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International Association for

Social Work with Groups, Inc.
The XXXV Annual International Symposium
Boston, Massachusetts, USA June 6-9th, 2013
Revitalizing Our Heritage:
A Bridge to the Future
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Training for life unscripted
Take your career beyond the next level. In as little as two years, you can earn a
professional degree, merging the clinical skills of intervention with the practical
tools of prevention. From counseling clients to organizing communities, our master
of social work program provides an evidence-based education, giving you the
competency and Àexibility to meet the needs of a changing world.
The Boston University School of Social Work’s distinguished characteristics:
- Highly-ranked master of social work program
- Personalized instruction
- Renowned faculty
- Advanced standing program
- One of the few graduate schools in the country offering group work specialization
- &erti¿cate programs in clinical social work and behavioral medicine, family
therapy, gerontology, human services management and trauma
- An active alumni network
- Dual degree programs in public health, education and theology
- Online master of social work degree program
- Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in sociology & social work
www.bu.edu/ssw
Optimists wanted.
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Thursday, June 6, 2013
9:00 - 9:00pm Registration Opens ~ Information and Hospitality Table
9:00 - 4:00pm Pre-Symposium Outstitutes and Institutes
12:00 - 5:00pm IASWG Board meeting
6:00 - 8:00 pm Opening Festivities & Cocktail Reception ~ Welcome and Urban Improv
8:00 - 9:00pm Welcome Reception for Students and Volunteers
Friday, June 7, 2013
7:30 - 5:00pm Registration
7:00 - 9:00am Continental Breakfast
Papers/Workshops
Session 1: 8:30 - 9:30am
Session 2: 9:45 - 10:45am
Session 3: 11:00 - 12:00pm
12:15 - 1:30pm Luncheon & Sumner Gill Plenary
Papers/Workshops
Session 4: 1:30 - 2:30pm
Session 5: 2:45 - 3:45pm
Session 6: 4:00 - 5:00pm
5:00 - 5:45pm Transportation from Simmons College to Boston University for GALA
6:00 - 7:00pm Cocktail Reception/Poster Presentations
7:00 - 9:00pm Performance by the Boston Children’s Chorus and Dinner
Beulah Rothman Plenary & International Honorees
9:00 - 11:00pm Dancing and Socializing
Saturday, June 8, 2013 – Boston Pride Day
7:30 - 6:00pm Registration
8:00 - 9:00am Joan K. Parry Plenary and Breakfast
Papers/Workshops
Session 7: 9:15 - 10:15am
Session 8: 10:30 - 11:30am
11:30 - 2:30pm Pride/Self-care Extravaganza
2:45 - 3:45pm Invitational Sessions
Papers/Workshops
Session 9: 4:00 - 5:00pm
5:00 - 6:30pm Annual Membership Meeting and Local Honorees
6:30pm onward Dine Around
Sunday, June 9, 2013
8:00 - 10:00am Registration
8:30 - 9:30am MA Chapter Plenary & Breakfast
Papers/Workshops
Session 10: 9:45 - 10:45am
Session 11: 11:00 - 12:00pm
12:15 - 1:15pm Closing Session & Ceremony
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XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Schedule of Events ................................................................................................................1
Table of Contents ................................................................................................................... 2
Greetings From the IASWG PRESIDENT........................................................................... 3
Greetings From the Symposium Chairs .............................................................................. 5
Members of the Planning Committee .................................................................................5
IASWG Board Members .........................................................................................................6
IASWG Organizational Members ........................................................................................7
Acknowledgements & Sponsors ........................................................................................8
Country Members ...................................................................................................................9
About IASWG ............................................................................................................................9
Thursday Outstitutes & Institutes ....................................................................................10
IASWG Board Meeting ..........................................................................................................10
Friday Continental Breakfast ............................................................................................11
Friday Presentations ............................................................................................................12
Sumner Gill Memorial Plenary .......................................................................................17
IASWG Lunch ..........................................................................................................................17
Friday Presentations Continued .....................................................................................18
Mix & Mingle (cash bar) .......................................................................................................23
Dinner & Invitational Presentation ................................................................................26
Entertainment ........................................................................................................................27
Saturday Presentations .....................................................................................................27
Pride/Self-care Extravaganza ........................................................................................30
Invitational Sessions ..........................................................................................................30
Saturday Presentations Continued .................................................................................31
Annual Membership Meeting & Honors ..........................................................................32
Dine Around with IASWG ..................................................................................................32
Sunday Plenary Breakfast & Speakers ..........................................................................32
Sunday Presentations .........................................................................................................33
Closing Session & Ceremony ...........................................................................................36
IASWG Local Honorees ....................................................................................................37
Invitational Session Contributors ...........................................................................40, 41
International Honoree ......................................................................................................43
In Memoriam ............................................................................................................................44
Places to Eat .........................................................................................................................45
Transportation .....................................................................................................................46
Advertisements .....................................................................................................................47
Presenter Index ....................................................................................................................49
Invitation to 36th Annual Symposium in Boston .......................... Inside Back Cover
Campus Map .......................................................................................................... Back Cover
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XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
T he iconic Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge (or Zakim Bridge) depicted on the
cover of our program book spans the Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. Its elegant appearance
is intended to echo the tower of the Bunker Hill Monument and the white cables mirror the rigging
of the USS Constitution. The bridge serves as a beacon for the city of Boston and stands as a moving
tribute to Boston civic leader and civil rights activist Leonard P. Zakim, former executive director of the
New England region of the Anti-Defamation League. Lenny Zakim was a leader in tolerance education,
ethnic reconciliation and inner-city youth programs. He died tragically in 1999 at the age of 46 from
myeloma. According to the New York Times, Mr. Zakim used his political connections and friendships
with African-American ministers, Roman Catholic leaders and sports celebrities to establish community
organizations and public-service events, including the 12,000-member Team Harmony antiracism rally
for teenagers and the nation’s largest Black-Jewish Passover seder. We believe that the image of the
bridge gracing the cover oI our IASWG program is a ftting tribute to a man championed Ior 'building
bridges between peoples.”
On behalf of the Board of the International Association for Social Work with Groups (IASWG), I warmly
welcome you to this 34th annual symposium. Again, we join with one another to celebrate group work by sharing
our knowledge and offering our mutual support to one another. We have traveled from many regions of the world
to connect in Boston. All of us are impacting others by creating and working with groups in various organizations,
communities, and societies across the globe.
Congratulations to our Boston Symposium Planning Committee, Mark Gianino, Dana Leeman, and Donna
McLaughlin, for organizing an event that includes our regular annual symposium activities as well as some special
offerings unique to this program in Boston; they have dedicated countless hours of their time to provide a successful
symposium experience for all of us. Additional appreciation to the IASWG Symposium Planning Committee, led by
Dana Leeman and Dominique Steinberg, for their hard work throughout the year in overseeing IASWG symposia
matters. Finally, much appreciation to the IASWG Boston Chapter, chaired by Patty Underwood, for contributing to
this event; the IASWG Boston Chapter is composed of many dedicated IASWG group workers, and their involvement
with the symposium this year represents one more contribution they have made to the IASWG mission.
The schedule this week of plenaries, invitationals, workshops, papers, and posters is a wonderful example of the
group work scholarship and creativity of our IASWG members. I hope you enjoy all the formal offerings at this
symposium. In addition, I hope you fnd time Ior inIormal opportunities to solidiIy existing group work relationships
and forge new ones.
Our symposia are always an exciting and enriching experience. Enjoy your time this year at our symposium in Boston!
Best wishes, Greg Tully, IASWG President
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GREETINGS FROM THE IASWG PRESIDENT
Brief Description of our Cover Photograph
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XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Welcome to the
IASWG XXXV Symposium
Revitalizing Our Heritage: A Bridge to the Future
IASWG Symposium 2013 Boston
T he Boston Planning Committee extends to you our warmest welcome to the annual Symposium of the
International Association for Social Work with Groups (IASWG). IASWG, founded in 1979, consists of an
international membership including faculty, practitioners, students and researchers. Symposium represents a unique
opportunity among social group workers for learning, building relationships, and promoting group work in our
profession. We could not be more delighted to be hosting this event in Boston this year.
This premier symposium is titled 'Revitalizing Our Heritage: A Bridge to the Future,¨ and is co-sponsored by the
Boston University, Simmons College and Springfeld College Schools oI Social Work and is held at the beautiIul
Simmons College campus. The title oI this year`s symposium refects our vision to honor the traditions oI our
cherished group work heritage including that of the beloved founders of the Boston Model. At the same time we
aIfrm cutting edge practices that advance excellence in group work practice, theory, research and advocacy. We
are very proud of our active Massachusetts IASWG chapter which has sponsored annual regional conferences over
many years here in Boston. This year, we put our shoulders to the wheel to bring together the talents and passions of
our local chapter members to craft what we know will be a memorable program.
This past year has been one of challenge, tribulation and loss for our members and client populations. The devastating
fooding in New York and New Jersey, the shootings in Newtown, Connecticut and the shocking Marathon attacks
that took place here in Boston in April have tested our resilience and resolve. Now more than ever the power of
group work is needed to provide healing, to mobilize action and reawaken our passion for the enduring power of
social justice that lives at the heart of social group work. We hope that you will experience Symposium as a means of
revitalizing yourselves through the myriad events that will advances skills, promote social engagement, and inspire
you through plenaries, diverse workshops, theater and musical events and fondly regarded traditions such as dine-
a-round.
This year Symposium coincides with Boston Pride - a weeklong celebration and aIfrmation oI the LGBTQ
community and its allies. We are pleased to offer several special events that interlace Symposium activities with
those of Pride including an outstitute to a premier community agency, a special plenary on group work across the
liIecycle Ior LGBTQ populations, and culminating in an opportunity Ior members to march with our Massachusetts
National Association of Social Workers (NASW) LGBT Shared Interest Group for all who are inspired to do so.
We extend heartfelt thanks to our sponsors, advertisers, donors and all the agencies with whom we have collaborated
to make this symposium a success. Finally, thank-you to all of you who make IASWG a professional home for all
who love and learn from our careers as social group workers each and every day.
Co-Chairs, Mark Gianino, Dana Grossman Leeman, Donna McLaughlin
Planning Committee
Melissa Brown
Jim Canning
Crystal Carrington
Marcia Cohen
Mary Dechillo
Nicole Dubus
Mark Gianino
Adam Glick
Sera Godfrey Grantz
Anthony Hill
Liz Hudson
Nate Bae Kupel
Dana Grossman Leeman
Donna McLaughlin
Lucy Mograss
Leah Hart Tennen
Patty Underwood
Erika Vargas
Kristina Whiton-O’Brien
MA Chapter Board of IASWG
Melissa Brown
Crystal Carrington
Nicole Dubus
Mark Gianino
Adam Glick
Sera Godfrey Grantz
Tfawa Haynes
Jared Kant
Nate Bae Kupel
Dana Grossman Leeman
Donna McLaughlin
Lucy Mograss
Leah Hart Tennen
Patty Underwood
Erika Vargas
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XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
I ASWG Board of Di rectors
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Executive Committee
Greg Tully .....................................................................................................................................................................................President
Jennifer Clements ................................................................................................................................................................ Vice President
Dominique Moyse Steinberg ......................................................... Treasurer; Co-Chair, International Symposium Planning Committee
Michael Wagner ...........................................................................................................................................................................Secretary
Olga Molina ...................................................................... Co-Chair, Membership Committee; Chapter Representative, Central Florida
Nancy Sullivan ....................................................................................................................................................Operations Administrator
Linda McArdle ............................................................................................................................Chair, Chapter Development Committee
Mark Macgowan ...............................................................Co-Chair, Commission on Group Work in Social Work Education Committee
John Ramey ..................................................................................................................................... Honorarv Adfunct Member, ex ofhcio
Dana Grossman Leeman ..............................Co-Chair, International Symposium Planning Committee and Boston Planning Committee;
Chapter Representative, Massachusetts
Board Members
Amirthini Ambrose ............................................................................................................................. Chapter Representative, Minnesota
Jean Bacon ............................................................................................................................................... 2012 Symposium Representative
Mayra Bagnoli .......................................................................................................................................................Member-at-Large, 2015
Ann Bergart ...................................................................................................................................Ad Hoc-Student Recruitment/Retention
Martin Birnbaum ................................................................................................................................................................... Life Member
Willa Casstevens ..........................................................................................................................Chapter Representative, North Carolina
Susan Ciardiello ............................................................................................. Member-at-Large, 2012; Co-Chair, Marketing Committee
Julie Clifton ......................................................................................... Board Member-at-Large, 2013; Co-Chair, Marketing Committee
Carol Cohen .......................................................................Co-Chair, Commission on Group Work in Social Work Education Committee
Laura Farley ............................................................................................................................................ Chapter Representative, Florida
Beverly Feigelman ...........................................................................................................Chapter Representative, Long Island, New York
Alexandra Fliess ....................................................................................................................................... Chapter Representative, Illinois
Charles Garvin .......................................................................................................................... Life Member; Chair, Practice Committee
John Genke ................................................................................................................................. Chapter Representative, NYC Red Apple
Maria Gurrola .......................................................................................................................................................Member-at-Large, 2015
Mark Gianino .................................................................2013 Symposium Representative; Co-Chair, Boston 2013 Planning Committee
Rhonda Hudson ........................................................................................... Member-at-Large, 2014; Co-Chair, Membership Committee
Steven Kraft ................................................................................................................................................ Past President; Legal Counsel
Andrew Malekoff .......................................................................................................................Editor, Social Work with Groups Journal
Kyle McGee ........................................................................................................................................................... Member-at Large, 2015
Donna McLaughlin ...................................................................... Member-at-Large 2014; Co-Chair, Boston 2013 Planning Committee
Dorlisa Minnick ..............................................................................................................................Chapter Representative, Pennsylvania
Hilde Mueller ........................................................................................................................................ Chapter Representative, Germany
Barbara Muskat .........................................................................................................................................Board Member-at-Large, 2013
Anna Nosko .............................................................................................................................................. Chapter Representative, Toronto
Catherine Papell ..................................................................................................................................................... Founding Life Member
William Pelech ........................................................................................................................... Calgary 2014 Symposium Representative
Reineth Prinsloo ................................................................................................................ Chapter Representative, South Africa Chapter
Karen Ring ................................................................................................................................. Calgary 2014 Symposium Representative
Joy Rubin ............................................................................................................................. Chapter Representative, Southern California
Mamadou Seck ...................................................................................................................................... Chapter Representative, NE Ohio
Mark Smith ................................................................Board Member-at-Large, 2013; Co-Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee
Sonia Spelters ........................................................................................................................................................Member-at-Large, 2014
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Organi zati onal Members
We thank our organizational members for their support.
More information on organizational membership available at: www.iaswg.org
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Adelphi University
http://socialwork.adelphi.edu/
University of Akron
http://www.uakron.edu/colleges/faa/schools/
socialwork/
Barry University
http://www.barry.edu/socialwork/default.htm
Boston University
http://www.bu.edu/ssw/
California State University, Long Beach
http://csulb.edu/colleges/chhs/departments/social-
work/
Community Outreach Programs in Addictions,
Toronto, Ontario Canada
http://www.copacommunity.ca
Fordham University
http://www.fordham.edu/academics/colleges__
graduate_s/graduate__profession/social_service/
Groupwork Consultation and Training Limited,
Southsea, Hampshire, England
http://www.groupworktraining.co.uk
Silberman School of Social Work at
Hunter College
http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/
Jewish Community Services
Johannesburg, Gauteng
South Africa
Loyola University
http://www.luc.edu/socialwork/
Molloy College
http://www.molloy.edu/academics/
undergraduatemajors/social-work
Renison University College, School of
Social Work, University of Waterloo, Canada
http://www.renison.uwaterloo.ca/social-work/
University of Central Florida
http://www.cohpa.ucf.edu/social/
University of Connecticut
http://www.ssw.uconn.edu/
University of Denver Graduate School
of Social Work
http://www.du.edu/socialwork/index.html
University of Southern California
http://sowkweb.usc.edu
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
I ASWG Symposi um 2013 Co- Sponsors and Collaborators
Symposium Co – Sponsors
Boston University School of Social Work
Simmons College School of Social Work
Springfeld College School of Social Work
Benefactor
IASWG Massachusetts Chapter
Planning Partner
NASW Massachusetts Chapter
Sustainers
Florida International University
Wheelock College School of Social Work
Supporters
Salem State University School of Social Work
Explore the Exhibit Tables
Simmons Main College Building ~ Floor One at “Common Grounds” Coffee Shop
Cambridge Eating Disorder Center – Florida International University – IASWG – NASW Assurance
Services – NASW MA Chapter – Massage Chair Event with John Koran, LCMT and Jennifer Koh,
LCMT – Taylor and Francis Publishers – Whiting Birch Publishers
CE’s:
Continuing Education Forms will be given out at the end of each session.
