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ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2012-2013

Academic Calendar 2012-2013

See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs,median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Academic Calendar
Publication Date: October 1, 2012
The information presented in this Academic Calendar supercedes previously published Calendar information.

Table of Contents
Administration ...............................................................................4 Welcome..................................................................................5 Mission, Vision, Values ................................................................5 History.....................................................................................6 Governance and Administration ...................................................6 Accreditation.........................................................................7 About Vancouver ..........................................................................8 Web Design & Interactive Media and Foundation for Design .........................................................94 Baking & Pastry Arts – Level 1................................................98 Baking & Pastry Arts – Level 2................................................99 Baking & Pastry Arts ..............................................................101 Culinary Arts – Level 1 ........................................................103 Culinary Arts – Level 2 ........................................................104 Culinary Arts ...........................................................................106 Culinary Arts & Restaurant Ownership................................108 Entrepreneurship & Restaurant Ownership.............................111 Hospitality & Restaurant Business Management.....................112

Degree Programs
Game Programming ......................................................................9 Graphic Design ............................................................................16 Interior Design ....................................... ...................................... 22 Web Design .................................................................................. 28

Continuing Education
Sommelier & Wine Studies........................................................115 Fundamental Skills for Aspiring Chefs ..................................121 International Cuisine for Aspiring Chefs...................................121 Asian Cuisine for Aspiring Chefs ..............................................121 English for Academic Purposes ................................................. 122 Digital Photography...................................................................122 Interactive Web Animation........................................................122 Kitchen and Bathroom Design .................................................123 Motion Graphics........................................................................123 Cross Disciplinary Studies.........................................................123 Admissions ................................................................................124 Financial Information ...............................................................130 Scholarship Information ............................................................134 Academic Policies and Procedures ...........................................135 Student Affairs ..........................................................................152 Career Services .........................................................................153 Library Services ........................................................................ 154 Student Information .................................................................155 Emergency Procedures .............................................................165 Fulltime Faculty by Program ....................................................167 Academic Dates ........................................................................169

Diploma and Certificate Programs
3D Modeling for Animation & Games .......................................35 Advanced Graphic Design ...........................................................38 Advertising ..................................................................................40 Animation Art & Design .............................................................43 Digital Film & Video ...................................................................46 Electronic Music..........................................................................49 Event Management .....................................................................52 Fashion Design ............................................................................55 Fashion Marketing .......................................................................57 Game Art & Design ......................................................................60 Graphic Design ............................................................................63 Graphic Design and Foundation for Design..................................66 Independent Recording Arts .......................................................69 Interior Design.............................................................................72 Professional Audio Visual (ProAV).............................................75 Professional Recording Arts ......................................................77 Professional Recording Arts (LIPA) .............................................81 Visual & Game Programming.......................................................85 VFX for Film & Television...........................................................88 Web Design & Interactive Media ................................................91

Calendar Preparation
This calendar was prepared by The Art Institute of Vancouver, 2665 Renfrew Street, Vancouver, BC V5M 0A7. This document serves The Art Institute of Vancouver with its main location at 2665 Renfrew Street and one learning site in Downtown Vancouver at 609 Granville Street. The Calendar will use the term “The Art Institute of Vancouver,” “The Art Institute” or “The Insitute” to refer to any or both locations as is appropriate. Information that is unique to each campus will be covered in the Student Tool Kit, which new students will receive at their Orientation. The Student Tool Kit and the Student Calendar are also available on the Student Affairs Web site (http://studentaffairs.artschool.com). Students should consult this calendar for on-going reference purposes. Refer to the Dean of Academic Affairs, Academic Advisor, Academic Director, or Student Affairs regarding any elements outlined herein that require clarification. The Calendar and the Campus Guide are periodically reviewed and updated as necessary to reflect current academic, operating, and related policies and procedures including, but not limited to, compliance with regulatory or accreditation requirements and The Art Institute of Vancouver policy changes. Changes are effective when made. The information contained herein applies to the 2012 academic year. Curriculum, fees, expenses, and other matters described herein are subject to change without notice at the discretion of The Art Institute of Vancouver. For more information, write to the above address or phone 1.800.661.1885.

artinstitutes.edu/vancouver/culinary Granville Campus Page 4 The Art Institute of Vancouver . BComm Director of Human Resources Locations The Art Institute of Vancouver 2665 Renfrew Street Vancouver.3205 www. BC V7Y 1G5 604.667.717.8839 www.Pacific Centre 300-609 Granville Street Vancouver.edu Renfrew Campus The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver The Cannaccord Tower .8080 Fax: 604.edu/vancouver Email: aivinfo@aii. BC V5M 0A7 604.3155 | 866.9200 | 866.684.Administration Brian Parker President Jamie NaYoung Choi Director of Administrative and Financial Services Benjamin Colling Senior Director of Admissions Milan Petrovich Dean of Academic Affairs Shannon Svingen-Jones Dean of Student Affairs and Director of Career Services Debra Walker.683.738.738.7288 Fax: 604.Academic Calendar .artinstitutes.

educational. exceeding the needs of the design. fostering the conviction that education is a life-long process.Welcome to The Art Institute of Vancouver Your decision to attend The Art Institute of Vancouver is an important step in pursuing your dreams and passion for a career in a creative field. or continue to build notable careers. media arts and culinary industries. mentation while being fiscally responsible. trust and integrity. Values • We believe in providing exceptional learning-centred education which supports students’ career goals and exceeds the needs of industry. and the list goes on. • We believe student success occurs best when it is undertaken in an active partnership between students. faculty and staff. preparing our graduates for entry level positions in their chosen career. performance management and an enjoyable working environment. As a member of The Art Institute of Vancouver community. • We believe in a dedicated professional team environment • We believe in a culture that creates an energizing and re• We believe in creating employee satisfaction through professional development. that supports open and effective communication. and cultural resource for the surrounding community.Academic Calendar Page 5 . please familiarize yourself with the rules. Vision Through excellence in creative education. include learningcentred. recognition. We are excited to have the opportunity to help you achieve your goals by providing the quality of education you need to succeed. and continues to be. • We believe in growth. and course information contained in this academic calendar. staff. defined by the success of our students and graduates. When you look closely at The Art Institute of Vancouver’s value. The Art Institute of Vancouver Mission. fashion. faculty and the community. mutual respect. we will be the school of choice. These words. trust and integrity. you will find within these statements words that describe our team members. warding experience for students. vision and mission. We trust your experience with us will fulfill your expectations and more. The Art Institute of Vancouver . It will serve as a guide and provide you with important information as you start down your educational path leading to a career in the creative arts. effective planning and resource imple• We believe in enhancing the school’s reputation. training and knowledge from industries in which they have. Their passion for working to the success of our students is matched only by our students themselves. industry experienced. dedicated. We support a proactive team environment that promotes open and effective communication. Vision and Values Mission We provide exceptional learning-centred. mutual respect. Our faculty bring with them experiences. industry driven education. policies. professional. Underpinning all that we do is the conviction that the success of The Art Institute of Vancouver has been. embodied by our employees. We serve as an intellectual. energizing.

business.. Education Management Corporation Senior Vice President. fashion and culinary arts professionals. Student Services Branch. with 97 schools located throughout the United States and Canada. adjacent to the Renfrew SkyTrain station. Mullin Former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Education Management Corporation Former Chief Executive Officer of Delta Airlines Todd S. and The Institute of Digital Arts in Richmond. Leeds Managing Director in the Merchant Banking Division of Goldman Sachs & Co.000 square feet. Beekhuizen Samuel C. Graphic Design. a system of over 50 education institutions located throughout North America providing an important source of design. a subsidiary of EDMC Canada Limited. students and administrative staff. This conveniently located building features increased library and student lounge spaces. West Chief Executive Officer and President. acquired The Center for Digital Imaging and Sound in Burnaby. In June 2009. Game Art & Design. Leo F. media arts. The Art Institute of Vancouver began operations in 2002 when our parent company. B. The Art Institute of Vancouver has been offering an array of exciting applied arts programs in such diverse fields as Animation. and strategic decisionmaking board of The Art Institute of Vancouver. In September 2004. two-story structure located at 2665 Renfrew Street. which through various intermediary companies. Killeen J. McKernan. Education Management Corporation Randall J. Dubrulle and The Art Institute of Vancouver-Burnaby were merged to re-form The Art Institute of Vancouver. in Vancouver. The Institute plans to expand its degree offerings over the next several years. 33rd Floor. Education Management Corporation is among the largest providers of private post-secondary education in North America. The Art Institute of Vancouver is an accredited school under the Private Career Training Institutions Agency of British Columbia (PCTIA) and registered with the Ministry of Advanced Education. President and co-founder of Leeds Equity Partners. the Design and Event Management programs moved into a new purpose-built.. EDMC purchased the Dubrulle International Culinary & Hotel Institute of Canada. Event Management. operational. Devitt Kramer Chief Financial Officer. Jones Jeffery T. and is specifically built to strict environmental requirements. Mid-Western. and Web Design. Education Management Corporation Senior Managing Director and a founder of Providence Equity Partners Peter O. B. This was followed by degrees in Game Programming and Web Design in 2011. The Art Institute of Vancouver received formal approval from the British Columbia Ministry of Advanced Education to offer a Bachelor of Applied Design in Graphic Design degree.C.C. is a subsidiary Page 6 Principal Officers of Education Management Corporation Edward H. In June 2003. Education Management Corporation (EDMC). Southern. Nelson Paul J. Cowley Adrian M. The Art Institute of Vancouver is owned by The Art Institute of Vancouver. Wright Chairman of Seamobile/MTN Satellite Communications and a director of Federal Signal Corporation Governance and Administration The Art Institutes system of schools consists of over 50 schools in four geographical regions (Eastern. Salem Chairman. and Western) through the United States and Canada. The Media Arts programs moved to the Renfrew campus in summer 2010.History The Art Institute of Vancouver is part of The Art Institutes. Video Game Programming. Board of Directors of Education Management Corporation Mick J. The Art Institute of Vancouver Executive Committee operates as the management. General Counsel & Vice President of Business Development of Prestige Brands Inc. Managing Director in the Principal Investment/Merchant Banking Division of Goldman Sachs & Co. Interior Design. Culinary Arts. In April 2010. based on student enrolment and revenue. Wilde Managing Director. The Art Institute of Vancouver is in the Western region. LLC John R. Digital Film & Video. Education Management Corporation The Art Institute of Vancouver . Professional Recording Arts. Since 2004. General Counsel and Secretary. The Executive Committee has the authority to approve policy and business decisions and to set strategic directions consistent with the school’s mission to deliver learning-centred. industry-driven academic programs in the applied arts. British Columbia. PA 15222. The Executive Committee is advised by an Academic Council composed of faculty. of Education Management Corporation located at 210 Sixth Avenue. Jr. VFX for Film and Television. Pittsburgh. Inc.Academic Calendar . bringing the student space to a total of 80. Providence Equity Partners Joseph R.

Accreditation
The Art Institute of Vancouver is accredited by the: Private Career Training Institutions Agency of BC #203 - 1155 West Pender Street Vancouver, BC V6E 2P4 Local: 604-569-0033 Toll-free: 1-800-661-7441 Fax: 778-945-0606 Email: info@pctia.bc.ca The Art Institute of Vancouver has been granted approval from the Private Career Training Institutions Agency of British Columbia (PCTIA) to operate, and has received institutional approval from the Agency to provide the following certificate, diploma, and advanced diploma programs: 3D Modeling for Animation & Games, Advertising, Advanced Graphic Design, Animation Art & Design, Baking & Pastry Arts, Culinary Arts, Culinary Arts & Restaurant Ownership, Entrepreneurship & Restaurant Ownership, Digital Film & Video, Electronic Music, Event Management, Hospitality & Restaurant Business Management, Fashion Design, Fashion Marketing, Game Art & Design, Graphic Design, Independent Recording Arts, Interior Design, Professional Audio Video, Professional Recording Arts, Professional Recording Arts (LIPA), Visual & Game Programming, VFX for Film & Television and Web Design & Interactive Media. This list may be amended from time to time. The Art Institute of Vancouver offers the Bachelor of Applied

Design in Graphic Design, Bachelor of Applied Design in Web Design, Bachelor of Applied Design in Interior Design and Bachelor of Science in Game Programming degrees under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development. The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver is recognized by the Industry Training Authority as a designated training provider for Professional Cook 1 and Professional Cook 2 (PC1 and PC2), and Baker Levels 1 and 2. The Art Institute of Vancouver is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) to award diplomas and certificates. Bachelor’s degrees awarded by The Art Institute of Vancouver are not accredited by ACICS. The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools is listed as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the United States Department of Education and is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. ACICS can be reached at 750 First Street NE, Suite 980, Washington, DC 20002- 4241 Telephone: 1.202.336.6780.

Accreditation Review
As an accredited institution, The Art Institute of Vancouver undergoes an annual review of its operations by PCTIA. The most recent annual review was completed in May, 2012.
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The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

About the City of Vancouver
Beautiful, breathtaking Vancouver. Home to two million people, this is a west coast lifestyle city like no other. Nestled snugly in and around the slopes of the snow-capped Coast Mountains in the southwest corner of British Columbia, Vancouver is consistently ranked as one of the top ten places in the world to live and voted as one of the top ten “best destinations” in the world by the readers of Condé Nast Traveler magazine. It’s a cosmopolitan and culturally diverse metropolis, a place to enjoy world class restaurants, art galleries, shopping, events and entertainment. Vancouver supports a thriving theatre community and is home to a number of first-class attractions such as the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Vancouver Museum. With one of the most temperate climates in Canada, exquisite natural scenery, and relaxed outdoor lifestyle are all part of what makes the city so popular. Greater Vancouver offers outdoor activities year-round. During the summer months, kayaking, hiking, boating, camping, rock-climbing and golfing are all popular recreational pursuits. In the winter months, neighboring ski hills such as Whistler, Cypress and Blackcomb teem with snowboarders and skiers from around the world. Industry wise, the Greater Vancouver area is considered the production capital of the game industry in North America where companies such as Radical Entertainment, Electronic Arts and Rainmaker Entertainment call home. The city is the continent’s third largest film and television production centre behind Los Angeles and New York City. Truly a city for innovative people, Vancouver, British Columbia is the gem of the Canadian southwest coast. For culinary and hospitality interests, international calibre restaurants offer students countless opportunities to experience tastes from all corners of the globe. A little known, but relevant fact for future world class chefs is that Vancouver boasts more five diamond hotels than New York or Los Angeles. In fact, Vancouver has the greatest concentration of deluxe-rated hotels per capita in the whole of North America - a fine training ground for the new chefs of the world. The Art Institute of Vancouver is centrally situated for all these activities and is well-serviced by public transport to the downtown core. At The Art Institute of Vancouver, you’ll learn what it takes to become a creative professional. Here, you’ll learn how to create a portfolio that shows what you can do. That’s called having an edge. Standing out. And offering employers the kind of talent they’re looking for. What separates us from other institutions? Professionalism. Industry informs us that the key indicators of life-long success are attitude, team skills and a strong work ethic. We believe that they are just as important to success as exceptional technical and artistic skills. Our instructors work hard to impress upon students the importance of good communication skills, a goal-oriented mindset and strong team skills. We encourage students to be adaptable, have a positive attitude and be accountable for their actions.

Many faculty members have professional as well as academic experience, and many continue to remain active in their fields. An appropriate mix of full-time and adjunct faculty infuse our competency-based academic curricula with real-world experience, creating an atmosphere that fosters student success. Our faculty and staff believe students deserve an attractive return on their education investment. Combining traditional studies with career-focused technical training and practicums, wellrounded graduates are prepared to excel for employers, or to be successful in their own business. An impressive faculty, many of whom are working professionals, strives to strengthen students’ skills and cultivate their talents through well-designed curricula. Programs are carefully defined with the support and contributions of leading members of the professional community. Curricula are reviewed often to ensure they meet the needs of a changing employment marketplace and prepare graduates for entry-level positions in their chosen fields. A dedicated team of professionals also provides personal career planning services to students and graduates, capping an outcome-oriented education experience.

The Art Institute of Vancouver
Every student is here to learn from the experienced faculty. They’ve come for industry skills and connections they’ll get. But they’re also here for the gear: the equipment and resources it takes to create a professional end result.
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The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

Academic Affairs - Degree Programs

Game Programming
Available at the Renfrew campus. 194 credits - 58 courses - 36 months - 12 quarters - Bachelor of Science Degree The Bachelor of Science in Game Programming has a strong applied focus in programming, mathematics, physics, game development, game design and teamwork to prepare students for a career as a Video Game Programmer. The program is committed to the advancement of applied art, computer science, software programming and its role in the global culture. Upon graduation, Game Programming students will have acquired the training, programming knowledge and professional skills to interview for entry-level and junior programming positions at game development studios, web development companies, serious game companies (games designed to educate), social networking companies, and general programming listings. Program objectives are to provide students the following: • • Bachelor of Science in Game Programming in a program emphasizing strong theoretical and practical knowledge. A hands-on, learning-centred educational environment that

supports and enhances students’ professional and academic development as designers. • Targeted preparation and training for entry-level employment and advancement opportunities within the programming field. Access to appropriately credentialed faculty with extensive industry experience.

Course Listing
Course Number and Title Credits CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC133 Digital Imaging 3 CC310 Preproduction and Project Management 3 CC450 Production Team I 3 CC451 Production Team II 6 CC452 Post-Production 3 CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts 3 GAD100 History of Games 3 GAD110 Game Design I 3 GAD130 Level Design I 3 GE100 Rhetoric and Composition 4 GE102 Speech Communications 4 GE111 Academic Writing 4 GE121 Critical Thinking 4 GE126 Applied Mathematics 4 GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra 4 GE210 Fundamentals of Sociology 4 GE220 World Civilization 4 GE240 Introduction to Political Science 4 GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology 4 GE330 Ethics 4 RS360 Media Business Law and Communication 3 VGP100 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 VGP104 Software Development and Testing 3 VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I 3 VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I 3 VGP112 UML and Technical Documentation 3 VGP120 Procedural Programming in C II 3 VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II 3

Course Number and Title Credits VGP220 Algorithms and Data Patterns I 3 VGP230 2D Games Programming 3 VGP232 Game Tools and Pipelines 3 VGP240 3D Graphics and Applications 3 VGP242 3D Graphics Programming 3 VGP244 Algorithms and Data Patterns II 3 VGP246 Calculus for Physics 3 VGP248 Physics of Motion, Light and Sound 3 VGP256 Math and Physics for Games 3 VGP320 Database Programming 3 VGP330 Real Time GPU Programming 3 VGP331 Network Programming 3 VGP332 Artificial Intelligence 3 VGP333 Programming for Game Engines 3 VGP334 Animation for Games 3 VGP335 Audio for Games 3 VGP336 Gameplay Programming 3 VGP400 Portfolio I 3 VGP420 Senior Research 3 VGP430 Senior Project 3 VGP440 Concurrency and Parallel Programming 3 VGP450 Programming Workshop 3 VGP452 Senior Portfolio 6 General Education Elective 1 4 General Education Elective 2 4 General Education Elective 3 4 Media Arts Elective 1 3 Media Arts Elective 2 3 Media Arts Elective 3 3
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The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

propose a solution. and learn to apply these tools to problems encountered in game development. A project or projects are then selected to move forward to Production Team. technological shifts. and how to perform translation. and discussion with an introduction to rhetoric. Students also develop critical thinking and listening skills. dot & cross product. Prerequisite: None GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra (4 credits) This course covers the essential analytic geometry and linear algebra tools and techniques used in 3D games and graphics programming. composition and informal logic of the English Language. The focus is on generating levels with attention to efficiency and design aesthetics. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I or permission of the Academic Director CC450 Production Team I (3 credits) In this course. Prerequisite: None GE126 Applied Mathematics (4 credits) This course covers the foundational mathematical tools required in any animation or physics based game. develop. combinatorics. Prerequisite: GE126 Applied Mathematics The Art Institute of Vancouver . as well as learn to apply creative and critical techniques to problem solve.Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. modeling. and functions. and key genres in the brief history of electronic video games. Topics include coordinate systems. The student will develop a written and verbal vocabulary for analyzing games and their cultural significance. Prerequisite: CC450 Production Team I CC452 Post-Production (3 credits) Using their recently completed project from Production Team. students will learn the postproduction process including further tuning and feature addition based on peer feedback. Emphasis will be placed upon crafting the best form of expression for specific audiences and purposes. prototyping. reflection. pitching the game. projection. Emphasis is placed on developing problem solving skills. and transformations. Prerequisite: GE100 Rhetoric and Composition GE121 Critical Thinking (4 credits) In this course. CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. mechanical energy. make decisions and evaluate the media. matrices. Students will analyze and evaluate ideas and theories. As students gain confidence with the vocabulary of language analysis and rhetorical strategy. lighting. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. processes. planes. and the creation of marketing materials. Prerequisite: GAD110 Game Design I GE100 Rhetoric and Composition (4 credits) Writing is done for a purpose: to solve a problem. students learn to identify and develop skills. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. determinants. and to develop and polish their presentation skills. Prerequisite: None CC310 Preproduction and Project Management (3 credits) Students work on a game prototype and learn to invent new game ideas. and techniques to become effective learners.Academic Calendar . scaling. students continue to work as a team on the production of an electronic games project in a studio environment. and complex numbers are introduced. Prerequisite: None GAD110 Game Design I (3 credits) Students will be introduced to traditional game theory and design and how they relate to their modern electronic cousin. Prerequisite: None GE102 Speech Communications (4 credits) This course teaches oral communication skills with emphasis on both theory and practice. and basic collision detection. Prerequisite: CC451 Production Team II Page 10 CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts (3 credits) Students will be introduced to basic concepts of 3D space. compose coherent messages adapted to a specific audience and situation. organize. or create awareness. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. trigonometry. A variety of concepts. and animation. post-mortem reviews. The overall aim of this course is to enhance cognitive abilities and improve communication practices. psychology. They learn how to represent objects mathematically. and design aspects of colour. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by producing a project from inception to completion. Prerequisite: CC310 Preproduction and Project Management or permission of the Academic Director CC451 Production Team II (6 credits) In this course. lines. This course emphasizes the critical arts of reading. Students will experience an entire game cycle: identifying the audience. archiving. call for action. Students are taught how to conduct responsible research. students work as a team on the production of an electronic games project in a studio environment. materials. Students review the essentials of high school mathematics: algebra. Students work in teams to apply models and strategies for creating traditional games that are based in solid play mechanics. writing. The students are introduced to the theory of project management and how it applies to modern game development. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. rotation. motion with constant acceleration. Prerequisite: None GE111 Academic Writing (4 credits) The key purposes of this course are to help students improve their academic writing capabilities and to help students prepare for writing in post secondary education and professional settings. as well as ethical communication behaviors. code and design clean-up and optimization. vectors. the more features of style and argument they will recognize and use. Elective options can be found after the listing of required courses. Prerequisite: None GAD100 History of Games (3 credits) This course introduces students to the timeline. creating a final product and play testing. Vectors. Prerequisite: None GAD130 Level Design I (3 credits) This is an introductory course covering the level design process and the tools of level editing as they relate to building game environments using an existing commercial game engine. In this course students will consider their purpose for writing to state. and support an argument or position. Students apply these concepts to problems in game programming.

Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing RS360 Media Business Law and Communication (3 credits) This course covers the multiple facets of media business law. Prerequisite: None TS091 Transitional Math (3 credits) This is a transitional course. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE330 Ethics (4 credits) This course examines human life. developmental. experimental. and fractions. which focuses on the understanding of the operations of addition. The course includes learning the use of percentages and applying critical thinking to problem-solving configurations. intellectual property. capitalization. multiplication. maintaining. This course is designed to teach the major findings of sociology and to help students master fundamental sociological skills. implementing. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing TS090 Transitional English (3 credits) This class will introduce students to the power of language by discussing purpose. designing. political institutions and processes. Students will explore physiological. Topics include an overview of the legal system. This field of research focuses on explaining and interpreting processes and patterns of human social interactions. including variables. experience. Students will apply a number of ethics paradigms to a variety of contemporary personal and social issues. The course will cover topics relating to software development process such as requirement gathering. Prerequisite: None VGP100 Introduction to Computer Systems (3 credits) This course introduces students to the basic operation of a computer on multiple hardware platforms.GE210 Fundamentals of Sociology (4 credits) Sociology is the study of human society. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE220 World Civilization (4 credits) This course covers some of the ancient civilizations that have shaped world history and then works toward building an understanding of how these civilizations evolved to the fifteenth century. various sentence structures. policy problems and solutions. understand the basics of data analysis and their broad use in a range of educational and work settings. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . basic word processing. planning. arrays. The use of peripherals and their interaction with the computer will be applied. and punctuation. and abnormal psychological processes. and thought in order to discover and develop the principles and values for pursuing a more fulfilled existence. competent English prose. and user-defined functions. Course work concentrates on basic paragraph writing with its attendant skills: parts of speech. This hands-on experience of exploring sociology will provide a solid foundation for sociological analysis and will help students to develop practical skills that can be applied in other creative and business contexts. structures. Prerequisite: None VGP104 Software Development and Testing (3 credits) This course is an introduction to software engineering techniques used in modern application and game development. and database techniques are explored. maintenance. ideologies. quality assurance. decimal numbers. File management and storage. pronoun/ antecedent agreement. contracts. and division for the sets of whole numbers. This course will also emphasize the skills needed to produce clear. The students will also be introduced to the Internet as a research and networking tool. copyright and additional legal and ethical business issues as it affects media and design professionals. The components of a computer and general network infrastructure will be examined. spelling. there will be introductions to software implementation. subject/ verb agreement. personal property. popular values and participation are examined in terms of political stability and change. Students will learn how to think with sociological creativity. algorithms. spreadsheet. and testing. audience. Students must earn a “C” or higher to pass the course. Additionally. institutions and issues. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of programming using the C language. looping. Evolution and change and the diversity of the human experience constitute central themes of this course. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE240 Introduction to Political Science (4 credits) This course develops skills for understanding and analyzing political and governmental situations in the contemporary world. Students must earn a “C” or higher to pass the course. principles. Government. correct verb tenses. conflicts. branching. and creativity as they relate to the writing process. logical and arithmetic operators.Academic Calendar Page 11 . C types. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology (4 credits) This course presents basic concepts. and methods involved in the scientific study and understanding of human behavior. social. and application troubleshooting. subtraction.

Furthermore. rendering. Students will be provided the 2D engine framework and will be shown how to use and extend the engine for their final game project. simple harmonic motion. Prerequisites: GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra and VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP242 3D Graphics Programming (3 credits) In this course. with application to physics and animation. time performance analysis and memory efficiency analysis. namespaces. lighting. graphs traversal. Emphasis is on replacing repetitive tasks in the development process with effective and functional tools. motion. requirement gathering. multiple inheritance.Students will explore the standard template library. Students will learn to build graphics software through interfacing. rasterization. basic artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: GE126 Applied Mathematics VGP248 Physics of Motion. documentation.VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I (3 credits) This is an introduction to object-oriented programming in C++. Prerequisite: GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra Page 12 The Art Institute of Vancouver . troubleshooting. interpolations. smart pointers. The class implements each of these concepts in an existing industry standard graphics framework. and other advanced standard data types. Greedy method. and linking with libraries and header files within the DirectX SDK environment. implementation. trees. Students will learn how to multiply team efficiency through building tools and pipelines to increase development productivity. computer graphic. and the basic physics of light and sound propagation in media. physics. tree traversal. deadly diamond. The student will also learn about the different types of memory including heaps and stacks. compression. breath first search. user documentation. reference counting. collision detection. Integral Calculus and Vector Calculus. rigid body dynamics. divide & conquer. Prerequisite: VGP220 Algorithms and Data Patterns I VGP246 Calculus for Physics (3 credits) This course will explore Single variable Differential. resource management. memory management. Students will also learn to use the DirectX User Documentation to navigate and find information on how to interface with the low-level subsystems within the framework. Problem solving. and optimality of a given algorithm. graphics pipelines. const-correctness. The students will learn data patterns including various types of linked lists. basic design patterns. and shading. The course will cover productivity tools. and special effects. integrating. dynamic memory access. hash tables and other advanced object-oriented data types in C++. students will learn to analyze the run-time big 0 efficiencies. queues. data structures. and software designs. and randomization algorithms. advanced data structures and dynamic memory. depth first search. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP240 3D Graphics and Applications (3 credits) Students are introduced the fundamentals of 3D graphics and the underlying mathematics. abstract data types. The fundamentals of object-oriented programming in C++ through applied design. recursions. stacks.Academic Calendar . operator overloading. Students learn to recognize the importance of developing fast and efficient algorithms for solving common complex problems in a simple and elegant manner. inheritance. Prerequisite: VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II (3 credits) This course focuses on advanced objectoriented programming techniques in C++. exception handling. Prerequisites: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I and GE126 Applied Mathematics VGP232 Game Tools and Pipelines (3 credits) The role and function of a tools programmer on a games team is introduced to the students. coding styles and idioms. tree traversal. pattern matching. polymorphism. Prerequisite: VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I VGP112 UML and Technical Documentation (3 credits) This course is an introduction to software documentation and planning techniques used in modern software development. This course will introduce game engine architecture including 2D graphics. dynamic memory allocations. virtual functions. Students are introduced to common object-oriented concepts such as classes. user interface. pipeline solutions. algorithm analysis. students will apply their 2D/3D mathematics. data retrieval. heaps. Students learn efficient sorting. Prerequisite: None VGP120 Procedural Programming in C II (3 credits) This course introduces students advanced topics using the C language with a particular focus on pointers. code modularity. Students will apply their knowledge of algorithmic efficiency analysis to devise more complex algorithms and data structures including both recursive and non-recursive algorithms. data driven design. correctness. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP220 Algorithms and Data Patterns I (3 credits) This course is an introduction to algorithms and design patterns. Topics include templates. The students will cover 3D geometry. clipping. objectoriented designs. Prerequisite: VGP240 3D Graphics and Applications VGP244 Algorithms and Data Patterns II (3 credits) This course introduces advanced algorithms including shortest path. texturing. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP230 2D Games Programming (3 credits) This class is a project focused course where the student is responsible for the design. Students learn how to apply these principles to problems encountered in physics based games. object-oriented design analysis. hashing. type casting. advance sorting. and programming knowledge to interface with a real-world software development kit including Microsoft DirectX SDK. vectors. space efficiency. Light and Sound (3 credits) This course covers Newtonian mechanics. Technical design documentation using UML and other technical writing techniques are emphasized. abstract data types. and standard template libraries. maintenance and testing are reinforced. and code robustness. materials. Students will simulate real world types of problems solving using C++ related to video games programming. tree traversal. The course will focus on utilizing the practical software engineering use-case approach to drive software specifications. implementation and testing of a simple two-dimensional game. Emphasis is placed on formulating solutions in pseudocode. automated build process and reusable tools. heaps. and divide and conquer techniques are the main focus to this course. matrix transformations.

Prerequisite: VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP332 Artificial Intelligence (3 credits) In this course. All custom shaders in this course will be written in a High Level Shader Language (HLSL) in a preexisting 3D graphics programming framework. Special focus will be given on building databases that allows for optimal look ups and queries. students will be able to make video games with smooth animations with skinning and complex blending. Streaming and memory optimizations will be covered using 3rd party audio libraries. state machines. data normalization. and complex blending techniques. animation evaluation trees. there are various artificial intelligence techniques and concepts that will be explored including automated reasoning. distributed star. parallax mapping. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP334 Animation for Games (3 credits) Students will explore the fundamentals of animation programming and pipelines for video games. network routing. and tree. physics and networking. creativity. literature and/or content review. the ability to adapt and effective problem solving. Prerequisite: VGP400 Portfolio I VGP430 Senior Project (3 credits) Students. prototype gameplay features. Common networking concepts in games such as dead reckoning. They will have hands-on experience building the major parts of an animation system and pipeline including key frame/ skeleton animation playback. peer to peer. parallel transport & quaternion frames. Prerequisite: VGP246 Calculus for Physics VGP320 Database Programming (3 credits) In this course students learn to work with a back end database through a front end programming language like C++ or C#. relational database systems. file formats and compression/decompression. Prerequisites: GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra and VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP400 Portfolio I (3 credits) Students assemble and critique works from completed courses. manipulate audio assets. Prerequisite: VGP242 3D Graphics Programming VGP331 Network Programming (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of basic networking including transport protocols. and discover the limits of their programming knowledge. Prerequisite: VGP420 Senior Research The Art Institute of Vancouver . normal mapping. build networking gameplay. data collection and analysis. expanding. motion blur. bot behaviours. synchronization. and depth of field. introduction to inverse kinematics. Frenet. Prerequisites: GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra and VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP335 Audio for Games (3 credits) Students will study elements of digital audio for video games beginning with the physics of sound. the project risk and effectively complete a project that demonstrates coding abilities. specular mapping. and decision making. Game play programming will focus on developing. Students learn the tools needed to program realistic animation of rigid bodies in 3D based on Newtonian mechanics. player interactions. determinism. audio. to be submitted and defended during their final quarter.VGP256 Math and Physics for Games (3 credits) This course covers the mathematics and physics used in physics engines. and error handling are introduced and demonstrated in class. and learn how integrate all major systems through advanced scripting. Verlet. star. Potential shaders students will implement includes morphing. and utilizing existing technologies to produce fun and interactive game mechanics. will pick a research thesis completed in Senior Research and turn it into a practical coding project. Newton Euler equations of motion. Topics include collision detection techniques. add. Prerequisite: 105 completed credits and approval of Academic Director VGP420 Senior Research (3 credits) The student will select a specific subject that can be effectively designed and coded in eleven week period of time. Furthermore. technical design documentation and research evaluation.Academic Calendar Page 13 . audio digitization. Following this course. Prerequisites: GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra and VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP333 Programming for Game Engines (3 credits) Students will learn how to work in a pre-existing modern game engine framework. A high level of emphasis will be working hands-on with numerous game subsystems including enemy behaviors. Students will apply their learning by implementing and design artificial intelligence algorithms through a 3D framework in C/C++. use a modern 3rd party physics engine. Students will learn to create. including the identification of a research problem. A production-intent audio engine will be developed in the context of a sample game project. The student will learn how to manage their time. various types of pathfinding. Lagrange multipliers. geodesic. Students are expected to present a plan that lead up to their Senior Portfolio which enables them to plan for future programming career objective. and get an introduction to techniques for animating articulated bodies and deformable bodies. Prerequisite: VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP330 Real Time GPU Programming (3 credits) Students will create more advanced visual effects that utilize real time programmable shader pipeline available on modern GPUs. fuzzy logic. in a team or on their own. Prerequisite: VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP336 Gameplay Programming (3 credits) This course is an introduction to game play programming that is focused around working with modern game programming architectures to produce. Euler. Students will also learn about network topologies commonly found in games such as client server. path finding. and general database querying. They will learn a brand new pipeline and import game assets. Hermite & Bezier spline curves. Students research potential employers and learn about the different positions available for them. and other techniques of numerical integration. and prototype game mechanics. This course will provide an introduction to various research methodologies and evaluation will focus on the research process. During this time students will conduct research sufficient for a professional presentation as a graduate project. Data & event-driven audio APIs will be used throughout all game audio exercises. artificial intelligence. Both pixel and vertex shader techniques will be explored in detailed. They will be introduced to modern data models. There will be exposure to various different techniques in creating more realistic AI behaviours through different randomization concepts. and error handling. bump mapping. linear & spherical linear interpolation. and manipulate tables using SQL database technologies. research purpose and hypotheses. students will learn the complex mathematics behind animation playback and blending. animations.

We will study the concepts. artists. and behavior will be avenues of exploration. central limit theory. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing Media Arts Electives CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line. Prerequisite: None GE203 History and Analysis of Design (4 credits) Curriculum will encompass a study of the art movements that have structured the field of graphic design covering political. measurement. in turn. Science. works. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE360 Survey of Architecture (4 credits) This course surveys North American architecture from the eighteenth century to the present. students will be introduced to mathematical activities of a number of present-day and historical cultures. parallel processing. This course involves the observation and translation of three-dimensional form into two dimensional drawings. lighting. logic. programming tests. algebra. probability theory. The aims of the course are to examine the development of mathematics as part of a wider culture. economic. though they may not have a class of people called “mathematicians. modeling. and problem solving techniques. and elementary number theory. and social significance. with specific emphasis on solving problems encountered in digital media applications. but will also try to gain some understanding of the cultural setting and to understand how culture and mathematics interact. students will build skill levels in composition. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director General Education Electives GE131 Environmental Science (4 credits) This course investigates humanity’s interaction with the natural environment. and animation. asynchronous design patterns. Prerequisite: None GE320 Cultural Theory (4 credits) This course will examine how cultural phenomena shape our world and how. Graphing and using polynomial functions and systems of equations and inequalities in the interpretation and solution of problems will be examined. images. materials. basics of asynchronous game application designs. shape. Starting with simple shapes and progressing to more complex organic forms. batch processing. The objective is for students to develop a basic understanding of the use of mathematics in the real-world. trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on construction detail and technique as well as measurement and engineering analysis. symmetry in patterns. the mathematical language of digital computing. Prerequisite: None GE232 Ethnomathematics (4 credits) All cultures have mathematics. data structures. Modern software design topics covered in this course include threading. Prerequisite: None GE230 Mathematics (4 credits) This course covers set theory. functions. asynchronous work load dispatching. architecture. we shape it.Academic Calendar . race and class. number systems. number words and number bases. Prerequisites: VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II and VGP244 Algorithms and Data Patterns II VGP450 Programming Workshop (3 credits) This is a special topics workshop where an instructor and students explore a contemporary games programming topic that has immediate relevance. Students will use political. shading. whiteboard questions. literature. Prerequisite: VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP452 Senior Portfolio (6 credits) This course focuses on the completion of a student’s portfolio and enables the student to begin their career search. form. Prerequisite: None CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts (3 credits) Students will be introduced to basic concepts of 3D space. proportion. and sampling distributions. social and economic influences and the analysis of contemporary design and design trends. how does culture embody power. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. data pipelines. and general performance optimizations. The next generation of technology in game consoles and applications is moving away from traditional programming approaches towards a more asynchronous paradigm. gender. Questions will be raised such as: what is the relationship between high and pop culture. urban planning. geometry.” In this course. Prerequisite: None Page 14 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Prerequisite: None CCM101 Drawing and Perspective (3 credits) This course is a fundamental drawing course where the students will explore various arts and media and learn to use a variety of drawing tools. examining visual. and scientific models to analyze current issues and examine the future of the environment and the effect they can have on it.VGP440 Concurrency and Parallel Programming (3 credits) An introduction to concurrency programming. and platform technologies across different gaming consoles and hardware. and how does material culture make us who we are? Students will look for answers to these questions in areas such as social and cultural criticism. technical interviews. historic. Prerequisite: None GE231 Statistics (4 credits) This course includes representing and analyzing data through such measures as central tendency. the normal curve and normal distributions. concurrency. ethics. framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination. dispersion. videos and projects. geometry. Prerequisite: None GE202 History of Art in Early Civilizations (4 credits) This course explores the history of art from the Prehistoric and Tribal periods through to the Baroque. strategy and chance in games and puzzles. popular culture and personal experience. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by producing a project from inception to completion. advertising. and use of tone. Students are introduced to games interview screening process. They will concentrate on the mathematics: general philosophy of measuring and counting. line quality. and styles of the periods through the use of textbook. complex problem solving and verbal presentation of tough technical challenges. the binomial distributions.

Prerequisite: GAD120 Scripting I GAD230 Level Design II (3 credits) This course builds upon the previous foundational Level Design course. Issues such as keyframing. script out. Presentation and critique will be components of learning. Prerequisite: GAD110 Game Design I GAD130 Level Design I (3 credits) This is an introductory course covering the level design process and the tools of level editing as they relate to building game environments using an existing commercial game engine. Prerequisite: None CCM181 3D Modeling I (3 credits) This course covers modeling techniques used for building organic and hard surface objects and environments. The focus is on generating levels with attention to efficiency and design aesthetics. Students will use a variety of materials and techniques to develop their skills and understanding of sculpture and its relationship to digital 3D animation. writing design documentation. The goal of the course is to help students prepare themselves for employment with a game company and generate design materials. scripted sequences and special effects. Prerequisite: CCM101 Drawing and Perspective GAD120 Scripting I (3 credits) Fundamentals of programming using a modern programming language. game. Prerequisite: None GAD121 Mini Games and Prototyping (3 credits) Students will design. 2011 having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the minister. and create small self-contained mini-games and subsequently balance and tune them. Prerequisite: GAD120 Scripting I GAD122 Game Design II (3 credits) Game Design II focuses on providing students with practical application and instruction of game design as it relates to working inside a game development studio. Prerequisite: GAD130 Level Design I GAD235 Online Game Scripting I (3 credits) Online Game Scripting provides students with an introduction to the online authoring environment. and artistic concepts necessary to render clear and concise storyboards at a professional level. and figure drawing as a basis for perceiving and executing physical forms. Additive and subtractive methodologies will be practiced. Students will learn how to apply their skills to construct a commercial website with Web accessibility. manipulating graphics and creating simple games are explored. or other educational institutions). weight. and force in human gesture drawing. Nevertheless. human anatomy. In this class. We will cover advanced level construction techniques including effective lighting. volume. Prerequisite: None WDIM130 Web Site Development I (3 credits) Students will learn to create effective websites with maximum browser compatibility utilizing authoring software. and exploring selected issues pertinent to the interactive entertainment industry. Students will also learn advanced HTML and CSS. Students will learn modern tools for rapid prototyping of various electronic game genres. and live action production.CCM141 Life Drawing I (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course where students explore the concepts of structure. Students learn the various terminologies. acceptable to potential employers. Prerequisite: None This program is offered under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education effective July 20. Interface design. cinematic techniques. Page 15 The Art Institute of Vancouver . from high-level idea to implementation an industry standard level editor. we explore a structured process of designing levels. proportion. prospective students are responsible for satisfying themselves that the program and the degree will be appropriate to their needs (for example.Academic Calendar . Prerequisite: GAD110 Game Design I GAD140 Scripting II (3 credits) This course builds on the previous scripting class and introduces students to advanced object-oriented programming and scripting concepts. Prerequisite: CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM291 Storyboarding (3 credits) This course focuses on the specifics of storyboarding as a storytelling medium and its place in the pipeline for animation. The student is introduced to the basics of scripting an online game. professional licensing bodies. It includes discussion of current ideas regarding game design. in-betweening. and cycling will be addressed. Prerequisite: CC401 Portfolio I or Permission of the Academic Director MAG151 Sculpture (3 credits) Students will employ elements and principles of design. created key-framed content. Prerequisite: GAD140 Scripting II GAD450 Game Design Workshop (3 credits) This is a special topics workshop where an instructor and students explore a contemporary games design topic that has immediate relevance. Prerequisite: CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM221 3D Animation I (3 credits) Students will study timing and weight through a series of projects designed to demonstrate the principles of animation.

there is a growing need for designers who can provide solutions while creating sustainable. Program graduates will possess a knowledge of design and sustainable fundamentals. critical thinking skills and ethical awareness. program graduates will have hands-on awareness of innovations within sustainable design and how these advances translate into the daily operations of schools and organizations within British Columbia. they will have the opportunity to launch and co-steer strategies for incorporating new sustainable standards. Students will be taught how to assume the role of innovators and leaders within the program: in collaboration with their academic director and instructors. As such. learning-centred educational environment that supports and enhances students’ professional and academic development as designers.Academic Affairs . A hands-on. as well as an understanding of core values. Targeted preparation and training for entry-level employment and advancement opportunities within the design field.36 months . 194 credits .12 quarters .59 courses . Access to appropriately credentialed faculty with extensive industry experience.Degree Programs Graphic Design Available at the Renfrew campus. This academic program aims to produce designers who combine technical aptitude. eco-conscious designs.Academic Calendar . emerging trends and discipline challenges.Bachelor of Applied Design Degree The Art Institute of Vancouver’s Bachelor of Applied Design in Graphic Design degree program focuses on the increasingly vital relationship between design and sustainable principles. • • Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CC110 Drawing 3 CC112 Fundamentals of Design 3 CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC133 Digital Imaging 3 GD101 Fundamentals of Sustainable Design 3 GD120 Graphic Stylization and Symbols 3 GD121 Concept Development 3 GD130 Digital Illustration 3 GD131 Typography 3 GD133 Advanced Typography 3 GD134 Digital Imaging II 3 GD140 Electronic Design 3 GD201 Principles of Sustainable Design 3 GD202 Sustainable Design Standards 3 GD203 Green Campaign 3 GD221 Production Procedures 3 GD222 Production Procedures II 3 GD231 Corporate Identity 3 GD233 Experimental Typography 3 GD240 Design and Technology 3 GD250 Advertising 3 GD301 Sustainable Design Leadership 3 GD311 Art Direction 3 GD331 Conceptual Illustration 3 GD340 Foundations of Electronic Production 3 GD350 Copywriting for Electronic Media 3 GD360 Digital Photography 3 GD390 Portfolio I 3 GD401 Senior Research Thesis 3 GD402 Environmental Design 3 Page 16 Course Number and Title Credits GD410 Dimensional Design 3 GD432 Senior Project 3 GD440 Publication Design 3 GD470 Information Design 3 GD480 Public Relations and Marketing 3 GD490 Senior Portfolio 6 GE100 Rhetoric and Composition 4 GE102 Speech Communications 4 GE111 Academic Writing 4 GE121 Critical Thinking 4 GE202 History of Art in Early Civilizations 4 GE203 History and Analysis of Design 4 GE210 Fundamentals of Sociology 4 GE220 World Civilization 4 GE230 Mathematics 4 GE240 Introduction to Political Science 4 GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology 4 GE320 Cultural Theory 4 GE330 Ethics 4 RS360 Media Business Law and Communication 3 WDIM100 Computer Literacy and Web Fundamentals 3 WDIM110 Design Layout I 3 WDIM130 Web Site Development I 3 WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia 3 WDIM141 Intermediate Interactive Web Scripting 3 WDIM142 Advanced Interactive Web Scripting 3 WDIM150 Introduction to Scripting Languages 3 WDIM440 Advanced Web Site Development 3 General Education Elective 4 The Art Institute of Vancouver . They will demonstrate professional excellence in the application of environmentally conscious principles to any design project or milieu. As environmental demands escalate and take centre focus in educational and political discourse. Our specific objectives are to provide students the following: • • Work-ready competencies in a program emphasizing strong theoretical and practical knowledge.

Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. properties of finishes used. psychology. Topics covered will include air and environmental quality. students will investigate the ecology and interaction of natural and human ecosystems. engineering. Prerequisite: GD131 Typography GD134 Digital Imaging II (3 credits) This course builds upon previous courses to integrate raster and vector graphics with concerns for varied formats. and design aspects of colour. Prerequisite: None GD133 Advanced Typography (3 credits) This course is a continuation of the study of Typography. original. including web and print graphics. and idea refinement. The course will explore vector-based graphic applications that are considered to be industry standard. Students will analyze the evolution of global sustainable design standards as well as how interactions between government regulation and private practices influence standards in design sustainability. Prerequisites: CC110 Drawing and CC112 Fundamentals of Design GD130 Digital Illustration (3 credits) This course helps students communicate and design with the computer as a professional tool. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD140 Electronic Design (3 credits) This course will explore various means of indicating. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. and ecological sustainability ranging from microcosm. assembly/ease of disassembly. brainstorming. the student will demonstrate an understanding of electronic illustration. placing and manipulating visual elements in page design. Students also explore the use of vector-based software as a design and typesetting tool. Prerequisite: GD101 Fundamentals of Sustainable Design GD202 Sustainable Design Standards (3 credits) Students will explore the central components and values of sustainable design in this course. The development of marketable. end of usable life. or the design of small objects to macrocosm. systematically developing strong and creative layout solutions by means of a cumulative. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. recyclability. Concept development processes and material manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions. CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line. Students use creative problem solving and research techniques. Logos and other symbolic images will be examined in historic and contemporary contexts. Exercises and projects focus on the hierarchical qualities of typography. identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. economic. conceptual design process. analysis. the design of buildings. Prerequisite: None CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore. Students will create visual messages and focused visual statements and gain an understanding of the differences in web and print graphics. form. framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination. They will also produce material which will sup­ port portfolio quality projects throughout their study. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour.Academic Calendar Page 17 . This course will provide an overview of sustainable movements across a variety of fields and provide insight into emerging practices. and creative problem solving solutions will also be examined with an emphasis on creative techniques. and display and text type will be developed using page composition software. Prerequisites: CC110 Drawing and CC112 Fundamentals of Design GD121 Concept Development (3 credits) This course emphasizes the conceptualization processes of art and design in determining solutions to course assignments. Prerequisite: None GD131 Typography (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the history of the evolution and application of typography for the perception of meaning. shape. graphic. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD201 Principles of Sustainable Design (3 credits) Students will build upon the knowledge gained in previous courses and investigate what components encompass a green audit. and abstract shapes will then be utilized to create individual logo designs and other symbolic images. proportion. modularity/ flexibility and education and interpretation. world fisheries. shading. eco-conscious printing processes. As a concept. Prerequisite: None GD101 Fundamentals of Sustainable Design (3 credits) Students will learn about the fundamentals and key topics associated with social. simplified imagery. and architectural design. specifically problem identification. illustrations. including energy systems and global climate change. with particular emphasis on the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. resource and waste management/ recycled content. Prerequisite: GD201 Principles of Sustainable Design The Art Institute of Vancouver . interior. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. Using different software applications. A variety of concepts. deserts and their implication for economic sustainable development. Elective options can be found after the listing of required courses. sustainable design is growing across various fields and standards are emerging in fashion. landscape. Prerequisite: None GD120 Graphic Stylization and Symbols (3 credits) This course examines the importance of graphic symbols in design. Prerequisite: None CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. The ability to effectively integrate photographs. By gaining an understanding of sustainable design standards. cities and the earth’s physical surface. standards and associations. industrial. Graphic elements including typography. by-products of the manufacturing process. students will acquire the knowledge to apply to multi-disciplinary projects. intention and personality of the written word. In addition. Industry-driven software will be used in the development of digital typography and hierarchal skills. rain forests.

psychology. Participants develop skills to analyze corporate objectives and apply practical applications. design consistency and time management. The emphasis is on design elements from the perspective of history. this course expands the philosophy behind illustration. Key multi-page print and dimensional projects allow for advanced exploration of conceptual approaches. illustration. including contracts. budgets. values. colour and problem-solving skills and stress attention to detail. deadlines. attention to detail. students will learn about and express their creative methods and cognitive processes. These applications will be part of a structured corporate image system. original concepts for green design campaigns. deadlines. trapping procedures. line screens. using contrast. Prerequisite: GD140 Electronic Design GD250 Advertising (3 credits) This course will explore the various aspects of advertising design communications with an emphasis on the development of creative. Emphasis will be on writing opportunities in the communications industries. Theory and techniques will be explored through lecture/tutorial series. and finishing techniques. and strategies for effectively selling a product and explore product concepts. original concepts. line camera & basic principles/ratios. Prerequisites: GD201 Principles of Sustainable Design and GD250 Advertising GD221 Production Procedures (3 credits) The course is designed to help students become proficient in designing and preparing various graphic materials for digital production via new printing technologies. and how these relate to bitmap resampling and image/file exporting. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing strong concepts appropriate to client needs. Prerequisite: GD140 Electronic Design GD350 Copywriting for Electronic Media (3 credits) This course examines the roles of copywriter and scriptwriter in interactive multimedia. typography.GD203 Green Campaign (3 credits) This course will build on the competencies acquired in previous courses with an emphasis on the development of creative. Key multi-page print and dimensional projects allow for exploration of conceptual approaches. billing along with business ethics. and function. students will learn about and express their creative methods and cognitive processes. strategy and understanding the client vision. large format signage. design consistency and time management. including paste-up techniques. composition. objectdefined graphics and text through the integration of file types in this advanced course. promotion. and traditional four-. Prerequisite: GD202 Sustainable Design Standards GD311 Art Direction (3 credits) This course will exhibit the role of the Art Director in producing multi-faceted design projects. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD222 Production Procedures II (3 credits) Building upon the concepts learned in Production Procedures I. price. While the course focuses on corporate identity and its function. Prerequisites: GD121 Concept Development and GD130 Digital Illustration and GD131 Typography GD233 Experimental Typography (3 credits) Emphasis is placed on the expressive potential of typography. professional presentation and attention to cultural diversity. methods. Students are expected to produce contemporary design solutions for corporate sectors. trapping procedures. such as establishing the premise. Through critique. logo development is also explored with other business communication solutions. How the form of the written word(s) affects the meaning is studied experimentally. attention to detail. Prerequisite: GD221 Production Procedures I GD231 Corporate Identity (3 credits) This course will explore the role of design in a corporate identity program. and distribution as they relate to advertising.Academic Calendar . Through critique. students are introduced to the concepts and theories of leadership and further develop the knowledge and skills needed to integrate sustainable design and green design principles and practices for graphic design purposes within the advertising. and six-colour presses. typography. communication and negotiating skills. emphasizing conceptual visual problem solving and quick sketching methods to portray ideas. Prerequisite: None GD301 Sustainable Design Leadership (3 credits) In this course. design. Prerequisite: GD140 Electronic Design and GD221 Production Procedures GD331 Conceptual Illustration (3 credits) Building upon the concepts. and artistic interpretation executed with digital tools. professional presentation and attention to cultural diversity. colour and problem-solving skills and stress attention to detail. Prerequisites: GD120 Graphic Stylization and Symbols and GD121 Concept Development and GD130 Digital Illustration GD340 Foundations of Electronic Production (3 credits) This is a major portfolio course that will further develop students’ ability to prepare electronic and physical material for production. image reproduction and manipulation. The course also explores the business of advertising. and put into practice through a series of project assignments designed to exercise both student understanding of techniques and design creativity. developing the treatment. Assignments will focus on black and white and colour techniques. It also highlights the uses of illustration in the graphic design industry. A team environment is emphasized and will acquaint the students with the necessity of leadership ability. The instructor will act in a mentoring role and help guide students through various creative processes. submission to newspapers or magazines. as well as on the process of interactive writing. The place of digital page make-up in modern print production is studied. The preparation of concepts will utilize the principles of design. skills and theoretical backdrop of the Digital Illustration course. typography. image reproduction and manipulation. The instructor will act in a mentoring role and help guide students through various creative processes. colour approaches. Lectures include a review of the target audiences. and defining the audience. bindery. Students will learn about the theories. bindery. Prerequisite: GD133 Advanced Typography GD240 Design and Technology (3 credits) This is a major portfolio course that will introduce students to the electronic preparation of material for production. packaging and communications industries. Exercises will train students in coordinating creative efforts from concept to finished product. Traditional reproduction techniques will be explored. The preparation of concepts for green campaigns will utilize the principles of sustainability. illustration. and finishing techniques. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing strong concepts appropriate to client needs. colour approaches. students will have created multi-page digital pre-press documents that include scanned and edited images. Prerequisite: None Page 18 The Art Institute of Vancouver . five-. typography.

Students are taught how to conduct responsible research. hierarchy. illustration. This class will focus on creating a publication. including the identification of a research problem. A major course emphasis will be to focus on learning skills and processes which will ensure design continuity throughout a complex multi-page document. and discussion with an introduction to rhetoric. colour. bindery. Prerequisite: GD390 Portfolio I GD410 Dimensional Design (3 credits) Students learn to effectively design using form. field research. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . colour and texture as well as a typographical relationship to the subject of the publication. concepts. Prerequisite: Completion of 165 credits and permission of the Academic Director GE100 Rhetoric and Composition (4 credits) Writing is done for a purpose: to solve a problem. consumer identity and representational ethics are among the topics covered. brand positioning and identification. Prerequisites: GD140 Electronic Design and GD221 Production Procedures I GD432 Senior Project (3 credits) Students will select. conceptual development and problem solving. compose coherent messages adapted to a specific audience and situation. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD390 Portfolio I (3 credits) This course prepares students for the transition to the professional world and for job interviews by helping them compile a portfolio. including digital still camera as well as camcorder orientation. Prerequisite: Completion of 90 credits and permission of the Academic Director GD401 Senior Research Thesis (3 credits) The student will select a specific subject that can be effectively presented using graphic and/ or web design. attention to detail. Government regulations affecting the package. and finishing techniques.Academic Calendar Page 19 . Emphasis will be placed upon understanding information systems and their function. image reproduction and manipulation. Prerequisite: GD390 Portfolio I GD440 Publication Design (3 credits) Publication design is a mainstay in the study of graphic design. design consistency and time management. Key multi-page print and dimensional projects allow for exploration of conceptual approaches. Instruction is given on basic techniques of production. set-up and operation. media relations. data collection and analysis. Research will culminate in a product or statement of philosophy. design. craftsmanship and presentation. The instructor will act in a mentoring role and help guide students through various creative processes. Prerequisite: GD390 Portfolio I GD402 Environmental Design (3 credits) Students will study a range of examples of environmental design measured against conventions of 2D display/informational systems and with consideration of sustainability. aesthetic and content considerations. Prerequisite: None GE102 Speech Communications (4 credits) This course teaches oral communication skills with emphasis on both theory and practice. and exercises students will examine package designs already in the marketplace. to be submitted and defended during their final quarter. The course focuses on the principles of using colour. Prerequisite: None GD490 Senior Portfolio (6 credits) This course will focus on the refinement of previous works into a comprehensive collection representative of Graphic Design skills. This course emphasizes the critical arts of reading. illustration. colour approaches. and other techniques for overall thematic and visual effects of moving and static images. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing strong concepts appropriate to client needs. page sequence and spreads. the expectations of performance and issues of functionality. diagrams and electronic displays. charts. The overall aim of this course is to enhance cognitive abilities and improve communication practices. In this course students will consider their purpose for writing to state. This course will provide an introduction to various research methodologies and evaluation will focus on the research process. printing and reproduction processes will also be addressed. literature and/or content review. tables. They will engage in individual research culminating in a statement of philosophy of conceptual development and problem solving as it relates to their work. Students will select an original major project in design or illustration and develop a “junior project” throughout the duration of the course. readability/legibility. This is a major portfolio course that focuses on electronic preparation of material for production. Emphasis will be on development. develop and execute a major design or illustration project. reflection. including technical. The study of public opinion research. research purpose and hypotheses. including text. Emphasis is on appropriateness for the specific market. The publication will be typographically -oriented with a combination of images. composition. photography. students will learn about and express their creative methods and cognitive processes. Through discussion. organize. grid. develop. lighting. call for action. schedule. Through critique. graphics and colour as they pertain to intelligent and compelling package design. and support an argument or position. trapping procedures. Projects that challenge students on issues of hierarchy. as well as ethical communication behaviors. Students will gain practical experience in conducting surveys and designing integrated campaigns. Prerequisite: GD390 Portfolio I GD470 Information Design (3 credits) Students will study a range of examples of information design applications and conventions of 2D display/informational systems. Students are also given the option to select various previous projects for major design revision. propose a solution. or create awareness. space. and to develop and polish their presentation skills. visual appeal and the physical container. the nature of the environment. typography. composition and informal logic of the English Language. Prerequisite: GD390 Portfolio I GD480 Public Relations and Marketing (3 credits) This course introduces strategic issues and effective practices of communication between organizations and their constituencies. type. writing. and techniques of digital visual composition for both static and moving images. lighting. and research evaluation. This course will address understanding the complexities of public space. Students also develop critical thinking and listening skills. During this time students will conduct research sufficient for a professional presentation as a graduate project. public communication campaigns.GD360 Digital Photography (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamental terminology. The course stresses a phased design process and the role of packaging in marketing. fabrication and sustainability are integral to this course.

Academic Calendar . Students will explore physiological. spreadsheet and database techniques are explored. logic. make decisions and evaluate the media. intellectual property. works. Prerequisite: GE100 Rhetoric and Composition GE121 Critical Thinking (4 credits) In this course. Evolution and change and the diversity of the human experience constitute central themes of this course. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing TS090 Transitional English (3 credits) This class will introduce students to the power of language by discussing purpose. the mathematical language of digital computing. Students must earn a “C” or higher to pass the course. Prerequisite: None GE210 Fundamentals of Sociology (4 credits) Sociology is the study of human society. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing RS360 Media Business Law and Communication (3 credits) This course covers the multiple facets of media business law. Prerequisite: None WDIM100 Computer Literacy and Web Fundamentals (3 credits) This course introduces students to the basic operation of computer hardware multiple platforms. advertising. File management and storage. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE220 World Civilization (4 credits) This course covers some of the ancient civilizations that have shaped world history and then works toward building an understanding of how these civilizations evolved to the fifteenth century. multiplication. audience. we shape it. principles. and methods involved in the scientific study and understanding of human behavior. urban planning. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE320 Cultural Theory (4 credits) This course will examine how cultural phenomenon shape our world and how. This field of research focuses on explaining and interpreting processes and patterns of human social interactions. and creativity as they relate to the writing process. This course is designed to teach the major findings of sociology and to help students master fundamental sociological skills. literature. Topics include an overview of the legal system. popular values and participation are examined in terms of political stability and change. how does culture embody power. Course work concentrates on basic paragraph writing with its attendant skills: parts of speech. Prerequisite: None GE240 Introduction to Political Science (4 credits) This course develops skills for understanding and analyzing political and governmental situations in the contemporary world. and class. and styles of the periods through the use of images and projects. and fractions. social and economic influences and the analysis of contemporary design and design trends. and thought in order to discover and develop the principles and values for pursuing a more fulfilled existence. in turn. copyright and additional legal and ethical business issues as it affects media and design professionals. architecture. Emphasis will be placed upon crafting the best form of expression for specific audiences and purposes. number systems. processes. developmental. students learn to identify and develop skills. and problem solving techniques. political institutions and processes. Prerequisite: None GE203 History and Analysis of Design (4 credits) Curriculum will encompass a study of the art movements that have structured the field of graphic design covering political. Students will study the concepts. measurement. Students will analyze and evaluate ideas and theories. trigonometry. experimental. which focuses on the understanding of the operations of addition. Prerequisite: None Page 20 The Art Institute of Vancouver . competent English prose.GE111 Academic Writing (4 credits) The key purposes of this course are to help students improve their academic writing capabilities and to help students prepare for writing in post secondary education and professional settings. the more features of style and argument they will recognize and use. correct verb tenses. capitalization. Government. Prerequisite: None GE202 History of Art in Early Civilizations (4 credits) This course is a history of art from the Prehistoric and Tribal periods through to the Baroque. The objective is for students to develop a basic understanding of the use of mathematics in the real-world. Prerequisite: None TS091 Transitional Math (3 credits) This is a transitional course. This hands-on experience of exploring sociology will provide a solid foundation for sociological analysis and will help students to develop practical skills that can be applied in other creative and business contexts. subject/ verb agreement. subtraction. contracts. Students must earn a “C” or higher to pass the course. institutions and issues. functions. conflicts. and how does material culture make us who we are? Students will look for answers to these questions in areas such as social and cultural criticism. pronoun/ antecedent agreement. experience. and division for the sets of whole numbers. and techniques to become effective learners. Questions will be raised such as: what is the relationship between high and pop culture. geometry. understand the basics of data analysis and their broad use in a range of educational and work settings. personal property. with specific emphasis on solving problems encountered in digital media applications. social. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE330 Ethics (4 credits) This course examines human life. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology (4 credits) This course presents basic concepts. As students gain confidence with the vocabulary of language analysis and rhetorical strategy. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE230 Mathematics (4 credits) This course covers set theory. policy problems and solutions. various sentence structures. algebra. This course will also emphasize the skills needed to produce clear. gender. as well as learn to apply creative and critical techniques to problem solve. race. The use of peripherals and network operations will be examined. artists. and punctuation. decimal numbers. Students will apply a number of ethics paradigms to a variety of contemporary personal and social issues. Students will learn how to think with sociological creativity. spelling. and abnormal psychological processes. Students will also be introduced to the Internet as a research and networking tool. ideologies. The course includes learning the use of percentages and applying critical thinking to problem-solving configurations. popular culture and personal experience. basic word processing.

and academic capabilities to create sophisticated interactive projects. prospective students are responsible for satisfying themselves that the program and the degree will be appropriate to their needs (for example. acceptable to potential employers. determinants. dot & cross product. Nevertheless. ethics. buttons. as well as visual. Students review the essentials of high school mathematics: algebra. rotation. vectors. and how to create the HTML necessary to display your graphics. buttons. and complex numbers are introduced. and conditions. and functions. and will develop the creative. manage and retrieve data. and learn to apply these tools to problems encountered in game development. Prerequisite: None GE360 Survey of Architecture (4 credits) This course surveys North American architecture from the eighteenth century to the present. lines. animate those graphics. designing storyboards for their interactive portfolios. symmetry in patterns. MySQL. central limit theory. and basic collision detection. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing This program is offered under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development effective March 31. Prerequisite: WDIM130 Web Site Development I General Education Electives GE126 Applied Mathematics (4 credits) This course covers the foundational mathematical tools required in any animation or physics based game. interactive movies. though they may not have a class of people called “mathematicians. the binomial distributions. create interface elements with interactivity. forms and variables. and sampling distributions.WDIM110 Design Layout I (3 credits) This course will enable the student to utilize their design skills in collaboration with web development technology and technology considerations. Other topics include pop-up menus. audio. Topics include coordinate systems. Prerequisite: None GE232 Ethnomathematics (4 credits) All cultures have mathematics. Students apply these concepts to problems in game programming. Prerequisite: None GE231 Statistics (4 credits) This course includes representing and analyzing data through such measures as central tendency. The aims of the course are to examine the development of mathematics as part of a wider culture. Prerequisite: None WDIM141 Intermediate Interactive Web Scripting (3 credits) Students will learn to create and deliver fastloading interactive animation. scaling. and transformations. Students will communicate with databases using the SQL query language and apply server side scripting knowledge to create dynamic websites. or other educational institutions). 2010 having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the minister. but will also try to gain some understanding of the cultural setting and to understand how culture and mathematics interact. Vectors. Prerequisite: WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia WDIM142 Advanced Interactive Web Scripting (3 credits) Students will continue to build upon what they have learned to create and deliver fast-loading interactive animation. and type elements. loops. economic. geometry. Students will also learn advanced HTML and CSS. Emphasis will be placed on students assessing their most marketable skills. Page 21 The Art Institute of Vancouver . students will use principles and techniques used to develop small-to-medium scale applications that store. mechanical energy. the normal curve and normal distributions. technical. trigonometry. dispersion. Emphasis will be placed upon translating original and innovative design concepts to the web. and how to perform translation. Prerequisite: GE126 Applied Mathematics GE131 Environmental Science (4 credits) This course investigates humanity’s interaction with the natural environment. projection. number words and number bases. and social significance. and elementary number theory. Prerequisite: None WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia (3 credits) In this class you will learn how to create graphics. and scientific models to analyze current issues and examine the future of the environment and the effect they can have on it. Science. graphics and sound for the Web with exciting transparency and shape blending effects. graphics and sound for the Web with exciting transparency and shape blending effects. students will be introduced to mathematical activities of a number of present-day and historical cultures. Emphasis is placed on developing problem solving skills. animations. creating professional design layouts. strategy and chance in games and puzzles.Academic Calendar . data structures. examining visual. motion with constant acceleration. probability theory. In addition. This course will teach advanced action scripting with classes to allow students to create sophisticated interactive projects. Prerequisite: None WDIM130 Web Site Development I (3 credits) Students will learn to create effective websites with maximum browser compatibility utilizing authoring software. and timeline control. Prerequisite: WDIM130 Web Site Development I WDIM440 Advanced Web Site Development (3 credits) This course will guide students through the process of compiling their work into a final interactive web-based portfolio with accompanying professional development content. planes. combinatorics. creating interfaces. In this course students will learn advanced action scripting. video. matrices. Graphing and using polynomial functions and systems of equations and inequalities in the interpretation and solution of problems will be examined. Projects will focus on essential web development skills using PHP.” In this course. Prerequisite: None GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra (4 credits) This course covers the essential analytic geometry and linear algebra tools and techniques used in 3D games and graphics programming. They learn how to represent objects mathematically. Emphasis is placed on construction detail and technique as well as measurement and engineering analysis. and interface elements as a webpage. Students will learn how to apply their skills to construct a commercial website with Web accessibility. historic. Prerequisite: WD141 Intermediate Interactive Web Scripting WDIM150 Introduction to Scripting Languages (3 credits) Students will learn to build database applications that are integrated with the Web. professional licensing bodies. Students will apply techniques and strategies to market themselves in their chosen fields. They will concentrate on the mathematics: general philosophy of measuring and counting. Students will use political. and behavior will be avenues of exploration.

functional. designed to prepare graduates to meet the current demands of the profession. business aspects of the profession. materials. history of interior design.36 months . and welfare of the public.Academic Affairs . and other issues related to the interior design field. and residential and contract/ commercial design. The program is designed to emphasize the areas of drafting. safety. protect the health. lighting.59 courses . Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CC110 Drawing 3 CC112 Fundamentals of Design 3 CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC118 Perspective 3 CC124 Rendering & Illustration 3 CC225 Human Factors & Psychology of Design 3 GE100 Rhetoric and Composition 4 GE102 Speech Communications 4 GE111 Academic Writing 4 GE121 Critical Thinking 4 GE202 History of Art in Early Civilizations 4 GE210 Fundamentals of Sociology 4 GE220 World Civilization 4 GE230 Mathematics 4 GE240 Introduction to Political Science 4 GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology 4 GE320 Cultural Theory 4 GE330 Ethics 4 ID109 Basic Drafting 3 ID111 Design Basics 3D 3 ID113 Introduction to Interior Design 3 ID127 Computer-Aided Design 3 ID134 Textiles 3 ID136 Advanced Drafting 3 ID211 Lighting 3 ID213 Programming & Space Planning I 3 ID215 History of Architecture. is the essence of the Interior Design program. The analysis of client needs and desires to create design solutions that are aesthetically pleasing.12 quarters . and architectural detailing/working drawing methods of presenting design ideas and communicating with related professional services. Courses cover two-dimensional and three- dimensional computer-aided design. threedimensional modeling.Bachelor of Applied Design Degree Program Description Today’s professional interior designers enhance the function and quality of interior environments.Academic Calendar . The Interior Design program begins with a foundation in art and design to increase artistic sensitivity. space planning. computer rendering. and support increased productivity. Interiors 3 and Furniture ID223 Programming & Space Planning II 3 Page 22 Course Number and Title Credits ID234 Materials and Resources 3 ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design 3 ID240 Corporate Design 3 ID303 Project Management 3 ID311 Codes/Barrier Free Design 3 ID316 3D Digital Modeling 3 ID317 3D Digital Rendering 3 ID321 Residential Design 3 ID323 Professional Practices 3 ID324 Interior & Architectural Detailing 3 ID330 Environmental Design 3 ID335 Residential Design II 3 ID340 Building Systems and Materials 3 ID350 Commercial Design 3 ID351 Presentation Techniques 3 ID354 Multi-Cultural/Global Design 3 ID401 Internship for Interior Design I 3 ID402 Internship for Interior Design II 3 ID411 Senior Project I 6 ID423 Portfolio Preparation 3 ID430 Portfolio 3 ID432 Senior Project II 6 ID440 Construction Documents 3 ID450 Commercial Design II 6 Interior Design Elective 1 3 Interior Design Elective 2 3 General Education Elective 1 4 General Education Elective 2 4 The Art Institute of Vancouver . is to design spaces that improve the quality of life. Their mission. environmental and sustainable design. The Bachelor of Applied Design in Interior Design degree program offers a well-rounded curriculum strengthened with numerous computer-based courses.Degree Programs Interior Design Available at the Renfrew campus. significant in today’s society. human factors. Other important topics explored include the areas of universal design. 191 credits . and in accordance with building codes and standards.

