................923-3111
Retail advertising .....768-8357
Classified advertising .242-4000
Delivery ...............853-6263
See page A2 for additional information
Contact The Press
ON TO STATE
Oak Hills Kevin
Konkoly is returning
to state track meet.
See story A6
RITAS KITCHEN
Tasty recipes from the
Taste.
See story B3
HONORING VETERANS B1
Sayler Park remembers service members.
West Price Hill Logan
Schneider saidhes lookingfor-
ward to building sand castles,
splashing in the ocean and
swimming with dolphins.
The St. Teresa of Avila
School fourth-graderwill expe-
rience the trip of his dreams
when he travels to the Baha-
mas with his family this July.
Its really cool that I get to
go, he said. Its a nice place
and I think it will be a lot of
fun.
Schneider and his family
will stay at the Atlantis resort
in the Bahamas courtesy of the
Make-A-Wish organization.
Logan, whose wish was to
swim with dolphins in the Ba-
hamas, was diagnosed with
acute lymphoblastic leukemia
in November 2011. He under-
went chemotherapy and other
treatments, and missed nearly
all of his third-grade year at St.
Teresa.
But he never backed down,
and although he will continue
receiving treatments until
April 2015, his cancer is consid-
ered to be in remission. He was
able to rejoin his classmates in
the fourth-grade this school
year.
Hes feeling very good,
said Logans father, Dave
Schneider of Delhi Township.
Hes back to school, hes
back to a more routine sched-
ule and doing things he enjoys
like playing soccer.
Logan knew Make-A-Wish
was consideringhis wishtovis-
it the Caribbean, but he didnt
know his wish had been grant-
ed.
St. Teresa Principal Sharon
Willmes, aMake-A-Wishvolun-
teer who served as the liaison
between the organization and
the Schneider family, sur-
prised Logan with his travel
St. Teresa of Avila fourth-grader Logan Schneider, center front, was granted a trip to the Bahamas by the Make-A-Wish organization. Logans
family, from left, mom Michelle Schneider, dad Dave Schneider and stepbrothers Noah and Luke Stolze will join him on the trip, where he will
swim with dolphins. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
St. Teresa student going
on his dream vacation
By Kurt Backscheider
kbackscheider@communitypress.com
See DREAM, Page A2
GOING SWIMMING
Watch the presentation. Go to
Cincinnati.Com/pricehill.
PriceHill Runners andwalkers are
invitedtohit thestreetstoraisemoney
for two community organizations.
The eighth annual Price Hill Pacer
5K run/walk benefiting Santa Maria
Community Services and Price Hill
Will is set for 9 a.m. Saturday, June 8.
The 3.1-mile course begins at Elder
High Schools Schaeper Center and
makes its way through the surround-
ing neighborhoods.
Special awards will be presented to
thetopmaleandfemalefinishers, plus
the top finishers in each division.
Both the run and walk have several
age divisions for men and women.
There is also a Kids FunRundirect-
ly following the 5K for children 10
years old and younger. All children
who participate will receive special
recognition.
Race dayregistrationbegins at 7:30
a.m. at the Schaeper Center.
Registration is $20 for adults; $15
for students 17 and younger; and $15
per personfor groups of five to10 peo-
ple.
The registration fee includes re-
freshments after the race anda goodie
bag while they last. Race T-shirts are
$5 each.
A door prize raffle will take place
after the race.
Runners and walkers can get more
information, a map of the course and
registration forms at www.pricehill-
pacer.org.
Thoseinterestedcanalsocall Leslie
Schultz at 557-2730, extension 408 for
more details.
Race sponsors this year include
Macys, Sisters of Charity Ministry
Foundation, Hart Pharmacy, Cincin-
nati SportsMedicine, Rudemiller Fam-
ily Medicine, Warsaw Federal, The
Model Group, Cincinnati Federal Sav-
ings and Loan, Consolidated Metal
Products, Greater Cincinnati Credit
Union, Bob Ronckers Running Spot,
Skallys Old World Bakery and Pepsi.
Runners tear out of the gate at a past Price Hill
Pacer 5K. The eighth annual installment of the
benefit race takes place Saturday, June 8, at Elder
High School. FILE PHOTO
Annual 5K supports Price Hill groups
A2 DELHI PRESS JUNE 5, 2013 NEWS
DELHI
PRESS
News
Marc Emral Senior Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6264, memral@communitypress.com
Monica Boylson Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com
Melanie Laughman Sports Editor . . . . . . 248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com
Tom Skeen Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com
Advertising
Melissa Martin
Territory Sales Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .768-8357, mmartin@enquirer.com
Lisa Lawrence
Sales Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .768-8338, llawrence@enquirer.com
Delivery
For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .853-6263, 853-6277
Sharon Schachleiter
Circulation Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .853-6279, sschachleiter@communitypress.com
Stephanie Siebert
District Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .853-6281
Classified
To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000, www.communityclassified.com
To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.
Find news and information from your community on the Web
Delhi Township cincinnati.com/delhitownship
Sayler Park cincinnati.com/saylerpark
Hamilton County cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty
Calendar .................B2
Classifieds ................C
Deaths ...................B6
Food ......................B3
Police .................... B6
Schools ..................A5
Sports ....................A6
Viewpoints .............A8
Index
Through June 30, 2013
See Store for Details.
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Church, 5261 Foley
Road. Anyone can reg-
ister online at www.del-
hi civicassociation.org
prior to the audition for
$10 or can pay $15 at the
door.
Judges will then nar-
row the number of
those who auditioned
into groups of seven or
eight to compete in
semifinals at Maloneys
Pub, 408 Greenwell
Ave., Skirt Game co-
chairman Clyde Kober
said. Dates and times
are still being deter-
mined, he said.
He explained the
winners of the semifi-
nal groups will compete
and the singers will be
narrowed to the final-
ists, who will perform
songs at the Delhi Skirt
Game Tailgate Party at
6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1,
at Remke Biggs, 5025
Delhi Road. The winner
of the finals will per-
form, including singing
the National Anthem,
before the fireworks at
the Delhi Skirt Game
Friday, Aug. 2.
In order to advance
through the ranks, he
said, the participants
must face judges and
try to get as many votes
as they can frompeople
in the crowd. The
judges do not have the
ability to vote in the
competition but will be
allowed a judges
save which gives them
the power to choose a
participant to compete
in the finals who may
not have received as
many votes.
We look for breath-
ing technique, tone and
quality, said Mary Ma-
zuk, a judge and musi-
cal director at the Col-
lege of Mount St. Jo-
seph. Competition was
tough last year and we
wished we could have
multiple winners.
Votes, which deter-
mine which person ad-
vances to the next
round, are in the form
of tickets. Guests can
purchase five tickets
for $1whichcanbe used
as votes for a perform-
er. The person with the
most tickets advances
to the next round.
Proceeds from audi-
tions and ticket sales
will be split between
the Skirt Game Com-
mittee and the Civic As-
sociation. Last year the
competition raised
$4,000.
Its a good night out
and only costs to vote,
Kober said. Plus the
money goes to a great
cause.
For more informa-
tion, email risingstar-
competi tion@delhicivi-
cassocia tion.org.
Rising
Continued from Page A1
documents, itinerary and
planetickets duringaspe-
cial assembly at the
school Wednesday, May
29.
University of Cincin-
nati football players Mun-
chie Legaux and Jordan
Luallen, who visited Lo-
gan while he was in the
hospital, also showed up
at the assembly to sur-
prise him and wish him
well in his travels.
Willmes said she
couldnt be more thrilled
for Logan and his family.
His parents have han-
dledeverythingwithsuch
strengthandcourage, and
she said Logan remained
upbeat and always had a
smile on his face through-
out his fight with the dis-
ease.
Through the whole
process Logankept aposi-
tive attitude, Willmes
said. His strength is un-
believable.
Michelle Schneider,
Logans mother, said she
and her husband are
grateful for all the love
and support their family
has received from the St.
Teresa community.
You never know how
its going to go when you
are faced with something
like this, she said.
Everyone here has
been so fantastic and sup-
portive.
She and her husband
saidthe Bahamas tripwill
be a nice escape and they
look forward to spending
time together as a family.
It will be a much wel-
comed reprieve to get
away, Mr. Schneider
said.
We couldnt be more
blessed.
Logansaidhejust cant
wait to get in the water
with those dolphins.
Its going to be really
cool, he said.
Dream
Continued from Page A1
St. Teresa of Avila fourth-grader Logan Schneider opens a basket of goodies he can take
with him on his trip to the Bahamas in July. St. Teresa Principal Sharon Willmes, right, a
Make-A-Wish volunteer, surprised Logan with his trip tickets and itinerary during a special
assembly at the school. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
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Ashley Nicole Jacobs
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Maggie Nicole Keyes
Hayley Willett Kirley
Kathleen Danielle Koch
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Taylor Kristina Kuhl
Grace Laiveling
Jenna Lane
Hannah Lynn Lanzillotta
Erika Elizabeth LaRosa
Sidney Michaela Lawson
Margaret Mary Leisgang
Julie Marie Lindeman
Stephanie Little
Caitlin Nicole Lopez
Adelaide Rose Lottman
Kayla Marie Luckett
Sarah Marie Macke
Ashley Nicole Makin
Sithandiwe Panashe Mamutse
Cheyenne Ashley Martinez
Jenna Elizabeth Martini
Emilie Marie Mattei
Chelsea Nichole McAuliffe
Kathleen Mary McCarthy
Meghan Laura McGregor
Nicole Lee Melvin
Erika Marie Merkle
Laura Mackenzie Mersmann
Jamie Christine Merz
Holly Marie Meyer
Marisa Kaitlyn Meyer
Cierra Devany Mitchell
Alexandra Marie Moehring
Mary Grace Moore
Paige Alysse Moorhead
Lindsey Kathleen Mullen
Kelsey Anne Murphy
Stephanie Nicole Myers
Jennifer Marie Nguyen
Nicole Marie Nie
Jenna Marie Niehaus
Emma Kathryn Nienaber
Colleen E. OBrien
Molly Rose Piller
Morgan Elizabeth Quatman
Kara Luehrmann attermann
Pamela Paige Redden
Emily Marcia Reiring
Kayla Christine Reuss
Kara Rose Ridder
Samantha Nicole Riser
Allison Elizabeth Roell
Sydney Glenna Roll
Haley Marie Rollison
Madison Elizabeth
Rosenacker
Christin Ann Rottenberger
Christine Therese Rowland
Helena Maria Teresa Sabato
Jordan Nicole Schmidt
Katelyn Marie Schoster
Christina Mary Schultz
Stefanie Ann Schwarm
Sara Jean Schwierjohann
Emily Louise Sedler
Lindsay Marie Selby
Courtney Marie Sergent
Elizabeth Ann Smith
Jaime Nicole Smith
Danielle Bree Smyth
Laura Margaret Sollmann
Regina Squeri
Anna Elizabeth Stagge
Nicole Marie Stemler
Rachel Elizabeth Stock
Emma Anne Summers
Elizabeth Mary Sunderhaus
Maria Christine Svec
Sydney Renee Terry
Ashley Lynn Tettenhorst
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Christina Rose Torok
Andrea Toth
Jacqueline Maria Tran
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Sydney Michelle Vollmer
Allison Marie Walke
Jaclyn Marie Waller
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Rachel Adele Wink
Ashley Hazel Witschger
Mara Elizabeth Witsken
Jessica Mary Woeste
Rachel Nicole Zieverink
Kourtney Kay Zigelmier
Westwood Dina Bal-
lard and Jazmine Mincy
said they wouldnt change
anything about their
years at Dater High
School.
The duo worked hard,
were involved in several
school activities and
earned the top two spots
in Daters class of 2013.
Ballard was her class
valedictorian and Mincy
was the salutatorian.
Ballard, the daughter
of Laura Reynolds of
Bond Hill, said her
friends helped make the
most difference in her
high school experience.
They are a great
group of individuals who
are positive influences on
me, Ballard said. I
wouldnt bewhereI amto-
day without them.
She said managing her
time proved to be her big-
gest challenge in high
school.
It seemed as if I was
always busy and never
really had enough time to
experience everything I
wanted to do, she said.
Outside of the class-
room, Ballardwas a mem-
ber of Daters cheerlead-
ing and the dance teams,
and she said she also took
upaninterest inphotogra-
phy.
If she could start over,
shesaidshewouldchange
absolutely nothing.
All of my experienc-
es, goodandbad, ledmeto
where I am today, Bal-
lard said. I appreciate
every bit of my journey.
She said shes glad she
had sci-
ence teach-
er Amy
Jameson
while she
was at Dat-
er.
She
forced me
to take re-
sponsibili-
ty for my-
self as a
student,
Ballard
said.
She will
attend the
Ohio State
University
this fall, where she said
sheplanstostudycommu-
nications.
Heradvicetoincoming
seniors is to, Live it up,
wisely. SenioryearisoneI
will never forget, and I
can only hope that you all
make the best of yours,
she said.
Mincy, daughter of
Jannis Durr-Mincy and
Kirk Mincy of Westwood,
said time management
was also her biggest chal-
lenge in high school.
From working as a
server at Bob Evans,
cheerleading, school
meetings and my hours of
homework, it becomes
pretty challenging, she
said. I still dont really
knowhowI did it.
In addition to cheer-
leading, Mincy said she
was also a member of stu-
dent council andservedas
president of National
Honor Society.
Like Ballard, she said
herfriendsmadethemost
difference in her high
school experience.
I have a group of sup-
portive friends who push
eachother to make higher
goals while always having
fun, she said.
From seventh-grade
to senior year, I have
gained another family.
Without them my high
school experience would
probably be boring and
Imgoing to miss them.
Mincy said shes glad
she took anatomy and
physiology at Dater be-
cause the course material
will be helpful in college.
She will attend Tuske-
gee University this fall,
and said she will study an-
imal poultry and veteri-
nary sciences.
If she could start high
school all over, she said
she would do everything
the same, except with
more passion.
Im proud of my
achievements but also of
my mistakes because I
have a chance to grow
from them, she said. If
life was perfect what fun
would it really be?
Mincy said her advice
to students who will soon
begin their senior year is
to never slack off.
Ive always had peo-
ple criticize me for taking
aheavyloadformysenior
year, but it is just prepar-
ing me for the course load
Ill be introduced to at a
university, she said. So
continue to take more
challenging classes such
as Advance Placement
coursestoprepareyoufor
next year.
Shesaidits alsoimpor-
tant to have fun. Senior
year was my favorite and
it went entirely too fast.
Daters top students:
senior year the best
By Kurt Backscheider
kbackscheider@communitypress.com
Ballard
Mincy
A4 DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS JUNE 5, 2013 NEWS
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church is bringing a cir-
cus to its grounds.
Just like everything
in life, change is neces-
sary at some point, said
St. Antoninus parishioner
and festival volunteer
Alex Hawk.
We felt like nowwas a
great time to make some
basic changes to our festi-
val.
Dubbed Cirque Du St.
A, the festival will feature
performances by the Cin-
cinnati Circus Co. The cir-
cus group, owned by life-
long West Side resident
Dave Willacker, will pre-
sent the Circus Big Show
at 6:30p.m. bothSaturday,
June 8, and Sunday, June
9.
He said Saturday and
Sunday will also have
strolling magicians, stilt
jugglers, balloon artists
and fire performers.
There will be pony rides,
train rides, a 20-animal pet-
ting zoo and new carnival
games for children as well.
The St. Antoninus festival
will also have its first ever
adult night this year. The
adults only night features
live music by The Polecats
and runs from 7 p.m. to mid-
night Friday, June 7.
Hawk said the Sullivan &
Janszen Band will provide
the musical entertainment
on Saturday.
Although an adult night
and circus attraction have
been added, Hawk said the
traditional festival, com-
plete with everyones favor-
ite booths and food, will also
still take place.
St. Antoninus festival
hours for Saturday are 5:30
to midnight.
The festival is open 4-10
p.m. Sunday. Chicken dinner
from The Farm in Delhi
Township is available from
5-7 p.m. Sunday.
St. Antoninus is at 1500
Linneman Drive; go to
www.saintantoninus.org.
St. Antoninus adds a circus to its festival
Dave Willacker will present
the Circus Big Show at 6:30
p.m. both Saturday, June 8,
and Sunday, June 9, at the
St. Antoninus festival at the
church, 1500 Linneman
Drive, Green Township.
THANKS TO SCOTT BRUCE
JUNE 5, 2013 DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS A5
SCHOOLS SCHOOLS
ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS CommunityPress.com
COMMUNITY
PRESS Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264
Awards
WarrenGrove has been initi-
ated into Phi Kappa Phi, the na-
tions oldest and most selective
collegiate honor society for all
academic disciplines.
Groveis pursuingadegreein
education at Western Illinois
University.

