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OFFSHORE SAFE WORK PRACTICES HANDBOOK


NXY000-080-SF-MN-0000-0004 Issue Date: August 2011 Audit Date: August 2014 YES Revision: 1

Proponent: Brad Koskowich Approver: Peter Addy Knowledge Assessment Required:

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 PURPOSE............................................................................................................. 9 SCOPE.................................................................................................................. 9 ACRONYMS AND DEFINITIONS ....................................................................... 10 OFFSHORE SAFE WORK PRACTICES HANDBOOK ...................................... 15 4.1 Safety and Environmental Management System ..................................... 15 4.2 Nexen Life Saving Rules.......................................................................... 16 4.3 Responsibilities ........................................................................................ 16 4.3.1 Nexen........................................................................................... 16 4.3.2 Nexen Supervisors ....................................................................... 17 4.3.3 Nexen Representative/Inspector/Construction Supervisor ........... 17 4.3.4 Contractor(s) ................................................................................ 17 4.3.5 Contractors Employees/Subcontractors ...................................... 19 4.3.6 Visitors ......................................................................................... 20 4.3.7 Stop Work Authority ..................................................................... 20 4.3.8 Audits and Continuous Improvement ........................................... 20 4.4 Personal Protective Equipment................................................................ 21 4.4.1 Safety Hats and Safety Boots ...................................................... 21 4.4.2 Eye Protection .............................................................................. 21 4.4.3 Hearing Protection........................................................................ 21 4.4.4 Flame Resistant Clothing ............................................................. 21 4.4.5 Fall Protection .............................................................................. 22 4.4.6 Hand Protection............................................................................ 22 4.4.7 Rings, Necklaces, and Other Jewelry........................................... 23 4.4.8 Clothing (Non-FRC)...................................................................... 23 4.4.9 Contact Lenses ............................................................................ 23 4.4.10 Facial Hair .................................................................................. 24 4.5 Training.................................................................................................... 24 4.5.1 Knowledge and Skills ................................................................... 24 4.5.2 Re-certifications for Offshore travel .............................................. 26 4.6 Worksite Inspection Programs ................................................................. 26 4.6.1 Daily Physical Conditions Inspections .......................................... 26 4.6.2 Compliance Inspections ............................................................... 26
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4.7

4.6.3 Planned Inspections ..................................................................... 27 4.6.4 Worksite Observations ................................................................. 27 General Safety Practices ......................................................................... 27 4.7.1 Abrasive Blasting.......................................................................... 27 4.7.2 Access to Exposure and Medical Records Plan ........................... 27 4.7.3 Air Hoses and Compressed Air .................................................... 27 4.7.4 Air-operated Equipment ............................................................... 28 4.7.5 Other General Hose Types .......................................................... 28 4.7.6 Area Designations ........................................................................ 29 4.7.7 Asbestos ...................................................................................... 29 4.7.8 Asset Integrity and Reliability ....................................................... 29 4.7.9 Batteries ....................................................................................... 30 4.7.10 Barricades, Flagging, and Signage ............................................ 30 4.7.11 Blow-out Prevention Equipment and Procedures ....................... 31 4.7.12 Bridging Documents ................................................................... 31 4.7.13 Cargo Manifest and Tracking ..................................................... 31 4.7.14 Cargo Loading............................................................................ 31 4.7.15 Cathodic Protection .................................................................... 32 4.7.16 Chain of Command .................................................................... 32 4.7.17 Changing Oil/Servicing Equipment............................................. 32 4.7.18 Chemical, Product, and Material Handling ................................. 32 4.7.19 Communications......................................................................... 33 4.7.20 Compressed Gas Cylinders ....................................................... 33 4.7.21 Compressors, Engines, and Pumps ........................................... 34 4.7.22 Compliance with Standards........................................................ 34 4.7.23 Conduct of Operations ............................................................... 34 4.7.24 Confined Spaces ........................................................................ 34 4.7.25 Contraband Items....................................................................... 35 4.7.26 Cranes........................................................................................ 36 4.7.27 Crane Assisted Personnel Transfers.......................................... 37 4.7.28 Designated Smoking Areas........................................................ 39 4.7.29 Drilling and Service Platforms .................................................... 39 4.7.30 Dropped Objects ........................................................................ 39 4.7.31 Drug-free Workplace Policy........................................................ 40 4.7.32 Electrical..................................................................................... 40 4.7.33 Exposure Control (Blood Borne Pathogens) .............................. 42 4.7.34 Emergency Response and Notification ...................................... 42 4.7.35 Emergency Drills ........................................................................ 43 4.7.36 For Fire Onboard Drills ............................................................... 44 4.7.37 For Abandon Platform Drills ....................................................... 44 4.7.38 Emergency Escape to the Water................................................ 44 4.7.39 Emergency Evacuation Plan ...................................................... 45 4.7.40 Emergency Signals .................................................................... 45 4.7.41 Engineering Guidelines .............................................................. 45 4.7.42 Equipment and Piping Isolation .................................................. 46 4.7.43 Ergonomics ................................................................................ 47
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4.7.44 4.7.45 4.7.46 4.7.47 4.7.48 4.7.49 4.7.50 4.7.51 4.7.52 4.7.53 4.7.54 4.7.55 4.7.56 4.7.57 4.7.58 4.7.59 4.7.60 4.7.61 4.7.62 4.7.63 4.7.64 4.7.65 4.7.66 4.7.67 4.7.68 4.7.69 4.7.70 4.7.71 4.7.72 4.7.73 4.7.74 4.7.75 4.7.76 4.7.77 4.7.78 4.7.79 4.7.80 4.7.81 4.7.82 4.7.83 4.7.84 4.7.85 4.7.86 4.7.87 4.7.88 4.7.89
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Eyewash Stations....................................................................... 47 Extension Cords/Cheater Cords................................................. 48 Firearms ..................................................................................... 48 Fire Extinguishers....................................................................... 48 Fire Prevention ........................................................................... 49 Fire Reporting............................................................................. 49 Fire Response ............................................................................ 49 Fire Watch .................................................................................. 49 Fire Fighting Equipment ............................................................. 50 Classes of Fires and Extinguishing Agents ................................ 51 Firewalls ..................................................................................... 51 First Aid ...................................................................................... 51 First Aid /CPR/AED Training ...................................................... 51 Fishing........................................................................................ 52 Fit for Duty.................................................................................. 52 Gas Detectors (Portable)............................................................ 52 Grinders (Bench) ........................................................................ 52 Equipment Guarding .................................................................. 53 Guardrails, Handrails, Platforms, and Barricades....................... 53 Hazard Identification and Risk Analysis ..................................... 53 Hazard Reporting ....................................................................... 53 Hazardous Substances Control.................................................. 53 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response ......... 54 Heaters (Portable) ...................................................................... 54 Helicopter Safety ........................................................................ 55 Hoses and Piping under Pressure.............................................. 55 Hot Tapping................................................................................ 56 Housekeeping ............................................................................ 56 Injury and Illness Reporting ........................................................ 56 Incident Reporting ...................................................................... 56 Job Observation Programs......................................................... 56 Job Planning............................................................................... 57 Ladders and Stairs ..................................................................... 57 Portable Ladders ........................................................................ 57 Lifejackets .................................................................................. 58 Lifesaving Equipment ................................................................. 59 Manual Lifting ............................................................................. 59 Lifting Devices ............................................................................ 60 Lightning..................................................................................... 61 Lockout/Tagout of Equipment..................................................... 62 Material Handling ....................................................................... 62 Man Overboard .......................................................................... 63 Management of Change............................................................. 63 Machinery Guards ...................................................................... 64 Maintenance............................................................................... 64 Marine Debris ............................................................................. 64
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4.8

4.7.90 Material Safety Data Sheets....................................................... 64 4.7.91 Mechanical Integrity ................................................................... 64 4.7.92 Medication and Prescription Drugs............................................. 64 4.7.93 Mobile Phone/Personal Electronic Device Use .......................... 65 4.7.94 BSEE Incident Reporting............................................................ 66 4.7.95 BSEE Facility Inspections .......................................................... 66 4.7.96 Near Miss Reporting................................................................... 66 4.7.97 On-site Orientation ..................................................................... 66 4.7.98 Overhead Work .......................................................................... 67 4.7.99 Paint and Coatings ..................................................................... 67 4.7.100 Personnel Transfer Basket ....................................................... 67 4.7.101 Perforating Guns ...................................................................... 68 4.7.102 Photographic Equipment .......................................................... 68 4.7.103 Pigging and Pressure Testing .................................................. 68 4.7.104 Pipe Handling ........................................................................... 69 4.7.105 Platform Cabling....................................................................... 69 4.7.106 Platform Modification................................................................ 69 4.7.107 Portable Hand Tools and Equipment........................................ 69 4.7.108 Process Safety Information ...................................................... 70 4.7.109 Radioactive Materials and Equipment ...................................... 70 4.7.110 Radiographic Inspections/Non-Destructive Testing.................. 70 4.7.111 Records and Documentation .................................................... 71 4.7.112 Respiratory Protective Equipment ............................................ 72 4.7.113 Rope......................................................................................... 72 4.7.114 S.A.F.E chart ............................................................................ 73 4.7.115 Safety Body Harness................................................................ 73 4.7.116 Scaffolding or Temporary Work Platforms................................ 73 4.7.117 Searches .................................................................................. 74 4.7.118 Sheen on Water ....................................................................... 74 4.7.119 Slings ....................................................................................... 74 4.7.120 Slips, Trips and Falls ................................................................ 75 4.7.121 Smoking ................................................................................... 76 4.7.122 Station Bill (Manned Platforms) ................................................ 76 4.7.123 Spills......................................................................................... 76 4.7.124 Swing Rope transfers ............................................................... 76 4.7.125 Tag Lines ................................................................................. 77 4.7.126 Tie-Ins to Nexen Equipment ..................................................... 77 4.7.127 Tool Usage ............................................................................... 77 4.7.128 Trailing Hand Technique .......................................................... 78 4.7.129 Using Nexen Equipment........................................................... 78 4.7.130 Waste Management ................................................................. 78 4.7.131 Weather Restrictions for Crane Operations.............................. 79 4.7.132 Water Transportation................................................................ 80 4.7.133 Welding/Welders ...................................................................... 80 4.7.134 Working over Water.................................................................. 81 Work Authorization Permits ..................................................................... 81
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4.9

4.10

4.11

Safety Meetings ....................................................................................... 82 4.9.1 Documentation and Topics........................................................... 82 4.9.2 General ........................................................................................ 82 4.9.3 Job Safety and Environmental Analysis ....................................... 82 4.9.4 Pre-tour (Platforms)...................................................................... 82 4.9.5 Safety Orientation Briefing ........................................................ 83 4.9.6 Safety Recognition ....................................................................... 83 Environmental Considerations ................................................................. 83 4.10.1 Spills........................................................................................... 83 4.10.2 Hazardous Materials and Waste Management .......................... 84 Social Responsibility ................................................................................ 85 4.11.1 Integrity ...................................................................................... 85 4.11.2 Human Rights............................................................................. 86

5.0 6.0 7.0

REFERENCES.................................................................................................... 86 SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS............................................................................. 89 REVISION NOTES .............................................................................................. 89

APPENDIX A NEXEN CORPRATE HEALTH, SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT, AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY POLICY............................................................................ 90 APPENDIX B WORKSITE HAZARD ASSESSMENT ............................................... 93 APPENDIX C JOB SAFETY & ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS .................................... 95 APPENDIX D UV INDEX ........................................................................................... 96 APPENDIX E - UV INDEX CHART .............................................................................. 97 APPENDIX F HEAT INDEX CHART.......................................................................... 98 APPENDIX G HEALTH EFFECTS OF HEAT STRESS ............................................ 99 APPENDIX H RISK MATRIX (RISK = CONSEQUENCES X LIKELIHOOD) .......... 102 APPENDIX J HAZARD COMMUNICATION COLOR CODING .............................. 104 APPENDIX K DANGEROUS GOODS CLASS GUIDE ........................................... 106 APPENDIX L WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEMS (WHMIS) HARMONIZED IDENTIFICATION............................................................. 108 APPENDIX M P.A.C.E. CARD................................................................................. 109 APPENDIX N S.TO.P. CARD .................................................................................. 111
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APPENDIX O EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION AND REPORTING FLOWCHART.. 112 APPENDIX P - USCG AND LEASE HOLDER INCIDENT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................... 113 APPENDIX Q USCG AND BSEE LEASE HOLDER ENVIRONMENTAL INCIDENT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................. 116 APPENDIX R WORK AUTHORIZATION PERMIT FIELD AUDIT........................... 119 APPENDIX S PPE MATRIX: GENERAL PPE AND GLOVES ................................ 122 APPENDIX T PPE MATRIX: CLOTHING AND EXPOSURE CONCENTRATIONS GREATER THAN PEL................................................................................................ 125 APPENDIX T OFFICE AND SHOREBASE CONTACT INFORMATION.................. 130 APPENDIX U HSE&SR ORIENTATION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT .......................... 132

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Nexens HSE&SR Commitment Statement

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This Handbook provides guidelines for establishing and implementing common safe work practices designed to minimize the risks associated with operating, maintenance, and modification activities and the handling of materials and substances that could affect health, safety, or the environment while on a Nexen-operated worksite. Before work begins, personnel are expected to proactively complete appropriate hazard assessment and documented protective mitigation measures in accordance with Nexens Job Safety and Environmental Analysis (JSEA) and Permit to Work programs. Personnel are reminded to reference relevant operating procedures, safe work practices, and emergency response plans in accordance to 30 CFR 250, Subpart S Safety and Environmental Management System (SEMS) processes. Nexen, through its Contractor Management Program, will ensure that contractors have their own written safe work practices and, where necessary, contractors may adopt appropriate sections of Nexen's SEMS program. Despite the urgency or importance of work requirements, Nexen expects tasks to be carried out in a way that protects the health and safety of personnel, the environment, the reputation of the company, and the communities in which we operate. Do not forget that it is everyones responsibility to stop the job if it is not right! Peter Addy
President, Nexen Petroleum USA, Inc.

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1.0 PURPOSE
The purpose of this Offshore Safe Work Practices Handbook is to expand on the goals set forth in the policy statement (Refer to Appendix A Nexen Corporate Health, Safety, Environment, and Social Responsibility [HSE&SR] Policy). To reach these goals, Nexen has identified the following objectives: a) Ensure a safe working environment by cultivating a safety and quality culture among our employees and contractors. b) Develop an understanding among employees and contractors that working safely, efficiently, and protecting the environment are part of meeting customer expectations. c) Maintain open lines of communication between employees and management on matters affecting health, safety, and the environment. d) Train employees in the methods of working safely and in an environmentally sound manner. e) Minimize, control, and properly dispose of substances that may threaten the health or safety of persons on Nexen platforms or degrade the environment. f) Provide procedures and work instructions to enable safe performance of employee tasks. g) Conduct operations in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and standards. h) Provide and maintain facilities, and equipment that are suitable for their intended purpose. i) Verify that employees have adequate Personal Protective Equipment to protect them from hazards. j) Monitor and evaluate Nexens health, safety, and environmental performance. Implement changes or additions to the HSE&SR Management System, if necessary. k) Meet or exceed all effective, applicable government rules, regulations, or restrictions, Federal, State, or local

2.0 SCOPE
This document applies to all Nexen offshore facilities or worksites, including Simultaneous Operations (SIMOPS) activities, drilling activities, shore-based activities, marine and helicopter operations, and/or Production operations.

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3.0 ACRONYMS AND DEFINITIONS


ANSI American National Standards Institute API American Petroleum Institute Approved Permission granted by Nexen, in the absence of an associated regulation or standard. ASNT American Society of Non-Destructive testing Biodiversity Variation of life forms within a given ecosystem. Often used as a measure of the health of biological systems BMP Best Management Practice BOP Blow-out Preventer BSEE Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement CFR Code Of Federal Regulations Company Nexen Petroleum U.S.A., Inc. Competent Possession of the knowledge, experience, and training to perform an unsupervised task without putting themselves or others at risk Contractor Companies, consultants, and individuals engaged by Nexen to provide services under a consulting or other contract arrangement. Contractor Supervisory Personnel A person, assigned by who has been assigned by the contractor and/or by Nexen, to oversee a task or project. (Drill Site Managers [DSM], Construction Inspector, HSE).

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Contractors Supervisory Personnel A person, assigned by the contractor and/or by Nexen, in charge of overseeing a task or project. dBA Decibels DSM Drill Site Manager Employee All hired staff of Nexen and its subsidiaries, including individuals who are employed on a regular, rotational, fixed term, part-, or full-time basis EPA Environmental Protection Agency ESD Emergency Shut-down Device FM Factory Mutual FRC Fire Resistant Clothing GFCI Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter HAZCOM Hazard Communications HAZWOPER Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response HIRA Health Industry Representatives Association HSE&SR Health, Safety, Environment, and Social Responsibility HUET Helicopter Underwater Egress Training

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Industrial Hygiene The anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of those environmental factors arising in or from the workplace which may cause illness, impaired health and well being, or significant discomfort among workers or citizens of the community. JSA Job Safety Analysis JSEA Job Safety and Environmental Analysis Life Cycle A cradle to grave approach recognizing that all life-cycle stages (raw materials acquisition, manufacturing, processing and formulation, distribution and transportation, use/reuse/maintenance, recycling, and waste management) can have environmental, social, and economic impacts that should be considered and preferably mitigated in the design phase Medication A medical treatment obtained legally, over the counter. MOC Management of Change MODU Mobile offshore drilling unit MSDS Material Safety Data Sheets Nexen Nexen Petroleum USA, Inc. Nexen HSE&SR Requirements Nexens requirements for employees, contractors, and other non-Nexen employees as outlined in this handbook. Nexen Representative Anyone that has entered into agreement and has been delegated authority by Nexen Nexen Worksite Property or facility owned, leased, and/or operated by Nexen NFPA National Fire Protection Agency

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NIOSH National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health NORM Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material NPU Nexen Petroleum USA, Inc. OBriens OBriens Response Management Group Occupational Health The promotion of healthy work environments, protection of Employee health from workplace health hazards, and prevention of occupational illnesses and injuries PA Public Address PED Personal Electronic Devices PEL Permissible Exposure Limit PFD Personal Flotation Device PIC Person in Charge PPE Personal Protective Equipment Prescription Drugs Medicine obtained through a doctors prescription. Process Safety Management A management system focused on the prevention of, preparedness for, mitigation of, response to, and restoration from a process safety event PSI Process Safety Information QI Qualified Individual
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Regulations Statutes, laws, rules, orders, and regulations, including the conditions of any approvals required for work in effect from, at the time, and made by governments or governmental boards or agencies having jurisdiction over the work or work-site activities, federal, state, or local. RPM Revolutions Per Minute SCADA Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition SCBA Self Contained Breathing Apparatus SIMOPS Simultaneous Operations Social Responsibility Maintaining Nexens social license to operate by interacting openly and respectfully with our stakeholders, and by assessing and managing the social risks and impacts of our activities Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Refers to the process for developing, implementing, and maintaining operating procedures that allow for safe and effective operations Subcontractor Any party that has entered into contract with a contractor to perform services for Nexen Sustainability Integrating health, safety, environmental, social, and broader economic considerations into decisions and actions in order to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs SWL Safe Working Load TDG Transportation of Dangerous Goods TLV Threshold Limit Value TSE Temperature Safety Elements
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UL Underwriters Laboratory USCG United States Coast Guard UV Ultra Violet WBGT Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures

4.0 OFFSHORE SAFE WORK PRACTICES HANDBOOK


4.1 Safety and Environmental Management System Nexen has in place a SEMS Standards Manual that outlines how Nexen develops, implements, and maintains its SEMS program to meet the requirements of 30 CFR 250, Subpart S. Nexens SEMS program has written standards that address the 13 elements described in 250.1902, American Petroleum Institute's Recommended Practice for Development of a Safety and Environmental Management Program for Offshore Operations and Facilities (API RP 75). These standards include: 1. General (see 250.1909) 2. Safety and Environmental Information (see 250.1910) 3. Hazards Analysis (see 250.1911) 4. Management of Change (see 250.1912) 5. Operating Procedures (see 250.1913) 6. Safe Work Practices (see 250.1914) 7. Training (see 250.1915) 8. Mechanical Integrity (Assurance of Quality and Mechanical Integrity of Critical Equipment) (see 250.1916) 9. Pre-startup Review (see 250.1917) 10. Emergency Response and Control (see 250.1918) 11. Investigation of Incidents (see 250.1919) 12. Auditing (Audit of Safety and Environmental Management Program Elements) (see 250.1920) 13. Recordkeeping (Records and Documentation) and additional BOEMRE requirements (see 250.1928).
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4.2

Nexen Life Saving Rules Nexen will provide a safe place of work and a culture where: a) HSE expectations and individual responsibilities are effectively communicated. b) Pre-job hazards will be assessed and appropriate controls developed and in place for the level of risk mitigation required before the work commences. c) Appropriate personnel are trained, competent, and in place to effectively and safely manage all activities associated with our operations. d) Personal protective equipment (PPE) will be provided as per the activity hazard assessment and the minimum site requirements. To accomplish this, all Nexen personnel must conduct work under the following 12 life saving rules: 1. Always conduct a hazard assessment. 2. Ensure safe systems of work. 3. Follow the Management of Change (MOC) process. 4. Isolate energy sources. 5. No breaking of containment without a valid work permit. 6. Do not enter a confined space without authorization. 7. Work safely at heights. 8. Conduct safe lifting operations. 9. Drive safely. 10. Assess all ground disturbance hazards. 11. Do not work under the influence of drugs or alcohol. 12. Ignition sources are not allowed in areas where hydrocarbons may be present.

