STUDENT BOOK

PART B

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Printed in the United States of America 10 11 12 13 14 WEB 9 8 7 6 One Hickory Centre • 1800 Valley View Lane, Suite 400 • Dallas, Texas 75234 • 1-888-399-1995

Copyright 2008 by Voyager Expanded Learning, L.P.

ISBN 978-1-4168-0955-5 208961

Table of Contents
Expedition 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Expedition 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Expedition 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Expedition 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Expedition 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Expedition 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Expedition 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Vocabulary Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220

Advanced Word Study Expedition 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E9 Expedition 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E10 Expedition 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E11 Expedition 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E12 Expedition 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E13 Expedition 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E14 Expedition 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E15

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Expedition 9, Lesson 2

Vocabulary Practice
1 Write one of the words from the box on the line below. Then draw a picture in the box that
will help you remember the word’s meaning. confine conduct accessible Word: impress enthusiasm engage

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Expedition Expedition 9, 3, Lesson Lesson 2 9

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Cause and

Effect

2. As you reread “A Guy Who Fixes Things,” watch for the signal words and phrases 2 Cause
Signal Word or Phrase

listed in the chart below. Write the cause and effect that each word or phrase links. Effect

because

Signal Word or Phrase

since

as a result

Signal Word or Phrase

Signal Word or Phrase

therefore

Signal Word or Phrase

so

consequently

Signal Word or Phrase

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Expedition 9, Lesson 2

3

You are Eddie Maldonado. You are getting ready to talk to a group of students about your life. You want them to see how certain actions in your life had certain effects on yourself and others. Look back in “A Guy Who Fixes Things.” Then complete the sentence starters below to answer this question.

Reading Response

How did certain actions and events in my life lead to other actions and events? Because I loved bikes, As a result of helping a friend in the wrong way, I But I had a good idea. I shared it with the prison warden. Consequently, I

. .

release,

I got great results from my work in prison. Therefore, after my

.

especially since

When I look back on things, I am glad they turned out this way,

.

.

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Expedition Expedition9, 7,Lesson Lesson49

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Vocabulary Practice
1
Answer each question about the Children’s Holocaust Memorial. humanity endure inspire ambitious contents
AP Images

dedicate

A. Why was the plan for this memorial especially ambitious? B. How does the project affect your ideas about humanity? C. Why did the students dedicate the railcar to the Holocaust victims? D. Why are the contents of the railcar important? E. How do you think the memorial inspires visitors?

F. How does the memorial help visitors think about what the victims of the Holocaust had to endure?

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Expedition 9, Lesson 4

Cause and
Project, write them in the boxes below.

Effect

2. Read “The Paper Clip Project.” As you discover the cause and the effects of the Paper Clip 2 Cause

Paper Clip Project

Effect (paragraph 2)

Effect (paragraph 3)

Effect (paragraph 4)

Effect (paragraph 6)

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Expedition 6, 9, Lesson 4

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You are a student at Whitwell Middle School. You have been invited to visit the middle school in the next town. They would like you to tell them how the Paper Clip Project got started and what happened as a result of it. Look back in the article and at the diagram on Student Book page 117. Then answer the question below. What caused the Paper Clip Project, and what were some effects of it?

Reading Response

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Expedition 9, Lesson 7

Vocabulary Practice
1 Hollywood filmmakers are turning the story of the Unknown Rebel into a movie. They will
major assume tolerate suspense incredible individual call it Showdown. Complete the advertisement for the movie on the lines below. Use at least four of the vocabulary words from the box in your advertisement.

SHOWDOWN
is coming soon to a theater near you!

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Jeff Widener/AP Images

Expedition 6, 9, Lesson 7

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Cause and
box. Then list the chain of effects that follow it.

Effect

2. As you reread “Showdown in Tiananmen Square,” look for the cause listed in the top 2 Cause (paragraph 1)

China is divided by a powerful clash of ideas. Effect (paragraph 2) Effect (paragraph 2) Effect (paragraph 3) Effect (paragraph 5) Effect (paragraph 6) Effect (paragraph 7)

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Expedition 9, Lesson 7

3

You are a newspaper reporter. You are planning to write a story about the Unknown Rebel. You want to describe the chain of events that led to the famous moment shown in the photograph. Look back in the article and at the diagram on Student Book page 120. Then answer the question below. Use at least three of the signal words and phrases from the box below in your response. because due to since therefore so as a result

Reading Response

What chain of events led to the Unknown Rebel’s moment of courage?

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Expedition 6, 9, Lesson 7 8

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Cause and

Effect

Reread “Rock ’n’ Roll to the Rescue.” Fill in a cause and the chain of effects that follow it. Cause (paragraph 1)

Effect (paragraph 2) Effect (paragraph 3) Effect (paragraph 4) Effect (paragraph 5) Effect (paragraph 6) Effect (paragraph 7)

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Expedition 9, Lesson 9

Comprehension Assessment
allowed to write in the test booklet. If you are, you can underline or mark important ideas such as causes and effects. You can also mark key words and phrases, and you can make notes in the margins that summarize each paragraph or section. Markings and notes such as these will help you recall what you read and find answers quickly.

Make Notes as You Read: Before you begin a test, find out whether you are

Multiple Choice
1. What is this article mainly about? A a famous fashion designer B a girl who helps needy children C a glove that translates sign language D teens who think big Read “Teens Who Dream Big” to answer questions 1–5. Fill in the bubble next to the best answer or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 4. For what event did Ryan Patterson invent the Handy Glove? A a New York fashion show B a science fair C a Nobel Prize contest D an art show

3. Besides painting, what else does Akiane Kramarik do? A writes poems B sings songs C studies science D designs buildings

2. What was one effect of Esteban Cortazar’s interest in costumes? A His mother was a jazz singer. B His father was an artist. C He became a successful designer. D A fashion shop opened near his home.

5. Which is a cause-and-effect signal word in this sentence? Because he wanted his project to be meaningful, he tried to think of an invention that would make life better. A Because B project C would D better

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Expedition 9, Lesson 9

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Short Response
Read “Teens Who Dream Big” to answer questions 6–10. Write your answers on the lines or on a separate sheet of paper. 6. How did Esteban’s home life help him become a fashion designer? Use a cause-and-effect signal word or phrase in your answer. Underline the word or phrase.

7. Esteban designed and entered a collection of clothes in a school talent show. What were two results of this? Result 1: Result 2:

8. Akiane Kramarik was born with artistic talent. What are two other things that led to her success? 1: 2:

9. What are two ways Akiane is using her talent to help other people? 1: 2:

10. How does the Handy Glove work? Fill in the effects below. Effect 1: Effect 2: Effect 3: Cause: Sensors are wired into the fingers of the glove.

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Expedition 9, Lesson 9

Extended Response
Read the section titled Ryan Patterson: Inventor to complete question 11. Look back in the section for information. Write your answers in the diagram or on a separate sheet of paper. Cause (paragraph 6) . Effect (paragraph 6) Effect (paragraph 7) Effect (paragraph 8)

11. Complete the cause. Then list effects that follow it.

Ryan Patterson remembers seeing

Ryan works right up to the deadline to finish the project.

Ryan enters the glove in national contests. Effect (paragraph 8) Effect (paragraph 8) Effect (paragraph 8)

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Expedition 9, Lesson 9

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Vocabulary Assessment
For questions 12–26, read each sentence. Fill in the bubble next to the correct meaning for the underlined word or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 12. The students wondered if their paper clip goal was too ambitious. What does the word ambitious mean? A far in the future B hard to do or achieve C silly or useless D likely to cause sadness 16. Because of the great music and Geldof’s constant pleas, the event raised millions of dollars. What does the word constant mean? A always happening B full of feeling C with great force D calm and quiet

13. The government would no longer tolerate the students’ protests. What does the word tolerate mean? A forbid B make way for C encourage D put up with 14. The warden gave Eddie permission to conduct his workshop. What does the word conduct mean? A to open B to carry out C to clean up D to sell

17. The airport workers checked the contents of our luggage. What does the word contents mean? A total weight B size C things held inside D shape 18. They read about this terrible time in the history of humanity. What does the word humanity mean? A the group made up of all people
B wearing paper clips C caring about others D all people who help others

15. Being confined gave him time to think about what he wanted to do. What does the word confine mean? A to cause to be late B to be new to something C to make famous D to keep in one place

19. The prisoners endured starvation. What does the word endure mean? A to refuse to do something unpleasant B to learn to get used to something C to pretend something D to go through something because you have to

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Expedition 9, Lesson 9 24. The university students planned a major protest. What does the word major mean? A small and quiet B involving weapons C big or important D held outdoors

21. He was impressed by Eddie’s idea. What does the word impress mean? A to excite B to be made upset C to entertain D to cause to admire

20. He liked Eddie’s enthusiasm for helping teens. What does the word enthusiasm mean? A talent B eagerness C knowledge D fear

22. The Unknown Rebel is a powerful symbol of what one individual can do. What does the word individual mean? A nation B decision C person D photograph

25. The concert would also include shows from remote locations. What does the word remote mean? A television B unusual C far away D beautiful 26. The crowds watched in suspense. What does the word suspense mean? A a state of nervous waiting B a state of panic C a state of rest and relaxation D a state of joy

23. Geldof knew he had to maintain people’s interest in the cause. What does the word maintain mean? A to stir up B to keep something going C to order or arrange D to stop something from happening

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Expedition 10, Lesson 2

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Read each word in the box. Then answer the questions below. In your answers, do not use the vocabulary words that appear in the questions. involve development cumbersome capable display essential

Vocabulary Practice

A. You are a scientist who is working to invent a new machine. What will this machine make the user capable of? B. What information will the machine display? C. How will you make sure that the machine is not cumbersome? D. In what situation might your machine be essential? E. What steps will be involved in using the machine? F. A large corporation gives you $5 million to use in your work. How will this gift affect the development of the machine?