Megan Rogg is a top student


at Butler University.
The Butler Alumni Associa-
tion sponsors the Outstanding
Student RecognitionProgramto
pay tribute to the talent and de-
dication that characterizes But-
ler students. The recipients are
nominated by students, faculty
andstaff members for their out-
standing character, scholarship
and leadership.

The following local students


were recognized at the Xavier
University All Honors Day:
Anna Ahlrichs received
AthleticDirectors Awards, pre-
sented to student-athletes who
have maintained a grade-point
average of 3.25-3.49.
Olivia Earls received the
Salter Political Science Award,
presented to the student com-
pleting the political science ma-
jor with highest distinction. She
also was inducted into the Pi of
OhioChapterof Phi BetaKappa,
which celebrates and advocates
excellenceintheliberal artsand
sciences.
Carly Hartman received a
Gold X-Key Achievement
Award, which recognizes stu-
dents well-rounded co-curricu-
lar involvement and contribu-
tions to the Xavier community.
Junior and senior students are
eligible for this Gold X-Key
based upon the breadth and
depth of their campus involve-
ment and academic achieve-
ment.
Edward Herbers received
the Student Employee of the
Year award, presented annually
by the On-Campus Employment
Council to a student who, while
working and attending college,
provided outstanding contribu-
tions and achievements in the
areas of reliability, quality of
work, initiative, professional-
ism and uniqueness of charac-
ter.
Alison Kehling received
the Alchemyst Award, a certif-
icate awarded to an outstanding
senior major in the department
of chemistry.
Carl Mai receivedthe Com-
puter Science Service Award,
presentedtoacomputerscience
student who has performed ex-
ceptional servicefor thedepart-
ment.
Patrick Phillips received a
Gold X-Key Achievement
Award, given to recognize stu-
dents well-rounded co-curricu-
lar involvement and contribu-
tions to the Xavier community.
Junior and senior students are
eligible for the Gold X-Key
based upon the breadth and
depth of their campus involve-
ment and academic achieve-
ment.
Keith Schenkel received
an Athletic Directors Award,
presented to student-athletes
who have maintained a grade-
point average of 3.25-3.49.
Adam Stowe received the
Randy Wilhelm Scholarship,
presentedtoamanagement and/
or entrepreneurship major who
has demonstrated outstanding
entrepreneurial talent and po-
tential.
Corey Zielinski received
an Academic Excellence
Award, given to those students
who have maintained a cumula-
tive grade-point average of 3.67
or above after at least three full
semesters at Xavier. He also re-
ceivedtheAthleticDirector and
Deans Awards.

Ryan Martini has received a


Fulbright English Teaching As-
sistant grant.
Martini, an integrated math-
ematics education major and
American literature minor at
Miami University, will teach in
Indonesia.
Award benefits for all Ful-
bright United States student
grants include round-trip trans-
portation to the host country,
and funding to cover room,
board and incidental costs. Ad-
ditional benefits include re-
search allowance and tuition
waivers, if applicable.

SerenityBurchard, a student
at the Midwest Culinary Insti-
tute, won a silver medal in cold
food platter presentation at an
American Culinary Federation
competition.
Deans List
The following students were
named to the fall honor roll at
Ohio State University:
Marygrace Ashdown, Lau-
ren Ashley, Kevin Bisher, Ni-
cole Bishop, Megan Butler,
Kathleen Byrne, Timothy Cap-
pel, Ryan Carlton, Noah Cave,
Matthew Dietrich, Stephanie
Franer, Rachel Gattermeyer,
Marisa Hartoin, Jamie Jack-
son, MeganJones, Krystal Kai-
ser, Kelsey Kinnemeyer, Jenna
Kremer, Mary Lange, William
Manning, Kayla Martini, An-
drew May, Colleen McHenry,
Zachary McHenry,
Laura Napolitano, Shaylen
Oswald, Brett Pohlman, Car-
lisha Powell, Justin Quatman,
Samantha Ramstetter, Alex
Redrow, Morgan Redrow,
Mark Roser, Courtney Scherer,
Theresa Schmidt, John Sieg-
mundt, William Voellmecke,
Paul Vonluehrte, Robert Wad-
dle, Bryan Walsh, Christopher
Weber, Christopher Wiegman,
Sarah Witsken, Mallory Work-
man and Brent Zeiser.

John Riestenberg was


named to the fall semester
deans list at Northeastern Uni-
versity.

Shayne Bateman was


named to the fall semester
deans list at the College of Mt.
St Joseph.
Graduates
The following have graduat-
ed from Wright State Univer-
sity during winter commence-
ment:
Andrew Bengel, bachelor of
science in business;
Benjamin Brennan, master
of science;
Stephanie Gilardi, master of
science;
Shayla McGill, bachelor of
science;
Daniel Rauh, master of sci-
ence;
Sherri Sievers, doctor of
nursing practice;
Tiana Steagall, bachelor of
arts; and
Melinda Turner, master of
business administration.

The following students have


graduated from Miami Univer-
sity:
HanamariamAmare, bache-
lor of arts;
Nicholas Brown, bachelor of
scienceinengineering, cumlau-
de;
Randall Gibson, master of
arts in teaching;
Rachel Howell, bachelor of
arts;
KristinKoch, bachelor of sci-
ence in kinesiology and health;
Kelsey Verville Long, bache-
lor of science in education;
Jason May, bachelor of sci-
ence in engineering;
Jawon McIntosh, bachelor
of science in kinesiology and
health;
Wyatt Thesing, associate in
applied science, cum laude; and
Kirsten Weber, bachelor of
science in education.
COLLEGE CORNER
Dater High School
Junior Mary Pickett has
been awarded the Carter G.
Woodson award from Berea
College.
The Woodson
Award honors
top performing
African Ameri-
can high school
juniors. Pickett
was nominated
by her social
studies teacher,
Jenny Franzoi, and accompa-
nied at the awards ceremony
by Javin Tucker, Dater Gear
Up SCORES! college access
specialist.
Elder High School
Senior Ryan Murphy and
sophomore JakeTiernanhave
been recognized in the 90th
Scholastic Art and Writing
National Awards.
Murphyreceivedthe silver
medal for his portfolio of
eight compositions. Tiernan
receiveda silver medal for his
painting titled Confusion.
Bothstudents have beenin-
vited along with other Nation-
al Medalists to celebrate at a
Carnegie Hall ceremony in
New York City.
Mother of Mercy High
School
Hannah Siefert has been
selected as a national youth
correspondent to the 2013
Washington Journalism and
Media Conference to be held
held July 7-July 12 at George
Mason University.
Siefert joins a select group
of students from all over the
countryfor anintensive study
of journalism and media. She
was chosen based on academ-
ic accomplishments and a
demonstrated interest and ex-
cellence in journalism and
media studies.
Oak Hills High School
Abigail Rubemeyer has
been nominated to represent
Ohio as a National Youth Cor-
respondent to the 2013 Wash-
ington Journalism and Media
Conference at George Mason
University, held July 7
through July 12.
Rubemeyer has been
awarded the opportunity to
join a select group of 250 stu-
dents fromacross the country
to participate in an intensive
week-long study of journal-
ism and media. Rubemeyer
was chosen based on academ-
ic accomplishments and a
demonstrated interest and ex-
cellence in journalism and
media studies.
National Youth Correspon-
dents participate in hands-on,
experiential learning through
decision-making simulations
that challenge them to solve
problems and explore the cre-
ative, practical, and ethical
tensions inherent in journal-
ism and media. The experien-
tial portion of the program is
complemented by speakers
who are well-knownleaders in
the media community. Pre-
senters include prominent
journalists, chief executive
officers of major media out-
lets, researchers, and recent
college graduates successful-
ly entering the field. Last
years conference included
HodaKotb, ChuckTodd, Brian
Lamb and Neil Leifer.
The week-long program,
held at George Mason Univer-
sitys state-of-the-art campus,
encourages and inspires
youngleaders fromacross the
country who desire a unique
experience focused on suc-
cessful careers in the indus-
try.

Two Oak Hills students in


the early childhood education
programat the Diamond Oaks
Career Campus are headed to
state competition in April af-
ter qualifying at regional
Family, Career and Communi-
tyLeaders of America compe-
tition.
Alyssa Kaiser won a gold
medal for in the language and
literacy category. Trisha Kel-
logg won a gold medal in con-
cept and curriculum.
FCCLA is a nonprofit na-
tional career and technical
student organization for
youngmenandwomeninfam-
ily and consumer sciences
education in public and pri-
vate school.

Three Oak Hills High


School students attending Di-
amondOaks wonmedals inre-
gional SkillsUSAcompetition.
The regional event gave
students in career-technical
high school programs the
chance to test their skills and
be judged by professionals in
their field. They now move to
the state contest.
The winning Oak Hills stu-
dents are:
Justin Evans, a junior in
commercial/residential elec-
tricity who won a silver medal
in industrial motor control.
RobbKlawitter, a junior in
commercial/residential elec-
tricity who won a silver medal
in residential wiring.
Michael Warren, a senior
in sports rehabilitation and
therapywhowonasilver med-
al in the job skills demo event.
Students who win at state
competition will earn the
right to compete nationally.