and techniques to become effective learners. Prerequisite: None GE111 Academic Writing (4 credits) The key purposes of this course are to help students improve their academic writing capabilities and to help students prepare for the kinds of writing you will be asked to do in your post secondary and professional careers. Prerequisite: None CC118 Perspective (3 credits) In this course. and styles of the periods through the use of textbook. measurement. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. Elective options can be found after the listing of required courses.Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. artists. Prerequisite: CC110 Drawing CC124 Rendering & Illustration (3 credits) Through a method of exploring a variety of traditional medium. Prerequisite: GE100 Rhetoric & Composition GE121 Critical Thinking (4 credits) In this course. This field of research focuses on explaining and interpreting processes and patterns of human social interactions. processes. geometry. make decisions and evaluate the media. This course emphasizes the critical arts of reading. the student will obtain basic presentation skills such as sketching and rendering. Prerequisite: None CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. We will study the concepts. psychology. Universal design is examined as a method to provide functionality.and in this course students will consider their purpose for writing to state. Prerequisite: None GE202 History of Art in Early Civilizations (4 credits) This course explores the history of art from the Prehistoric and Tribal periods through to the Baroque. and discussion with an introduction to rhetoric. They will learn to represent light. This hands-on experience of exploring sociology will provide a solid foundation for sociological analysis and will help students to develop practical skills that can be applied in other creative and business contexts. Prerequisite: None CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore. framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination. Prerequisite: ID113 Introduction to Interior Design GE100 Rhetoric and Composition (4 credits) Writing is done for a purpose: to solve a problem. functions. students will draw three-dimensional forms. shape. as well as ethical communication behaviors. and support an argument or position. and problem solving techniques. As students gain confidence with the vocabulary of language analysis and rhetorical strategy. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE220 World Civilization (4 credits) This course covers some of the ancient civilizations that have shaped world history and then works toward building an understanding of how these civilizations evolved to the fifteenth century. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. students will learn the principles of perspective. Evolution and change and the diversity of the human experience constitute central themes of this course. develop. the mathematical language of digital computing. understand the basics of data analysis and their broad use in a range of educational and work settings. form.Academic Calendar Page 23 . shading. number systems. shade and shadows through a variety of rendering and drawing techniques. This course is designed to teach the major findings of sociology and to help students master fundamental sociological skills. algebra. reflection. Students will analyze and gain an understanding and appreciation of interior elements designed for people considering the human form and culture. Students are taught how to conduct responsible research. and design aspects of colour. The overall aim of this course is to enhance cognitive abilities and improve communication practices. compose coherent messages adapted to a specific audience and situation. as well as learn to apply creative and critical techniques to problem solve. videos and projects. Prerequisite: None CC225 Human Factors & Psychology of Design (3 credits) This course will foster an awareness and understanding of the role and contribution that human factors and psychology of design play within a built environment. organize. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . works. logic. Students also develop critical thinking and listening skills. students learn to identify and develop skills. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE230 Mathematics (4 credits) This course covers set theory. The objective is for students to develop a basic understanding of the use of mathematics in the real-world. writing. trigonometry. Using observation and the application of perspective principles. identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line. call for action. composition and informal logic of the English Language. Students will analyze and evaluate ideas and theories. and to develop and polish their presentation skills. Students will learn how to think with sociological creativity. Prerequisite: None GE102 Speech Communications (4 credits) This course teaches oral communication skills with emphasis on both theory and practice. images. Prerequisite: None GE210 Fundamentals of Sociology (4 credits) Sociology is the study of human society. or create awareness . This course explores theories regarding physical perception. the more features of style and argument they will recognize and use. A variety of concepts. propose a solution. with specific emphasis on solving problems encountered in digital media applications. Students will learn how to identify or construct an issue to write about and will consider issues through various critical lenses. Emphasis will be placed upon crafting the best form of expression for specific audiences and purposes. safety and comfort for all end users. Concept development processes and material manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions. proportion.

race. They will apply their gained knowledge on real-world case studies by developing lighting plans for both residential and commercial built environments. Prerequisite: ID109 Basic Drafting ID211 Lighting (3 credits) In this course. and methods involved in the scientific study and understanding of human behavior. Assignments provide opportunities to recognize how the styles of the past continue to influence design today. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE320 Cultural Theory (4 credits) This course will examine how cultural phenomenon shape our world and how. students will develop the required skills for preparation of working drawings. Students will learn strategies for analyzing clients’ needs and conveying effective solutions successfully. demonstrations. In addition to reviewing current and future trends in office design. drawing and drafting principles. space planning and alternate design solutions. and proper application of these materials from technical. advertising. experience. and/or economic conditions of the times are included. institutions and issues. quality. exposing students to the steps for completing a design project. popular values and participation are examined in terms of political stability and change. Utilizing their knowledge of color theory as well as design. Various methods of specification and estimation are covered.Academic Calendar ID215 History of Architecture. Prerequisite: ID127 Computer-Aided Design ID213 Programming & Space Planning I (3 credits) This course begins the design stream by introducing the interior design process including programming. construction. The course continues with advanced techniques for drawing. architecture. conflicts. Students will apply a number of ethics paradigms to a variety of contemporary personal and social issues. terminology. Students solve problems by organizing and constructing three-dimensional forms within spatial environments. principles. and design from the ancient world to the Industrial Revolution. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology (4 credits) This course presents basic concepts. view manipulation. experimental. in turn. text. and how does material culture make us who we are? Students will look for answers to these questions in areas such as social and cultural criticism. Prerequisite: None ID127 Computer-Aided Design (3 credits) CAD training requires in-depth understanding of the commands and features of the AutoCAD software. ideologies. plan and elevation construction with an emphasis on proper line weight. and class. detailed drawings and other components of a working drawing package using hand-skills introduced in Basic Drafting. popular culture and personal experience. Questions will be raised such as: what is the relationship between high and pop culture. fabrics. Content includes discussion of fibers. and environmental factors. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing ID109 Basic Drafting (3 credits) An introduction to the basic drafting techniques. dimensioning. Prerequisite: ID113 Introduction to Interior Design ID136 Advanced Drafting (3 credits) Students will develop an understanding of mechanical drawings. literature. The cultural. developmental. and scale. and fixture types and learn how to make appropriate specifications. Government. and symbols used on drawings. Prerequisite: None ID111 Design Basics 3D (3 credits) An introduction to the basic elements and principles of three-dimensional design and exploration of the visual and structural qualities of objects. and aesthetic approaches. lettering. policy problems and solutions. and thought in order to discover and develop the principles and values for pursuing a more fulfilled existence. Prerequisite: ID113 Introduction to Interior Design The Art Institute of Vancouver . Students research and assess performance criteria including aesthetics. Prerequisite: ID213 Programming and Space Planning I ID234 Materials and Resources (3 credits) This course explores materials and finishes utilized in interior applications through lecture. students will analyze and develop an understanding of the impact that light. Students will increase their awareness of visual communication through exploration of editing. finishes. working with attributes and plotting. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE330 Ethics (4 credits) This course examines human life. political institutions and processes. social. Prerequisite: ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design . Students will also explore lighting theories. environmental. Students will explore physiological. political. gender. urban planning. students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary for creating basic 2D drawing. social. Prerequisite: ID113 Introduction to Interior Design ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design (3 credits) In this course. hatching and plotting techniques.GE240 Introduction to Political Science (4 credits) This course develops skills for understanding and analyzing political and governmental situations in the contemporary world. including use of drafting equipment. techniques. interiors. Prerequisite: None ID223 Programming & Space Planning II (3 credits) This course is a continuation of the design stream that advances knowledge gained in Programming and Space Planning I by applying those skills to more complex spaces and design challenges. Prerequisite: None Page 24 ID113 Introduction to Interior Design (3 credits) This course merges theory with practice. annotating. Students will be introduced to the most efficient commands for various tasks to enhance CAD productivity. design development. yarn. Through this hands-on course. both natural and artificial has on a built environment. how does culture embody power. editing. schematics. function. and/or field trips. and abnormal psychological processes. design methods. Prerequisite: ID127 Computer-Aided Design ID240 Corporate Design (3 credits) This course will allow students to study and apply the design process from programming through presentations to working drawings based upon client needs and applicable open and closed corporate environments. we shape it. Interiors and Furniture (3 credits) This course covers the evolution of architecture. Prerequisite: None ID134 Textiles (3 credits) This course explores the nature of man-made and natural materials used to produce textiles for use in interior design. They will build on their basic AutoCAD skills while increasing their speed and problem solving abilities. students will conceptualize spaces that reflect the corporate culture and also analyze user needs from corporate philosophy to office structure and individual workstation. furniture. students will research and document solutions to several residential design problems.

and retail planning. Students will realize their design solutions volumetrically as part of the design process. materials and specifications throughout the design process. Areas of study include concept development. steel. aging in place or specialty areas of the home such as home theatre. Students will develop a knowledge of a variety of cultures and relate that knowledge to their personal design philosophy. furniture and finish selection as well as concepts of universal design and sustainability. and manual technology. Methods of communicating interior details in construction drawings and contract documents will be reviewed. This studio course will simulate as closely as possible actual industry work conditions. Combining a variety of software. Prerequisite: None ID354 Multi-Cultural/Global Design (3 credits) Survey and research application of multicultural design is the study of different cultures as they relate to design issues and concerns. universal design. Prerequisite: None ID321 Residential Design (3 credits) This course explores the design of residential interiors as a problem solving process. Course includes issues of design. Prerequisite: None ID317 3D Digital Rendering (3 credits) This course will introduce students to 3D rendering software as it applies to computer generated models. practices. and typography. designing from a global perspective. with emphasis on universal design. acoustics. air conditioning. Prerequisite: None ID324 Interior & Architectural Detailing (3 credits) Students will focus on the materials and fabrication techniques used to design and construct interior details and structures. research and business communication as it relates to the profession of interior design.ID303 Project Management (3 credits) This course focuses on the creation. The course will include team projects emphasizing time management. color. legal and financial aspects of a design practice. arrangement and planning of a process which will enhance the capacity of an individual or group to take effective action in a design project. Prerequisite: ID213 Programming and Space Planning 1 ID323 Professional Practices (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the principles of marketing Interior Design services. Students will also develop an understanding of the common building construction systems: wood frame. home office and/or outdoor living spaces. Prerequisite: None ID350 Commercial Design (3 credits) In this course. self-generated work schedules. students explore ways to manipulate and integrate images and text into a cohesive graphic package. and mechanical systems for residential and commercial interiors. This course also examines the concepts and theories behind indoor air quality. ventilation. varying familial structures. ID440 Construction Documents The Art Institute of Vancouver . Students will investigate components that encompass a LEED certified project and implementation of the LEED project checklist. Students will learn to communicate their design solutions by appropriately rendering interior models. composition. concrete and masonry. Students will also cover writing. Prerequisite: None ID335 Residential Design II (6 credits) This course offers an in depth study of concepts introduced in Residential Design I with application to specific needs in the home. Prerequisite: ID321 Residential Design I ID340 Building Systems and Materials (3 credits) This course is a study of the materials and principles utilized in basic construction. fire/safety and accessibility that affect the interior design of private and public buildings. Prerequisite: ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design. Prerequisite: None ID351 Presentation Techniques (3 credits) This course experiments with alternate methods of creating and producing interior design presentations. analyzes and applied to various projects. students will investigate the physical requirements and code restrictions involved in a variety of specialty areas such as recreational. human factors. and alternate presentation methods. Electrical and heating systems. Prerequisite: None ID401 Internship for Interior Design I (3 credits) Through a field internship experience. In class discussions on the importance of environmental ethics and the role of sustainability with regard to the business practices of the interior design industry will also be reviewed. The main objectives of the internship are to allow students the opportunity to observe and participate in the operation of successful businesses related to their field of study. and plumbing are surveyed. Other certification and rating systems will also be reviewed. and sustainability. hospitality. Prerequisite: ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design ID330 Environmental Design (3 credits) Exploration and integration of sustainable design principles. with applications to a variety of residential interiors. and issues of sustainability. and peer review. lighting applications. Students will research and articulate the psychological and sociological needs of a specific culture and interpret them in a design solution. Exploration may include advanced issues of human factors. students will be able to apply their acquired classroom skills in real and practical situations. conflict resolution. programming and space planning. Individual projects cover the total design process. research. Students will review all business. They will learn how to design and detail the building construction and the typical interior components and finishes. Prerequisite: None ID311 Codes/Barrier Free Design (3 credits) This course is a comprehensive study and application of the codes and regulations for building construction. reproduction methods. Students will also be required to meet with the Internship Coordinator/Lead Faculty member on a weekly basis to review course curriculum and submit weekly assignments (in addition to the internship journal). Students will gain valuable experience that will complement their classroom studies. building.Academic Calendar Page 25 . Prerequisite: None ID316 3D Digital Modeling (3 credits) This course will introduce students to 3D modeling software as a communication tool.

cohesiveness and presentation. Emphasis is on real-world needs that could be better met through more responsible interior design and architecture. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying short. observation and information gathering. safety and welfare of the public. craftsmanship. craftsmanship. Content includes problem identification. Students focus on formatting and cross-referencing drawings and how to present floor plans. Students will also be required to meet with the Internship Coordinator/Lead Faculty member on a weekly basis to submit weekly reports for their internship journal. elevations. analysis of user needs. universal design and accessibility. Students will demonstrate their conceptual. and schedules. students continue the development of a viable solution for the project initiated in Senior Project I. sections. Ultimately a design program and schematic solution are prepared that will be further developed into a complete design solution in Senior Project II for an interior environment that will better support the psychological and physiological health. Skills from the entire program are leveraged into a final portfolio project motivated by environmentally sound. details. each student will select representative pieces. design. sustainability and detailed specifications that are packaged into construction drawings and specification documents. The main objectives of the internships are to allow students the opportunity to observe and participate in the operation of successful businesses related to their field of study. Students will gain the experience they need to enter the field of interior design when they graduate. Prerequisite: ID411 Senior Project I ID440 Construction Documents (3 credits) This course introduces students to the process of producing and using a set of contract architectural documents for interior spaces. Prerequisite: ID350 Commercial Design The Art Institute of Vancouver . Emphasis will be on development. showcasing work that reflects a unique style. Working individually with an instructor. This course will prepare students for job interviews by helping them compile a portfolio. Prerequisite: ID401 Internship for Interior Design I ID411 Senior Project I (6 credits) Students select a subject based on their individual career aspirations and develop a project of a substantial scope. legends. Prerequisite: ID423 Portfolio Preparation ID432 Senior Project II (6 credits) In this culminating studio course. and other skills as they assemble and refine their portfolio pieces. as well as related strategies and resources. Prerequisite: ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design ID450 Commercial Design II (6 credits) This course further develops the study of the commercial environment by synthesizing information gained in Commercial Design with way-finding.and long-term professional employment goals. design.ID402 Internship for Interior Design II (3 credits) Through a second field internship experience.Academic Calendar . Prerequisite: None ID430 Portfolio (3 credits) This course will focus on the refinement of previous works into a comprehensive collection representative of Interior Design skills. Prerequisite: None Page 26 ID423 Portfolio Preparation (3 credits) This course prepares students for the transition to the professional world. students will continue applying their acquired classroom skills in real and practical situations. notes. cost-effective and responsible design practices.

examining visual. or other educational institutions). rotation. Prerequisite: ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design ID412 Furniture Design (3 credits) This course explores the principles of furniture design. geometry. lines. Prerequisite: None GE360 Survey of Architecture (4 credits) This course surveys North American architecture from the eighteenth century to the present. pronoun/ antecedent agreement. and complex numbers are introduced. and behavior will be avenues of exploration. Topics include coordinate systems.Academic Calendar Page 27 .TS090 Transitional English (3 credits) This class will introduce students to the power of language by discussing purpose. Prerequisite: ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design ID345 Introduction to Revit (3 credits) This course introduces students to the concepts of parametric building information modeling (BIM) and Revit Architecture. dispersion. data structures. audience. and basic collision detection. economic. and sampling distributions. and how to perform translation. and scientific models to analyze current issues and examine the future of the environment and the effect they can have on it. Prerequisite: None GE232 Ethnomathematics (4 credits) All cultures have mathematics. Students apply these concepts to problems in game programming. fittings. symmetry in patterns. Science. prospective students are responsible for satisfying themselves that the program and the degree will be appropriate to their needs (for example. central limit theory. Prerequisite: Permission of Academic Director This program is offered under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education effective August 3. ethics. construction. subtraction. scaling. and learn to apply these tools to problems encountered in game development. strategy and chance in games and puzzles. Students will advance their ability to work with BIM and Revit by taking a project from schematic design through the completion of a preliminary set of construction documents. Students must earn a “C” or higher to pass the course. Course work concentrates on basic paragraph writing with its attendant skills: parts of speech. Prerequisite: GE126 Applied Mathematics GE131 Environmental Science (4 credits) This course investigates humanity’s interaction with the natural environment. The course includes learning the use of percentages and applying critical thinking to problem-solving configurations. Prerequisite: None GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra (4 credits) This course covers the essential analytic geometry and linear algebra tools and techniques used in 3D games and graphics programming. 2011 having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the minister. but will also try to gain some understanding of the cultural setting and to understand how culture and mathematics interact. decimal numbers. Students will use political. and division for the sets of whole numbers. Graphing and using polynomial functions and systems of equations and inequalities in the interpretation and solution of problems will be examined. the binomial distributions. subject/ verb agreement. Prerequisite: None GE203 History and Analysis of Design (4 credits) Curriculum will encompass a study of the art movements that have structured the field of graphic design covering political. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing Interior Design Electives ID245 Kitchen and Bath Design (3 credits) This course addresses the fundamentals of kitchen and bath design including universal design and accessibility in new construction and renovation. Nevertheless. social and economic influences and the analysis of contemporary design and design trends. They will concentrate on the mathematics: general philosophy of measuring and counting. planes. capitalization.” In this course. and creativity as they relate to the writing process. trigonometry. Topics include fixtures. and fractions. They learn how to represent objects mathematically. and functions. Students review the essentials of high school mathematics: algebra. dot & cross product. Using Revit students will explore the advantages and uses of parametric modeling in the development and documentation of interior design concepts and ideas. This course will also emphasize the skills needed to produce clear. and transformations. though they may not have a class of people called “mathematicians. The Art Institute of Vancouver . the normal curve and normal distributions. correct verb tenses. competent English prose. electrical and basic plumbing. professional licensing bodies. spelling. motion with constant acceleration. projection. probability theory. mechanical energy. multiplication. and elementary number theory. and punctuation. cabinetry and finishes. students will be introduced to mathematical activities of a number of present-day and historical cultures. number words and number bases. and social significance. acceptable to potential employers. Prerequisite: None General Education Electives GE126 Applied Mathematics (4 credits) This course covers the foundational mathematical tools required in any animation or physics based game. vectors. various sentence structures. Emphasis is placed on developing problem solving skills. determinants. Prerequisite: None GE231 Statistics (4 credits) This course includes representing and analyzing data through such measures as central tendency. Students must earn a “C” or higher to pass the course. The aims of the course are to examine the development of mathematics as part of a wider culture. equipment. Students will apply knowledge learned in previous courses with ergonomic/anthropometric standards and environmental issues to create furniture designs and present them through various media. Vectors. combinatorics. matrices. furnishings. Industry relevant nomenclature and product information are used to create specifications and cabinet plans. Emphasis is placed on construction detail and technique as well as measurement and engineering analysis. which focuses on the understanding of the operations of addition. historic. Prerequisite: None TS091 Transitional Math (3 credits) This is a transitional course.

film and gaming industries. 194 credits . web development companies. Web Animator. Multimedia Web Designer. To fulfill this goal. advertising agencies and related services. Site Architect. Some may establish design firms or take challenging freelance assignments. Production Artist. students will be assessed on their ability to investigate core principles critically. 2) development of key technical skills.Academic Affairs . publishing houses. The objective is to produce designers who will be able to lead and initiate innovations within the design industry and discipline. students will have acquired the training and the portfolio necessary to interview for entry-level positions in design studios. and 5) concept development. or they may be self-employed.36 months .12 quarters . graduates may go on to advanced positions such as Web Designer. Critical thinking will be a central component of each course. Flash Designer. printing and related support activity. communications departments. identify discipline-specific challenges. Each subsequent quarter will provide students opportunities to build upon and expand these skills.Bachelor of Applied Design Degree The Bachelor of Applied Design in Web Design has a strong applied focus. and propose innovative and workable solutions to be applied to everyday industry practice. Upon graduation. information technology units throughout the private and public sectors. blending design theory with practical application to prepare students for employment and advanced study in the field of Web Design. marketing. information technology consulting firms. 3) development of critical thinking skills. the program will deliver five major learning outcomes: 1) industry readiness. book and directory publishing. public relations departments. After gaining professional experience.Degree Programs Web Design Available at the Renfrew campus. Interface Designer. Multimedia Production Associate. 4) ethical awareness. Web Typographer. Intranet Applications Specialist. Students will have the opportunity to learn fundamental technical skills and concept development during their foundation quarter. Web Master.Academic Calendar . Web Graphic Designer. and Web Writer.59 courses . newspapers. computer software development firms. Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits Course Number and Title Credits CC110 Drawing 3 CC112 Fundamentals of Design 3 CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC133 Digital Imaging 3 DFV120 Introduction to Video Production 3 GD101 Fundamentals of Sustainable Design 3 GD130 Digital Illustration 3 GD134 Digital Imaging II 3 GD350 Copywriting for Electronic Media 3 GD480 Public Relations and Marketing 3 GE100 Rhetoric and Composition 4 GE102 Speech Communications 4 GE111 Academic Writing 4 GE121 Critical Thinking 4 GE126 Applied Mathematics 4 GE203 History and Analysis of Design 4 GE210 Fundamentals of Sociology 4 GE220 World Civilization 4 GE230 Mathematics 4 GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology 4 GE320 Cultural Theory 4 GE330 Ethics 4 RS360 Media Business Law and Communication 3 WDIM100 Computer Literacy and Web Fundamentals 3 WDIM101 Concepts in Computer Graphics 3 WDIM110 Design Layout I 3 WDIM111 Design Layout II 3 WDIM130 Web Site Development I 3 WDIM131 Digital Typography 3 WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia 3 WDIM141 Intermediate Interactive Web Scripting 3 WDIM142 Advanced Interactive Web Scripting 3 WDIM150 Introduction to Scripting Languages 3 WDIM201 Introduction to User Centred Design 3 WDIM202 Human Computer Interaction 3 WDIM203 Corporate Identity for Web 3 WDIM205 Introduction to Game Development 3 WDIM225 Desktop Video 3 WDIM302 Usability Testing 3 WDIM305 E-Learning 3 WDIM312 Designing for Dynamic Websites 3 WDIM330 Interface Design 3 WDIM360 Information Design 3 WDIM390 Portfolio I 3 WDIM410 Project Management 3 WDIM412 Designing for Server Side Technology 3 WDIM415 Production Team 3 WDIM431 Intermediate Scripting Languages 3 WDIM440 Advanced Web Site Development 3 WDIM441 Capstone 1 3 WDIM450 Design for Mobile Devices 3 WDIM451 Capstone 2 3 WDIM470 Web Systems Management and Structures 3 WDIM490 Senior Portfolio 3 Applied Elective 1 3 Applied Elective 2 3 Applied Elective 3 3 Applied Elective 4 3 General Education Elective 1 4 General Education Elective 2 4 Page 28 The Art Institute of Vancouver .