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Expedition 10, Lesson 2

2 What things are essential for your health and happiness? Write some of these things in the
blank circles below.

essential

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Expedition 10, Lesson 2

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Problem/Solution
2. Complete this chart as you reread “MP3 Players: They’re Breaking All the Records.” 3

Problem

Solution

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Expedition 10, Lesson 2

4 You are a historian. You are working on a book about the history of music
What were some problems with the record player? How did the MP3 player solve these problems?

Reading Response

technology. Look back in the article and at the chart on Student Book page 130. Then complete the sentence starters below to answer these questions:

One of the main problems with the record player was .

The MP3 player solved this problem. It

Another important problem with the record player was

.

The MP3 player solved this problem, too. It

.

A third problem with records was that

.

The MP3 player solved this problem by

.

.

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Expedition 6, Lesson 7 Expedition 10, 4

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Read the words in the box. Then complete each item below. Do not use the boldfaced vocabulary word in your response. lapse compose conceal technological notify assignment

Vocabulary Practice

A. I told Mom that without a cell phone, I felt like a technological nerd. “But honey,” she said, “you

B. “What if I need to notify you of something important?” I asked. “You are doing a pretty good job of

.”

C. “But what if I have a memory lapse and forget an assignment?” I tried. will be She said, “I guess you will have to tell the teacher that your

right now—without a cell phone,” she replied.

D. I tried to conceal my sad feelings. “There’s no need to E. “I would compose a message to my friends, but I’m phoneless,” I said. “Too bad,” said Mom. “Why not them a said Mom. “Maybe your friends can help.”

,”

.”

?”

Sean Justice/Getty

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Expedition 10, Lesson 4

Problem/Solution
2. As you reread “Using High Tech to Connect,” look for a main problem and solution. List 2 Problem them in the diagram. Then look for other problems that are caused by that solution, and list them in the diagram.

Solution(s)

New Problem

New Problem

New Problem

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Expedition 10, Lesson 4

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You are a scientist who studies the effects of technology on people. Currently, you are studying how cell phones have affected families and schools. Look back in “Using High Tech to Connect.” Then use the paragraph frame below to answer these questions: What problem did cell phones solve? What new problems have cell phones created?

Reading Response

Cell phones have solved the problem of . However, this new technology has created some new problems.

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Expedition 10, Lesson 7

Vocabulary Practice
monitor investigate identity assist microscopic typical Find the word in the box that BEST answers each question below. B. Which word goes with “germ”? A. Which word goes with “name”?

1

2 Write words and ideas related to the word investigate in the web.

C. Which word goes with “helping the teacher”?

investigate

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Expedition 10, Lesson 7

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Problem/Solution
2. As you reread “Tech Tools for Fighting Crime,” look for a main problem and several 3 Effect different solutions. Write these in the diagram. Then think of possible effects of these solutions, and write them in the diagram. Solution

Effect Problem Solution

Effect

Effect

Solution

Effect

Effect

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Expedition 10, Lesson 7

4 You are the mayor of a small town where crime is on the rise. You are working

Reading Response

with members of the city council to put a stop to it. You have studied how people in other towns are fighting crime. Write a memo to your city council members. Use information from “Tech Tools for Fighting Crime” and the graphic organizer you completed on Student Book page 136 to answer these questions:

How are cities, businesses, and schools working to solve the problem of crime? What are some possible effects of these solutions?

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Expedition 10, Lesson 8

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Problem/Solution
2. 1 Reread “Are Video Games Harmless?” Then write one problem video games may cause in the top box. Think of some solutions to the problem. What are some possible effects of each solution? Write the solutions and effects in the diagram. Then answer the questions below. Problem

Solution 1

Solution 2

• • •

Possible Effects

• • •

Possible Effects

2. Which solution seems best? Why? ________________________________________________ 2 ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Expedition 10, Lesson 9

Comprehension Assessment
you may notice right away that one or two answers are wrong. Cross out these answers right away. Then, focus on the remaining choices. Decide which sounds most reasonable. Then look back at the text to see whether your thinking is correct.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices: When you read a multiple choice question,

Multiple Choice
Read “The Sound of Music” to answer questions 1–5. Fill in the bubble next to the best answer or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 1. How did many people enjoy music 150 years ago? A They used MP3 players. B They used record players. C They used a piano. D They used the Internet. 4. Which technology first made it easy for many people to listen to recorded music in their own homes? A the piano B the computer C the jukebox D the record player 5. When was the CD introduced? A 1979 B 1983 C 1989 D 1998

3. Read these sentences from the article: (1) Those who could afford the machines still had a problem. (2) Early phonographs were expensive. (3) They were not easy to operate. (4) Maybe there was a way to create a machine for public places. Which sentence names a possible solution to a problem? A 1 B 2 C 3 D 4
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2. What was one reason Thomas Edison wanted to record the human voice? A so people could record phone messages B so people could record stories C so people could record music D so people could record nursery rhymes

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Expedition 10, Lesson 9

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Short Response
Read “The Sound of Music” to answer questions 6–10. Write your answers on the lines or on a separate sheet of paper. 6. Why did Edison think it would be useful to record business deals?

7. How did the first phonograph work?

8. What were two effects of the invention of the record player? Effect 1: Many people stopped Effect 2: The was born.

.

9. How might Effect 1 in question 8 create a new problem?

10. How have computers affected the music business? Name two ways. 1: 2:

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Expedition 10, Lesson 9

Extended Response
Read “The Sound of Music” to complete question 11. Look back in each section for information. Write your answers in the diagram or on a separate sheet of paper. 11. What problem and solution does each section describe? Mary Had a Little Lamb (paragraphs 2 and 3)

Problem

Solution
Making Music Available for All (paragraphs 4 and 5)

Problem

Solution
Homemade Music (paragraphs 6 and 7)

Problem

Solution

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Expedition 10, Lesson 9

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Vocabulary Assessment
For questions 12–26, read each sentence. Fill in the bubble next to the correct meaning for the underlined word or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 12. The cameras assist school staff in keeping students and staff safe. What does the word assist mean? A to make certain B to entertain C to keep from D to help

14. They compose text messages to friends. What does the word compose mean? A to listen to B to send C to write D to receive

13. A portable MP3 is capable of storing a lot of tunes. What does the word capable mean? A enjoying something B able to do something C used to do something D not able to do something

15. The development of these pocket-sized devices has changed the way we collect music. What does the word development mean? A the process of buying and selling something B the process of making or improving something C the process of learning how to use something D the process of storing and caring for something

18. Video games expose kids to adult subjects. What does the word expose mean? A to warn someone against something B to trick someone into doing something C to make someone aware of something D to urge someone to do something 19. This type of badge is used to check a person’s identity. What does the word identity mean? A where someone works B when someone was born C who someone is D what someone is doing

17. An MP3 player will even display information about the songs as you’re listening to them. What does the word display mean? A to tell B to print C to record D to show

16. Talking on a cell phone while driving can cause drivers to have a lapse in concentration. What does the word lapse mean? A a momentary slip B a sudden thought C a dangerous error D a serious problem

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23. A large record player and a stack of records were cumbersome. What does the word cumbersome mean? A made of vinyl B varied in style C old-fashioned D awkward to carry

22. School officials can use them as a way to notify students of school information. What does the word notify mean? A to let someone know B to collect C to post for people to see D to understand

21. The cameras are used to monitor people’s activities. What does the word monitor mean? A to change B to watch C to organize D to study

20. Some games are for mature players, not for kids. What does the word mature mean? A adult B wealthy C creative D smart

Date

Expedition 10, Lesson 9 24. They use technology to solve a technological problem. What does the word technological mean? A related to computers B going beyond reason or logic C used by a person who repairs things D related to tools made by humans 25. A typical ID badge is about the size of a playing card. What does the word typical mean? A high tech B like most others C attractive D able to be worn

26. Video games are beginning to resemble films. What does the word resemble mean? A to earn more than B to be based on C to look like D to take the place of

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Expedition 11, Expedition 7,Lesson Lesson29

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Vocabulary Practice
11. You are a judge in a break-dance contest. You have just watched the first contestant. Record
your thoughts about the performance in the chart below. thrilling activity resemble alter

Was the performance thrilling? Why or why not?

Describe a move that seemed to resemble some other object or action.

What do you think the dancer should alter about his or her performance?

To improve his or her skills, what activity do you recommend for this dancer?

Getty

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Expedition 11, Lesson 2

Cause and
2

Effect

As you reread “In a Spin: B-boying and B-girling,” look for the cause listed in the top box. Then list in order the chain of effects that follow it. Some of the effects are provided. Cause Gang leaders in New York City have dance contests. The leader who can do moves that the other leader can’t match wins the contest. Effect (paragraph 2) Effect (paragraph 3)

B-boys improve their style and invent new moves. Effect (paragraph 3) Effect (paragraph 4) Effect (paragraph 5) Effect (paragraph 5) Effect (paragraph 7)

People outside the b-boy culture begin to notice this exciting style of dance.

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Expedition 11, Expedition 7,Lesson Lesson29

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Yesterday, you and a group of friends were talking about b-boying. You were all wondering how and when it started. Look back in the article and at the diagram on Student Book page 145. Then answer the question below. Use at least three cause-and-effect signal words and phrases from the box in your response. because due to since therefore so as a result

Reading Response

What chain of events led to the popularity of b-boying and b-girling today?

consequently

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Expedition 11, Lesson 4

Vocabulary Practice
11. Read each pair of sentences. The first sentence is how the sentence appears in “Dancesport:
Get in Step!” The second is how the author could have written it. On the lines below each pair, explain whether you think the author chose the right word and why. advice fabulous promote assume

A. IS: This form of dance is a fabulous way to get fit and stay fit.

COULD HAVE BEEN: This form of dance is a great way to get fit and stay fit.