Two Oak Hills students in


the early childhood education
programat the Diamond Oaks
Career Campus are headed to
state competition in April af-
ter qualifying at regional
Family, Career and Communi-
tyLeaders of America compe-
tition.
Alyssa Kaiser won a gold
medal for in the language and
literacy category. Trisha Kel-
logg won a gold medal in con-
cept and curriculum.
FCCLA is a nonprofit na-
tional career and technical
student organization for
youngmenandwomeninfam-
ily and consumer sciences
education in public and pri-
vate school.
SCHOOL NOTES
Pickett
T
heeighth-gradestudents
of St. Dominic School
presented a musical,
The Nifty Fifties, for the en-
joyment of their parents, sib-
lings, students and staff.
Set in a teen hangout known
as Louises Luncheonette, the
students had to find a place to
holdthe springdance since the
school gym is being remod-
eled.
Photo #1: Gage Hammann,
Mikki Thai, Corey Manhema
and Juliet Perrino at the lun-
cheonette.
Photo #3: Ziggy Springer
(AndrewWhite) performswith
his backup singers (Olivia
Murray, McKayla Listermann,
Renee Rodgers and Hannah
Doll).
Photo #4: Sinbad Galluci
(Dontius Brown) withthe beat-
niks (Michael Corcoran, Abby
Brinker, Livy Murray, Mike
Kirkendall, Jake Wells and An-
drew Ingle).
Sinbad Galluci (Dontius Brown) with the beatniks (Michael Corcoran, Abby Brinker, Livy Murray, Mike
Kirkendall, Jake Wells and Andrew Ingle) in St. DOminics play The Nifty Fifties. PROVIDED
The Nifty Fifties
Gage Hammann, Mikki Thai, Corey Manhema and Juliet Perrino at
the luncheonette during St. Dominics The Nifty Fifties. PROVIDED
A6 DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS JUNE 5, 2013
SPORTS SPORTS
HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL CommunityPress.com
COMMUNITY
PRESS Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573
cy left behind is their work ethic, em-
bracing of the teamphilosophy and they
reallyshowedtheunderclassmenwhat it
means to be a good teammate and howto
be dedicated. As a coach I cant ask for
more.
GREENTWP. There is no better feel-
ing for a track coach than being too busy
to watch all your student-athletes com-
pete in their respective events.
WhileOakHillsboys trackcoachBen
Hagemandidhisbest at theDivisionI re-
gional meet May 29-31 at the University
of Dayton, it had to be tough considering
the Highlanders had12 athletes compet-
ing in eight different events.
Its a lot of fun, the first-year head
coach said. As a coach its all about
the kids. Its really neat because it is a
payoff for all those winter workouts and
the work theyve put in all year long.
Of those 12 athletes, just one will
make the trip to Jesse Owens Memorial
Stadium on the campus of Ohio State
University June 7-8 for the state meet.
Senior Kevin Konkoly will return to
Columbus in the 400-meter dash, where
he finished seventh a season ago. Unfor-
tunately for Hageman and Konkoly, the
senior is dealing with an injured ham-
string for the second consecutive sea-
son, but he wouldnt let it stop him from
reaching his goal.
It was really one of the more unbe-
lievable performances that Ive seenina
while, Hageman said of Konkolys run
in the 400 at regionals. He came
around the curve at 100 meters and was
limping pretty bad. He ran the last 300
meters lame and was still able to finish
second and qualify (for state).
Thesenior has workedtoprevent said
injury from happening by changing his
diet and being very regimented in what
he does, so maybe its just bad luck.
... If there is anysilver liningto it, its
that hes been through (the injury) and
knowswhat todotoget ready,Hageman
said. When he pulled up you could hear
the thousands in the stands (gasp) and I
thought he was done, but he wasnt going
to quit.
Senior Blake Meyer finished seventh
in the 1,600-meter run and teammate
Ross Frondorf was 13th.
Konkoly, Meyer and Frondorf repre-
sent a senior class that will leave a last-
ing legacy on and off the track.
They will be sorely missed, Hage-
man said. They are a neat group on the
track but also academically. Their lega-
OHs Konkoly overcomes
injury to reach state
Kevin Konkoly of Oak Hills, center, leads
the pack in the men's 100-meter dash at
the 2013 Greater Miami Conference track
preliminary meet. Konkoly finished second
in the 400-meter dash at the Division I
regional meet in Dayton, May 31 to qualify
for state for the second consecutive
season. MELANIE LAUGHMAN/COMMUNITY PRESS
By TomSkeen
tskeen@communitypress.com
Blake Meyer of Oak Hills gains position on
his Colerain counterpart in the last leg of
the 4x800 relay in the May 15 Greater
Miami Confrence preliminary meet. Meyer
did not qualify for the state meet with a
seventh-place finish at the Division I
regional meet in Dayton, May 31. MELANIE
LAUGHMAN/COMMUNITY PRESS
Bill Redman distinctly recalls his
first reaction when seeing Loretta
Blaut practice basketball.
I told my brother (Kevin), If I
could get her to come out for track, I
couldmake her a state championhigh
jumper, the Seton assistant coach
said. So, far, it looks like it might
come true.
Blaut, a Seton junior in her first
year of high jumping, added another
record to her growing, glowing re-
sume whenshe wonthe DivisionI Re-
gion 4 championship with a jump of 5
feet, 8 inches. The previous record of
5-7was set in 1998.
Im just kind of in shock, Blaut
said. I never thought Id be here. I
feel really blessed and happy and
thankful.
The 6-foot-2 Blaut already had set
the school, Girls Greater Cincinnati
League and district record going into
Wednesdays competitionat Welcome
Stadium.
Blauts footwork, height and obvi-
ous jumping ability were some of the
factorsthat ledRedmantobelieveshe
could be a high jump force.
What I also saw was she was the
hardest workerontheteam,Redman
said.
Blaut really didnt know what to
think when Redman approached her.
I mostly just thought it would be
something fun to try, and I wanted to
do it to get better in basketball, she
said. Thats my passion in life. I love
it so much.
Blaut watched one video to learn
the technique and took it from there,
she said. Shes obviously a quick
learner.
Im just trying to take it one step
at a time and try not to get too crazy
with it, she said. Its something I en-
joyalot. I just trytojumpthebest that
I can.
Setons
Blaut sets
regional
record
By Gannett News Service
Track and field
The following qualified for the
state meet, which begins June 7 at
Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium on
the campus of The Ohio State Univer-
sity:
St. Xavier - Michael Hall, 800-
meter run, third place, 1,600-meter
run, first-place; Michael Vitucci,
1,600-meter run, second place; Zach
Lynett, 300-meter hurdles, second-
place; 4x800-meter relay team of Mi-
chael Vitucci, Jake Grabowski, Jax
Talbot and Michael Hall.
Elder- A.J. Burdine, discus, third
place; Joe Ratterman, pole vault, sec-
ond place.
Seton - Loretta Blaut, high jump,
first place.
Oak Hills Kevin Konkoly, 400-
meter dash, second place.
Taylor Lizzi Lakamp, 100-meter
hurdles, third-place, 300-meter hur-
dles, fourth place.
La Salle - Alex Murray, third
place, pole vault.
Tennis
The St. Xavier doubles team of
Matt SantenandMatt Dumalost inthe
first round of the Division I state ten-
nis tournament, May 31 at The Ohio
State University. After taking the
first set 4-6 over Rob DeMarco and
Mike OConnor of North Canton Hoo-
ver High School, Duma and Santen
lost the second set 6-1. The third set
went to a tiebreaker where the duo
lost 11-9 to lose the set 7-6.
TOURNAMENT
HIGHLIGHTS
By TomSkeen
tskeen@communitypress.com
PRICEHILL Sean Tierneys message
to his teamwas the same all season: Play
your best volleyball in May.
His Elder Panthers did just that to
make a run to the Division I state final
where they lost to Hilliard Darby in four
sets.
It was a challenge but our guys
really gutted it out, Tierney said. We
made a tremendous defensive effort and
what was most important throughout the
entire weekend is our team didnt quit.
They dug in and stayed aggressive.
What made the run so impressive is
the Panthers beat two teams along the
way who handed them losses earlier in
the season. In the state quarterfinals
they got by Cleveland St. Ignatius in five
sets toavengeastraight set loss April 27.
Next upwasBeavercreek, ateamwho
beat the Panthers in four sets at the Cen-
terville Tournament May 7. Elder lost a
tough first set 25-27 and the coach was
worried.
I was alittlefearful our spirits would
be broken, Tierney said. Once again
we bounced back and fired it back up.
The Panthers went on to win the next
three sets to advance to the finals.
Hilliard Darby beat Moeller whom
many thought was the state favorite in
the semifinals and had already beat El-
der twice in the regular season. After
losing the first two sets, Tierneys guys
fired back to take the third set 25-27 and
had Darby on the ropes in the fourth.
Trailing 24-22, the Panthers made it 24-
23beforerippingaserveout of boundsto
end the match at 25-23.
We didnt have any grand illusion
and knewDarby was a worthy opponent
and was favored by far, the coach said.
We talked about howwe had nothing to
lose and to come out swinging and stay
swinging no matter how the fight went.
Our heart and determination were in-
spiring and we fought hard until the
end.
While there is no doubt Tierney is dis-
appointed his squad didnt bring home a
title, considering his team battled to
overcome injury and inexperience from
the start of the season to the end, things
are all good in Price Hill.
It was kind of challenging to get
the guys to understand varsity is a dif-
ferent level, he said. You have to bring
the intensity to every set and every
match. Our goal was to be playing our
best volleyball at the end of the season
andI amextremelygrateful thingscame
together andour guys werent intimidat-
ed by teams we previously lost to, losing
a first set or going to a fifth set.
With nine juniors and three sopho-
mores along for the state ride, all things
point to another deep run in 2014.
Just for them to see the prepara-
tion that is necessary, to see the grueling
demand that state tournament has on
you physically, mentally and emotional-
ly will only pay dividends for our pro-
gramdown the road.
Panthers run ends in state volleyball finals
By TomSkeen
tskeen@communitypress.com
Elders Anthony
Stacklin gets way
up over the net to
slam home a kill
for the Panthers
during last years
state tournament.
Stacklin played a
key role in helping
the Panthers reach
the state finals for
the first time since
2010. BRANDON
SEVERN/FOR THE
COMMUNITY PRESS
R.J. Albers of Elder connects on his jump
serve during the 2012 state tournament.
Albers and his Panther teammates reached
the state finals for the first time since
winning the title in 2010. FILE PHOTO
JUNE 5, 2013 DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS A7 SPORTS & RECREATION
SIARI|N NLXI SUNDAY |N IPL LN0U|RLR AND 0N C|NC|NNAI|.C0N:
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Fathers Day Special
Dads Play Free All Day!*
*when accompanied by a full paying son/daughter
Sunday, June 16th
Enjoy a free picnic lunch
from 11am - 2pm!
Delhi Hills Par 3
1068 Ebenezer Road
Cincinnati, OH 45233
Phone: (513)941-9827
Visit us on the web at
www.delhihillspar3.com
TWISTERS TEAR UP TOURNAMENT
The Cincinnati West Twisters U13 soccer team are the Mid-American Soccer Classic
GU13 Silver Division champions, having won all four games. The girls scored 12 goals
against the other teams, allowing only one goal to be scored against them. In back
are Lexi Gerke, Jessica Horgan, Ashlynn Brooks, Lily Borgemenke, Sydney Carpenter,
Courtney Hatfield and Miranda House. In front are Emily Connor, Emily Soto, Amy
Anderson, Allie Schaefer, Miranda Jung, Marissa Jung and Hannah Knight. Teyah
McEntush is sitting on the ground. Their coach is Shellie Hatfield, not pictured. THANKS
TO CAROL JUNG
Five Star volleyball
The annual four-day
Five Star Volleyball camp
at Our Lady of Victory is
Aug. 5-8. Second- through
fourth-graders are sched-
uledfor4-5p.m.; fifth- and
sixth-gradersare5-7p.m.;
and seventh- and eighth-
graders are 7-9 p.m.
Only 24 spots per age
group are available.
Contact Betsy Jones at
emo52980@gmail.com, or
visit
www.fivestarvolleyball
.comfor registration
Softball summer
Oak Hills softball head
coach Jackie Cornelius-
Bedel and her staff will
conduct the Highlander
Softball Summer Camp
June17and18at OakHills
High School.
The clinic will be run
by current and former
college and professional
players and coaches en-
suring each player re-
ceives the highest quality
instruction available in
the area.
The clinic will focus on
all areas of fastpitch. Of-
fensive skills to be cov-
eredinclude hitting, bunt-
ing, slapping, base run-
ning. Defensive areas will
focus on both infield and
outfield skills.
Special drills for pitch-
ers and catchers will also
be available. Second
through fifth are 9-11:30
a.m., sixth through 10th
grades are 1-3:30 p.m.
each day.
For a registrationform
see www.oakhillssoftball-
.comor phone 703-6109
Challenger soccer
Challenger Sports is
having several of its Brit-
ish Soccer Camps in the
area:
Dater Montessori Soc-
cer, week of June 10.
Challengers 1,000
touches coaching sylla-
bus provides an innova-
tive daily regimen of foot-
skills, moves, juggling,
tactical practices and dai-
ly tournament play.
Visit www.challenger
sports.com.
SUMMER SPORTS CAMPS
Twenty-three high
school seniors fromOhio
have been awarded the
Chick Evans Caddie
Scholarship, a full tu-
ition and housing college
scholarship, beginning
this fall.
Evans Scholars are
golf caddies who were
selected based on four
criteria: A strong caddie
record, excellent aca-
demics, demonstratedfi-
nancial need and out-
standing character.
The students, whose
names are listed below,
were awarded scholar-
ships to either Ohio State
University in Columbus
or Miami University in
Oxford, where they will
liveintheEvans Scholar-
ship House. The scholar-
ship is valued at more
than $70,000 in four
years.
Scholarship funds
come mostly from con-
tributions by about
26,000 golfers across the
country, who are mem-
bers of the WGA Evans
Scholars Par Club. Evans
Scholars Alumni donate
more than $4 million an-
nually, and all proceeds
from the BMW Champi-
onship, the third of four
PGA TOUR Playoff
events in the PGA
TOURs FedExCup com-
petition, are donated to
Evans Scholars. Visit
www.wgaesf.org for
more information.
Listed below are the
local Chick Evans Schol-
arship recipients, who
were awarded the schol-
arship to either Ohio
State University or Mi-
ami University begin-
ning this fall, as well as
their hometown, high
school and sponsoring
golf or country club.
Joseph Hansman,
The Ohio State Univer-
sity, Milford High
School, Terrace Park
Country Club
Tyler Hauck, Ohio
State, Bethel-Tate High
School, Coldstream
Country Club
Dakota Kathman,
Ohio State, Oak Hills
High School, Western
Hills Country Club
Mykel Kilgore, Mi-
ami University, Indian
Hill High School, Ken-
wood Country Club
Tyler Martini, Ohio
State, Taylor High
School, Western Hills
Country Club
Sarah Smith, Ohio
State, Wyoming High
School, Maketewah
Country Club
Jesse Tenkman, Mi-
ami, La Salle High
School, Clovernook
Country Club
Golf caddies awarded
full tuition, housing
DELHI
PRESS
Delhi Press Editor
Marc Emral
memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264
Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday
See page A2 for additional contact information.
5556 Cheviot Road
Cincinnati, Ohio 45247
phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220
email: delhipress@communitypress.com
web site: www.communitypress.com
A publication of
VIEWPOINTS VIEWPOINTS
EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM CommunityPress.com
COMMUNITY
PRESS Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264
A8 DELHI PRESS JUNE 5, 2013
Braxton W. Campbell lived
in Delhi Village, where he
was a prominent figure in the
communitys development
from1887 to 1919. Then he
moved to Cincinnati and be-
came a prom-
inent figure
in the indus-
trial and fi-
nancial devel-
opments of
Cincinnati.
Born in
Covington,
Ky., on Nov.
22, 1851, he
was the son of
Morgan and
Sally Campbell. Braxton
attended the public schools
of Burlington, Ky. In 1869,
the 18 year old moved to Cin-
cinnati and worked as a clerk
in the candy factory of C. H.
Reinhardt and Co. Five years
later he was the companys
traveling salesman.
He quickly learned about
the business and in 1875 he
began representing DeCamp,
Perkins and Lavoy, harness
manufacturers. After four
years he had learned the
details of the industry and of
its market so well that he was
able to organize his own com-
pany.
In 1879, together with
Henry and William Perkins
he organized the Perkins-
Campbell Co., and became
vice president and general
sales manager. The company
was located on Main Street.
In 1886, they built a factory
at No. 622 Broadway. In 1904
Mr. Campbell bought out part
of the interest of both Camp-
bells and increased the capi-
talization from $250,000 to
$500,000, and became presi-
dent. In 1915, his sons W. B.
and Milton D. Campbell came
into the company and pur-
chased the remaining Per-
kins interests and became