shape. the more features of style and argument they will recognize and use. sustainable design is growing across various fields and standards are emerging in fashion. Students also develop critical thinking and listening skills. industrial. Using different software applications. This course will provide an overview of sustainable movements across a variety of fields and provide insight into emerging practices. and design aspects of colour. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. Vectors. and support an argument or position. Students integrate the principles of lighting and gripping into video applications. consumer identity and representational ethics are among the topics covered. The overall aim of this course is to enhance cognitive abilities and improve communication practices. Prerequisite: None Page 29 . social and economic influences and the analysis of contemporary design and design trends. framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination.Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. and ecological sustainability ranging from microcosm. Emphasis is placed on developing problem solving skills. or create awareness. including web and print graphics. and functions. the design of buildings. compose coherent messages adapted to a specific audience and situation. develop. Prerequisite: None GE111 Academic Writing (4 credits) The key purposes of this course are to help students improve their academic writing capabilities and to help students prepare for writing in post secondary education and professional settings. Prerequisite: None DFV120 Introduction to Video Production (3 credits) This course introduces students to the video camera as a technical and creative tool for communication and art. economic. Emphasis will be on writing opportunities in the communications industries. and learn to apply these tools to problems encountered in game development. Prerequisite: None GD480 Public Relations and Marketing (3 credits) This course introduces strategic issues and effective practices of communication between organizations and their constituencies. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. trigonometry. public communication campaigns. Prerequisite: None GE126 Applied Mathematics (4 credits) This course covers the foundational mathematical tools required in any animation or physics based game. Students will analyze and evaluate ideas and theories. Students will create visual messages and focused visual statements and gain an understanding of the differences in web and print graphics. processes. developing the treatment. as well as on the process of interactive writing. Prerequisite: None GD130 Digital Illustration (3 credits) This course helps students communicate and design with the computer as a professional tool. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. and defining the audience. engineering. This course emphasizes the critical arts of reading. as well as ethical communication behaviors. The study of public opinion research. As a concept. Prerequisite: None GD134 Digital Imaging II (3 credits) This course builds upon previous courses to integrate raster and vector graphics with concerns for varied formats. the student will demonstrate an understanding of electronic illustration. Concept development processes and material manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions. organize. composition and informal logic of the English Language. The course emphasizes camera operation and the setup for electronic field production (EFP) and studio applications. Prerequisite: None GE102 Speech Communications (4 credits) This course teaches oral communication skills with emphasis on both theory and practice. mechanical energy.Academic Calendar discussion with an introduction to rhetoric. cities and the earth’s physical surface. Emphasis will be placed upon crafting the best form of expression for specific audiences and purposes. and The Art Institute of Vancouver . propose a solution. and to develop and polish their presentation skills. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. and architectural design. reflection. The course will explore vector-based graphic applications that are considered to be industry standard. identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. Camera movements and framing are applied using different camera mounts. psychology. Prerequisite: GE100 Rhetoric and Composition GE121 Critical Thinking (4 credits) In this course. combinatorics. standards and associations. and techniques to become effective learners. such as establishing the premise. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD350 Copywriting for Electronic Media (3 credits) This course examines the roles of copywriter and scriptwriter in interactive multimedia. students learn to identify and develop skills. make decisions and evaluate the media. Prerequisite: None GE100 Rhetoric and Composition (4 credits) Writing is done for a purpose: to solve a problem. Students will gain practical experience in conducting surveys and designing integrated campaigns. As students gain confidence with the vocabulary of language analysis and rhetorical strategy. motion with constant acceleration. graphic. In this course students will consider their purpose for writing to state. Prerequisite: None GE203 History and Analysis of Design (4 credits) Curriculum will encompass a study of the art movements that have structured the field of graphic design covering political. Students are taught how to conduct responsible research. Elective options can be found after the listing of required courses. CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line. Prerequisite: None CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. form. call for action. or the design of small objects to macrocosm. writing. proportion. shading. Prerequisite: None CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore. media relations. Prerequisite: None GD101 Fundamentals of Sustainable Design (3 credits) Students will learn about the fundamentals and key topics associated with social. Students review the essentials of high school mathematics: algebra. as well as learn to apply creative and critical techniques to problem solve. landscape. interior. and complex numbers are introduced. A variety of concepts.

which focuses on the understanding of the operations of addition. in turn. experience. the mathematical language of digital computing. Prerequisite: WDIM110 Design Layout I WDIM130 Web Site Development I (3 credits) Students will learn to create effective websites with maximum browser compatibility utilizing authoring software. popular culture and personal experience. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE320 Cultural Theory (4 credits) This course will examine how cultural phenomenon shape our world and how. This field of research focuses on explaining and interpreting processes and patterns of human social interactions. intellectual property. Students will learn how to apply their skills to construct a commercial website with Web accessibility. gender. Prerequisite: None WDIM131 Digital Typography (3 credits) An examination of typographic structures for digital communication. contracts. This course is designed to teach the major findings of sociology and to help students master fundamental sociological skills.and raster-based imaging programs. Prerequisite: None WDIM110 Design Layout I (3 credits) This course will enable the student to utilize their design skills in collaboration with web development technology and technology considerations. subtraction. algebra. race. and abnormal psychological processes. and methods involved in the scientific study and understanding of human behavior. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing RS360 Media Business Law and Communication (3 credits) This course covers the multiple facets of media business law. and problem solving techniques. File management and storage. animations.Academic Calendar . and division for the sets of whole numbers. This course will also emphasize the skills needed to produce clear. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE230 Mathematics (4 credits) This course covers set theory. and other key features of vector. geometry. and timeline control. and interface elements as a web page. Emphasis is on the development of basic cognitive and critical thinking skills related to the use of tools. correct verb tenses. principles. Students will learn principles of typographic composition with an emphasis on effective use of type in screenbased media. Topics include an overview of the legal system. how does culture embody power. measurement. trigonometry. understand the basics of data analysis and their broad use in a range of educational and work settings. interactive movies. and fractions. number systems. grid systems in relationship to interface development and outputting to a final product that is optimized for screen delivery. functions. subject/verb agreement. Other topics include pop-up menus. multiplication. Prerequisite: None WDIM101 Concepts in Computer Graphics (3 credits) This course introduces the student to the wide range of applications for computers in industries ranging from computer animation to video production and includes extensive hands-on training in the use of mainstream computer graphics programs. The course includes learning the use of percentages and applying critical thinking to problem-solving configurations. This hands-on experience of exploring sociology will provide a solid foundation for sociological analysis and will help students to develop practical skills that can be applied in other creative and business contexts. architecture. Emphasis will be placed upon translating original and innovative design concepts to the web. competent English prose. experimental.GE210 Fundamentals of Sociology (4 credits) Sociology is the study of human society. and thought in order to discover and develop the principles and values for pursuing a more fulfilled existence. with specific emphasis on solving problems encountered in digital media applications. and how does material culture make us who we are? Students will look for answers to these questions in areas such as social and cultural criticism. spelling. create interface elements with interactivity. menus. Prerequisite: None GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology (4 credits) This course presents basic concepts. and punctuation. logic. and class. Students must earn a “C” or higher to pass the course. The use of peripherals and network operations will be examined. pronoun/antecedent agreement. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing TS090 Transitional English (3 credits) This class will introduce students to the power of language by discussing purpose. urban planning. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE220 World Civilization (4 credits) This course covers some of the ancient civilizations that have shaped world history and then works toward building an understanding of how these civilizations evolved to the fifteenth century. Prerequisite: None WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia (3 credits) Students will learn how to create graphics. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . Course work concentrates on basic paragraph writing with its attendant skills: parts of speech. various sentence structures. spreadsheet and database techniques are explored. Prerequisite: None WDIM111 Design Layout II (3 credits) Students will continue to develop and demonstrate through projects effective conceptual development processes and research techniques. Students must earn a “C” or higher to pass the course. and creativity as they relate to the writing process. we shape it. forms and variables. audience. Students will also learn advanced HTML and CSS. Students will explore physiological. personal property. animate those graphics. capitalization. Students will apply a number of ethics paradigms to a variety of contemporary personal and social issues. Students will also be introduced to the Internet as a research and networking tool. The objective is for students to develop a basic understanding of the use of mathematics in the real-world. social. basic word processing. developmental. Students will learn how to think with sociological creativity. literature. Emphasis will be placed on the process of design development from roughs to comprehensives. Questions will be raised such as: what is the relationship between high and pop culture. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing Page 30 GE330 Ethics (4 credits) This course examines human life. Prerequisite: None TS091 Transitional Math (3 credits) This is a transitional course. Evolution and change and the diversity of the human experience constitute central themes of this course. Prerequisite: None WDIM100 Computer Literacy and Web Fundamentals (3 credits) This course introduces students to the basic operation of computer hardware multiple platforms. decimal numbers. and how to create the HTML necessary to display your graphics. copyright and additional legal and ethical business issues as it affects media and design professionals. advertising.

compression schemes. The students will design the container for their digital presentations. user-centred design. By exploring the process step-bystep. special effects compositing software. During the course. Students will produce short video projects for output to various storage formats. instructional analysis. build.Academic Calendar Page 31 . students will use principles and techniques used to develop small-to-medium scale applications that store.students will design and organize content into information structures that encourage users to browse. Students will apply their advanced knowledge in classes where they will design and develop sophisticated interactive projects. Students will communicate with databases using the SQL query language and apply server side scripting knowledge to create dynamic websites. playable. types of authoring software. set of game criteria and rules for game-play. and evaluation of effective e-learning programs. The course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of human factors and usability. They will learn action scripting. efficient. search. and conditions. as applied to media such as wireless devices. and understandable . learn. and other digital media. database structures and server side scripting to create dynamic web sites. and marketable. Parameters relating to colour. websites. Students will apply user-centred design principles. prototyping. and explore. Prerequisites: WDIM201 Introduction to User centred Design and GE310 Fundamentals of Psychology WDIM203 Corporate Identity for Web (3 credits) This course will explore the role of design in a corporate identity program. loops. and production of e-learning materials. students are introduced and gain experience in the design. Prerequisite: Completion of 90 credits and permission of the Academic Director The Art Institute of Vancouver . options for authoring systems. playback on digital media and for streaming on the web.WDIM141 Intermediate Interactive Web Scripting (3 credits) Students will learn to deliver fast-loading interactive animation. usability. and shooting and editing for digital compression and DVD authoring. gaming environments and other media. challenging. Prerequisite: WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia WDIM142 Advanced Interactive Web Scripting (3 credits) Students will continue to build upon what they have learned to deliver fast-loading interactive projects for interactive media. Prerequisite: WDIM201 Introduction to User Centred Design WDIM305 E-Learning (3 credits) Through the course. Prerequisite: WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia WDIM225 Desktop Video (3 credits) This course deals with the processes involved with desktop editing of audio and video for digital output. Students learn the fundamentals of what makes a game enjoyable. Prerequisites: WDIM130 Web Site Development I and WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia WDIM312 Designing for Dynamic Websites (3 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the dynamic website authoring environment. Students presentation and defend their decisions. Participants develop skills to analyze corporate objectives and apply practical applications. and academic capabilities to create interactive projects. students either physically create a Web site or a prototype. Prerequisite: WDIM130 Web Site Developmnent I WDIM201 Introduction to User Centred Design (3 credits) This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of developing web sites which have as a primary goal addressing and solving user needs. While the course focuses on corporate identity and its function. Prerequisite: WDIM201 Introduction to User Centred Design WDIM360 Information Design (3 credits) An examination of systems for organizing and presenting information so that it is effective. Prerequisite: WDIM111 Design Layout II WDIM390 Portfolio I (3 credits) This first class in a series of two portfolio classes will assist the students with the overall look and feel of their digital portfolios. Prerequisite: WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia WDIM202 Human Computer Interaction (3 credits) This course provides an introduction to and overview of the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). evaluate. and revise instructional applications using industry standard authoring systems. Prerequisite: WDIM141 Intermediate Web Scripting WDIM150 Introduction to Scripting Languages (3 credits) Students will learn to build database applications that are integrated with the Web. and composition will mediate the design process. and will be introduced to advanced action scripting. development. principles of effective design. buttons. HCI is an interdisciplinary field that integrates theories and methodologies from computer science. the World Wide Web. manage and retrieve data. Students will also employ principles of interactive design appropriate for the client and target audiences. technical. students will identify where user issues are raised and how they are answered. Topics include the operation of nonlinear systems. and usability evaluation. and will develop the creative. Corequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production WDIM302 Usability Testing (3 credits) This course provides an introduction to the central ideas and concepts of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). or some other inspection method. and many other areas. Particular attention will be paid to design issues relating to the display of dynamic content on the screen and how that dynamic content will be delivered. psychology. Students design. and User Interface (UI) design. Prerequisites: WDIM150 Introduction to Scripting Languages and WDIM141 Intermediate Interactive Web Scripting WDIM330 Interface Design (3 credits) Students will formulate design projects specifically for the delivery mediums such as the kiosk. logo development is also explored with other business communication solutions. In addition. The course focuses on theoretical foundations of e-learning. MySQL. Students will learn design strategies for developing integrated digital branding. Projects will focus on essential web development skills using PHP. Prerequisite: WDIM111 Design Layout II WDIM205 Introduction to Game Development (3 credits) A well-designed game is an integration of artistic and technological components that must have a clearly defined goal. design. Students will learn to examine cultural disposition and reaction to interactive systems through heuristic evaluations. resolution access speed. graphics and sound for the Web with transparency and shape blending effects.

Emphasis will be placed on students assessing their most marketable skills. and qualitative results. Prerequisite: WDIM412 Designing for Server Side Technology The Art Institute of Vancouver . materials. Students will explore various site models. Prerequisite: WDIM410 Project Management WDIM431 Intermediate Scripting Languages (3 credits) This course will enable expand upon concepts and techniques presented in the Introduction to Scripting Languages. Intermediate Scripting Languages functions as a research course for major portfolio classes. During this time students will conduct research sufficient for professional presentation as a graduate project. and budget. to be submitted and defended during their final quarter. and print material to support their interactive portfolios and to begin their industry networking process. video. Students will experience an entire game cycle: identifying the audience. creating professional design layouts. modeling. and type elements. Prerequisite: WDIM130 Web Site Development I WDIM441 Capstone 1 (3 credits) The student will select a specific subject that can be effectively presented using interactive media or Web design. Prerequisites: WDIM150 Introduction to Scripting Languages and WDIM141 Intermediate Interactive Web Scripting Corequisite:WDIM312 Designing for Dynamic Websites WDIM415 Production Team (3 credits) This course focuses on the interactive design project management process. designing storyboards for their interactive portfolios. Prerequisite: WDIM410 Project Management WDIM450 Design for Mobile Devices (3 credits) Students will learn to create custom solutions for content delivery on mobile devices by developing web application and device application user interface tools optimized for delivery on mobile devices. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by producing a project from inception to completion. Prerequisite: WDIM441 Capstone 1 WDIM470 Web Systems Management & Structures (3 credits) This course introduces the student to the operating systems. Prerequisites: WDIM130 Web Site Development I and WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia WDIM412 Designing for Server Side Technology (3 credits) Students will design and develop web content for server-based dynamic delivery. project scheduling. Students will apply techniques and strategies to market themselves in their chosen fields. Prerequisite: GAD110 Game Design I GAD230 Level Design I (3 credits) This is an introductory course covering the level design process and the tools of level editing as they relate to building game environments using an existing commercial Game Engine. They participate in a team on a realistic project. Prerequisite: GAD110 Game Design I Page 32 . government and education. Focus will be on incorporating server side solutions into user-centred web design in order to provide an exchange of information between client and server. research techniques and data organization by programming. Emphasis is on students assessing their most marketable skills. Students work on the packaging and presentation of various projects developed in other upper-level courses including resumes. presentation methods. They engage in individual research culminating in a statement of their philosophy of conceptual development and problem solving. Students will work in class with mobile devices to learn needs and restrictions of designing for mobile devices as well as test student-designed interfaces. Emphasis will be placed on the process of design and web development from roughs to final projects optimized for screen delivery. and text elements. stressing the development of the project team as key to successfully achieving project goals. Students examine the main elements required in efficient planning and execution of an interactive project and study issues of copyright and intellectual property as they relate to project implementation. Students will continue to develop and demonstrate through projects effective conceptual development processes. Using case studies. Students work in teams to apply models and strategies for creating traditional games that are based in solid play mechanics. creating interfaces. audio. The students go through the entire game cycle on their own. including corporate. time frame. The focus is on generating levels with attention to efficiency and design aesthetics. In addition. as well as visual. Prerequisite: WDIM201 Introduction to User Centred Design WDIM451 Capstone 2 (3 credits) Students select a major interactive media design project. network protocol and technology essential for setting up an Internet/Intranet site. The student will then apply this knowledge to porting a digital game to another platform. by distilling popular games down to their game mechanic essence. Key areas of interactive design project teams serve to support the fundamental approach that every project team is tailored to achieve project results efficiently and effectively.Academic Calendar WDIM490 Senior Portfolio (3 credits) This course guides students through the process of compiling their work into a final interactive portfolio. Prerequisite: None GAD110 Game Design I (3 credits) Students will be introduced to traditional game theory and design and how they relate to their modern electronic cousin. creating a final product and play testing. Prerequisite: Completion of 165 credits and permission of the Academic Director Applied Electives CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts (3 credits) Students will be introduced to basic concepts of 3D space. Prerequisites: WDIM130 Web Site Development I and WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia WDIM440 Advanced Web Site Development (3 credits) This course will guide students through the process of compiling their work into a final interactive web-based portfolio with accompanying professional development content. designing storyboards for their interactive video.WDIM410 Project Management (3 credits) Curriculum focuses on the project management process and development of the project team as they pertain to success in interactive media design. lighting and animation. Prerequisite: None GAD120 Game Design II (3 credits) Game Design II further explores the player experience. prototyping. Emphasis during this research is to be on quantitative and qualitative components of the subject area. commercial. further re-enforcing all phases of production. Students apply techniques and strategies to market themselves in their chosen fields. pitching the game. The course examines the main elements required in every proposal/plan. the students will develop moderate-scale site designs that solve problems inherent in the distribution and security of information on the World Wide Web.

students study the nature and attributes of motion and broadcast graphics and learn to generate. Prerequisite: WDIM140 Computer Animation for Multimedia WDIM340 Interactive Game Prototyping (3 credits) Rapid development of Internet technologies allow more and more complex games to be delivered over the net. but also apply them to media content design. there will be introductions to software implementation. students will work in class with mobile devices to learn needs and restrictions as well as test student-designed interfaces. manipulate audio assets. This class is designed to emulate a real world environment by combining the skills of students from more than one curriculum. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I WDIM205 Broadcast Graphics (3 credits) In this course. podcasts. wikis. Students not only produce graphics. use a modern 3rd party physics engine. The course focuses on the principles of using colour. and the science of persuasive marketing. structures. namespaces. Integral Calculus and Vector Calculus. type casting. Prerequisite: VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I VGP246 Calculus for Physics (3 credits) This course will explore Single variable Differential. quality assurance. const-correctness. platforms. product placement. lighting. social media news releases. implementing. inheritance. the project may require web. dynamic memory allocations. arrays. polymorphism. The course will cover topics relating to software development process such as requirement gathering. and other techniques for overall thematic and visual effects of moving and static images. A specific course description will be published for the term the course is offered. logical and arithmetic operators. with application to physics and animation. Prerequisite: Completion of 75 credits and permission of the Academic Director The Art Institute of Vancouver . creation and implementation of mobile applications. and creative problem-solving solutions with an emphasis on professional presentation techniques. Additionally.Academic Calendar Page 33 . branching. One quarter a project may be selected that will require web. set-up and operation. Prerequisites: WDIM130 Web Site Development I and WDIM205 Introduction to Game Development WDIM413 Design for Social Media (3 credits) In this course. monitor feeds. virtual functions. Students are introduced to common object-oriented concepts such as classes. prototype gameplay features. Topics covered include. social bookmarking. lighting. genres. Prerequisite: WDIM111 Design Layout II WDIM440 Advergames (3 credits) This course will discuss how to develop games for marketing and advertising applications.0. concepts. Projects will vary and students and faculty will have the ability to propose projects for future classes. build networking gameplay. looping. This course addresses the design and delivery constraints of games for the net and provides an opportunity for students to design a multiplayer game that can be accessed and played on the net. and perform competitive analysis for the optimization of a social campaign. Prerequisite: None VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++I (3 credits) This is an introduction to Object Oriented Programming in C++. establish benchmarks. including digital still camera as well as camcorder orientation. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of programming using the C language including variables. Topics covered include: social media and Web 2. Another quarter. graphic. RSS feeds. film and web skills. Instruction is given on basic techniques of production. branded entertainment. player markets. Students will simulate real world types of problems solving using C++ related to video games programming. Exercises and projects focus on the hierarchical qualities of typography. maintaining. composition. viral video. advanced data structures and dynamic memory. Prerequisite: GE126 Applied Mathematics VGP333 Programming for Game Engines (3 credits) Students will learn how to work in a pre-existing modern game engine framework. They will learn a brand new pipeline and import game assets. Students will research new and emerging mobile device platforms and will build upon their knowledge of delivery on mobile devices to develop appropriate applications. and techniques of digital visual composition for both static and moving images. Prerequisite: WDIM450 Design for Mobile Devices WDIM480 Special Projects (3 credits) A variable content course in Web design in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest not found in the regular curriculum. original. Prerequisite: WDIM205 Introduction to Game Development WDIM455 Design for Mobile Devices II (3 credits) This is an intensive research and production course focused on the design. planning. and testing. designing. In this class. and other emerging web technologies. and learn how integrate all major systems through advanced scripting. Prerequisite: GD131 Typography or WDIM131 Digital Typography GD233 Experimental Typography (3 credits) This course explores printed communication and the advanced use of typography as an exclusive element of design. objectoriented designs. students will be introduced to a full range of social media tools that will identify key influencers.GD133 Advanced Typography (3 credits) This course is a continuation of the study of Typography. The course also focuses on the development of marketable. and user-defined functions. and application troubleshooting. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging VGP104 Software Development and Testing (3 credits) This course is an introduction to software engineering techniques used in modern application and game development. and creative problem solving solutions will also be examined with an emphasis on creative techniques. The development of marketable. original. Prerequisites: GD133 Advanced Typography GD360 Digital Photography (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamental terminology. maintenance. and interior design students to complete the final project. Industry-driven software will be used in the development of digital typography and hierarchal skills. blogs. select and manipulate still and motion graphics for broadcast and other media delivery. C types.

rotation. central limit theory. 2011 having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the minister. Students will use political. examining visual. political institutions and processes. vectors. Topics include coordinate systems. prospective students are responsible for satisfying themselves that the program and the degree will be appropriate to their needs (for example. strategy and chance in games and puzzles. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing GE360 Survey of Architecture (4 credits) This course surveys North American architecture from the eighteenth century to the present. the normal curve and normal distributions. dot & cross product. determinants. Prerequisite: None GE231 Statistics (4 credits) This course includes representing and analyzing data through such measures as central tendency. They will concentrate on the mathematics: general philosophy of measuring and counting. and behavior will be avenues of exploration. economic. the binomial distributions. symmetry in patterns. popular values and participation are examined in terms of political stability and change. planes. Prerequisite: GE126 Applied Mathematics Page 34 GE131 Environmental Science (4 credits) This course investigates humanity’s interaction with the natural environment. number words and number bases. professional licensing bodies. and transformations. students will be introduced to mathematical activities of a number of present-day and historical cultures. but will also try to gain some understanding of the cultural setting and to understand how culture and mathematics interact.Academic Calendar . conflicts. Graphing and using polynomial functions and systems of equations and inequalities in the interpretation and solution of problems will be examined. projection. images. geometry. historic. The students will gain the experience they need to enter the field when they graduate. acceptable to potential employers. The aims of the course are to examine the development of mathematics as part of a wider culture.GE232 Ethnomathematics (4 credits) All cultures have mathematics. Students apply these concepts to problems in game programming. ideologies. Science. They learn how to represent objects mathematically. and elementary number theory. data structures. Emphasis is placed on construction detail and technique as well as measurement and engineering analysis. We will study the concepts. and social significance. videos and projects. works. ethics. though they may not have a class of people called “mathematicians. Students will also be required to meet with the Internship Coordinator/Lead Faculty member on a weekly basis to submit weekly reports for their internship journal. Prerequisite: None GE202 History of Art in Early Civilizations (4 credits) This course explores the history of art from the Prehistoric and Tribal periods through to the Baroque. probability theory. matrices. WDIM481 Internship (3 credits) Through a field internship experience. and styles of the periods through the use of textbook.” In this course. policy problems and solutions. and basic collision detection. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . Nevertheless. artists. Prerequisite: GE111 Academic Writing This program is offered under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education effective August 3. and how to perform translation. or other educational institutions). dispersion. Prerequisite: None GE240 Introduction to Political Science (4 credits) This course develops skills for understanding and analyzing political and governmental situations in the contemporary world. and sampling distributions. lines. institutions and issues. The main objectives of the internship are to allow students the opportunity to observe and participate in the operation of successful businesses related to their field of study. scaling. and scientific models to analyze current issues and examine the future of the environment and the effect they can have on it. Prerequisite: WDIM390 Portfolio I General Education Electives GE128 Geometry and Linear Algebra (4 credits) This course covers the essential analytic geometry and linear algebra tools and techniques used in 3D games and graphics programming. students will be able to apply their skills in a real and practical situation. Government.