4.3

Responsibilities

4.3.1 Nexen Nexen will: a) Maintain a high level of commitment to HSE&SR in the workplace for employee, contractor, and the public benefit. b) Make HSE&SR considerations an integral part of every project. c) Assign a Nexen Representative, or designee, to serve as the liaison between the contractor and Nexen. d) Provide a site-specific HSE&SR orientation session before commencement of work for contracting employees working on a Nexen site.
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4.3.2 Nexen Supervisors Nexen Supervisors are the link between the management of the company and its general workforce. As such, a great deal of responsibility is placed on supervisors to ensure the people working under them are conversant with the present operations and are given all the information, training, and equipment necessary to perform their tasks safely. Supervisors will: a) Adopt a global view of operations to be able to verify that all aspects of the operation are being conducted safely. b) Ensure that personnel working for them are competent to perform the operations required. c) Stop the operation until he can be assured that the operation can be performed successfully. 4.3.3 Nexen Representative/Inspector/Construction Supervisor A Nexen Site Representative/Inspector/Construction Supervisor will: a) Verify that contractors inform their employees and subcontractors about safe practices and any hazardous conditions associated with each particular job done by the person. b) Present a site-specific HSE&SR orientation to all personnel working on the Nexen site prior to the commencement of work. c) Issue work permits to the contractor in conjunction with operating personnel at existing company facilities and verify that a site-specific hazard assessment has been completed and documented prior to starting on-site work. d) Verify that all work orders are in place before mobilizing contractors to complete the work, a Management of Change (MoC) document has been approved before asking contractors to complete work involving new field additions, alterations to field equipment, processes, and/or field replacements that are not in kind. e) Conduct worksite observations on a regular basis to verify compliance to Nexens HSE&SR expectations and address deficiencies noted in a timely manner. 4.3.4 Contractor(s) Contractors will: a) Take the necessary steps to protect all personnel within their and adjacent work areas from any potential injury or illness and property, equipment, and the environment from damage from the work being carried-out. b) Provide equipment that is maintained in good operating condition and meets regulations and company requirements.
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c) Be held responsible for any violations of Nexens HSE&SR requirements by their own employees, subcontractors employees, or any persons carrying out business on the work-site on behalf of the contractor. d) Address any non-compliance issues related to Nexens HSE&SR requirements with their contract representative. i. Non-compliance with Nexens HSE&SR expectations could result in the activation of contractor corrective measures. ii. If Nexens HSE&SR requirements cannot be complied with, then the contractor is expected to contact a Nexen Representative and explain the situation. The Nexen Representative will, if required, submit a Request for Variance on the contractors behalf. e) Cease work near a defined HSE hazard until it is resolved. The contractor will also report unsafe conditions and/or acts to a Nexen Representative who will verify correct and documented findings. Contractors can use their own hazard identification form to document these findings or ask the Nexen Representative to complete a Nexen P.A.C.E. card or equivalent on their behalf (Refer to Appendix M P.A.C.E. Card). f) Plan work procedures in advance to meet or exceed Nexen HSE&SR requirements and the regulations applicable to the performed work. g) Immediately report events that result in illness, injury, death, property/environmental damage, or a high-potential near miss to the Nexen Representative. Promptly thereafter, a detailed written report will be submitted to Nexen. These immediately reported events require incident investigation and root-cause analysis. h) Require the use of applicable personal protective equipment (PPE). i) Support and encourage Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) meetings. As a minimum, these HSE meetings should be held monthly, or more frequently, based on the risk of the work. The meeting schedule should be posted. j) Effectively communicate Nexen HSE&SR requirements, policies, procedures, and practices to employees on a timely basis. k) Provide feedback to the Nexen Facility Supervisor, Drill Site Manager (DSM), Construction Superintendent, or the HSE&SR team on the development and implementation of HSE&SR practices and standards related to their work. l) Have a sufficient number of competent employees at the work-site, trained in the use of emergency safety equipment. m) Verify that the contractors employees are properly trained for the tasks being conducted, including adequate training in hazard identification, hazard assessments, or the Job Safety and Environmental Analysis (JSEA) process.

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4.3.5 Contractors Employees/Subcontractors Contractors Employees/Subcontractors will: a) Be aware of and abide by Nexen HSE&SR requirements as they apply to where they work and the regulations. b) Have the right to exercise stop work authority if the job as become unsafe to themselves or fellow workers. Immediately report any unsafe act(s), conditions, and/or equipment to the Nexen PIC or supervisor. c) Conduct themselves with regard for the well-being of themselves, personnel, equipment, property, and the environment. d) Be knowledgeable of the work area and know the potential health, safety, or environmental hazards and control measures associated with their specific work tasks. In order to be in compliance to this expectation, contracting employees verify that a site-specific hazard assessment has been conducted prior to starting work. Document identified hazards and demonstrate effective controls in place through the JSEA or equivalent process. e) Avoid distractions, concentrate on the job at hand, and do not cause injury to themselves, other workers, or the public. f) Take an active part in health, safety, and environmental programs and review materials provided by the contractor or Nexen. g) Report all events/accidents/incidents that occur on the job to the supervisor or Nexen Representative as soon as practicable. h) Refrain from prohibited conduct, such as scuffling, practical joking, harassment, or horseplay. i) Obey No Smoking signs and smoke only in designated areas. j) Use only safety matches or approved 2-stage lighters (Zippo only, no butane lighters allowed) where they are permitted to be carried in process or production areas, drilling/service platforms, or work site/storage areas containing flammable materials or in classified areas. k) Will be fit for duty as outlined in Nexens Drug Free Workplace Standard and not use or have on their persons, alcohol and/or intoxicating drugs while on duty or when coming on to a Nexen work-site. Random testing, reasonable cause, and post-incident testing will be initiated as situations warrant, including significant events, significant injuries, and signs of being under the influence. Contraventions to these requirements will be dealt with in accordance with the Nexen Drug Free Workplace Policy, which could result in immediate expulsion from the work site. For further information on the specific requirements of Nexens Drug Free Workplace Policy, contact the supervisor and/or a Nexen representative.

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l) Refrain from bringing contraband items, such as weapons, guns, or knives, on to Nexen lease sites. Refer to Nexens Contraband Items Standard for further clarification and to Section 4.7.25 Contraband Items. m) Know the location and proper use of emergency equipment in the working area. n) Avoid unnecessary risks and promptly report unsafe practices and/or hazardous conditions to their supervisor. These can be reported and documented using the contract companies own hazard identification form or by asking a Nexen Representative to complete a Nexen Near-miss Report on the workers behalf. o) Call for assistance, when required. Do not perform a hazardous job alone. p) Use contractor provided PPE as required by the company or applicable regulations. 4.3.6 Visitors Visitors will: a) Obtain the permission of a Nexen Representative before entering any Nexen site. b) Use either a written or verbal check-in/check-out process to ensure that they are accounted for at all times. c) Be oriented to the site-specific requirements. d) Always be escorted by Nexen personnel or their designee. e) Abide by Nexen HSE&SR requirements. f) Use PPE as required by Nexen. 4.3.7 Stop Work Authority Personnel have the duty to stop an unsafe operation. If you perceive a situation where imminent danger exists, stop the work. This also applies if personnel are at the immediate risk of injury with continued operation. The operation must be deemed safe to restart the operation. 4.3.8 Audits and Continuous Improvement Nexen conducts compliance audits, internal audits, and worksite conditions inspections on a regular basis. Note and correct deficiencies in accordance with industry standards, such as American Petroleum Institute (API) 14C or those regulations set by the US Coast Guard, Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Nexen, in many cases, is following best industry practice for its offshore facilities as reasonably practicable.

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4.4

Personal Protective Equipment

4.4.1 Safety Hats and Safety Boots At Nexen work sites, personnel wear Class 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved safety boots covering the ankle and ANSI approved hard hats. 4.4.2 Eye Protection When wearing eye protection: a) Personnel are to wear ANSI Z87.1 approved safety glasses, complete with side shields, while performing work at Nexen worksites. b) Additional eye and face protection, such as chemical goggles and full face shields, is mandatory for specific tasks where there is potential for eye injuries. For more information, refer to HSE&SR Management Systems Manual, Personal Protective Equipment: Eye Protection. 4.4.3 Hearing Protection When using hearing protection: a) Personnel are to wear approved hearing protection devices at all times where noise levels exceed 85 decibels (dBA). These areas will usually be marked with signage stating that hearing protection is required. b) When noise levels exceed 105 dBA, use a dual hearing protection system, including an ANSI class A (or a ANSI Grade 4) rated earplug as well as an ANSI class A or class B (or a ANSI Grade 2, 3 or 4) rated earmuff. c) Hearing protection should be worn when leaving living quarters. 4.4.4 Flame Resistant Clothing When wearing Flame Resistant Clothing (FRC): a) FRC is required for Nexen employees, contractors, and visitors when: i. Personnel are located in a production facility with hydrocarbon-containing equipment, in areas where PPE is required. ii. There are areas with potential exposure to flash/arc burn injuries, such as electrical circuits over 300 volts. iii. An employee and/or supervisor identify a site-specific job or task not identified above. b) Unless required by local policies, FRC is not required, unless otherwise specified: i. On drilling barges, drill ships, and Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs), unless conducting live well servicing or well testing. i. Under layers of clothing meant to improve the effectiveness of flame resistant garments in the event of a flash fire. Under garments are to be made of 100 percent natural fibers and include, shorts/t-shirts.
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ii. If the work area is considered new construction and has never had flammable products through it. The need for FRC may be waived if there is a completed and approved Request for Variance. Note Personnel should refer to Personal Protective Equipment Program for specific information.

4.4.5 Fall Protection When using fall protection: a) Each employee on a walking/working surface (horizontal and vertical surface) with an unprotected side or edge that is 6 feet or more above a lower level shall be protected from falling by the use of guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems b) Tie-off fall protection devices with the lanyard to a fixed support, where required by Nexen HSE&SR requirements, applicable regulations, and/or at the workers request. c) Train workers with a certified instructor to fall arrest standards and be fully aware of the regulations regarding use, care, and maintenance of these safety equipment devices. d) Contractors and supervisors verify that workers are using the protective equipment effectively and that they are always 100 percent tied-off to a suitable anchor-point. e) Prior to using fall protection and/or working at heights, establish, document, and communicate a site-specific/work- task specific fall prevention and rescue plan to the workers involved. There must be sufficient rescue workers in place to execute approved rescue plans. 4.4.6 Hand Protection As part of the JSEA process, Personnel shall identify and communicate the appropriate and suitable hand protection specific to the current work as part of the permitting and assessment of work processes. Suitable hand protection, with respect to different glove types depending on hazards and activities, includes, but is not limited to: Hazard/Activity Chemical Handling Sharp objects or cutting Welding Vibrating equipment Sampling (soil, water) Glove Type Specific chemical resistant gloves Kevlar or leather Leather welder gloves Shock absorbing gloves Latex

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Live electrical work (depending on voltage) 0-750 V 750-5000 V 5-144 KV

Class 0 insulated rubber gloves with leather protectors Class 1 insulated rubber gloves with leather protectors Class 2 insulated rubber gloves with leather protectors

Note

Refer to Appendix R PPE Matrix: General PPE and Gloves and Appendix S PPE Matrix Clothing and Exposure Concentration Greater Than PEL for more information.

4.4.7 Rings, Necklaces, and Other Jewelry When working offshore, jewelry is not allowed to be worn outside of living quarters on the production facility or MODU. a) Remove: i. Rings on fingers when performing any duties and/or operating any machinery while on a Nexen work site. ii. Neck chains, tie strings, and other articles of jewelry that could encounter moving parts of machinery or equipment. b) Information on Medical alert necklaces shall be given to the PIC or Medic on the MODU. c) Facial rings and earrings are not allowed, as they create exposed and hard to clean areas when contamination hazards exist, such as being splashed by chemicals, solvents, hydrocarbons, and paints. 4.4.8 Clothing (Non-FRC) When choosing clothing, follow these guidelines; a) Long sleeve shirts and full-length pants, in good condition. b) Loose fitting clothing that could encounter moving parts of machinery or equipment is not allowed. Baggy pants that can interfere with a persons ability to safely perform a task are prohibited. Note Refer to Section 4.4.4 Flame Resistant Clothing for further information

4.4.9 Contact Lenses Do not wear contact lenses when working in industrial environments subject to exposure to dusts and vapors from mixing chemicals or Ultra Violet (UV) radiation from welding processes. This includes those people conducting these
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processes and others who may encounter these work processes while on a drilling rig or production platform, such as coworkers or passersby. The use of safety glasses, goggles, or face shields may not provide the complete seal necessary to prevent damage to contact lenses and damaging and causing eye injuries by exposure to dusts and chemical vapors while working in an industrial environment. Welders wearing certain types of contact lenses may face the danger of the contact lens melting due to exposure to UV radiation generated during the welding process. 4.4.10 Facial Hair For personnel with facial hair: a) Facial hair is forbidden when working in known H2S and shallow gas hazard areas to ensure an effective facial seal when using a Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA). Facial hair, such as a full facial beard or long sideburns, will prevent an effective face-to-mask seal when using a SCBA. b) Refrain from having beards, long side burns, and/or mustaches that extend beyond the corner of the mouth when entering or working in process areas, well sites, or drilling/service platform areas. c) Facial hair can constitute a hazard due to: i. Improper seal on a face mask. ii. Wicking effects from chemicals. iii. Burns from a flash fire. d) Personnel are to be clean-shaven, including the area immediately below the bottom lip. e) Ensure scalp hair is trimmed short enough or contained so that it will not become entangled in rotating equipment or interfere with the effective sealing of respiratory protective or resuscitation equipment. 4.5 Training

4.5.1 Knowledge and Skills The following training certifications are necessary for personnel traveling to offshore facilities: a) Offshore Orientation, such as SafeGulf or IADC Rig Pass (or equivalent) b) Water Survival / HUET with METS Personnel shall be qualified to perform the work assigned or shall work under the direct supervision of a competent/qualified worker. Any person stationed or assigned to a Nexen offshore Facility or MODU shall be competent in the following types of HSE training for offshore work:
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a) Job Observation Program (P.A.C.E., STOP, or equivalent) b) Blood Borne Pathogens as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1030(g)(2) c) Confined Space Entry as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146(g) d) Drug Awareness as per DOT 46 CFR 16.401 & 391.119 e) Electrical Safety as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.332 f) Emergency Evacuation procedures g) First Aid/CPR as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.151(b) h) HAZWOPER as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120 i) HAZCOM as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200(h) j) Hearing Conservation as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.95 k) Incident Investigation Training (TAPROOT or equivalent) l) Job Safety Analysis Training or equivalent m) Lockout/Tagout as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.147(c)(7) n) Manual Lifting Techniques o) Marine Debris / NPDES p) New Employee Orientation as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.119(g)(1) q) Personal Protective Equipment as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.132(f) r) Rigging/Material Handling as per API RP 2D, 4th edition or later If applicable to scope of work, the following minimum certifications must also be in place: a) Cranes as per API RP 2D, 4th edition or later
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b) DOT HM-126 Hazmat Employee as per DOT 49 CFR 172.704 (waste manifests) c) Firefighting as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.157(g) d) Respiratory Protection as per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134. (e)(5) e) Subpart O / Production Safety Systems T-2 as per BSEE 30 CFR 250.1502 f) Subpart O / Well Control/Completion/Workover as per BSEE 30 CFR 250.1502 4.5.2 Re-certifications for Offshore travel The following certifications are necessary for personnel traveling to offshore facilities: a) Helicopter Underwater Evacuation Training (HUET) or equivalent in the last 5 years b) SafeGulf or Rig Pass certification in the last 5 years 4.6 Worksite Inspection Programs

4.6.1 Daily Physical Conditions Inspections In addition to Nexen Offshore personnel daily responsibilities, the personnel are expected to: a) Conduct facility and housekeeping inspections on an ongoing basis as part of their daily activities on Nexen worksites. b) Identify and immediately correct unsafe, unhealthy, and/or environmentally damaging conditions or practices found during inspections. c) Cease related work immediately until the conditions or practices are remedied or controlled. d) Document the results of inspections and follow-up actions to correct deficiencies found. 4.6.2 Compliance Inspections Nexen representatives shall conduct ongoing compliance inspections in their areas of responsibility at least once a week in accordance with API 14C and US Coast Guard and BSEE requirements. Take immediate corrective action to resolve the problems identified. The results of the inspection will be documented in the SMART/SMART Plus Database. Refer to the Compliance Inspections Program - Productions standard for more information.

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4.6.3 Planned Inspections In addition to compliance inspections, a Nexen Representative shall conduct a planned formal inspection in their areas of responsibility at least once a month. Refer to the Planned Inspections Program D&C and Planned Inspections Program P&C standards for more information. 4.6.4 Worksite Observations Nexen personnel and representatives shall conduct worksite observations on a regular basis. Nexen uses a program called P.A.C.E. to document observations and feedback given to those who are observed. This observation tool looks at Personnel, Administration, Site Conditions, and Equipment activities to ensure effective follow-up to observational findings, including recognition to on-site workers for positive work practices. A copy of the observation results, as well as items discussed as follow-up to observations, will be shared with the most senior contract worker on location at the time the observations are made. 4.7 General Safety Practices

4.7.1 Abrasive Blasting When abrasive blasting: a) Verify that no employee or contractor inhales any blasting dust. b) Take samples of spent blasting material to determine if the material is hazardous before it is disposed of. c) Blasting materials must meet applicable regulations. d) Follow Nexens Blasting and Abrasive Surface Coating Best Management Practice (BMP). 4.7.2 Access to Exposure and Medical Records Plan The Access to Exposure and Medical Records Plan provides information to NPU employees and their designated representatives regarding their rights of access to employee exposure and medical records concerning toxic and hazardous substances. Refer to the Access to Exposure and Medical Records Program for more details. 4.7.3 Air Hoses and Compressed Air Do not use compressed air: a) To clean-off clothing. b) To clean equipment, such as ball bearings, unless the balls are held securely. c) As a carrier agent for solvents while cleaning equipment. d) For pressure testing vessels or pipelines, unless specifically authorized by a Nexen Representative(s) and the HSE&SR Department.
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e) When any soft line air hoses are in use at pressures over 15 psig, use a securing system over the hose connections. The most common type of securing system is the whip-check system. Follow manufacturer specifications to ensure that securing systems are used correctly and are properly fitted, depending on pressures and hose sizes. No homemade and/or uncertified securing systems will be accepted. Note Worm gear type hose clamps shall not be used on Nexen facilities.

4.7.4 Air-operated Equipment When using air-operated equipment: a) Pneumatic power tools are to be in good working condition, paying particular attention to the use of proper connectors, fittings, and hoses. b) Bleed off air pressure before disconnecting any air hose. c) Keep lubricators and water traps in good working order. d) Drain air tanks daily of accumulated water. e) Do not install valves between any tank, compressor, or other piece of equipment and its relief valve. f) Regulate compressed air used for cleaning purposes to 30psi to limit the pressure and flow. g) Fit air tools with a regulator adjusted to the recommended air operating pressure. h) Compressed air is dangerous. Treat it with respect. i) Pneumatic power tools shall not have the ability to be in a locked-on position. 4.7.5 Other General Hose Types When working with other hose types: a) Soft Line Hoses When using any soft line hose on boiler systems operating at a pressure greater than 15 psig, including a soft line connected to steel piping, use a securing system over the connection points. The most common type of securing system is the whip-check system. Follow manufacturer specifications to ensure that securing systems are used correctly and are properly fitted, depending on pressures and hose sizes. Do not accept homemade and/or uncertified securing systems. b) Hydraulic Hoses When using any soft line hose over 6.5 feet in length on hydraulic systems operating at a pressure greater than 100 psig, including soft line connected to steel piping, use a whip-check securing system over the connection points.
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All hydraulic hoses shall be integrity tested, including new and repaired hoses, and those being fabricated on site. Note All hoses must be checked to ensure the appropriate pressure rating and that they are suitable for the intended service or product.

4.7.6 Area Designations A Nexen Representative will determine area designations during the work permitting process and communicate these to those performing the work. Take in to account the potential hazards associated with these areas and type of work being performed when issuing work permits. Area designations can include: a) Free or Non-process areas, where there are no flammable or toxic atmosphere potentials. b) Classified or Process areas, where the potential exists for flammable and/or toxic atmospheres. c) Radiographic areas, where there are radioactive hazards due to equipment or work activities. d) Mustering areas, or gathering points, when emergency evacuation is required. e) Restricted areas that are off-limits to personnel unless they are authorized to enter. f) Danger or Caution areas, where temporary hazards exist due to operations or maintenance activities. g) Explosives area, where there are explosive hazards due to equipment or work activities. 4.7.7 Asbestos When working with asbestos: a) Remove asbestos in compliance with applicable regulations. b) Verify that workers removing the asbestos are adequately trained and qualified. 4.7.8 Asset Integrity and Reliability Ensures that critical equipment used to process, store, or handle hydrocarbons or other hazardous chemicals and materials of construction at Nexen facilities will be procured, inspected, tested, and maintained to minimize uncontrolled releases of these substances. Preventative Maintenance programs ensure Reliability of Critical equipment maintained to minimize the occurrence of hazards that will jeopardize personnel safety, environmental quality, or profitability of Nexen operations.
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4.7.9 Batteries When working with batteries: a) Cover batteries stored in boxes as sources of emergency power with a nonconductive rubber mat under the lid of the box. b) Fit battery boxes with vents directed away from air inlets and sources of ignition. During the change out of batteries, avoid naked flames and sparks in the immediate vicinity of the battery. c) Chock batteries in their storage boxes to prevent movement undertow. d) Do not lift batteries by their terminals. e) Have plenty of ventilation, wear all required protective clothing and eyewear, remove jewelry, and exercise caution. f) Specialty or non-conductive tools should be considered when performing maintenance on batteries. g) Whenever possible, follow the manufacturer's instructions for testing, jumping, installing, and charging. Only use spirit (alcohol) thermometers when measuring a batterys temperature. h) All lead acid, NiCad, and lithium batteries will be disposed of in accordance with all local, state, and federal regulations. These batteries will be recycled and categorized as universal waste. Refer to Nexens Waste Management Plan for more information. Note Be advised, batteries store sulfuric acid electrolytes and electrical energy that may cause an explosion and personal injury if suddenly released.