respectively vice president
and secretary of the compa-
ny.
In 1887, he moved to 6410
River Road in Delhi Village.
He married Hattie deGarmo,
daughter of James and Hattie
(Carpenter) deGarmo of
Chillicothe, Mo. The couple
had two sons; Wendell B.
Campbell, born April 4, 1886,
and Milton D. Campbell, born
June 3, 1888. Braxton Camp-
bell served in every public
office in Delhi Village from
councilman to mayor for
some 20 years, and was chair-
man of the village commis-
sion.
His energy and enthusi-
asm lead him into many other
pursuits besides his own
company. He was a director
of the Dow Drug Co., the
Cincinnati Model Homes Co.,
the Braxton Hotel Co., the
Braxton W. Campbell Realty
Co., and, the Union Trust Co.
He took an active part in
civic affairs, serving as
president of the Manufactur-
ers Association of Cincinnati
and vice president of the
chamber of commerce. He
was a member of the Build-
ing Committee of the Hamil-
ton County Court House, and
chairman of the Ohio Com-
mittee of the Jamestown
Exhibition held at Norfolk,
Va. From1902 to 1907 he was
president of the Decatur
Street Railway Co. of Deca-
tur, Ill.
His fraternal affiliations
were with the Free and Ac-
cepted Masons, the Benevo-
lent and Protective Order of
Elks, the chamber of com-
merce, the Ohio Society of
New York, the Travelers Club
of New York, the Jersey Cat-
tle Club of New York. He was
a life member of the Cuvier
Press Club, and a member of
the Cincinnati Golf Club, the
Queen City Club, and the
Walnut Hills Business Mens
Club. His religious affiliation
was with the Walnut Hills
Methodist Episcopal Church.
Betty Kamuf is a winner of Griffin
Yeatman Award for Historical
Preservation. She lives in Sayler
Park. You can email her at
westnews@communitypress.com.
Campbell helped shape Delhi
Betty Kamuf
COMMUNITY PRESS
GUEST COLUMNIST
Jesus said, Let the little
children come to me, and do
not hinder them, for the king-
dom of heaven belongs to such
as these (Matt 19:14).
Mary Ann
Donelan is a
member of the
American
Council of the
Blind of Ohio,
Greater Cin-
cinnati Chap-
ter. It is a
group of peo-
ple who are
blind or visu-
ally impaired
who, with the assistance and
friendship of people who are
sighted, work hard to make life
better for all of us.
Mary Ann has been our
secretary since January 2012.
She is a resident of Fort Thom-
as, Ky., and has been a child
care worker since the age of
16. After graduating from high
school at Our Lady of Provi-
dence, she became formally
certified as a child care work-
er. Mary Ann really enjoys
taking care of her little 2-year-
olds (who happen to be some of
her favorite people), and, at
the end of the day, she has a
big smile on her face. She has
been a child care worker for 34
years now, and, yes, she still
has a big smile on her face at
the end of the day.
Mary Ann was born with a
visual impairment, a fact that
means she rides a bus to work
and that she uses a computer
with magnification features.
Most important, Mary Ann is a
member of a large family
whose members know how to
love, laugh, and give gener-
ously of themselves. Perhaps
her family experiences are
what make her such a caring,
dedicated, and competent
worker at the day-care center
where she works.
Mary Ann receives well-
deserved respect and appreci-
ation from her employer to say
nothing of the satisfaction she
receives from the children
who look to her for help and
guidance. Mary Ann loves to
tell the children stories, and
they love to hear her stories.
She sings songs with them, and
they hug her and call her, My
Mary. The little ones are ea-
ger to help her find her purse
and her jacket at the end of the
day, and then they cry when
she leaves.
On May 4 and May 5, Mary
Ann was one of 20 or so people
with visual impairments who
represented American Council
of the Blind of Ohio, Greater
Cincinnati Chapter, in the Fly-
ing Pig Marathon. She walked
a three-way and raised the
most money of any single
member for the chapter. A
three-way means finishing a
10K and a 5K on the first day
of the Flying Pig weekend
followed by a half marathon on
the second day.
Thanks, Mary Ann, for do-
ing so much good.
Joyce Rogers lives in Covedale.
Donelan,
dedicated
worker
and
volunteer
Joyce Rogers
COMMUNITY PRESS
GUEST COLUMNIST
Almost $3 billion dollars.
That is the estimated amount
of money seniors lose to
scams and financial exploita-
tion each year.
The extent
of these
crimes is not
completely
known as they
are often not
reported.
That may be
because sen-
iors do not
realize they
have been
victimized, or
are afraid or embarrassed to
tell anyone. If the scams and
exploitation continue, seniors
are left vulnerable to losing
their homes, life savings and
independence.
There are some scams that
are most commonly used
against the elderly.
Prizes and sweepstakes
where the senior is asked to
send money to cover taxes or
shipping in order to receive a
prize.
Investments or financial
products promising unre-
alistically high rates of re-
turn.
Charity contributions to
nonexistent charities or reli-
gions organizations.
Telemarketing calls sell-
ing bogus products or ser-
vices.
Fraudulent home and
auto repairs that require ad-
vanced deposits and often
result in work not started,
started but not finished or
substandard work.
Travel packages that are
low-cost but often provide
substandard accommodations.
A phone call fromsome-
one claiming to be the friend
of a grandchild or other rela-
tive, claiming their relative
has been in an accident or
arrested and needs money
wired to them.
Agreeing to help some-
one posing as a police officer
who asks for a bank or ATM
withdrawal in order to help
themcatch a crook.
Financial exploitation often
begins when seniors are
asked to financially help fam-
ily or caregivers. It can be
difficult to say no to an
adult child or grandchild,
even when giving themmon-
ey means there isnt enough
left to meet their own ex-
penses. In other instances, the
senior may be asked to sign a
deed, will, change in benefi-
ciaries, or co-sign a loan.
Family and caregivers are
responsible for more than
half of financial abuse cases,
but seniors can also be ex-
ploited by someone they know
and have come to trust. These
individuals will befriend a
senior, insinuate themselves
into their life and the exploita-
tion begins. Those being taken
advantage of may allowit to
continue because they fear
retaliation, being left alone
without help or being placed
in a nursing home.
Seniors, or those who are
concerned a senior is being
exploited or scammed and
need assistance, can contact
Cincinnati Area Senior Ser-
vices (CASS) 513-559-4483, or
email tcollins@cassdeliv-
ers.org. CASS can help begin
the process to stop the prob-
lem.
Knowing howto recognize
financial exploitation and
scams can help prevent sen-
iors frombecoming victims.
CASS and U.S. Bank are pre-
senting Financial Fraud of
the Elderly and Vulnerable
Adults to help seniors iden-
tify, prevent and stop finan-
cial abuse and fraud. This
programwill be held on Fri-
day, June 14, from10:30 a.m.
until noon at the Green Town-
ship Senior Center, 3620
Epley Road. The programis
open to anyone wanting to
knowmore about this issue.
For more information on
the programor reservations,
contact the Green Township
Senior Center at 513-385-
3780.
Tracey Collins, MSW, LSW is the
executive director of Cincinnati
Area Senior Services. CASS con-
nects older adults with the re-
sources to help them maintain
their independence. Information is
available at www.cassdelivers.org;
513-721-4330.
Elderly often targets of scams and frauds
Tracey Collins
COMMUNITY PRESS
GUEST COLUMNIST
The Place for Better Hear-
ingis joining the Better Hear-
ing Institute (BHI) in urging
Americas dads, granddads
and all men in Greater Cincin-
nati to get their hearing
checked dur-
ing Mens
Health Week,
which starts
June 10 and
runs through
Fathers Day,
June 16.
The Place
for Better
Hearings
efforts are
focused on
underscoring the importance
of mens hearing health to
their whole health and on
raising awareness of the link
between hearing loss and
several chronic diseases. Re-
search shows that men are
often reluctant to address
hearing loss. But what many
dont realize is that hearing
loss affects virtually every
aspect of a mans life from
relationships and intimacy to
job performance and earn-
ings. Unfortunately, most
doctors dont ask their pa-
tients if they have any hearing
problems. So its important
that we call attention to mens
hearing health today.
There are simple things
men can do to protect their
hearing, said audiologist
Stefanie Godbey. Listening to
their MP3 players at no more
than 50 percent maximum
volume and wearing earplugs
while at rock concerts, using
power tools, mowing the lawn,
and using leaf blowers are
just a fewexamples.
Sixty percent of the 34
million people with hearing
loss in the United States are
male. And hearing loss re-
mains one of the most com-
monly unaddressed health
conditions in America today.
In a 2010 study, BHI found
that people with untreated
hearing loss lose as much as
$30,000 in income annually,
depending on their degree of
hearing loss. The use of hear-
ing aids, however, was shown
to dramatically reduce the
risk of income loss and un-
employment.
Todays hearing aids do
make a difference. Three out
of four hearing aid users re-
port improvements in their
quality of life due to wearing
hearing aids. Some hearing
aid users who once com-
plained of tinnitus (ringing or
buzzing in the ears) report
that their tinnitus decreases
and sometimes is gone when
they wear their hearing aids.
And studies showthat when
people with even mild hearing
loss use hearing aids, they
improve their job perfor-
mance, increase their earning
potential, enhance their com-
munication skills, improve
their professional and inter-
personal relationships, and
stave off depression.
Advances in digital tech-
nology have dramatically
improved hearing aids in
recent years, making them
smaller with better sound
quality. Designs are modern,
sleek, and discreet. Clarity,
greater directionality, better
speech audibility in a variety
of environments, better cell
phone compatibility, less
whistling (feedback) than
hearing aids of the past, and
greater ruggedness for active
lifestyles are common fea-
tures.
More information about
hearing aids and hearing loss
is available at the Place for
Better Hearing and at their
website:
www.HearingBetter.net.
Laurie DeWine is an audiologist for
The Place for Better Hearing. Email
her at PBH@fuse.net; call 513-922-
0123 to make an appointment.
Dads, check your hearing during mens health week
Laurie DeWine
COMMUNITY PRESS
GUEST COLUMNIST
LIFE LIFE
PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES
COMMUNITY
PRESS
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 2013
Sayler Park World War II
Army Air Corps veteran Wil-
liam Bauer said it was a great
honor to be recognized for his
service by the Sayler Park His-
torical Society.
The 88-year-oldalongwith11
other veterans, including his
twin brother Jack Bauer who
was killed in action in World
War II, werehonoredbythehis-
torical society during a Memo-
rial Day celebration Tuesday,
May 21, at St. Lukes Chapel of
the Resurrection.
It was beautiful and really
appreciated, he said.
Along with the Bauers, the
historical society recognized
the following people:
DeweyFrederick Marine
Corps., Korean War
Albert Kelley Army,
World War II, killed in action
James Kelley Navy,
World War II, deceased
WilliamKelley Merchant
Marine, WorldWar II, deceased
Robert Kumpf Army,
World War II, deceased
Joseph Noppert Army,
World War II, deceased
Donald OShaughnessy
Army, World War II, deceased
Louis Smith Jr. Navy,
VietnamWar, deceased
Robert Smith Navy,
peace time, deceased
Frank Wells Sr. Navy,
World War II, deceased
At thechapel therewas adis-
play of photos of Sayler Park
veterans andacollectionof ser-
vice uniforms and medals dis-
played by Covington resident
Robert Snow. The ceremony in-
cluded prayers, songs per-
formed by the Eden Chapel
United Methodist Churchs
childrens choir and a recogni-
tion of veterans. The American
Legion Chambers Hautman
Budde Post 534 Color Guard
presented colors, had a 21-rifle
salute and taps was played.
These men sacrificed so
much for our freedom, His-
torical Society President Jack-
ie Litchfield Apted said. We
wanted to support those who
gave so much of their soul for
their fellowcountrymen.
GreenTownshipresident Gi-
gi Smith, 90, said she knewthat
the historical society was hon-
oring veterans but had no idea
her sons Louis and Robert were
included.
It was absolutely heart-
warming, she said. It was just
a wonderful gesture. It was a
nice honor but we honor them
anyway whether theyre here
or not.
The American Legion Chambers Hautman Budde Post 534 Color Guard stands at attention before a 21-rifle salute. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
Sayler Park veterans
honored at celebration
By Monica Boylson
mboylson@communitypress.com
Holding service awards from the Sayler Park Historical Society are, from left, Jinnie Kumpf for her late husband Robert Kumpf,
Korean War veteran Dewey Frederick, Katie Noppert for her late husband Joseph Noppert and Mary Rose O'Shaughnessy for her
late husband Donald O'Shaughnessy. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
Gigi Smith, 90, Green Township looks fondly at photos of her sons Louis
D. Smith, Jr. and Robert Smith who served in the Navy. MONICA
BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
Looking at a display of service uniforms are, from left, Tom Bauer, 75,
Green Township, Karen Bauer, 54, Lawrenceburg, Ind., and William
Bauer, 89, former Sayler Park resident. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
Dennis Mathey of American Legion Post 534
sounds taps at the Memorial Day ceremony in
Sayler Park. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
Sayler Park Historical Society President Jackie
Litchfield Apted recites a prayer at the ceremony.
MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
B2 DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS JUNE 5, 2013
THURSDAY, JUNE 6
Health / Wellness
Pre-Diabetes Class, 1-3 p.m.,
Mercy Hospital Western Hills,
3131 Queen City Ave., Informa-
tion on making healthy food
choices, exercise and blood
sugar control and monitoring
blood sugar levels. $20. Present-
ed by Mercy Health Partners.
956-3729; www.e-mercy.com.
Westwood.
FRIDAY, JUNE 7
Farmers Market
Sayler Park Farmers Market,
4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memori-
al Park, Parkland Avenue and
Monitor Street, Farmers Market
with home-grown items like
fruits, vegetables, desserts,
salsas, relishes, jam and olive oil.
Presented by Sayler Park Village
Council. 675-0496. Sayler Park.
Lettuce Eat Well Farmers
Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot
United Methodist Church, 3820
Westwood Northern Blvd.,
Locally produced food items.
Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat
Well. 481-1914; www.lewfm.org.
Cheviot.
Festivals
St. Antoninus Parish Festival,
6 p.m.-midnight, St. Antoninus
Parish, 1500 Linneman Road,
Music by The Polecats. Wine
available for purchase with ID
and wristband. Music, air-
conditioned casino, games and
rides. Alcohol with ID. Saturday
and Sunday: petting zoo, pony
rides and walking circus enter-
tainment. Free. 922-5400;
www.saintantoninus.org. Green
Township.
St. Bernard Summer Festival,
6 p.m.-midnight, St. Bernard
Church, 7130 Harrison Ave.,
Music by The Remains. Brats,
metts, hot dogs, hamburgers,
corn on the cob, City Barbeque
and NYPD Pizza available. Rides,
games and raffles. Beer garden
with alcohol available for pur-
chase with ID. Free. Through
June 9. 353-4207; www.bernard-
fest.com. Colerain Township.
Holy Family Church Festival,
6-11 p.m., Holy Family Church,
814 Hawthorne Ave., Food,
games, entertainment, DJ Pau;,
karaoke and bid-and-buy.
Through June 9. 921-7527. East
Price Hill.
Music - R&B
Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.,
Drews on the River, 4333 River
Road, $3. 451-1157; basictruth-
.webs.com. Riverside.
SATURDAY, JUNE 8
Art & Craft Classes
Sewing101, 9-11 a.m., Broad-
hope Art Collective, 3651 Harri-
son Ave., Learn to sew on sew-
ing machine. Leave with pillow
you have sewn yourself. All
materials provided. $50. Regis-
tration required. 225-8441;
www.broadhopeartcollective-
.com. Cheviot.
CLUBS & ORGANIZA-
TIONS
Block Party, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., The
Womens Connection Learning
Center, 4042 Glenway Ave.,
Corner of Glenway and Iliff
avenues. Bounce house, face
painting, clowns and
games.101.1 The Wiz broad-
casting live. Free. Presented by
The Womens Connection.
471-4673; www.thewomenscon-
nection.org. West Price Hill.
Exercise Classes
Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western
Sports Mall, 2323 Ferguson
Road, Racquetball Center. Group
cycling workout. Ages 14-99.
$8-$10. Presented by SpinFit LLC.
451-4920; www.spinfitcincinnat-
i.com. Westwood.
Festivals
St. Antoninus Parish Festival,
5:30 p.m.-midnight, St. Antoni-
nus Parish, Texas HoldEm Tour-
nament in undercroft. Music by
the Sullivan and Janszen Band.