Each 3 month term of the program is comprised of tightly integrated. Starting with simple shapes and progressing to more complex organic forms. and other branded marketing materials.34 courses . The 3D Modeling for Animation & Games diploma program is focused upon enabling students to learn the fundamental artistic skills necessary to enter into and maintain a career in Media Arts industries. animation and visual effects entertainment industries. They will learn how to market themselves.Academic Affairs . It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. conflict resolution. cohesive courses in which students accomplish specific. Environment Modeler. Exercises in contrast. industry driven competencies and outcomes. and use of tone. decision making. Texture Artist. 105 credits . Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. balance.7 quarters . They will also develop their skills in problem solving. spatial perception. This course involves the observation and translation of three-dimensional form into two dimensional drawings. and identifying and pursuing career opportunities through the job search process. and symbolism will be used to demonstrate the unique communication properties of colour. Students will develop the technical and creative aptitude necessary to demonstrate and present their skills to industry. By participating in interview activities. Lighting Artist. This course also explores the theories regarding physical perception and design aspects of colour. resumes. self management.Diploma and Certificate Programs 3D Modeling for Animation & Games Available at the Renfrew campus. as well as their ability to read the room by understanding non-verbal communication. creative thinking and dealing with interpersonal situations found in a work environment. and then providing students with hands on training in its modern application. harmony. Technical Artist. using such tools as effective cover letters. they will practice their listening and communication skills. Prerequisite: None CCM101 Drawing and Perspective (3 credits) This course is a fundamental drawing course where the students will explore various arts and media and learn to use a variety of drawing tools. Prerequisite: None Page 35 . line quality. CC102 Professional Development (3 credits) This course is designed to prepare students for the process of gaining employment. Junior Production Designer.Academic Calendar CCM111 Design and Colour Theory (3 credits) A presentation of the basic elements and principles of design and colour theory will be made in this course. and a host of related entry level production positions. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver .20 months . Character Modeler. Career opportunities for graduating students may include 3D Modeler. This goal is achieved by building a foundation of traditional artistic skill.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title CC102 Professional Development CCM101 Drawing and Perspective CCM111 Design and Colour Theory CCM121 Digital Imaging CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM141 Life Drawing I CCM161 Concept Design and Illustration CCM171 Digital Imaging II CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM191 Life Drawing II CCM221 3D Animation I CCM231 Materials and Textures I CCM241 Life Drawing III CCM261 Portfolio I CCM271 Rigging CCM281 CG Lighting and Rendering I CCM291 Storyboarding Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Course Number and Title CCM311 3D Effects CCM321 Preproduction Team CCM341 Editing CCM361 Production Team CCM391 Script Programming CCM411 Portfolio II CCM431 Mentor Studio GAD130 Level Design I MAG151 Sculpture MAG201 Character Modeling I MAG251 Environment Modeling MAG301 3D Modeling II MAG331 Materials and Textures II MAG351 Character Modeling II MAG381 CG Lighting & Rendering II MAG401 Brush Based Modeling MAG441 Matte Painting Credits 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Program Description The 3D Modeling for Animation & Games diploma program at the Art Institute of Vancouver is designed to provide graduates with the relevant skills necessary to enter into and maintain a career in the game. The student will develop a firm foundation to lay out and organize design elements. Render Wrangler. students will build skill levels in composition. They will do this by assessing their personal background. Each course builds on the lessons of the ones before it and each term is a prerequisite for the following.

acting. Students create and apply shaders and materials in support of lighting effects. each student will have created and tested a complete character set up and have the necessary skills to rig their own characters. image manipulation. Upon completion. Prerequisite: None CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts (3 credits) Students will be introduced to basic concepts of 3D space.CCM121 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. and design skills. environment. and artistic concepts necessary to render clear and concise storyboards at a professional level. Prerequisite: CCM191 Life Drawing II CCM261 Portfolio I (3 credits) This course serves as a mid program checkpoint. and live action production. modeling. Prerequisite: CCM101 Drawing and Perspective The Art Institute of Vancouver . vehicle. and create and deliver a presentation of final portfolio goals. Students also explore rendering and camera effects to enhance their images. Prerequisites: CCM181 3D Modeling I and CCM221 3D Animation I CCM281 CG Lighting and Rendering I (3 credits) This course introduces students to lighting and camera strategies for computer generated images. mechanics. and animation. painting and compositing. Students explore the concept design and development process to create several drawings from thumbnail sketch to inked final. Prerequisite: CCM111 Design and Colour Theory CCM171 Digital Imaging II (3 credits) Students will further develop knowledge of digital imaging theory and application of digital imaging techniques. Issues such as keyframing. and apply the theories to the digital environment. textures. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM241 Life Drawing III (3 credits) Students will engage in different methods of drawing and rendering to suggest movement. Prerequisite: CCM121 Digital Imaging CCM181 3D Modeling I (3 credits) This course covers modeling techniques used for building organic and hard surface objects and environments. Prerequisite: None CCM161 Concept Design and Illustration (3 credits) This course focuses on prop. Prerequisite: CCM141 Life Drawing I CCM221 3D Animation I (3 credits) Students will study timing and weight through a series of projects designed to demonstrate the principles of animation. volume. with an emphasis on advanced skills in masking. and cycling will be addressed. posing. and lighting strategies to add detail and realism to geometry without adding complexity. and force in human gesture drawing. Students will simulate real world surfaces using reflection. design a production schedule for the duration of their studies. channels. cinematic techniques. Students also have the option of creating and presenting a pitch package for consideration in the team production courses. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by producing a project from inception to completion. Each assignment is evaluated based on functionality. maps. Prerequisite: None CCM271 Rigging (3 credits) The purpose of this course is to demystify character setup. research potential employers. Students assemble and critique works from completed courses. performance. radiosity. Prerequisite: None CCM141 Life Drawing I (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course where students explore the concepts of structure. The students will also work with models interacting with each other and props. and character design. Students learn the various terminologies. proportion. and limitations of the human form. materials. The students will explore a variety of poses that will help them improve their drawing. Students analyze real world lighting and cameras.Academic Calendar . Prerequisite: CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts Page 36 CCM231 Materials and Textures I (3 credits) This course introduces students to materials. Prerequisite: CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM191 Life Drawing II (3 credits) Student will learn the importance of the skeletal structure and how it affects the surface. There will also be an emphasis on the differences between the male and female form. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM291 Storyboarding (3 credits) This course focuses on the specifics of storyboarding as a storytelling medium and its place in the pipeline for animation. The character rig is broken down into its component parts and animation tested throughout the course. and organization. weight. lighting. game. in-betweening. and other effects.

CCM311 3D Effects (3 credits) Using a 3D application. Students model a character in a brush based 3D application using geometry from other software programs and learn to generate characters in the brush based package. and stencils. Prerequisite: CCM231 Materials and Textures I The Art Institute of Vancouver . It provides students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and develop an original media arts concept. students will focus on the preproduction of a media arts project in a studio environment. textures and to add details and realism to objects without adding complexity to the model. The student portfolio consists of two major components. contrast texturing polys vs. Students will explore techniques of character modeling to include various approaches to figure construction. students will develop particles systems from use in animated scenes and to enhance story points as outlined in the script or project concept. on-line propagation and web site. This class is the first complete team experience that exposes students to the collaborative efforts of a large production team. virtual sets and digital backgrounds. Prerequisite: CCM321 Preproduction Team CCM391 Script Programming (3 credits) This course is focused upon providing students with a strong foundation in script programming for use with 3D computer generated software applications. Additive and subtractive methodologies will be practiced.Academic Calendar MAG351 Character Modeling II (3 credits) This course provides an opportunity for students to prepare an advanced character model for use in their portfolio. pixols. texture painting and lighting strategies to add detail and realism to objects without adding complexity to the model. Prerequisites: CCM171 Digital Imaging II and CCM181 3D Modeling I Page 37 . The second component is the assembly and assessment of the student’s demo reel. incorporate photo referencing. discover internet resources. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I MAG331 Materials and Textures II (3 credits) In this class students will further develop their knowledge of materials and shader systems. Prerequisite: None MAG151 Sculpture (3 credits) Students will employ elements and principles of design. Prerequisite: CCM261 Portfolio I CCM341 Editing (3 credits) Students will develop the foundations of basic video editing using non-linear editing software. Prerequisite: None CCM361 Production Team (6 credits) In this course. The first component consists of a self-promotional package that includes business cards. Students will use a variety of materials and techniques to develop their skills and understanding of sculpture and its relationship to digital 3D animation. Students will present work from their portfolio for review (critique) and obtain an assessment of the quality of their work in order to make necessary enhancements. personal portfolio pieces and assignments. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I MAG301 3D Modeling II (3 credits) Students continue to develop their modeling skills by developing a project from the concept stage and following it through to completion by the end of the course. Prerequisite: MAG201 Character Modeling I MAG381 CG Lighting and Rendering II (3 credits) In this course students will further explore lighting stratagies to maximize the use of materials. Emphasis will be on making choices and editing for story. In addition attention will be paid to matching particle lighting with simulated and real world lighting. students focus on the production of a media arts project in a studio environment. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I MAG251 Environment Modeling (3 credits) This course focuses on the elements of environment modeling. students will learn advanced mapping systems and techniques including camera mapping. Emphasis will be placed upon how to utilize compositing to integrate particles and dynamic simulations into animated projects. Presentation and critique will be components of learning. Prerequisite: MAG301 3D Modeling II MAG441 Matte Painting (3 credits) This course explores and integrates design and technology to develop matte paintings. Students will simulate real world lighting effects. packaging. Corequisite: CCM411 Portfolio II GAD130 Level Design I (3 credits) This is an introductory course covering the level design process and the tools of level editing as they relate to building game environments using an existing commercial game engine. Prerequisite: None MAG201 Character Modeling I (3 credits) This course covers modeling techniques used for building three dimensional characters. create detailing masks. resume. Prerequisite: CCM281 CG Lighting and Rendering I MAG401 Brush Based Modeling and Texturing (3 credits) The course covers brush based software user fundamentals. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM411 Portfolio II (3 credits) This course focuses on the completion of a student’s portfolio and enables the student to begin their career search. learn morph target generation. projection masks. Corequisite: CCM431 Mentor Studio CCM431 Mentor Studio (3 credits) Industry mentors guide students through the completion of team projects. Students will continue to develop their basic modeling and texturing skills as well as learning to plan and design. In addition. create polymesh groups layers and levels. Prerequisite: CCM221 3D Animation I CCM321 Preproduction Team (3 credits) In this course. human anatomy. Students acquire the knowledge and practical skill sets for digital matte painting production. and figure drawing as a basis for perceiving and executing physical forms. The student will create a production plan with milestones from design through to final presentation. and learn to output normal and displacement maps to a 3D application renderer. Students revisit sculpting basics. The focus is on generating levels with attention to efficiency and design aesthetics. explore documents and tools.

and periodic examinations. and dynamic web design. tutorials.Advanced Graphic Design Available at the Renfrew campus.2 quarters . students will foray into interactive design technologies that encompass video production. Students must also receive a passing grade or credits for all required course work. Method of Instruction Program Description Instructional methods at The Art Institute of Vancouver include lecture. students must complete a minimum of 30 quarter credits with a cumulative GPA of 2. This program lasts half of an academic year (two quarters) and contains 30 quarter credits.0 or higher. demonstration. and technology solutions across media platforms. Some course prerequisites for this program are satisfied by having completed one of the Graphic Design diploma programs. Graduates are prepared to seek employment as freelance web design and developers and in the field of interactive design. scripting languages.Advanced Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits DFV120 Introduction to Video Production 3 GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages 3 IMD122 Design Layout 3 IMD301 Introduction to User-Centred Design 3 IMD410 Desktop Video 3 Course Number and Title IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites IMD441 Senior Research IMD451 Senior Project IMD461 Portfolio WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting Credits 3 3 3 3 3 Introduction Advanced Graphic Design is a user-centred design program that will provide graphic design graduates with the opportunity to expand upon their graphic design skills by acquiring Web development and design skills.10 courses . In order to be admitted to the Advanced Graphic Design program. Each course within the program is worth 3 credits (except GD330 Portfolio II which is 6 credits) and the program consists of 9 courses. Except for field trips. students must have completed either the Graphic Design diploma program or the Graphic Design and Foundation for Design diploma program at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Program outcomes are focused on creativity. one-on-one instruction. In addition. 30 credits . all instruction is conducted in a classroom/studio setting.6 months . Page 38 Graduation Requirements To receive a Diploma in Advanced Graphic Design. The Art Institute of Vancouver . and satisfy all financial obligations with The Art Institute of Vancouver. meet portfolio or other requirements outlined in the student handbook. design strategy.Academic Calendar . Students in this program will build interactive applications for web delivery. or have the permission of the Academic Director. The Art Institute of Vancouver offers an Advanced Diploma of Achievement upon successful completion of the Advanced Graphic Design Program.

IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites (3 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the dynamic website authoring environment. Students will apply user-centred design principles, database structures and server side scripting to create dynamic web sites. Particular attention will be paid to design issues relating to the display of dynamic content on the screen and how that dynamic content will be delivered. Prerequisites: GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages and WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting IMD441 Senior Research (3 credits) The student will select a specific subject that can be effectively presented using interactive media or Web design. Emphasis during this research is to be on quantitative and qualitative components of the subject area, project scheduling, presentation methods, and qualitative results. During this time students will conduct research sufficient for professional presentation as a graduate project, to be submitted and defended during their final quarter. Prerequisite: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia IMD451 Senior Project (3 credits) Students select their major project major project in interactive media design. They engage in individual research culminating in a statement of their philosophy of conceptual development and problem solving. Corequisite: IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites IMD461 Portfolio (3 credits) This course guides students through the process of compiling their work into a final interactive portfolio. Students apply techniques and strategies to market themselves in their chosen fields. Emphasis is on students assessing their most marketable skills, designing storyboards for their interactive video, and text elements. Students work on the packaging and presentation of various projects developed in other upper-level courses including resumes, and print material to support their interactive portfolios and to begin their industry networking process. Corequisite: IMD441 Senior Research WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting (3 credits) An advanced course that applies motion graphics as an integrated interactive solution; students will script interaction, sequencing, and motion for interactive projects. Optimization is a critical consideration in the creation of the usercentered experience. Prerequisite: None
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Course Descriptions

Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. Some course prerequisites for this program are satisfied by having completed either the Graphic Design diploma program or the Graphic Design and Foundation for Design diploma program. DFV120 Introduction to Video Production (3 credits) This course introduces students to the video camera as a technical and creative tool for communication and art. The course emphasizes camera operation and the setup for electronic field production (EFP) and studio applications. Students integrate the principles of lighting and gripping into video applications. Camera movements and framing are applied using different camera mounts. Prerequisite: None GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages (3 credits) Students will learn to build database applications that are integrated with the Web. In addition, students will use principles and techniques used to develop small-to-medium scale applications that store, manage and retrieve data. Projects will focus on essential web development skills using PHP, MySQL, loops, and conditions. Students will communicate with databases using the SQL query language and apply server side scripting knowledge to create dynamic websites. Prerequisite: None

IMD122 Design Layout I (3 credits) This course will enable the student to utilize their design skills in collaboration with web development technology and technology considerations. Emphasis will be placed upon translating original and innovative design concepts to the web. Prerequisite: None IMD301 Introduction to User Centred Design (3 credits) This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of developing web sites which have as a primary goal addressing and solving user needs. By exploring the process step-bystep, students will identify where user issues are raised and how they are answered. During the course, students either physically create a Web site or a prototype. Students presentation and defend their decisions. Prerequisite: None IMD410 Desktop Video (3 credits) This course deals with the processes involved with desktop editing of audio and video for digital output. Topics include the operation of non-linear systems, compression schemes, special effects compositing software, and shooting and editing for digital compression and DVD authoring. Students will produce short video projects for output to various storage formats, playback on digital media and for streaming on the web. Corequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production

The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

Advertising
Available at the Renfrew campus. 90 credits - 29 courses - 18 months - 6 quarters - Diploma

Course Listing
Course Number and Title Credits AD100 Survey of Advertising 3 AD101 Fundamentals of Advertising 3 AD102 Fundamentals of Marketing 3 AD110 Conceptual Illustration 3 AD120 Advertising Copywriting 3 AD140 Principles of Photography 3 AD200 Consumer Behaviour 3 AD201 Principles of Marketing Research 3 AD202 Brand Strategy 3 AD210 Advertising Design 3 AD220 Writing for Interactive Design 3 AD240 Storyboarding and Scriptwriting 3 AD250 Basic Web Design 3 AD310 Advertising Campaign I 3 AD311 Advertising Campaign II 6 Course Number and Title Credits AD313 Sales and Persuasive Techniques 3 AD350 Website Development II 3 AD390 Professional Development and Portfolio 3 CC110 Drawing 3 CC112 Fundamentals of Design 3 CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC133 Digital Imaging 3 GD120 Graphic Stylization & Symbols 3 GD121 Concept Development 3 GD130 Digital Illustration 3 GD131 Typography 3 GD133 Advanced Typography 3 GD134 Digital Imaging II 3 GD140 Electronic Design 3

Introduction
The goal of the Advertising Diploma Program at The Art Institute of Vancouver is to prepare students for careers in the diverse arena of advertising. To teach advertising from business to creative across all media platforms with content to enrich the understanding of advertising as an essential component of our economic and social system. To provide a curriculum based on regular examination of the industry and the evolving media. A commitment to lifelong learning is instilled in students as a means to develop their careers from entry-level positions in the advertising field.
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Program Description
The Diploma Program in Advertising is a six-quarter program. The program provides students with skills in conceptual thinking, copywriting, design, marketing, developing advertising campaigns, and account planning. The diploma also educates the student in the application of advertising principles to evolving communication channels (interactive media) and the life skills needed to develop and sustain a career in advertising and related fields.

The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

Course Descriptions

Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. AD100 Survey of Advertising (3 credits) The purpose of this course is to provide a critical understanding of advertising’s role in society in the areas of print, television, radio, film, and the Web. Topics include the relation of advertising to consumption; the history of the advertising industry; the meaning of material goods in a capitalist society; the advertising industry’s influence on institutions such as media and politics; and approaches to decoding the messages of advertising are discussed. The basic orientation of the course is to study advertising as a form of communication unique to modern society. Prerequisite: None AD101 Fundamentals of Advertising (3 credits) This course explores advertising and its role in various markets (local, regional, national, and global). The course includes an overview of the following: ad agencies, campaigns, socioeconomics, research, positioning, branding, consumer behavior, target audiences, sales, marketing, management, and the ethical and legal considerations of the industry. Prerequisite: None AD102 Fundamentals of Marketing (3 credits) This course addresses the fundamental concepts and principles of marketing. The overview of marketing provided here will help students place their knowledge in a framework and understand how each component contributes to the strength and utility of a marketing plan. Students will also learn how to identify the ways in which world events and cultural assumptions influence marketing. Prerequisite: None AD110 Conceptual Illustration (3 credits) Building upon the concepts, skills and theoretical backdrop of previous courses, this course expands the philosophy behind illustration, emphasizing conceptual visual problem solving and quick sketching methods to portray ideas. It also highlights the uses of illustration in the graphic design industry. Assignments will focus on black and white and colour techniques, using contrast, values, composition, and function. Prerequisites: GD120 Graphic Stylization and Symbols and GD121 Concept Development and GD130 Digital Illustration

AD120 Advertising Copywriting (3 credits) Through materials presented in this course, students learn the techniques to develop effective advertising strategies that underlie and enable creative executions, and to cultivate clear, logical and creative copywriting skills. Prerequisite: AD101 Fundamentals of Advertising AD140 Principles of Photography (3 credits) In this fundamental course, students will identify basic photographic tools and their intended purposes, including the proper use of various camera systems and a light meter. Students will analyze photographs to determine their positive and negative attributes and apply these principles to produce their own visually compelling images by employing the correct photographic techniques. Prerequisite: CC112 Fundamentals of Design AD200 Consumer Behaviour (3 credits) This course examines the cultural, social, and individual variables involved in consumer behaviour. It also reviews how these variables are incorporated into buyer decision processes and marketing practices. Prerequisite: AD102 Fundamentals of Marketing AD201 Principles of Marketing Research (3 credits) The use of the marketing research process as a tool for solving management problems is a focus of this course. The source of data, sampling procedures, questionnaire design, data collection, and analysis will be covered. Prerequisites: AD101 Fundamentals of Advertising and AD102 Fundamentals of Marketing AD202 Brand Strategy (3 credits) Although good brands are easy to identify, they are hard to create. This course addresses the factors which make a brand successful, and then approaches the factors—like price pressure, fragmented markets and media and proliferating competition—that businesses must control to build a strong, successful brand. Prerequisite: None AD210 Advertising Design (3 credits) This course will further define the role of graphic design in an advertising context. Students will be introduced to informational and administrative approaches to the development of advertising. Campaign strategies, based on media and marketing realities, will also be defined and applied. Prerequisite: GD140 Electronic Design

AD220 Writing for Interactive Design (3 credits) This is a specialized writing course for interactive design. Students will learn the unique characteristics and techniques of media writing and apply them to interactive media production. Students will also learn to conduct research for media writing projects. Prerequisite: None AD240 Storyboarding and Scriptwriting (3 credits) This course focuses on applying industry-standard storyboarding and scripting techniques to communicate effectively for various forms of media. Contents to be covered include the various purposes and formats of storyboards, the basic terminology and concepts used in storyboarding, and the application of storyboarding techniques to the creation of storyboards with or without a written script. Prerequisite: None AD250 Basic Web Design (3 credits) This course introduces some of the techniques, tools, and technologies associated with web development. By identifying, interpreting, and implementing the roles and responsibilities of web industry team members students will define, design, develop an HTML based website using standard authoring tools. Prerequisites: CC133 Digital Imaging and GD130 Digital Illustration AD310 Advertising Campaign I (3 credits) Students in the course research, create, and present mixed-media campaigns. The students learn the fundamentals of conceiving and executing an integrated local/regional advertising campaign that utilizes major advertising media. Prerequisite: AD210 Advertising Design AD311 Advertising Campaign II (6 credits) Students research and develop a fully integrated advertising/promotional campaign for a National name brand account in this course. The student’s senior project documents, supports and argues the rationale and effectiveness of the campaign in written form. Students prepare, present and defend a graduate project suitable for a professional audience. Prerequisite: AD310 Advertising Campaign I

The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

Page 41

as well as the ways that the sales pitch can be focused to solve customer problems. Students also explore the use of Illustrator as a design and typesetting tool. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging Page 42 . and design aspects of colour. Prerequisites: CC110 Drawing and CC112 Fundamentals of Design GD121 Concept Development (3 credits) This course emphasizes the conceptualization processes of art and design in determining solutions to course assignments. shape. This course focuses on the essential skills and knowledge one needs to effect a sale. and idea refinement. emotional hot buttons. Participants also develop the ability to effectively integrate photographs. identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. This course also covers persuasive communication techniques in the area of advertising. Prerequisite: AD250 Basic Web Design AD390 Professional Development and Portfolio (3 credits) This course focuses on the completion of the portfolio. Areas covered include the fields of logic and psychology. Prerequisite: None CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. original. Emphasis will be placed upon translating original and innovative design concepts to the web. Prerequisite: None AD350 Website Development II (3 credits) This course will enable the student to utilize their design skills in collaboration with web development technology and technology considerations. simplified imagery. emotional reactions and how to achieve them and the various types of media that could be used to achieve the appropriate desired response are also covered. illustrations. Industry-driven software will be used in the development of digital typography and hierarchal skills. Using different software applica¬tions. Logos and other symbolic images will be examined in historic and contemporary contexts. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. mass appeal. Students systematically develop strong and creative layout solutions by means of a cumulative. Concept development processes and material manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions. Graphic elements including typography. form. brainstorming. and abstract shapes will then be utilized to create individual logo designs and other symbolic images. Selling is an essential skill for the sales function of a business. A variety of concepts. The development of marketable. Prerequisites: CC110 Drawing and CC112 Fundamentals of Design GD130 Digital Illustration (3 credits) This course helps students communicate and design with the computer as a professional tool.AD313 Sales & Persuasive Techniques (3 credits) An understanding of the sales process and the steps to sell a product or service is essential to a student who works in any area of business. Prerequisite: GD131 Typography GD134 Digital Imaging II (3 credits) This course builds upon previous courses to integrate raster and vector graphics with concerns for varied formats. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. shading. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD140 Electronic Design (3 credits) This course explores various means of indicating. snob appeal. intention and personality of the written word. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. Students will create visual messages and focused visual statements and gain an understanding of the differences in web and print graphics. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . display. specifically problem identification. proportion. framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination. The course will explore vector-based graphic applications that are considered to be industry standard. but is also part of the job for many other employees. and creative problem solving solutions will also be examined with an emphasis on creative techniques. including web and print graphics. Students use creative problem solving and research techniques. psychology. Your final portfolio should focus on your individual strengths. placing and manipulating visual elements in page design and multi page design. Prerequisite: None CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore. conceptual design process. the student will demonstrate an understanding of electronic illustration. subliminal messages. Prerequisite: None GD131 Typography (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the history of the evolution and application of typography for the perception of meaning. analysis. This work should reflect your uniqueness and your ability to meet demanding industry standards.Academic Calendar GD133 Advanced Typography (3 credits) This course is a continuation of the study of Typography. Prerequisite: None GD120 Graphic Stylization and Symbols (3 credits) This course examines the importance of graphic symbols in design. and text type will be developed using page composition software. and the band wagon effect. They will also produce material which will support portfolio quality projects throughout their study. Prerequisite: Permission of Academic Director CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line. Exercises and projects focus on the hierarchical qualities of typography. Among the topics to be covered are the framing effect.