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XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Member Countri es
About the I ASWG
IASWG Member Countries 2012 -2013
Australia ~ Barbados ~ Belgium ~ Canada ~ China ~ Croatia
England ~ France ~ Germany ~ India ~ Ireland ~ Israel ~ Japan
Lithuania ~ Namibia ~ Netherlands ~ Scotland ~ South Africa
Spain ~ Switzerland ~ Trinidad/Tobago ~ United States
Founded in 1979, the International Association for Social Work with Groups, Inc. (IASWG), is the premier
association for social workers and allied helping professionals engaged in group work across the globe. The
purpose of this non-profit, member-driven organization is to promote excellence in group work practice,
education, field instruction, research and publication. The goals of this Association are realized through a
program of action and advocacy at both the local and international levels.
The activities of the Association include annual Symposia; local conferences and workshops; publications; and
collaborative efforts with key social work associations and institutions. Key achievements include the
development of Standards for Social Work Practice with Groups, and the annual publication of selected
symposium proceedings. Commissioned projects include the Strengthening Group Work Education Publication
Series, in collaboration with the CSWE; and the Encyclopedia of Social Work with Groups.
Recently, the membership of the AASWG voted to change our name to the International Association for Social
Work with Groups (IASWG). Our membership represents individuals from over 20 countries, and we want our
name to reflect our international composition and mission. We are proud to announce our new website and
new logo illustrating this mission. It delivers a more dynamic design, and content that is better organized and
more complete.
Ongoing efforts are continuously made to foster excellence in group work education and practice. Local chapter
events and annual symposia are characterized by warmth and inclusion. Opportunities exist for members to
network, collaborate, and share their interests and expertise. This informal network of collaboration is an
invaluable resource to the group work community.
Please join us in our commitment to group work. Become a member today!
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XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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Thursday, June 6, 2013
Registration Opens ~ Information and Hospitality Table ~ 9:00am to 9:00 pm
Simmons Main College Building ~ Floor One at “Common Grounds” Coffee Shop
Outsti tute
John F Kennedy Museum, Boston ( 12:30-4:00 PM). LdžƉůŽƌĞ ƚŚŝƐ ŵŽǀŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ďĞĂƵƟĨƵůůLJ ĐŽŶĐĞƉƚƵĂůŝnjĞĚ
ŵƵƐĞƵŵ ůŽĐĂƚĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ďĞĂƵƟĨƵů ǀŝĞǁ ŽĨ 8ŽƐƚŽŶ PĂƌďŽƌ͘ ;uŝƐĐŽƵŶƚĞĚ ŐƌŽƵƉ ƌĂƚĞƐ ǁŝůů ĂƉƉůLJ ĨŽƌ ƚĞŶ Žƌ ŵŽƌĞ
ƉĂƌƟĐŝƉĂŶƚƐ͘Ϳ
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ϭ͘ nĂůĨͲDĂLJ IŝĞůĚ LĚƵĐĂƚŽƌƐ͛ ƐĞŵŝŶĂƌ ǁŝƚŚ AůĞdž GŝƩĞƌŵĂŶ͘ ϭͲϰ Þ͘M͘ 1ŚĞ ŐŽĂů ŽĨ ƚŚŝƐ ǁŽƌŬƐŚŽƉ ŝƐ ƚŽ ŝŶĐƌĞĂƐĞ
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ĞdžƉůŽƌĞ ƚŚĞ ŽƌŝŐŝŶƐ ŽĨ ŵŝŶĚĨƵůŶĞƐƐ ƉƌĂĐƟĐĞƐ͕ ŚŽǁ ƚŚĞLJ ĐĂŶ ĞŶŚĂŶĐĞ ŐƌŽƵƉ ǁŽƌŬ ƉƌĂĐƟĐĞ͕ ĂŶĚ ǁŝůů ůĞĂƌŶ
ŚŽǁ ƚŽ ĚŽ ŵŝŶĚĨƵůŶĞƐƐ ƉƌĂĐƟĐĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĚŝǀĞƌƐĞ ĐůŝĞŶƚƐ ŝŶ ŵLJƌŝĂĚ ŐƌŽƵƉ ƐĞƫŶŐƐ͘ ;CϭϬϲͿ
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ŐƌŽƵƉ ǁŽƌŬ ƉƌĂĐƟƟŽŶĞƌƐ ǁŝƚŚ ůĞƐƐ ƚŚĂŶ ƚǁŽ LJĞĂƌƐ ŐƌŽƵƉ ĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ͘ SƚƵĚĞŶƚƐ͕ ĂŶĚ ŶĞǁ ŐƌĂĚƵĂƚĞƐ͕ ĂŶĚ
ďĞŐŝŶŶŝŶŐ ŐƌŽƵƉ ǁŽƌŬĞƌƐ ĂƌĞ ǁĞůĐŽŵĞ ƚŽ ĞŶƌŽůů͘ ;CϭϮϬͿ
IASWG Board Meeting Room School of Management, Room 501
Thursday, June 6 – 12:30 - 5:00 PM
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XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
FESTI VI TI ES - Paresky Center
CƉĞŶŝŶŐ IĞƐƟǀŝƟĞƐ Θ CŽĐŬƚĂŝů kĞĐĞƉƟŽŶ ;ĐĂƐŚ ďĂƌͿ
WĞůĐŽŵĞ ĂŶĚ UƌďĂŶ IŵƉƌŽǀ
uƌďĂŶ lŵƉƌŽǀ ŝƐ ĂŶ ŝŶƚĞƌĂĐƟǀĞ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵ ĨŽƌ LJŽƵŶŐ ƉĞŽƉůĞ ƚŚĂƚ ƵƐĞƐ ŝŵƉƌŽǀŝƐĂƟŽŶĂů ƚŚĞĂƚĞƌ ǁŽƌŬƐŚŽƉƐ ƚŽ ƚĞĂĐŚ
ǀŝŽůĞŶĐĞ ƉƌĞǀĞŶƟŽŶ͕ ĐŽŶŇŝĐƚ ƌĞƐŽůƵƟŽŶ͕ ĂŶĚ ĚĞĐŝƐŝŽŶͲŵĂŬŝŶŐ͘ !ŽŝŶ ƵƐ ĨŽƌ ƚŚŝƐ ĚLJŶĂŵŝĐ ǁŽƌŬƐŚŽƉ ƚŽ ŚĞůƉ ƵƐ
ůĂƵŶĐŚ SLJŵƉŽƐŝƵŵ͊
WELCOME RECEPTI ON FOR STUDENTS AND
VOLUNTEERS - Paresky Center
;1ŚŝƐ ƌĞĐĞƉƟŽŶ ŝƐ ŐĞŶĞƌŽƵƐůLJ ĨƵŶĚĞĚ ďLJ ƚŚĞ 8ŽƐĞůůĞ kƵƌůĂŶĚ lƵŶĚͿ
Thursday, June 6 – 8:00 - 9:00pm
Thursday, June 6 – 6:00 - 8:00pm
Friday, June 7 – 7:30 - 5:00pm
REGI STRATI ON & EXHI BI TS
CONTI NENTAL BREAKFAST
SŝŵŵŽŶƐ MĂŝŶ CŽůůĞŐĞ 8ƵŝůĚŝŶŐ Ε IůŽŽƌ CŶĞ Ăƚ ͞CŽŵŵŽŶ GƌŽƵŶĚƐ͟ CŽīĞĞ SŚŽƉ
Friday, June 7 – 7:00 - 9:00am
SŝŵŵŽŶƐ MĂŝŶ CŽůůĞŐĞ 8ƵŝůĚŝŶŐ Ε IůŽŽƌ CŶĞ Ăƚ ͞CŽŵŵŽŶ GƌŽƵŶĚƐ͟ CŽīĞĞ SŚŽƉ
11
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room W201
SESSION 1: Friday, June 7 – 8:30 - 9:30am
PAPER FR 101A
Group Work and Trauma Sensitive Yoga Practice with Young Adults with
Trauma Histories
David Prichard, School of Social Work, University of New England, Maine, USA
This paper presents an innovative program joining cognitive behavioral group treatment with trauma sensitive
group yoga practice for young adults at risk for homelessness and substance abuse in a residential group
home. The efhcacv of combining these traditional and complementarv group modalities for treating this
population is explored.
PAPER FR 101B
The impact of stigma on survivors bereaved by suicide loss: how support
groups facilitate healing
Beverly Feigelman, Adelphi University School of Social Work, Long Island, NY, USA
Suicide has long been associated with stigma, for the deceased and also for the bereaved survivors, who
often experience rejection, “disenfranchised grief” (Doka, 2001), excessive guilt, shame and complicated
grief. This presentation reviews the literature on stigma and suicide bereavement and demonstrates, with case
vignettes, how support groups facilitate healing.
PAPER FR 102A
Oh Baby! Evaluation of a prenatal group for women living with HIV
Simone Shindler, The Teresa Group, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
There are signihcant barriers for women living with HIJ in accessing prenatal care. A group was developed
specihc to the needs of this population with evaluation results indicating that the group is critical in allowing
women to support each other through the complex psychosocial dimensions of HIV and pregnancy.
PAPER FR 102B
Using Group Work with Mothers with Multiple Sclerosis to Nurture a
Second “True Self”
Rebecca Juliet Halperin, New York University Langone Medical Center, NY, USA
This paper looks at the positive emotional responses elicited from group work with mothers with Multiple
Sclerosis who regularly displayed tearfulness and hopefulness during individual counseling sessions. This
discrepancy in emotional output will be examined and ultimately discussed through the lens of D.W. Winnicott’s
theory of “True and False Self”.
WORKSHOP FR 103
THE IMPORTANCE OF GROUPS IN HELPING BEREAVED PARENTS COPE AFTER
THE DEATH OF A CHILD
Edward Paley, Holistic Counseling & Consulting Services, New York, USA
This Workshop will focus on using groups to help bereaved parents. It will discuss doing open-ended monthly
bereavement groups and time-limited close-ended groups for bereaved parents.The skills needed by the group
worker to facilitate these groups will be explored and the training one needs to do grief counseling.
WORKSHOP FR 104
Back to the Future (with apologies to the movie:)
Kay Goler Levin, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Workshop will discuss structuring social work with groups classes as a forum for consultation, as well as, the
traditional didactic and experiential portions. The support from peers and the chance for the professor to help
the student understand applicable theorv helps to make the student a more conhdent practitoner.
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room W201
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room W205
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room W205
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room C105
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room W203
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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WORKSHOP FR 105
The “Tree of Life” collective narrative therapy method: An experiential
workshop
Naomi Rush Olson, Simmons School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
The “Tree of Life” -- a collective narrative therapy workshop -- creates a context for exploring past hardships
while avoiding re-traumatization. Session participants will explore adapting the model to work with children,
adolescents and adults who have experienced losses and trauma, and will enjoy an abbreviated version of the
process.
PAPER FR 106A
A Student’s Perspective on Motivating resistant Clients for GroupWork
Nilsa Rivera, Springfeld College, Springfeld, MA, USA
This presentation is an exploration in using decisional balance and stages of change to motivate resistant
clients. I will address how to assess a client’s readiness to attend groups, describe several factors that
contribute to clients being labeled resistant, and discuss strategies to keep clients engaged in group therapy.
PAPER FR 106B
A Common Factors Model of Social Work Group Practice
Mark Cameron, Southern Connecticut State University, CT, USA
Josey Madison, Southern Connecticut State University, CT, USA
This presentation describes a common factors model of group practice, building on common factors theory
and mutual aid philosophy. This approach focuses on the role of personal, relational, and interpersonal
conditions and processes in successful clinical practice and how practice can focus on these to promote
optimally effective group work.
WORKSHOP FR 107
Behind the Lens: A Filmmaking Group for Adolescents Managing Mental
Illness
Será Godfrey Grantz, Liz Hudson, David Carpenter, Kyle Taylor Ganson; Riverside Community Care,
Needham, MA, USA
This workshop will explain the application of the “Behind the Lens” group curriculum. Films from group
members will be shown as well as candid descriptions of their hlmmaking processes.
PAPER FR 108
Don’t Forget to Say Good-bye: Remembering the Importance of Endings in
Groups
Mayra Bagnoli, Legacy Behavioral Health;
Mark Smith, Barry University, FL, USA
The authors review the importance of endings in groups and offer strategies for managing this stage with
single-session, open-membership, and open-ended groups. Suggestions are made for ways to transform
'termination talk` so that all members beneht and so that ongoing evaluation of group effectiveness is made
possible.
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room C106
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room C106
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room L007
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room C120
Friday, June 7th
8:30-9:30 a.m.
Room E305
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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PAPER FR 109A
When the workgroup doesn’t (work)
Kathleen M. Walsh, Millersville University;
Jennifer Clements, Shippensburg University, PA, USA
In this interactive presentation, seasoned social workers will discuss their personal experiences (and yours!)
in higher education and professional practice, share exploratory data to illustrate the similarities, differences
and challenges, as well as provide “real life” explanations and discussions about how to cope when “group
work isn’t working!”
PAPER FR 109B
Two roads diverged: a group leader’s dilemma
Walter J. Mullin, Springfeld College School oI Social Work, MA, USA
James J Canning, Springfeld College School oI Social Work, MA, USA
What happens to the group when the leader doesn’t know which way to go? Resolving dilemmas is an expectable
experience for groups. The paper is a case study of the co-authors’ experiences as instructors of a one-year
post-graduate certihcate program. This paper concludes bv emphasi:ing a group-as-a-whole approach.
PAPER FR 110A
The Search for Balance in a Long-Term Psychodynamic Group for Men
with HIV and Depression
Melissa Elayne Brown, Simmons College, Boston, MA, USA
Benjamin Kudler, Simmons College, Boston, MA, USA
This paper will focus on the struggle to achieve balance between extremes in a group for men with HIV and
depression. How do we make space for darkness while fostering an environment with room for hope? Where
is the balance between encouraging growth and allowing clients to just be?
PAPER FR 110B
Using Focus Groups for Wellness Program Development within ICCD
Clubhouses: Process and Outcomes
Willa J. Casstevens, North Carolina State University, Department oI Social Work, NC, USA
This paper presents outcome data on wellness programming developed using focus groups within clubhouse
model agencies. Two clubhouses aimed to develop initial wellness programming, while the third aimed to
enhance established programming. Follow-up surveys completed by clubhouse members and staff indicate
levels of success and this paper summari:es these results.
WORKSHOP FR 111
Caring through Campfire: A Model of an Overnight Camp for Bereaved
Boys
Jennifer Kaplan Schreiber, Manitou Experience/JeII`s Place, Framingham, MA, USA
What processes inform and dehne the sense of cohesion among bereaved bovs who attend a weeklong overnight
camp? This session will explore the factors that facilitate generative healing, with a focus on the use of sharing
circles and camphres. First person accounts will be shared.
PAPER FR 112A
Beyond independent studies: The experience of teaching and mentoring
in groups
Shantih Clemans, SUNY Empire State College, NY, USA
This paper will report on hndings of a research profect focused on the complexities and nuances of teaching
and mentoring in groups in a non-traditional undergraduate public college where independent studies are the
signature pedagogy.
PAPER FR 112B
Getting to Know You’: Social Work with Groups meets ‘Threshold Concept
Theory’
Gloria Kirwan, School oI Social Work & Social Policy, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
This paper introduces Threshold Concept Theory and considers how this theory can inform teaching and
learning on social work with groups. Bv dehnition, Threshold Concepts are concepts that learners hnd difhcult
to grasp or applv and usuallv thev are concepts which are complicated, fu::v, contested or ambiguous.