4.7.10 Barricades, Flagging, and Signage When using barricades, flags, or signage: a) Use the necessary signs and barricades whenever a temporary hazard exists due to operations or maintenance work. b) Any ground level barricade device, such as flagging, sawhorses, or cement blocking, set in place for control of either pedestrian or vehicle traffic, must be at least 3 feet in height and extend 3 feet past the ends of the hazardous zones. c) Use flagging to warn workers of hazards in work areas and add a description tag, as required. Color-coded flagging tape can easily identify actions needed by workers near these hazardous areas. Use: i. Red flagging tape to indicate Do Not Enter, where there is a danger of hazards, such as falling objects or overhead lifts. Only those involved in the work are allowed in these areas.
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ii. Yellow flagging tape to indicate caution, providing a warning that a hazard exists in the area. Increased awareness of the surrounding work area is required. d) When the hazard no longer exists or work has been completed, remove all flagging tape. 4.7.11 Blow-out Prevention Equipment and Procedures The Blowout Preventer (BOP) systems and system components shall be designed, installed, used, maintained, and tested to assure well control as per applicable applications. Key items in reference to BOP equipment: a) Ensure the BOP stack has been certified, shop serviced, and shell-tested every 3 years. b) Keep the equipment, including accumulators, operational at all times during drilling operations, completing required checks on schedule and documented per BSEE requirements (IADC). c) Ensure blowout drills are performed and recorded prior to drilling out any casing. d) Well-control drills are to be performed and documented by each drilling crew every 7 days, or as needed, to ensure proficiency with the operation, as per BSEE requirements. 4.7.12 Bridging Documents Bridging documents are used primarily for contract drilling work, where the HSE program of Contractor and Nexen are reviewed and the best practices are documented. Bridging documents are in place before the well is spud or SIMOPS take place where Nexen is the operator. 4.7.13 Cargo Manifest and Tracking All Cargo shall have the proper manifests before being shipped offshore, returning onshore, or being shipped between facilities. Nexen logistics team cargo tracking processes shall be followed. 4.7.14 Cargo Loading When loading cargo a) Secure cargo inside containers for shipment by sea to prevent movement during transportation. Tie-down heavy and bulky items to prevent movement. b) Boom-type binders are prohibited. Refer to Nexens Transit Container Code for further details. c) Position equipment unloaded from supply vessels on the platform so that access to the container doors is possible. Do not block escape routes at any time.
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d) When opening doors of recently received cargo: i. Open them carefully, as loose or heavy equipment may have moved during transport and could be lying against the door. Open 1 door at a time and stand to the side of the unopened door when opening. ii. Have an escape route if contents spill from the container. 4.7.15 Cathodic Protection Do not begin work on equipment protected by an impressed current protection system until Nexen operations personnel or the Nexen Representative has made a determination whether the protection system should be left on or off. Complete a documented risk/hazard assessment prior to the work starting and communicate determinations made to all workers as part of the tailgate or pre-job meetings. 4.7.16 Chain of Command The supervisor is the most likely person to have the ability to help with immediate concerns. The chain of command for offshore platforms is as per the platform specific Station Bill (refer to Section 4.7.122 Station Bill). If it is apparent that the chain of command has broken down during an emergency, take whatever actions are necessary to protect personnel without putting anyone at more risk. For every day requirements, report concerns and/or questions to your immediate supervisor. Nexen has an open door policy regarding communication and concerns can be brought to the highest level wished. 4.7.17 Changing Oil/Servicing Equipment Properly collect, store, transfer, and dispose of waste products generated by the servicing of equipment. Refer to Nexens Waste Management Plan. 4.7.18 Chemical, Product, and Material Handling When working with chemicals, products, and materials: a) MSDS will be available for all hazardous chemicals and products on Nexen worksites. b) Employees will be trained in the safe handling of chemicals and products in accordance with the Hazardous Communications (HAZCOM) requirements. Contractors should have comparable training as required by their HAZCOM program. c) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are made available to employees and contractors. Designated site storage of MSDS is communicated during orientation. d) Verify that the appropriate placard markings and cargo manifests are in place at the platform. Damaged or faded placard markings shall be replaced.
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e) Prior approval is required before bringing a new chemical or controlled product to a Nexen site. Note Section 4.7.18 Chemical, Product, and Material Handling does not apply to products purchased or used in quantities available for retail sale. Such as liquid hand soap and sanitizer.

4.7.19 Communications There are several ways to communicate while offshore. These options include: a) Voice communication public address (PA) system equipped on platforms. Use alarm signals or bells to signal emergency conditions, such as a fire. When using the PA: i. Do not abuse or use it for anything other than company-specific information. Music or other non-company business is not allowed. ii. During an electric power blackout, the PA system is powered from a battery backup system and is able to power alarms and communicate information regarding the specific emergency. b) For any operation where line of sight by the equipment operator cannot be maintained with personnel or material, use a repeat back system of communication. 4.7.20 Compressed Gas Cylinders When using compressed gas cylinders: a) Return them promptly to a suitable storage area after use. b) Locate storage areas away from general and emergency escape traffic paths. c) Divide cylinder storage areas: i. Into areas marked as full and empty. ii. By obviously tagging the cylinders. d) Oxygen cylinders in storage shall be separated from fuel-gas cylinders or combustible materials (especially oil or grease), a minimum distance of 20 feet or by a noncombustible barrier at least 5 feet high having a fireresistance rating of at least one-half hour. e) Separate cylinders containing substances that, if mixed, could produce an explosive or fire hazard. For example, do not store acetylene and oxygen cylinders together unless they are stored in an approved bottle-rack carrier, per NFPA Standard 55. f) When not in use, close cylinder valves and depressurize connecting hoses. g) Be sure that valve protection caps are in place on cylinders whenever they are not connected for use or while they are being transported.
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h) Store, transport, and use compressed gas cylinders in accordance with manufacturers specifications and NFPA codes i) Secure cylinders to some substantial stationary object or structure by a chain or other suitable means capable of supporting the weight of the cylinder. 4.7.21 Compressors, Engines, and Pumps When working with compressors, engines, and pumps: a) The equipment may start automatically, without warning. Personnel should stay away and refrain from leaning on or resting anything against the equipment. Post warning signs on the equipment. b) Some parts of air compressors may become extremely hot during use. Mark these places on the machine to warn personnel who may come into accidental contact with it. c) Fit rotating parts of pumps, engines, and other machinery, such as fans, belts, chain drives, and clutches, with machinery guards. Do not remove safety guards except when inspecting, making repairs, lubrication, or making adjustments. Replace these parts immediately. d) Do not perform work until power has been shut off, the machinery properly locked and/or tagged out, and any Work Authorization Permits and/or Isolation Certificates have been issued. e) All compressors, engines, and pumps will have all required safety devices installed as per API RP 14C and manufacturers recommendations. 4.7.22 Compliance with Standards As required, NPU standards are developed and implemented to ensure that Nexen sites operate in compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and generally accepted industry codes of practices and standards, and company policies and guiding principles. 4.7.23 Conduct of Operations Develop and implement a system to ensure a consistently high level of human performance to avoid an adverse affect on aspects of an operation. As the complexity of the operational activities increases, a similar increase in the formality of operational conduct must occur to ensure safe, reliable, and consistent performance of critical tasks. 4.7.24 Confined Spaces Confined space entry can be extremely dangerous. Nexen personnel are not authorized to conduct confined space entries. It is important, however that they understand the rules applicable to operations conducted in confined spaces. OSHA considers workplaces confined when their configurations hinder the activities of employees who must enter, work in, and exit them. A confined space
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has limited or restricted means for entry or exit and is not designed for continuous employee occupancy. Confined spaces include, but are not limited to: a) Vaults b) Tanks c) Voids d) Storage bins e) Man ways f) Pits g) Process vessels h) Pipelines Where a worker must enter a confined space, verify that suitable procedures are in place to protect the worker and that they have received the proper training. Documentation of this training shall be provided to Nexen prior to the job. Make the required Confined Space Entry Procedure and Entry Plan readily available at the work site. The procedures are required to meet all the requirements of Nexens Confined Space Entry Standard and applicable regulations. These procedures include, but are not limited to: a) Engineering controls b) Entry permit c) Atmospheric testing (periodic or continuous) d) Verification of training e) Isolation and Lockout/Tagout safeguards f) Retrieval methods g) Communications h) Emergency Response Retrieval and Rescue Plan 4.7.25 Contraband Items Nexen USAs Contraband Items Standard states that: a) The possession of deadly weapons or explosives on company premises or while conducting company business is strictly forbidden. b) Firearms, guns, ammunition or other similar items where the use, possession, transfer, storage, concealment, transportation or sale of which is not specifically authorized or allowed on NPU property by the President of NPU or his/her designated representative is prohibited. c) Illicit drugs, drug paraphernalia, incense, controlled substances or alcoholic beverages on company premises or while conducting company business is strictly forbidden
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d) Only knives with retractable blades designed for commercial use are to be for work. This does not apply to catering knives used for meal preparation work areas. A personal jackknife or hunting knife is prohibited. e) Explosives are prohibited on Nexen leases, excluding those used for legitimate operational purposes, such as perforation. f) Company employees or contractors who violate this standard or fail to cooperate with a search request may be refused access to Nexen sites. 4.7.26 Cranes Crane Operator and Rigger Qualifications The qualifications of crane operators and riggers must follow API RP 2D standard, including: a) Each crane operator is designated in writing by the PIC. On manned platforms, the PIC maintains a list containing the names of authorized crane operators. Only designated personnel are allowed to operate the cranes, excluding when trainees may operate cranes under the direct supervision of a qualified operator. b) Crane riggers must have a recognized crane rigging course certification, as per API RP 2D. Crane Operating Practices When operating cranes: a) Crane operators verify that the following are compliant and in place at the beginning of the tour and documented on the Pre-use Inspection form: i. Crane controls ii. Capacity chart iii. Properly marked controls iv. Operational boom angle indicator v. Hand signal charts vi. Operational limit switches vii. Wire rope condition, by a visual inspection viii. Sling and cable condition, by a visual inspection ix. Boom condition x. Hook safety latches xi. Check all fluid levels b) If operational limit switches are not functional, then the crane will be taken out of service until repaired. c) Do not leave cranes unattended with a suspended load. d) Use 2-part shackles with cranes when conducting normal deck operations. e) Operate cranes within their rated load capacities as specified by the load capacity chart.
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f) Do not use cranes to slide or snake the load by pulling from the side with the crane boom. g) Use tag lines to control the load. h) Use Shepherd Hooks to retrieve tag lines. i) Utilize a Hands Free practice when handling loads. j) Do not stand under a suspended load. k) Deck crews verify that an avenue of escape is available in order to avoid pinch points. l) Paint crane blocks and crane balls safety yellow or orange. m) The crane operator knows the weight of every load lifted with the crane. n) Do not ride the crane block, suspended loads, boom, or hooks. o) During helicopter operations near the platform or MODU, position the crane booms so that there is no possibility of interference with the helicopter and the crane operator must stand outside of the cab so that the pilot can see them. p) Do not operate cranes in adverse weather conditions. Follow the manufacturers safe operating parameters. Refer to Section 4.7.131 Weather Restrictions for Crane Operators. q) Make personnel aware of the crane loads fall zone area where the load could land if dropped during a lift. Keep this area clear of personnel during any lift, except for those associated with the lifting process. r) Lay the crane boom in the boom rest for maintenance. s) Never override crane safety limit switches without the PICs permission and a MoC or Permit to Work documentation. t) Do not transfer personnel by crane unless the crane is outfitted with an antitwo block device, a personnel basket is used, and a certified crane operator is at the controls. 4.7.27 Crane Assisted Personnel Transfers The following minimum lifting practices are recommended for all crane assisted personnel transfer net devices: a) Have a written procedure for transferring personnel on offshore facilities with a personnel carrier. b) Review a personnel transfer training video, provided by the manufacturer, prior to going offshore. c) Conduct a pre-use inspection of the transfer basket prior to making any personnel transfer, as per the manufacturers specification. d) Ensure that cranes assigned to personnel lifting duties are suitable for this purpose .
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e) Crane operators assigned to personnel lifting duties must be certified and competent to perform this task. f) Affix a snag resistant tag line to all personnel carriers. g) Crane hooks used for personnel transfers must have a positive locking latch. h) Use only approved personnel carriers for lifting personnel per API RP 2D. Do not use personnel carriers as a workbasket or cargo net. i) Legibly mark personnel carriers with the maximum number of passengers. j) Transfer luggage in the center of the personnel net is not recommended. This practice can cause the debarkation process to be slowed and the rider be delayed in getting to a safe area. There is also the potential for back injury due to the awkwardness of leaning over to get bags. Both risks are increased in rough seas. k) Do not use personnel carriers in weather, wind, or sea conditions that the qualified crane person considers unsafe. l) Before any attempt is made to lift personnel with a carrier, give clear instructions to all persons involved. m) Do not transport personnel suffering from acute seasickness or vertigo by personnel carrier. n) Any individual has the right to refuse transfer by a personnel basket. o) Personnel riding on a personnel carrier must wear an approved life vest or life preserver. An approved Type I Personal Flotation Device (PFD) is required for all transfers. p) Personnel riding on a personnel carrier must stand on the outer rim, evenly spaced, and adjacent to a sidewall opening in the netting, facing inward. Passengers interlock forearms to the inside of the sidewall netting. q) If crane operators view of the primary signalman is obstructed, the personnel carrier should not be moved until alternative communication or signal devices are placed in service. r) A designated primary landing zone should be marked in a safe area as determined by a JSA. s) When transferring personnel, lift the personnel carrier only high enough to clear obstructions and gently lower it to the deck. t) Do not raise or lower a loaded personnel carrier directly over a vessel. u) The crane operator may refuse to lift any person who does not comply with the operators instructions. v) Provide an experienced escort for persons who are not confident performing a personnel carrier transfer.
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w) Injured, ill, or unconfident persons may ride in a sitting position, on the inside of the personnel carrier, with a qualified person as an escort. 4.7.28 Designated Smoking Areas Smoking is permitted only within designated areas. Within the Nexen worksite and office locations, designated smoking areas are outside of any building, structure, or other enclosed workplace areas, such as office areas, storage areas, workshop areas, and doghouses. They will be at least 16.5 feet away from doors, windows, or air intakes of these locations. Designated smoking areas are at least 35 feet away from any process area, tank storage area, wellhead, or other locations where there is a potential for a flammable and/or explosive atmosphere. Designated smoking areas will be clearly identified and include a cigarette receptacle for the clean and safe disposal of ashes and cigarettes or cigarette butts. The use of and/or carrying of strike anywhere matches and lighters is restricted to designated smoking areas and/or non-hazardous work areas only. For more information on where site-specific designated smoking areas are located, contact the designated Nexen Supervisor or site representative. 4.7.29 Drilling and Service Platforms When working on drilling and service platforms: a) The contractor provides well-maintained equipment that is in safe operating condition. b) Verify that equipment complies with all requirements stipulated by the regulations, the manufacturer, and industry standards. c) The contractor conducts inspections of these platforms as required by governmental agencies and/or regulation and repairs or replaces any item found to be deficient during any of these inspections. d) The drilling and service platform contractors provide the company with the latest governmental agencies inspection report for the platform to be used to perform work for the company. e) Before a new service platform is used on Nexen locations, a Nexen Representative and Service Platform personnel conduct an inspection. 4.7.30 Dropped Objects When objects are dropped: a) Notify the PIC and/or the supervisor of any dropped objects whether on- or overboard. b) Record objects that are lost overboard on the facility's daily operations report and investigate incidents, as appropriate. c) Report all dropped objects to PIC as well as HSE&SR manager to ensure they are externally reported as per BSEE regulations.
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d) Adhere to all industry best practices for dropped objects prevention guidelines. 4.7.31 Drug-free Workplace Policy Nexen is committed to protecting the safety health and well-being of employees and other individuals in our workplace and we recognize that alcohol abuse and drug pose a significant threat to our goals. The Drug-free Workplace Program balances our respect for individuals with the need to maintain an alcohol and drug-free environment. With this Policy: a) Employees are forbidden to use, possess, or be under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs while conducting business on company premises. b) Nexen may test personnel for illicit drug or alcohol use for these reasons: i. Random Tests at any time chosen by Nexen management ii. Post-Incident following an injury, spill, or property damage incident iii. For Cause reasonable suspicion exists to prompt testing c) Employees or contractors are expected to disclose any prescription medication at initial orientation and subsequent trips offshore. 4.7.32 Electrical When working with electricity: a) Only authorized employees perform maintenance or repairs on electrical wiring or equipment in accordance with the Electrical Safety Program for qualified individuals. b) Complete installations, repairs, and maintenance by electrical guidelines and Preventive Maintenance Routine requirements. c) Verify that electrical installations comply with applicable regulatory requirements. d) Ground electrical wall outlets, tools, extension cords, and equipment. e) Post a Danger High Voltage sign at the entrance to generator, transformer, and other high voltage equipment areas. f) Hang first aid/CPR instructional posters in a prominent position within Control rooms, generator, transformer, and other high voltage equipment areas. g) A die-electric mat is required at all times in front of all switchboards. No maintenance performed under a Permit to Work will take place unless the insulating mat is in place. Maintain the mats in a clean and dry condition. h) Place, secure, and maintain enclosures and covers for electrical equipment, junction boxes, and switches. i) Maintain electrical equipment in proper working condition. If a piece of equipment is out of service and immediate repairs are not planned,
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disconnect the power source and clearly mark the equipment as being out of service. j) Always use proper testing instruments. Never use a hand or finger to test for voltage. k) Do not bridge fuses with coins, foil, or jumper wires. Keep a fuse puller on hand and use for replacing fuses. l) Do not use splices in electrical extension cords. m) Do not use water to clean around generators, electrical switchboards or other electrical devices. n) Do not alter electrical equipment in hazardous locations, negating their hazard rating. For example, persons performing maintenance to explosion proof equipment must be careful not to alter the equipment or its fittings in such a manner as to change the rating, approval, or characteristics of the equipment. o) Inspect electrical hand tools for damage to cords or connections. Do not use electrical hand tools while standing in water or outside during foul weather conditions. p) Always disconnect or check that the power source is off before attempting repairs and locked and tagged. q) Do not work on live electrical equipment. r) Keep vapor-proof globes and guards in place over lights in required areas. s) Do not use metal ladders for electrical work. t) Locate a die-electric hook, insulated rubber gloves, heat tempered face shield, and die-electric apron near generators, transformers, and in high voltage equipment areas (600v or greater as per NFPA 70E) as appropriate. u) In case of fire in any electrical equipments or areas, use only CO2 or a powder type extinguisher in the order of preference.

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4.7.33 Exposure Control (Blood Borne Pathogens) Nexen employees share the responsibility of preventing exposure of communicable diseases to themselves, contractors, and vendors during the course of performing their duties and responsibilities. If it is reasonable anticipated employees will be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials while using first-aid supplies, employers should provide PPE. Appropriate PPE includes: gloves, gowns, face shields, masks, and eye protection. Refer to Occupational Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogens. Employee responsibilities include: a) Exposure Determination. b) Scheduling and method of implementation for Methods of Compliance, Hepatitis B Vaccination, and Post-Exposure Evaluation and Follow-up, Communication of Hazards to Employees, and Recordkeeping. c) Procedure for the evaluation of circumstance surrounding exposure incidents. Refer to the Exposure Control (BBP) standard for more details. d) BBP kits will be placed strategically where needed on platforms and MODUs. 4.7.34 Emergency Response and Notification Nexen uses an All Hazards Emergency Management process with OBriens Response Management (OBriens) Group. Call 1-866-931-5727 for this Group. OBriens will notify NPUs Qualified Individual (QI). This includes all spills and emergency medical evacuations. Production Platforms Emergency Notification Procedure a) In the case of an emergency, the Facility Supervisor, or PIC of a facility or location, after taking any necessary immediate lifesaving actions, i. Verbally notify the OBriens Duty Watch Stander, who will capture the incident information in a Spill/Incident Report Form. ii. Notify the HSE&SR Manager Prod&Construction, the Production Superintendent immediately after contacting OBriens. b) OBriens Duty Watch Stander or the OBriens Deputy Incident Commander verbally notifies the Nexen Petroleum USA, Inc. Incident Commander/Qualified Individual (QI). OBriens watch commander will Fax or email a copy of the Spill/Incident Report Form to all parties. c) OBriens Team members make required agency notifications, unless the Incident Commander/QI specifies otherwise. d) Incident Commander/QI activates the Regional Oil Spill Response Plan, if needed.
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e) The Incident Commander/QI assesses the situation and mobilizes the Nexen Emergency Operations Team, if needed after contacting the Platform Supervisor to confirm the information f) The Incident Commander/QI notifies Nexens Vice President Production & Operations or designate as appropriate. Drilling MODU on Nexen Lease Location Emergency Notification Procedure a) In the case of an emergency, the Drill-site Manager or Rig Supervisor onboard, after taking any necessary immediate lifesaving actions, verbally notifies the OBriens Duty Watch Stander, who will capture all the incident information in a Spill/Incident Report Form. The DSM or Supervisor then notifies the HSE&SR Manager D&C as well as the Drilling Superintendent of the incident. b) OBriens Duty Watch Stander or the OBriens Deputy Incident Commander verbally notifies the Nexen Incident Commander/QI. Fax or email the Spill/Incident Report Form to all parties. c) OBriens Team members make the required agency notifications, unless the Incident Commander/QI specifies otherwise. d) Incident Commander/QI activates the Regional Oil Spill Response Plan, if needed after contacting the DSM or Rig Supervisor to confirm the information. e) The Incident Commander/QI assesses the situation and mobilizes the Nexen Emergency Operations Team(s), if needed. f) The Incident Commander/QI notifies Nexens Vice President Production/Operations or designate as appropriate. Hurricane Preparedness Nexens Hurricane Preparedness plan includes non-essential personnel early evacuation, and designated T-time essential personnel evacuation. Nexen production and Logistics teams in support of its GoM operations constantly monitor weather conditions during Hurricane season May 30 to Nov 30. Depending on the nature and location of the storm, evacuations may start up to 72 hours before the storm approaches a Nexen facility or lease location. Review the Emergency Evacuation plan for your location 4.7.35 Emergency Drills Nexen will conduct all emergency drills in accordance with all federal regulatory requirements, as per the US Coast Guard (USCG) and BSEE. These drills include but are not limited to: Environmental Spills, Collision, Homeland Security, Helicopter Crash, Fire and Abandon, and Man Overboard Drills. When conducting emergency drills:
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a) All emergency drills must be documented, maintained, and made readily available to the USCG upon request. After 1 year, such records may be destroyed. b) Conduct a fire and abandon platform drill at least once each month for manned facilities. All persons on board participate. c) In addition to alarm signals, an announcement will be made over the PA system stating, "This is a drill, this is a drill," in order to distinguish drills from actual emergencies. The location of an actual fire or simulated fire will also be given over the PA system. d) Pre-plan drills and vary them to cover a variety of learning points. For example, periodically include mock injury or rescue situations. e) Deploy and use equipment to the extent practicable to simulate a true emergency, including starting each fire pump, if applicable. f) Simulate Activation of Emergency Shut-off Devices (ESDs) as part of the drill. On larger facilities or MODUs may require activation of ESDs. 4.7.36 For Fire Onboard Drills When conducting a fire onboard drill: a) The PIC coordinates emergency procedures from a pre-designated command center. b) Test communication equipment during drills by contacting shore based operations and other units in the area informing them that a fire drill is in progress. c) All personnel are to muster at their designated muster areas. Promptly take roll call and report it to the PIC in the command center. d) Report hazardous materials present at the scene of the fire and take the appropriate steps to minimize any special hazard associated with the hazardous material. e) After the fire is out, post a fire watch to guard against re-ignition. 4.7.37 For Abandon Platform Drills Persons proceeding to lifeboats or raft embarkation points are required to wear properly donned life jackets. Take a roll call by name. Account for all personnel and report to the PIC. If someone is missing, the PIC will instruct a rescue team 4.7.38 Emergency Escape to the Water In the event of an emergency water escape: a) The Station Bill lists locations for emergency escape to the water. b) Individual escape into the water is a last resort option, to be exercised only when other means are not available.
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c) Personnel should go to the lowest level possible before jumping into the water. 4.7.39 Emergency Evacuation Plan Manned structures will have Coast Guard approved Emergency Evacuation Plans (EEPs) onboard for use in addressing all aspects of a potential emergency evacuation of the platform and listing the required contacts, should an emergency evacuation be required. This plan will be posted around the rig and be made available in escape boats and capsules, where personnel will understand their duties. 4.7.40 Emergency Signals In case of the need for emergency signals: a) The platform is provided with emergency signals to indicate the following situations: i. Fire or Emergency ii. Abandon Platform b) When an alarm sounds, personnel are to take emergency action as defined in the Station Bill. The tones and signals used in the alarms may vary because of the requirements of different operating areas. Demonstration of the actual tones and alarms is mandatory for all new arrivals during the on-platform safety introduction and orientation. c) Treat alarms as the real thing until told otherwise. 4.7.41 Engineering Guidelines Understanding of some engineering concepts and guidelines will foster a high degree of safety consciousness. An active interest in accident prevention will contribute to improved safety on board the platform. General guidelines to follow at all times while offshore: a) Load Requirements i. Never exceed the safe working load or limits of operation of any equipment item/fittings on-board. ii. Do not load decks to more than the structural capacity limitation. iii. Do not have the weight of items concentrated over limited sections of the platforms steel structure. This may promote structural failure, resulting in severe corrosion, or more serious fatigue cracks and brittle fractures. iv. Try to distribute the loads over the deck area. b) In steel structures, deterioration mainly originates from corrosion, fatigue, or a combination of both.