Each 3 month term of the program is comprised of tightly integrated. and a host of related entry-level animation production positions. expression. posing. Prerequisite: CCM221 3D Animation I Page 43 . 105 credits . Junior Production Designer. balance.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title ANI151 2D Animation I ANI201 Acting for Animators ANI211 Drawing for Animators ANI221 Conceptual Storytelling ANI251 2D Animation II ANI301 3D Animation II ANI331 Vector Animation I ANI351 3D Animation III ANI381 Vector Animation II ANI401 3D Animation IV ANI441 Motion Capture ANI501 3D Animation V CC112 Fundamentals of Design CCM101 Drawing and Perspective CCM121 Digital Imaging CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM141 Life Drawing I Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Course Number and Title CCM161 Concept Design and Illustration CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM191 Life Drawing II CCM221 3D Animation I CCM231 Materials and Textures I CCM241 Life Drawing III CCM261 Portfolio I CCM271 Rigging CCM291 Storyboarding CCM292 Digital Storyboarding CCM321 Preproduction Team CCM361 Production Team CCM391 Script Programming CCM412 Portfolio II CCM432 Mentor Studio Media Arts Elective Media Arts Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3 Program Description The Animation Art & Design diploma program is designed to provide graduates with the relevant skills necessary to enter into and maintain a career in the animation. The concept of narration through imagery will be studied and experimented with in depth through the application of staging and posing characters. 2D Animator (traditional & vector based). Career opportunities for graduating students may include 3D Animator. and cycling will be addressed. Prerequisite: ANI151 2D Animation I ANI221 Conceptual Storytelling (3 credits) The course is an introduction to storytelling and the components of story. The Animation Art & Design diploma program enables students to gain the fundamental artistic skills necessary to enter into and maintain a career in Media Arts industries. This goal is achieved by building a foundation of traditional artistic skills. Prerequisite: ANI201 Acting for Animators The Art Institute of Vancouver . and an understanding of story form. Junior Texture Artist. Prerequisite: None ANI201 Acting for Animators (3 credits) The introduction of acting as a tool to aid in the understanding of how and why we move as it applies to Animation. ANI151 2D Animation I (3 credits) Students will study timing and weight through a series of projects designed to demonstrate the principles of animation. Characters’ personality.Animation Art & Design Available at the Renfrew campus. Render Wrangler. Students will develop the technical and creative aptitude necessary to demonstrate and present their skills to industry. Junior Modeler. VFX Animator. Previous notions from 2D and 3D classes will be reiterated and applied. Technical Animator. Use of a capture device. body language. game and visual effects entertainment industries. motivation. and then providing students with hands on training in various modern applications.34 courses . and posture will be studied through classroom exercises in a variety of media. The goal is to develop storytelling skills. in-betweening. industry driven competencies and outcomes. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. and performance. cohesive courses in which students accomplish specific.Academic Calendar ANI251 2D Animation II (3 credits) Students will apply animation principles to produced solidly constructed animation sequences. Prerequisite: None ANI211 Drawing for Animators (3 credits) This course will introduce the student to the refinement of drawing for the purposes of animation and storytelling. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes.20 months . weight. Media Arts electives may be selected from courses in the 3D Modeling for Animation & Games program. Motion Capture Artist. pencil tests. Posing and timing will be studied and experimented with in depth. and other 2D animation skills will be explored. Prerequisite: ANI151 2D Animation I ANI301 3D Animation II (3 credits) This course will introduce the student to the refinement of observation for the purpose of animating believable weight. Each course builds on the lessons of the ones before it and each term is a prerequisite for the following.7 quarters . Emphasis will be placed on timing. Issues such as keyframing. Video Game Animator.

students will further develop their ability and practice in terms of executing complex animated shots and/or sequences. Prerequisite: CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM231 Materials and Textures I (3 credits) This course introduces students to materials. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by producing a project from inception to completion. and demonstrate that they have a practical understanding of a simplified workflow that they can adapt and implement to accommodate the production requirements.ANI331 Vector Animation I (3 credits) Students will learn how to use vector based animation software to produce animation. mechanics. With the use of a Wacom digital drawing tablet. Prerequisite: CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM191 Life Drawing II (3 credits) Life drawing II is designed specifically to prepare animators and modelers for future classes including character rigging. Prerequisite: CC112 Fundamentals of Design and CCM101 Drawing and Perspective CCM181 3D Modeling I (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of 3D modeling software. identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. Prerequisite: ANI1351 3D Animation III ANI441 Motion Capture (3 credits) This course provides a general understanding of Motion Capture. line quality. Prerequisite: CCM191 Life Drawing II Page 44 . students will build skill levels in composition.Academic Calendar CCM161 Concept Design and Illustration (3 credits) This course focuses on prop. Concept development processes and material manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions. lighting. and light and render a scene. Student will learn the importance of the skeletal structure and how it affects the surface. and other effects. Particular emphasis will be placed on completing strong animations. radiosity. design consistency. Student will learn the importance of the skeletal structure and how it affects the surface. and cycling will be addressed. and endows students with the necessary skills to alter and manipulate motion capture data. mechanical. Prerequisites: ANI151 2D Animation I and CCM121 Digital Imaging ANI351 3D Animation III (3 credits) This course will continue the student’s refinement of observation for the purpose of animating human body mechanics with believable weight. materials. Starting with simple shapes and progressing to more complex organic forms. mechanics. modeling. and lighting strategies to add detail and realism to geometry without adding complexity. Students explore the concept design and development process to create several drawings from thumbnail sketch to inked final. attention to detail. volume. Prerequisite: ANI301 3D Animation II ANI381 Vector Animation II (3 credits) Students will apply skills from Vector Animation I to create short films for their portfolio projects using vector based software. cut-out animation and a combination of the two methods that is referred to as “Tradigital” animation. weight. There will also be an emphasis on the differences with the male and female form. proportion. its processes and applications. Posing and timing will be studied and experimented with in depth. Students will be expected to produce finished industry-quality animation solutions of above-average competency. There will also be an emphasis on the differences with the male and female form. Students learn to construct and manipulate geometry. Through individual and group critique. vehicle. Prerequisite: CCM141 Life Drawing I CCM221 3D Animation I (3 credits) Students will study timing and weight through a series of projects designed to demonstrate the principles of animation. Key animation project frameworks will allow for advanced exploration of character. They will execute each stage of a production work-flow individually or in teams. and force in human gesture drawing. Both live action and animated acting will be studied and analyzed in depth.e. in-betweening. textures. Issues such as keyframing. students will learn how the brushes available within most graphics applications (both Vector and Bitmap based) are pressure sensitive and will allow an artist to draw and paint on the digital Canvas like they would on a real canvas. This course involves the observation and translation of three-dimensional form into two dimensional drawings. Prerequisite: None CCM121 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. Prerequisite: None CCM101 Drawing and Perspective (3 credits) This course is a fundamental drawing course where the students will explore various arts and media and learn to use a variety of drawing tools. Students use 3D modeling software to simulate real world surfaces using reflection. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . and/or other dynamic simulations. and limitations of the human form. Prerequisite: None CCM141 Life Drawing I (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course where students explore the concepts of structure. Students explore the tools and techniques of 3D modeling through a series of assignments. and limitations of the human form. environment. and animation. create and edit materials and textures. Prerequisite: None CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts (3 credits) Students will be introduced to basic concepts of 3D space. and use of tone. Previous principles and theories from 2D and 3D classes will be reiterated and applied. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM241 Life Drawing III (3 credits) Life drawing III is designed specifically to prepare animators and modelers for future classes including character rigging. They will learn how to plan and execute a production using current industry workflows and techniques that will include traditionally drawn artwork.. and character design. Students will also be introduced to a paperless Workflow by using digital tools that are both software and hardware based. from concept to finished product). Prerequisite: ANI331 Vector Animation I ANI401 3D Animation IV (3 credits) This course will continue the student’s refinement of observation for the purpose of animating performances with believability. and time management. Prerequisite: ANI301 3D Animation II ANI501 3D Animation V (3 credits) In this studio course. Prerequisite: ANI1401 3D Animation IV CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore. Concepts from previous animation and acting classes will be reiterated and applied. students will develop a critical eye to identify deficiencies in animation and develop solutions for these problems. The instructor will act in a mentoring role and help guide students through the creative process (i.

Students will present work from their portfolio for review (critique) and obtain an assessment of the quality of their work in order to make necessary enhancements. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM412 Portfolio II (3 credits) This course focuses on the completion of a student’s portfolio and enables the student to begin their career search. design a production schedule for the duration of their studies. games. cinematic techniques. on-line propagation and web site. each student will have created and tested a complete character set up and have the necessary skills to rig their own characters. The student portfolio consists of two major components. Corequisite: CCM432 Mentor Studio The Art Institute of Vancouver . live action and CGI).Academic Calendar CCM432 Mentor Studio (3 credits) Industry mentors guide students through the completion of team projects. and create and deliver a Powerpoint presentation of final portfolio goals. game. Prerequisite: None CCM271 Rigging (3 credits) The purpose of this course is to demystify character setup. research potential employers. students focus on the production of a media arts project in a studio environment. Prerequisite: CCM261 Portfolio I CCM361 Production Team (6 credits) In this course. Prerequisite: CCM321 Preproduction Team CCM391 Script Programming (3 credits) This course is focused upon providing students with a strong foundation in script programming for use with 3D computer generated software applications. students will focus on the preproduction of a media arts project in a studio environment. The first component consists of a self-promotional package that includes business cards. Students assemble and critique works from completed courses. personal portfolio pieces and assignments. Prerequisites: CCM181 3D Modeling I and CCM221 3D Animation I CCM291 Storyboarding (3 credits) This course focuses on the specifics of storyboarding as a storytelling medium and its place in the pipeline for animation. and artistic concepts necessary to render clear and concise storyboards at a professional level. The second component is the assembly and assessment of the student’s demo reel. Students learn the various terminologies.. Prerequisites: CCM221 3D Animation I and CCM291 Storyboarding CCM321 Preproduction Team (3 credits) In this course. and organization. The character rig is broken down into its component parts and animation tested throughout the course. Corequisite: CCM412 Portfolio II Page 45 . resume. Prerequisite: CCM101 Drawing and Perspective CCM292 Digital Storyboarding (3 credits) In this course students will focus upon understanding the role of digital storyboards/animatics and their use in production for animation. Each assignment is evaluated based on functionality. major emphasis will be placed upon executing professional quality storyboards/animatics. Students also have the option of creating and presenting a pitch package for consideration in the team production courses. Upon completion. cinematic techniques and artistic concepts necessary to render clear and concise digital storyboards and animatics. performance. and live action production. Students will learn the various terminologies. as well as for film and television productions (i.e.CCM261 Portfolio I (3 credits) This course serves as a mid program checkpoint. It provides students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and develop an original media arts concept. DVD packaging. In addition. This class is the first complete team experience that exposes students to the collaborative efforts of a large production team.

Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits Course Number and Title Credits DFV110 Introduction to Digital Film Editing 3 DFV210 Motion Graphics and Compositing 3 DFV111 Digital Film Editing 3 DFV220 Electronic Field Production 3 DFV120 Introduction to Video Production 3 DFV221 Short Form Media Production 3 DFV121 Television & Film Production Techniques 3 DFV222 Documentary Filmmaking 3 DFV130 Visual Storytelling & Aesthetics 3 DFV223 Advanced Project Production 3 DFV131 Concept Development & Scriptwriting 3 DFV224 Music Video Production 3 DFV140 Introduction to Cinematography 3 DFV230 Screenwriting 3 DFV141 Cinematography 3 DFV250 Media Business: Law.Digital Film & Video Available at the Renfrew campus. With this in mind. and progressive lighting and shooting techniques will be reinforced. Prerequisite: None DFV121 Television and Film Production Techniques (3 credits) This course is designed to develop intermediate production skills and to acquaint students with the aspects of various production models found in the industry. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. scene flow and continuity. focusing on digital film. 90 credits . The Applied Elective may be satisfied by DFV212 Advanced Post Production or by selecting a course from the Professional Recording Arts program. Prerequisite: None DFV111 Digital Film Editing (3 credits) Students will build on the foundations of basic video editing using industry-standard editing software. With the guidance of seasoned industry professionals and mentors. The Digital Film & Video Program at The Art Institute of Vancouver provides an intensive study of digital production and visual storytelling. This is achieved through group class projects utilizing a combination of hands on technical instruction. class critique. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. DFV110 Introduction to Digital Film Editing (3 credits) Students will develop the foundations of basic video editing using industry-standard nonlinear editing software. Emphasis will be on theory. The course emphasizes camera operation and the setup for electronic field production (EFP) and studio applications. Prerequisite: DFV110 Introduction to Digital Film Editing DFV120 Introduction to Video Production (3 credits) This course introduces students to the video camera as a technical and creative tool for communication and art. shot selection. the Digital Film & Video program offers students an ever expanding curriculum which prepares them to meet the needs of industry. accessing and executing their own ideas and vision via hands-on learning opportunities and practical field exercises. Students integrate the principles of lighting and gripping into video applications. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production Page 46 The Art Institute of Vancouver . introduction to media management and managing long form projects.18 months . Marketing and DFV161 Introduction to Production Planning 3 Distribution 3 DFV171 Applications in Video Production 3 DFV251 Business Development & Communications 3 DFV172 Working with Actors 3 DFV252 Social Media Strategy 3 DFV180 Film Studies 3 DFV253 Professional Development and Portfolio 3 DFV181 Colour Theory for Digital Media DFV260 Advanced Project Preproduction 3 and the Web 3 DFV270 Directing 3 DFV191 Location Audio 3 DFV281 Media Management & Delivery 3 DFV192 Sound Design for Film 3 Applied Elective 3 Program Description New tools for content creation are continually rising on the digital landscape. corporate and commercial video production. with particular attention to camera placement. Expanding digital markets continue to present new challenges for the workforce. designed in consultation with industry representatives. Camera movements and framing are applied using different camera mounts. Emphasis will be on making choices and editing for story. and the simulation of a working production company. selfstarters who want a well-rounded education preparing them for a career in Digital Film & Video production.Academic Calendar .6 quarters . Emphasis is on production. Technical issues such as cinematography. The Digital Film & Video program is best suited for highly-motivated.30 courses . prepares students for entry-level positions in digital filmmaking and related industries. Students will also learn and reinforce the fundamentals of professional shooting and set management. students will explore the skills and organizational thinking necessary for a creative and productive experience. Today’s content developer must be able to navigate this world with confidence. The curriculum.

and vocabulary of compositing. building from the competencies acquired in previous courses. and editing language work to tell the story within the various mediums. Special emphasis will be given to cinematic style and substance as it relates to: contemporary filmmaking. Students learn to produce commercials and public service announcements working with clients and established professional organizations. Prerequisite: None DFV210 Motion Graphics and Compositing (3 credits) Students in this course will learn the concepts. Students will learn to apply rotoscope. It will seek to divorce the “visuals” from the various other elements of production. Prerequisite: DFV130 Visual Storytelling and Aesthetics DFV191 Location Audio (3 credits) This course introduces students to the equipment. dialogue. It is designed for visual arts students. It explores film genres and history.DFV130 Visual Storytelling and Aesthetics (3 credits) This course will approach the medium of film and television from a primarily “visual” standpoint. development of visual elements. from a practical and administrative perspective. With the assistance and mentorship of an experienced industry professional. rather than those pursuing an audio engineering program. The creative and technical usage of colour in digital filmmaking will be examined and applied. students create sound design elements and engineer a complete soundtrack for a 3-5 minute short film. Corporate Videos. EPK (Behind the Scenes).Academic Calendar Page 47 . Prerequisite: None DFV171 Applications in Visual Production (3 credits) This course will ask the student to scrutinize various cinematic shooting styles and techniques and will encourage the implementation of these techniques in a number of hands on video production exercises. Prerequisite: None DFV181 Colour Theory for Digital Media and the Web (3 credits) This course introduces students to the complexities of colour and colour space when applied to film and media creation. corporate and sports/news formats. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production DFV221 Short-Form Media Production (3 credits) This course approaches short form as a genre of media production and its features in subject matter and style. wireless systems. keying. music. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production DFV141 Cinematography (3 credits) This course is designed to provide structured opportunities for students to examine and work with the relationship between the lens and light. hidden and exposed lavaliere techniques. This course covers the fundamentals of scriptwriting. with particular reference to social. techniques. Sports and news events. Prerequisite: DFV130 Visual Storytelling and Aesthetics DFV140 Introduction to Cinematography (3 credits) This course introduces students to the art and craft of cinematography. and the impact a film can have on the viewer. and the process of creating. The course covers aesthetic and technical issues including sound design and manipulation. and will instead examine how shot composition. basic lighting practices. Through participation in exercises and role-plays. choices including camera movements and framing will be previewed and practiced. Prerequisites: DFV110 Introduction to Digital Film Editing and DFV181 Colour Theory for Digital Media and the Web DFV220 Electronic Field Production (3 credits) Students will learn the skills required for creating effective and compelling field productions. students will select from a variety of possible real-world or staged opportunities in one or more of the following event-style scenarios: Special Event Coverage. as well as the relationship between actors and members of a production team are complex in nature. This course will allow students the opportunity to discover the acting process in a practical way. protocols and procedures used in on-site audio recording for film and television. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production The Art Institute of Vancouver . matchmoving. These exercises will culminate in a final genre production to be completed by the end of term. Students will gain a clear understanding of camera and lighting treatments. etc.. The necessity of understanding postproduction technology and the preparation of this valuable step will be explored as part of the process. Wedding Videos. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production DFV172 Working With Actors (3 credits) Actors and their craft represent an integral and often complex aspect of the collaborative filmmaking process. commercial. promotional. The navigation of camera technology. Combining theory with applied technical skills. how to plan a film from concept to screen. booming and shotgun microphone techniques. as well as the rationale and theory behind these resources. Prerequisite: None DFV180 Film Studies (3 credits) This course examines the classics ̶ the films of the past that have shaped the way films are created and viewed today. Standard theories of digital additive and subtractive colour models will be discussed in depth. and alpha channels to final projects. Topics include set-up and operation of field mixers. and audio postproduction tools and processes. Students are introduced to a variety of script formats including those used in documentary. and Multi Camera Shoots. director and production designer will be examined from conception to completion. techniques. narrative. designing and producing content for targeted audiences and intended delivery systems. the important elements of a film (such as visual aesthetics. This course provides students with an invaluable contextual framework that will assist them in creating their own compelling films. Prerequisite: None DFV192 Sound Design for Film (3 credits) This course introduces students to the processes and tools used in sound design for moving images. character development). Prerequisite: DFV140 Introduction to Cinematography DFV161 Introduction to Production Planning (3 credits) This course introduces the student to the process of planning a project through all phases of production. students will gain valuable insight into effective strategies and practices for working with actors effectively. layering. camera choreography. The relationship between actors and directors. artistic and political influences that have shaped and affected the development of film. Prerequisite: None DFV131 Concept Development and Scriptwriting (3 credits) Film and video productions start with a concept. storytelling technique. The relationship between cinematographer. Students will learn.

networking and the interview process. disciplined environment throughout each phase of the production process. students will learn to collect and apply information on developing a comprehensive job search strategy. This course will allow students to explore how a director collaborates with the production team. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director The Art Institute of Vancouver . and Distribution (3 credits) Students will examine and explore law. Prerequisite: None DFV252 Social Media Strategy (3 credits) This course introduces students to the theory and practice of available online social media technology to effectively create a grassroots international marketing campaign. and developing a narrative structure. shot angles. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production DFV223 Advanced Project Production (3 credits) Students will complete the major stages of production with the guidance of a professional mentor. budgets. casting. This involves defining career goals and objectives realistically. Through study of compelling music videos. marketing. shooting. postproduction and delivery. resume workshop. under the guidance of a professional mentor. Students will experience how to implement a marketing initiative from start to finish. This course will focus on the film and television industry. Students will add value to their own creations with the use of social networking and online community interactions. and guides the story through all phases of its creation. for the completion of a final advanced project. Prerequisite: DFV260 Advanced Project Preproduction DFV224 Music Video Production (3 credits) This course will introduce students to the approaches and processes behind the creation of music videos. They will begin the process of writing a short 10-15 minute narrative (of a genre of their choice) following a standard writing process: brainstorming. and design. Students will complete their demo reel and portfolio under the guidance of a mentor in preparation for graduation. utilizes film grammar. Beginning with a concept and lyrics. marketing and distribution as it relates to the media business. Strategies learned in previous courses will be actively applied and built upon as students learn how to take a performer and their music successfully to the screen. students will work with a band/musician of their choice to create a compelling music video. Prerequisite: DFV172 Working with Actors DFV281 Media Management and Delivery (3 credits) This course provides an overview of the development of industry formats and standards for media delivery. the production process and the tools used for asset creation and content preparation. students will fulfill the obligations of these roles while taking responsibility for maintaining a professional. Prerequisite: None DFV250 Media Business: Law. composition.Academic Calendar DFV260 Advanced Project Preproduction (3 credits) The student will master the process of planning one project through all the phases of preproduction including: storyboards. lighting. location scouting and the effective completion of all relevant paperwork.DFV222 Documentary Filmmaking (3 credits) Students will screen compelling documentaries to analyze what makes them effective. covering all stages of production from concept through development. focusing on their structure. pacing. Students will workshop their scripts in class and continue the writing process to the final draft stage. dynamics. Prerequisite: None Applied Electives DFV212 Advanced Post Production (3 credits) Students interested in expanding their opportunities for a future in postproduction will be responsible. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director Page 48 . sales techniques. and post-production. Students also learn and use an authoring tool for completing assignments in authoring and producing projects on various formats. Through participation in relevant roles found in industry. They will work in teams to produce a documentary. business communications and writing skills are a vital part of bringing a project from concept to completion. Marketing. In this course students will hone the writing skills necessary for creating professional proposals and packages for the development of projects. crewing. Instruction addresses the technology involved (hardware and software). images. marketing oneself. Corequisite: DFV230 Screenwriting DFV270 Directing (3 credits) Students will learn the director’s role in translating a script into the visual story medium. as well as gain a greater understanding of the ongoing communication required between production companies and industry partners during production. Prerequisite: None DFV251 Business Development & Communications (3 credits) Whether developing independent projects or working for a production company. creating a treatment. participants of this course will perform an analysis of what makes them effective. as well as new developments in the new media sector. Prerequisite: None DFV230 Screenwriting (3 credits) Students will examine the structure of a short screenplay. Prerequisite: None DFV253 Professional Development and Portfolio (3 credits) Working with their instructor and their career services advisor.