Adults only. Free. 922-5400;
www.saintantoninus.org. Green
Township.
St. Bernard Summer Festival,
5 p.m.-12:30 a.m., St. Bernard
Church, Music by Ryan Broshear.
Free. 353-4207; www.bernard-
fest.com. Colerain Township.
Holy Family Church Festival,
5-11 p.m., Holy Family Church,
921-7527. East Price Hill.
Garden Clubs
Hillside Community Garden
Regular Gardening Day, 9
a.m.-noon, Hillside Community
Garden, 5701 Delhi Road, Gar-
den together in unique hillside
edible garden. All experience
levels welcome. Dress for weath-
er and bring water to drink.
Work gloves and boots recom-
mended. Other useful items are
pruning shears and shovels.
Free. Presented by Hillside
Community Garden Committee.
Through Nov. 2. 400-4511;
hillsidegardendelhi.com. Delhi
Township.
Home & Garden
Hamilton County Recycling
and Solid Waste District Yard
Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30
a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717
Bridgetown Road, Hamilton
County residents can drop off
yard trimmings for free. Free.
Presented by Hamilton County
Recycling and Solid Waste
District. 598-3089;
bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green Township.
Music - Pop
HowBizarre 90s Night, 8
p.m.-midnight, Cabana on the
River, 7445 Forbes Road, Free.
941-7442. Sayler Park.
Youth Sports
Youth Baseball League, 9
a.m.-4 p.m., Gamble-Nippert
YMCA, 3159 Montana Ave.,
Weekly through July 27. Base-
ball field. Instructional league
with goal of teaching funda-
mentals of baseball, such as
hitting, throwing and basic
game concepts. Ages 3-12. $90,
$50 members. Registration
required. 661-1105. Westwood.
SUNDAY, JUNE 9
Festivals
St. Antoninus Parish Festival,
4-10 p.m., St. Antoninus Par-
ish,Chicken dinner from The
Farm 57 p.m. Free. 922-5400;
www.saintantoninus.org. Green
Township.
St. Bernard Summer Festival,
2-10 p.m., St. Bernard Church,
Music by The Menus. Rons
Roost Chicken dinner 1-7 p.m.
$11. Free. 353-4207; www.ber-
nardfest.com. Colerain Town-
ship.
Holy Family Church Festival,
3-10 p.m., Holy Family Church,
921-7527. East Price Hill.
Home & Garden
Hamilton County Recycling
and Solid Waste District Yard
Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30
a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free.
598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green
Township.
MONDAY, JUNE 10
Exercise Classes
Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., West-
ern Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-
4920; www.spinfitcincinnat-
i.com. Westwood.
Summer Camps - Arts
Western Hills Music School of
Rock, 10-11 a.m., Western Hills
Music, 4310 Harrison Ave.,
Group classes to explore basics
of drums, bass, guitar, voice and
keyboards with other budding
rock stars. Monday-Friday. For
ages 7-12 and 12-17. $75. Regis-
tration required. 598-9000;
westernhills-music.com. Western
Hills.
Mini Pops Summer Strings, 6-8
p.m., Western Hills Music, 4310
Harrison Ave., Experience of an
ensemble with popular music
and opportunity to perform.
Must have two years experience.
Monday-Friday. Saturday dress
rehearsal and performance. For
ages 7-12 and adults. $125.
Registration required. 289-2575;
www.westernhills-music.com.
Western Hills.
Summer Camps - Sports
Soccer Unlimited Camps, 9
a.m.-noon, St. Antoninus School,
5425 Julmar Drive, Through
June 14. Soccer Unlimited & Jack
Hermans organize camps and
clinics to improve/maintain your
soccer talents by playing serious,
training with intensity, and
keeping the element of FUN
involved at all times. $79. Pre-
sented by Soccer Unlimited.
922-2500. Green Township.
TUESDAY, JUNE 11
Art & Craft Classes
Sewing101, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.,
Broadhope Art Collective, $50.
Registration required. 225-8441;
www.broadhopeartcollective-
.com. Cheviot.
Farmers Market
Sayler Park Farmers Market,
4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memori-
al Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park.
Music Education
Music for Munchkins, 10-11
a.m., College of Mount St.
Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road, Weekly
through July 16. CL25 in Music
Department. Children ages 4-6
learn basic fundamentals of
music through movement,
rhythm, singing, group partici-
pation and playing instruments.
$100. Registration required.
244-4235; www.msjmusicacade-
my.com. Delhi Township.
Senior Citizens
55+ Club for Seniors, 10:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m., Grace Lutheran
Church, 3628 Boudinot Ave.,
Farbach-Werner presentation.
Free. $8.75 for lunch. Regis-
tration required for lunch.
661-5166. Westwood.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12
Art & Craft Classes
Sewing101, 3:30-5:30 p.m.,
Broadhope Art Collective, $50.
Registration required. 225-8441;
www.broadhopeartcollective-
.com. Cheviot.
Exercise Classes
Gentle Ashtanga Vinyasa
Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnec-
tion, 370 Neeb Road, Moving
meditation, increasing strength
and flexibility, allowing for
calming of mind and refreshing
of spirit. Bring mat. $35 five-
class pass; $8 drop-In. Presented
by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725;
www.yogabymarietta.com.
Delhi Township.
Health / Wellness
Yoga Back Therapy, 6 p.m.,
EarthConnection, 370 Neeb
Road, Gentle yoga postures to
soothe the back. $30 for five-
class pass or $7 drop-in. Present-
ed by Yoga by Marietta. 675-
2725; www.yogabymarietta-
.com. Delhi Township.
Shoulder Talks, 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports
Medicine-West, 6480 Harrison
Ave., Dr. Robert Rolf speaks on
options for shoulder pain relief.
Includes refreshments. Free.
Registration required. 354-7635;
www.beaconortho.com. Green
Township.
On Stage - Childrens
Theater
Wump Mucket Puppets, 10:30-
11:30 a.m., Cheviot Branch
Library, 3711 Robb Ave., Puppet
show full of original songs.
Created and performed by
puppeteer Terrence Burke. Free.
Presented by Wump Mucket
Puppets. 370-9803; www.wump-
mucketpuppets.com. Cheviot.
Religious - Community
Wednesday Night Solutions,
7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside
Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave.,
Weekly interactive DVD presen-
tation hosted by Dr. Henry Cloud
and Dr. John Townsend. Variety
of topics addressing everyday
issues such as communication,
conflict and more. 922-7897;
www.cloudtownsend.com/
resources/solutions. Cheviot.
Free Community Meal, 5:30-
6:30 p.m., Central Church of
Christ, 3501 Cheviot Ave., Free.
481-5820; www.centralchurchof-
christ1.com. Westwood.
Senior Citizens
Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green
Township Senior Center, 3620
Epley Road, Modified Zumba for
seniors and beginners with
standing and chair participation.
For seniors. $3, $25 for 10 class-
es. Presented by Debs Fitness
Party. 205-5064; www.debs-
fitnessparty.com. Green Town-
ship.
Support Groups
Western Hills Job Search
Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m.,
Westwood First Presbyterian
Church, 3011 Harrison Ave.,
Community members welcome
to learn from and support each
other in job-seeking process.
Speakers present valuable
content about latest in electron-
ic resumes, LinkedIn, effective
networking, interview skills,
available funding and communi-
ty resources. Group members
provide support and account-
ability to one another during
this stressful time. Free. 608-
9359. Westwood.
THURSDAY, JUNE 13
Art & Craft Classes
An Evening of Needle Felting,
6-8 p.m., Broadhope Art Col-
lective, 3651 Harrison Ave.,
Learn how to needle felt and
experience magic of turning pile
of wool into finished project.
For ages 12 and up. $20. 225-
8441. Cheviot.
Fanciful Fairies, Noon-2 p.m.,
Broadhope Art Collective, 3651
Harrison Ave., Make your own
tiny fairy to be hung as deco-
ration or to play with. All sup-
plies included. $20. 225-8441;
www.broadhopeartcollective-
.com. Cheviot.
FRIDAY, JUNE 14
Farmers Market
Sayler Park Farmers Market,
4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memori-
al Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park.
Lettuce Eat Well Farmers
Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot
United Methodist Church, Free.
481-1914; www.lewfm.org.
Cheviot.
Festivals
St. Martin of Tours Festival, 6
p.m.-midnight, Harvest Home
Park, 3961 North Bend Road,
Games for children and adults,
rides and raffles. Hamburgers,
bratts, metts and more available
for purchase. Beer available
with wristband. Presented by St.
Martin of Tours. 661-2000;
www.saintmartin.org. Cheviot.
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
Art & Craft Classes
Sewing101, 9-11 a.m., Broad-
hope Art Collective, $50. Regis-
tration required. 225-8441;
www.broadhopeartcollective-
.com. Cheviot.
Craft Shows
Craft Showand Vendor Event,
10 a.m.-3 p.m., Delhi Hills Baptist
Church, 5421 Foley Road, Tup-
perware, crafts, jewelry, food,
cosmetics and more. To raise
money for paving parking lot at
church. Free. 375-8808. Delhi
Township.
Exercise Classes
Spinning, 9-10 a.m., Western
Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-4920;
www.spinfitcincinnati.com.
Westwood.
Festivals
St. Martin of Tours Festival, 5
p.m.-midnight, Harvest Home
Park, 661-2000; www.saintmarti-
n.org. Cheviot.
Garden Clubs
Hillside Community Garden
Regular Gardening Day, 9
a.m.-noon, Hillside Community
Garden, Free. 400-4511; hillside-
gardendelhi.com. Delhi Town-
ship.
Home & Garden
Hamilton County Recycling
and Solid Waste District Yard
Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30
a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free.
598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green
Township.
Music - Blues
Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna
Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Jim &
Jacks on the River, 3456 River
Road, $4. 251-7977. Riverside.
Music - Classic Rock
The Gamut, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.,
Drews on the River, 4333 River
Road, $3. 451-1157; www.drew-
sontheriver.com. Riverside.
Music - Concerts
Sizzlin Summer Concert
Series, 7-9 p.m., Fernbank Park,
60 Thornton Ave., River City
Rewind. Bring seating. Free.
Presented by Hamilton County
Park District. 521-7275;
www.greatparks.org. Sayler
Park.
SUNDAY, JUNE 16
Festivals
St. Martin of Tours Festival,
3-10 p.m., Harvest Home Park,
661-2000; www.saintmartin.org.
Cheviot.
Home & Garden
Hamilton County Recycling
and Solid Waste District Yard
Trimmings Drop-Off, 11:30
a.m.-5 p.m., Kuliga Park, Free.
598-3089; bit.ly/11UQb9r. Green
Township.
MONDAY, JUNE 17
Exercise Classes
Spinning, 5:45-6:45 p.m., West-
ern Sports Mall, $8-$10. 451-
4920; www.spinfitcincinnat-
i.com. Westwood.
Summer Camps - Arts
Cincinnati Young Peoples
Theatre Pre-Program- Sum-
mer Drama Camp, 9 a.m.-2
p.m., Covedale Center for the
Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway
Ave., Session One: Summer
Drama classes (Musical Theatre
Session). Daily through June 21.
Final performance is free at 3
p.m. June 17. Acting, improvisa-
tion, theatre skills, music and
final performance on stage.
Program features experienced
instructors. Ages 10-13. $100.
Registration required. 241-6550;
www.cincinnatilandmarkpro-
ductions.com. West Price Hill.
Western Hills Music School of
Rock, 10-11 a.m., Western Hills
Music, $75. Registration re-
quired. 598-9000; westernhills-
music.com. Western Hills.
Aca-fabulous Vocal Day
Camp, 6-8 p.m., Western Hills
Music, 4310 Harrison Ave., Join a
capella ensemble singing new
and old music to entice any age.
Opportunity to perform on
stage. Monday-Friday. Saturday
dress rehearsal and perfor-
mance. For grades 7-12 and
adults. $125. Registration re-
quired. 289-2575; www.west-
ernhills-music.com. Western
Hills.
TUESDAY, JUNE 18
Art & Craft Classes
Sewing101, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.,
Broadhope Art Collective, $50.
Registration required. 225-8441;
www.broadhopeartcollective-
.com. Cheviot.
Farmers Market
Sayler Park Farmers Market,
4-7 p.m., Nelson Sayler Memori-
al Park, 675-0496. Sayler Park.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19
Art & Craft Classes
Sewing101, 3:30-5:30 p.m.,
Broadhope Art Collective, $50.
Registration required. 225-8441;
www.broadhopeartcollective-
.com. Cheviot.
Exercise Classes
Gentle Ashtanga Vinyasa
Yoga, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnec-
tion, $35 five-class pass; $8
drop-In. 675-2725; www.yoga-
bymarietta.com. Delhi Town-
ship.
Health / Wellness
Yoga Back Therapy, 6 p.m.,
EarthConnection, $30 for five-
class pass or $7 drop-in. 675-
2725; www.yogabymarietta-
.com. Delhi Township.
Religious - Community
Wednesday Night Solutions,
7-8:30 p.m., Vineyard Westside
Church, 922-7897; www.cloud-
townsend.com/resources/solu-
tions. Cheviot.
Free Community Meal, 5:30-
6:30 p.m., Central Church of
Christ, Free. 481-5820; www.cen-
tralchurchofchrist1.com. West-
wood.
Senior Citizens
Zumba Gold, 1-2 p.m., Green
Township Senior Center, $3, $25
for 10 classes. 205-5064;
www.debsfitnessparty.com.
Green Township.
Support Groups
Western Hills Job Search
Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m.,
Westwood First Presbyterian
Church, Free. 608-9359. West-
wood.
THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD
The annual Holy Family Festival is 6-11 p.m. Friday, June 7, 5-11 p.m. Saturday, June 8, and 3-10 p.m. Sunday, June 9, at the
church, 814 Hawthorne Ave. in East Price Hill. For more information, call 921-7527. FILE PHOTO.
ABOUT CALENDAR
To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click
on Share! Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com
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Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more
calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a
menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.
JUNE 5, 2013 DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS B3 LIFE
Eagle Savings
CE-0000556716
Anne G. Banta D.D.S.
General Dentistry
Ofering New Patient Specials!
The practice ofers an array of
oral health services for children and adults.
Professional
cleanings and
exams
Digital X-rays
Porcelain Veneers
Dental Sealants
Fillings
Crown and Bridge
Implant
Restorations
Oral appliance
therapy for treating
snoring and sleep
apnea
Oral cancer
screenings
Complete and
partial Dentures
Teeth Whitening
Dr. Banta received her Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from The Ohio State
University. She has been practicing dentistry in Greater Cincinnati for over 25
years, formerly an associate of The Dental Practice of Dr. Corbitt & Dr. Banta.
Anne G. Banta D.D.S., General Dentistry,
is a state-of-the art practice focusing on
high-quality dentistry and patient experience.
The ofce is located at
5680 Bridgetown Rd., Suite B, Cincinnati Oh 45248.
Dr. Banta was selected by her peers to be included in
2013 top Dentists which was featured in
Cincinnati Magazines February issue.
For APPOINTMENTS CALL 513.574.2444
www.AnneBantaDDS.com
CE-0000557140
Thanks to all of you
who stopped to chat
while I was cooking up
fun food with my friend
and Price Hill Kroger
executive chef Deb
Goulding at the Taste of
Cincinnati. This was a
new venue for Taste. We
were in the P&G pavilion
surrounded by upscale
restaurants offering
amazing food. Our demo
featured natural foods,
including Debs gazpacho
with basil crme fraiche
and my tabouleh. The
students
from our
various
culinary
schools
helped
prepped
our food
for 150
servings,
and they
did a won-
derful job,
chopping and mincing
ingredients to perfection.
My familys
tabouleh
This is the time of
year I pick wild grape
leaves for scooping up
tabouleh. You also can
use leaf lettuce. This is a
go to taste recipe, won-
derful as a main or side
dish, or stuffed into pita
for a sandwich. I keep
tweaking the recipe and
heres my latest. Tabou-
leh uses bulghur cracked
wheat (great for lower-
ing cholesterol and a
good source of fiber).
Every family has their
own version. (Check out
my blog for the tabouleh
video).
1 cup bulghur cracked
wheat, No. 2 grind
5 mediumtomatoes,
chopped fine, skin left on
1 bunch green onions, sliced
thin, white and green
parts
1 bunch parsley, chopped
fine
1 small bunch radishes,
chopped fine (optional)
1 large English cucumber,
chopped fine, skin left on
1 bell pepper, chopped fine
Cumin to taste, start with1
teaspoon
Handful chopped mint and
basil (optional)
Salt and pepper
Olive, corn or safflower oil
to taste (start with 4
tablespoons)
Lemon juice to taste
Place wheat in bowl
and rinse under cool
water three times. (Why
three times? Because my
mom said so!). Leave
about a
1
4 inch of water
after the third rinse on
top of the wheat to soften
it. Let sit for 15-20 min-
utes, until water is ab-
sorbed and wheat is ten-
der. Squeeze to drain any
remaining liquid out.
Meanwhile, mix vegeta-
bles: Add all vegetables
in large bowl, mixing
gently. Add cumin, mint,
basil and salt and pepper.
Add wheat, and mix well.
Add oil, a little at a time,
and mix. Taste for sea-
sonings. Add lemon juice
to taste.
Tip fromRitas
Kitchen
Be sure and buy
cracked wheat that also
says bulghur on the
label so that it reconsti-