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c) Never cut any opening on the primary platform structure without approval from the Nexen Engineering Department. Ensure proper material reinforcement when openings are cut in the secondary structures. d) Never leave tanks with a small quantity of water inside, this will lead to corrosion. The atmosphere in such tanks can become deficient in oxygen due to corrosion resulting from the remains of seawater. If there is reason to suspect a lack of oxygen or the presence of toxic vapors, then start ventilation or gas freeing some time before entry and check the atmosphere before tank entry is allowed. e) Corrosion on structures and pipes leads to progressive pitting and to safety hazards if left unattended over a period. Ensure corrosion is under control by using various corrosion control methods and proper protective coatings. Consult the PIC when in doubt. f) Provide adequate maintenance space before putting items near machinery or any mechanical item so that accessibility would not be a problem in times of an emergency. g) Use certified and rated lifting lugs, shackles, wires, and ropes for lifting jobs. h) Do not attach any items/equipment to the soft points on deck plating or bulkhead plating. i) Avoid or minimize vibration. j) If any visible cracks or excessive deformations are found in any part of the platforms structure, report the matter to the PIC for corrective measures. Timely detection can avoid structural failure. When leaks, ignition sources, and potential hazards are detected, inform the PIC. 4.7.42 Equipment and Piping Isolation When isolating equipment and piping: a) Properly isolate, de-pressurize, and/or de-energize equipment and associated piping before any maintenance or repair work is done. b) Isolation methods can include lockout and tagging of electrical equipment and the use of safety blinds and/or valves to secure piping associated with serviced equipment. c) When breaking the integrity of piping or equipment, a work permit must be issued before starting the work and necessary safety equipment, such as fire extinguishers and respiratory protection, in place if there is potential to expose the worker to hazardous substances. d) When breaking the integrity of hazardous or harmful piping under pressure for maintenance, repair, alteration, or replacement, isolate the piping in accordance with current regulations and Nexen practices, which could include the use of blinds or blanks, a double block and bleed method, or another alternate means of isolation that provides adequate protection to workers that
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has been approved by Nexen and/or certified as appropriate and safe by a professional engineer. e) Clearly mark all blinds and blanks. Lock and tag valves used for isolation. Isolation must be in place and proven effective before work begins and remain in place during the work activities. f) When safety blinds are installed, keep a record of blind number, location, size, and pressure rating and blinds and correctly pressure rate gaskets for their specific service. Refer to Nexen Line and Equipment Breaking Standard for more information. g) Install gaskets used in conjunction with blinds on the pressure side and where possible, on both sides of the blind. h) Tag valves used for isolation of equipment Do Not Operate and keep a record of the identifying location and position the valve was left in for isolation, for example, open or closed. i) Before removing locks, blinds or valves, check the isolation log to verify that all blinds have been removed and that all valves have been put back to normal operating position. j) When isolating equipment for confined space entry, physically disconnect, blind, or isolate all associated piping using the double block and bleed method. 4.7.43 Ergonomics When allocating jobs to personnel, consider the relationship of the equipment to positioning of personnel. All jobs must be reviewed to minimize the need for personnel to twist, overreach, stoop, or overstretch themselves. Further details of workstation design can be found in the Computer Workstation section of the Corporate Ergonomics manual. 4.7.44 Eyewash Stations Eyewash stations are provided around the platform/MODU for the express purpose of providing clean water for eye washing in the event that eyes become contaminated with hazardous substances. For each station: a) Keep them clean and free from dust, fluids, oils, greases, and other contaminants. b) Each person working in an area that has an eyewash station checks that it is available for use before work commences. c) For stations with bottle-type dispensers, check: i. For tampering. ii. The bottles expiration date for timeliness. iii. That open bottles are replaced with new, intact ones.
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d) Eyewash stations of the refill-type must contain sufficient water to irrigate the eyes as defined by the manufacturer. Change out the water in the refill-type on a monthly basis. e) Activate emergency showers and supplied water type eyewash stations to verify that they are functioning correctly. 4.7.45 Extension Cords/Cheater Cords Most power tools and portable electrical test equipment are not rated for use in classified areas and are equipped with standard non-explosion-proof plug ends, making it sometimes necessary to use an extension / cheater cord when plugging into explosion-proof receptacles. Due to the hazard of arcing electrical equipment or connections when plugging in this equipment, use the following practices: a) Do not use electrical equipment not approved for use in a classified area until a Hot Work Permit has been issued and the atmosphere has been tested to ensure flammable, gas-free conditions. b) Connections made with non-explosion-proof ends must be made outside of the classified areas and taped to prevent them from pulling apart. c) Plugging the cheater cord into the explosion-proof receptacle is always the last connection made. d) When the job is completed, break the connection at the explosion proof receptacle first. e) Extension cords that are frayed, taped, or otherwise damaged should be removed from service and tagged Do Not Use. f) Use extension cords only for temporary situations. 4.7.46 Firearms See Contraband Items Standard and section 4.7.25. 4.7.47 Fire Extinguishers For fire extinguishers (Refer to API RP 14G) at work sites: a) Properly maintain and appropriate fire extinguishers for the most likely class of fire to be exposed to at the work site. b) The fire extinguisher of choice within Nexen is a 30 lbs. Low Temperature, dry-chemical type portable extinguisher with an ABC or BC rating. c) The BSEE-approved plan for the platform specifies the size, type, and location of all fire extinguishers, hoses, reels, etc. required for the facility. d) All fire extinguishers will be located as per the approved personnel safety and fire fighting equipment drawings.

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e) Monthly inspection records are maintained and annual certifications are documented by the Facility Operator. 4.7.48 Fire Prevention To prevent fires offshore, API RP 14G can be used as a reference: Also: a) Storage cabinets shall be designed and constructed to limit internal temperatures to no more than 325F with a maximum capacity less than 60 gallons of Class I and Class II liquids. b) Store containers with flammable liquids away from the work area, traffic areas, and any source of ignition. Portable flammable containers shall be of Underwriters Laboratories (UL) Listed or Factory Mutual (FM) approved, or equivalent. c) When flammable liquids are being transferred from one container to another, electrically bond or ground transfer equipment. d) Prior to any hot work taking place in process areas or other potentially hazardous areas, a Hot Work Permit must be issued by a Nexen representative and work area must be tested and continuously monitored. Hot work can include the use of welding/torch equipment, electrical work, use of open flame heaters, use of cameras, other non-intrinsic devices, or any work where there is a potential to create heat and/or sparks. e) For further information on fire prevention and hot work, refer to Nexens Work Authorization Permit standard and Safe Welding and Burning Plan. 4.7.49 Fire Reporting When there is a fire: a) Sound the fire alarm to alert all personnel. b) The person first observing the fire: i. Calls out the location of the fire over the PA system. ii. Should only try to fight the fire if it is in its incipient stage and they are trained to do so. 4.7.50 Fire Response All personnel hearing the fire alarm will act in accordance with their responsibilities as described on the Station Bill. 4.7.51 Fire Watch Most hot work will require at least one fire watch. When this is the case: a) A fire watch is assigned during any welding, cutting, or other hot work operations being conducted outside the designated safe welding area on the platform. b) Fire watch is not to use any of the facility assigned Fire extinguishers.
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c) In case hot work is performed over an area (when welding on walls or decks) where the possibility of fire exists, a second fire watch is assigned in that area during the full fire watch period. d) The assigned fire watcher: i. Is trained and has the proper documentation. ii. Wears a high-visibility vest. iii. Monitors the hot work area for fire. iv. Is not be involved in any other activity while fire watching. v. Is proficient in the use of fire extinguishing equipment. vi. Has a fire extinguisher in their possession during assignment. vii. Remains on-site for 30 minutes after the hot work has been completed. viii. Has portable gas meter and continuously samples atmosphere, logging data in 15 min increments. 4.7.52 Fire Fighting Equipment There is specific equipment onboard to help in the case of a fire. This equipment consists of: a) Fire stations with a hydrant, fire hose, and fire nozzle . These may be located throughout the platform as set forth by the Station Bill. b) Special fire fighting systems, such as fixed CO2 or water mist systems and foam systems for helidecks. These may be found on various facilities. Each person must become familiar with these systems and the alarms associated with the activation of these systems. All persons must leave a fixed fire fighting system-protected area when the alarm sounds. Fixed fire fighting system protected areas are clearly identified. Note Instructions should be posted with clear activation directions.

c) Some platforms may have a diesel or electric driven fire pump. Become familiar with the platform you are working on by reviewing the station bill or platform drawings. d) Fire extinguishers of a class suitable for the most likely type of fire in a given area are located throughout the platform as shown on the Station Bill or platform drawings e) Smoke and heat detectors, fire eyes, and Temperature Safety Elements (TSE) are available at specified locations on each manned platform. Note Call for help before fighting fires; do not put yourself at risk!

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4.7.53 Classes of Fires and Extinguishing Agents Fire Class Class A Typical Occurrence Materials
Ordinary combustible materials, such as wood, cloth, and paper Vapor-air mixtures over the surface of flammable liquids, such as grease, gasoline and lubricating oils Electrical equipment where nonconducting extinguishing agents must be used Combustible metals, such as magnesium, titanium, zirconium, lithium, and sodium

Extinguishing Technique and Materials


Water, Special dry chemicals for use on Class A, B, and C fires. A smothering or combustion inhibiting effect; Dry chemical, foam, vaporizing liquids, carbon dioxide, and water fog Dry chemical, carbon dioxide, and vaporizing liquids; Do not use foam, non-spray water, and water-type extinguishing agents Specialized techniques, extinguishing agents and equipment have been developed to control and extinguish fires of this type. Do not use normal extinguishing agents on metal fires because of the danger of increasing the intensity of the fire with a chemical reaction between some extinguishing agents and the burning metal.

Class B

Class C

Class D

4.7.54 Firewalls Do not make an opening in a firewall that may affect its integrity without written approval from the Nexen Representative. 4.7.55 First Aid First aid on offshore facilities: a) Meets first aid equipment and first aid training requirements as specified by Regulations and Nexen requirements. b) Has a First Aid Station set up in a safe, easily accessible area with properly equipped with unexpired supplies. 4.7.56 First Aid /CPR/AED Training Sufficient personnel will be on the platform at all times to render First Aid/CPR/AED when necessary. Continuing training in first aid will be conducted at least every 2 years.

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4.7.57 Fishing Fishing is prohibited from MODU. Personnel on production platforms may be allowed to fish with permission from the PIC if they hold a valid Louisiana fishing license. 4.7.58 Fit for Duty Employees and contract personnel being able to safely and acceptably perform assigned duties without any limitations due to the use or after-effects of alcohol, illicit drugs, fatigue, or medications. 4.7.59 Gas Detectors (Portable) When using portable gas detectors: a) Only competent persons are allowed to use these units and perform operator maintenance b) Calibrate gas detectors according to the manufacturer's recommendations, and only with an approved calibration kit daily bump test c) Portable gas detectors shall have appropriate auxiliary pumps and wands for confined space gas sampling. d) Gas sampling will be conducted before issuing a Confined Space Entry Permit, and/or Safe Welding & Burning Permits. e) Continuous monitoring of the atmosphere within a confined space or hot work area is to be documented at 15 min intervals. f) Ensure each portable gas detector has been calibrated by the external service provider at least every 90 days, with the current inspection sticker (with date) attached. 4.7.60 Grinders (Bench) When using grinders: a) Grinders are to have a protective guard and a properly adjusted tool rest with a gap of approximately 1/8 inch between the grinding disc and the rest. b) Wear goggles and full-face shields, keep these positioned near the bench grinder for ease of use. c) Locate an on/off switch within reach of the person using the bench grinder (Preference is to use a dead mans switch). d) Only competent personnel will change grinding discs. e) Ensure the revolutions per minute (RPM) are indicated (brass plate) on the bench grinder.

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f) The RPM rating of the grinding disk should match, or be greater than, that of the grinder rated RPM. g) Never use a bench grinder to grind wood, plastics, or aluminum. 4.7.61 Equipment Guarding All moving machinery that presents a hazard to employees working in its proximity is to be equipped with safety guards. a) Replace removed guards before the machinery is returned to operation. b) Before removing guards, use a lockout/tagout process to determine exact energy isolation requirements. c) Insulate or properly guard piping and exhausts that could cause burns. d) Do not remove guards on portable tools and keep them in good working order. 4.7.62 Guardrails, Handrails, Platforms, and Barricades For all guardrails, handrails, platforms, and barricades: a) Install these as required by Coast Guard and OSHA Regulations. b) Provide and maintain signs, barriers, and/or flag persons necessary to protect workers from injury. c) Approved guardrails with safe, sturdy walking surfaces must accompany work areas, walkways, platforms, or other elevated areas, 6 feet or more from ground level, whether permanent or temporary. d) Securely install temporary covering or proper guardrails on all deck openings. 4.7.63 Hazard Identification and Risk Analysis Ensure that a Hazard Identification and Risk Analysis (HIRA) system is in place and encompasses activities for identifying hazards and evaluating and controlling risk at sites. JSEA is a HIRA process. 4.7.64 Hazard Reporting Personnel are responsible for reporting any hazards they may observe on the platform. The line of reporting is through the immediate platform supervisor. The person observing the hazard must do all within his ability to prevent the situation from developing further, without putting himself at risk. Follow Nexens near miss/incident reporting requirements. 4.7.65 Hazardous Substances Control To protect against hazardous substances: a) Follow all HAZCOM required standards when handling hazardous substances.
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b) Do not accept chemical or other hazardous material on any facility without a current MSDS for the relevant product. c) Check hazardous substances received to ensure that all packaging is intact; with no leakage of the contents and package labeling that is consistent with the MSDS. d) Place chemicals and hazardous substances in the appropriate hazardous storage area for the particular substance. e) Store containers with chemicals and hazardous materials in liquid form in suitable storage areas. These areas will provide: i. Drainage for leakage to suitable containment tanks. ii. Chemicals and hazardous materials in powder form are stored such that the aerosol effect from such materials, combined with free flowing air currents, will not cause human or environmental problems. f) Before using any hazardous substance, the personnel using the substance must understand the instructions on its use and precautions to be taken. Adequate personal protective equipment must be available and used as required. g) The supervisor must assess the job to be performed and if required, conduct training sessions and a Pre-Job Safety Meeting with all personnel involved in the use of the hazardous substance. h) Maintain a master file of MSDS for all hazardous material in use for reference. i) Hazardous materials labels or markings on containers in use or stored on platforms or MODUs that have been damaged, defaced or faded need to be replaced. Contact Supplier for necessary replacement labels. j) Keep separate file for all archiving all chemicals that were present on the facility at any time. 4.7.66 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response HAZWOPER refers to the 5 types of hazardous waste operations conducted in the United States under OSHA Standard 1910.120 "Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response." The standard contains the safety requirements employers must meet in order to conduct these operations. 4.7.67 Heaters (Portable) When working with heaters: a) Only competent workers will: i. Install, ignite, and service portable heaters. ii. Perform repairs and maintenance. b) Operational flame-failure shutdown devices must be on all portable fired heaters.
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c) Contractors ensure that adequate ventilation is available to prevent the buildup of carbon monoxide where there could be a lack of breathable air in a confined area or hoarded structure. 4.7.68 Helicopter Safety When using helicopters, passengers must: a) Be HUET trained every 5 years. b) Pay attention to the boarding and safety instructions given by the helicopter company. c) Make themselves aware of all exits and safety equipment locations upon boarding the flight d) Always enter or leave the helicopter in the safe access/egress area. This is explained during the pre-flight briefing. As a rule, this is at an angle of approximately 45 degrees to the helicopter, avoiding the tail rotor area. Exercise special tail rotor caution when retrieving baggage from the tail section of the helicopter e) Secure lightweight articles, such as coats, hats or other loose items inside passenger baggage to prevent them from being sucked into the rotor blades or blown overboard. f) Follow boarding and seating instructions from the pilot. g) Wear seatbelts, and ear protection, if applicable, and life jackets during the flight. h) Respect flight provided safety equipment. Do not tamper with this equipment. i) Only disembark at arrival at the instruction of the flight crew. j) Maintain windsocks, helideck markings, and lighting in accordance with the applicable government regulations. k) Keep the helideck clean and free of protruding objects at all times. The surface must be of a non-skid nature. l) Do not use the crane during helicopter operations. m) Carry only one piece of luggage from the helideck at any one time. Always keep one hand on the handrail. 4.7.69 Hoses and Piping under Pressure When using temporary hoses and piping under pressure: a) Secure temporary hose, piping, and/or associated connections operating under pressure if workers could be injured by its movement, should it fail or become disconnected. b) In the event that temporary hoses, piping, and/or associated connections operating at a working pressure of 290 psig or more cannot be secured, then
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they must be designed, installed, used, inspected, and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer specifications or in accordance to specifications certified by a professional engineer. c) When temporary hoses and piping are pressurized to 290 psig or more, establish a safe working zone within the line area and position adequate warning signs before hoses or piping are pressurized. d) No workers are allowed to enter this danger zone while hoses or piping are under pressure unless authorized to do so by Nexen representative or site supervisor. 4.7.70 Hot Tapping Do not begin hot tapping without the written consent of a Nexen Representative. If a hot tap is to be performed, review the Contractors or Nexens Hot Tapping and In-service Welding standard by the workers performing the hot tap before the hot tap commences. Hot tap procedures must comply with and be approved as per applicable regulations and legislation. 4.7.71 Housekeeping Keep work areas, equipment, walkways, and buildings clean and orderly at all times. 4.7.72 Injury and Illness Reporting When personnel are offshore, all injuries or illnesses are to be reported and documented. This includes both work related and non-work related injuries or illnesses. 4.7.73 Incident Reporting An incident or accident is an unplanned event that occurs, that causes or has the potential for causing injury or property damage, damage to assets, the environment, or loss of process. All incidents must be reported verbally to the Nexen PIC verbally, as soon as practicable (within 1 hour) Written notification reports are to be submitted within 4 hours and preliminary investigation reports within 24 hours. Contractors should plan to submit completed investigation reports no later than 7 days from time of the incident. Refer to Nexens Event Reporting and Investigation standard for more information. 4.7.74 Job Observation Programs Many Nexen Contractors use the DuPont STOP behavior based safety as a job observation system program that aims to promote and encourage positive safety behavior. It requires that observers intervene with personnel who carry out unsafe behaviors or practices, taking positive steps to correct them. Nexen will participate in contractor STOP programs where applicable to the worksite location (e.g. drilling). See Appendix N STOP Card.
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Nexen USAs job observation program is called P.A.C.E. It stands for People Observation, Administrative Process, Conditions working and Equipment conditions. Refer to Appendix M PACE Card for review of the P.A.C.E. Program 4.7.75 Job Planning The key to good performance lies in the amount of planning that went into the operation before the job started. All personnel should take the time to review the proposed work schedule and ensure that everything that is required to perform the job is ready. These could include: a) Correct tools b) Personal protective equipment c) Permits to Work or Isolation Permits d) Barrier tape or signs warning of the work being performed e) The correct number of trained personnel to do the job f) Work instructions g) JSEA (Refer to Appendix C Job Safety and Environmental Analysis Example). 4.7.76 Ladders and Stairs For ladders and stairs onboard: a) Light tools and equipment may be attached in a fit-for-purpose tool bag or dedicated lanyard attached to ones person, not carried. b) Keep stairways clear at all times, as they are also designated escape routes in most cases. c) Report and repair damage to stairways immediately. d) Use at least 1 handrail at all times while personnel are ascending or descending stairways. If carrying items or baggage on stairways, 1 hand must be free to use the handrail. e) Fit stairways with non-slip nosing to prevent personnel from slipping on stairways. f) Follow the trailing hand technique while descending stairs. g) Fixed ladders greater than 20 feet require cages. 4.7.77 Portable Ladders When working with portable ladders: a) Thoroughly inspect ladders before use and remove any defective ladder from service immediately, tagged out, and reported. b) Personnel must:
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i. Not climb higher than the third rung from the top on extension ladders or the second step from the top on stepladders. ii. Not reach beyond arms length from the side rails, nor should the ladder be moved with a person on it. iii. Face a ladder when climbing up or down. iv. Not hand carry any load or item while using ladders. v. Not to use boxes, chairs, sawhorses, or tables to improvise a ladder. c) Maintain 3 points of contact (2 hands-1 foot or 2 feet-1 hand), at all times by personnel using a ladder. d) Only 1 person is to climb and descend a ladder at a time. e) Secure portable ladders at the top or held in position by another person. Only use ANSI approved ladders. Remove ladders with weakened, broken, or damaged rungs, broken side rails or missing side rails, or non-slip devices at the base from service and label them Do Not Use. f) Equip ladders with non-slip feet and extension ladders with suitable extension locks. g) Use fiberglass ladders (Dielectric) when working near or with electrical circuits. Do not use metal ladders in this application. h) When in use, the ladder must extend 3 feet past any platform or landing, be secured from movement, and positioned so that it is no more than 1/4th of its height away from the wall or structure against which it stands. Do not work from either of the top 2 rungs or steps. Move the ladder as the work progresses. i) If a ladder is used for a height over 10 feet, secure the ladder against accidental movement during use. For heights over 21 feet, scaffolding must be in place as a replacement for a ladder. In applications between 10 21 feet, scaffolding is recommended as an alternative to a ladder. j) Ladders are not recommended as an elevated work area over 6 feet in height. If so used, then the required fall protection and be tied off to a suitable anchor point. k) When using extension ladders, overlap at least 3 rungs of the ladder extension. 4.7.78 Lifejackets When using lifejackets: a) Use a minimum of Type I PFD with high-visibility tape and the name of the facility or MODU. b) Lifejackets are located in storage containers at locations set forth on the Station Bill or safety equipment drawing. c) Properly wear lifejackets during emergency drills and during actual emergencies.
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d) When not in use, return lifejackets to their original position. e) Notify the supervisor of any lifejacket defects, remove the device from service, and replace. f) Fit lifejackets with a whistle and a light. Inspect these annually. 4.7.79 Lifesaving Equipment There is specific equipment onboard to help in the case of a life-threatening emergency. The location of this equipment is detailed in the Station Bill or safety equipment drawing. To use this equipment: a) Keep life floats in a ready condition at all times except when maintenance is being performed. b) Life floats installed on Nexen platforms are of the throw over or quick release type. These are considered escape equipment and will only be used as a last resort. c) Ring buoys, located on the handrails as shown on the Station Bill or safety equipment drawing, are available to be thrown to a person in distress. d) Ring buoys are equipped with water lights and buoyant lines. Buoys are not to be permanently secured, tied, or attached to the platform in any way. 4.7.80 Manual Lifting Most back injuries are caused by negligence or violation of basic safe lifting rules. Back injuries can be prevented by first assuming a squatting position. Keep the object close to the body and raise the object by straightening the legs. Get help lifting when needed. When lifting, also: a) Have secure footing. b) Keep the spine erect, lifting with the legs and not the back. c) Assess the weight before lifting. If the object is too heavy, get help. To avoid the load on one person, pick up or lay down the object on a given signal. d) Take advantage of skids, hoist, bars, jacks, blocking, rollers, or hand trucks when moving heavy material. e) Never pick up or put down an object while in a twisted position. f) Never be under a heavy object while it is being lifted. g) Use the same lifting procedures for lightweight objects as you would for heavy weight. Failure to do so may result in needless injury. h) Limit manual lifting loads to 50 lbs.