SESSION 2: Friday, June 7 – 9:45 - 10:45am
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room L004
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room L005
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room L005
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room E209
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room L008
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room C416
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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WORKSHOP FR 113
Red Flags and Common Themes Working with an Addiction Group
Golnaz Agahi, Conrad Fuentes, University of Southern California, CA, USA
Conrad Fuentes, University of Southern California
Discuss the role of a counselor in facilitating an addiction support group. This includes learning to identify
'red ßags` and draw from group discussion to highlight themes to promote wellness, obtain support from
peers, and develop healthy coping skills to help clients maintain sobriety.
WORKSHOP FR 114
The Meithal Model: combining methodologies of creativity and social
groupwork for effective field supervision
Mary Wilson, University College, Cork, Ireland
Deirdre Quirke, University College, Cork, Ireland
The Meitheal Model of group supervision is an emancipatory approach with social justice, creativity and
human rights at its core. The workshop will provide a facilitated experience of the model demonstrating its
application in held supervision in Ireland for practitioners in the Public, Private and NGO sectors.
WORKSHOP FR 115
Improvisation 101: The Use of Theater Improvisation in Social Group Work
Education
Karen Ann Ring, Private Practice, Bridgetown, Barbados
This experiential workshop introduces basic theater improvisation concepts, group practices and skills as
teaching tools with social work students. Improvisation, an activity-based approach, will be applied to learning
group development and mutual aid, as well as promoting student professional development. Participants will
engage in small group improvisational exercises and games.
WORKSHOP FR 116
Being an Ally: Workshops and resources to promote a respectful, accessible
and equitable environment for clients and colleagues
Marylin Kanee, Joanne Sulman Sulman, Michelle Du Boulay, Camala Day; Mount Sinai Hospital, Canada
Mount Sinai Hospital launched its Being an Ally Campaign in 2012. Workshop participants will experience
groupwork activities related to social identity, privilege, oppression and becoming an ally that build
understanding and engage a diverse workforce at all levels of stafhng to support diversitv and inclusion for
co-workers and clients.
WORKSHOP FR 117
Preventing the commercial sexual exploitation of girls: The My Life My
Choice Curriculum
Lisa Goldblatt Grace, My Life My Choice, Justice Resource Institute, Boston, MA, USA
Girls are deceived, manipulated or coerced into prostitution every day with the most frequent age of entry
being 12-15 years old. My Life My Choice (MLMC) is a nationally recognized program designed to stem the
tide of commercial sexual exploitation. This workshop will explore MLMC’s groupwork model and prevention
curriculum.
WORKSHOP FR 118
Service Learning: Social Groupwork in Action An Interdisciplinary
Approach Promoting Civic Engagement
Paul Johnson, Andrea Thompson McCall, Alicia Ethridge, University of Southern Maine , Portland, ME,
USA
Service learning through social groupwork allows students to make meaningful connections with local, national
and international communities. Students are able to quickly apply theortetical knowledge in meaningful ways.
The concepts they are studying are no longer just abstract and theoretical but have practical and meaningful
implications.
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room L316
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room L305
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room C106
Friday, June 7th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room W203
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room C416
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room L004
SESSION 3: Friday, June 7 – 11:00am - 12:00pm
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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PAPER FR 119A
Working with violent men in group: issues and strategies
Jean-Martin Deslauriers, Université d’Ottawa, Canada
The group practice with men who have violent behaviors must take into account the issue of the effects of
men’s socialization on participants. The focus of this paper is to formulate concrete strategies to address men
socialization and overcome the challenges it brings in group practice with violent men.
PAPER FR 119B
Group work programmes for women and children experiencing domestic
violence: Do they work and do they last?
Stephanie Holt, School of Social Work & Social Policy, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Gloria Kirwan, School of Social Work & Social Policy, Trinity College Dublin
This paper presents a study exploring the impact of a group work programme for mothers and young children
who have experienced domestic abuse. Participation in the group programme impacted positively on the
relationship between the mothers and their children and this studv found positive benehts were sustained over
time.
PAPER FR 120A
Task group process: Writing a collective paper in a web based online course
Mamadou Mansor Seck, Cleveland State University, Ohio, USA
This paper analyzes different steps of the developmental process of an online model of task-group using Bales’
phases in group problem solving and Tuckman’s group development stages. Findings show that faculty and
supervisors effectiveness mav be enhanced through a combination of held groupwork practice and online
teaching activities.
WORKSHOP FR 121
Social Group Work Training for the Youth Development Field: Why, What,
How, and Outcomes
Dominique Moyse Steinberg, Smith College SSW, MA, USA
Helene Filion Onserud, Center for Family Life; Steven Kraft, NY, USA
Steven Kraft, IASWG
Organized around need, purpose, methods, content, temporal considerations, and outcomes, this workshop
will present an innovative training model in social group work for youth development workers. The goal of this
session is to help participants to identify, initiate, and implement similar programs in their own geographic
settings.
PAPER FR 122A
10 Years With a Secret: Breaking the Isolation of Compulsive Hoarding
Through Groupwork
Patty Underwood, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA, USA
Many people with a compulsive hoarding problem isolate themselves from family, friends, and neighbors due
to the shame and humiliation of the clutter problem. Compulsive hoarding groups offer a place where people
who hoard can begin to decrease their isolation, learn skills to de-clutter, and begin the healing process.
Paper (30 minutes)
PAPER FR 122B
Hey, they stole our card room! : Planning an evidence based group to
address diversity issues in a senior center
Deirdre G. Weliky, Private Practice, Flushing , NY, USA
This paper will examine the planning of a proposed grant funded, evidence based, yearlong group to address
diversity issues in a Queens senior center. Material describing group themes and sessions, also development
of evaluation tools and strategies will be provided to assist agencies and practitioners in addressing similar
challenges.
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room L007
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room L007
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room C105
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room C106
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room W203
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room W203
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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WORKSHOP FR 123
Words to Live by: Spirituality and Meaning Making in Group Work with
Adolescents
Emily Willie, Boston University School of Social Work, School of Theology, Boston, MA, USA
Use of spirituality in groups with adolescents is not widely used but possesses great possibilities for therapeutic
work. This workshop will identify statements such as ‘everything happens for a reason’ and their implications
for meaning and coping structures enlisted by adolescents. Also explored: self-care, culture, boundaries, the
arts, and authenticity.
PAPER FR 124A
An Exploratory Study on Collective Ritual as Clinical Intervention:
Interviews with Group Workers about the Use of Ritual in Groups with
African-American Women
Kathryn K. Berg, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Shirley R. Simon, Loyola University Chicago, IL, USA
This paper describes an exploratory study on the use of ritual as a clinical intervention in group work with
African-American women. It analyzes eight one-hour qualitative interviews conducted with group workers in
a large, Midwestern city. Findings and recommendations for implementation are discussed.
PAPER FR 124B
LATIN@S CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ENGAGED IN GROUP THERAPY!
Mauricio Jose Cifuentes, Augsburg College, MN, USA
It’s widely assumed and supported by some authors that Latin@s tend not to participate in therapy groups. This
presentation challenges this belief and discusses specihc interventions that has been applied to successfullv
engage and retain Latin@s in group therapy.
LUNCHEON and SUMNER GILL
MEMORIAL PLENARY - Paresky Center
Weaving a rainbow from our past to our future: Using Group work to
support LGBTQ people across the lifespan
Adam Glick, Beacon High School and Private Practice, Boston, MA
Tfawa Haynes, Fenway Health, Boston, MA
Rebecca Hoffman, Director of Member Services at Rainbow Heights Club, New York, NY
Lisa Krinsky, Director, LGBT Aging Project, Boston, MA
Kim Westheimer, Director, Welcoming Schools, Human Rights Campaign, Washington, D.C.
Moderator: Mark Gianino, Boston University School of Social Work
Presentation Summary: In acknowledgement of Boston Pride Week, our panelists will share their experiences
in harnessing the power of group work with members of the LGBTQ community. Highlighted will be work with
youth, elders, communities of color, and trangender populations.
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room E305
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room E305
Friday, June 7th
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Room C120
Friday, June 7 – 12:15 - 1:30pm
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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SESSION 4: Friday, June 7 – 1:30 - 2:30pm
WORKSHOP FR 125
The Application of Mindfulness to Groupwork Practice
Martin Birnbaum, NY, USA
The workshop provides an experiential understanding of Mindfulness, as well as exploration of how mindfulness
can be applied to groupwork practice.
WORKSHOP FR 126
“US, THE LOVING CAREGIVERS”: A SUPPORT GROUP FOR NON-RESIDENTIAL
FAMILY CAREGIVERS
Ruth S. Engel, Chicago, IL, USA
This workshop describes a support group for non-resident family caregivers at a residential facility for elderly.
The group was created by an MSW whose mother entered the facility and a staff member. Group support helps
caregivers better advocate for loved ones, while improving their coping mechanisms by learning better self-
care.
WORKSHOP FR 126
Resiliency through Social Group Work with Adolescents
Dana Spada, Adelphi University; Good Shepherd Services
Leo Coodin, Good Shepherd Services, NY, USA
This workshop will illuminate the impact of social group work on resiliency with adolescents and inspire the
use of evidence-based practice.
PAPER FR 128A
The challenges and rewards of facilitating support groups in an under-
resourced county jail
Kerry Dunn, Stephanie Clapp, Erin Bishop, Kristen Cianelli, Elisa Orme, Ariane Bowie; University of
New England, Maine, USA
This presentation describes the experiences of MSW students who facilitated support groups at a county jail.
The idea for the groups came out of discussion with inmates about needs at the jail. In this presentation,
students and their faculty mentor will discuss the challenges they faced doing group work inside.
PAPER FR 128B
Getting to ‘Yes I Can’: Using Affirmation in Alternatives to Incarceration
(ATI) Groups for Adolescents
Alvaro Cumberbatch, Lehman College, NY, USA
Afhrmation is vital to the process of developing non-conßict resolution skills with court mandated adolescents
in groups. This presentation will discuss various wavs afhrmation can be implemented in groups and hurdles
that must be overcome.
PAPER FR 129A
Do the IASWG Standards bridge cultures or is the gap too wide? An
empirical test in Scotland
Mark Macgowan, Florida International University, Miami FL, USA
IASWG Standards for Social Work Practice with Groups are intended to be international. Originally developed
in North America, we present preliminary reliability and validity data about a Standards-based inventory
involving participants across Scotland. We report how Scottish group workers perceive the Standards and their
level of conhdence in doing them.
PAPER FR 129B
Group Stages of Development and Reflections from an International
Travel & Study Project
Katarzyna Jadwiga Olcon, Association House of Chicago, IL, USA
James Scherrer, Dominican University; IL, USA
Using Tuckmans group model, this paper will analv:e the hve stages of group development, i.e., forming,
storming, norming, performing and adjourning, in an international group of social work students and
educators. A multi-university, international partnership, “Travel and Study Project,” gathered this group in
Chicago, including twelve participants from Ethiopia.
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room L316
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room L008
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room L004
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room C416
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room C416
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room L305
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room L305
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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WORKSHOP FR 130
Traditional social work with groups training: New places to practice!
Kay Goler Levin, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
We are familiar with using group work in agencies, hospiitals, schools and social service agencies. We also
train to teach social work with groups - but there are new positions in health care and residency training that
are exciting and really can make excellent use of our skills.
PAPER FR 131A
Don’t Forget to Say Good-bye: Remembering the Importance of Endings in
Groups
Mark Smith, Barry University, FL, USA
Mayra Bagnoli, Legacy Behavioral Health, FL, USA
The authors review the importance of endings in groups and offer strategies for managing this stage with
single-session, open-membership, and open-ended groups. Suggestions are made for ways to transform
'termination talk` so that all members beneht and so that ongoing evaluation of group effectiveness is made
possible.
PAPER FR 131B
“Boring group leaders have boring groups”: group membership as guideline
for group leadership
Reineth Prinsloo, University of Pretoria, South Africa
“Boring group leaders have boring groups!” A group leader may possess skills, knowledge, experience,
personalitv, interpersonal stvle and use the self and still have drearv, dull and uninspiring groups. Reßecting
on own group membership experiences to guide group leadership enables group leaders to replicate positive
experiences and limit negative experiences.
WORKSHOP FR 132
The Truth N’ Trauma Program: An intervention for youth to address
exposure to community violence, through radical healing
Brittanie Hudson, Danton Floyd, Troy Harden, Chicago State University Truth n Trauma Program;IL,USA
This workshop highlights an innovative program addressing exposure to violence through the use of trauma-
informed and restorative practices. The Truth N’ Trauma program train’s youth in trauma-informed practices
and participatory action research methods, theatre, media, and advocacy. Our workshop will work with
participants to explore how to develop similar programs.
PAPER FR 133A
The Stress of Being a Graduate Student: Using Student Mutual-Aid Groups
to Teach Group Work Skills
Olga Molina, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA
This paper presents the hndings of a studv (N÷200) that explored students perceptions and satisfaction with
the mutual-aid groups they facilitated during a graduate group work course. The mutual-aid groups focused
on the stress of being a graduate student and the goal was to learn group work skills.
PAPER FR 133B
Charles Darwin’s lesson: Mutual aid groups harness a natural law
Pamela Cohen, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney NSW, Australia
When we invoke mutual aid in our groups we are in fact harnessing a process that has been associated with
profound evolutionary success. This paper will provide the basis for a dynamic discussion about Charles
Darwin’s insights, social evolution and its relevance to our group work practice.
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room W203
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room C106
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room C106
Friday, June 7th
1:30-2:30 p.m.
Room E305
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room W201
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room W201
SESSION 5: Friday, June 7 – 2:45 - 3:45pm
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room W205
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room W203
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room L004
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room L007
WORKSHOP FR 134
Assisting with Client Healing Through Innovative Co-facilitation in
Poetry Therapy Groups
Scott Reed Sorensen, University of Utah, UT, USA
Lisa Danielle Dubrasky, Southern Utah University, UT, USA
The presenters will review the relevancy of poetry therapy, introduce an innovative approach to poetry therapy
that involves the use of both a clinical therapist and a professional poet as co-facilitators, and demonstrate a
practice concept to be used in group work. Preliminarv hndings and implications will also be discussed.
WORKSHOP FR 135
Coming Out Whole - Group as a model for helping GLBQ adults with the
coming out process
Adam Glick, Boston, MA, USA
A long-standing coming out support group for LGBQ adults will be presented to highlight the importance
of groups in addressing complex issues related to coming out. Specihc themes will be highlighted including.
coming out to family, and the impact of religion, age, gender, culture, and family of origin issues.
WORKSHOP FR 136
Empathy vs Certainty: Creating Hope in Cultures of Healing
Bruce St. Thomas, Westbrook Street Psychotherapy Associates
Paul Johnson, University of Southern Maine, ME, USA
0DULH6KHI¿HOG, Center For Grieving Children, ME, USA
Alicia Ethridge, University of Southern Maine, ME, USA
For 16 years, the Multicultural Peer Support Program at the Center for Grieving Children, (CGC), Portland,
Maine has developed a unique, collectivistic, collaborative, intercultural and community arts-based approach
in supporting refugee and immigrant children.. It is through this natural process of healing in community, we
have found acceptance and healing.
WORKSHOP FR 137
Engaging Teen Girls in Groups: A Time for Building Healthy Relationships,
Self-Empowerment, and Leadership Skills
Zaza Samir Sakhat, Jamaica Plain, MA, USA
Adolescent girls can be challenging! This workshop illustrates the importance of group work with teen girls
through an interactive discussion about child development, how group work theory plays out with teen girls,
and concrete ideas for coordinating and leading a teen girls group in an outpatient setting.
WORKSHOP FR 138
Social Group Work Does it Again: A Transformative Experience in a Bereaved
Parents Writing Group
Sandra Radzanower Wolkoff, Private Practice, NY, USA
This experiential workshop will discuss the work of bereaved parents who used writing to share their common
experiences and trauma. The group facilitator, herself a bereaved parent, will share some of the group’s work.
Collaborative writing and brainstorming will be used with workshop participants.