B. IS: Some people assume that ballroom dancing is old-fashioned and boring.

COULD HAVE BEEN: Some people think that ballroom dancing is old-fashioned and boring.

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Kerry Hayes/New Line Productions/Bureau L.A. Collection/Corbis

Expedition 11, Expedition 7,Lesson Lesson49

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Persuasive Writing
2
Complete this chart as you reread “Dancesport: Get in Step!” Write the author’s opinion statement in the top box. Then list the supporting reasons she gives. Consider each reason. If it is a fact—if it can be proven—place a check mark under F. If it is an opinion, a belief that cannot be absolutely proven, place a check mark under O.

Opinion Statement

Supporting Reasons Paragraph 2

F

O

Paragraph 3

Paragraph 4

3

• •

What two different opinions does the author state, and then argue against, in paragraph 4?

4

How does the author conclude the article?

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Expedition 11, Lesson 4

5

You own a ballroom dance studio. You are starting a new class for teen dancers. You want to place an ad for the class on the bulletin board in the local community center. Look back in the article and at the graphic organizer on Student Book page 148. Then, in the space below, create an advertisement in response to this question: Why should young people take ballroom dance lessons?

Reading Response

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Expedition 6, Lesson 4 Expedition 11, 7

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Vocabulary Practice
devote essential detail maintain aware major

1 Read each word pair in the first column. Then decide how they relate to each other. Do
Word Pair Same? Opposite? Go Together? Unrelated?

they mean the same thing? Do they mean the opposite? Do they go together? Or, are they unrelated? Place a check mark in the proper column. devote/give

major/minor maintain/ envelope

essential/food

2 Now write two word pairs of your own, one including the word aware and the other
Word Pair Same? Opposite? Go Together?

including the word detail. Then exchange charts with a partner and add check marks where they belong. aware/ detail/ Unrelated?

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Expedition 11, Lesson 7

Sequential Order
3 Read each set of sentences from “How to Fight Without Really Fighting.” Fill in the
Some Basics of Stunt Fighting The correct signal words. Then, for each section, number the sentences 1, 2, and so on to show the order of events. , put pads on your elbows and knees.

Putting It All Together video camera.

thing you need to do is warm up.

you will act out the fights while someone records them on a

, you will practice all the moves in each fight scene.

, the trainer will show you and another actor a set of drawings of the scenes in the movie called storyboards. , the trainer will play back the tape.

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Expedition 6, Lesson 7 Expedition 11,

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4 You are a stunt-fight trainer. You are writing a handbook for stunt actors to use to
help them remember the steps in the process of performing a fake fight scene. Look back in the section of the article titled Putting It All Together and at the activity on Student Book page 151. Use the information you find to write an answer to this question: How do you perform a stunt-fight scene?

Reading Response

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Expedition 11, Lesson 8

Compare and

Contrast

Complete this chart as you reread “The Steelers vs. Swan Lake.” •

In the first column, write sentences in which football and ballet are compared or contrasted. Underline the signal word or phrase in the sentence.

Place a check mark in the S or D column to show whether the sentence describes a similarity or a difference.

Both jobs demand a lot from the human body.

Sentences that Compare or Contrast

Football vs. Ballet

S

D

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Comprehension Assessment
Use Clues to Figure Out the Answer: Sometimes answers are not in plain view. You might look back to the text to find an answer and still come up emptyhanded. If this happens, look for clues in the text. Look for information that is related to, but not exactly what you need. Then add these ideas to what you already know. Use your head to think of the answer. Multiple Choice
1. Four-year-old Savion Glover was very skilled at playing drums. What happened as a result of this? A He loved rhythm from the start. B He began to take drum lessons. C He received a scholarship. D He discovered tap dancing. Read “Tapmaster” to answer questions 1–5. Fill in the bubble next to the best answer or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 4. What is Glover’s style of tap dancing called? A step-flap-step B hitting C NYOT D footnotes

2. Which statement is true? A Students who want to learn rhythm tap must take drum lessons first. B Rhythm tap was invented by Savion Glover. C The old tap step-flap-step style of tap dancing is based on rhythm tap. D Rhythm tap uses all parts of the foot to make sounds.

5. In the following sentence, which is a cause-and-effect signal word? Glover became famous because he’s an original. A became B famous C because
D original

3. Why did Glover study the basic moves of older experts? A so that he could begin creating moves of his own B so that he could begin giving lessons to younger dancers C so that he could get roles in musicals and movies D so that he could win a Tony Award for choreography

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Short Response
Read “Tapmaster” to answer questions 6–10. Write your answers on the lines or on a separate sheet of paper. 6. What problem did Savion Glover face when he began taking tap lessons? How did he solve this problem? Problem: Solution:

7. When and how did Savion Glover’s dance career begin?

8. Place the following events in sequential order. Number them 1–4. Glover creates his own dance company. Glover stars in Bring In ’Da Noise, Bring In ’Da Funk.

9. The author of “Tapmaster” wants to persuade young readers that tap dancing is .

Glover stars in Spike Lee’s film Bamboozled.

Glover creates his first choreography.

10. Find a signal word or phrase in the article. Write the sentence that contains it. Then write the signal word or phrase. Finally, tell what kind of signal word it is—sequential order, compare-and-contrast, or cause-and-effect. Sentence:

Kind of signal word:

Signal word or phrase:

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Extended Response
11. What cause-and-effect chain does “Tapmaster” describe? Write the effects in order. Some effects are provided. Savion Glover loved rhythm from the start. Effect (paragraph 2) Cause Read “Tapmaster” to complete question 11. Look back in the article for information. Write your answers in the diagram or on a separate sheet of paper.

He began to dance with his own style, which was old and yet new in some ways. Effect (paragraph 3)

Effect (paragraph 3)

Audiences couldn’t get enough of Glover’s dancing. Effect (paragraph 5)

Effect (paragraph 5)

Effect (paragraph 6)

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Expedition 11, Lesson 9

Vocabulary Assessment
For questions 12–26, read each sentence. Fill in the bubble next to the correct meaning for the underlined word or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 12. If you’re a teen and haven’t yet discovered ballroom, take our advice. What does the word advice mean? A an idea put forward about what someone else should do B an idea that one person tells another person in secret C an idea expressed through dance movements D an idea that comes from someone who is older 15. Ballroom dancing promotes trust and respect for others. What does the word promote mean? A to cause problems with something B to make an impression on someone C to help something take place D to go against something

14. Some people assume that ballroom dancing is old-fashioned and boring. What does the word assume mean? A to believe, often very firmly B to express an opinion loudly C to guess, sometimes wrongly D to look at rudely

13. Break-dancers altered some of the basic moves by adding their own special flavor to them. What does the word alter mean? A to prepare B to change C to perform D to create

17. That’s because someone has planned every detail of the fight. What does the word detail mean? A a moment

16. What can you conclude, then, about professional football players and ballet dancers? What does the word conclude mean? A to compare and contrast two things B to learn from experts C to use facts to decide something D to get an idea

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18. He will train himself to endure blow after blow. What does the word endure mean? A to go through something to prove that you can B to go through something because you have to C to go through something because it is enjoyable D to go through something because others are also doing it

B a small part of something larger C a movement D a difficult skill that must be learned

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21. A hurt player will often ignore pain during a game. What does the word ignore mean? A to treat B to focus on for too long C to cause D to pay no attention to

20. This form of dance is a fabulous way to get fit and stay fit. What does the word fabulous mean? A mostly unknown B very popular C happening quickly D very good

19. From silent movies to today’s blockbusters, fighting has been an essential part of the action. What does the word essential mean? A very important B crowd-pleasing C causing disagreement D not happening often

23. You are on your way to becoming a major star! What does the word major mean? A new B one of only a few C wealthy D big; important

25. They added moves that resembled those in kung fu movies. What does the word resemble mean? A to be based on B to look like C to be better than D to come after 26. His moves are thrilling to watch. What does the word thrilling mean? A very boring B frightening C very exciting D unusual

24. You are going to devote 3 months to learning how to fight. What does the word devote mean? A to avoid taking part in something B to make something more important C to give your time to something D to gain approval for something

22. You will need to practice this many times to maintain control over where your punch lands. What does the word maintain mean? A to keep something going B to let go of C to learn to do without thinking D to understand

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Expedition 12, Lesson 2

Vocabulary Practice
1
Read each sentence below. Which vocabulary word would help make the sentence more suspenseful than the underlined word or words? Write a word from the box on the line. Finally, in item F, write a short explanation for the droning sound. hideous droning grating gnashing eerie carcass

A. I heard a low noise behind Grandma’s basement door. B. I nudged open the door, pressing together my teeth all the while. C. I crept down the stairs into the scary darkness. D. Was that an ugly monster crouching in the corner? E. Suddenly, it became as still and quiet as a dead body. F. Then I realized:

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Expedition 12, Expedition 7, Lesson Lesson 2 9

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2

As you reread “The Bloody Fangs,” complete the chart below. The first column lists vague, or unclear, details the authors might have used. For each example, find the concrete details that the authors actually used. Write them in the second column. Locate an additional concrete detail in the story. Write the corresponding vague detail and paragraph number in the first column. Have a partner read the story to fill in a concrete detail in the second column. “The Bloody Fangs” Cats are doing things. (paragraph 4) Vague Detail

Concrete Details

Concrete Detail

He could hear sounds in the temple. (paragraph 11) Something moved across the temple floor. (paragraph 27) The temple was a mess. (paragraph 35)

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Expedition 12, Lesson 2

3

You are an illustrator. You are interested in illustrating “The Bloody Fangs.” Look back in the story and at the chart on Student Book page 160. In a letter to the authors, answer the question below, explaining why you would like to illustrate the story. Tell them which details already seem to leap from the page—and which vague details you could help bring to life. Why would you like to illustrate “The Bloody Fangs”? Dear Authors: “The Bloody Fangs.” I would like to do this for a couple of reasons. easy and fun to illustrate. For example, you describe First, the story contains many concrete details that would be I am very interested in drawing pictures to go with your story

Reading Response

in this way:

I can already picture this scene perfectly in my mind. you say that

.