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4.7.81 Lifting Devices Refer to Nexens Lifting Operations standard for further lifting operations. When using the aid of lifting devices: a) All lifting devices and material hoists must meet BSEE and Coast Guard requirements and be labeled for maximum lifting capacity. b) Only competent/qualified, authorized workers shall operate lifting devices. c) One person is designated as a signalman (flagman) and the lifting device operator takes direction or instruction from the signalman only. However, anyone can give the all-stop signal. d) Prior to performing a lift, the operator determines the weight of the object to be lifted and ensure that cables, lifting devices, slings, and wire ropes are of sufficient strength, in proper condition, and positioned to support the weight of the load and that the boom angle is appropriate for the load and the expected dynamics of the load. e) Where critical lifts, such as heavy lifts, lifts over process equipment, or lifts involving two cranes require formal lift plans. f) For lifts where the operator cannot see the load, at a minimum, a JSA must be completed and a signalman properly positioned to signal the lift. g) Do not allow any part of the body to extend under any load being lifted by a crane, side boom, or other lifting device. h) Never attempt to lift unbalanced loads or lift materials directly above workers. i) Do not use a lifting device to pull loads sideways. j) Never leave a load suspended while the lifting device is unattended. When shutting down a lifting device leave all the controls in neutral, the brakes locked, and loads lowered to ground level. k) When hoisting materials, keep loads as close to ground level as possible. l) Use tag lines to guide the load. m) Make the inspection and maintenance records for each lifting device available for review by the Nexen Representative. n) Tag rigging equipment for safe working loads and do not exceed the safe limits established by the manufacturer on loads exerted on rigging. If rigging equipment is not tagged or marked for safe workloads, do not use it until a rating of the equipment can be determined. o) Verify that running lines of the sling do not contact the shackle bolt. p) Protect slings from any cutting edges. q) Do not shorten legs of a sling using knots and/or bolts. r) Use shackles to pin the eye of the sling or lifting lugs. Do not allow pins to meet the running part of any sling.
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s) Hooks on lifting and rigging equipment must have functioning safety latches. t) When using cranes, pickers or hoisting equipment always consider the following: i. ii. iii. iv. v. Proximity to other personnel and equipment Wind velocity Temperatures Reach or extension of lifting equipment Weight of the load including the rigging being used

4.7.82 Lightning Lightning is an electrical discharge caused when static electricity builds up between thunderclouds, or thunderclouds and the ground. Lightning strikes carry up to 100 million volts of electricity and leap from cloud to cloud, or cloud to ground and vice versa. Lightning tends to strike higher ground and prominent objects, especially good conductors of electricity such as metal. Because light travels at a faster speed than sound, you can see a lightning bolt before the sound of thunder reaches you. To judge how close lightning is, count the seconds between the lightning flash and the thunderclap. Each second represents about 1000 feet. For every 5 seconds you count, the lightning flash is approximately one mile away. (e.g., you see lightning and count to 6 before you hear the thunderclap. The lightning would be approximately 1000 feet x 6 seconds = 6000 feet (just over a mile) away.) a) Follow the 30-30 Rule: i. If you count less than 30 seconds between lightning flash and thunder bang, stop work and take shelter, preferably in an enclosed building/trailer, an enclosed vehicle, or in a low-lying area avoiding wide open areas or tall isolated objects such as trees or power poles. ii. Wait for at least 30 minutes after storm has passed or dissipated before resuming work activities. b) Note that lightning may strike several miles away from the parent cloud. Precautions should be taken even if the thunderstorm is not directly overhead. If you see a flash or lightning but do not hear the thunder, the lightning was probably too far away to hear. Thunder from lightning discharged 15 or more miles away is not usually heard. c) The Facility PIC is responsible for monitoring the weather and stopping work when required, due to weather.

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4.7.83 Lockout/Tagout of Equipment When using lockout/tagout: a) When performing maintenance or repair work on air, gas, diesel, electrical, hydraulic, or steam driven equipment, use an approved lockout device in conjunction with other blocking devices, as necessary, to ensure that all equipment is in a zero energy state. b) No one is to remove another workers lock without the approval of a Nexen representative. c) Use a secure lock and chain on valves if an accidental opening or closing will create a hazard to workers. An alternative would be to use blinding/blanking or double block and bleed systems. d) Lock, tag, and try off/on switches to verify that the equipment is locked-out before starting work. e) Neither a Do Not Operate tag nor a lock alone constitutes a lockout device; a combination of a lock and tag is required to ensure an effective lockout. f) Place Do Not Operate tags on all necessary valves and engagement devices used in the isolating or locking out of equipment. g) Activate the proper blocking, braking, and securing devices of all equipment when servicing or repairing. Examples may include: i. Electrical - De-energize all panels relevant to area of maintenance or service and install locks and tags to switches and power disconnects. ii. Rotating equipment - Lock, secure, and block all movement. Tag the unit. iii. Auxiliary power - Turn off equipment, disconnect battery or starter cables, shut-off, and tag fuel sources on gas engine drivers. Tag the unit. iv. Remove or control all hazards, pressure conditions, tension, or toxic substances. 4.7.84 Material Handling Any item shipped offshore that requires lifting by a crane must be placed in an appropriate container (i.e. basket or cargo container) that has certified rigging pre-installed (pre-slung). Alternatively, if size prohibits the previous requirement and the item has appropriate lifting attachments, installation of certified rigging is required (pre-slung) prior to loading. All rigging utilized on these containers must remain with the container and shall not be removed or replaced unless damaged. Diligence will be required by all to manage the utilization of these containers to assure we have sufficient containers to support our transportation needs. These requirements will assist in loading and offloading our materials creating a safer and less risky environment for our Personnel and Equipment. Refer to Nexens Transit Container Code for more information.

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4.7.85 Man Overboard a) On witnessing a person falling overboard or already in the water, give the call "Man Overboard by voice or PA system. Try not to lose sight of the person in the water. b) Directing someone else to make the announcement over the PA system may allow personnel to keep the person in sight. This is important, as it is often very difficult to relocate a person overboard once you have taken your eyes off them. c) Throw the nearest ring buoy to the individual in the water. d) Repeat the announcement over the PA system several times. If the location of where the person went overboard is known, include that information in the announcement. e) The platform personnel will notify the standby boat, where applicable, to commence the rescue operation. Personnel on the facility must be prepared to treat the person, upon retrieval, for hypothermia and any injuries sustained. f) When appropriate, throwing floatable objects overboard every 5 minutes or so may give rescue boats or aircraft a line of drift leading to the person overboard. g) Assemble the rescue team at the nearest lifeboat, capsule, or rescue craft, if appropriate, to commence the rescue as soon as possible. h) Maintain communications between the rescue craft and the platform and/or standby vessel at all times. Check communications during each drill. i) Hold man overboard drills every 3 months as per United States Coast Guard (USCG) requirements weather permitting, to ensure proficiency in retrieving a person overboard is maintained. Log the drills. j) Get help before trying any rescue attempt. 4.7.86 Management of Change Nexen requires that a MoC system be in place to effectively manage changes to the organization and its related systems, procedures, equipment, products, materials, substances, processes, and people. MoC is the formal procedure that addresses process-related or mechanicalrelated modifications of a facility and the safe management of change. MOC ensures that changes are recognized, documented, formally reviewed, and approved before being implemented to avoid potential safety, environmental and operational problems

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4.7.87 Machinery Guards When working with machinery guards: a) Before any equipment is put in service, the worker in charge verifies that all machinery guards are in place. b) Keep machinery guards in place at all times when the equipment is in operation. c) Post a sign or erect a barricade to remove a guard. d) Equipment shall not be run without guards unless an approved MoC is in place. 4.7.88 Maintenance All equipment that is considered critical shall be identified and documented to ensure full integration into Nexens maintenance program. Specific maintenance procedures and activities shall be established and documented for each piece of critical equipment identified 4.7.89 Marine Debris a) Everyone must have annual marine debris training. b) Do not throw items overboard. c) Strict observance of all environmental laws and restrictions pertinent to the local jurisdiction is required. 4.7.90 Material Safety Data Sheets In accordance with the Right-to-Know laws, MSDS provide vital safety information on chemical products used at the worksite. They are provided for all substances, must be present at their storage locations, and consulted before use. Maintain a complete set of MSDS to ensure they are available for ready reference. 4.7.91 Mechanical Integrity Ensure an Asset Integrity and Reliability program is in place that encompasses the systematic implementation of activities to ensure that designed equipment will function as required during its life 4.7.92 Medication and Prescription Drugs Prescription drugs are defined as medicine obtained through a doctors prescription. Medication is defined as a medical treatment obtained legally, over the counter. Workers are expected to use medications, both prescribed and over-the-counter, responsibly. Medications of concern are those that inhibit or may inhibit a safetysensitive workers ability to perform their job safely and productively. The following are prohibited:
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a) The intentional misuse of prescribed or over-the-counter medications (e.g. using the medication not as it has been prescribed, using someone elses prescription medication, combining medication and alcohol use against direction) while on the worksite. b) Possession of prescribed medications without a legal prescription and distribution of prescription medications to others. Workers who are using a prescription or over-the-counter medication should only take that medication as directed by a competent professional, or according to the manufacturers recommended dosage, and should be aware of any potentially unsafe side effects. The legal use of prescription drugs prescribed by a licensed physician is permitted. When using these prescribed drugs: a) Employees shall immediately inform their supervisor prior to using prescribed drugs/medication on the job. b) Medication shall be in its original vial or be in a vial provided by the pharmacist commonly referred to as "day carriers," with the employee's the doctor's names, the prescription number, and the date of issuance on the label. c) Each prescription shall not exceed its expiration date. d) Employees shall only possess the prescribed amount of medication for a normal work shift (number of days). e) The employee whose name appears on the label of the vial shall not allow any other Nexen employee, visitor, guest, subcontractor, or any other person to consume the prescribed drug or medication. f) The employee shall not consume the drug or medication more often than as prescribed by the employee's physician and as set out on the label of the vial. 4.7.93 Mobile Phone/Personal Electronic Device Use When using mobile phones or Personal Electronic Devices (PEDs): a) PEDs, include such items as cellular telephones, pagers, cameras, and CD/mp3/iPod players. b) Report mobile phones and PEDs to the PIC when arriving on the platform. c) Under no circumstances are these types of equipment to be used outside of living quarters, except in PPE-free zones. d) Turn off mobile phones, portable electronic devices, and radio transmitting devices during helicopter flights and at any time the helicopter pilot instructs. e) The use of cameras in classified areas will require a Hot Work Permit

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4.7.94 BSEE Incident Reporting Nexen is required to submit incident reports for events occurring on their facilities that meet BSEE reporting guidelines via the eWell Reporting system (within 4 hours).Some incidents will require a verbal report to BSEE as soon as practical. Refer to Appendix R BSEE Lease Holder Reporting Requirements for a list of BSEE events. Contact will need to be made to the production or drilling superintendent, the HSE&SR manager, as well as the Regulatory Manager. 4.7.95 BSEE Facility Inspections BSEE conducts annual facility inspections. See Nexens Compliance Inspection Program for further details. 4.7.96 Near Miss Reporting A Near Miss is an unplanned event that occurs, with the potential for causing injury or property unplanned event that occurs, with the potential for causing injury or property damage, (i.e., under slightly different circumstances the event would have resulted in personal injury, damage to assets, the environment, or loss of process). Near Misses are reported as described in Event Reporting and Investigation standard. 4.7.97 On-site Orientation The list below contains guidelines for ensuring basic information requirements are achieved during preliminary on-site orientations: a) Upon arrival at the platform/MODU personnel undergo an offshore orientation. As a condition of boarding, it is mandatory that the personnel accept the Person-in-Charges (PIC) authority and agree to comply with the Nexen HSE&SR Management System. Non-compliance will result in removal from the facility or MODU. b) Advise personnel to whom they report to while on board. Daily pre-job safety meetings, monthly safety meetings, and emergency drills and exercises are required. c) Review Station bill and alarms for the facility, including muster points and emergency egress. d) Use of PPE, RPE, as it relates to work on the facility. Include Right to Know station and location of MSDS. e) Remind personnel of Nexens Drug-Free Workplace Policy, Prescription Medications Policy, designated smoking area and contraband items. f) HSE responsibilities including reporting of incidents, spills, injuries, etc. g) Discuss Job Safety & Environmental Analysis process, Permit Authorizations and Stop Work Authority. Include Simultaneous Operations and reference to specific programs or procedures as required.
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4.7.98 Overhead Work When completing overhead work: a) Tools and equipment shall be raised to the work site in a bag or utility belt designed for that purpose. b) Overhead work should not be carried out above other workers unless the workers below are adequately protected by the installation of an overhead barrier. c) Every area where a worker could be struck by a falling object shall be clearly marked by barriers, notices, warning lights or other warning devices. d) Tools with drop lanyards shall be used to prevent dropped objects. 4.7.99 Paint and Coatings All paint will be handled and disposed of in accordance with Nexens Waste Management Plan. When using paint or coatings: a) Follow the protocol below when working with paints: i. Paints are hazardous substances and must be stored in their original container. ii. Dispense small quantities of paint to tins for paint jobs and return any residual paint to the original paint container. iii. Store paint in the paint locker and keep it closed at all times. iv. Keep the paint inventory neat. v. Secure lids at all times and open tins of paint not placed in the paint locker. b) Follow the protocol below when working with paint thinners: i. Handle paint thinners with the same protocol as paint, outlined in bullet A. ii. Do not use paint thinners for cleaning anything other than paintbrushes. iii. Dispose of used thinners correctly. Do not throw the thinners into the sea. c) For offshore facilities, blasting and painting practices will follow Nexens BMP for Abrasive Blasting and Coating Operations. 4.7.100 Personnel Transfer Basket When using a personnel basket: a) All personnel shall review training videos on personnel transfers as part of their offshore assignment. b) The maximum load for a personnel transfer basket is 8 persons. Nexen uses Billy Pugh style Personnel baskets. c) No personnel shall be transferred in adverse weather conditions. Refer to Section 4.7.26 Cranes. d) The foregoing assumes the bags will be the usual personal belongings of crewmembers. Do not use personnel baskets to transport cargo.
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e) All persons must wear a Type 1 PFD. f) Persons riding the basket are to stand on the outside ring, with arms locked through the ropes, facing inward. g) Equip the personnel basket with a tag line. h) Swing the basket to the side, over the water, as soon as practical when picking the basket up from the deck of a vessel. Conversely, keeps the basket over the water as long as is practical when lowering the basket to the deck of a vessel. i) Persons will not be transferred using cargo nets or any other make shift basket. j) Keep basket transfers in the line of sight of the crane operator, or if this is not possible, use an experienced signalman. 4.7.101 Perforating Guns When perforating guns are being loaded or handled on surface: a) Barricades will be erected accordingly to protect personnel. b) Only authorized persons are allowed in the barricaded area. c) When required, turn off phones and radios, including Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems. d) Perforating jobs will not proceed if lightning storms are in the area. e) Turn off Cathodic Protection Systems. f) Make a PA announcement to warn non-essential personnel. 4.7.102 Photographic Equipment The use of cameras and video recorders is prohibited, unless authorized to do so by a Nexen Representative. If authorization is given for use in potentially hazardous atmospheres, such as inside process building areas, storage tank areas, or pressure vessels, then a Hot Work Permit must be issued and atmospheres proven safe before using. Pigging and Pressure Testing When pigging and pressure testing: a) Where pigging and testing are to be conducted, develop procedures satisfactory to Nexen prior to work being started. Before the removal of a test head or the opening of a pig launcher or receiver, a competent Nexen Representative verifies that the line and/or pig trap (launcher) is depressurized. b) Only workers directly involved with the pigging or testing operation shall be in the immediate vicinity during the work.
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c) Post warning signs and do not allow workers in the immediate vicinity of either end of the pipe when the pipe or pig launcher or receiver is under pressure. 4.7.104 Pipe Handling Follow Nexens Lifting policies when handling pipe. a) Pipe stringing procedure is to be discussed with the Nexen Representative prior to the job starting. b) Sawhorses and stools shall be used on two and three inch pipe only. Four inch pipe and larger shall be placed on skids. Any exceptions shall be approved by the Nexen Representative. c) When transporting a partial load of pipe to another location, it shall be tied down to prevent the pipe from shifting. d) Standing or walking on pipe should be avoided as much as possible. e) Tiers of pipe must be properly blocked and secured to control the hazard of rolling pipes and to prevent pipe from falling to ground level or striking nearby workers. f) Do not use hands and feet to position pipe as this allows for great risk of crushing injuries. g) Never walk or work under or near a suspended pipe, unless the load is fully secured or supported by blocking. h) All suspected loads must be controlled by the use of tag lines so workers can keep clear of suspended loads. 4.7.105 Platform Cabling When platform cabling: a) Check platform electric cables on a regular basis by an authorized electrician. Do not make temporary splices to damaged cables. b) Support cabling on cable trays secured with stainless steel straps or plastic tie wraps fire rated for location. c) Close holes made through watertight bulkheads for cabling with the correct transit blocks and/or glands. 4.7.106 Platform Modification Control alterations to the platform through the MoC process. Portable Hand Tools and Equipment When working with portable hand tools and equipment: a) They must be in good condition and used for their intended purposes. b) Verify unmodified guards are on all power tools and equipment.
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c) Verify that all portable electric hand tools and equipment are equipped with a 3-pronged electrical connection, are double insulated, and are used in conjunction with a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI). d) All hand-held power tools, such as drills, grinders, needle guns, etc, shall be equipped with a constant pressure on/off control switch that will automatically turn off the equipment/tool whenever the control switch is released. Portable tools with locking on/off control switch capabilities are prohibited from Nexen facilities. e) Use cold cutting tools, not electric hand tools, in areas where flammable liquids and/or gas may still be behind pipe or released to atmosphere. Follow the Hot Work Authorization Permit process and JSEA. 4.7.108 Process Safety Information Have systems in place to ensure that Process Safety Information (PSI) [also known as process knowledge management] focuses on information that can be recorded in documents such as; technical standards, engineering drawings/calculations, specifications for design/fabrication/installation of equipment, designed operating envelope, and information on process hazards. Radioactive Materials and Equipment When handling radioactive materials and equipment: a) Store it in a dedicated storage area with the appropriate signage. b) Only experienced third party personnel are to handle and use radioactive materials under a Work Authorization Permit. Strict rules govern the handling of radioactive material and will be followed at all times. c) Prior to use, make PA announcements warning personnel of their use and the areas they will be used in. Restrict area access during use. d) The third-party company using radioactive material must supply the PIC with a complete set of rules and regulations governing the use of the material and the contact information for the Radioactive Supervisor. 4.7.110 Radiographic Inspections/Non-Destructive Testing When conducting radiographic inspections, there is potential for on site workers to be exposed to radioactive source hazards due to the use of xray emitting devices and/or laser equipment as part of this inspection process. When radiographic inspections are being conducted on Nexen worksites, follow the safe work practices below:
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a) The contractor: i. Must be certified and approved. ii. Conducting these inspections verifies that work is being conducted in accordance to applicable regulations. iii. Using this equipment must be licensed and approved in accordance with applicable regulations. iv. Conducting these inspections must have a written procedure outlining safe work practices associated with inspection activities. b) Conduct an x-ray to the degree possible, only when a minimum number of personnel are in the testing vicinity, such as after normal work hours. c) The qualified operators performing the inspections have the primary responsibility for health and safety of workers within the testing vicinity. d) Designate and identify radiographic testing areas as a Restricted/Highhazard area. Rope off or barricade these areas. e) Place warning signs in conspicuous and visible locations around the testing area to ensure all personnel on-site are made aware that hazardous work activity is taking place. Keep warning signs in place until the testing activity has been completed. f) For GoM, in service testing of vessels or pipes is the norm. 4.7.111 Records and Documentation A system for identification, collection, indexing, filing, storage, maintenance, and disposition of Records, Any relevant HSE&SR documents created or received related to Company business in all formats. These include, but are not limited to, the following subject areas: a) Environmental records b) Occupational health and safety records c) Process safety records d) Inspection reports e) Testing results f) Training records g) Audits and Reviews h) Regulatory permits and licenses i) Hazard/risk assessment results and reports j) Community outreach reports

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4.7.112

Respiratory Protective Equipment When using respiratory protective equipment: a) Wear the appropriate respiratory protective equipment if workers are or may be exposed to airborne contaminants or a mixture of airborne contaminants in concentrations exceeding the permissible exposure limits, such as: i. Atmospheres with an oxygen concentration of less then 19.5 percent by volume. ii. Other airborne contaminants, such as dusts, hazardous and noxious fumes. b) Respiratory protective equipment must be National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) approved and selected for workers in accordance with ANSI Z88.2-1992 Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators c) Make respiratory equipment readily accessible, stored, and maintained in a clean and sanitary condition, inspected before and after each use to ensure it is in satisfactory working condition, and serviced and used in accordance with the manufacturers recommendations. d) Properly fit and fit test respiratory protective equipment used by workers on Nexen locations in accordance to the ANSI Z88.2-1992 standard to ensure an effective facial seal. Workers should be prepared to provide proof of fit testing when requested. e) Workers required to wear respiratory protective equipment must be clean-shaven as per Section 4.4.6 General Work Wear Clothing of this handbook. f) Contractors must ensure that their Respiratory Protective Equipment practices are in compliance to applicable OSHA legislation. g) Medically clear workers wearing respirators. h) Make MSDS available to ensure that proper PPE is being used.