PAPER FR 139
“Together we can”: Exploring disability with black South African
adolescents who have physical disabilities
Louie Talitha Strydom, University of Pretoria, South Africa
This practice example highlights the value of group work and how effectively it can provide a safe and
empowering environment in which vulnerable adolescents can openly discuss a variety of issues, even issues
that are taboo within their own culture and of which they have never dared speak of before
WORKSHOP FR 140
From Combat to College: Use of the Mutual Aid Model in a Student Veteran
Mentor Group
Mary Hobbins DeChillo, Phillip Lippens, Patrick Cornell; Salem State University, Salem, MA, USA
Military life is a highly structured group experience. Most Student Veterans are non-traditional students.
They often feel isolated upon entering college. This workshop will describe the The Second Mission Student
Mentoring Group at Salem State University--which uses Mutual Aid and a hybrid peer and professional co-
leading structure.
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room C120
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room C120
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room L316
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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WORKSHOP FR 140A
Community-Defined Bienvenido Groups: Reaching the Latino immigrant
on mental health and integration
Gilberto Pérez Jr., Goshen College, IN, USA
This workshop will outline the creation and expansion of mental health promotion groups with the Latino
immigrant community in the U.S. Special emphasis will be given to presenting culturally responsive strategies
that have led to the development of groups in various sectors of the Latino community and juvenile correctional
system.
WORKSHOP FR 141
The Use of Expressive Therapy in Group Work
Adam Joseph Riccio, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
This experiential workshop explores expressive therapy in order to illustrate the power of the arts in connecting
diverse groups of people with varied life experiences.
PAPER FR 142A
COLLABORATING WITH A FAITH BASED ORGANIZATION TO CREATE A GROUP MENTORING
PROGRAM FOR URBAN ELEMENTARY YOUTH
Anthony C. Hill, Springfeld College School oI Social Work, Springfeld, MA, USA
This workshop will examine the Black Leadership and Enrichment Societv of Springheld (B.L.E.S.S.) program,
a group mentoring project in collaboration with a faith based organization for elementary students. This
workshop will discuss this program in detail and discuss how social workers can promote academic success
for urban at-risk youth.
PAPER FR 142B
“Why do WE have to come in here?”: Using group work to reduce conflict
and stigma among boys in a youth development setting
Dara Elisabeth Kammerman, The Boys’ Club of New York, NY, USA
This paper focuses on how group work was used to reduce conßict and feelings of stigmati:ation among
a group of boys who were labeled “emotionally disturbed.” The purposeful use of activities, a collective
incentive system and unconditional positive regard for the group are discussed as interventions.
WORKSHOP FR 143
“It was a mind changing program”: An older MSW student
Betty Surbeck, Linda Ello; West Chester University, PA, USA
Linda Ello, West Chester University, PA, USA
This presentation examines, through videotaped interviews, the critical thinking processes, motivations,
and experiences of older MSW students. The group discussion will delineate the needs of older students, the
opportunities and obstacles encountered, and the unique perspectives students have to offer with a discussion
of value of group work.
PAPER FR 144A
What’s Love Got to Do with it? The Practice of Applying Relational Theory
to Group Interventions for Women in Recovery
Nina M. Vitello, Springfeld College, Springfeld, MA, USA
Women frequently use substances as a way of responding to, and coping with a myriad of relational paradoxes.
Understanding the signihcance of a womans need to feel connected with others provides an etiological
foundation for the use of Relational focused interventions when treating groups of women who are in recovery.
PAPER FR 144B
Practice wisdom meets evidence based practice: Do mutual aid groups
decrease substance use for adolescents?
Joan Anne Letendre; University of Connecticut, CT, USA
Cristina Mogro-Wilson, University of Connecticut, CT, USA
This paper reports on a university/agency collaboration to evaluate whether mutual aid groups decreased
substance use in adolescence. Findings indicated that participation in the groups decreased substance use
and increased engagement with leader and group members. Implications for collaboration with agencies in
developing evidence based group work will be discussed.
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room C106
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room E305
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room E305
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room C105
SESSION 6: Friday, June 7 – 4:00 - 5:00pm
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room E209
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room C416
Friday, June 7th
2:45-3:45 p.m.
Room L316
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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WORKSHOP FR 145
The Gift of Facilitation: Enhancing the Transfer of learning in
Experiential and Activity-based Group Work
Christian Marcel Itin, Metropolitan State University of Denver,Department of Social Work, CO, USA
Activity-based group work is a powerful vehicle for group learning and change. This workshop will explore
facilitation as an exchange of gifts between the practitioner and the group. Practical methods for enhancing
the transfer of learning from group experience to other parts of the client’s life will be actively explored.
PAPER FR 146A
Innovative trauma informed community group practice for marginalized
people in transition
Anita Lightburn, Fordham University Graduate School of Social Service, NY, USA
Amanda Sisselman, SUNY Empire State College, NY, USA
An integrated model of group practice built on mutual aid, grounded in community, is discussed as it meets the
needs of marginalized people in transition. Findings from a developmental process evaluation and initial pilot
study’s quasi-experimental design support this innovative model with an emphasis on healing and restorative
justice.
PAPER FR 146B
The Truth n’ Trauma Project: Restorative and Trauma-Informed Practices
and Groupwork with Adolescent Youth
Troy D. Harden, Chicago State University, IL, USA
This paper reviews the “Truth n’ Trauma Project” that trained urban youth in trauma-informed and restorative
practices to work to facilitate community healing. Trauma-informed practices with youth and group work
generally involve interventions for youth by trained professionals. This project empowered youth to act to
promote healing within their communities.
PAPER FR 147
Evaluation of a Psychoeducational Group to Address Mental Health Literacy and Substance Abuse among
Rural Older Adults
Dara Bergel Bourassa, Shippensburg University, PA, USA
This paper will discuss the evaluation of a three-site psychoeducational group to improve upon the mental
health and substance abuse literacy among rural elderly, which is a contentious topic in the older adult
communitv. Risks and benehts of conducting a psvchoeducational group dealing with potentiallv sensitive
material will be discussed.
PAPER FR 148A
Group Work Education today: A Content Analysis of MSW Group Work
Course Syllabi
Jay Sweifach, Yeshiva University, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, NY, USA
This presentation presents the results of a content analysis of MSW group work course syllabi in an effort
to better understand the extent to which social group work education shows consistency with guidelines
articulated in the Standards for Social Work practice with Groups.
PAPER FR 148B
Virtual Groupwork - An Oxymoron?
David Prichard, School of Social Work, University of New England, Maine, USA
This paper presents initial hndings of teaching social work with groups in the hrst online MSW program in the
Country. Challenges and limitations are presented as well as unexpected positive outcomes of online training
social work professionals in the use of groups in their social work practice.
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L004
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L004
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L005
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L007
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L007
Friday, June 7th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room E209
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
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5:00-5:45pm Transportation from Simmons College to Boston University for GALA (George Sherman
Union Building, 775 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA)
6:00-7:00pm Cocktail Reception (Cash Bar) and Poster Presentation Ziskind Lounge at the George
Sherman Union Building
POSTERS
a. Spirituality in Social Work Groups for African-American Women
Amanda Ali, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Using an innovative model of spiritual psychoeducation in groups, this poster describes a curriculum relevant
to the lives and culture of African-American women. Blending elements of spiritual interviews, reßection
and meditation with African-American literature and ritual, the group will strive to create a holistic place of
healing exploration for participants.
b. Support Groups for Urban Youth who have Experienced Community Violence
Megan Elizabeth Knoster, Tamara Tereza Soraluz, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Tamara Tereza Soraluz, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Community violence is often referred to as a taboo subject. Urban youth who have been affected by community
violence report difhcultv in sharing these experiences due to others unfavorable responses. We propose a
group work model to provide at-risk youth with a safe space to share these experiences and commonalities.
c. Anxiety Groups for Children in Elementary School
Nadia Victoria Kury, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Children in elementary school experience anxiety from academics and social situations such as recess time.
This poster will present group work done specihcallv for children suffering from anxietv in a school-based
setting. These groups are designed to decrease anxiety and help children develop coping strategies.
d. Integrating and applying group work process to an 8-10 year old girls’
empowerment group in an after-school program
Elizabeth Mary Anderson, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
This poster examines the impact that knowledge of group work process can have when applied to an
empowerment group for girls 8-10 years old. Information will be presented on the use of group work process
through relationships and purposeful activities to enhance girls’ development.
e. Group Process in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Emily Alexander, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston,MA, USA
Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is effective for treating a wide range of clinical symptoms, yet these
groups have received limited empirical research (Petrocelli, 2001). This poster will examine the role of group
process, highlight the potential benehts of process, and raise awareness about the importance of process in
CBT groups.
f. The Challenges of ‘Difference’ in Group Work with a Time-Limited Anger
Management Group: the Challenged Member.
Cristina Hinestroza, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
This poster presentation describes a time-limited, anger management group for mandated and voluntary
clients in a multi-service community center. It highlights the challenges in working with groups in which some
members are cognitively challenged or illiterate.
g. Engaging High School Males in Talking about Healthy Relationships:
A Case Study
Daniel Do, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston MA, USA
This poster examines a case study on how utilization of community organizing techniques and a youth
empowerment perspective engaged high school males from an urban high school to discuss health relationships.
h. Empowering the Silent Member: A Strengths-Based Approach
Kelly Mogren, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Can we include the silent member without coercing him or her to speak? This poster aims to illustrate how
perceptions of silence inßuence the wav group facilitators and members understand and react to silent
group members. A strengths-based approach focusing on prefacing groups with a discussion about silence is
proposed.
Friday Evening Activities ~ June 7 – 5:00 - 11:00pm
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
24
i. We’re All In This Together: Growth in Friendship and Self-Esteem
Through Group Work with Girls
Melissa Aubrey Sonier, Springfeld College School oI Social Work, Springfeld, MA, USA
This poster displays inIormation pertaining to a school-based group oI fve girls in Iourth and fIth grade. The
group met once weekly for a total of eight weeks. Major group topics included self-esteem, communication
skills, friendship, and bullying.
j. Online Support Groups and the Butterfly Project
Jennifer Martino, University of Akron, OH, USA
The purpose of my presentation is to discuss the affects of self-harm internet discussion groups and its affects
on self-harm. Due to inaccurate understandings, health professionals and family may not provide the support
that self-infurers require. There are numerous self harm tools that help alleviate pain including the Butterßv
Project.
k. African Sisters Mutual Aid Alumnae Groups: A Mixed-Methods Study
Eric S. Stein, Marywood University, PA, USA
Kristin M. DeVries, Marywood University, PA, USA
This mixed-methods study explores experiences of 100 African Sisters who have completed a 10-week initiative
that has provided leadership training for women religious across six countries in Africa since 2006. Mutual
aid processes have emerged through informal networking and other means, culminating in “alumnae groups”
at the request of participants.
l. From High School to College: Bridging the Gap with a Social Work
Learning Community
Amberly Liptow, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, WI, USA
Kali Stegmueller, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, WI, USA
Learning communities can help students bridge the gap between high school and college. Learning
communities are groups which connect students with similar interests. This poster will discuss one universities
social work learning communitv through the eves of two student participants. Past research and benehts of
learning communities will be discussed.
m. Social skills training with secondary school adolescents
Zaneta Grinkeviciute, Vytautas Magnus University, Lithuania
Kaunas Atþalyno, Vytautas Magnus University, Lithuania
Jorune Vysniauskyte Rimkiene, Vytautas Magnus University, Lithuania
The study investigated the ability of adolescents the ages of 14 and 16 years to acquire a set of social skills
through training. The research showed that social skills training program was partially effective: the results
show less changes in girls group, while signihcant changes were evaluated in the bovs group.
n. Group Work with Future Foster Families: Bridging The Gap in Training
Minuette Farmakis, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, WI, USA
Michael Wallace, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, WI, USA
Foster families are an essential part of many children’s futures. As part of transitioning to becoming foster
families, individuals are frequently required to participate in education and training. This poster will provide one
authors experiences/outcomes related to providing a group to families in the process of becoming foster parents.
o. Educational group with typically developing adolescents
Dovile Jankunaite, Vytautas Magnus University, Lithuania
Jorune Vysniauskyte Rimkiene, Vytautas Magnus University, Lithuania
The purpose of the current poster is to discuss the educational group work with 16-18 years old typically
developing adolescents. The goal of the group was to provide knowledge for participants’ of self-knowledge,
to enhance skills in solving conßicts and collaboration, to raise adolescents tolerance to diversitv.
p. The net: A creative and expressive intervention for creating group safety
within an adolescent girls group
Maya Maria Ribot, Wheelock College, Boston, MA, USA
Kelly Mogren, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
This poster proposes an intervention used in a therapeutic adolescent girls group to establish group safety,
culture, and cohesiveness. Group co-facilitators in an outpatient day treatment center utilized an intervention
called “The Net” to empower members to create a safe space to discuss female related issues and develop
group rules.
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
25
q. The Allies: Group Psychoeducation and Psychotherapy for LGBTQA
Adolescents
Timothy Matthew Feltman, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This poster describes an afterschool group focusing on LGBTQA issues called The Allies. This poster describes
the issues facing LGBTQA vouth, focuses on group interventions utili:ed, describes benehts and challenges of
the program, and emphasi:es the benehts of using group interventions with this population.
r. Integrative psychoeducational groups: Bridging the gap between
finding and maintaining employment
Hannah Jane Green, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This poster describes a psychoeducational group for unaccompanied homeless adolescents and young adults,
focusing on important life skills needed to maintain gainful employment. It highlights the youths’ social
and emotional needs, the importance of learning social and interpersonal skills, and makes suggestions for
replication of the model.
s. Remembering the Past and Present: Reminiscent Therapeutic Group Work
with Women with Dementia
Jennifer Kate Niendorf, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This poster will highlight the use of reminiscent and remotivational techniques in a therapeutic group for
women with Dementia. The poster aims to illustrate the challenges faced by women with Dementia, identify
benehts and complexities, and studv the experience of group work with this population.
t. Finding Focus: A Group of Adolescents Experiencing Major Mental
Illness Exploring Their Photographic Realities
Kyle Taylor Ganson, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA, USA
This poster presents the therapeutic photography group, Finding Focus, which was designed and implemented
at a day treatment program in the Greater Boston area. The theoretical framework, group purpose, and case
presentations are outlined to highlight the effectiveness of using photography with adolescents experiencing
symptoms of major mental health illness.
u. Enhancing recovery in peer mentors by fostering leadership in
adolescent milieu groups
Virginia Anne Collins, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Interventions using peer leaders channel peer inßuence to reduce alcohol and drug abuse. Adolescent
engagement as leaders has been shown to lessen the peer leaders own substance use. A residential treatment
center capitalized on this dynamic by creating structured milieu groups, fostering engagement and recovery.
v. Addressing Anti-Semitism: Group Work Strategies to Respond
Sonya Jacobs Morgan, Loyola University School of Social Work, Chicago, IL, USA
In 2011, over 63.2% of religious-based hate crime incidents targeted Jews (Federal Bureau of Investigations,
Annual Hate Crimes Report, 2011). Few programs exist to address the concerns of anti-Semitism (MacDonald-
Dennis, 2006). This poster examines group work strategies for promoting positive Jewish identity, assertiveness,
and skilled responses for confronting anti-Semitism.
w. Benefits and Challenges of Support Groups for Postsecondary Students
with Disabilities
Jeremy Dylan Lynch, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This poster discusses the growing prevalence of postsecondary students with disabilities in the U.S., highlights
their unique needs and challenges, addresses lacking literature on support groups for these students, reßects
on the presenter developing and running a support group for this population, and provides recommendations
on implementing such groups.
x. Group Work Intervention Addressing Trauma and PTSD Symptoms in
Preadolescent and Adolescent Students
Colette Valrie, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This poster aims to 1)identify link between trauma and PTSD symptoms in preadolescent and adolescent
students in low income urban schools, 2) to describe method of trauma focused-cognitive behavioral theory
(TF-CBT), 3)assess benehts and limitations of a school-based group work treatment program utili:ing TF-
CBT behavioral intervention.