Second, there are a few vague details in the story. For example,

I would like to help bring this detail to life by Please let me know whether you would like to see some sample Sincerely,

. .

drawings.

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Vocabulary Practice
1
Each underlined word in the sentence pairs below has more than one meaning. Read the sentences and the meanings. Then write the letter of the correct meaning on the line next to each sentence. annoying obsessed heave furiously frantically lurch

A.

The runner’s chest heaved as he tried to catch his breath after the sprint. b. pushed, pulled, or lifted a. rose and fell in a rhythmic way

The players heaved the coach onto their shoulders to celebrate the victory.

B.

The dog chewed furiously on the bone. b. with great energy, effort, or speed a. with extreme anger

My sister yelled at me furiously when she saw me wearing her sweater.

C.

The bus’s sudden turn caused the passengers to lurch to the left. b. to lean suddenly to one side a. to move in a jerky, swaying fashion

In a dream, I saw a monster lurch after my little brother.

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Expedition 12, Lesson 4

Sensory Details
2
As you reread “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” complete the chart below by identifying sensory details. Locate an additional detail in the story. In the last row, record the paragraph number, the type of detail, and the detail. Sensory Details in “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” Paragraph 3 5 7 8 11 12 Sense seeing feeling seeing hearing seeing hearing Detail

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3

You are Ichabod Crane. As you ride in fear through the darkness, you wish you could record these strange events in your journal. If you could, you would describe everything in great detail so that you could avoid making the same mistakes again. Look back in the story and at the chart on Student Book page 163. Then write your answer to the question below. What did you see, hear, and feel on your ride home from the Van Tassels’ party? As I rode along the dark road, I first saw It made me feel Then I heard was only

Reading Response

.

I reminded myself it was just

. I told myself it

. . . .

.

Suddenly, I noticed something terrifying. It was

feeling I experienced was

Without a doubt, though, the most frightening sight, sound, or

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Expedition 12, Lesson 7

Vocabulary Practice
1 Choose the word in the box that belongs in each group of synonyms below. Write it on the
line. Then write the weakest and strongest synonym in the group. indigo rank lurk loll contemplate

A. wait, loiter, Weakest: B. violet, blue, Weakest: C. smelly, stinky, putrid, Weakest: D. recline, lounge, lie, Weakest: E. ponder, consider, watch, Weakest: Strongest: Strongest: Strongest: Strongest: Strongest:

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Strong Words Contrast
2
For each highlighted word in “The Wendigo,” think of a weaker synonym. Write it on the line. Then read your new poem aloud to a partner. “The Wendigo” by Ogden Nash The Wendigo, The Wendigo!

And scummy, Slimy, Leathery!

Its tentacles are slithery,

Its voice is hoarse and bellowish!

Its blood is rank and yellowish!

Its eyes are ice and indigo!

3. 4.

2.

1.

Sucky,

Rubbery!

and smacky,

Its lips are hungry blubbery,

5.

Tonight, on your veranada! You loll,

I saw it just a friend ago!

Last night it lurked in Canada;

The Wendigo!

The Wendigo,

It contemplates, It lollops.

It contemplates you stomachwise.

As you are lolling hammockwise

6. 8.

7.

The rest is merely gulps and gollops.

9.

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Expedition 12, Lesson 7

3

Last night, you spent the night with a friend. After he or she fell asleep, you happened to see something awful. Was it a small critter crawling into your friend’s ear? Or, was it a monster attacking your friend? Look back in either “Whatif” or “The Wendigo” for ideas. Then describe what you saw, using as many strong words of your own as possible. When you are finished, circle the five strongest words you have used. What did you see last night?

Reading Response

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Expedition 12, Expedition 7, Lesson Lesson 8 9

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Elements of Descriptive Writing
As you reread “How It Happened,” look for examples of concrete details, sensory details, and strong words. List two examples of each below. A. Concrete Details Example 1 (Paragraph Example 2 (Paragraph ): ):

B. Sensory Details

Example 1 (Paragraph

): ):

Example 2 (Paragraph

C. Strong Words

Example 2 (Paragraph

Example 1 (Paragraph

): ):

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Expedition 12, Lesson 9

Comprehension Assessment
Cross Out Obvious Wrong Answer Choices: When you read a multiple choice
question, read each answer choice and decide if it is right or wrong. If you know it is wrong, cross it out, then go on to the next choice. If you think it may be right, leave it alone and go on to the next choice. When you have read them all, look at the ones that aren’t crossed out. Decide which one seems most correct.

Multiple Choice
1. Where is Polli going when she gets lost? to visit friends in the country to the car repair shop to pick up her dog to an important meeting Read “Dog Days” to answer questions 1–5. Fill in the bubble next to the best answer or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 4. Which of the following is a sensory detail? Polli itched in her prim suit. “She was speeding Mama,” said the girl. At last they reached an old farmhouse. “Your dog wrecked my car,” said Polli. 5. In the following sentence, which underlined word is the strongest? Polli Hartaway drove along the dirt road, glancing back now and then at the long trail of dust billowing behind her red sports car. drove glancing billowing red

3. How does Granny’s tonic make Polli feel? thirsty sleepy angry sorry

2. What is Polli doing when she hits the dog? thinking about her childhood looking at the road talking to her boss on the phone listening to the radio

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Short Response
Read “Dog Days” to answer questions 6–10. Write your answers on the lines or on a separate sheet of paper. 6. Suspense is a growing feeling of anxiety or fear. Listed below is one detail the author uses to build suspense. List two more. Detail that builds suspense: She was driving way too fast for this stretch of country road, but Polli was lost.

Detail that builds suspense:

Detail that builds suspense: 7. Polli feels angry after she runs into the girl’s dog. List two details from the story that help show that Polli is angry. Detail 1:

Detail 2: 8. Why can’t Polli call for someone to pull her car out of the ditch? 9. What effect does Granny’s tonic have on Polli? How does Polli feel about this? Effect: Polli’s feelings about what happened: 10. A. How did Polli get lost in the first place? B. Based on your answer above, what lesson might readers learn from this “scary story”?

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Extended Response
11. What descriptive details help bring this story to life? Write one in each oval below. Include both concrete details and sensory details. In each detail you list, underline the word you think is the strongest. Read “Dog Days” to complete question 11. Look back in the story for information. Write your answers in the diagram or on a separate sheet of paper.

Descriptive Details in “Dog Days”

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Vocabulary Assessment
For questions 12–26, read each sentence. Fill in the bubble next to the correct meaning for the underlined word or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 12. It’s kind of annoying having a name like a food. What does the word annoying mean? A interesting to talk to B popular C causing a little bit of anger D different 16. But from the time I got out at the little country station everything is extraordinarily clear. What does the word extraordinarily mean? A in an upsetting way B in a very unusual way C in an ordinary way D in a very comforting way

13. Scarier still was the monstrous carcass lying against the far wall. What does the word carcass mean? A a scary creature B a weapon C a dead body D a coffin

14. It contemplates you stomachwise. What does the word contemplate mean? A to eat B to look at and think about C to spin D to reach out toward 15. An eerie silence fell over the temple. What does the word eerie mean? A strange and frightening B going on and on C calm and soothing D inside the ear

17. He frantically rained a shower of kicks and blows upon Gunpowder. What does the word frantically mean? A with great strength B with a growing sense of doom C in spite of harsh conditions D in a quick but disorganized way 18. He pushed furiously against Moose’s arm. What does the word furiously mean? A over a long period of time B with great energy, effort, or speed C gladly D with very little interest or care

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Expedition 12, Lesson 9 23. Alex lurched to his feet. What does the word lurch mean? A to move in a jerky, swaying fashion B to make a deep, growling sound C to wave your arms in front of you D to move with smooth, graceful steps 24. Last night it lurked in Canada. What does the word lurk mean? A to wait in a threatening way B to sleep C to wander from here to there D to attack

21. I remember so well walking down the platform and looking at the illuminated clock that told me that it was half-past eleven. What does the word illuminated mean? A familiar B lit up C high D made of tin 22. Its eyes are ice and indigo! What does the word indigo mean? A rolling around wildly B a bright, sparkly green C opening and shutting D a dark, purplish blue

20. His brothers wanted him to draw goblins with hideous eyes and great sharp fangs. What does the word hideous mean? A too large B covered by a thin veil C very ugly or hard to look at D having several different colors

19. The whole temple was awash with shrieks and howls, the gnashing of teeth, and the slashing of claws. What does the word gnashing mean? A the act of grinding together B the act of ripping out C the act of whistling D the act of tapping together

26. Its blood is rank and yellowish! What does the word rank mean? A boiling B slimy-feeling C thick D foul-smelling

25. It just merges into all my other visits to London. What does the word merge mean? A to disappear B to seem very different from C to blend or combine D to stand out from

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Vocabulary Practice
11. Read the words in the box. Then complete the graphic organizer.
psyche disfiguring simplicity complexity digit solemnly

digit

Meaning 1

Meaning 2

Similarities?