4.7.113

Rope When using rope: a) Do not use rope for lifting or securing purposes. Sisal rope exposed to the sun will deteriorate, become brittle, and could break at limits below those expected for the size of rope. b) Rope can be used for tag lines and for securing small lightweight items during platform moves.

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4.7.114

S.A.F.E chart API RP 14C requires the development of SAFE charts (cause-and-effect charts) and safety flow diagrams (P&ID diagrams showing equipment and safety devices). The BSEE requires them to be submitted during the design phase of any project production. In the SAFE chart for each piece of process equipment, all the required safety devices are listed, and those that have been excluded have the reference to the safety analysis checklist, which lists all the reasons for excluding a device. The SAFE chart becomes an easy tool to check that all requirements have been met and what actions the safety devices take.

4.7.115

Safety Body Harness When using a safety body harness: a) A full body harness must be worn for: i. Fall protection from height above 6 feet vertical from a temporary work site, and/or above 4 feet vertical from a permanent work site. ii. When completing hazardous confined space work. iii. When using a man basket as part of the work. b) Contractors must be fully aware of and following the Regulations regarding the use of full body harnesses. When the use of one of these devices is required, the contractor must ensure that they are properly maintained and used. c) Ensure the proper fall protection is worn for the task being conducted (i.e., chest d-ring for ascending and descending ladder safe systems and to aid in rescue).

4.7.116

Scaffolding or Temporary Work Platforms When working on scaffolding or platforms: a) Provide toe boards and guardrails on any work platforms above 6 feet in case of a temporary installation or 4 feet in case of a permanent installation. b) Construct, maintain, and use scaffolds or platforms used for installation, maintenance, or removal of equipment according to specific regulations and industry standards. c) Scaffolding must be: i. Erected by a competent person. ii. Anchored to prevent accidental movement. iii. Equipped with guardrails and toe boards if the working height exceeds 10 feet or if the scaffold is erected over an area, where others will be working or passing by.

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d) Before using scaffolding, it must be inspected and tagged by a competent person. Scaffold identification tags are color coded for each reference and should be located at point of access. These colored tags are: i. Green tag - No restrictions: Safe for use. ii. Yellow tag Caution: Scaffold has special requirements for safe use. iii. Red tag Danger: Do not use as it has been deemed unsafe. 4.7.117 Searches All personnel on Nexen facilities must consent to and cooperate with searches of areas and items on the Company Premises including (1) their person; (2) their personal belongings, including but not limited to toolboxes, luggage, and similar items; (3) their work areas and sleeping quarters; and (4) all vehicles and equipment. Any individual who refuses to consent to or cooperate with a search may be removed from the Premises and denied future entry. Sheen on Water Nexen reports all spills and loss of containment of hydrocarbon based fluids including Glycol and hydraulic fluid. In GoM, any sheen visible on the water surface from these products is reported. Refer to Section 4.10.1 Spills for more details. Slings Refer to Nexens Lifting Operations standard for further information. When using slings: a) Inspect wire rope, cable clamps, shackles, sheaves, and thimbles prior to each use. Use the correct number of cable clamps. b) Replace wire rope when broken strands or wire, crushed wire, bird caging, kinking, weather or chemical corrosion, damage to eyes or damage to other fittings, is observed. c) Slings must have a permanent inspection tag affixed and certifications available at the facility. d) Discard defective wire rope. e) Check slings prior to each job. f) When not in use, properly store slings and wire rope in a protected area. g) Issue and Use of Fiber/Soft Slings i. Slings commonly made from canvas or manufactured fiber, such as nylon or polypropylenes, are referred to as fiber or soft slings. These slings have an advantage over traditional wire rope slings
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when grip is required on small diameter machined surfaces or where minimal damage to machined or soft surfaces is required. ii. Treat fiber or soft slings as tools with specific purposes and not general lifting devices for all occasions. h) Personnel on each Nexen platform will strictly adhere to the following: i. Carefully consider the load to be lifted, the weight of the load, and an alternate means of lifting to determine the use of each sling. ii. When sling type is determined, conduct a JSEA to review the stepby-step lifting procedure to identify hazards and determine risks. iii. Specify the precautions to minimize risk on a JSEA form, authorized by the PIC. i) A register will be maintained on the platform that will provide the following details for each fiber or soft sling: i. Swing Weight Limit (SWL) ii. Date the sling entered service iii. Identification mark/serial number 4.7.120 Slips, Trips and Falls Slips Whenever any substance has been spilled or is standing, clean it up immediately before pursuing any other job. Report sources of spills/wet spots to ensure repairs are made. If the identity of the spilled substance is unknown, identify it and use proper cleanup and disposal techniques. If you must walk on wet surfaces, take short steps to lessen the chance of slipping and keep your hands free and out of your pockets to ensure better balance. Wear slip-resistant shoes and keep them clean. Never run. Trips Use designated walkways or access routes whenever possible. Be aware however, that in spite of best efforts to eliminate tripping hazards, some tripping hazards will still exist. Stay focused and concentrate on the path ahead of you. Falls Climbing up and down ladders requires the use of both hands. To avoid slips and falls, walking up and down stairs requires the use of at least 1 handrail. There are instances when making two trips or calling for help to carry a load may seem too time consuming. To avoid injury, slow down. Use both hands on ladders and go up and down stairs with at least 1 hand on the handrail.

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4.7.121

Smoking When smoking offshore: a) Only smoke in designated smoking areas on the platform. b) Clearly identify designated smoking areas identified by posted signs. c) Do not smoke in the living quarters. d) Do not take smoking materials, including matches, out of the accommodation.

4.7.122

Station Bill (Manned Platforms) The Station Bill provides specific instructions on where each person is to go and what to do in the event of a fire, man overboard, or abandonment. It is the responsibility of personnel to read, understand, and comply with the Station Bill. Personnel must know the alarm signals, their emergency stations, and their duties at the station. Should the general alarm sound, personnel are to report to their designated stations with proper clothing and/or equipment, as required by the Station Bill. The Station Bill shall be posted and made available to all personnel on the facility.

4.7.123

Spills Refer to Section 4.10.1 Spills. Swing Rope transfers A swing rope is commonly used to transfer personnel from boats to the landing area of the platform. Using a swing rope can be demanding, especially in moderate to heavy sea conditions. Follow all severe weather restriction guidelines. Note Transfers should occur only during daylight unless approved by person in charge.

4.7.124

Transfer by the swing rope: a) Deck hand should always be available for swing transfers. b) Personnel shall face where the boat is bumping against the offshore structure, if seas allow boat to bump the structure, or where boat is at a safe position as determined by the Boat Captain. c) Use correct rope for outboard or inboard swing. d) Have both hands and arms free, catch the knotted rope when the boat is at top of a swell, and swing to the structure by pushing off from the boat with your feet.

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e) Do not let the swing rope get between your legs. Always keep feet and legs clear of the structure's landing. f) Ensure there is proper lighting of the boat or platform landing area. g) Wear a Type I PFD while transferring. Note 4.7.125 Do not carry luggage, tools, or any other items while transferring by swing rope.

Tag Lines Tag lines play an important part in helping to maneuver, control, and position loads being moved by cranes. When using tag lines: a) Do not tie or wrap tag lines around the hands or bodies of people using them. b) Do not make knots at the end of the tag lines. c) Use the length that is appropriate for the lift.

4.7.126

Tie-Ins to Nexen Equipment Contractors must not tie into existing Nexen facilities, including pipelines, electrical power circuits, and all other equipment without specific written approval from the Nexen Representative. Tool Usage When using tools: a) Use tools only for their proper function and keep them in good condition. Do not use defective or altered tools. b) Operators visually inspect equipment and verify it is in safe operating condition before starting work. c) Disconnect the power source from a tool and/or depressurize before adjusting the tool. d) Properly fit guards and verify good condition at all times. e) Label grinders and grinding discs to indicate maximum RPM and check for correct size and speed prior to fitting. f) Wear appropriate personal protective equipment at all times when using any tools. g) Only competent and properly trained workers operate power tools. Use only ANSI approved properly grounded electrical tools with 3-pronged plugs or double insulation or ground fault insulation. Do not use switch lock-on devices with any electrical or air-powered tool. h) Explosive-actuated fastening tools must meet all requirements of the current NFPA 70 and be used only by trained, competent workers.

4.7.127

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i) Before using electric tools in potentially flammable atmospheres, issue a Hot Work Permit and conduct suitable testing. Complete documentation that: Indicates whether the atmosphere contains a flammable substance in a quantity sufficient to create an explosive atmosphere. ii. Confirms work may be safely performed. 4.7.128 Trailing Hand Technique The Trailing Hand Technique is used to reduce the chance of injury if a slip and fall occurs while descending a stairway. To practice this technique: a) Grasp the handrail behind in a trailing motion while descending stairs. This will give more control in case of a slip. If a person does slip and fall, there will be enough control to be able to go into a sitting position instead of falling forward. b) The use of the trailing hand technique also has the effect of twisting the body when descending stairs, causing more of the foot to be placed on the stair tread, giving a better grip for the feet and hands. c) Personnel working on platforms or any shore base facility must use the trailing hand technique when descending stairs. 4.7.129 Using Nexen Equipment When using Nexen equipment: a) Contract personnel must not operate any switches, valves, or controls on Nexen equipment unless specifically authorized to do so by the Nexen Representative. b) Contractors shall not tie in to existing Nexen facilities including pipelines, sewer system, electrical power circuits, or any other equipment, without specific approval from Nexen Representative. Install blinds, locks and other safeguards to the satisfaction of Nexen and all other affected personnel. Once approved tie-ins have been made to existing Nexen equipment, the entire system is considered as Nexen property for the purpose of control. 4.7.130 Waste Management Nexens Waste Management Plan is a guidance document identifying the appropriate management practices for each type of waste generated by exploration and production operations. The plan gives guidance for field and staff personnel and contractors on handling, characterizing and disposing of wastes generated by oil and gas operations. i.

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4.7.131

Weather Restrictions for Crane Operations The decision to make a lift is left up to the crane operator and the boat captain. When incidents occur during adverse weather conditions, it is easy to question why the decision was made to make the lift. Even a routine lift can cause property damage or personal injury when weather conditions exceed certain conditions. The intent of these recommendations is to ensure that all of the appropriate personnel are involved in the decision to proceed or to shut down crane operations. It also documents that the decision was based on the information gathered and discussed at the work site and that the best decision was made based on the information available. Nexens Crane Operations and Maintenance Program currently does not address any restrictions due to weather conditions.

Note

Crane JSA Requirements Dynamic load charts are designed using 6-8 foot seas and 24 mph wind speeds. Therefore, when actual conditions meet or exceed these limits, a Crane JSA should be completed to reflect that the factors listed below have been considered and documented. The Crane JSA discussion should include the following personnel: a) Crane Operator. b) Boat Captain. c) Third-party Crane Operators supervisor. d) Facility Supervisor. e) Construction Foreman or Contract Inspector where applicable. All factors below should be considered and discussed and a mutual decision should be made. All personnel involved in the discussion shall sign the JSA. Factors to Consider There are many factors that go into the final decision and the following factors should be considered when decisions are made to operate the crane. These factors include: a) Crane to be used. b) Skill and experience of crane operator and riggers. c) Skill and experience of the boat captain. d) Weight of the load. e) Size and configuration of the cargo to be lifted.
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f) Dynamic lifting capacity and lift angle. g) Current speed and direction. h) Position of cargo to be lifted. i) How much other cargo is on boat? j) Is sufficient lighting available during operations before daylight hours or after dark? When weather conditions deteriorate beyond a certain point, crane operations should not proceed. Refer to Table 2 Weather Stops for Crane Operations as a general guideline. Weather Stops for Crane Operations When stopping crane operations, even if all parties agree to proceed with a lifting operation, a Stop Work Authority can and should still be used if the situation is deemed unsafe to proceed. Crane Operations must be stopped under the conditions shown in the following table: Weather and Sea Conditions that Stop Crane Operations Seas meet or exceed 12 feet Winds meet or exceed 35 mph Lightning in the vicinity Operations Stopped All Dynamic Crane Operations All Crane Operations, Static and Dynamic All Crane Operations, Static and Dynamic

Table 2 Weather Stops for Crane Operations 4.7.132 Water Transportation There may be times when crew changes are done by boat. Should this happen, personnel must follow instructions given by the boat crew. Welding/Welders When welding, follow regulations, hot work authorization permits, and: a) Only competent/qualified and authorized workers shall use welding, cutting, and grinding equipment. b) Do welding and hot work with the permission of the Nexen PIC, Construction Inspector, or person with delegated authority, under a Hot Work Permit. c) The supervisor responsible for the job ensures that safe welding procedures are followed, including proper welding grounding procedure, the use of welding flash shields, and eye protection for aides.
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d) All welders entering a Nexen work site must wear flame resistant clothing fully covering the arms, legs, and torso, meeting standards for NFPA 2112. If the welders outerwear is non-fire resistant, the welder must wear FRC under their non-fire resistant rated welding garments as needed to ensure that body parts not covered by these welding garments are adequately protected. e) Take suitable precautions to prevent exposure to personnel from excessive ultraviolet radiation, fire, explosion, asphyxiation, toxic gases, fumes, or dust when welding or cutting equipment is being used. f) Equip gas-welding hoses with appropriate flame arresters or check valves. 4.7.134 Working over Water When working over water: a) Consider environmental and rescue arrangements before authorizing personnel to work over water. b) At a minimum, wear a full body harness with properly secured lanyards and/or retractable lifelines and a life preserver. Keep persons working over water under surveillance by either a fellow worker or a person specifically designated. c) Any work over the water, or any other position where a fall to the water is possible, shall be a Work Authorization Permitted activity. d) Advise the standby boat, where applicable, of the operation and the expected time involved so as to allow the standby boat to remain at an appropriate state of readiness to assist if the need should arise. 4.8 Work Authorization Permits This handbook cannot state all situations that require a work permit, therefore, the Nexen Representative and/or the contractor, must work in a responsible manner to identify and control the hazards found at the work location when known, regardless of whether a work permit is issued or not.

Note

Work Authorization Permits are intended to ensure potentially hazardous work is carried out under safe working conditions. The permit system is a 2-way arrangement and the responsibility for taking special precautions rests on both the issuer and the receiver of the permit. Prior to starting work contractors are expected to discuss work permit requirements with the Nexen representative. When a work permit is issued from an area other than at the immediate work site, an agreement will be made between the two parties regarding who will be
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responsible to perform the site hazard assessment prior to work starting and which hazard assessment form will be used to document the assessment. If working under a Term Work Authorization (greater than 1 day), the contractor carries a copy of the agreement and those working under the agreement must be familiar with it, working in compliance with the expectations outlined. Refer to the Work Authorization Permit (Hot and Cold) standard for more information. Nexen DSM will also sign off on hot work, working over water, transfer of base oil, and confined space entry permits when working with MODU Contractors or as part of a SIMOPS program.

Note

4.9

Safety Meetings

4.9.1 Documentation and Topics Safety Meetings will be documented. 4.9.2 General Hold General Safety Meetings weekly on a crew basis. Each crewmember is required to attend the General Safety Meeting. Operator and third party employees attend. The PIC conducts the meeting. Specific topics for discussion may be assigned to specific crewmembers. 4.9.3 Job Safety and Environmental Analysis The JSEA is an important accident prevention tool that will provide assistance in identifying hazards and eliminating or minimizing them before performing a job and creating accidents. Appendix C is an example JSEA form to document this discussion. Hold a JSEA at the work site before every job. All persons involved in the job or who will be performing functions that relate to the safe performance of the job are required to attend, including key third-party personnel. The immediate supervisor conducts the meeting, or in some cases, a person with specialized technical expertise. Use the JSA process at the work site to facilitate a two-way conversation for: a) Job clarification b) Hazard awareness c) Protective measures 4.9.4 Pre-tour (Platforms) Conduct daily Pre-tour Safety Meetings prior to each tour. All members of the oncoming crews are required to attend meetings specific to their discipline. The meeting is conducted by the applicable line supervisor for the discipline concerned. Specific topics for discussion may be assigned to crewmembers.
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4.9.5 Safety Orientation Briefing Orientations contain information that will help personnel understand Nexen safety policies and the proper response to an emergency. When holding a Safety Orientation Meeting: a) Give personnel arriving on the platform a Safety Orientation Briefing as per the Orientation Procedure. The scope of the orientation may vary depending of whether the new arrival is a crewmember, visitor, or third-party employee and the duration the person is expected to stay on board. b) Give personnel arriving on the platform, including experienced crewmembers arriving back from leave, the briefing on current operations and any special safety requirements in force before starting the first shift. 4.9.6 Safety Recognition Nexen follows a Recognition Program to promote safe and environment friendly work practices by rewarding those employees who: a) Work safely. b) Take an active role in ensuring their fellow crewmembers work safely. c) Promote teamwork among their fellow crewmembers. d) Take an active role in protecting the environment. Note Full details of the program can be found in the Recognition Program Standard.

4.10 Environmental Considerations Environmental awareness and good operating practices are very important to Nexen. As a result, Nexen has and enforces an HSE&SR Policy for all of its operations, facilities and construction programs (refer to Appendix A). In addition to the requirements outlined in this handbook, contractors adhere to all applicable regulatory requirements and to any site-specific standards that may be required for the contracted services. 4.10.1 Spills Nexen reports all spills and loss of containment of hydrocarbon based fluids including Glycol and hydraulic fluid. In GoM, any sheen visible on the water surface from these products is reported. When encountering a spill: a) Immediately report spills, whether contained on Production Platform or MODU or if sheen is visible on the water in proximity to the asset to the Nexen Supervisor or representative. b) Take precautions to prevent spills and assess impact to the environment.
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c) The facility owner provides basic spill response capability for small spill contained on the production platform/ MODU. d) Prevent spills from entering the water. e) Set up temporary booms and containment equipment if possible. f) Remove wildlife from the spill area, as necessary. g) If the spill consists of flammable material, remove all ignition sources. h) Clean spills up immediately. Place contaminated materials in the appropriate containers. i) The person observing the spill promptly reports the spill event to Nexen or its representative, via OBriens Response Management. 1-866-931-5727 j) The PIC shall prepare and utilize a Region Oil Spill Response plan - Spill Report form. k) ORM will contact the appropriate regulatory agencies, as necessary, on behalf of Nexen. DO NOT DELAY NOTIFICATION to ORM. 1-866-931-5727 l) The first line supervisor/foreman will complete or participate in Nexens investigation of the event to determine its cause. m) Nexen and the supervisors will review all investigation reports and monitor the status of the follow-up action. The PIC verifies that suitable corrective action is taken to eliminate the potential for a recurrence. 4.10.2 Hazardous Materials and Waste Management When encountering hazardous materials and waste management: a) Handle, store, transport, and dispose of hazardous materials and waste in accordance with applicable regulatory requirements and Nexen standards. b) All personnel shall abide by Nexens hazardous materials handling program, including all the requirements of the HAZWOPER Program. The Program shall include: i. Proper labeling of all hazardous materials and hazardous waste containers. ii. Suitable equipment to minimize and clean up potential spills or releases. iii. Suitable equipment to store and use all hazardous materials needed for the work. iv. Suitable equipment to store and dispose of hazardous waste. c) Store hazardous materials and waste in a manner consistent with the requirements of applicable environmental legislation, regulations, and Nexen standards. For longer-term projects, Nexen may require additional environmental protection measures, such as the provision of secondary containment dikes.

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d) Where reasonably practicable and consistent with environmental protection goals, keep storage areas free of grass, weeds, and all other combustible materials. e) Clearly mark or barricade storage areas to prevent damage by moving vehicles. f) Where liquid fuel is stored on site, instruct all contractor employees in procedures to dispense fuel in a manner that minimizes the potential for spills. g) Personnel shall not litter. Pick-up and remove debris, including litter, off-site to an appropriate waste disposal facility. h) Dispose of hazardous materials and hazardous wastes both liquids and solids in a manner approved by Nexen, its representative, or the presiding regulatory authority. i) Remove non-hazardous solids, such as wood and metal, debris, bagged material, cables, pails, and other similar materials from the site to be recycled or disposed of. Materials, which are deemed safety or fire hazards, require special handling as specified by Nexen or its representative. j) Personnel shall track and record all waste disposal activities, noting: i. ii. iii. iv. v. Waste type. Origin/site of generation. Volume (liquids) or weight (solids). Carrier/transporter. Recycle/disposal facility. Provide any manifests, shipping documents, bills of lading, truck tickets, tracking spreadsheets, or other documentation associated with waste disposal activities to Nexen or its representative.

Note

4.11 Social Responsibility Nexen Inc. is committed to environmental stewardship and the health and safety of its employees, contractors, and the public. By conducting our business in a socially responsible manner, we: a) Contribute to community development. b) Meet our obligations legally and as a corporate citizen. c) Help to ensure our long-term reputation as a company. Employees and contractors are expected to know and follow the Nexen HSE&SR Policy (refer to Appendix A). 4.11.1 Integrity Nexen promotes a culture of integrity through awareness, appreciation, and application of Nexen's values and principles. To support this, all regular
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employees, fixed term employees, and individuals contracting with Nexen for 6 months or more are required to take an introductory integrity workshop. Employees, contractors, and other stakeholders are also expected to bring forward incidents that include perceived or actual: a) Violations of the law. b) Violations of Nexen's integrity-related policies. c) Danger to an employee/contractor or the public's health, safety or security. d) Risk to Nexen-owned assets, property, or resources. e) Accounting or auditing irregularities. f) Concerns about other business conduct that exposes Nexen to fraud and/or are contrary to Nexen's values. In most instances, integrity concerns can be raised directly with a Nexen representative. Direct dialogue is preferred because it allows for two-way exchange and faster resolution of concerns. In rare instances where direct dialogue may not be the best option, contractors should seek guidance from another source that can assist in the resolution of the concern, including: a) The Nexen Integrity Resource Centre (integrity@Nexeninc.com). b) Nexen's Integrity Helpline, which facilitates anonymous and confidential reporting, allows for two-way dialogue, and is administered through an independent third party that can be accessed at www.Nexeninc.com or 1866-384-4277 Note Do not use the Integrity Helpline for reporting events that may present an immediate threat to life or property.

4.11.2 Human Rights Nexen has established procedures to ensure that business decisions and operations are examined for their potential impact on human rights and to establish safeguards to ensure Nexen and its employees are not complicit in human rights abuses. If there is concerned or suspect that a human rights violation may have occurred at a work location, contact the Nexen representative immediately, or the Nexen Integrity Helpline.