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
26
y. Movement as a Metaphor: A Psychoeducational Dance Movement Therapy
Group for At-Risk Adolescents
Amanda R. Groves, Loyola University, School of Social Work, Chicago, IL, USA
This poster describes a group intervention model using dance movement therapy to teach psychoeducational
lessons with inner-citv adolescents. It identihes alternatives to traditional talk therapv and techniques to
promote increased self-esteem and healthy lifestyle changes.
z. Recovery in relationships: combining 12-step programs and group
therapy to treat addiction
Santiago Delboy, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This poster presents addiction as an attachment disorder, highlights the importance of relationships for
recoverv, describes the relevance and benehts of 12-step programs and group therapv for addiction treatment
under this framework, and proposes that these group processes are complementary and enhance the client’s
recovery experience when used concurrently.
aa. North America’s First Nations People: Repairing Historical Trauma
Through Culturally Competent Group Interventions
Brandon Robert Haydon, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Natalie Anne Hock, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This poster aims to (1) explain the complex needs of Native American clients, (2) identify common themes and
presenting problems that impact this diverse population, (3) examine the experience of past and current therapeutic
group interventions with this population, and (4) describe the benehts of group work for Native Americans.
bb. The Relevance of Targeting Moral Development in Batterer Intervention
Groups for Black Men: A Critical Review
Bernadine Y. Waller, Adelphi University, NY, USA
Black men are often assigned to attend group batterer intervention training, yet their rates of recidivism are
higher than Caucasian men. Group interventions targeting moral development have better outcomes and are
reviewed as an important strategy to reducing re-assault.
cc. Decentralizing Authority: The Necessity of a Culturally Competent
Approach to Group Work
Samuel I. Villasenor-Guevara, Loyola University-Chicago, IL, USA
Sarah R. Burnette, Loyola University-Chicago, IL, USA
This poster advocates for culturally competent practices in social work with groups. Group social workers
interact with multi-cultural members differing in values and beliefs; this diversity will only increase. Our
roles as social workers, therefore, must include culturally competent approaches from skills found in the 1996
NASW ethical mandate.
7:00-7:20PM Welcome & Performance by the Boston Children’s Chorus at the George Sherman Union Ballroom
Opening Remarks: Mark Gianino and Donna McLaughlin, Boston University School of Social Work
Boston Children`s Chorus Artistic Director: Anthony Trecek-King
Boston Children`s Chorus Executive Director: David C. Howse
The Boston Childrens Chorus (BCC) was founded bv Hubie Jones, a civic leader who for almost hve decades
has labored to address the social problems facing Boston’s underserved children and communities. Mr. Jones
gathered the support of civic leaders and, after a year of planning and pilot projects, the Boston Children’s
Chorus was launched in October of 2003. Since the BCC’s inception, its programs have grown rapidly.
Twenty children were accepted into an initial pilot program, and in the current season, the BCC has over 450
singers representing over 50 of Boston’s urban and suburban neighborhoods. The Boston Children’s Chorus,
an integral part of Boston’s cultural and social fabric, creates communities through the passionate provision
of participation opportunities for all children in all neighborhoods.
7:20PM - Dinner & Dessert Served
Friday, June 7 – 8:15 - 8:50pm - Beulah Rothman Plenary
“Group Work in an Era of Rage and Disunity”
Presenter: Hubie Jones, City Year, Boston, MA
Chair: Donna McLaughlin, Boston University School of Social Work
In the aftermath of the 9/11 tragedy, the American people have been on edge, expressed in chronic anxiety
and anger. This condition has negative consequences for our social and political life. The lecture will focus
on how the power of groups can be used to achieve social healing and greater solidarity.
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
27
Saturday, June 8 – 9:15 - 10:15am
Saturday, June 8 – 7:30 - 6:00pm Boston PRIDE DAY
Saturday, June 8 – 8:00 - 9:00am
PRESENTATIONS
WORKSHOP SA 201
Panel Discussion: Challenges & Opportunities for Applying Group Work
Principles to Enhance Online Learning in Social Work
Marcia B. Cohen, University of New England, School of Social Work, ME, USA
Donna McLaughlin, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Barbara Muskat, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Shirley Simon, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Mary White, University of New England, School of Social Work, ME, USA
There is a growing literature which suggests that the online environment is highly conducive to the development
of group cohesion which has been found to improve learning outcomes. A panel of group work educators will
discuss the major challenges, opportunities, and group work informed strategies for teaching online.
PAPER SA 202B
The HIV Happiness Support Group
Jeanne Williams Saporito, James J. Peters, Nelly Rodas-Valdez; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, NY, USA
This paper will examine the dynamics of a time-limited support group composed of veterans “living with AIDS”.
The purpose of the group was to increase levels of happiness and improved quality of life. The inspiration for
this group was based on the book, The Happiness Project, by Gretchen Rubin (2009).
WORKSHOP SA 203
Dreaming in a Group
Linda Yael Schiller, Private Practice, Watertown, MA, USA
Learn active dream work by participating in an experiential dream group.This workshop will cover skills of
dream exploration, how to use dreamwork with multiple types of groups, what happens in stages of group
development in a dream circle, and engage in experiential and fun learning.
WORKSHOP SA 204
Parenting is a Journey that does not come with a road map. … An
Introduction To The Parenting Journey program – A strength-based
group program for parents
Cheryl D. Vines, The Family Center, Somerville, MA, USA
Parenting stvles are inßuenced bv ones past, familv, and bv cultural, social and economic circumstances. This
workshop will provide an interactive overview of the widely replicated 12-session Parenting Journey group
program. The program focuses on the emotional understanding of what it means to be a parent.
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room E305
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room L004
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room L316
Registration & Exhibits
Simmons Main College Building ~ Floor One at “Common Grounds” Coffee
Joan K. Parry Memorial Plenary and Breakfast – Paresky Center
Louis Lowy: Group Work through the Holocaust
Presenter: Lorrie Greenhouse Gardella, University of Saint Joseph, Connecticut
Chair: Alex Gitterman
Lorrie will draw from her recent book, The Life and Thought of Louis Lowy: Social Work through the Holocaust,
to explore Lowy’s enduring legacy as a social group worker and implications for social workers today.
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room W203
Friday, June 7 – 8:50 - 9:00pm - Recognition of International Honorees
Presenter: Greg Tully, IASWG President
9:00-11:00PM - Dancing and Socializing
Music by DJ: Sobhan Namvar
11:00PM – Transportation from Boston University back to Simmons Housing
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
28
PAPER SA 205A
Distance Education: Teaching Social Group Work Effectively at a Distance
Cheryl D. Lee, California State University, School of Social Work, Long Beach, CA, USA
William Pelech, Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Canada
Teaching at a distance has become more popular to serve a variety of consumer needs. Social work schools/
departments are routinely delivering courses through technology. Two models of teaching social group work
through distance education technology will be presented, one in Canada and the other in the U.S.
WORKSHOP SA 206
Democracy: Missing value in social work with groups?
Phyllis N. Black, Marywood University, PA; Joanne Whelley, Barry University, FL, USA
Joanne Whelley, Barry University
There is a question whether the historical principle of group democratic governance remains an integral
component of social work with groups. Findings from a survev of AASWG members reßect an inclination
favoring group self-governance, although one-third were opposed, in deference to organizational policy.
WORKSHOP SA 207
Learning the circle from the inside out: An instructor and student speak
about lessons learned from experiential group work training
Dana Grossman Leeman, Simmons College School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Joshua M. Barnes, Simmons College School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Experiential learning is essential to social wok training. This workshop explores the conceptual framework,
pedagogical rationale, and developmental gains made by both instructor and student, during an eight week
experiential support group in an advanced MSW group work course.
PAPER SA 208A
Special Issues in Group Work with Queer, Female Survivors of Sexual Violence
Natalie Marie Beck, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Queer women are at increased risk for sexual assault due to their gender and sexual orientation. (Lehavot,
Molina, & Simoni, 2012) This paper outlines a support group that recogni:es treatment needs specihc to both
the sexual trauma and the queer population. Additional complications such as hate crime are also explored.
PAPER SA 208B
Social Action & LGBTQ equality
Sasha Z. Kaufmann, Simmons School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Like social work, social action has been a cornerstone in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer
(LGBTQ) civil rights movement. This workshop will examine the best practices used to advance LGBTQ
equalitv through a group worker lens, providing clinicians with concrete steps to engage clients to foin the hght'
OTHER SA 209
The IASWG Standards for Social Work Practice with Groups: Celebrating
the Special Issue of Social Work with Groups
Carol S. Cohen, Adelphi University School of Social Work, NY, USA
Mark J. Macgowan, Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International
University, USA
Charles D. Garvin, University of Michigan School of Social Work, USA
Barbara Muskat, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
Gloria Kirwan, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
Jay S. Sweifach, Yeshiva University, NY, USA
Presented by editors and authors, this session focuses on the recently published Special Issue of Social Work
with Groups, on the IASWG Standards for Social Work Practice with Groups.
PAPER SA 210A
Theological Reflection and Social Change: Implications for Enhancing
Group Social Work Practice
Christopher Ryan Leach, Joy Patricia Ziemke, Graham Ross Golden; Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Group theological reßection has sparked social change throughout historv. in the Civil Rights Movement,
Latin American liberationist movements, and recently in the “Arab Spring.” This paper explores how models
of theological reßection can enhance our group social work practice and empower our clients to plan and
implement social change.
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room W205
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room L007
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room L005
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room L005
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room L305
SESSION 8: Saturday, June 8 – 10:30 - 11:30am
Saturday, June 8th
9:15-10:15 a.m.
Room W201
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room L005
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
29
PAPER SA 210B
“How Sweet the Sound”: Meeting Spirituality Needs in a Group through
Musical Intervention
Mary Frances H. (Mitzi) Beno, IL; Katarzyna Jadwiga Olcon, Association House of Chicago, IL, USA
Katarzyna Jadwiga Olcon, Association House of Chicago
Spirituality-sensitive social work group work practice is vital. Musical interventions are effective means of
experiencing and expressing spirituality. This paper will experientially demonstrate sample interventions
and describe benehts seen from their use within a multifaith-tradition womens growth group, discussing
implications for spirituality-competent social work group practice.
WORKSHOP SA 211
Integrating Authentic Movement with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in
Substance Abuse Recovery Groups: The Power of Activity
Mark Smith, Barry University, FL, USA
Daniela Riccelli, Hanley Center, FL, USA
This workshop presents an innovative approach for integrating CBT and dance/movement activity in CD
recovery groups. Following an introduction, participants are led in exercises that consist of several consecutive
groups. a traditional CBT group, an experience with Authentic Movement, and a reßection group where
participants engage and process their experience.
WORKSHOP SA 212
Bridging the gap between resettlement and citizenship: Group work with
immigrants, refugees and asylees
Radha Adhikari, Laura Maceyka, Bhola N. Subedi; Springfeld College, Springfeld, MA, USA
This presentation explores the challenges that impact immigrants, refugees and asvlees during their hrst hve
years in the United States and the psychosocial support groups that help individuals, families and communities
cope with the transition. The presentation is both research and experientially based with open discussion and
role playing exercises.
PAPER SA 213
An MSW Student Intern’s Perspective on Overcoming Anxiety Working
with Severely Mentally Ill Patients in a Group Setting
Tanesha Lambert, Springfeld College, Springfeld, MA, USA
Individuals with psychotic disorders frequently suffer with limitations in their social relations. Their personal
network may be restricted which makes it challenging in engaging this population in group therapy. This
workshop will examine how an MSW intern overcame anxiety in working with severely mentally ill clients in
a group setting.
OTHER SA 214
Bridging Social Group Work Competencies Through the Development of
an Online Problem-based Learning Approach
Alice Jasmine Schmidt Hanbidge,
Ellen Sue Mesbur; Renison University College, University of Waterloo, Canada
This Think Tank creates an opportunity for participants to discuss ways to develop and deliver virtual social
group work cases encompassing didactic and experiential learning while teaching professional social work
competencies. A desired outcome would be a strategy for the development of an IASWG international teaching
resource.
WORKSHOP SA 215
Offbeat Rhythms: Drumming as a therapeutic activity in Group Work
Kyle Marland McGee II, Adelphi University, NY, USA
Drumming as an activity in group work helps to enhance member engagement, communication, and a sense of
group unity. This workshop will provide a structured learning experience that is creative and highly interactive
as we explore how to incorporate drumming into your groups as an activity.
WORKSHOP SA 216
Analysis of the Group Dynamics in a Women’s Group after an Anticipated
and an Unanticipated Death
Lauren Taylor, Columbia University, NY, USA
A group for older women experienced the death of two members. The hrst was anticipated, the second
unexpected. Group cohesion increased each time, but interaction rose after the hrst and fell after the second.
A narrative network analysis was conducted, and interpreted in the context of stages of group development.
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room L005
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room L008
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room C120
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room L004
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room C106
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room L316
Saturday, June 8th
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Room L007
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
30
Pride/Self-care Extravaganza
We offer you a 3 hour pause in scheduled programming in order to catch up with friends and colleagues, enjoy
a chair massage, tour the city, or participate in Boston Pride events. Those who wish to participate in Pride
events will meet at the Hospitalitv table (Simmons Main College Bldg, First ßoor) immediatelv following
Presentation Session 8. We will depart promptly at 11:45am to join the Pride Parade or if you wish, to join the
spectators. We will be travelling by public transportation on the MBTA.
The Robert Salmon Invitational (Room C101)
“Things I didn’t learn in graduate school: A survival guide for leading non-voluntary groups”
Social workers are often required to facilitate groups comprised on individuals with signihcant relational
limitations—those who commit varying types of interpersonal violence, who lack empathy, and those with
addictions- thusly often required or pressured to participate in treatment groups. These groups can unleash
powerful anti-relational forces that can overpower the skills and good intentions of the social worker. This
presentation offers a dramatically different approach to leadership, based on clinical experience and research.
Presenter: Frank Bartolomeo, Private Practice
Chair: Mark Gianino, Boston University School of Social Work
The Catherine Papell Invitational (Room M101)
“Processing our stuff together”: Group interventions for hoarding disorder
Hoarding disorder is characteri:ed bv difhcultv discarding, clutter that interferes with use of space, and often
excessive acquiring that result in marked impairment and distress for the individual with hoarding and those
living with or near them. Presenters will focus on group processes in cognitive behavioral interventions for this
complex problem.
Presenters: Patty Underwood, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA and Jordana Muroff, Boston
University School of Social Work
Chair: Leah Hart Tennen, Boston University School of Social Work
The University of Southern California Invitational (Room M223)
“Task Groups to Make, Manage and Maximize Productive Change”
Task oriented groups are the primary medium through which grassroots community organizing takes place,
providing structures for recruitment, consciousness raising, leadership development, committee work,
strategic analysis, action planning, collective action, lobbying, and negotiating. Human services managers
and front-line social workers also utilize task groups for a variety of purposes, including strategic planning,
staff meetings, fundraising, event planning, board meetings, organizational development, collaborative
endeavors, and all manner of committees. This presentation will examine common group work principles
and best practices that maximize the effectiveness of task groups as vehicles for productive change in both
communities and organizations.
Presenter: Lee Staples, Boston University School of Social Work
Chair: Erika Vargas, The Home for Little Wanderers
The Roselle Kurland Memorial Invitational (Room M201)
“Women’s Voices in Group Work”
The purpose of this panel is to invite inßuential women in group work to a conversation. Each discussant
represents a different phase of her career and a distinct area of group work practice. Participants will be
asked to talk about their inßuences, their accomplishments, and their hopes for themselves and group work,
going forward. Audience participation will be encouraged.
Presenters: Saida Abdi, Boston Children’s Hospital; Carol Cohen, Adelphi University, Trudy Duffy, Luz
Lopez, Boston University School of Social Work; and Dominique Moyse Steinberg
Moderator: Dana Grossman Leeman, Simmons College School of Social Work
Saturday, June 8 – 11:30am - 2:30pm
INVITATIONAL SESSIONS: 2:45 - 3:45pm
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
31
SESSION 9: Saturday, June 8 – 4:00pm - 5:00 pm
WORKSHOP SA 217
From Getting to know you, to the Self-Talk Walk, to the Good-bye Go
Around:The purposeful use of activities in group work with adolescents
Susan Ciardiello, Larchmont-Mamaroneck Community Counseling Center, NY, USA
The purposeful use of activities in group work with adolescents considering the stage of group development
and the purpose of the group will be reviewed. Activities from the presenter’s book, Activities for group work
with adolescents, will be demonstrated, specihcallv Group Power, Activate, The Self-Talk Walk, and The Good-
bye go-Around.