Circle the examples. Cross out the non-examples. • 14 • your phone number •3 • one thousand • eleven o’clock •8

Circle the examples. Cross out the non-examples. • your arm • your pinkie • your knee • your big toe • your hand • your thumb

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Expedition 13, Lesson 2

Elements of Description: Literal and Figurative Language
1. Read each of the sentences below from “Eleven.” Tell whether the underlined description is 2 A. Only today I wish I didn’t have only eleven years rattling inside me like pennies in a tin Band-Aid box. Literal or figurative? If figurative, what things are being compared? literal or figurative. If it is figurative, tell what things are being compared.

B. It’s an ugly sweater with red plastic buttons and a collar and sleeves all stretched out like you could use it for a jump rope. Literal or figurative? If figurative, what things are being compared?

C. An ugly sweater like that, all raggedy and old . . . Literal or figurative? If figurative, what things are being compared?

D. But when the sick feeling goes away and I open my eyes, the red sweater’s still sitting there like a big red mountain. Literal or figurative? If figurative, what things are being compared?

3

Example 1:

Find two more examples of figurative language in the story.

4 What do you think the red sweater in the story is a symbol of? Write as many possibilities as
you can think of.

Example 2:

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5

You are writing a book about birthdays. To gather information, you interview people of different ages. You ask them to explain what it was like for them to turn that age. Look back in “On Turning Ten” and “Eleven.” Then write the answers you think the main characters would give to the questions below if they were interviewed: What is it like to turn 10? What is it like to turn 11?

Reading Response

The Speaker in “On Turning Ten” Turning 10 is like

Rachel in “Eleven” Turning 11 is like

.

.

In the past, my life was full of For example,

. coatroom. For example, they both

It reminds me of the old red sweater in the

. Now my life is . Also, they both

.

It is like

.

.

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Expedition 13, Lesson 4

Vocabulary Practice
11. Read the words in the box. Tell what each word means, and use it in a sentence.
cognate divert fruition canny eloquently A. Complete the graphic organizer. The word fruition means and contains the word . mesmerized

Related Word

Related Word

Related Word

Means

Means

Means

B. How can this word family help you remember the meaning of the word fruition?

C. Draw a picture to help you remember the meaning of the word fruition.

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Getting to Know a Character
2 As you reread the selection from Cuba 15, complete the chart.
What She Says • • • What She Does • • • What She Thinks and Feels • • • Violet What This Tells Me About Her

• • • What This Tells Me About Her • • • What This Tells Me About Her • • •

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Expedition 13, Lesson 4

3

You are friends with both Violet and Yara, and you want to introduce them to each other. What will you tell Yara about Violet? What will you tell Violet about Yara? Use the sentence starters below to write your response to the following questions: What is Violet like? What is Yara like? Why do you think they would make good friends? What I want Yara to know about Violet is that

Reading Response

. What I want Violet to know about Yara is that

. I think the two girls would make good friends because

.

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Expedition 6, Lesson 4 Expedition 13, 7

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Vocabulary Practice
11. An example and a non-example are given for each vocabulary word below. On the line
ritual A. initiation initiation compelled oppressive dissension denounce in front of each, write E if it is an example and NE if it is not an example. For the word ritual, provide an example and a non-example of your own.

B. compelled

You take an oath.

You take a 20-minute nap.

C. oppressive

You feel you must report a crime you witnessed. a hot, humid day in August

You feel you are coming down with a cold.

D. dissension

a hot, steaming cup of cocoa “You’re right. This $5 bill is Tom’s.”

E. denounce

“You’re wrong. That $5 bill is mine!”

You refuse to go along with a prank. You help plan a prank.

F. ritual E: NE:

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Expedition 13, Lesson 7

Narrative Elements: Plot
1. As you reread “Salomón’s Story,” fill in the chart below. 2 _______________________________________________ Story Title Characters Setting

Problem (paragraph 6)

Event 1 (paragraphs 8 and 9)

Event 2 (paragraph 11)

Event 3 (paragraph 14)

Event 4 (paragraph 16)

Solution

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Expedition 6, Lesson 7 Expedition 13,

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3

You are Salomón. It is evening on the day of your initiation. What will you write in your journal about the day? Look back in the story and at the chart on Student Book page 181 to find information. Then answer these questions: What happened today? What can I learn from this experience?

Reading Response

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Expedition 13, Lesson 8

As you reread “The Day It Rained Cockroaches,” look for details that describe the setting. List each one in an oval below.

Setting

123 Glen Street

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Expedition 13, Lesson 9

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Comprehension Assessment
Use Your Head: Remember that some answers will be stated directly in the story.
You will have to infer other answers from story details and from what you already know. First, decide which part of the story the question is related to. Then reread that part. Use the information there to help you infer the answer.

Multiple Choice
Read “The Cement Truck” to answer questions 1–5. Fill in the bubble next to the best answer or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 1. How does Lasky feel about wrestling? He loves it. He is entertained by it. He hates it. He feels confused by it. 4. How does Lasky’s problem get solved? He quits before the match begins. He finds the courage and strength to win the match. He gets through the match, even though he loses. He is thrown off the team by the coach. 5. Which of the following is an example of figurative language? “He’s a county champ, Lasky.” He wasn’t too overconfident when he stepped on the scale. His eyebrows were down, his mouth expressionless. He was on me like an octopus.

3. Why does Lasky think about hurting himself? He wants to pass the time. He can’t stand being with the other wrestlers. He doesn’t like to sing. He wants an excuse not to wrestle.

2. At the beginning, where is the story set? on a bus at Lasky’s high school in a locker room at South Rock High School

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Expedition 13, Lesson 9

Short Response
Read “The Cement Truck” to answer questions 6–10. Write your answers on the lines or on a separate sheet of paper. 6. Is the story set in modern times, or long ago? How do you know?

7. Lasky describes the South Rock High School building as “ugly and cruel.” A. What other character in the story does Lasky see in a similar way?

B. List a detail that shows how Lasky sees this character. 8. In paragraph 28, Lasky describes the mat in great detail. Why does the author have Lasky do this? The author does this to show .

9. What does Lasky have in common with Salomón in “Salomón’s Story”?

10. Why is the story called “The Cement Truck”?

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Extended Response
11. What narrative elements make up “The Cement Truck”? Read “The Cement Truck” to complete question 11. Look back in the story for information. Write your answers in the diagram or on a separate sheet of paper.

_______________________________________________ Story Title Characters Setting Time: Place:

Event 1

Event 2

Event 3

Event 4

Event 5

Event 6

Event 7

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Expedition 13, Lesson 9

Vocabulary Assessment
For questions 12–26, read each sentence. Fill in the bubble next to the correct meaning for the underlined word or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 12. I notice a bevy of giant cockroaches heading for me. What does the word bevy mean? a box a cloud a bucket a group 16. It makes me feel as if I am coming down with a disfiguring chicken pox of the soul. What does the word disfiguring mean? turning into something else costing more than you want to pay spoiling how something looks moving in a jerky manner 17. Behind me I heard murmurs of dissension. What does the word dissension mean? fear surprise and delight a gentle wind disagreement and argument

13. Abuela is especially canny that way. What does the word canny mean? funny clever grouchy forgetful

14. I could have forsaken my initiation and denounced the darkness and insanity. What does the word denounce mean? to reject to conquer to explore to fail 15. But I can lie on my bed and remember every digit. What does the word digit mean? year any of the numbers 0 through 9 day any of the letters A through Z

18. “Your hair looks nice, Mom,” I said, trying to divert her attention. What does the word divert mean?

to capture to make something go in another direction to lose some of to make something stronger than it was before

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20. Emblazoned on my brain is the display of giant cockroaches. What does the word emblazoned mean? carved burning printed crawling 21. The only thing she had trouble with was fruition. What does the word fruition mean? cooking skills a good plan saving money a hoped-for outcome

19. I will speak English so well, write it so eloquently, that no one will notice the clothes I wear. What does the word eloquently mean? clearly and beautifully perfectly quickly and quietly secretly

23. I cursed the oppressive darkness. What does the word oppressive mean? coming nearer heavy; burdensome disappearing empty; still

25. He kept the ritual of the seasons. What does the word ritual mean? a task or a job a calendar a service or ceremony a lesson

24. It makes me feel as if I’m coming down with a mumps of the psyche. What does the word psyche mean? your body the olden days your mind or spirit the head

22. My sister taught me how to make imitation lamb chops. What does the word imitation mean? fake juicy delicious old-fashioned

26. Back then it never fell so solemnly against the side of my tree house. What does the word solemnly mean? in a very serious manner in a frightening manner in a warm, cheerful manner in a surprising manner

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Expedition 14, Lesson 2

Vocabulary Practice
1 Read each word pair. Decide whether the words are synonyms or antonyms. Write synonym or
antonym on the line. Then complete each sentence below. bizarre A. bizarre, strange B. virtue, fault virtue morsel perpetually exception attribute

Bizarre is to strange as outstanding is to . .

.

C. morsel, chunk

Virtue is to fault as love is to

D. perpetually, constantly

Morsel is to chunk as friend is to

2 Circle the correct word to complete the first sentence. Then write a word pair to complete the
A. An exception is something that is (inside / outside) of a rule. B. Exception is to rule as is to second sentence. .

Perpetually is to constantly as quietly is to

.

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Problem/Solution and How-To Texts
3
Use the sidebar feature on page 271 to complete the following. Problem

Solution Step 1: Step 2: Step 3: If a person read only this sidebar feature, would he or she understand the main idea of

4

the article? Why or why not?