5.0 REFERENCES
The following references are relevant to the implementation of this document: 29CFR 1904, Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses 29CFR 1910.1200, Hazard Communications
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29CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection 29CFR 1910.146, Permit Required Confined Spaces 29CFR 1910.147(C)(7), Control of Hazardous Energy (LOTO) 29CFR Subtitle B 1910.1020, Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records 29CFR1910.119(F), Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals 29CFR1910.66, Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance 29CFR1926.502, Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices 30CFR 250, Mineral Resources 29CFR 250.300(D), Pollution Prevention 30CFR 250 109.113, Welding Documents 30CFR 250 Subpart O, Well Control & Production Safety Training 30CFR 250.448, BOP Pressure Test Requirements 46CFR 109.527, Cranes: Operator Designation Access to Exposure and Medical Records Plan Alberta OH&S Code Section 225, Schedule 4 ANSI S12.6-1996, Methods for Measuring the Real-Ear Attenuation of Hearing Protectors ANSI S12.6-1997, Methods for Measuring the Real-ear Attenuation of Hearing Protectors ANSI Z41.1, Mens Safety Toe Footwear ANSI Z87.1, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protective Devices ANSI Z88.2-1992, Respirator Package ANSI Z89.1, Hard Hats ANSI Z89.2, Industrial Protective Helmets for Electrical Workers API RP 2C, Offshore Pedestal Mounted Cranes API RP 2D, Operations and Maintenance of Offshore Cranes API RP 520, Sizing, Selection, and Installation of Pressure-relieving Devices in Refineries API RP 521, Guide for Pressure-relieving and Depressurizing Systems API RP 54, Occupational Safety of Oil and Gas Well Drilling and Servicing Operations API RP 74, Recommended Practice for Occupational Safety for Onshore Oil and Gas Production and Operations ASNT RP TC-1A, Personnel Qualification and Certification for Non-destructive Testing
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BMP for Abrasive Blasting and Coating Operations Compliance Inspection Program Confined Space Entry Plan Confined Space Entry Procedure Confined Space Entry Standard Contraband Items Standard Drug-free Workplace Policy Electrical Safety Program Emergency Response Retrieval and Rescue Plan Event Reporting and Investigation Standard Exposure Control (Blood Borne Pathogens) Hot Work Authorization Permit Hot Work Authorization Permit (Hot and Cold) Standard HSE&SR Commitment Statement HSE&SR-MS PPE: Eye Protection Hurricane Preparedness Plan Isolation Permit Lifting Operations Standard Near-miss Report NFPA Standard 55, Compressed Gases and Cryogenic Fluids Code NFPA Standard 70, National Electrical Code NFPA Standard 77, Recommended Practice on Static Electricity OSHA Standard 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response PACE Card Personal Protective Equipment Program Planned Inspections Program: Drilling and Completions Planned Inspections Program: Production Safe Burning Permit Safe Welding Permit Transit Container Code Waste Management Plan Waste Management Plan
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Work Authorization Permit

6.0 SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS


There are no documents that support the implementation this document.

7.0 REVISION NOTES


Revision Section(s) Description of Changes

July 2011

Overview 4.1 4.2 4.5.1 4.7.58 Appendix H Appendix O Appendix P Appendix Q Appendix V

Updated to reflect new SEMS language Added section to include 13 Standards of SEMS Added Nexens Life Saving Rules Removed HUET requirements for over night or at least 3 times in a calendar year HUET Training Mandatory for offshore travel to MODU, 5 year renewal. Updated Risk Matrix Updated flow chart on Nexen Internal notification Updated BSEE 30 CFR 250.l188 lease holder reporting Added BSEE 40 CFR 110 Environmental Reporting Updated Orientation Acknowledgement Statement to SEMS requirements.

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APPENDIX A NEXEN CORPRATE HEALTH, SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT, AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY POLICY
1.0 Policy Statement The purpose of the Health, Safety, Environment & Social Responsibility (HSE&SR) Policy is to provide guidance and set expectations for Nexen Employees and Contractors on how to respect and help to achieve the companys commitments to sustainability. 2.0 Definitions Biodiversity Variation of life forms within a given ecosystem. Often used as a measure of the health of biological systems. Contractor Companies, consultants, and individuals engaged by Nexen to provide services under a consulting or other contract arrangement. Employee Includes all employees of Nexen Inc. and its subsidiaries, including individuals who are employed on a regular, rotational, fixed term, part, or full time basis. HSE&SR Health, Safety, Environment & Social Responsibility Industrial Hygiene The anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of those environmental factors arising in or from the workplace that may cause illness, impaired health and well being, or significant discomfort among workers or citizens of the community. Life cycle A cradle to grave approach recognizing that all life-cycle stages (raw materials acquisition, manufacturing, processing and formulation, distribution and transportation, use/reuse/maintenance, and recycling and waste management) can have environmental, social and economic impacts that should be considered and preferably mitigated in the design phase. Nexen Nexen Inc. and its majority owned subsidiaries. Occupational Health The promotion of healthy work environments, protection of employee health from workplace health hazards, and prevention of occupational illnesses and injuries. Process Safety Management A management system that is focused on prevention of, preparedness for, mitigation of, response to, and restoration from a process safety event.

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Social Responsibility Maintaining Nexens social license to operate by interacting openly and respectfully with our stakeholders, and by assessing and managing the social risks and impacts of our activities. Sustainability Integrating health, safety, environmental, social, and broader economic considerations into decisions and actions in order to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. 3.0 Objectives A Nexen-wide commitment to health, safety, environment, and social responsibility helps us grow the value of our business responsibly. We work hard to be a recognized leader in sustainability and to integrate health, safety, environmental and social considerations into the way we do business. 4.0 Persons Affected Each Employee and Contractor of Nexen, as well as external stakeholders with an interest in Nexens operations. 5.0 Policy We conduct our business with respect and care for people and the environment. We comply with all applicable regulatory requirements and we apply industry best practices. We steward our performance through our HSE&SR management system and through transparent and timely reporting of our performance. We provide a safe and attractive work environment characterized by respect, trust, and cooperation. We promote a company-wide culture that supports HSE&SR and we are guided by the principles that follow. 5.1 Occupational Health: Personal Safety and Process Safety We are committed to excellence in health and safety performance and controlling the risks arising from our operations. We target zero harm to our Employees, Contractors and the communities where we work and provide our workforce with the necessary information and training to prevent accidents. We apply the principles of process safety management to ensure the integrity of our operations. 5.2 Environmental Management We continually evaluate and apply ways to reduce the impact of our operations on air, water, land, and biodiversity. We target to minimize waste and steward our products throughout their life cycle to protect people and the environment.

5.3 Social Responsibility


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We engage openly and honestly with people affected by and with a genuine interest in our activities, and develop collaborative and mutually beneficial relationships with our stakeholders. We contribute to the economic and social development of the communities where we operate. We respect universal human rights and the rights of aboriginal and indigenous peoples. 6.0 Roles and Responsibilities: President and CEO Ensures compliance to this Policy. Vice President HSE&SR Establishes and maintains the practices, guidelines, and internal controls pertaining to this Policy. The HSE&SR Executive Committee Exercises due diligence with respect to the Policy through regular review, discussion and endorsement of HSE&SR management systems, strategies and action plans, as well as stewardship of HSE&SR performance. The HSE&SR Committee of Nexens Board of Directors Assists the board in overseeing the development, implementation and monitoring of policies and programs that manage HSE&SR issues and ensures Nexen continues to institute best-in-class practices. All Nexen Employees Required to adhere to the principles of this Policy and will actively promote its adoption by our Contractors, suppliers, customers, partners and agents. 7.0 Guiding Principles This policy is informed by the International Code of Ethics for Canadian Business and the principles contained in the United Nations Global Compact. In certain operations, our HSE&SR conduct is also guided by the Responsible Care initiative.

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APPENDIX B WORKSITE HAZARD ASSESSMENT 1.0 Stop and Think: Overall Focus
1. How can I be hurt?: ___________________________________________________ 2. How can I protect myself?: ______________________________________________ Comments:

2.0 Identify Hazards Assess Risks


I have the skills and knowledge to do this task. I have reviewed the procedures associated with this work. I have received, read, and understand the safe work permit. I clearly understand the work and job plan and have reviewed it with the rest of my crew. I have completed the Nexen Worksite Hazard Assessment on the Safe Work Permit. Operations knows exactly what I will be doing and where I will be located. Control Room has been included, if necessary. All necessary isolations are validated and for electrical work, my lock controls the isolation. All isolation points have been identified, including blinds and locks on the isolation sheet. Gas testing has verified that I will be working in a safe environment and the proper precautions are in place. I have all the necessary tools and equipment and they are safe to work with. I have all the correct PPE to protect myself. I know the evacuation routes are clear and the location of the nearest assembly point. I have located the nearest safety shower/eyewash location. I have inspected the work area for possible physical and process hazards above, below, or near me. I have completed a walkdown with the Nexen PIC or their designee prior to my job/task.
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I flagged off the appropriate area to protect myself from work nearby or to protect others from my task. I have put the permit precautions into place, such as fire or spark watch, extinguisher, or additional PPE. I feel that it is safe to proceed with the work. Comments:

3.0 Control Risks


What could hurt me? Inattentive to job hazards Heavy lifting and exertion Electric shock, arc Burns, hot surfaces, steam and condensate Pinch points, Wrench slips How can I protect myself? Focus on the task, look for hazards, and identify what could hurt me? Proper lifting practice, mechanical assistance, other personnel Proper isolation, lockout to ensure equipment is de-energized, apply grounds Proper isolation, PPE Keep hands clear, wear gloves, pull the wrench whenever possible, control the force if you cannot pull Monitor work and rest times, plan work based on the work environment Isolation, lockout, PPE, MSDS, WHMIS Guard rails, fall protection, housekeeping, 3-point contact with ladders and stairs, use designated walkways Respirator, ventilation, breathing air Gloves, file, grind smooth, tap, use the correct tool PPE, spark watch, screens, fire extinguisher Stop the work and assess for new or additional hazards and develop controls to address risks

Heat/Cold exposure Hazardous material/Energy contact Slip, trip, or fall

Dust, gas, vapor Sharp edges Welding flash sparks Change in work scope or plan, people, process, procedures, or equipment throughout the day

After these steps have been completed, it is safe to Resume Work.

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APPENDIX C JOB SAFETY & ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS


The Proactive Approach to Injury Prevention Supervisor:_____________________ Location:_____________________ Date: _____________ Time: ______________ Pre-Job Preparation Identify Potential Hazards/Risks

Sequence of Basic Job Steps

Preventive Measures to Eliminate Hazards/Risks

Cleanup
Leave the Site Cleaner Than You Found It Comments

Close-Out Job
End the Job Properly Remove All Tags Comments Time: ________________ Initials: _________________ Sign: _____________________

ALL MEMBERS OF THE TASK GROUP SIGN BELOW 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

7.

8. 9. 10.

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APPENDIX D UV INDEX
UV Index: How to use it As described in other sections of the UV information, the UV Index is a forecast of the probable intensity of skin damaging ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface during the solar noon hour (11:30-12:30 local standard time or 12:30-13:30 local daylight time). The greater the UV Index is the greater the amount of skin damaging UV radiation. How much UV radiation is needed to actually damage one's skin is dependant on several factors. But in general the darker one's skin is, (that is the more melanin one has in his/her skin) the longer (or the more UV radiation) it takes to cause erythema (skin reddening). Figure 1 shows a look up chart where by one can cross check his/her propensity to burn versus the UV Index. For those who always burn and never tan the times to burn are relatively short compared to those who almost always tan. The EPA has devised general guidelines as far as what to do to protect oneself from overexposure to UV radiation. These are shown in the table below. Exposure Category Minimal Low Moderate High Very High UV Index 0, 1, 2 3, 4 5, 6 7, 8, 9 10+ Protective Actions Apply skin protection factor (SPF) 15 sun screen. SPF 15 & protective clothing (hat) SPF 15, protective clothing, and UV-A&B sun glasses. SPF 15, protective clothing, sun glasses and make attempts to avoid the sun between 10am to 4pm. SPF 15, protective clothing, sun glasses and avoid being in the sun between 10am to 4pm.

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APPENDIX E - UV INDEX CHART

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APPENDIX F HEAT INDEX CHART

.
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APPENDIX G HEALTH EFFECTS OF HEAT STRESS


Health Effect Heat Rash Symptoms Red bumpy rash with severe itching Treatment Change into dry clothes and avoid hot environments. Rinse skin with cool water. Wash regularly to keep skin clean and dry. GET MEDICAL ATTENTION: Assess the need for CPR. Move to a cool area, loosen clothing, make person lie down, and if the person is conscious, offer sips of cool water. NOTE: Fainting may also be due to other illnesses.

Fainting

Sudden fainting after at least two hours of work; cool, moist skin; weak pulse.

Painful, involuntary muscle spasms that usually occur during heavy exercise in hot environments. Inadequate fluid intake often contributes to this problem. The spasms may be more intense and Heat Cramps more prolonged than typical nocturnal leg cramps. Muscles most often affected include the calves, arms, and abdomen and back, although the cramps may involve any muscle group involved in the exercise.

Rest briefly and cool down. Drink water or an electrolyte-containing sports drink. Practice gentle, rangeof-motion stretching and gently massage the affected muscle group.

Heat Exhaustion

Get out of the sun and into a shady or air-conditioned location. Lay the person down and elevate the feet Signs and symptoms of heat slightly. Loosen or remove the exhaustion often begin suddenly, individuals clothing. Have the sometimes after excessive exercise, person drink cold water, not iced, or perspiration, and inadequate fluid a sports drink containing intake. Features resemble shock electrolytes. Cool the person by and include: feeling faint, nausea, spraying them with cool water and ashen appearance, rapid heartbeat, fanning. Monitor the person low blood pressure, hot, red, dry or carefully. Heat exhaustion can sweaty skin, low-grade fever, quickly become heatstroke. If fever generally less than 104F. especially greater than 104F fainting, confusion, or seizures occur, CALL FOR EMERGENCY MEDICAL ASSISTANCE.
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Health Effect

Symptoms The main sign of heatstroke is a markedly elevated temperature generally greater than 104F - with hot, dry skin and changes in mental status ranging from personality changes to confusion and coma. Other signs may include rapid heartbeat, rapid and shallow breathing, elevated or lowered blood pressure, cessation of sweating, irritability, confusion or unconsciousness, fainting, which can be the first sign in older adults.

Treatment

Heat Stroke

Move out of the sun and into a shady or air-conditioned space. Dial CALL FOR EMERGENCY MEDICAL ASSISTANCE. Cool the person by covering them with damp sheets or by spraying with cool water. Direct air onto the person with a fan or newspaper.

How Forecasters Decide Whether to Issue Excessive Heat Products NOAA's heat alert procedures are based mainly on Heat Index Values. The "Heat Index", sometimes referred to as the "apparent temperature" and given in degrees Fahrenheit, is a measure of how hot it really feels when relative humidity is added to the actual air temperature. To find the heat index, look at the Heat Index Chart. As an example, if the air temperature is 96F (found on the top of the table) and the relative humidity is 65% (found on the left of the table), the heat index-or how hot it really feels-is 121F. This is at the intersection of the 96 column and the 65% row. The National Weather Service will initiate alert procedures when the Heat Index is expected to exceed 105- 110F (depending on local climate) for at least two consecutive days. IMPORTANT: Since heat index values were devised for shady, light wind conditions, EXPOSURE TO FULL SUNSHINE CAN INCREASE HEAT INDEX VALUES BY UP TO 15F. Also, STRONG WINDS, PARTICULARLY WITH VERY HOT, DRY AIR, CAN BE EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS. Note on the Heat Index Chart shaded zone above 105F. This corresponds to a level that may cause increasingly severe heat disorders with continued exposure and/or physical activity. Vulnerability to Heat Stress: Many permanent or temporary conditions (e.g. age, heart or lung conditions, dehydration, fatigue, some medications) can make a person more vulnerable to heat strain. Despite these conditions, workers may be able to cope given adequate knowledge of the signs and symptoms of heat stress and the latitude to make the appropriate adjustments to their pace of work. More often, the young, fit workers may think they are invincible who succumb to heat strain. Some workers may need medical advice about what accommodations would be right for them.

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HEAT SAFETY: a) Slow down. Strenuous activities should be reduced, eliminated, or rescheduled to the coolest time of the day. Individuals at risk should stay in the coolest available place, not necessarily indoors. b) Dress for summer. Lightweight lightcolored clothing reflects heat and sunlight, and helps your body maintain normal temperatures. c) Put less fuel on your inner fires. Foods (like proteins) that increase metabolic heat production also increase water loss. d) Drink plenty of water or other nonalcohol fluids. Your body needs water to keep cool. Drink plenty of fluids even if you don't feel thirsty. Persons who (1) have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease, (2) are on fluid restrictive diets or (3) have a problem with fluid retention should consult a physician before increasing their consumption of fluids. Do not drink alcoholic beverages. e) Spend more time in air-conditioned places. Air conditioning in homes and other buildings markedly reduces danger from the heat. If you cannot afford an air conditioner, spending some time each day (during hot weather) in an air conditioned environment affords some protection. f) Don't get too much sun. Sunburn makes the job of heat dissipation that much more difficult g) Do not take salt tablets unless specified by a physician.

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APPENDIX H RISK MATRIX (Risk = Consequences x Likelihood)


Consequence Describe below what is the most likely, worst-case scenario that might have occurred under slightly different circumstances. For example, A 20 lb. dropped object that narrowly missed a worker on the drill floor could have resulted in a fatality and be rated as Critical (4). Similarly, a head-on vehicle collision with minor injuries that could have resulted in multiple fatalities shall be rated as Catastrophic (5). Harm to People Yes/No Environment Effects Yes/No
Outside spill response assistance required (beyond local co-op) Long term impact and clean up required (>5 years) Outside spill response assistance required (local co-op) Long term impact and clean up required (< 5 years) Company spill response required Localized, short term impact and clean up required (< 2 years) Reportable event $500 k to $5 MM

Likelihood How often would it be expected to have similar circumstances aligned for this event to occur? Please refer to site, company, and industry historical data to help predict the occurrence frequency of such an event. A Remote: < once in 40 years B Unlikely: Once every 20 years C Possible: Once every 10 years D Probable: Once every 3 years E Frequent: One or more times/yr

Financial loss Yes/No

Impact on Reputation Yes/No


National or International media attention Shut down of operations by regulators

Multiple fatalities

> $100 million

5 Catastrophic

Single fatality or permanent disability injury/illness

$10 to $100 million

Regional media attention Regulatory or legal action taken

4 Critical

Lost time injury/illness

$5 MM to $10 million

Local media attention Regulatory or legal action likely Public awareness may exist, but there is no public concern

3 Major

Modified work or medical treatment injury/illness

2 Serious 1 Minor

First aid injury/illness

Non- reportable event

$50 k to $500 k

On site communications

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After a Risk Assessment has been conducted, look to implement all possible risk reduction measures when initial assessments indicate low, medium, or high-risk levels. Refer to HSE&SR manuals, handbooks, procedures, standards, code of practices, and so on to help determine most practicable risk reduction measures. Taking into account the applicable risk reduction measures identified, redo risk assessment to determine level of residual risk still associated with conducting the specific work activities. Use the Approval Guide to help determine the level of approvals needed depending on the outcome of the residual risk assessment. RISK CONTROL GUIDE (Refer to HSE&SR manuals, handbooks, work procedures, and/or codes of practice for possible risk reduction measures) Insignificant Risk/Low Risk: Manage risk through controls identified in Work Permit and Pre-Work Hazard Assessment. Medium Risk: Alert: Involve Lead Operator/Supervisor or HSE&SR staff to determine risk control plan. High Risk: Stop Work! Work should not proceed until Senior Lead/Supervisor and HSE&SR are involved in risk control plan, the risk is lowered and/or the task is redefined.

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APPENDIX J HAZARD COMMUNICATION COLOR CODING

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APPENDIX K DANGEROUS GOODS CLASS GUIDE


1. EXPLOSIVES

2. GASES

3. FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS

4 FLAMMABLE SUBSTANCES

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5. OXIDES / ORGANIC PEROXIDES

6. TOXIC / INECTIOUS SUBSTANCES

7. RADIOACTIVES

8. CORROSIVES

9. MISCELLANEOUS

UN NUMBER, PACKING GROUPS, MIXED LOAD Packing Groups I Great Danger II Moderate Danger III Minor Danger _____________________ Mixed Loan Placard

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APPENDIX L WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEMS (WHMIS) HARMONIZED IDENTIFICATION

Class A Compressed Gas

Class B Flammable and Combustible Material

Class C Oxidizing material Class D Poisonous and Infectious Material Division 1 - Materials Causing Immediate and Serious Toxic Effects

Division 2 Materials Causing Other Toxic Effects

Division 3 Biohazardous Infectious Material

Class E Corrosive Material

Class F Dangerously Reactive Material

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APPENDIX M P.A.C.E. CARD

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APPENDIX N S.TO.P. CARD

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APPENDIX O EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION AND REPORTING FLOWCHART

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X = Call

O = Email

eWell = eWell data entry / = No Notification Required

APPENDIX P - USCG AND LEASE HOLDER INCIDENT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS


Incident Type Notify OBriens Group
-

Notify Environmental Specialist -

Notify HSE&SR Specialist O, X5

Notify Regulatory Specialist O, X2


eWell

Notification Timing Immediate

Regulatory Reference 30 CFR 250.188 30 CFR 146.30 33 CFR 146.30

Follow-up on Written Report 10-15 Days HSE&SR (10)

All Fatalities Injury to 5 or more in a single incident All injuries that require the evacuation of the injured persons from the facility to shore or to another facility All losses of well control All Fires and explosions All reportable releases of hydrogen sulfide gas All collisions that result in property of equipment damage > $25K All incidents involving structural damage to an OCS facility Damage to a floating OCS facility

O, X5

Immediate

HSE&SR

O, X2

O, X
eWell

Immediate

30 CFR 250.188

HSE&SR

X1

O O, X O, X
2

O O, X

O, X2
eWell

Immediate Immediate

30 CFR 250.188 30 CFR 250.188 30 CFR 250.490 40 CFR 300.125 33 CFR 153

Regulatory HSE&SR

O, X

eWell

eWell

O, X

O, X

Immediate

HSE&SR

O, X

O, X

2, 5

eWell

Immediate

30 CFR 250.188 33 CFR 146.30

Regulatory

O, X

O, X

eWell

Immediate

30 CFR 250.188

Regulatory

O, X

O, X

2, 5

eWell

Promptly

30 CFR 250.188

Regulatory

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O = Email

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Incident Type

Notify OBriens Group

Notify Environmental Specialist

Notify HSE&SR Specialist

Notify Regulatory Specialist

Notification Timing

Regulatory Reference

Follow-up on Written Report 10-15 Days

All incidents involving crane or personnel material handling operations All incidents that damage or disable safety systems or equipment, including life saving and firefighting systems Any injuries that result in one or more days away from work or one or more days on restricted work or job transfer All gas releases that initiate equipment or process shutdown All Incidents that require operations personnel on the facility to muster for evacuation for reasons not related to weather or drills

O, X
eWell

O, X

Immediate

30 CFR 250.188

Regulatory

O, X

O, X,
eWell

Promptly

30 CFR 250.188 33 CFR 146.30

HSE&SR (10)

O, X2
eWell

Immediate

30 CFR 250.188

HSE&SR

O, X

eWell

O, X

O, X

Immediate

30 CFR 250.188

Regulatory

X1, 5

O, X

O, X

O, X

eWell

Immediate

30 CFR 250.188

Regulatory

114 of 132 Electronic documents residing within the Nexen Document Management System are controlled. All printed documentation is considered uncontrolled.