WORKSHOP SA 218
The Group Work Ensemble: Working to develop the next generation
Sari Skolnik, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, NY
Pamela J. Brodlieb, LIU - Post, NY
Lynn Meir, Stony Brook University, NY, USA
Helping students acquire group work skills is an investment for contemporary social work educators. There
are many roles involved in carrying out this mission. Participants in this workshop will develop a sociodrama,
an educational group experience, exploring the important issue of teaching group work.
WORKSHOP SA 219
TEACHING ABOUT INTERRACIAL CONFLICT: LEARNING FROM OUR SUCCESSES
AND FAILURES
Ann M. Bergart, Loyola University Chicago & University of Chicago, IL, USA
This workshop presents educators an opportunity to share their experiences in teaching group work students
how to address interracial conßict. The presenter will hrst share her successes and failures in addressing this
topic. She will then facilitate discussion aimed at identifying how classroom experiences can best facilitate
student learning.
PAPER SA 220A
Social group work with adolescents in therapeutic day schools:
Discovering group purpose with nonvoluntary clients.
Frank Bartolomeo, CT, USA
The results of a qualitative study that explored the complexity of negotiating group purpose with students
attending therapeutic day schools using a framework that incorporates adolescent developmental needs, the
impact of varied and co-morbid presenting problems, histories of negative social experiences, the impact of
nonvoluntariness, and group developmental theory.
PAPER SA 220B
Trust and Resistance: When Agency culture and service delivery conflict.
An exploration of a mandated, adolescent group
Dawn Marie DiMartino, Simmons College, School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
This paper explores the ethical and therapeutic conßicts that arise when an agencvs culture undermines
the clinician’s ability to perform pre-group planning for a mandated group with adolescents who have high
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE). Participants will be encouraged to share experiences and approaches
to addressing this challenge.
PAPER SA 221A
In the Rwandan Mud: Facilitating Group Work through Clay
Jennifer Clements, Shippensburg University, PA, USA
This presentation will illustrate a group that centers on the use of clay. Using the local resources of a school
in Rwanda, group work was facilitated with the children. The process of using this modality will be shared as
well as pictures of the work and recommendations for practice.
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room E305
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L004
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room C416
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L008
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L008
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L005
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
32
PAPER SA 221B
Theatre workshops as a group format for promoting intercultural
understanding
Claude Olivier, School of Social Work, King’s University College, London, Ontario
William E. Dunn, University of Alberta, Canada
This paper reports on the use of theatre as a means of giving voice to international students’ experiences
of inclusion. Objectives of the project included producing video-recorded skits based on key themes of the
students’ experiences, and to explore the impact on the students who took part in several workshops.
WORKSHOP SA 222
Bridging the future: Integration of strengths and empowerment into
group work practice
Thelma Silver, Youngstown State University, OH, USA
Linda McArdle, The University of Akron, OH, USA
Charlla D. Allen, Youngstown State University, OH, USA
As a bridge to the future in groupwork, this workshop will integrate strengths and empowerment into mutual
aid groups. Attention will also be given to diversity in regards to empowerment and groupwork. Case examples
and experiential exercises will be utilized to enable participants to apply this integrated approach.
PAPER SA 223
Parent Coffee Hour and Social Determinants of Health
Jessy Benjamin, Hospital for Sick Kids, Toronto, ON, Canada
This presentation will describe and examine the diversity, socio economic and cultural background, the
hnancial struggles, and familv dvnamics -how thev are disadvantaged due to their social position or other
sociallv determined circumstances. Families face added struggles related to familv conßict associated with
the social determinants of health.
WORKSHOP SA 224
Teaching a Social Work Research & Statistical Methods Class as a
Laboratory inspired by William Schwartz
Rhonda Hudson, Union University, TN, USA
This paper presentation will detail the group process and teaching strategies used in delivering a Research
& Statistical Methods course to BSW undergraduate students. Core teaching principles derived from William
Schwartz, and the process by which students were encouraged to become independent, imaginative, and re-
sponsible learners will be described
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L005
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L305
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room C120
Saturday, June 8th
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room L007
Saturday Evening Activities ~ June 8 – 5:00 - 6:30pm
5:00-6:30PM Annual Membership Meeting and Local Honorees (School of Management, Room, 501)

6:30PM onward - Dine Around (Boston dining)
You are cordially invited to join old and new friends at IASWG’s Annual Dine Around. Sign-up sheets with descriptions
of the Dine Around restaurants will be available throughout the day on Friday and Saturday at the Hospitality table (1st
ßoor, Simmons Main College Bldg.).
Regi strati on & Exhi bi ts
Simmons Main College Building ~ Floor One at “Common Grounds” Coffee Shop
IASWG MA Chapter Plenary & Breakfast (C103)
“Better together: IASWG MA Chapter highlights innovative group work in the Commonwealth”
(Produced in collaboration with Wheelock College and Boston University MSW students)
Through creative flmmaking a group oI local MSW students take an intimate look at the inspired and leading
edge group work happening in Massachusetts.
Presenters: David Carpenter, Maya Ribot, Kyle Ganson, Kelly Mogren
Chair: Sera Godfrey Grantz, Riverside Community Care, Needham, MA
Sunday, June 9 – 8:00 - 10:00am
Sunday, June 9 – 8:30 - 9:30am
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
33
PAPER SU 300
Social Work Dissertations Focusing on Group Work: An Historical
Analysis
Shirley R. Simon, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Teresa Kilbane, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This paper describes the initial results of a review of group work dissertations in social work. It identihes the
number of dissertations in each decade, their content and focus, the types of social work programs producing
these dissertations, and the trends in doctoral research in group work.
PAPER SU 301A
Application of group care principles to the Vietnam context
Donna M. McLaughlin, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Mary Elizabeth Collins, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Group work has tremendous promise as a strategy in the development of social work in Vietnam. This
presentation describes the introduction of group work strategies within a Vietnamese social work education
context. The potential impact of lessons learned and how this informs group-focused social work in Vietnam
are discussed.
PAPER SU 301B
Collaboration between social and health care institutions in primary
health care (PHC) solving health care problems in social risk families in
Lithuania: how to create space for common language
Jorune Vysniauskyte Rimkiene, Laura Varzinskiene, Roberta Motieciene; Vytautas Magnus University,
Lithuania
The profect was performed aiming to reßect current intersectional collaboration principles between social
workers and health care providers. A new collaboration model of good practice just started to be provided
which will hopefullv increase intersectional collaboration and will be efhcient in the experimental PHC
settings.
WORKSHOP SU 302
Steps for Two: The Art and Practice of Co-Facilitation in Social Group Work
Dana Grossman Leeman, Simmons College School of Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Co-facilitation in group work practice is challenging and can exert tremendous impact on the group-as-a-
whole. This interactive workshop will unpack the dynamic.
PAPER SU 304A
Revisiting Boundaries: Male Group Workers and “Fatherless” Young Urban
Males
Carl Mazza, Lehman College, City University of New York, NY, USA
Anthony David, Catholic Home Bureau, NY, USA
Ruben Quiles, Lehman College, City University of New York, NY, USA
When working with voung urban males lacking a father hgure, the male group leader often hnds himself thrust
into a semi-parental role. This raises many transference and counter transference issues. Traditional social
worker boundaries may have to be reexamined and perhaps expanded to meet the needs of these young men.
PAPER SU 304B
Motivational Interviewing and Group Work: Fostering Connection
Between Men in a Men’s Intimacy Group
David Prichard, School of Social Work, University of New England, Maine, USA
This paper presents a practice model utilizing motivational interviewing as a model for developing connection
between men. Specihc interventions and group work approaches for use in a mens intimacv group are
discussed, based on application to an existing and well-established men’s support group utilizing the MI
approach by the presenter.
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room W203
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room E207
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room E207
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room W205
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room C120
SESSION 10: Sunday, June 9 – 9:45 - 10:45am
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room C120
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
34
PAPER SU 305A
Ethnic nonprofit organizations during the economic recession: an
examination of the role of organizational capacity and leadership
building among ethnic groups for long-term sustainability
Dale Asis, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
Biswas Pradhan, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA
This paper examines series of group workshops designed for community organizations for strengthening
strategic organizational capacity building and nurturing groups as effective strategies for long-term
sustainability for social service agencies. These capacity and leadership group workshops are especially
effective for small ethnic community organizations struggling in the current economic recession.
PAPER SU 305B
TRUSTBUILDING: A Team Building Approach to Strengthening Relationships
in Diverse Venues
Brenda Exum, Norfolk State University, VA, USA
This presentation will demonstrate a unique model of community development using task groups to create trust
building opportunities with diverse populations and stakeholders in Hampton Roads, VA. This grass roots
organization developed a multifaceted program that emphasized capacity building and mobilization of citizens
to acquire optimal healthy lifestyles.
PAPER SU 306A
Maximizing the Interprofessional Collaborative Experience Using Group
Work Skills and Knowledge
Edna Comer, University of Connecticut, CT, USA
Tyfanni Douglas, University of Connecticut, CT, USA
This paper addresses the role of social work in interprofessional collaboration in primary health care. It
describes how social work students at the University of Connecticut joined a well established training and
mentoring program, with other students from the Schools of Medicine, Dental Medicine, Pharmacy, Nursing,
And Physicians Assistants.
PAPER SU 306B
Experiential Group Training: When Being a Member Enhances Practitioners
Skills
Martin Camiré, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Canada
This paper will describe an Experiential Group work training developed for group leaders. Through the lens
of group phases, the presentation will explore the different strategies use by the trainer to increase awareness
about group process as well as developing knowledge and skills for group work.
PAPER SU 307A
Healing the Hurt: A group for young women who self-harm
Katya Sivacek, Wheelock College, Boston, MA, USA
This paper will highlight “New Directions” a curriculum based group for adolescent girls who engage in
self-harm. This presentation will include a discussion of current research, interventions and touching group
member narratives.
PAPER SU 307B
Membership in Open-Ended Groups: Exploring Structure in Group Work
during Long-Term Psychiatric Hospitalizations
Danya Bader-Natal, Simmons College, Boston, MA, USA
Through presentation and discussion with session attendees, this work seeks to explore group membership and
structure best suited for a population where some individuals experience active psychosis and others do not.
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room W206
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room W206
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room C106
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room C106
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room E209
Sunday, June 9th
9:45-10:45 a.m.
Room E209
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
35
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room W203
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room W203
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room W206
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room W206
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room C106
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room W201
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room C218
SESSION 11: Sunday, June 9 – 11:00 - 12:00pm
PAPER SU 308A
The “GenderBread Client” Increasing Self Esteem of LGBTQ Adolescents
Rachel Marie Younkins, Cindy Lee Zweifel, Sarah Nicole Bishop; University of Akron, OH, USA
Have you ever wondered what types of challenges a non-heterosexual person faces? Have you questioned how
to increase self-esteem in adolescents? Allow us to help you discover new techniques for improving self-esteem
within the LGBTQ community!
PAPER SU 308B
Specialized bereavement group programming for the LGBT community:
Exploring disenfranchised grief
Beth Ellen Prullage, Simmons College School for Social Work, Boston, MA, USA
Since 2008, the LGBT Aging Project of MA has run grant-funded bereavement groups for the Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual and Transgender communitv in MA. This session will discuss the assessed need for LGBT-specihc
bereavement services; describe the curriculum designed for the grant, as well as how these services are evaluated.
PAPER SU 309A
From classroom to practice: using role plays to bridge classroom learning
to practice
Sarah Louise Hessenauer, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, WI, USA
Michael Wallace, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, WI, USA
Role plays are frequently assigned in social work education to bridge classroom learning to the profession of
social work. Results of a mixed study on the use of role plays in group classes in one bachelor level program
will be discussed. Sample role play exercises will also be provided.
PAPER SU 309B
A Student’s Perspective on the Vitality of Clinical Supervision during
Group Work with Substance Abusers
Nickia Monique Miller, Springfeld College, Department oI Correction Substance Abuse Counselor,
Springfeld, MA, USA
This paper presentation examines the importance of clinical supervision in reducing compassion fatigue and
managing transference and countertransference issues during group work. This presentation identihes 1)
examples and consequences of transference and countertransference and 2) clinical supervision as vital to
professional and personal health.
WORKSHOP SU 310
Practical Pre-Group Planning is Practical: How to engage in manageable,
effective planning
Martie Finkelstein, Baltic St. Clinic, NY, USA
Pre-group planning is essential but often overlooked. This workshop will provide a framework for the process,
making it manageable and emphasizing its importance. We will explore important topics for planning and why,
and in doing so see how specihc choices and planning as a whole can affect a groups trafectorv.
WORKSHOP SU 311
Group workers do have sex!
Sonia Spelters, PBA Personalbildungsagentur, Germany
Tanja Schmitz-Remberg, PBA Personalbildungsagentur, Germany
Steven Kraft, NY, USA
Groups are lead by male and female workers. If we think we neutralize our sex(uality) when we start leading
groups, we are verv likelv under the illusion that our sex doesnt have a high impact' This workshop reßects on
the questions of how various aspects of sex inßuence our leadership stvle.
WORKSHOP SU 312
Group Work with Major Mental Illness and Addiction, Clinical Group
Practice with HIV+ Men over 50
Elizabeth Kapstein, Donald McVinney, Kelsey Louie, Harlem United Community Organization, NY, USA
We will look at clinical theories and interventions that we use with the Men Over 50+ and Men’s Empowerment
Group, focusing on harm reduction techniques in a community based organization that offers wraparound
services in the Bronx and Harlem, NYC. Both groups support men living with HIV/AIDS for 10+ years
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
36
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room E207
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room E209
Sunday, June 9th
11:00-12:00 p.m.
Room W205
PAPER SU 313
School Based Substance Abuse Prevention via Group Work with Multi-Tier
Preventions
Sarah Beth Spunt, Hanover Townwhip Youth and Family Services, IL, USA
This paper describes the process of implementing a multi-tier substance abuse prevention program, with an
emphasis on applying the program within PBIS groups. This paper presents a model for intertwining substance
abuse prevention into PBIS groups, emphasizes group work theory, reports program outcomes, and concludes
with recommendations for effective replications.
WORKSHOP SU 314
Mutual aid: search for common understanding
Barbara Muskat, The Hospital for Sick Kids, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Charles Garvin, Uniersity of Michigan, MI, USA
Mark Macgowan, Florida International University, FL, USA
William Pelech, Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Canada
The term “mutual aid” is featured prominently in the IASWG Standards and literature; however there are
inconsistencies in its dehnition and use. This session will build on previous IASWG work to explore 'mutual
aid` with an ultimate goal to bring claritv and specihcitv to this concept.
WORKSHOP SU 315
If You Build It, They Will Learn It
Sandra Sheppard, Buffalo State College, NY, USA
Attend this workshop to learn how BSW students experience the rigorous and reßective process of learning
group work skills by designing and running stress management groups, and supervising groups that role-
play domains of social work they identify for study. Walk away with templates, tools, and excitement to try
something new!
Sunday, June 9 – 12:15 - 1:15pm
CLOSI NG SESSI ON & CEREMONY
First Floor Main College Building
Facilitator: Michael Wagner
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
R i v e r s i d e
Communi t y
Care makes
a difference
in the lives of
i ndi vi dual s,
families, and
communities by delivering compassionate, locally-
based, integrated behavioral healthcare and human
services. They believe that people possess the ability
to grow and change and are focused on providing high
quality and responsive services in support of both
individual and collective community goals. Each year,
more than 40,000 people across Massachusetts depend
on Riverside for quality mental healthcare, develop-
mental disability & brain injury programs, addiction
treatment, early childhood services and more. Cities,
towns, school systems, and private companies also turn
to Riverside when faced with the emotional aftermath
of tragic events ranging from teen suicide to natural
disasters. Riverside’s Outpatient Centers offer individ-
ual, group, and family counseling, treatment planning
and consultation, medication management, and connec-
tions with a large network of community services.