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Expedition 14, Lesson 2

5

You are Doug Stewart. You are getting ready to write “The Food Stylist’s Art.” You are reviewing the notes you took when you interviewed food stylists Dolores Custer, Ricki Rosenblatt, and Marilinda Hodgdon. Use information from the article—along with your own thinking—to write a response to the following questions. What questions did you ask the food stylists? What answers did you get? Custer

Reading Response

Q: A:

Rosenblatt Q: A: Hodgdon Q: A:

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Expedition 14, Expedition 7,Lesson Lesson49

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Vocabulary Practice
1
Read the words in the box and tell the meaning of each. Then read each pair of sentences. The first example is how the sentence appears in “Sandy Skoglund.” The second is how the author could have written it, replacing one word with another one. On the line below each pair, explain whether you think the author chose the right word and why. caricature paralyze executive element deceiving zany

A. IS: She was especially good at drawing caricatures of people.

COULD HAVE BEEN: She was especially good at drawing pictures of people.

B. IS: Sandy knows, however, that appearances are deceiving.

COULD HAVE BEEN: Sandy knows, however, that appearances are wrong.

C. IS: Over the past twenty years, Sandy has become well known for her zany photographs in which animals and foodstuffs reign. COULD HAVE BEEN: Over the past twenty years, Sandy has become well known for her crazy photographs in which animals and foodstuffs reign.

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Expedition 14, Lesson 4

Elements of Poetry
2. For each word listed, underline an example in one of the stanzas from the poem below. Then 2 number the example. 1. rhyme 4. sensory detail

2. strong word

1 Cats are creeping, cats are craning—there are twenty-five or more! It’s as if I’m in a nightmare or a twisted children’s fable.

1 Cats are crouching in the cupboard, there are felines on the floor.

3. concrete detail

5. repeated sounds

6. figurative language

Cats are poised atop the fridge and perched upon the breakfast table.

Please believe me when I tell you it’s a most peculiar scene,

They’re like a lab experiment gone horribly wrongish.

Their tails are pointy fingers, their bodies sleek and longish;

And if that’s not weird enough, well, all the cats are colored green!

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3

You are planning to write a book-length biography of Sandy Skoglund. Choose three important events from her life. What questions would you like to ask her about each event? Use information from the biography, as well as your own thinking, to answer the following: What would you like to ask Sandy Skoglund in an interview?

Reading Response

Event 1:

Question 1: Question 2:

Event 2:

Question 1: Question 2:

Event 3:

Question 1: Question 2:

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Expedition 14, Lesson 7

Vocabulary Practice
1 Read each word in the box and give a meaning for each. Then complete the graphic organizer
below using the word savor. clasp populated instinctively savor grade hesitantly

Examples

Non-Examples

Word savor

What It Looks Like

What It Means

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Expedition 6, Lesson 7 Expedition 14,

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Descriptive Details in an Autobiographical Story
2. As you reread the story from The Circuit, complete the web. Write examples of each 2 kind of descriptive detail in the outer ovals. Concrete Detail

Figurative Language

Concrete Detail

Figurative Language

Sensory Detail

The Circuit

Figurative Language

Sensory Detail

Strong Words

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Expedition 14, Lesson 7

3

You are Francisco Jiménez. You have been thinking about a teacher you had in the past. This teacher inspired you to do great things, and you want to write her or him a thank-you letter. Look back in the story and in the author’s biography. Include the details you find in a letter to this teacher. Answer the following question in your letter. Why do you owe your teacher thanks? Dear Teacher,

Reading Response

Sincerely, Francisco Jiménez

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Expedition 6, Lesson 7 Expedition 14, 8

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Each note card below contains a quotation used in “‘Mermaids’ Fight to Save Florida Roadside Attraction.” Complete each card by writing the name and a brief description of the person who said the quote. Then explain why you think the authors of the article included it.
. . . esp eci ally on sun ny I lov e the sw imm ing asp ect “ kno win g tha t peo ple in day s, it’s so bea uti ful . And som etim es you do fee l as the re are wat chi ng you . . . tho ugh it’s a rea l thi ng.” Wh o sai d the quo te: Rea son aut hor inc lud ed it:

Direct Quotations in a Magazine Article

AFP/Getty

“ Ev er yb od y wh o lea ves fo r an ot he r jo b . . . wa nt s to ke ep on e fo ot in th e do or so th ey ca n co me ba ck .” W ho sa id th e qu ot e:

Re as on au th or inc lu de d it:

Getty

wh ate ver— we’ re rea dy Wr inkl es, cel lul ite, chu bby , “ to go. ”

Wh o sai d the quo te: Rea son aut hor inc lud ed it:

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Expedition 14, Lesson 9

Comprehension Assessment
Find Key Words: When you read a question, look for key words or phrases and
circle them. This will help you understand exactly what the question is asking. Then, you can use these key words to find the answer in the text. Scan the text to find your circled words. Reread the paragraphs that include the words you circled.

Multiple Choice
Read the selection from The Beet Fields, Memories of a Sixteenth Summer and the Connect to the Author feature to answer questions 1–5. Fill in the bubble next to the best answer or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper.

1. What does the boy in The Beet Fields most want? to be rich for Alice to like him to get another job to be visited by Lynette

3. Why did Gary Paulsen first enter a library? to find a book to get away from other students to get warm to meet the librarian

2. Which is a sensory detail from The Beet Fields? . . . a thick bread sandwich with eggs and bacon between the slices. . . . Jail must be like this, he thought after three weeks . . . The fields were a good three miles from his farm . . . . . . a week, then another, then another . . .

4. Which of the following contains an example of figurative language? “After we returned to the States, we moved around constantly.” “I was unbelievably shy, and terrible at sports. I had no friends.” “It was as though I had been dying of thirst and the librarian handed me a five-gallon bucket of water.” “You are not allowed any outside assistance. If you make a mistake, you are left to die.”

5. How are the boy in The Beet Fields and Gary Paulsen alike? They both sleep very little. They have both worked as farmhands. They both like country music. They have both written stories.

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Expedition 14, Lesson 9

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Short Response
Read the selection from The Beet Fields, Memories of a Sixteenth Summer and the Connect to the Author feature to answer questions 6–10. Write your answers on the lines or on a separate sheet of paper. It is easier because

6. In what way is the boy’s tractor-driving job easier than his last job? In what way is it more difficult? It is more difficult because • • •

.

7. What do the boy’s “tractor thoughts” tell you about him? List three things.

.

8. List in order five important events that led Gary Paulsen to become an award-winning author. The events should come between the first and last events listed below. • • • • • • wrote the award-winning novel Dogsong • ran away from home at age 14

9. For what two reasons does Paulsen say he writes? Reason 1: 10. Why do you think Paulsen wrote this selection? Reason 2:

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Expedition 14, Lesson 9

Extended Response
Read the selection from The Beet Fields, Memories of a Sixteenth Summer and the Connect to the Author feature to complete the chart below. Look back in the texts for information. Write your answers in the chart or on a separate sheet of paper. the story from The Beet Fields

11. How are the two texts similar? How are they different?

Connect to the Author

What kind of text is it?

Whom is the text about?

What is the purpose of the text?

Are quotations used? If so, give an example.

Quotations are used to show . . .

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Expedition 14, Lesson 9

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Vocabulary Assessment
For questions 12–26, read each sentence. Fill in the bubble next to the correct meaning for the underlined word or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 12. “No,” say members of a bizarre and highly competitive profession known as food styling. What does the word bizarre mean? a box a cloud a bucket very strange or odd 13. Air increases buoyancy. What does the word buoyancy mean? the ability to float the ability to bounce the ability to swim the ability to breathe 16. Sandy knows, however, that appearances are deceiving. What does the word deceiving mean? misleading valuable confusing helpful

14. She was especially good at drawing caricatures of people. What does the word caricature mean? a very small drawing a funny drawing of someone a drawing of a story character a drawing of someone as a child 15. Mama clasped her hands and hurried back to the car. What does the word clasp mean? to wave to raise up to hold tightly to clean thoroughly

17. The state is a patchwork of springs that discharge fresh water from underground aquifers. What does the word discharge mean? to absorb to mix around to put out to collect

18. The peas are laid out so perfectly that we see them as elements in a pattern, not as food. What does the word element mean? a stitch one part of a larger whole a kind of animal a large piece

19. Her father began working as an executive for the Shell Oil Company. What does the word executive mean? a farmworker the founder of a business a machine operator a leader of a business

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Expedition 14, Lesson 9 24. It was an underwater novelty designed to bring the crowds in off the highway. What does the word novelty mean? something you can read a place for rest and relaxation something new and interesting a kind of shop or store

23. Stylists are allowed to handpick the prettiest morsels. What does the word morsel mean? a small piece a decoration a kind of dish a person who models

22. Instinctively, Roberto and I ran and hid in the vineyards. What does the word instinctively mean? all of a sudden full of mischief as quickly as possible without thinking it through

21. “Would you like to read?” he asked hesitantly. What does the word hesitantly mean? in a cheerful manner in a shy or doubtful manner in a rough or angry manner in a soothing manner

20. I walked to the top of a small grade next to the shack. What does the word grade mean? a slope a porch a tower a pile

25. Rosenblatt has slipped pieces of dry ice under a pile of smoked ribs to give them a perpetually steamy look. What does the word perpetually mean? recent always never long ago 26. For the food stylist, patience is a virtue. What does the word virtue mean? something required a good quality a joke something rare

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Expedition 15, Lesson 2

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1

Read each word in the box, tell its meaning, and use it in a sentence. Then complete the diagram below. mill circuit impression lace hostage stir

Vocabulary Practice

Impression means and contains the word

. Related Word

Related Word

Related Word

Means

Means

Means

2 How can this word family help you remember the meaning of the word impression?

3 Draw a picture to help you remember the meaning of the word impression.

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Expedition 15, Lesson 2

Elements of Narrative: Plot and Character
2. An important outer event is listed in the left half of each box. In the right half, write what 4 Jack’s mom invites him to a poetry reading. Jack thinks or feels in response to that event.