tutes in cool water easily.
Jungle Jims sells several
grinds. I like the No. 2
grind.
Deb Gouldings
gazpacho with basil
crme fraiche
Debs recipe is on my
blog at Cincinnati.Com/
blogs.
Mashed potato
cakes with garlic
Boiling potatoes in
their skins helps prevent
sogginess. The egg holds
potato mixture together.
1 pound Yukon gold
potatoes, unpeeled
3 tablespoons butter,
softened plus extra for
frying
1 teaspoon minced garlic or
to taste (optional)
Palmful chopped parsley
(optional)
Salt and pepper
1 large egg, lightly beaten
Oil, about 1 tablespoon
Cover potatoes with
cold water and cook until
tender. Drain and cool
just until they can be
handled and peeled.
While still warm, mash
and stir in butter, garlic,
parsley, salt and pepper.
Then add egg, combining
well. Form
1
2 cupfuls into
four four-inch cakes. (If
you want to chill for 30
minutes or so before or
after forming patties,
that is OK.). Add 3 table-
spoons butter and oil to
skillet over medium-low
heat. After butter quits
foaming, add cakes and
cook about 5 minutes on
each side, or until golden,
adding more butter if
necessary.
South-of-the-border
cinnamon sugar
sprinkle
For the reader who
had pine nut sugar cook-
ies in Santa Fe, topped
with a sugar, cinnamon
and cocoa mixture. I
cant forget the haunting
flavor of the topping and
want to make some cook-
ies, she said.
Mix together
1 cup granulated sugar
1 generous tablespoon of
cinnamon
1 tablespoon cocoa powder
Can you help?
Carlos Restaurants
chicken. Francine L. wants
to make her husband a spe-
cial birthday dinner, like the
chicken dish from Carlos
restaurant in Florence, now
closed. He loved it so much
that when they sat down,
the waitress would auto-
matically ask if he wanted
Carlos chicken. His heart
is broken now that its
closed.
Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an
herbalist, educator and author.
Find her blog online at Cincin-
nati.Com/blogs. Email her at
columns@communitypress.com
with Ritas kitchen in the
subject line. Call 513-248-7130,
ext. 356.
Rita shares Taste of
Cincinnati recipes
Ritas family
tabouleh
recipe is
chock full of
fresh
vegetables.
THANKS TO
RITA
HEIKENFELD.
Rita
Heikenfeld
RITAS KITCHEN
Golfers are invited
to form foursomes
and pack their clubs
to join in the fun and
fundraising at The
Womens Connection
fourth annual golf
outing at Aston Oaks
Golf Club, North
Bend, on Friday, June
28.
The purpose of
the golf outing is
threefold, explained
Sister of Charity
Thelma Schlomer,
who is co-chair with
Tom Gates. It is an
opportunity to get the
word out about The
Womens Connection,
a neighborhood agen-
cy that does good
work with local wom-
en and girls. Its also a
chance to have a good
time hanging out with
family and friends,
enjoying an afternoon
of golf and a nice din-
ner. And lastly, you
can do all that while
supporting a worthy
cause.
Prizes will be
awarded in both the
mens and womens
categories to the golf-
ers closest to the pin,
with the longest
drive, with the long-
est putt, and to the
foursome with the
best overall score.
The cost is $100 for
anindividual; $400 for
a foursome. Registra-
tion includes greens
fees, golf cart, lunch,
dinner, beverage
tickets and a gift bag.
Mulligans will also be
for sale. Non-golfers
can come for dinner
for only $30. The din-
ner will also feature a
giant split-the-pot,
lottery tree, barrel of
cheer and a basket
raffle. Lunch and
check-in begin at
noon, with a shotgun
start and Scramble
starting at 1:30.
To register or for
more information,
contact Aimee at 513-
471-4673 or ashin
kle@thewomenscon
nection.org. Compa-
nies or individuals in-
terested in sponsor-
inga hole at the outing
can also contact Ai-
mee.
The Womens Con-
nection has been com-
mitted to strengthen-
ing families in the lo-
cal community since
its opening in May
1997. The center fo-
cuses on empowering
and educating women
andgirls tomakegood
choices that lead to
positive change in
their lives. Learn
more about The Wom-
ens Connection at
www.thewomenscon
nection.org.
Golfing helps
Womens
Connection
B4 DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS JUNE 5, 2013 LIFE
FAST SERVICE
Is Your Mower OK?
14 Point Service Special!
Price Hill
Mower Service
Since 1957
Visit Us Online At: http://pricehillradiator.com
FREE
Pick-Up
-n-
D
elivery
Seniors D
iscount
Complete lawn mower service and repair
on all makes and models.
We Specialize in Service!
$55.95 plus parts
921-8380
4535 W. 8th Street at Overlook
CE-0000549986
www.corcoranharnist.com
921-2227
CE-0000553283
Corcoran
&
Harnist
Heating &
Air Conditioning Inc.
Serving Delhi & Western Hills
for over 32 years.
A Name You Can Trust
CE-0000556387
(859) 904-4640
www.bryanthvac.com
No Breakdown A/C Tune-up
$64.95
If your system breaks down during the
next six months, we will REFUND you the
cost of the tune-up guaranteed*
(859) 904-4640
*Offer expires 6/12/13. Some restrictions apply. Call for details.
$64.95 refunded per system serviced. Breakdown must be diagnosed
and repaired by Bryant HVAC, Inc. Not valid with any other offers or
promotion with existing customers.
Great for golf outings.
C
E
-
0
0
0
0
5
5
8
4
0
7
9 hole , Par 31 - very walkable
Course is in excellent shape
Weekend play is available
Some Riding Carts are available
Beer, Drinks, and food available
at the Clubhouse
Have your outing with us!
Fernbank
Golf Course
7036 Fernbank Ave.
941-9960
10 (9-hole) rounds for $75
June 15th 2013 thru Oct. 15 2013
Good Any Day. Not valid for League Play or Special Events
2013 Special Offer
Please bring this ad to redeem this Special Offer
Liberty Missionary
Baptist Church
"Where Everybody is Somebody"
1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502
Rev. Kendell Hopper
Sunday School - 10:00 am
Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am
Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm
Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm
DELHI HILLS BAPTIST
CHURCH
Come Hear The Story of Jesus
5421 Foley Rd. 513-922-8363
Rev. Bob Overberg
Sunday School..................................10:00a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ..................11:00a.m.
Wednesday Evening Bible Study .........7:00p.m.
SOUTHERN BAPTIST
SHILOH
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
5261 Foley Rd. / Cincinnati, Ohio 45238
513-451-3600 www.shilohumc.com
WORSHIP TIMES
Saturday @ 5:30 pm
Sunday @ 9:30 am & 11:00 am
NORTH BEND UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
123 Symmes Ave. North Bend, OH 45202
One block off Route 50, Phone 941-3061
Small, friendly, casual, blended music, Bible
based messages that connect with real life.
Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am
UNITED METHODIST
St. Peter & St. Paul
United Church of Christ
3001 Queen City Ave. 513-661-3745
Rev. Martin Westermeyer, Pastor
Bible Study: 9 am
Worship & Church School: 10 am
Dial-A-Devotion 426-8957
www.stpeterandstpaulucc.org
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Nursery Care Avail.
Come and worship in a small casual church that
emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the
community and globally.
www.oakhillspc.com
OAK HILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
6233 Werk Rd.
(Enter off Werkridge)
922-5448
Rev. Jerry Hill
10:00 a.m Worship & Sunday School
PRESBYTERIAN
Weve seen it for
years, companies call
and offer to come to your
home and clean your
carpets for a great price.
But what you receive
is not what you thought
you were getting. So,
before you sign up, there
are several questions you
need to ask.
Maureen Cleary of
Springfield Township
received a call to clean
her carpets froma firm
she had used in the past,
but which is nowunder
newownership. She
agreed to have them
clean, but they didnt
showup for the appoint-
ment. They didnt show
up until several days
later.
They just called
when they were in the
driveway and said,
Were here to clean the
carpets. I said. Its Sun-
day. But I had enough
time to have themclean
the carpet. I thought Id
rather get it clean than
have to reschedule,
Cleary said.
It cost her $93 for the
cleaning, which she paid
by check. But, the next
morning
Cleary
found
problems.
The spots
where the
carpet is
not dry,
there are
large
brown
spots in
various places all around
the carpet, she said.
Cleary called the com-
pany; a technician came
out and tried, unsuccess-
fully, to clean the spots
by hand. Cleary said he
then told her, Dont
worry, its not a problem.
We can get this out. Ill be
back on Wednesday with
the machine and Ill have
it taken care of. Dont
worry about it; its going
to come out.
Unfortunately, Cleary
said no one came back to
get out the stains. She
called the company again
and asked themto send
over the same people
who had successfully
cleaned the carpets in the
past. But, she says, she
got no response to that
request either.
They certainly didnt
clean the carpet. Its
worse than it ever was. I
never had stains like this
on the carpet. There
were no stains, period ...
Theyre not taking care
of this. Theyre not an-
swering the phone.
Theyre not communicat-
ing. Theyre taking no
responsibility whatso-
ever, Cleary said.
So I contacted the
carpet cleaning company
and, eventually, a tech-
nician came back and
re-cleaned the carpets.
But Cleary said while
they look better, some
spots remain and she
wants her money back. I
told the company and its
nowagreed to refund her
money and replace pad-
ding so the spots dis-
appear.
To protect yourself
when hiring a company
to do work around your
home, first get a copy of
the firms liability insur-
ance policy. Do that be-
fore you hire thembe-
cause trying to get it
later, after theres a prob-
lem, can be difficult.
Remember, you need to
have that policy so you
can file a claimif the
company damages your
property.
In addition, when
hiring a carpet cleaning
company ask if it is pro-
viding its own high volt-
age electricity, or just
plugging into your house
current. It should pro-
vide its own power in
order to dry your carpets
properly so such spot
dont appear.
Finally, dont pay the
company with a check.
Instead, pay with a credit
card so you can dispute
the charge if theres a
problem.
Howard Ain answers consum-
er complaints weekdays on
WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to
him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906
Highland Ave., Cincinnati
45219.
Protect yourself when hiring carpet cleaner
Howard
Ain
HEY HOWARD!
If you are having a festival and
it is not listed, email your
information to memral@com-
munitypress.com.
Assumption, 1500 McMackin
Ave., Mount Healthy
Family Fun All Weekend
Friday, June 7, 6 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, June 8, 5 p.m.-mid-
night
Sunday, June 9, Noon-10 p.m.
Fish dinner Friday; Saturday
hamburgers, brats, metts, fried
foods, corn, sauerkraut balls,
funnel cakes and more; old
fashion chicken dinner Sunday
Fireworks Saturday
Elvis Show on Sunday
Live bands every night
Beer and wine coolers with ID
513-521-7274
St. Antoninus, 1500 Linne-
man Road, Green Township
Cirque du St. A
Friday, June 7, 6 p.m.-midnight
(adults only)
Saturday, June 8, 5:30 p.m.-
midnight
Sunday, June 9, 4 p.m.-10 p.m.
Food available: burgers, brats,
metts, wings and more.
Sunday: Chicken dinner from
The Farm from 5-7 p.m.
Music: Friday The Polecats;
Saturday The Sullivan &
Janszen Band
Other Entertainment: The Big
Show, presented by the Cincin-
nati Circus Company Saturday
and Sunday from 6:30-7:30
p.m.; Saturday and Sunday: live
petting zoo, pony rides, walk-
ing circus entertainment.
Texas HoldEm Tournament in
the undercroft Saturday
Alcohol with ID and wristband
(wine served Friday night)
513-922-5400
St. Bernard, 7130 Harrison
Ave., Taylors Creek
Summer Festival 2013
Friday, June 7, 6 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, June 8, 5 p.m.-12:30
a.m.
Sunday, June 9, 2-10 p.m.
Food Available: brats, metts,
hotdogs, hamburgers, corn on
the cob and more. City Bar-
beque and NYPD Pizza avail-
able.
Rons Roost chicken dinner
Sunday (1-7 p.m. $11)
Live music all weekend: Friday
The Remains; Saturday Ryan
Broshear; Sunday The Menus
Beer Garden
Alcohol with ID, wristbands
513-353-4207
Holy Family, 3006 W. Eighth
St. Price Hill
Friday, June 7, 6 p.m.-11 p.m.
Saturday, June 8, 5 p.m.-11 p.m.
Sunday, June 9, 3 p.m.-10 p.m.
Food available
Spaghetti dinner Saturday
Chicken dinner Sunday
Friday Karaoke; Saturday
Live Band
513-921-7527
St. Martin of Tours, Harvest
Home Park, 3961 North Bend
Road, Cheviot
Friday, June 14, 6 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, June 15, 5 p.m.-
midnight
Sunday, June 16, 3-10 p.m.
Food Available: hamburgers,
bratts, metts and more
Beer with wristband
513-661-2000
Catholic Kolping Society
Schuetzenfest, 10235 Mill
Road, Springfield Township
Shooting of the Eagle to select a
king for next year
Friday, July 19, 6 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, July 20, 4 p.m.-mid-
night
Sunday, July 21, 2-10 p.m.
Live German music
Food Available: brats, metts,
goetta burgers, hamburgers
Chicken and pork dinners
Saturday and Sunday
Beer garden with wristband, ID
513-851-7951
St. Joseph, 25 E. Harrison
Ave., North Bend
Friday, July 19, 6-11:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 20, 5:30-11:30
p.m.
Sunday, July 21, 3-10 p.m.
Food available: hamburgers,
hotdogs, brats, corn, pizza,
fish, french fries and ice cream
Alcohol with ID, wristband
513-941-3661
St. James the Greater, 3565
Hubble Road, White Oak
Parish family festival with live
music
Friday, July 26, 6 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, July 27, 5:30 p.m.-
midnight
Sunday, July 28, 4-10:30 pm
Food available
Beer and margarita with ID,
wristband; wine garden
513-741-5300
Our Lady of Lourdes, Glen-
way Avenue and Muddy Creek
Road, Westwood
Family festival
Friday, July 26, 6 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, July 27, 5 p.m.-mid-
night
Sunday, July 28, 4-10 p.m.
Food available: chicken dinner
Sunday (3-7 p.m.)
Beer garden with ID, wristband
513-922-0715
St. Aloysius on-the-Ohio,
6207 Portage St., Sayler Park
Riverboats
Friday, Aug. 2, 6-11:30 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 3, 5-11:30 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 4, 4-10:30 p.m.
Food available: burgers, hot-
dogs, brats, metts, fish, famous
chicken livers and chicken
dinner Sunday at 4 p.m.
Alcohol with ID, wristband
513-941-3445
St. Teresa of Avila, 1175
Overlook Ave., Price Hill
Friday, Aug. 2, 6:30-11:30 p.m.
Reds night theme
Saturday, Aug. 3, 5-11:30 p.m.
Bahama night theme
Sunday, Aug. 4, 4-10 p.m.
Green and white out theme
Food Available: LaRosas Pizza,
Skyline Chili, ice cream and
more.
Chicken Dinner from The Farm
Sunday from 4-7 p.m.
Beer and mixed slush drinks
with ID, wristband
513-921-9200
Our Lady of Visitation, 3180
South Road, Green Township
Friday, Aug. 9, 6:30-11 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 10, 5 p.m.-
midnight
Sunday, Aug. 11, 4-11 p.m.
Live music: Sullivan Janszen
Band Friday; Naked Karate
Girls Saturday
Food available: hot dogs, bur-
gers, cheese conies, fries,
grilled chicken sandwiches,
brats and metts. spaghetti
dinner Sunday (4 p.m.)
Beer with ID, wristband
513-922-2056
St. John the Baptist, 5361
Dry Ridge Road, Colerain
Township
St. Johns Family Festival
Friday, Aug. 16, 7 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, Aug. 17, 6 p.m.-
midnight
Sunday, Aug. 18, noon-10 p.m.
Food available: country style
chicken dinner Sunday (11:30
a.m.-6:30 p.m.)
Alcohol with ID, wristband
513-385-8010
St. William, 4125 St. William
Ave., Price Hill
Friday, Aug. 16, 6-11 p.m. (adults
only)
Saturday, Aug. 17, 6-11 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 18, 5-10 p.m.
Food available: great barbeque
Friday and Saturday; Chicken
dinner Sunday
Alcohol with ID, wristband
513-921-0247
St. Ignatius Loyola, 5222
North Bend Road, Monfort
Heights
Festival 2013
Friday, Aug. 23, 6 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, Aug. 24, 4 p.m.-
midnight
Sunday, Aug. 25, 4-11 p.m.
Food available: abrbeque
chicken, metts, burgers, LaRo-
sas pizza, chicken tenders,
fries, baked potatoes and
Skyline
Beer with ID, wristband
513-661-6565
St. John Neumann, 12191
Mill Road, Springfield Town-
ship
Friday, Aug. 30, 6 p.m.-midnight
Saturday, Aug. 31, 4 p.m.-
midnight
Sunday, Sept. 1, 3-11 p.m.
Food available: pulled pork
Saturday
Chicken dinner Sunday
Alcohol with ID, wristband
513-742-0953
St. Margaret Mary, 1830 W.
Galbraith Road, North College
Hill
Saturday, Aug.31, 4 p.m.-mid-
night
Sunday, Sept. 1, 3-11 p.m.
Food available: chicken dinner
Sunday (3-8 p.m.)
Alcohol with Id charge $2
admission
513-521-7387
Source: http://www.catholic
cincinnati.org/
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Sewing Quilting Fiber Art
CE-0000556889
Delhi Twp. Police Lt.
Darryl Haussler said he
has accomplished all his
goals in the police depart-
ment and is ready to turn
in his uniform after 22
years.
I wanted to become a
lieutenant, work my way
up through the ranks, he
said. Since I cant really
becomethechief, itstime
to move on to something
else. I feel like its time
for a newchallenge and a
newchapter in life.
He said hes interested