B o s t o n
Children’s
Hospital is
a 395-bed
c o mp r e -
h e n s i v e
center for pediatric health care. As one of the largest
pediatric medical centers in the United States,
Children’s offers a complete range of health care
services for children from birth through 21 years of age.
Boston Children’s is the #1 ranked pediatric hospital
nationwide according to the 2012-13 edition of Best
Children’s Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.
The Hospital has long been at the forefront of provid-
ing expert, compassionate care to children and adoles-
cents with a variety of mental health problems, using
cognitive behavioral therapy, individual psychotherapy,
family therapy, group therapy, and parent guidance.
Boston Children’s also provides support groups for
children and parents of children with various medical
conditions, including cancer and Celiac Disease.
Lois Levinsky, MSW,
LICSW, has been a clinical
social worker for 40 years,
including 20 years as
Clinical Associate Profes-
sor at the Boston Univer-
sity School of Social Work
and 30 years in her private
practice, providing counsel-
ing, psychotherapy, consulta-
tion and training. Focussing
on community mental health
and youth development with
adolescents, young adults
and families, Lois has consulted to numerous schools,
youth and Iamily serving organizations, clinic and feld
practitioners, and staff teams and administrators, providing
clinical supervision and consultation as well as professional
development coaching and training to front-line, manage-
ment and executive staff.

Since its founding in 1893,
Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston
(BGCB) has been helping
young people, especially
those who need us most,
build strong character and
realize their full potential
as responsible citizens and
leaders. BGCB does this by
providing: a saIe haven flled
with hope and opportunity,
ongoing relationships with caring adults, and life-enhanc-
ing programs in six core program areas. BGCB serves
more than 15,000 young people ages 6-18 in 10 Clubs, and
through Camp Harbor View and YouthConnect. BGCB is an
aIfliate oI Boys & Girls Clubs oI America and The United
Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley. For more
information, visit www.bgcb.org.



I ASWG LOCAL HONOREES
Lois Levinsky
Boys & Girls Clubs
of Boston


Riverside Community Care
Boston Children’s Hospital
37
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
designed to make the state’s aging services system ‘open and
aIfrming` Ior LGBT elders. Lisa Irequently consults with
mainstream aging service providers about cultural competen-
cy with LGBT elders.
Kim Westheimer is the
director of the Human
Rights Campaign (HRC)
Foundation’s Welcom-
ing Schools, an LGBT
inclusive initiative that
helps elementary schools
embrace family diversity,
avoid gender stereotyp-
ing and end bullying and
name calling. Kim is also
an adjunct faculty member
at Wheelock College in
Boston, MA. Prior to
joining the HRCF in 2010,
Kim was a consultant for
a wide range of govern-
ment, education and non-proft organizations on topics
related to equity, LGBT youth, health promotion, community
dialogue, and program development. These organizations
included the American Psychological Association, Ground-
Spark, the Massachusetts Department of Education, Boston
Gay & Lesbian Adolescent Social Services, and individual
school districts. As a consultant, Kim also helped design
and implement a multi-state pilot of Welcoming Schools.
She formerly directed the Safe Schools Program for Gay
and Lesbian Students at the Massachusetts Department of
Education and is the co-author with Jeff Perrotti of When the
Drama Club is Not Enough: Lessons From the SaIe Schools
Program for Gay and Lesbian Students. She has a BSW and a
Masters in Urban and Environmental Policy with an emphasis
on Child Development.
Rebecca Hoffman, LMSW,
is a social group worker and
the Director of Member
Services at Rainbow
Heights Club, a psychoso-
cial and advocacy club for
lesbian, gay, bisexual and
transgender people living
with mental illness in New
York City. She received her
MSW in group work from
Hunter College School of
Social Work in 1999 and
has worked as an English
professor at Brooklyn
College, a geriatric case
managment program
director and an advocate for medical malpractice survivors.
She honed her group work skills at SAGE (Services and
Adovocacy for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender
Elders) as the community building coordinator and at Carter
Burden Center for the Aging, where she facilitated groups
for survivors of elder abuse. She is delighted to attend the
IASWG Symposia to discuss the peer specialist-led Trans/
Gender Explorers Group at Rainbow Heights Club.
In 2007 Tfawa received his
MSW, with a concentration in
Group work, from the Boston
University School of Social
Work. He was awarded the
Herb Schneider Memorial
Group Work Student of the
Year in 2007 by the Massachu-
setts Chapter of AASWG. He
is currently working at Fenway
Health as a Psychotherapist,
where he has created a therapy
group, 'Shades oI Black:
A Therapy Group for Gay/
Bi Black Men.” The group is
intended to help members develop, integrate and consolidate their
racial, ethnic, cultural, religious, gender and sexual identities. One
goal of the group is to increase self-awareness, self-esteem and
acceptance while decreasing isolation and internalized negative
messages related to having multiple intersecting and sometimes
conficting identities.
Since 1994, Adam has been a
full time clinical social worker
at Beacon High School (a
program of Walker) conduct-
ing individual and group
therapy with adolescents who
are challenged with signifcant
emotional issues. In addition to
his work at Beacon, Adam runs
a private practice in Brookline
and Watertown, MA where he
works with individuals, couples
and groups. Adam has run a
Coming Out Support Group in
this private practice for the past
16 years and is a sought after
speaker on topics related to Coming Out, Work with GLBTQ
clients and gender identity. Adam also enjoys consulting, training,
guest lecturing at schools of social work and presenting at confer-
ences. He has published an article with fellow board member,
Mark Gianino in the Journal of Social Work With Groups, on
the topic of being both and individual and group therapist for the
same client. Adam was honored to receive the 'Group Worker oI
the Year” honor from the MA Chapter of AASWG for his work
with adolescents and his work with adults who are coming out.
Adam earned his BS in Psychology from Tufts University and his
MSW from Boston University School of Social Work.
Lisa is the Director of the
LGBT Aging Project in Boston.
She has twenty years of experi-
ence in community based elder
services, ranging from Case
Manager to Director of Home
Care. She has been an active
member of the LGBT Aging
Project since it’s inception in
2001, and in 2004 the LGBT
Aging Project hired her as its
2nd full-time Director. In that
capacity, Lisa leads the Aging
Project’s Open Door Program,
Kim Westheimer
Rebecca Hoffman
Adam Glick
Lisa Krinsky
38
Sumner Gi ll Plenary Paneli sts
Tfawa Haynes
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Joan Parry Plenary
Lorrie Greenhouse Gardella is Professor of Social Work at the University of Saint
Joseph, Connecticut, where she previously served as founding chair of the Department
of Social Work and Latino Community Practice and as Associate Dean of the School of
Graduate and Professional Studies. She earned her A.B. degree at Smith College, and
her J.D. and M.S.W. at the University of Connecticut, but she remembers learning the
values and goals of social group work as a settlement house volunteer. Gardella has
devoted her career to improving educational access to underrepresented populations.
She has held national leadership positions in social work education such as President of
the Association of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors, Chair of the NASW
Legal Defense Fund, and the Board of Directors and other positions in the Council
on Social Work Education. Locally, she was a founding member of the Connecticut
Chapter of IASWG. With research interests in social work history; social work with
immigrants, migrants, and refugees; and multicultural health equity, her recent books
include The LiIe and Thought oI Louis Lowy: Social Work Through the Holocaust
(2011, Syracuse University Press) and A Dream and A Plan: Women Leaders in Human Services, coauthored with
Karen S. Haynes (2004, NASW Press). She considers the privilege of writing Louis Lowy’s biography to be a
highlight of her career.
Lorrie Greenhouse
Gardella
Frank Bartolomeo, Ph.D., LICSW is a hybrid of social work practitioner, adminis-
trator, teacher, and scholar with extensive experience revolving around a core set of
interests focused on adolescent mental and behavioral health, program development,
addiction & recovery and especially groupwork. Since completing his MSW with a
major in groupwork from Boston University in 1989, Frank pursued his passion for
groupwork by receiving additional training in group psychotherapy, psychodrama,
and organizational psychology. He was past co-chair of the Children’s Group Therapy
Association in Boston, and taught at Boston University SSW and UCONN SSW. In
2003, Frank was awarded the Saul Bernstein Memorial Group Worker of the Year, by
the Massachusetts Chapter of AASWG. In 2007, Frank received his Ph.D. at Simmons
College: His research Iocused on group work and culminated in his dissertation:
Social group work with adolescents in therapeutic day schools: Discovering group
purpose with nonvoluntary clients. He has numerous publications including articles in
The encyclopedia of social work with groups and he frequently presents at national conferences most recently in the
area of treatment of substance use and co-occurring disorders in youth and young adults. Currently, he maintains a
consulting practice in Connecticut.
The Robert Salmon I nvi tati onal
Frank Bartolomeo
39
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Lee Staples is a Clinical Professor at the Boston University School of Social Work. He
received his MSW at the University of California, Los Angeles, and his PhD in social
work and sociology from Boston University. His professional career includes extensive
experience as a community organizer, supervisor, staff director, trainer, consultant,
coach, and educator. He practices and publishes in the areas of grassroots community
organizing, consumer/community empowerment, task oriented group work, interna-
tional development, and immigrant rights. His research has focused on NGO develop-
ment in the Balkans, consumer empowerment in Israel, social capital in Chelsea, mental
health rights with the Massachusetts Clubhouse Coalition, grassroots leadership, social
action groups, immigrant workers centers, and youth organizing. His book, Roots To
Power: A Manual Ior Grassroots Organizing, is used widely by practitioners and as a
text in many schools of social work. Recently, he co-authored Youth-Led Community Organiz-
ing: Theory and Action with Melvin Delgado.
Dr. Jordana Muroff is
an Assistant Professor
at Boston University
School of Social Work,
Clinical Practice Depart-
ment. She received her
joint doctorate in Social
Work and Psychol-
ogy from the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Her
post-doctoral studies
were completed at the
Center for Decision and
Behavioral Medicine at the University of Michigan
and VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. She participat-
ed in the NIMH Race and Mental Health pre-doctoral
Training Program, focusing on reducing racial/ethnic
and gender disparities in mental health diagnosis,
assessment and interventions. Dr. Muroff received
specialized training in cognitive behavioral therapy
methods (CBT) with children and adults. Dr. Muroff
is a licensed social worker with extensive clinical
experience. She has published and presented widely
in the areas in CBT for children and adults with
anxiety disorders, and especially OCD and hoarding,
the infuence oI race and ethnicity on clinical diagnos-
tic decisions, and the use of technology in assessment
and interventions. Her research has been funded by
the Obsessive Compulsive Foundation, Massachu-
setts Department of Public Health, and SAMHSA.
She teaches graduate-level courses in cognitive and
behavioral treatment, assessment and intervention,
and clinical research methods.
Patty Underwood is an
outpatient clinician at a large
community based mental
health center in Newton,
Massachusetts where she
works with individuals
and groups and supervises
interns and clinicians. She is
a part-time clinical instruc-
tor at the Boston Univer-
sity School of Social Work
(courses include Differential
Social Work with Groups,
Clinical Practice with Individuals, and Introduction to
Clinical Practice). She also teaches in a post-graduate
group work certifcation course at Simmons School oI
Social Work. Patty has been on the BU Hoarding Project
team since 2007 running compulsive hoarding groups
as part of the research in developing the CBT-based
hoarding treatment model. She is the President of the
Massachusetts Chapter of the International Association of
Social Work With Groups (IASWG).
Patty Underwood
Lee Staples
Jordana Muroff
The Catheri ne Papell I nvi tati onal
The Uni versi ty of Southern Cali forni a I nvi tati onal
40
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
as well as adults through individual, group and family therap
in community mental health, prison, hospital, and outpatient
settings. More recently, she has been providing clinical
services to post-combat veterans and their families.
Luz M. López completed
a Ph.D. degree in Social
Work and a Master degree
in Public Health from
Tulane University in New
Orleans. She is currently a
faculty member at Boston
University School of Social
Work and the BU Associate
Director for the MSW/MPH
dual degree program. She is
a group work specialist and
teaches clinical practice,
group work and advanced
courses in substance abuse
treatment, trauma and narratives culture. She has experience
facilitating trauma groups for men and women in substance
abuse treatment. Her research interest is on HIV, substance
abuse prevention and prison reentry working with Latinos
and other diverse groups. Dr. López was born and raised in
Puerto Rico. She is passionate about teaching the transforma-
tive power of groups, serving as tools for healing and social
justice.
Dominique Moyse
Steinberg’s career in social
work began in 1978, with
her earliest years dedicated
to working with homebound
elderly in the upper east side
of New York City. Over the
next 35 years she practiced
with people of all ages,
focusing on adolescents in
particular, and trained many
agency practitioners in
social group work, especial-
ly on catalyzing mutual aid
and dealing effectively with
group confict. Dominique
has taught at three schools oI social work: New York Univer-
sity, Smith College, and Hunter College, where she chaired
the group work department until she retired at the end of
2011. Author of numerous articles and books on social group
work and a handbook on social work research, Dominique
sits on the editorial boards of Social Work with Groups and
The Journal of Teaching in Social Work. She has also served
on the NYC-NASW ethics-review committee and currently
focuses on the well-being of people in care and of those who
care for them through Custom Elder Care, which she created
in 2010. A member of IASWG since 1983, Dominique has
been the Association’s treasurer since 2007 and chair of the
Symposium Planning Committee since 2009.
Saida Abdi, LICSW, MSW.,
MA., is a clinical social worker
and expert in refugee trauma and
resilience. She holds a masters
degree in Social Work from
Boston University and another
masters degree in Communica-
tions from Carleton University
and will be starting her PhD
studies at Boston University
School of Social work in Septem-
ber. She is a native of Somalia
and a former refugee herself. Ms.
Abdi has worked for more than
20 years in the area of refugee
youth programming, developing
school-based programs to support adjustment of refugee youth in
resettlement and community-based research and intervention. She
is trained in Trauma System’s Therapy and is currently working in
research focused on refugee youth, trauma and resilience.
Carol S. Cohen, DSW is Associ-
ate Professor at the Adelphi
University School of Social
Work, and founder of the Global
Group Work Project, building
an international education,
research and practice network.
She is a co-chair of the IASWG
Commission on Group Work in
Social Work Education, member
of the CSWE Commission on
Global Social Work Education,
and the Editorial Board of
Groupwork. Her work in the
areas oI group work, feld and
classroom learning, supervision,
agency-based practice, housing, child welfare and community
development has been published and disseminated nationally and
internationally. Among publications, she is guest co-editor and
contributor to the recent Special Issue of Social Work with Groups
on the IASWG Standards, co-editor of Strength and Diversity in
Social Work with Groups: Think Group, and co-author oI Group
Work Education in the Field. Before joining the academic ranks,
she held leadership positions with Catholic Charities of Brooklyn
and Queens, and is currently a member oI the Catholic Charities
Neighborhood Services Board of Directors.
Trudy Duffy has enjoyed a long
and distinguished career as a
practitioner, scholar, teacher,
and consultant. She was on
the faculty of Boston Univer-
sity School of Social Work form
1972-2005. She earned her
doctorate in Clinical Social Work
from Simmons College School
of Social Work in 2002. Much
of her practice has been dedicat-
ed to working with clients who
have substance use disorders and
mental illness. She has worked
with children and adolescents,
Saida Abdi
Carol Cohen
Trudy Duffy
Luz Lopez
Dominique Moyse
Steinberg
The Roselle Kurland Memori al I nvi tati onal
41
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Kyle Taylor Ganson
(Framingham, MA)
received his BFA in photog-
raphy from the School of
Visual Arts in New York,
NY. Kyle graduated with
a Masters of Social Work
from Wheelock College
this spring (2013). Kyle
intends to use his creative
thinking as a clinical social
worker and employ his
interests in photography,
video, art, and writing to collaborate with youth experienc-
ing major mental illness, and their families, realize their
strengths and improve their lives.