Jack appears in the parking lot at 6:30.

Jack arrives at the bookstore.

Camilla walks over and begins to talk to Jack. After the reading, Camilla and Jack talk about the poetry.

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Expedition 15, Lesson 2

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5

Write a diary entry from Jack’s point of view. Look back in the story and at the chart on Student Book page 205 to find information. Then answer these questions. What happened today? What did I learn about myself and others? Dear Diary,

Reading Response

Some amazing things happened today.

following new ideas:

Because of all these events, my head is spinning with the

.

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Expedition 15, Lesson 4

1

Read each word in the box below. Then pretend you own a jargon manufacturing company. Your company has been hired to create new jargon to be used in the world of sports. Work with a partner to think of a new jargon term for each word. The jargon term should be connected in some way to the meaning of the word. Write the word’s meaning, your jargon term, and the connection between the two words on the lines. tournament intercept rebound deuce opportunity

Vocabulary Practice

A. tournament jargon term: connection:

definition:

B. intercept

jargon term: connection: C. rebound definition:

definition:

jargon term: connection: definition:

D. deuce

jargon term: connection: definition:

E. opportunity jargon term: connection:
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Expedition 6, Lesson 7 Expedition 15, 4

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2 In each text, find the kind of sentence listed below. Write it on the line. Then write a literal
“translation” of the sentence. A. • Sentence from “Old Snake” that contains figurative language:

Figurative Language and Jargon

• Translation:

• Does the sentence from the poem or your translation of it make the poet’s ideas more vivid in your mind? Why?

B.

• Sentence from Hoops that contains jargon:

• Translation:

• Does the sentence from the story or your translation of it make the idea more vivid in your mind? Why?

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Expedition 15, Lesson 4

3

You want to write about a turning point in your own life. Will your writing be a poem or a short story? Will it use figurative language to compare the turning point to something else—maybe something in nature? Will it be a short story that uses sports jargon, teenage jargon, or high-tech jargon? What turning point will you describe? What kind of text will you write? What kind of language will you use? I plan to write about the time

Reading Response

. . I have chosen this

My writing will be a

kind of text because

. I plan to use • • • • • in my writing. Here are

some words and phrases I would like to use:

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Expedition 15, Lesson 7

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1

Read each word in the box. Then use at least four of the vocabulary words to create an advertisement encouraging young people to apply for a position as a chef-in-training at Fifteen. disadvantaged grueling decor lavish brigade ban

Vocabulary Practice

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Expedition 15, Lesson 7

Planning a Persuasive Letter
2 You think the food in your school’s cafeteria needs to be improved. Plan a persuasive letter
to your school’s administration. Look back in the last section of “Jamie Oliver” for ideas. A. The problem: B. Your opinion: I believe the administration should II. Body A. Supporting reason 1: . I. Opening

B. Supporting reason 2: C. Counterargument 1: Other people may say In response, I say D. Counterargument 2: Other people may say In response, I say III. Closing Restate the opinion, give new information, or include a quote from an expert. . . . .

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Expedition 15, Lesson 7

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3

Use the outline on Student Book page 211 and information from “Jamie Oliver” to write a letter in response the following question. What should the school administration do to improve food in our cafeteria? Dear Administrators:

Reading Response

Sincerely yours,

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Expedition 15, Lesson 8

Character Analysis
How are you like Ted? How are you different? List details in the diagram to show similarities and differences. Then draw some conclusions below.

Ted Same

Me

How has the story about Ted helped you to know yourself better?

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Expedition 15, Lesson 9

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Comprehension Assessment
Use Multiple Strategies: Even if you have a favorite test-taking strategy, do not
ignore the others. Some of the strategies you have practiced are Find Key Words, Eliminate Answers that Overgeneralize, Preview the Questions, Make Notes as You Read, Eliminate Obvious Wrong Answers, and Use Your Head. Some strategies work better for some questions than others. Each time you take a test, choose among all the strategies you know.

Multiple Choice
Read “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me,” Connect to the Author, and “Bessie Coleman” to answer questions 1–5. Fill in the bubble next to the best answer or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper.

1. Which line from “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me” contains repeated sounds? “Noises down the hall” “Lions on the loose” “They go wild” “I can walk the ocean floor” 2. What does the speaker do to keep from being afraid? reads Mother Goose rhymes laughs and smiles at her fears gets tough guys to protect her throws frogs and snakes at her fears

4. What does Bessie Coleman mean when she says, “I found a brand new world in the written word”? She means that she enjoyed science fiction books about distant worlds. She means that reading gave her the idea of leaving home to look for a new life. She means that she learned new things about planet Earth from her reading. She means that reading made her aware of many new ideas.

3. Why did Maya Angelou begin to write about her childhood? because she needed the money because she failed as a performer because her friends urged her because she felt different from other people

5. Which sentence from “Bessie Coleman” contains a cause-and-effect signal word? After working and saving for several more years, Bessie Coleman moved to Chicago. Coleman also became known as “Brave Bessie.” In fact, Coleman was not able to fly again for almost two more years. She did not fasten her seat belt because she was too short to see out of the plane.
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Expedition 15, Lesson 9

Short Response
Read “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me,” Connect to the Author, and “Bessie Coleman” to answer questions 6–10. Write your answers on the lines or on a separate sheet of paper. 6. A. What sentence is repeated throughout “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me”? B. Why do you think it is repeated?

7. A. On what does Maya Angelou base her stories and poems? B. Write one detail from “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me” that is most likely autobiographical.

8. How are the texts Connect to the Author and “Bessie Coleman” alike?

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Expedition 15, Lesson 9

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9. Four events from Bessie Coleman’s life are listed below. Write the effect of each event in the box. Cause Coleman ran out of money after one semester of college. Effect

Cause Coleman read many newspaper reports of the air war in Europe.

Effect

Cause Coleman became friends with Robert S. Abbott.

Effect

Cause Coleman did not fasten her seat belt for the May Day Exhibition. 10. A. Write one direct quotation from “Bessie Coleman.” B. What does this quotation show about the person who said it?

Effect

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Expedition 15, Lesson 9

Extended Response
Read “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me,” Connect to the Author, and “Bessie Coleman” to complete question 11. Look back in the texts for information. Write your answers in the diagram or on a separate sheet of paper. 11. How are Maya Angelou and Bessie Coleman alike? How are they different? Use details from the texts, as well as your own ideas, to complete the Venn diagram.

Maya Angelou Same • • • • • • • • • •

Bessie Coleman

• • • • •

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Expedition 15, Lesson 9

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Vocabulary Assessment
For questions 12–26, read each sentence. Fill in the bubble next to the correct meaning for the underlined word or write the letter of the correct answer on a separate sheet of paper. 12. The government increased funding for school food and banned the sale of sugary soft drinks and junk food. What does the word ban mean? to state that something must not be done to state that something can only be done at certain times to state that something must be done at once to state that something will be postponed for a period of time

15. It would be about giving disadvantaged youths a chance to turn their lives around. What does the word disadvantaged mean? worse off than others very talented angry or upset being afraid to try something new 16. The training was grueling. What does the word grueling mean? enjoyable very difficult and tiring costly; expensive lasting a very long time

13. He concocted a latch and a door, with his hand ax over it, just in case. What does the word concoct mean? to fasten to invent to take apart to plan 14. I put the ball on the backboard anyway for another deuce. What does the word deuce mean? a win two points free throws a time-out

18. Stealer intercepted the ball and started downcourt again. What does the word intercept mean? to catch a ball that was thrown to you to throw a ball to someone on the other team to catch a ball that was thrown to someone else to throw a ball to someone on your team
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17. I’ll be interested to hear your impressions then. What does the word impression mean? thought and opinion outstanding grade school supply extra time

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Expedition 15, Lesson 9 24. He began to build the top floor now but he had to prune some limbs out of the way. What does the word prune mean? to push or shove to cut or trim to pull or haul to set or place 25. The crowd stirs and talks and kind of hums. What does the word stir mean? to stretch to move about to do something quickly to turn around

20. I lace my hands behind my head and tip my chair back. What does the word lace mean? to place gently to raise to wind or twist together to curl up into a fist

19. Maybe I like the moon too, he thought, involuntarily. What does the word involuntarily mean? with pleasure without interest without meaning to with surprise

21. A third critic saved his most lavish praise for Oliver himself. What does the word lavish mean? harsh or cruel given in order to be liked not honest given in large amounts 22. There’s a bunch of people milling around out front. What does the word mill mean? to play to relax to march to wander

26. I was surprised because mostly these tournament games didn’t amount to much. What does the word tournament mean? a sports event made up of rounds of games a sports event that takes place before a season begins a sports event that is played between only two teams a sports event that scouts come to watch

23. That’s an opportunity we let die. What does the word opportunity mean? a dream a good idea a small creature a chance

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Word Meaning

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Vocabulary Log
Expedition 11
Word Meaning

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Word Meaning

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Vocabulary Log
Expedition 13
Word Meaning

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Vocabulary Log
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Expedition 9
Advanced Word Study
Lesson 1
1. teachable 3. portable

Suffixes -able and -ible
2. convertible terrible flexible

printable likeable

returnable

responsible credible audible

unbeatable

1. charity

Sight Words
2. trouble 3. warden

early

experience either

groups

challenge

convenient diesel

repair

inmates

Lesson 3
1. anxious

Suffixes -ious and -ous
2. nervous 3. marvelous cautious joyous

nutritious ambitious obnoxious thousand perilous happening humorous

1. flooded 2. honor 3. publish

Sight Words

repair

leather groups

couple early

charity

memorial crowded barrels

Lesson 6
1. protesters

Multisyllabic Words
2. democratic personality

3. surrounded demonstration suddenly

frustrated

meaningful

consequently donations

nominated 3. couple

organized

1. soldiers 2. area

Sight Words

wounded leather flooded

determine memorial predicted

negotiate tolerate support

Lesson 8
1. 2. 3.