in working in corporate
security. His last day at
the police department is
June 1.
Im going to miss be-
ing able to work with the
public and to help people
in a crisis situation, he
said. I enjoyhelpingpeo-
ple.
He said it is the small
things that he will look
back on in his career with
the force.
Sometimes you have
no idea that youve made
an impact, he said. A
mother who had lost a
childcamebacktometwo
years later and brought
me flowers thanking me
for the way I comforted
her at that time. That was
two years later on the an-
niversary of his death.
Haussler, who has five
children, saidhestill hasa
pressed flower from the
bouquet that he keeps in
his office. He said it is
those moments that make
himrealizethat what heis
doing is worthwhile.
It makes me feel good
to know Ive made an im-
pact on someones life,
the Delhi resident said.
But police work wasnt
his first career choice.
The 48-year-old start-
ed his career in the Army.
He served active duty
from 1983 to 1987; was in
the National Guard from
1987 to 1988; left for a
short time to pursue po-
lice work and then was in
the Army Reserve in1994
to 1995.
He said it was his work
intheArmythat prepared
himfor police work.
I was used to doing
something different ev-
ery day, he said. I need-
ed a job that would be ex-
citing and that would hold
my interest. At the time, I
didnt want to be stuckbe-
hind a desk.
He started his police
careerasacorrectionsof-
ficer at the Hamilton
County Jail in 1987. From
1988 to1991he workedfor
theColerainTownshipPo-
lice Department and then
moved to the Delhi dce
Department.
While he was an offi-
cer at Colerain and Delhi,
Haussler also was on the
Hamilton County Police
Association SWAT team,
a combined 14 years.
Ive had a very re-
warding career, he said.
I reallyfeel like I accom-
plished something. I just
never dreamed it would
go this quickly.
When Haussler re-
tires, he said he wants to
restore a classic car and
spend more time with his
family.
Im still going to pur-
sue another career, he
said. I cant sit around
thehouseall day. Ill drive
my wife crazy.
Police lieutenant ready for a new job
Delhi Police Lt. Darryl Haussler, 48, works his last few days at the Delhi Township Police
Department before he retires. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
Delhi Lt. Darryl
Haussler last day
was June 1
By Monica Boylson
mboylson@communitypress.com
support of my family.
Theyre usually more
than willing to help, he
said.
He said he has experi-
ence in a range of cases
includingpersonal injury,
foreclosure, wills and
debt collection. As a solo
practitioner, Curry said
he envisions his practice
to specialize in estate
planning.
I also want to develop
some seminars. Ive
talked with the Delhi Li-
brary about doing an edu-
cational series about
planning for the future,
hesaid. I want toeducate
peopleinthecommunity.
He is also interested in
offering free estate plan-
ning for Delhi Township
police, fire and military
personnel.
I just enjoy helping
people, he said.
Delhi Twp. Mount Ad-
ams resident Adam Cur-
ry, 28, never had any
plans to become an attor-
ney, though his parents
may have thought other-
wise.
My parents thought I
would make a good law-
yer because I liked to ar-
gue, he saidandlaughed.
As a kid, I was always
taking arguments to the
next level, so they defi-
nitely thought it was
something I would be
good at.
But he became an at-
torney and has now
opened his practice at
4953 Delhi Road in Delhi.
He follows in the foot-
steps of his late grandfa-
ther Richard Curry Sr.
who was also an attorney.
My grandpa always
used to claim that he de-
fended the last train rob-
ber, he said.
Curry said that his
grandfather represented
a train conductor in an in-
teresting case.
The conductor was
showing off the train to
his girlfriend when she
pushedit intogearandthe
train crashed and caused
all sorts of damage, he
said. So, he always
claimed that he defended
the last train robber.
Despite his grandfa-
ther being an attorney,
Curry said it wasnt until
he went to London to
study during college that
he found his calling.
In my junior year at
Ohio State I was in the
study abroad program. It
was a pre-lawprogramat
Oxford University, he
said. We studied Ameri-
canandEnglishlaw. After
that, I was pretty sure
that was somethingI real-
ly wanted to do.
Curry grew up in
Green Township, gradu-
ated from Oak Hills High
School in 2003, earned a
bachelors degree inpolit-
ical sciencefromtheOhio
State University in 2007,
graduatedfromMichigan
State University College
of Lawin 2010 and passed
the bar examin July 2010.
He said he never imag-
ined he would have his
own practice only a few
years after passing the
bar exam.
I wouldnt have been
able to do this without the
And Curry has some
big plans for his practice
in the next five years.
I want tohireaparale-
gal, partnerupwithsome-
bodyandhave a firmwith
several attorneys, he
said.
He is currently work-
ing to establish a satellite
office in West Chester
and has plans for one in
Blue Ash.
In the meantime, he
hopes to serve as a re-
source to Delhi Township.
I want Delhi residents
to be comfortable enough
to come to me if theyhave
questions, he said. If I
cant help somebody, Ill
find somebody who will.
Fore more information
about Curry, visit
www.adamcurrylaw.com
. He is available by ap-
pointment and can be
reached at 560-2326.
Adam Curry recently opened his law office at 4953 Delhi
Road. MONICA BOYLSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS
By Monica Boylson
mboylson@communitypress.com
Lawyer takes root in Delhi Township
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WilliamBechtol
William B. Bechtol, 84, Delhi
Township, died May 27. He was
a scheduler with Schenley
Distillers.
Survived by wife Alberta
Bert Bechtol; daughter Terry
Huth; grandchildren Lisa Evans,
Scott (Tracy), Eric, Colleen Huth
and two others; four great-
grandchildren. Preceded in
death by children John, Mi-
chael, Mary Bechtol.
Services were May 31 at St.
Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt,
Stermer & Anderson Funeral
Home. Memorials to St. Dominic
Church, Hospice of Cincinnati or
St. Rita School for the Deaf.
Joseph Emmrich
Joseph A. Emmrich, 88, died
May 28. He owned a trailer
park.
Survived by children Judy
(Mike) Flynn, Joe (the late
Cheryl Minniear), Bob, Tim
(Brenda), Nancy (Mollie Doug-
lass), Dave Emmrich; grand-
children Jill, Kevin, Kim, Colette,
Haley, Andy; great-grand-
children Allie, Alex, Adam,
Scott, Natalie, Conner, Clare,
Scarlet; niece Marsha Ezrow,
nephew Mark Radel. Preceded
in death by wife Virginia Gin-
ny Emmrich.
Services were June 1 at St.
Lawrence Church. Arrange-
ments by Radel Funeral Home.
Memorials to: St. Lawrence
Education Fund, 3680 Warsaw
Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.
Terry Greene
Terry W.
Greene, 61,
died May 29.
He was a
shipping clerk
with Bax
Global.
Survived by
sons Terry L.,
Jeremy (Katie)
Greene; grandchildren Bailey,
Molly, Max; siblings William,
Phillip, Rhonda, Vera, Brenda,
Barb; brothers- and sisters-in-
law Bob, Junior, Johnny, Betty,
Kelly, Mischelle, Colleen; many
nieces and nephews. Preceded
in death by wife Billie Jean
Greene, brother Curtis, sister-in-
law Diann.
Services were June 1 at Vitt,
Stermer & Anderson Funeral
Home. Memorials to the Amer-
ican Cancer Society.
Aleda Justice
Aleda Thompson Justice, 77,
East Price Hill, died May 22. She
was an assembler for Kenner
Toy Company.
Survived by daughter Phyllis
(Timothy)
Ryan; grand-
children Brian
Kelly, Tamara
Fiorito, Andrea
Hofmeyer, Tim
Ryan; sisters
Martha Gul-
lion, Rose
Deaton, Mary
Jane Cochran; seven great-
grandchildren. Preceded in
death by husband James Justice,
siblings.
Services were May 28 at
Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral
Home. Memorials to the Amer-
ican Cancer Society.
Virginia Linger
Virginia Boimann Linger, 84,
West Price Hill, died May 26,
Survived by husband John
Linger; children Tom (Becky),
Bob (Pam) Linger, Barb (Joe)
West; grandchildren Becky
(Brandon) Noble, Jessica, Jacob,
Jason Linger, Caitlin (Andrew)
Baker, Taylor
West; great-
grandsons
Max, Oliver
Noble; broth-
er- and sister-
in-law Ray-
mond Mueller,
Norma Boi-
mann; many
nieces and nephews.
Services were May 29 at
Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle
Funeral Home.
Vickie Schierloh
Vickie
Reeves Schier-
loh, 53, Cov-
edale, died
May 29.
Survived by
husband
Gerry Schier-
loh; children
Elizabeth
(Dustin Kieffer), Andrea, Mark
(Ruth Ann Potter) Andriola II,
Samantha Schierloh; grand-
children Robert III, Olivia
ORourke, Carmen, Mark III
Andriola; best friend Glenda
Smith. Preceded in death by
parents Edger, Elizabeth Reeves.
Services were June 3 at Vitt,
Stermer & Anderson Funeral
Home.
Bill Schueler
Wilfred Edward Bill Schuel-
er, 88, died May 26. He was
co-owner of Schuelers Seven
Kitchens and Wedding Halls,
and V.I.P. Pizza.
Survived by wife Juanita
Schueler; children Pam (Lloyd)
Thompson, Kim Schueler;
grandchildren Zachary Thomp-
son, Darcie (Trent) Sutherland,
Breeze (Adam) Walter, Tara
(Steven) Sherman; great-grand-
children Wyatt, Wayde Suther-
land, Alanah Walter, Stevie,
Lexie Sherman; brother Donald
(Jackie) Schueler. Preceded in
death by brother Arthur (Mar-
garet) Schueler.
Arrangements by Bolton &
Lunsford Funeral Home. Memo-
rials to Pilgrim United Church of
Christ.
Judy Siler
Judy Massey Siler, 68, for-
merly of Delhi Township, died
May 23. She was a certified
nursing assistant with Ivy
Woods.
Survived by husband Carl
Siler; children Debbie (Bob)
Grau, Vince (Tricia) Siler, Carl
(Lynn) Massey; 12 grandchil-
dren; eight great-grandchildren.
Services were May 25 at Vitt,
Stermer & Anderson Funeral
Home.
Patrick Tierney
Patrick T. Tierney, 61, West
Price Hill, died
May 24. She
was a su-
pervisor for
the Cincinnati
Water Works.
Survived by
wife Ruth
Tierney; chil-
dren Sean
(Robyn) Tierney, Jill (David)
Hudak, Bridget (Mark) McChris-
tian; mother Betty Ann Tierney;
siblings Timothy, Colleen, Mau-
reen Tierney; six grandchildren;
niece and nephews. Preceded in
death by father James Tierney.
Services were May 31 at St.
Teresa of Avila. Arrangements
by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funer-
al Home. Memorials to: Elder
High School, 3900 Vincent Ave.,
Cincinnati, OH 45205 or DCI Inc.,
499 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati,
OH 45206.
DEATHS
DELHI TOWNSHIP
Incidents/reports
Thefts
Purse, keys and taser stolen at
1116 Timbervalley Court, May
15.
Phone and change stolen at 1128
Timbervalley Court, May 15.
Purse, baseball bag, jewelry and
other items stolen at 1111
Timbervalley Court, May 15.
Window shattered, wallet stolen
at 664 Sundance Drive, May 15.
Suspect trespassed on roof,
removed lightbulb and then
attempted to get the owner to
pay him to fix it at 4862 Delhi
Road, May 16.
Tools stolen at 432 Wilke Drive,
May 18.
Narcotic patch stolen from
resident at 990 Bayley Place ,
May 18.
GPS razor and tools stolen at 443
Wilke Drive, May 18.
MP3 player/headphones stolen
at 5157 Cleves Warsaw, May 19.
GPS stolen at 4439 Foley Road,
May 17.
Lawn equipment stolen at 602
Ivyhill Drive, May 19.
Tent and camping supplies
stolen at 4724 Delhi Road, May
19.
CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3
Arrests/citations
Allison Murray, born 1983, drug
abuse, misdemeanor drug
possession, possession of drug
paraphernalia, 912 Purcell Ave.,
May 20.
Antonio Clemons, born 1975,
drug abuse, having a weapon
under disability, misdemeanor
drug possession, possession of
drug paraphernalia, trafficking,
755 Woodlawn Ave., May 24.
Bennett Lamb, born 1982,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, 2302 Wyoming Ave., May
22.
Blaine A. Long, born 1966,
criminal trespassing, theft
under $300, 3609 Warsaw Ave.,
May 20.
Brandon House, born 1984,
criminal trespassing, 3201
Warsaw Ave., May 25.
Brian D. Grady, born 1984,
domestic violence, 3216 War-
saw Ave., May 23.
Caitlin Marie Smith, born 1993,
drug abuse, misdemeanor drug
possession, possession of drug
paraphernalia, 1211 McKeone
Ave., May 25.
Carlos Johnson, born 1976,
falsification, 810 Summit Ave.,
May 25.
Charles D. Delph, born 1974,
domestic violence, obstructing
official business, theft under
$300, violation of a temporary
protection order, 3003 W.
Eighth St., May 27.
Chaz Black, born 1983, aggravat-
ed menacing, criminal damag-
ing or endangering, having a
weapon under disability, ob-
structing official business,
resisting arrest, 3749 Glenway
Ave., May 26.
Courtney N. Mackey, born 1981,
felonious assault, 1020 Seton
Ave., May 20.
Curtis Beasley, born 1968, crimi-
nal damaging or endangering,
4628 Joana Place, May 23.
David N. Hardy, born 1973,
simple assault, 3201 Warsaw
Ave., May 16.
Donald L. Wright, born 1989,
possession of drug abuse
instruments, 3410 Warsaw Ave.,
May 27.
Ebony Campbell, born 1984,
domestic violence, 1258 Beech
Ave., May 24.
Grant Jason Mitchell, born 1977,
possession of an open flask,
possession of drugs, 3629
Glenway Ave., May 18.
James Edward Sweet, born 1967,
criminal trespassing, 5243
Glenway Ave., May 25.
James Elwood Miller, born 1963,
possession of an open flask,
4420 Glenway Ave., May 19.
James Vincent Harrison, born
1963, violation of a temporary
protection order, 3788 West-
mont Drive, May 22.
Jimmy D. Bowling, born 1972,
assault, 6313 River Road, May
23.
Julian Norman, born 1979,
domestic violence, 1100 Rut-
ledge Ave., May 24.
Kyle Patrick McNamara, born
1994, aggravated burglary,
drug abuse, misdemeanor drug
possession, possession of drug
paraphernalia, underage
possession of beer or liquor,
4338 W. Eighth St., May 22.
Ledavid Beasley, born 1989,
possession of drugs, 5000
Glenway Ave., May 17.
Michael ONeal, born 1992,
murder, 545 Elberon Ave., May
23.
Montez Washington, born 1984,
disorderly conduct, 3201 War-
saw Ave., May 17.
Nathan Underwood, born 1986,
assault, 5251 Glenway Ave.,
May 23.
Philip A. Abney, born 1986,
obstructing official business,
800 Rosemont Ave., May 27.
Rhonda R. Taylor, born 1974,
theft under $300, 1011 Morado
Drive, May 21.
Ryan T. Gamble, born 1985,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, 1146 Nancy Lee Lane, May
20.
Tim Darden, born 1993, pos-
session of drugs, 3901 Glenway
Ave., May 19.
Timothy Mitchell, born 1972,
criminal trespassing, 3753
Warsaw Ave., May 18.
Tommy Kessler, born 1943,
disorderly conduct, 3766 War-
saw Ave., May 25.
Triana Hill, born 1989, assault,
obstructing official business,
1100 Rosemont Ave., May 27.
Valerie L. Buchert, born 1977,
criminal damaging or en-
dangering, domestic violence,
6332 Hillside Ave., May 28.
William Mitchell, born 1988,
misdemeanor drug possession,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, 3611 Warsaw Ave., May 26.
Incidents/reports
Abduction
4000 Glenway Ave., May 21.
Aggravated menacing
3003 W. Eighth St., May 19.
Assault
1253 Quebec Road, May 23.
3120 Lehman Road, May 19.
3300 Warsaw Ave., May 18.
331 Rosemont Ave., May 20.
3400 Glenway Ave., May 20.
3419 W. Liberty St., May 18.
3648 Glenway Ave., May 17.
3767 St. Lawrence Ave., May 22.
424 Elberon Ave., May 20.
529 Elberon Ave., May 19.
536 Purcell Ave., May 20.
941 Grand Ave., May 20.
6340 River Road, May 23.
6360 Revere Ave., May 23.
1256 Rutledge Ave., May 20.
1266 Rutledge Ave., May 18.
4323 Glenway Ave., May 23.
4356 Dunham Lane, May 17.
Breaking and entering
1030 Seton Ave., May 19.
3454 Price Ave., May 23.
3644 Warsaw Ave., May 22.
Burglary
1862 Provincial Court, May 18.
2917 Price Ave., May 23.
106 Vienna Woods Drive, May
21.
1258 Rutledge Ave., May 20.
1266 Sliker Ave., May 20.
1870 Sunset Ave., May 19.
4753 Rapid Run Road, May 17.
Criminal
damaging/endangering
2601 Ring Place, May 17.
2701 Lehman Road, May 18.
3609 Warsaw Ave., May 22.
387 Grand Ave., May 23.
430 Elberon Ave., May 20.
529 Elberon Ave., May 19.
1013 Schiff Ave., May 20.
1117 Winfield Ave., May 17.
1237 Beech Ave., May 19.
5000 Glenway Ave., May 23.
740 Rosemont Ave., May 20.
Domestic violence
Reported on Lehman Road, May
18.
Reported on Grand Avenue,
May 21.
Reported on Rutledge Avenue,
May 23.
Reported on North Overlook
Avenue, May 18.
Felonious assault
526 Woodlawn Ave., May 17.
1964 Sunset Lane, May 19.
Gross sexual imposition
Reported on Willnet Drive, May
22.
Menacing
3609 Warsaw Ave., May 19.
120 Twain Ave., May 20.
Rape
Reported on Glenway Ave., May
21.
Robbery
6340 River Road, May 18.
4366 Dunham Lane, May 18.
Theft
3050 Mickey Ave., May 21.
3431 Warsaw Ave., May 17.
3783 Warsaw Ave., May 23.
622 Hawthorne Ave., May 20.
706 Mount Hope Ave., May 24.
POLICE REPORTS
ABOUT OBITUARIES
Basic obituary information and a color photograph of
your loved one is published without charge by The Com-
munity Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission
form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or
pricing details.
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ABOUT POLICE REPORTS
The Community Press publishes the names of all adults
charged with offenses. The information is a matter of
public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.
To contact your local police department:
Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060
Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300
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Cheviot The Eagle
Riders from the Cheviot
Fraternal Order of Ea-
gles are once again invit-
ing bikers to join themin
revving up their motor-
cycles to help World War
II veterans get to Wash-
ington, D.C.
The Eagles are spon-
soring its third annual
Honor Run benefiting
Honor Flight Tri-State, a
nonprofit group whose
mission is to fly as many
World War II veterans as
possible to the nations
capital to see their me-
morial. HonorFlight cov-
ers all the costs for the
veterans who take the
trip.
This years run is set
for Saturday, June 15.
Registration begins at 10
a.m.
Its our time to serve
those who served for our
freedom, said Cheviot
resident Irene Viltrakis,
a member of the Eagles
ladies auxiliary and co-
chair of the Eagle Riders
with her husband, Rome.
We cant say thank
you enough to those
guys. They gave till it
hurt sometimes, and we
all owe them.
Described as a scram-
ble, she said the 100-mile
motorcycle ride will
start intheCheviot muni-
cipal parking lot at Har-
rison and Glenmore ave-
nues. Motorcyclists will
depart at noon in groups
in 15-minute intervals.
She said the ride fea-
tures scheduled stops at
the Lebanon, Hamilton
West and Mount Healthy
Fraternal Order of Ea-
gles clubs, and then Kel-
lers Cafe in Cheviot be-
fore ending at the Chevi-
ot Fraternal Order of Ea-
gles club where dinner
will be served.
The Eagles will host a
party after the dinner
featuring live music by
the Power Piggz. The
party will also include
raffles and door prizes,
Mrs. Viltrakis said.
Cheviot Mayor Samu-
el Keller, a board mem-
ber of Honor Flight Tri-
State and co-chair of the
motorcycle run, said all
the proceeds from the
run go directly toward
helping veterans get to
D.C.
Weve raised some
great money doing this
run, he said.
Each year it gets big-
gerandbigger. Itsagood
day and a lot of fun.
Viltrakis said the run
is $15 per person and $25
per couple, which in-
cludes the ride, dinner
and after party. Those
who only want to attend
the dinner and party can
do so for $10 per person.
She hopes to have 100
to 200 motorcyclists take
part in the ride, and she
said she would like to
raise at least $5,000 this
year for Honor Flight.
Viltrakis said, I think
what they do is so spe-
cial. All of our WorldWar
II veterans deserve to
see their memorial.
For more informa-
tion, visit www.chev io-
teagles.com/eagle-rid
ers.html or email Viltra-
kis at iviltra-
kis@fuse.net.
The Eagle Riders
from the
Cheviot
Fraternal Order
of Eagles will
host their third
annual
motorcycle ride
benefiting
Honor Flight
Tri-State on
Saturday, June
15. The ride
begins at the
Cheviot city lot
near the corner
of Harrison and
Glenmore
avenues. THANKS
TO IRENE VILTRAKIS
Eagle Riders saddling up to
help Honor Flight Tri-State
By Kurt Backscheider
kbackscheider@communitypress.com
Summer park
programs in Delhi
Twp.
The Delhi Parks and
RecreationDepartment is
getting ready for summer
programs and are taking
registrations.
There will be adven-
ture days, arts and crafts
and other sports pro-
grams available all sum-
mer. Most programs are
$15 per child. Summer
camp begins Monday,
June 10, and continues
through Thursday, Aug. 1.
Cost is $15 per week per
child.
For more information
or to register, call the
parks department at 451-
3300 or visit www.delhi.o-
h.us.
Imago hosting
Mulberry Fest
The Imago Earth Cen-
ter, 700 Enright Ave., will
host aMulberryFest from
1-5 p.m. Saturday, June 8.
Spring brings with it
many edible delights.
Imago is celebrating
the arrival of spring, the
edible mulberry and also
the need to deal with
springs more invasive
and annoying plants.
Along with homemade
treats of mulberries and
other spring berries, Ima-
go will present a variety
of useful methods for
dealing with invasive
plants.
The family-friendly
event will include a culi-
nary competition be-
tween local cooks to see
who can create foods us-
ing invasive plants like
garlicmustardandhoney-
suckle; Devin Schenk will
present a workshop on
how to handle invasive
plants; clever crafts using
honeysuckle art for the
whole family; and a con-
test to collect the most
garlicmustardandeuony-
mus.
Prizes will be awarded.
The cost is $10 per per-
son and $15 per family.
Womens
Connection hosting
block party
The Womens Connec-
tion hosting a neighbor-
hood Block Party to kick
off the start of summer.
The block party will be
11a.m.-3p.m. outsideof its
Learning Center, 4022
Glenway Ave. The party
is to celebrate the start of
summer and and learn
more about programs and
services the center pro-
vides for the women and
girls of Price Hill. There
will be games including a
bounce house, bean bag
toss, water balloon toss,
and hula hooping. Local
radio station, the Wiz,
101.1, will be broadcasting
live fromthe block party.
Complimentary food
and prizes will also be
part of the day.
This event is free and
open to the public. For
more information, con-
tact Aimee Shinkle at 513-
471-4673 ext. 12 or email
ashinkle@thewomens
conection.org.
The Womens Connec-
tion is a neighborhood
center servingthewomen
and girls of the west side
of Cincinnati. The center
is committed to educating
and empowering women
and girls to make good
choices that lead to a posi-
tive change in their lives.
Established in 1997, The
Womens Connection,
4042 Glenway Ave., as-
sisted over 1,000 women
and girls. For more infor-
mation go to the website
at www.thewomenscon-
nection.org.
8th-graders explore
career options
Eighth-graders from
all three of Oak Hills Lo-
cal School Districts mid-
dle schools recently visit-
ed Bridgetown Middle
School to talk with area
business professionals
and learn about a variety
of careers.
The career fair gave
students a chance to have
one-on-one time with ex-
perts in the profession of
their choice.
With a number of busi-
nesses andindustries rep-
resented, studentshadthe
opportunity to explore
many career options and
questions of the exhibi-
tors.
When asked what she
learned at the fair, Holly
Reuss said, I learnedthat
no matter what your job
is, you are always impor-
tant in society and you
should just do the best job
you can do.
EmilyMetz, alanguage
arts teacher at Bridge-
town, coordinatedthefair.
We want to thank the
many parents, business
partners, alumni, board
members and community
members who came out to
represent their career
and interact with our stu-
dents, she said.
This experience real-
ly opens their eyes to the
variety of possibilities
that their future holds.
Elder senior lauded
for his poetry
Elder senior Kory
Smith recently entered
two poems in the Cincin-
nati Public Librarys Teen
Poetry Contest, and won
an award for each.
His poem Steilhand-
granate won second
place, and A Call to the
Dance Floor won honor-
able mention.
Smith wrote Steil-
handgranate as an as-
signment for Dave Reir-
ings senior English class.
He wrote A Call to the
DanceFloorasanassign-
ment for GregAligs stud-
ies in poetry class.
Help for grief
There are 43 losses
from the death of a loved
one to major financial
changes that produce
the range of emotions
known as grief. The Grief
Recovery Method Out-
reach Program, offered
by the Crossroads Hos-
pice Charitable Founda-
tion, helps people move
beyond the pain of any
loss and achieve healing.
This 12-week program
starts from 1-3 p.m.
Thursday, June 6, at
Union Church, Delhi, 1085
Neeb Road. Sessions are
every Thursday after-
noon; there is no charge
for the program or ma-
terials.
To register, contact Be-
reavement Coordinator
Donna Hartmann at 513-
793-5070 or donna.hart
mann@crossroadshos
pice.com.
DevelopedbytheGrief
Recovery Institute, the
program creates a safe
environment to learn how
losses affect people, and
howtomovepast thegrief
and pain through new ac-
tions. A trained and certi-
fiedmoderator leads each
session.
See summer skies at
Astronomical
Society
Just in time for vaca-
tion, learn your way
around the night skies of
summer.
For the next install-
ment of the Cincinnati As-
tronomical Societys CAS
Second Saturdays pro-
gram, society member
Mike Smith will present a
tour of the stars, planets
and constellations of the
summer sky.
The program begins at
8 p.m. Saturday, June 8, at
the society headquarters,
5274 Zion Road in Cleves.
Thesocietyhostsanas-
tronomyprogramthesec-
ond Saturday of every
month, and invites fam-
ilies, students, teachers,
scouts and anyone with a
sense of wonder about the
solar system, galaxy or
universe.
After Smiths presen-
tation, astronomers will
be on hand to answer
questions, show how tele-
scopes work and help
those in attendance view
the night sky through the
societys array of tele-
scopes.
No reservations are re-
quired. Admission is free,
but donations are accept-
ed.
The programis open to
all ages.
Visit www.cinastro.org
for more information.
BRIEFLY
B8 DELHI-PRICE HILL PRESS JUNE 5, 2013 LIFE
HAVING TROUBLE
P AYI NG YOUR MORT GAGE ?
WERE HERE TO HELP.
The State of Ohio provides free assistance for homeowners to help them stay in their homes.
Save the Dream Ohio is administered by the Ohio Housing Finance Agency and funded by the
U.S. Department of the Treasurys Hardest Hit Fund. Its safe, secure andavailable at nocost.
APPLY NOW FOR UP TO $35,000.
Note: Applicants must meet eligibility requirements related to income, assets and hardship. Participation is contigent upon mortgage service approval.
OHIOHOUSING
FINANCEAGENCY
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To place your BINGO ad
call 513.242.4000
LEGAL NOTICE
DELHI TOWNSHIP
ZONING
COMMISSION
CASE ZC2013-1
The Delhi Township
Zoning Commission
will hold a public
hearing on an appli-
cation for an amend-
ment to the map of
the Delhi Township
Zoning Resolution on
Wednesday evening,
June 19, 2013 at
7:00 PM at the Delhi
Township Administra-
tion Building, located
at 934 Neeb Road,
Delhi Township,
Hamilton County,
Ohio (Cincinnati,
45233). This applica-
tion, filed by Develop-
ment Planning, Inc.
(agent for optionee),
and Charles E. Mitch-
ell, Trustee (property
owner), proposes
amending the zoning
classification of the
properties known as
6066, 6072 & 6088
Cleves Warsaw Road
(Hamilton County Au-
ditor Parcels 540-
0113-0003, 0006 &
007) from "A2" Resi-
dence District to "DD"
Planned Multiple
Residence District.
The Hamilton County
Auditors current tax
list shows Charles E.
Mitchell, Trustee as
the owner of 6066,
6072 & 6088 Cleves
Warsaw Road (Ham-
ilton County Auditor
Parcels 540-0113-
0003, 0006 & 007).
The proposed zoning
amendment would
accommodate devel-
opment of the subject
premises as nine (9)
detached single-
family dwellings. Af-
ter conclusion of the
hearing before the
Delhi Township Zon-
ing Commission this
matter will be submit-
ted to the Delhi
Township Board of
Trustees for its ac-
tion. This amendment
application is on file
at the Delhi Township
Department of Devel-
opment Services,
697 Neeb Road (Del-
hi Township Fire
Headquarters), Delhi
Township, Hamilton
County, Ohio (Cincin-
nati, 45233), and can
be reviewed between
the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
on regular business
days for at least ten
days prior to the pub-
lic hearing on this ap-
plication. As Zoning
Administrator/Inspect
or, Thomas R. Stahl-
heber is responsible
for giving notification
of this hearing by
publication and mail
on behalf of the Delhi
Township Zoning
Commission.
ThomasR.Stahlheber
Director
Department of Devel-
opment Services
1001764642
A large, white cement
wall surrounding one side
of Phillips Swim Club lay
bare for years.
I hadthis ideafloating
around since last sum-
mer, said Brendan
Haehnle, a senior from
Bridgetown majoring in
finearts withaminor inil-
lustration at the College
of Mount St. Joseph. No
pun intended.
That ideawas topaint a
mural depicting some of
the favorite summer
scenes combined with
those that might be more
familiar to onlyswimclub
members. White-capped
waves highlight a beach
scene. Inthecorner, arac-
coon with a drink in his
hand reclines on the sand,
which pokes fun at the
raccoon that is often
found in the clubs wom-
ens restroom.
By the time hes done
with the mural, Haehnle
figures he will have spent
10-11 hours a day for two
weeks designing and
painting the wall. He uses
100 percent acrylic paint
and will eventually seal it
with a clear coat varnish
to protect it from the
weather.
Haehnle volunteered
to paint the mural for
free. Its what I love to
do, and its rewarding at
the same time, he said.
Phillips Swim Club, a
West Side community
landmark since 1929 at
1536 Sidona Lane in Cov-
edale, recently became
member-owned and oper-
ated after years of being
privatelyowned. The club
offers memberships and
rentstheirpartyspacefor
non-members who would
like to host a pool party.
Many members have vol-
unteered hundreds of
hours making improve-
ments and fixing the pool
up to get ready for the
summer.
Brendans effort and
imaginationthat went into
the mural makes our
members smile and en-
riches their time here,
said Michael Colligan, a
pool member and volun-
teer. He is a tribute to the
Mount because hes giv-
ing back his time and tal-
ents to the community.
Haehnle, who has been
a member since he was 1
year old, said hes happy
to have been able to use
his talent to help the club.
He is a 2010 graduate of
Oak Hills High School.
Swim club gets
new look from
Mount art student
Brendan Haehnle, a senior from Bridgetown majoring in fine arts with a minor in
illustration at the College of Mount St. Joseph, painting his mural at Phillips Swim Club.
THANKS TO JILL EICHHORN
In 1978, Brandon Ryan
and Tim Goldrainer told
their Our Ladyof Lourdes
classmates that they
would one day start a
band.
They laughed at us,
Ryan said, chuckling.
Now, Ryan and Gol-
drainer are the ones
laughing.
After graduating from
high school in1983 Ryan
from Elder, Goldrainer
from Oak Hills they
founded The Menus, per-
forming their first gig at
Midnight Express on
Glenway Avenue.
Thirty years and near-
ly 5,000 shows later, the
band has become a clas-
sic-rock staple of Cincin-
nati not to mention the
state of Ohio.
Its a hobby that
turned into a career, said
Goldrainer, The Menus
lead vocalist. Were com-
pletely blessed.
The band, which has
undergone a handful of
personnel changes over
the years, got its name
from former founding
member Steve Perrman,
also an Elder grad, who
collected menus from re-
gional restaurants.
Goldrainer and Ryan
have been at it three dec-
ades, while Jimi Orwig
joined the group in 1989,
Steve Chiodi joined in
1997andAdamScovanner
joined in 2013.
Orwig described the
bands music as classic
rock with a twist, while
Goldrainer sees it as his
goal to make people
wince andgut laughat the
same time.
Whatever Goldrainer
andhisbandmatesaredo-
ing, its working.
In the 1980s and early
1990s, The Menus per-
formed four to five nights
a week, almost exclusive-
ly in Cincinnati. Over the
last 15 years or so, howev-
er, theyve taken their
show on the road with far
more regularity. Their fa-
vorite locations include
Fraze Pavilion in Ketter-
ing and the Beer Barrel in
Put-In Bay, where they
performbetween two and
four shows every month
from May until October.
Overall, The Menus
typically perform be-
tween 140 and 160 shows
each year.
People give us so
much love when we come
into their city; its really
exciting, Goldrainer
said. We kind of create a
buzz wherever were go-
ing. These people give us
a love like you wouldnt
believe and everyone in
the bandgives love back.
Intheir earlydays, The
Menus wrote their own
music as muchas 70per-
cent, Ryanestimatedbut
they now perform cover
material almost exclu-
sively. In that time,
theyve witnessed rock
become classic rock.
And then they wit-
nessed it again.
Still, theyve adapted
with the times and con-
tinue to drawpeople of all
ages to their shows.
Weve been in busi-
ness for 30 years, but we
still focus on our music
and entertainment value
first and foremost, Or-
wig said. Weve reached
a milestone, but to us,
were just reaching the
height of our career right
now. Werestill at thevery
beginning.
And theres no end in
sight.
Most of the band mem-
bers are married; all have
children. Finding babysit-
ters, especiallyduringthe
summer, is a challenge
that The Menus didnt
have a decade or two ago.
Travel and time away
fromfamily can be tough.
But The Menus make
sacrifices because they
love performing.
That, and their fans de-
mand it.
Imstill kicking eight-
and-a-half feet in the air;
still ripping through15, 16
wardrobe changes a
night; still making people
feel strong, Goldrainer
said. A Menus show is
nothing but positivity.
The Menus celebrate 30 years of classic rock
The Menus
band Jimi
Orwig,
Adam
Scovanner,
Brandon
Ryan, Steve
Chiodi and
Tim
Golodrainer
are
celebrating
30 years of
playing
rock.
PROVIDED
By Tony Meale
westnews@communitypress.com THE BAND AT A
GLANCE
Lead vocalist Tim
Goldrainer, 49, lives in
Delhi Township.
Drummer Brandon
Ryan, 47, lives in Monfort
Heights.
Vocalist and keyboar-
dist Jimi Orwig, 57, lives
in Crestview Hills, Ky.
Vocalist and acoustic
guitarist Steve Chiodi, 58,
lives in East Side.
Bass guitarist Adam
Scovanner, 38, lives in
Columbia-Tusculum.
For more information
on The Menus, visit
www.themenus.org.