Kelly Mogren earned a
Bachelor of Social Work
from Wheelock College
in 2012 and a Master of
Social Work from Boston
University in 2013. Kelly
was inspired to earn a
group work specializa-
tion certifcate at BU aIter
discovering the transfor-
mative power of group
work with children and
adolescents. Kelly is
dedicated to working with youth managing mental illness
and feels passionate about empowering youth to discover
their unique strengths and potential. Kelly enjoys spending
time with friends and family, traveling, and eating great
food.
David Carpenter received his
BA in American Studies and
Cultural Criticism from The
George Washington University
in Washington, D.C. David’s
interest in intimate and family
relationships brought him to
Wheelock College where he
is studying to earn his masters
in clinical social worker. Upon
graduation (2013), David is
excited to assist children and
families in identifying their
strengths, overcoming obstacles, and connecting with their
dreams in order to move towards a more hopeful future. Or as
Kimya Dawson so eloquently sang, 'We all become important
when realize our goal should be to fgure out our role within the
context of the whole.”
Maya Ribot (Brookline, MA)
received her BA in Communi-
cations and minor in Sociol-
ogy from Fairleigh Dickinson
University in Madison, NJ.
Maya has always been dedicat-
ed to helping others by creating
a socially just world. Maya
received her Masters in Social
Work from Wheelock College
in Spring, 2013 and will contin-
ue her work serving children
and families to promote human
rights and social justice. Maya enjoys spending her time hiking,
eating well, camping and being around her family, friends, and
animals.
David Carpenter
Maya Ribot
Kyle Ganson
Kelly Mogren
MA Chapter Plenary
42
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Jürgen Kalcher began his education in Germany as a social worker from 1956 to 1959,
earning the degree oI a 'JugendwohlIahrtspleger¨ (at that time the ordinary social work
education in Germany starting with a guided internship.) From April to September 1960,
he participated in the Cleveland International Program for Youth Leaders and Social
Workers. In the 1960’s Jürgen studied psychology at Hamburg University, earning the
degree oI a 'Diplom-Psychologe¨ in1966. Jürgen has been a member oI the IASWG
German Chapter since 1995.
In June 1980, Jürgen was appointed proIessor in the Hamburg 'University oI Applied
Sciences¨. His teaching and supervision in the feld oI social work have been mainly in
the feld oI social group work, residential care, human communication, methods oI social
work, social psychology, and eventually mask making.
By the recommendation of Gisela Konopka, Jürgen participated in the 1995 AASWG
Symposium held in San Diego. With a few exceptions he has participated in the IASWG
Symposia from 1995 until today. Jürgen presented at the Miami Symposium about
creative methods in social work (utilizing creativity through masks) together with a
colleague utilizing creativity through dance. In Akron, 2001, his presentation was on 'Social Group Work in Germany: An
American Import¨. In Minneapolis, 2005, he presented with his colleague, Otto Lüdemann, on 'The Hamburg Mask Making
Approach: Bridges to Group Work¨.
Jürgen Kalcher
I nternati onal Honoree
International Honoree and Beulah Rothman Plenary
Hubie Jones is currently Dean Emeritus of the Boston University School of Social
Work, and served as Professor and Dean there from 1977 to 1993. He served as Special
Assistant to the Chancellor for Urban Affairs at the University of Massachusetts Boston
from 1995 to 2003, and for eight months in 1992 he served as Acting President of
Roxbury Community College. From 1972 to 1977, he served as Associate Professor
in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology.
Hubie has played a key role in the formation, rebuilding, and leadership of at least thirty
community organizations within the black community and across the city of Boston; in
twenty of these organizations he served as Chairman of the Board or Executive Director.
Some oI his leadership roles included: Executive Director oI the Roxbury Multi-Service
Center; Board Chairman of the Massachusetts Advocacy Center; and Board President
of Roxbury Youthworks, Roxbury Community College Foundation, and the Citywide
Educational Coalition. He serves as a trustee of City Year, Inc. He is a vital member of
the social justice movement in Boston, and he has held numerous positions in academia,
served on multiple boards, and played a leadership role in the social development of the
city and its people. Since 2002, he has been President of the Boston Children’s Chorus, an organization he founded. He served
as a trustee at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute Ior ten years, and as a trustee oI the Foley Hoag Foundation Ior twenty-fve
years. For twenty years he appeared weekly as a panelist on 'Five on Five¨, a public aIIairs program on WCVB-TV.
Hubie earned his B.A. degree from the City College of New York, and his graduate degree in social work (MSW) from Boston
University School of Social Work. He has been awarded honorary doctorate degrees from Northeastern University, University
of Maryland, Lesley University, and the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology. He founded the Boston Children’s
Chorus; the twin goals of the Chorus are teaching self-esteem to children through music and the arts, and bringing diverse
children together from different neighborhoods and ethnic groups in the city and surrounding suburbs. As founder of the
Boston Children’s Chorus, he assembled a board, hired staff, raised funds, and started rehearsals in 2003 with ninety children.
He believes the Children’s Chorus is an instrument of social justice.
Hubie Jones
43
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
IN MEMORIAM
Dr. Norma C. Lang, Professor Emerita, founding member of the Association
for the Advancement of Social Work with Groups (AASWG) and the Toronto
Region Group Workers Network (TRGN), passed away June 26, 2012. She
was an illustrious group work theoretician, who constantly sought meaning and
signifcance to assist individuals to achieve their social competencies, as well as
a treasured teacher and mentor of many group work students and practitioners.
Norma was a passionate advocate for social justice. However, she carried out her
advocacy quietly, mostly through teaching, writing, and the mentoring of others.
Carol Ramey died peacefully on February 20, 2013. For many years, Carol
served as our AASWG Administrative Assistant, working alongside her husband
John in his role as General Secretary of AASWG. Carol and John worked as
a team on our membership services, at our symposia, and while editing our
newsletter. Through this dedicated work for our organization, their network
of group work friends and colleagues stretched across the globe. Music was
an important and central part of Carol’s life, and she received her Bachelor of
Music with a specialty in organ performance from Ohio State University. John
and Carol were married for 62 years, and have two children, and four grandchil-
dren. Upon hearing the sad news of Carol’s passing, IASWG member responses
Irom around the world included these sentiments: 'For many years she lent our
Association her grace, charm and competence¨ ; 'The giIt oI perseverance and
work ethic she possessed as a trained musician, she gave to our association with
her enduring hard work¨; 'She knew us each by name along with our histories,
and she brought much stability and good cheer to the organization'; 'Her love
lives in all of us.”
Norma Lang
Carol Ramey
44
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Places to eat near Simmons:
Citizen Public House and Oyster Bar
(great tavern food in a vibrant and comfortable setting)
1310 Boylston Street Boston, MA 02215 (617) 450-9000 www.citizenpub.com
Basho Japanese Brassarie
(Sushi and Japanese)
1338 Boylston Street Boston, MA 02215 (617) 262-1338 www.bashosushi.com
Sweet Cheeks
(BBQ)
1381 Boylston Street Boston, MA 02215 (617) 266-1300 www.sweetcheeksq.com
Thaitation
(Thai Cuisine)
(617) 585-9909 129 Jersey St Boston, MA 02215
Tasty Burger
(inexpensive burgers, fries, beer)
(617) 425-4444 1301 Boylston St Boston, MA
UFood Grill
(healthy fast food and smoothies)
(857) 254-0082 201 Brookline Ave Boston, MA 02215
45
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
Things to do in Boston:
Museum of Fine Arts
www.mfa.org
465 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02115
(617) 267-9300
Boston Duck Tours
a land and water tour around boston, leaving from Prudential/Copley
www.bostonducktours.com/
New England Aquarium
www.neaq.org
1 Central Wharf, Boston, MA 02110
(617) 973-5200
Kayaking on the Charles River
www.paddleboston.com
The Freedom Trail
www.thefreedomtrail.org
(617) 357-8300
99 Chauncy Street #401, Boston,
Welcome to the Freedom Trail, a 2.5-mile, brick-lined route.
Discover the rich history of the American Revolution, as it began in Boston.
Walk or bike around Faneuil Hall/Quincy Market, Boston Common & Public Gardens,
Newbury Street, North End, Beacon Hill neighborhoods.
Transportation
Public Transportation
MBTA – www.mbta.com
Taxis:
Boston Cab – 617-262-2227
Metro Cab – 617-782-5500
Bike Rental:
Hubway – hourly and daily bicycle
rentals with stations throughout Boston
www.thehubway.com
46
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
SIMMONS
SIMMONS COLLEGE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK provides a rigorous
clinical social work education for women and men. Simmons’ Master
of Social Work offers what you need to succeed as a clinical social worker:
■ Rigorous education in clinical practice
■ Distinguished faculty, actively engaged in their fields
■ Prized field placements 24 hours a week
■ Small student-to-faculty ratio promotes mentoring and learning
■ Advanced clinical specializations

Adult mental health and substance abuse

Health and aging

Children and families

Trauma and interpersonal violence
The Field Educator, an on-line Journal of the Simmons
School of Social Work
S C H O O L O F S O C I A L W O R K
B O S T O N , M A S S A C H U S E T T S
A Rigorous Education in Clinical Social Work
ssw@simmons.edu

617.521.3939

www.simmons.edu/ssw
• Bachelor of Social Work
• Master of Social Work
• Master of Social Work Urban Leadership
Certificate
• Master of Social Work/ MBA
• Interdisciplinary MSW/MPH study opportunity
with Harvard School of Public Health
• Ph.D.
PROGRAMS
47
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
BECOME A PART OF
SALEM STATE UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
and our tradition of educating social workers for careers and
leadership in public and nonprofit organizations

THE BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK (BSW) PROGRAM
prepares practitioners for entry level professional
positions in a wide range of settings

THE MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (MSW) PROGRAM
prepares advanced practitioners for work and leadership
in specific areas:
· Child and family services
· Health and mental health services
· Older adult services and end-of-life care
Learn from faculty dedicated to teaching, civic engagement and scholarship.
For details about full, part-time and advanced standing study plans
visit us at salemstate.edu/swk
Earn Your Ph.D. at FIU ÷
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TAKE YOUR CAREER IN GROUP WORK
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callusat305.348.5887 -Evenbetter,comevisitusinMiami!
· Unique
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research with
diverse people
from Latin America
and Caribbean;
· Worlds-ahead in
curriculum, quality
of faculty, and in
funded research.
48
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
INDEX OF PRESENTERS
49
A
Adhikari, Radha, 29
Agahi, Golnaz, 15
Alexander, Emily, 23
Ali, Amanda, 23
Anderson, Elizabeth Mary, 23
Asis, Dale, 34
B
Bader-Natal, Danya, 34
Bagnoli, Mayra, 13, 19
Bartolomeo, Frank, 30, 31, 39
Beck, Natalie Marie, 28
Benjamin, Jessy, 32
Beno, Mary Frances H. (Mitzi), 29
Berg, Kathryn K., 17
Bergart, Ann M., 31
Birnbaum, Martin, 18
Black, Phyllis N., 28
Bourassa, Dara Bergel, 22
Brown, Melissa Elayne, 14
C
Cameron, Mark, 13
CamirÈ, Martin, 34
Casstevens, Willa J., 14
Ciardiello, Dr. Susan, 31
Cifuentes, Mauricio Jose, 17
Clemans, Shantih, 14
Clements, Jennifer, 14, 31
Cohen, Pamela, 19
Cohen, Marcia B., 27
Cohen, Carol S., 30, 41
Collins, Virginia Anne, 25
Comer, Edna, 34
Cumberbatch, Alvaro, 18
D
DeChillo, Mary Hobbins, 20
Delboy, Santiago, 26
Deslauriers, Jean-Martin, 16
DiMartino, Dawn Marie, 31
Do, Daniel, 23
Dunn, Kerry, 18
E
Engel, Ruth S., 18
Exum, Brenda, 34
F
Farmakis, Minuette, 24
Feigelman, Beverly, 12
Feltman, Timothy Matthew, 25
Finkelstein, Martie, 35
G
Ganson, Kyle Taylor, 13, 25, 32, 42
Glick, Adam, 17, 20, 38
Godfrey Grantz, Sera, 13, 32
Goldblatt Grace, Lisa, 15
Green, Hannah Jane, 25
Grinkeviciute, Zaneta, 24
Groves, Amanda R., 26
H
Halperin, Rebecca Juliet, 12
Haydon, Brandon Robert, 26
Hessenauer, Sarah Louise, 35
Hill, Anthony C., 21
Hinestroza, Cristina, 23
Holt, Stephanie, 16
Hudson, Brittanie, 19
Hudson, Rhonda, 32
I
Itin, Christian Marcel, 22
J
Jankunaite, Dovile, 24
Johnson, Paul, 15, 20
K
Kammerman, Dara Elisabeth,21
Kanee, Marylin, 15
Kapstein, Elizabeth, 35
Kaufmann, Sasha Z., 28
Kirwan, Gloria, 14, 16, 28
Knoster, Megan Elizabeth, 23
Kury, Nadia Victoria, 23
L
Lambert, Tanesha, 29
Leach, Christopher Ryan, 28
Lee, Cheryl D., 28
Leeman, Dana Grossman, 28, 30, 33
Letendre, Joan Anne, 21
Levin, Kay Goler, 12, 19
Lightburn, Anita, 22
Liptow, Amberly, 24
Lynch, Jeremy Dylan, 25
M
Macgowan, Mark, 18, 28, 36
Martino, Jennifer, 24
Mazza, Carl, 33
McGee II, Kyle Marland, 29
McLaughlin, Donna M., 26, 27, 33
Miller, Nickia Monique, 35
Mogren, Kelly, 23, 24, 32
Molina, Olga, 19
Morgan, Sonya Jacobs, 25
Mullin, Walter J., 14
Muskat, Barbara, 27, 28, 36
N
Niendorf, Jennifer Kate, 25
O
Olcon, Katarzyna Jadwiga, 18, 29
Olivier, Claude, 32
Olson, Naomi Rush, 13
P
Paley, Edward, 12
Perez Jr., Gilberto, 21
Prichard, David, 12, 22, 33
Prinsloo, Reineth, 19
Prullage, Beth Ellen, 35
R
Ribot, Maya Maria, 24, 32
Riccio, Adam Joseph, 21
Ring, Karen Ann, 15
Rivera, Nilsa, 13
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
50
S
Sakhat, Zaza Samir, 20
Saporito, Jeanne Williams, 27
Schiller, Linda Yael, 27
Schmidt Hanbidge, Alice Jasmine, 29
Schreiber, Jennifer Kaplan, 14
Seck, Mamadou Mansor, 16
Shindler, Simone, 12
Silver, Thelma, 32
Simon, Shirley R., 17, 33
Skolnik, Sari, 31
Smith, Mark, 13, 19, 29
Sonier, Melissa Aubrey, 24
Sorensen, Scott Reed, 20
Spada, Dana, 18
Spelters, Sonia, 35
Spunt, Sarah Beth, 36
Stein, Eric S., 24
Steinberg, Dominique Moyse, 16, 30, 41
Strydom, Louie Talitha, 20
Surbeck, Betty, 21
Sweifach, Jay, 22, 28
U
Underwood, Patty, 16, 30, 40
V
Valrie, Colette, 25
Villasenor-Guevara, Samuel I., 26
Vines, Cheryl D., 27
Vitello, Nina M., 21
W
Waller, Bernadine Y., 26
Walsh, Kathleen M., 14
Weliky, Deirdre G., 16
Willie, Emily, 17
Wilson, Mary, 15
Wolkoff, Sandra Radzanower, 20
Y
Younkins, Rachel Marie, 35
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
51
Notes
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
52
Notes
XXXV Annual International Symposium ~ June 6th - 9th, 2013
CONNECTING IN CALGARY 2014!
Join us as we lift our spirits in
celebration of group work at
THE XXXVI Annual
Symposium
Of the
International Association For Social Work with Groups
When: June 2014 (exact date tbd)
Where: University of Calgary Campus
~Calgary is located near the scenic Canadian rockies,
Banff, Lake Louise, and Lake Kananaskis.
~Come and Enjoy Canada’s Natural Beauty at its best!
We’re a Team in 2014
Karen Ring
William Pelech
Co-Chairs Planning Committee
Dominique Moyse Steinberg
Dana grossman Leeman
Co-Chairs, Symposium Planning Committee
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