Spelling

4. 5. 6.

1. broadcast 2. wounded 3. soldiers

Sight Words

genius

expected

negotiate

famine

determine

struggling

debt

satellite

audience

1. . . . sick and desperate for food. 2. The other half paid for long-term projects . . . 3. . . . to do more to end world poverty.

Building to Fluency

paragraph 1 paragraph 5 paragraph 6

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E9

Expedition 10
Advanced Word Study
Lesson 1
1. employment instrument

Suffix -ment
2. interrupt 3. unrecorded

addition

predicament batteries

appointment installment sunglasses

information

entertainment

2. digital

1. favorite

Sight Words
3. soundtrack

broadcast grouped

music

certain debt

famine

wear

squeeze genius

Lesson 3
1. educational 2. partial 3. distract

Suffixes -al and -ial
initial special

criminal

betrayal

disloyal martial

jammers

irrational

commercial

2. wear

3. reasonable music

1. nuisance

Sight Words

calculator experience favorite certain

borrow

deadly

scissors

establish

Lesson 6
1. pretended

Multisyllabic Words
2. permission 3. kidnapped several scanner

angrily

photographs returned signal

moment

robberies property

3. nuisance

2. disguised

1. aisle

Sight Words

earlier

deadly

thieves

obey

scissors

employee

livestock borrow

justice

Lesson 8
1. 2. 3.

Spelling

4. 5. 6.

3. justice

1. violence 2. bulging

Sight Words

thieves

mindless obey

marketed

behavior

characters

disturbing aisle

improve

1. . . . problems these games are said to create. 2. . . . a scientist who studies teen behavior. 3. “Who wants to waste a day roaming around a . . .”

Building to Fluency

paragraph 2 paragraph 4 paragraph 6
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E10

Expedition 11
Advanced Word Study
Lesson 1
1. jerky 2. bark

Homographs
3. imitate

match beats

rumble

brand

strength extend

flies

bluff

acrobat

1. rhythm 2. talent

Sight Words
3. improve

encourage violence nodding

pioneers

smoothly behavior

media

mindless

borrowed

Lesson 3
1. protective 2. massive 3. waltz

Suffixes -tive and -ive
pensive

relative

corrosive cursive

negative

selective

blossom

imaginative permissive

1. elbows

Sight Words
2. pioneers 3. rhythm

local

instructor stamina

muscles foxtrot

ballroom

watch

media

encourage

Lesson 6
2. politeness 1. willingness injuries

Multisyllabic Words
3. direction

remember mistakes

performing demanding

blockbusters martial several

equipment

1. routine 2. impact 3. elbows

Sight Words

ceiling watch

punching

local

storyboard

rehearse

height

muscles

millions

Lesson 8
1. 2. 3.

Spelling

4. 5. 6.

1. ballet

Sight Words
2. imagine 3. routine

rehearse

bruised

professional

leagues height

teammates

activity

rough

ceiling

1. . . . a football player and a ballet dancer. 2. . . . training his body for short bursts of activity . . . 3. . . . might also lift weights to build strength.

Building to Fluency

paragraph 1 paragraph 3 paragraph 6

©Voyager Expanded Learning, L.P.

E11

Expedition 12
Advanced Word Study
Lesson 1
1. poetic

Suffixes -ic and -ish
2. foolish 3. charcoal yellowish snobbish

metallic

electronic ticklish goblins

economic selfish athletic

2. rough

3. crickets

1. shrieks

Sight Words

chirp

pieces

grind

bruised

leagues

wandered

bamboo ballet

scarcely

Lesson 3
1. exclude

Prefix ex2. extreme 3. sullenly

exclaim jogged

tormented

exist

haunted dangled

extra

exhausted devoured

2. stirrups 3. weird

1. narrow

Sight Words

arrogant

wandered shrieking

perils

grinds

cannonball scarcely

gross

shoulders

Lesson 6
2. intentionally remembered horrible 3. disappeared appetite 1. splendidly

Multisyllabic Words

illustrated

maltreated descriptions slightly

attracting encountered

1. rhymes 2. tours 3. gross

Sight Words

narrow

vary

perils

hoarse

regions

transform

tongues

bolt

arrogant

Lesson 8
1. 2. 3.

Spelling

4. 5. 6.

1. vague 3. vary 2. bolt

Sight Words

chauffeur groaning rhymes

peculiar regions

whirring

mourn

brushwood ignition

1. . . . gear-shifting lever with notches . . . 2. . . . what an awful and yet majestic sight . . . 3. . . . touch was inexpressibly soothing.

Building to Fluency

paragraph 6 paragraph 14 paragraph 23

E12

©Voyager Expanded Learning, L.P.

Expedition 13
Advanced Word Study
Lesson 1
1. pointless 2. hiccups

Suffix -less
3. mentioned

joyless

lifeless

raggedy

underneath nonsense

blameless

dreamless homeless invisible

1. garage 3. major

Sight Words
2. chauffeur

sweater plastic mourn

onion

vague

peculiar

months rattling

stomach

Lesson 3
2. protective 1. proceed

Prefix pro3. murmured

beginning angle swirling

protrude

project

mentioned whistling

professional

produce

1. ironed 3. onion

Sight Words
2. clutching

coiffed garage

months

ensemble sweater exactly

tiara

graphics cousin

Lesson 6
2. disturbed 1. dissension bordering

Multisyllabic Words
storyteller

3. quivering dissatisfaction underbrush cultivated

vanished

willingly

encountered desperation

1. slew 2. tiara

Sight Words
3. ensemble

echoed ironed

gurgling

syrup

useless

encrusted

tortoise coiffed

mournful

Lesson 8
1. 2. 3.

Spelling

4. 5. 6.

1. coughed 2. echoed 3. slew

Sight Words

aliens

grenade tortoise

cyclorama scurrying

emblazoned

memoir syrup ceiling

1. . . . biographical points about me . . . 2. . . . tidal waves, volcanoes, or other natural disasters. 3. . . . said comfortingly as she grabbed an old dishrag . . .

Building to Fluency

paragraph 1 paragraph 21 paragraph 34

©Voyager Expanded Learning, L.P.

E13

Expedition 14
Advanced Word Study
Lesson 1
1. tighten

Suffix -en and Prefix sub3. shorten 2. subcontract subnormal subsoil

persnickety submersible maintain

weaken

golden

sublease

strengthen

1. recipe 2. aliens

Sight Words
3. charity

guaranteed homeless memoir

maneuvers distributes cyclorama

ingenuity coughed finicky

Lesson 3
2. captions 1. impression foodstuffs sculptor

Multisyllabic Words
destroys

3. decorative perfectly inspiration

surroundings information strangeness

promoted

1. diamond 2. weird

Sight Words

3. investigate recipe

fascinated theatrical museum

maneuvers ingenuity

reign

cartoonist

guaranteed

Lesson 6
2. nervous 1. remained

Multisyllabic Words

3. understandingly permanent cardboard politely

exchanged illegally

underneath murmured whispered signaling

3. theatrical blanketed speechless

2. reign

1. sweat

Sight Words

kerosene

fascinated instinct

handkerchief swallowed diamond

pretending

Lesson 8
1. 2. 3.

Spelling

4. 5. 6.

1. neutral 3. sweat

Sight Words
2. routines

inventiveness kerosene investor

hover

unique

handkerchief scuba

swallowed

iridescent

1. With today’s environmental laws, . . . 2. . . . a hot tub in a retirement home . . . 3. . . . mermaid fantasy is an incurable disease . . .

Building to Fluency

paragraph 6 paragraph 22 paragraph 24
©Voyager Expanded Learning, L.P.

E14

Expedition 15
Advanced Word Study
Lesson 1
1. direction

Mulitsyllabic Words
3. sinister unravel

2. microphone mimicking frightening important displaying earrings

bookstore reluctantly amazes

1. cruise

Sight Words
2. leather 3. iridescent

stroll

unique rhyme

second hectic

neutral

guess

hover

dictate

Lesson 3
2. fabulous switched 1. dribbled anxious

Multisyllabic Words

3. moment delivering indifferently

uncomfortable interested

referees

nonprofessional expressed

1. veins

Sight Words
3. cruise

2. varsity appreciative guess

society

involvement embarrassing second

guys

stroll

doubt

Lesson 6
1. demanded millions 2. wooden 3. impacts pestle

Multisyllabic Words

remembered benefit

cheerful focused

invested misinformed

mansion

1. chefs

Sight Words
2. fantastic 3. veins

recruits doubt society

sugary guys

charity

restaurant

improvement struggling

Lesson 8
1. 2. 3.

Spelling

4. 5. 6.

1. cereal

Sight Words
2. sugary 3. recruits

autumn

cautiousness kindling

pheasants appetite

restaurant

tunnel chefs

blurred

1. . . . his great appetite and obvious enjoyment of it . . . 2. . . . to see the moon’s reflection in the water. 3. . . . picking delicately and greedily at the unpicked grapes . . .

Building to Fluency

paragraph 3 paragraph 16 paragraph 20

©Voyager Expanded Learning, L.P.

E15

ISBN 978-1-4168-0955-5
208961

90000

10 11 12 13 14

WEB

9876

9

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