X = Call

O = Email

eWell = eWell data entry / = No Notification Required

Incident Type

Notify OBriens Group

Notify Environmental Specialist

Notify HSE&SR Specialist

Notify Regulatory Specialist

Notification Timing

Regulatory Reference

Follow-up on Written Report 10-15 Days

Injury causing personnel to be incapacitated for more than 72 hours. All other incidents resulting in property or equipment damage

O, X5

Promptly

33 CFR 146.30

HSE&SR

O, X

O, X2
eWell

Immediate

30 CFR 250.188

Regulatory

115 of 132 Electronic documents residing within the Nexen Document Management System are controlled. All printed documentation is considered uncontrolled.

X = Call

O = Email

eWell = eWell data entry / = No Notification Required

APPENDIX Q USCG AND BSEE LEASE HOLDER ENVIRONMENTAL INCIDENT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
Incident Type Spills and Sheens ( Oil, OBM/SBM, Unknown) > 1bbl Spills and Sheens ( Oil, OBM/SBM, Unknown) < 1bbl Notify OBriens Group Notify Environmental Specialist
2, 3

Notify HSE&SR Specialist

Notify Regulatory Specialist

Notification Timing

Regulatory Reference 30 CFR 254.46 & 40 CFR 110.6 & NTL 2007-G12 40 CFR 110.6 40 CFR 300.125 33 CFR 153 40 CFR 302.6 40 CFR 300.405 40 CFR 300.125 33 CFR 153 CERCLA Section 103 30 CFR 250.300 40 CFR 110.6 NTL 2007-G03 30 CFR 250.300 NTL 2007-G03 GMG290000 Part 2 D.7

Follow-up on Written Report 15 Days

X1

O, X

eWell

O, X

Immediate

Environmental

O, X 3
eWell

O, X

Immediate

Environmental

Chemical Spill > RQ or unknown quantities

X1

O, X 3
eWell

O, X

Immediate

Environmental

Floating debris or sheen sighting of unknown origin Marine Debris / Dropped objects overboard Sheen from NPDES permitted discharge

X1

O, X

Immediate

Environmental

O, X

O, X2
eWell

12 hours

HSE&SR

O, X3

12 hours

Environmental

116 of 132 Electronic documents residing within the Nexen Document Management System are controlled. All printed documentation is considered uncontrolled.

X = Call

O = Email

eWell = eWell data entry / = No Notification Required

Incident Type Toxicity test failure of NPDES permitted discharge (drilling fluid or chemicallytreated misc. discharge) Oil and grease concentration > 42mg/L (per test) or 29mg/L (monthly avg.) for NPDES permitted discharge (completion fluid) Sighting of dead or injured marine wildlife

Notify OBriens Group

Notify Environmental Specialist

Notify HSE&SR Specialist

Notify Regulatory Specialist

Notification Timing

Regulatory Reference

Follow-up on Written Report 15 Days

O, X3

12 hours

GMG290000 Part 2 D.7

Environmental

O, X3

12 hours

GMG290000 Part 2 D.7

Environmental

O, X4

12 hours

NTL 2007-G04

Environmental

117 of 132 Electronic documents residing within the Nexen Document Management System are controlled. All printed documentation is considered uncontrolled.

X = Call

O = Email

eWell = eWell data entry / = No Notification Required

Definitions: RQ Reportable quantity, that quantity, as set forth in 40 CFR 302.4, the release of which requires notification to the regulatory Agency. Immediate 15 minutes, Although Statutes do not define the term immediately, in enforcement, U.S. EPA relies on a comment in CERCLAs legislative history that expects notification within fifteen (15) minutes after knowledge of a release of a Reportable Quantity (RQ)*. *(The note was extracted from Emergency Release Notification Requirements: How Soon is Soon Enough? American Bar Association, Environmental Enforcement and Crimes Committee Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Feb. 2007)). 12 Hours Report the same day as the incident occurs, during day light hours or if incident occurs at night then next day (reported a soon as possible after the situation is stabilized) OBM Oil based mud SBM Synthetic Based Mud NPDES National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act; aka Superfund Notes 1) NRC Verbal Notification 2) BOEMRE Verbal Notification 3) EPA Notification 4) NOAA/NMFS Notification 5) USCG

118 of 132 Electronic documents residing within the Nexen Document Management System are controlled. All printed documentation is considered uncontrolled.

APPENDIX R WORK AUTHORIZATION PERMIT FIELD AUDIT


Permit/Job Number: _____________________________________________________ Job Description: ________________________________________________________ Auditor(s): _____________________________________________________________ Date: _________________________________________________________________ Section 1 Work Planning 1.1 Is the job description complete and clear? 1.2 Has the correct location and area for the job been identified? 1.3 Have job procedures been completed to the right level of detail and available for the job (as required)? 1.4 Do procedures cover the entire job area from pre-job to post-job requirements? 1.5 Were SIMOPS issues addressed in the job planning? Comments: Yes No N/A

Section 2 Risk Assessment and Management 2.1 Are the job steps defined at an appropriate level of detail? 2.2 In the opinion of the auditor(s), have potential hazards been identified adequately? Were all relevant categories of hazardous energy sources (Pressure, Motion, Chemical, Radiation, Electrical, Gravity, Heat/Cold, and Biological) adequately addressed? 2.3 In the opinion of the auditor(s), have appropriate controls (safeguards/mitigations) been identified? 2.4 Have all controls been assigned to an accountable person? 2.5 In the opinion of the auditor(s), is the level of risk assessment performed adequate for the job? Comments:

Yes

No

N/A

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Section 3 Authorization and Issue 3.1 Have the correct authorizations been identified and given for this job/permit? 3.2 Has a pre-job site visit been carried out by the Issuing Authority or designee? 3.3 Has a pre-job site visit been carried out by the Performing Authority? Comments:

Yes

No

N/A

Section 4 Job Execution (Worksite Audit) 4.1 4.2 4.3 Is the activity within the defined job source? Have all controls (safeguards/mitigations) specified been put in place? Is there an up to date copy of the permit and risk assessment at the worksite signed by all personnel involved in the job? Has the Performing Authority held a pre-job toolbox talk with the work team? Can the work team demonstrate an adequate level of awareness of the hazards associated with the task? Can the work team demonstrate an adequate level of awareness of the control measures that are required to safely perform the task? If new hazards and/or controls were identified, was the job stopped to consult with the Performing Authority or Issuing Authority to update the permit/JSA? Have the appropriate gas tests been carried out and recorded on the permit? Does the work team know what to do in the event of an accidental release of spill? Are emergency procedures addressed in the JSEA?

Yes

No

N/A

4.4 4.5 4.6

4.7

4.8 4.9

4.10 If any PPE has been specified in a JSEA, is it in use and in good condition? 4.11 If chemicals or hazardous materials are being used, is the MSDS sheet readily available? 4.12 Is the safety equipment defined in the JSEA available at the worksite?
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Section 4 Job Execution (Worksite Audit) 4.13 Have personnel who have joined a job in progress been briefed to the same level of understanding of the tack and associated hazards and control measures? 4.14 Are all personnel trained and competent to perform their tasks? 4.15 Have all issues regarding the Golden Rules of Safety been addressed? 4.16 Was the Performing Authority adequately overseeing the job task? 4.17 Are all supporting documents attached to the permit (isolations, etc)? 4.18 If multiple permits are associated with a job task, is everyone aware of the issues concerning multiple permits? 4.19 Is everyone aware of the SIMOPS issues of other tasks that may affect him or her? Comments:

Yes

No

N/A

Section 5 Post Job Actions 5.1 When the job was completed, was the worksite returned to a safe condition? 5.2 Was a walk down conducted by the Issuing Authority to assure the area was safe before the permit was closed? 5.3 If changes or improvements were identified for the job, were these captured and shared? Were procedures updated? Comments:

Yes

No

N/A

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APPENDIX S PPE MATRIX: GENERAL PPE AND GLOVES


KEY X = REQUIRED FIELD O = SELECT BASED ON JSA RESULT PEL = PERSONAL EXPOSURE LIMIT

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT MATRIX Hard Hat Safety Glasses Side Shields

GENERAL PPE
Goggles Face Shields Welding Lenses/ UV Hearing Protection Personal Flotation Devices \(PFD) Fall Protection Welding/ Thermal Cut Resistant Natural Rubber BUT YL

GLOVES
PVC VITON Nirel Neoprene Leather/ Cotton ELEC TRIC AL

ABRASIVE BLASTING / IN RESP. REQ. ZONE CHANGING FILTERS CHIPPING / CHISELING COMPRESSOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE COMPRESSOR CYLINDER HONING COMPRESSOR START -UP COMPRESSOR VALVE MAINTENANCE CONFINED SPACE WORK CUTTING NEW GASKETS NON - ASBESTOS GRINDING / BUFFING WELDS HAMMERING HANDLING ENGINE OILS HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATION HIGH PRESSURE WATER CLEANING HOT TAP / COLD TAP INSTALLATION / REMOVAL OF BLINDS LAUNCH / RETRIEVE PIG LIGHTING HEATERS / REBOILERS LOADING / DUMPING NUISANCE DUSTS MANUAL TRANSFER OF CHEMICALS

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X O X X

X O O

X X X X X

X X X O X X X X O O O X X X X

O X

X X X X

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GENERAL PPE
Hard Hat Safety Glasses Side Shields Goggles Face Shields Welding Lenses/ UV Hearing Protection Personal Flotation Devices \(PFD) Fall Protection Welding/ Thermal Cut Resistant Natural Rubber BUT YL

GLOVES
PVC VITON Nirel Neoprene Leather/ Cotton ELEC TRICAL

METER CALIBRATION GAS MEASUREMENT METER CALIBRATION LIQUID MEASUREMENT OPENING CONDENSATE PROCESS / INLET OPENING PROCESS LINES / LINEBREAKING OPERATING VALVES AND EQUIPMENT PAINT REMOVAL USING CHEMICALS PAINTING WITH ISOCY ANATE PAINT PAINTING WITH SOLVENT BASED PAINT PAINTING WITH WATER BASED BAINT PD PUMP PACKING, PLUNGER, VALVE REPLACE PIPE HANDLING @ PIPEYARD PIPE HANDLING DURING DELIVERY PIPE HANDLING ON SITE PRESSURING / DE PRESSURE LINES RELIEF VALVE TESTING REMOVING LEAD BASED PAINT ROUTINE OPERATION OF PLATFORM / RIG SEAL REPAIRS SEPARATING FLANGES SERVICING METER RUNS TAKING READINGS AND MAKING ROUNDS TANK GAUGING (ATMOSPHERIC)

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X

X X X X X X X X O O

X X X X X

X X

X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X O O X O O

X X X X X X X X X X X X X

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Electronic documents residing within the Nexen Document Management System are controlled. All printed documentation is considered uncontrolled.

GENERAL PPE
Hard Hat Safety Glasses Side Shields Goggles Face Shields Welding Lenses/ UV Hearing Protection Personal Flotation Devices \(PFD) Fall Protection Welding/ Thermal Cut Resistant Natural Rubber BUT YL

GLOVES
PVC VITON Nirel Neoprene Leather/ Cotton ELEC TRICAL

THREAD CUTTING UNPROTECTED SCAFFOLDS USING POWER TOOLS / SAWS WALKING THROUGH AREA / (VISITORS) WELDING / HELP WELL SERVICING, FRAC JOBS WORK AT UNPROTECTED ELE. HEIGHTS WORK IN POSTED HIGH NOISE AREAS WORK ON NORM CONTAINING EQUIP. WORK ON / AROUND HOT SURFACES WORK OUT OF SUSPENDED PLATFORMS WORK WITH ACIDS WORK WITH BENZENE WORK WITH BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS WORK WITH CAUSTICS / BASES WORK WITH ELECTRICITY WORK WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE WORK WITH MINERAL SPIRITS WORK WITH ORGANIC SOLVENT WORK WITH OTHER CHEMICALS WORK WITH RESPIRABLE FIBERS WORK WITH SHARP OBJECTS

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X

When working above water


X X X X O X X X X X O O O X X X X X O O X X O O O X O O O O O O O O X X X X X O X X O O O O O O X X X X

X X X X X X

X X X X X X

X X

X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

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APPENDIX T PPE MATRIX: CLOTHING AND EXPOSURE CONCENTRATIONS GREATER THAN PEL
KEY X = REQUIRED FIELD O = SELECT BASED ON JSA RESULT PEL = PERSONAL EXPOSURE LIMIT

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT MATRIX FRC

CLOTHING
TYVEK SPLASH APRON 100% COTTON STEEL TOE PPE FROM JSA PPE FROM MSDS RESPIRATORS 1/2 FACE MASK

EXPOSURE CONCENTRATIONS GREATER THAN PEL


FULL FACE MASK N (NON OIL PROOF) P (OIL PROOF) 95 (DUST, FUME, MIST) 100 (HEPA) ORGANIC VAPOR CARTRIDGE ACID CARTRIDGE CHLORINE CARTRIDGE RADIONUCLIDE CARTRIDGE AIRLINE S C B A

ABRASIVE BLASTING / IN RESP. REQ. ZONE CHANGING FILTERS CHIPPING / CHISELING COMPRESSOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE COMPRESSOR CYLINDER HONING COMPRESSOR START -UP COMPRESSOR VALVE MAINTENANCE CONFINED SPACE WORK CUTTING NEW GASKETS - NON ASBESTOS GRINDING / BUFFING WELDS HAMMERING HANDLING ENGINE OILS HEAVY EQUIPMENT

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X

X X X

X X X X X

X X X X X X X X

O X

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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT MATRIX FRC

CLOTHING
TYVEK SPLASH APRON 100% COTTON STEEL TOE PPE FROM JSA PPE FROM MSDS RESPIRATORS 1/2 FACE MASK

EXPOSURE CONCENTRATIONS GREATER THAN PEL


FULL FACE MASK N (NON OIL PROOF) P (OIL PROOF) 95 (DUST, FUME, MIST) 100 (HEPA) ORGANIC VAPOR CARTRIDGE ACID CARTRIDGE CHLORINE CARTRIDGE RADIONUCLIDE CARTRIDGE AIRLINE S C B A

OPERATION HIGH PRESSURE WATER CLEANING HOT TAP / COLD TAP INSTALLATION / REMOVAL OF BLINDS LAUNCH/ RETRIEVE PIG LIGHTING HEATERS / REBOILERS LOADING / DUMPING NUISANCE DUSTS MANUAL TRANSFER OF CHEMICALS METER CALIBRATION GAS MEASUREMENT METER CALIBRATION LIQUID MEASUREMENT OPENING CONDENSATE PROCESS / INLET OPENING PROCESS LINES / LINEBREAKING OPERATING VALVES AND EQUIPMENT PAINT REMOVAL USING CHEMICALS X X X X X X

X X

X X

X X X X X

X X X

X X X X X

OFFSHORE SAFE WORK PRACTICES HANDBOOK

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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT MATRIX FRC

CLOTHING
TYVEK SPLASH APRON 100% COTTON STEEL TOE PPE FROM JSA PPE FROM MSDS RESPIRATORS 1/2 FACE MASK

EXPOSURE CONCENTRATIONS GREATER THAN PEL


FULL FACE MASK N (NON OIL PROOF) P (OIL PROOF) 95 (DUST, FUME, MIST) 100 (HEPA) ORGANIC VAPOR CARTRIDGE ACID CARTRIDGE CHLORINE CARTRIDGE RADIONUCLIDE CARTRIDGE AIRLINE S C B A

PAINTING WITH ISOCY ANATE PAINT PAINTING WITH SOLVENT BASED PAINT PAINTING WITH WATER BASED BAINT PD PUMP PACKING, PLUNGER, VALVE REPLACE PIPE HANDLING @ PIPEYARD PIPE HANDLING DURING DELIVERY PIPE HANDLING ON SITE PRESSURING / DE PRESSURE LINES RELIEF VALVE TESTING REMOVING LEAD BASED PAINT ROUTINE OPERATION OF PLATFORM / RIG SEAL REPAIRS SEPARATING FLANGES SERVICING METER RUNS

X X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X

X X X X X X X X

X X X X

X X X X X X X

OFFSHORE SAFE WORK PRACTICES HANDBOOK

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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT MATRIX FRC

CLOTHING
TYVEK SPLASH APRON 100% COTTON STEEL TOE PPE FROM JSA PPE FROM MSDS RESPIRATORS 1/2 FACE MASK

EXPOSURE CONCENTRATIONS GREATER THAN PEL


FULL FACE MASK N (NON OIL PROOF) P (OIL PROOF) 95 (DUST, FUME, MIST) 100 (HEPA) ORGANIC VAPOR CARTRIDGE ACID CARTRIDGE CHLORINE CARTRIDGE RADIONUCLIDE CARTRIDGE AIRLINE S C B A

TAKING READINGS AND MAKING ROUNDS TANK GAUGING (ATMOSPHERIC) THREAD CUTTING UNPROTECTED SCAFFOLDS USING POWER TOOLS / SAWS WALKING THROUGH AREA / (VISITORS) WELDING / HELP WELL SERVICING, FRAC JOBS WORK AT UNPROTECTED ELE. HEIGHTS WORK IN POSTED HIGH NOISE AREAS WORK ON NORM CONTAINING EQUIP. WORK ON / AROUND HOT SURFACES WORK OUT OF SUSPENDED PLATFORMS WORK WITH ACIDS WORK WITH BENZENE

X X

X X X X X

X X

X X

X X X X

X X X X X O O O

X X

X X

X X X O

X X X

X X X X X O X O X O O

OFFSHORE SAFE WORK PRACTICES HANDBOOK

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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT MATRIX FRC

CLOTHING
TYVEK SPLASH APRON 100% COTTON STEEL TOE PPE FROM JSA PPE FROM MSDS RESPIRATORS 1/2 FACE MASK

EXPOSURE CONCENTRATIONS GREATER THAN PEL


FULL FACE MASK N (NON OIL PROOF) P (OIL PROOF) 95 (DUST, FUME, MIST) 100 (HEPA) ORGANIC VAPOR CARTRIDGE ACID CARTRIDGE CHLORINE CARTRIDGE RADIONUCLIDE CARTRIDGE AIRLINE S C B A

WORK WITH BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS WORK WITH CAUSTICS / BASES WORK WITH ELECTRICITY WORK WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE WORK WITH MINERAL SPIRITS WORK WITH ORGANIC SOLVENT WORK WITH OTHER CHEMICALS WORK WITH RESPIRABLE FIBERS WORK WITH SHARP OBJECTS

X X X

X O

X X X

X X

X X

O O O O

X X O

X X

X X

X X

X O O O

X X

X X

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APPENDIX T OFFICE AND SHOREBASE CONTACT INFORMATION


NEXEN PETROLEUM USA INC 5601 Granite Parkway, Suite 1400 Plano, TX, USA, 75024 Main Number: 972-450-4600 Fax Number: 972-450-4729 Lafayette, Louisiana 3639 Ambassador Caffery Pkwy, Suite 104 Lafayette, LA, USA, 70503 Main Number: 337-735-2500 Fax Number: 337-735-2518 Houston, Texas 2000 West Sam Houston Parkway, South Houston, TX, USA, 77042 Main Number: 713-341-2900 Fax Number: 713-341-2990 Fourchon Shorebase, Louisiana 300 Adam Ted Gisclair Road Golden Meadows, LA, USA 70357 Main Number: 985-664-4837 Fax Number: 985-664-4858 Berwick Shorebase, Louisiana 1410 River Road, Lot 1 Berwick, LA, USA, 70342 Main Number: 403-699-4000 Fax Number: 403-699-5800 New Iberia, Louisiana 5319 Port Road New Iberia, LA, USA 70560 Main Number: 337-335-1017 Fax Number: 337-335-1040 PHI Heliport Houma, Louisiana 3550 Taxi Road Houma, LA 70363 Main Number: 985-868-1705 Fax Number: 985-868-0107 Talens Fuel & Marine Fresh Water City 41937 Louisiana Highway 3147 Kaplan, LA 70548 Dock (337) 737-2440
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APPENDIX U HSE&SR ORIENTATION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT


This is to acknowledge that I have received this Safe Work Practices Handbook and will become familiar with Nexen Petroleum USA, Incs Safety and Environmental Management System (SEMS) components as they relate to my work assignment on Nexen-operated facilities. The following introductory items were covered in the facility orientation session: 1) General - Personal Conduct/Responsibilities Drug-free Work Place/Prescription Medications Contraband Items/Search Program SafeGulf Certificate or IADC equivalent (2) Safety and Environmental Information - S.A.F.E chart (3) Hazards Analysis - Including Job Safety and Environment Assessment Program (4) Management of Change expectations (5) Operating Procedures Designated Smoking Areas First Aid Station Location/ Muster Station Domestic Facilities - Drinking Water/Toilets/Lunch Rooms Personnel Transfer Requirements (HUET, swing rope, boat) (6) Safe Work Practices Work Authorization/Safe Work Permits Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) P.A.C.E. Worksite Observations or Equivalent Hot Work (cutting, welding, grinding) Requirements Environmental Awareness/NPDES/ Marine Debris Waste Management/Manifests Control of Hazardous Energy Sources (LOTO) (7) Training expectations (8) Assurance of Quality and Mechanical Integrity of Critical Equipment (9) Pre-startup Safety Review Program (10) Emergency Response and Control Station Bill and Emergency Evacuation Plans for facility Spill and other Serious Emergency Notification Phone Number 1-866-931-5727 (11) Investigation of Incidents reporting and follow-up (12) Audit participation (13) Records and Documentation requirements I hereby agree to comply with the following: Each individual has the duty to immediately report any incidents, activity or condition (fires, explosions, slips, trips, falls, other injuries, hazards associated with lifting operations Equipment Damage, Spills or Materials Overboard) in which they are involved or that he/she witnesses in a prompt, open, frank, and complete communication with Nexen Petroleum Inc USA supervision. Date: __________________________ Company: ____________________________________

First Name: _______________________ Last Name: ___________________________________ Signature: ____________________________________________________________________________ Nexen Location: ________________________________________________________________ Nexen Platform Supervisor/Representative: _____________________________________

Note

This acknowledgment and agreement is to be returned to your Nexen Representative and FAXED to 1-800-997-9719 BEFORE commencing work.

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