tutorials. Program Description The Art Institute of Vancouver offers a Certificate of Achievement upon successful completion of the Electronic Music Program. Page 49 The Art Institute of Vancouver . sequencers. and computer-based recording make the creation of professional electronic music easy on a home computer. and cadences. and periodic examinations. or create the music and sound effects for a video game.Certificate Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio 3 PRA101 Digital Audio and Control Systems 3 PRA110 Audio Technology I 3 PRA120 Digital Music Technology I 3 PRA121 Digital Music Technology II 3 PRA130 Digital Audio I 3 PRA131 Digital Audio II 3 PRA140 Music Theory I 3 PRA141 Music Theory II 3 PRA170 Game Audio I 3 PRA200 Acoustics 3 Course Number and Title Credits PRA201 Psychoacoustics 3 PRA220 Synthesis and Sound Design I 3 PRA221 Synthesis and Sound Design II 3 PRA240 Songwriting 3 PRA241 Music Arranging and Recording Technology 3 PRA242 Music for Television and Film 3 PRA243 Composition for Advertising 3 PRA260 Business Fundamentals 3 PRA340 Scoring for Film and Television 3 Introduction Write a popular song. Method of Instruction Instructional methods at The Art Institute of Vancouver include lecture. graduates of the Electronic Music Program have the skills and knowledge necessary to produce their own electronic music and run an independent business. and in marketing that music to industry. Graduation Requirements To receive a Certificate in Electronic Music. With the music/sound design needs of Vancouver’s busy film. and production are covered using industry standard samplers. and satisfy all financial obligations with The Art Institute of Vancouver. and video game industries.0 or higher. 60 credits . synthesizers and hard disk recorders. Courses address audio theory. score a film or documentary. animation. melodic and harmonic structure and notation. rhythmic. all instruction is conducted in a classroom/studio setting. ear training. For individuals interested in electronic music creation and composition in the digital age. meet portfolio or other requirements outlined in the student handbook. the Electronic Music Program at The Art Institute of Vancouver is the right place to start. Students must also receive a passing grade or credits for all required course work. arrangement. demonstration. Topics include musical structure and notation. The object of this program is to provide students with skills and knowledge in the area of Electronic Music to enable them to explore further opportunities in this growing field. students must complete a minimum of 60 quarter credit hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.4 quarters . samplers. Synthesizers. tonality and scales.Academic Calendar . Except for field trips. and musical structure. one-on-one instruction.12 months . psychoacoustic principles. Song writing.Electronic Music Available at the Renfrew campus.24 courses .

automating parameters in external MIDI devices. auditory stream and source segregation and perceptual fusion and auditory perspective. Prerequisite: PRA130 Digital Audio I PRA140 Music Theory I (3 credits) Students examine the fundamental concepts of music and its relationship to history and the technology used in composition and recording. advanced sequencing concepts.Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. Understanding these environments helps the audio professional become more marketable and opens a wider variety of positions to explore in the software environment. computer based digital audio workstations. and the basic recording of MIDI messages. A review of the terminology used by musicians. voice physics and neurology. Prerequisite: PRA121 Digital Music Technology II Page 50 The Art Institute of Vancouver . A practical eartraining component will train students to listen critically and to aurally identify various features of audio signals. The theory of control systems will be introduced through common music/audio based protocols leading to consideration of AV industry standards. the design and use of typical microphone types as well as understand the history of the recorded medium and its transition from analog to digital. Prerequisite: None PRA121 Digital Music Technology II (3 credits) Students develop a detailed knowledge of the MIDI language. Prerequisite: None PRA101 Digital Audio and Control Systems (3 credits) Students will learn the fundamentals of digital audio theory through examination of current and historical systems. interactive software environments feature important differences concerning expectations of the audio professional. and develop familiarity with sound design concepts using subtractive synthesis methods. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I (3 credits) Students learn MIDI and basic synthesis skills for music production and sound design. field recording. Some of these programs model how content and control structures are used together to create interactive sound and music for video games. and real-time automation. Prerequisite: None PRA131 Digital Audio II (3 credits) Students move beyond the basics of Pro Tools and digital audio skills. students are ready to apply their skills to intermediate and advanced work in non-linear digital audio production effects and mixing. digital audio transfer protocols. structure of the ear. Students will also be exposed to the work habits. A practical ear-training component will teach the ability to identify and distinguish acoustical properties of spaces. PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio (3 credits) Students will be introduced to the foundational concepts in audio theory. and Pro Tools software and hardware. Curriculum also covers sound design. songwriters. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA110 Audio Technology I (3 credits) Introduction to professional audio recording equipment with an emphasis on its practical use in a hands on environment. principles behind audio hardware and software signal processors. Prerequisite: PRA120 Digital Music Technology I PRA130 Digital Audio I (3 credits) Digital Audio I introduces students to the concepts. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA201 Psychoacoustics (3 credits) This course builds on and expands the development of critical listening skills and the introduction of psychoacoustics and cognition. consonance.Academic Calendar . Prerequisite: None PRA120 Digital Music Technology I (3 credits) Students develop a working theoretical and skills-based knowledge of the multi-timbral synthesizer and the sequencing environment within the context of the contemporary MIDI production studio. Through lectures and inclass projects. Topics covered include: perception of pitch. hearing damage. Examples of studio and listening room acoustics will be examined. software-based effects plugins. The protocols and procedures of the professional audio industry will be discussed and followed in class. They will learn about the nature of audio waveforms. attitudes and expectations of the audio industry. Prerequisite: None PRA141 Music Theory II (3 credits) Students develop keyboard and theoretical musical skills. instruction covers digital audio theory and developing non-linear audio workstation skills. arrangers. including dynamic and static parameter automation. Various technologies are examined to gain a strong theoretical basis for the use of proprietary computer audio programs typically used in video game studios. The course content includes audio signal flow and digital multitrack recorder operations. Prerequisite: PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA200 Acoustics (3 credits) Students are introduced to the theoretical concepts of acoustics and acoustic design. use of programmable or MIDI based hardware interfaces. dissonance and tuning systems. Professional skills are taught in a MIDI production studio using industry standard software and hardware. loudness and timbre. Music examples are used throughout and basic keyboarding skills are developed to apply to course material. This leads to more flexible and in-depth uses of sequencers involving graphical and list based editing. static and dynamic parameter and tempo automation. Topics include SMPTE time code and synchronization. The course also includes instruction and practical experience using software samplers and synthesizers with Pro Tools and the integration of MIDI control surfaces. Both live and studio applications are covered. Practical keyboard skills are fused with relevant theoretical concepts necessary for success in advanced music composition courses. procedures and techniques of non-linear digital audio editing. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. Topics covered include configuring and maintaining a complex MIDI studio through a multiport interface. By the end of the course. Prerequisite: PRA140 Music Theory I PRA170 Game Audio I (3 credits) As an alternate employment possibility to the standard studio environment. subtractive synthesis basics and audio recording in a sequencing environment. producers and engineers to communicate with each other is included. In a practical component students will learn to distinguish between various frequency bands. They will learn to measure and evaluate acoustic spaces and develop an understanding of both the acoustical and electronic approaches to acoustic correction.

melody. This course is valuable to both non-musicians (audio engineers and producers) and musicians (arrangers and composers).PRA221 Synthesis & Sound Design II (3 credits) This course will survey both commercially available synthesis methods and recent developments at audio research institutes. Finally. chord extensions and substitutions. communications. The course allows students to experiment musically and discover their strengths and individual styles. and providing library music. assessing client needs. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . voicing. covering practical considerations to get a career started. Course designed for the student to be capable in all areas of the process. as MIDI files. vocal). Freelancing. remix techniques and arrangement planning and execution. Students will also survey the current market for hardware and software implementations of various synthesis methods. Prerequisites: PRA121 Digital Music Technology II and PRA141 Music Theory II PRA241 Music Arranging and Recording Technology (3 credits) Students study approaches to arranging as it relates to computer-based technology. voiceover casting and production for production and comedy campaigns. strategizing creative planning and producing creative through to final delivery and follow up. melodic development. students further develop their compositional and technical skills through the production of several pieces to accompany sections of film. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA260 Business Fundamentals (3 credits) Students gain valuable knowledge and skills to prepare them for being self-employed in the media entertainment industry. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA242 Music for Television and Film (3 credits) This course starts by analyzing contemporary musical and sound design trends in TV and film work. harmonization. brass. Topics include traditional concepts relating to controlling arrangement flow for live musicians. records. enabling them to be valuable in all areas of the industry. Detailed study of subtractive. Prerequisite: PRA242 Music for Television and Film Page 51 . computer-based performance techniques. marketing and taxes are practical topics that are addressed. students go on to create their own music projects. FM. invoices. Students also write and record an original song as a final project. and production techniques. sound design. instruments and tools used in film scoring to convey theme. The analysis includes both music theory and investigations of the technology behind the production.Academic Calendar PRA340 Scoring for Film and Television (3 credits) Using the technical and creative skills acquired in previous music composition courses. strings. With a new found understanding of the demands of current production values. mood and emotion to enhance the audience’s viewing experience. Students analyze the characteristics of all song genres with respect to form. students pay particular attention to different textures. arranging for sections (rhythm. From getting the project. developing their music theory and technical expertise. Students submit weekly projects on paper. The students’ final projects involve working with Digital Film & Video students to score their student films. harmony. the course investigates the business aspects of creating music for the film and TV industries. Analytical listening sessions will expose students to synthesis methods in various musical contexts. Students are introduced to the processes and practicalities of writing for film. physical modeling and granular synthesis will culminate in original sound design projects. Prerequisite: PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA240 Songwriting (3 credits) Songwriting is a study of the elements that make a successful song. or audio files. contracts. beat creation. Course will cover all areas of creative including original music. television dramas and documentaries. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA243 Composition for Advertising (3 credits) Student gains knowledge encompassing all areas of audio for broadcast advertising. arrangement. With the instructor’s guidance.

Program Description The Event Management Diploma Program is a one year. and has been Management Diploma Program with an overall cumulative endorsed by our local employer based Professional Advisory grade point average of 3. Reaching a number of industry sectors including the tourism. and many more. galas. As a result.Academic Calendar . the two organizations as well as go2 who is the provincial The Event Management Diploma Program has worked with the partner of the CTHRC and delivery agent of emerit tourism trainCanadian Tourism Human Resource Council in order to provide ing and certification in the province of British Columbia. Working to promote professionalism. have curriculum that teaches to Event Management International entered into an articulation agreement. Sales.20 courses .Event Management Available at the Renfrew campus. Conferences & Trade Shows 3 EVM401 Practical Application 3 EVM402 Ethics & Professionalism 3 EVM403 Public Relations 3 EVM404 Professional Development 3 Introduction Every day special events take place all over the world. The Art Institute of Vancouver is a proud member of the International Special Events Society (ISES). Festivals. These standards have been developed in a collaborative effort from a large group of authors and event Current and future students that successfully complete the Event management professionals from around the world. awards shows. exhibitions. All these events require someone. students receive relevant and industry specific education. incentive programs. or a team of people to put them together. four quarter program that is designed to prepare students to enter into the professional and corporate world of special events. Event managers and coordinators spend countless hours preparing and coordinating every detail of their event so that the audience can enjoy a seamless and spectacular event. entertainment and meetings industries. conferences.4 quarters . towards the knowledge component of the TCP-EVC certification and designation. Occupational Standards. & Relationship Building 3 Course Number and Title Credits EVM300 Risk Management & Law 3 EVM301 Technical Production 3 EVM302 Event Design 3 EVM303 Sponsorship & Program Funding 3 EVM304 Proposals & Presentations 3 EVM400 Destination Management. The Art Institute of Vancouver . With industry professionals as instructors. Canadian Special Events Society (CSES). and Meeting Knowledge component of the TCP. ethics and growth in the special events industry.12 months . marketing events. there is a wide range of opportunities and entry-level career paths for graduates to pursue. cation program and found the programs to be equivalent.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits EVM100 Food & Beverage Services 3 EVM101 Essential Software 3 EVM102 Project Management & Strategic Planning 3 EVM103 Business Communications 3 EVM104 Stakeholder Management & Measuring Return 3 EVM200 Financial Management & Administration 3 EVM201 Human Resource Management 3 EVM202 Site Management & On-Site Operations 3 EVM203 Event Marketing 3 EVM204 Customer Service.Event Coordinator certifiProfessionals International (MPI). 60 credits . meetings.0 automatically qualify to receive credit Committee. sporting events. Meetings. (Application fees apply) Professional Designation (TCP-EVC) The Art Institute of Vancouver and the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC) have analyzed and compared the Event Management Diploma Program to the Occupational Page 52 Memberships All students enrolled in the program will receive a one-year student membership to Meeting Professionals International. as well as to develop opportunities for students.

Course Descriptions

Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. EVM100 Food & Beverage Services (3 credits) Food & Beverage Services is an introductory course that helps students identify the food and beverage requirements for special events. While providing a basic understanding of the food service function & catering operations, students will learn about selecting & contracting caterers, choosing appropriate meals for specific clients or groups, and understanding costs & quality. Licensing, sanitation, legalities, scheduling, alcohol service & related risks, and health & safety regulations are also included in this course, which will prepare students to complete an exam for FoodSafe certification. Prerequisite: None EVM101 Essential Software (3 credits) Understanding how to use standard software is a requirement of most employers today. Essential Software will teach students the fundamentals of computer operating systems and software such as Microsoft Word, Excel, and Powerpoint, as well as Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. Each software will be taught with examples from within the special events industry. Prerequisite: None EVM102 Project Management & Strategic Planning (3 credits) Project Management & Strategic Planning introduces students to the special events industry as well as the logistical planning involved in organizing an event. Beginning with developing missions, goals & objectives, students will also develop critical paths, project plans, procurement plans, as well as conduct a SWOT analysis. As a large focus of this course is on project management, many of the skills that are learned will be transferable to a variety of other projects and jobs. Prerequisite: None

EVM103 Business Communications (3 credits) Business Communications is a foundation course that helps students develop writing strategies that can be confidently adapted to a wide range of professional situations. Because the course aims to raise the student’s communication performance to a professionally acceptable level, this is a “learn by doing” course. The primary means of instruction and learning will be guided writing practice in realistic business contexts. Instruction and assessment of student writing will focus on both the writing process and students’ ability to create professional, finished products. Prerequisite: None EVM104 Stakeholder Management & Measuring Return (3 credits) While an event may seem successful after completion, it is important to evaluate and recognize whether or not it has met the goals and objectives of the stakeholders involved. As an integral part of the event management process, Stakeholder Management & Measuring Return will teach students how to identify and manage event stakeholders as well as develop effective evaluation techniques to measure ROI (Return On Investment). Prerequisite: None EVM200 Financial Management & Administration (3 credits) Having an understanding of business and event finances is crucial to the ultimate success of the event management organization. Financial Management & Administration teaches students about basic business accounting principles and procedures such as profit & loss statements, break-even analysis, cash flow management, as well as event-specific budgeting and pricing strategies. This course will also focus on the coordination and management of both business and event administration including the filing & storage of information, writing reports, and developing policies & procedures. Prerequisite: None EVM201 Human Resources Management (3 credits) The largest and most important resource that an event coordinator will need to manage is “human”. Human Resource Management addresses how to effectively recruit, train and manage staff, volunteers, crew, entertainers, and vendors in order to develop an amazing and motivated event team. Topics for this course include; establishing workforce policies & procedures, developing a training plan for both staff & volunteers, interview techniques, candidate selection, and employee evaluations. Prerequisite: None

EVM202 Site Management & On-Site Operations (3 credits) As a continuation from Project Management & Strategic Planning, Site Management & OnSite Operations investigates how to select the appropriate venue for your event by developing selection criteria, conducting a site inspection and designing a site layout. This course focuses heavily on the logistics involved in on-site coordination as well the management of an event site before, during & after the event, creating production schedules & event binders, and establishing communications. Prerequisite: EVM102 Project Management & Strategic Planning EVM203 Event Marketing (3 credits) While an event manager can produce a spectacular event, if nobody attends, it will not be successful. Event Marketing is an introduction into marketing fundamentals, concepts and trends that help generate attendance at special events. Through the development of a marketing plan, students will learn about related subjects such as branding, creating marketing and other collateral materials, event merchandise, advertising, and promotions. Prerequisite: None EVM204 Customer Service, Sales & Relationship Building (3 credits) An event manager may have award-winning ideas, the best products and services, however, clients often choose a company based on its people rather than price and creativity. Clients want to trust the people they are doing business with, feeling comfortable that they have chosen the right company for the job. Customer Service, Sales & Relationship Building examines customer service, sales strategies and how to build relationships with both clients and suppliers that last well past the one contract. Prerequisite: None EVM300 Risk Management & Law (3 credits) Every time an event is organized, the event manager is charged with the responsibility to ensure the safety, comfort and well being of all those that attend. Many times the risks are not as obvious as most people would imagine, and require a great deal of analysis in order to be identified and prepared for. Risk Management & Law exposes students to a variety of risks through case-studies and examples of real incidents. A portion of this course will cover contingency plans, crowd management, and security, as well as legal and regulatory obligations, agreements, insurance, copyright and gaming laws. Prerequisite: EVM202 Site Management & OnSite Operations
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The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

EVM301 Technical Production (3 credits) Most events require some sort of technical production, whether it is a simple microphone on a stand, or an extensive stage-show production with multimedia, live cameras, and special effects. Technical Production introduces students to the technical aspects of special events including lighting, sound, video, staging, tents, set-design, power, rigging and special effects. This course focuses on the technical terms, language, and technologies that are available so that an event manager can order the correct equipment and incorporate these items into the overall event design and theme. In addition, students will learn about floorplan design, scripts, and show direction. Prerequisite: EVM202 Site Management & OnSite Operations EVM302 Event Design (3 credits) Creating an exciting environment or atmosphere that guests will speak about for months following an event can be an extremely rewarding experience. Event Design will take students through the creative process of designing an event while focusing on developing concepts and themes using décor, audio-visual, staging, food, entertainment, and other related items. A portion of this course will also discuss other factors contributing to a guest’s enjoyment and comfort such as, event signage, credentialing and registration processes, crowd management, hospitality services, accommodations, and protocol requirements. Prerequisite: EVM202 Site Management & OnSite Operations EVM303 Sponsorship & Program Funding (3 credits) Every event requires a source of funding, regardless if it is a corporate, private, or not-forprofit event. Sponsorship & Program Funding explores revenue generation for special events as well as sponsorship programs, fundraising activities, and the development of financial resources. Students will also learn about sponsorship sales while developing sponsorship packages and related materials. Prerequisite: None

EVM304 Proposals & Presentations (3 credits) As a client watches presentations from several companies, they are typically comparing creative ideas as well as price. Although the client may not realize this, they are also looking for a feeling of rapport with the people conducting the presentation. Proposals & Presentations focuses on delivering effective, professional presentations that not only build rapport, but also trust, credibility and confidence. Throughout the course, students work on improving presentation skills as well as producing a professional printed proposal with accompanying multimedia materials for a mock event, which will be presented to a real client in the final class. Prerequisite: None EVM400 Destination Management, Meetings, Conferences & Trade Shows (3 credits) The special events industry is closely connected to the tourism and hospitality industry by bringing in many out-of-town and out-ofcounty visitors for meetings, conferences and trade shows. One industry sector is called Destination Management, where a related company handles everything from ground transportation, flights, and accommodations, to conferences, social events and tours. This course provides an overview of the destination management industry as well as meetings, conferences and trade show management. Topics include program planning for out of country groups, transportation, accommodation, tours, incentive travel and British Columbia as a destination. Prerequisite: None EVM401 Practical Application (3 credits) As a one of the final courses in the Event Management Diploma Program, students will put into practice some of the skills that they have learnt in the previous three quarters. Students will design, organize and execute an internal event and/or an event for a charitable organization while being observed and supervised by an instructor who is also an industry professional. The Practical Application course is specifically designed to provide hands-on learning experiences as well as periodic performance evaluations on organizational, interpersonal and event coordination skills. Prerequisites: EVM300 Risk Management & Law, EVM302 Event Design, EVM303 Sponsorship & Program Funding, and EVM304 Proposals & Presentations

EVM402 Ethics & Professionalism (3 credits) Business organizations and special event industry associations highly promote professionalism as well as ethical business practices, making this an important topic to understand and demonstrate. While many unethical and unprofessional behaviours are easy to identify, there are some not-so-obvious situations that may arise during the course of one’s career. Ethics & Professionalism exposes students to a variety of situations using case-studies and examples which will be analyzed and discussed in class. A large portion of this course will also focus on developing leadership skills, exhibiting professional behaviour and projecting a professional image. Prerequisite: None EVM403 Public Relations (3 credits) As an extension of the Event Marketing course, Public Relations focuses specifically on the development of public relations plans and strategies as well as creating publicity utilizing media sources such as newspapers, television and radio. In addition to preparing press releases and media kits, students will also learn about managing public relations crises and controversies. Prerequisite: EVM203 Event Marketing EVM404 Professional Development (3 credits) As a final step in the preparation to begin a new career, students will gain experience in how to market themselves effectively for employment as well as how to participate in professional development activities. Course topics include; job search methods, pre-employment networking skills, professional resume preparation, cover letters, thank you letters, and interview skills. Students will also learn other valuable skills that can be applied throughout their career, such as time and stress management, making decisions, and solving problems. Prerequisite: None

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The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

Fashion Design
Available at the Renfrew campus. 90 credits - 28 courses - 18 months - 6 quarters - Diploma

Course Listing
Course Number and Title Credits Course Number and Title Credits CC110 Drawing 3 FD241 Intermediate Patternmaking 3 CC112 Fundamentals of Design 3 FD250 Draping 3 CC115 Colour Theory 3 FD260 Trends and Forecasting 3 CC133 Digital Imaging 3 FD280 Apparel Evaluation and Production 3 FD104 Survey of the Fashion Industry 3 FD300 Professional Development and Portfolio 3 FD110 Fashion Illustration 3 FD320 Design Studio: Women’s Wear 3 FD124 Fundamentals of Construction 3 FD321 Advanced Sewing Techniques 3 FD130 Textile Fundamentals 3 FD324 Advanced Construction 3 FD180 Product Development 3 FD340 Computer Patternmaking 3 FD190 History of Fashion 3 FD341 Computer Patternmaking II 3 FD210 Concept Development 3 FD370 Final Collection Concept 3 FD211 Digital Illustration for Fashion 3 FD372 Final Collection Production 9 FD224 Intermediate Construction 3 FM102 Introduction to Fashion Marketing 3 FD240 Fundamentals of Patternmaking 3 FM304 Website Development 3

Program Description
The Fashion Design program offers the ability to transform design ideas into garments and accessories as well as knowledge of the business side of the fashion industry. In the design segment of the program, students develop skills in garments construction and design including tailoring, flat pattern drafting and draping as well as computer pattern drafting and grading to provide a solid foundation in the fundamentals of apparel engineering. In addition, marketing courses enable the students to develop, analyze and implement effective market strategies. The faculty nurtures creativity and teaches hands-on skills using traditional tools as well as industrial equipment similar to those found in the fashion design field. The combination of professional marketing skills and technical knowledge will prepare students for entry level positions in the industry such as a junior designer, pattern grader, management trainees, visual merchandisers and assistant merchandise buyers.

Course Descriptions

Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line, shape, form, shading, proportion, framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination. Prerequisite: None CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore, identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. Concept development processes and material manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions. Prerequisite: None CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. This course explores theories regarding physical perception, psychology, and design aspects of colour. A variety of concepts, materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. Prerequisite: None FD104 Survey of the Fashion Industry (3 credits) This course is an overview of the fashion industry, including design, production, and marketing. Students examine the process of production from the development of textiles to the strategies of retailing. Prerequisite: None
The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

FD110 Fashion Illustration (3 credits) Students further explore techniques of fashion illustration for design communication. Life drawing is included. Prerequisite: None FD124 Fundamentals of Construction (3 credits) Students demonstrate a working knowledge of basic garment construction methods in a laboratory setting. Prerequisite: None FD130 Textiles Fundamentals (3 credits) Students study natural and manufactured fibers, their production, uses and characteristics. Prerequisite: None

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Prerequisites: CC133 Digital Imaging and FD104 Survey of the Fashion Industry FD190 History of Fashion (3 credits) Students analyze and research historic. Advanced concepts in designing a collection of marketable apparel will be covered. Prerequisite: FD241 Intermediate Patternmaking Page 56 FD260 Trends and Forecasting (3 credits) This course is a comprehensive study of trend forecasting.FD180 Product Development (3 credits) Students take products from concept to marketplace researching material markets and analyzing trends for development of private label merchandise. Prerequisite: None FD372 Final Collection Production (9 credits) This course provides students with the opportunity to continue to implement their own apparel line. national and cultural themes in costume and fashion from ancient to modern times. Prerequisite: None FM304 Website Development (3 credits) This course introduces students to the theory and practice of web design. analysis and forecasting. Students will learn how to input existing patterns and take a general look at the computeraided design process including alterations. Technical garment drawings are emphasized. Prerequisites: FD320 Design Studio: Women’s Wear and FD324 Advanced Construction FD324 Advanced Construction (3 credits) Students continue to refine and expand their knowledge of construction creating their own patterns for tailored pieces. Prerequisite: FD124 Fundamentals of Construction FD240 Fundamentals of Patternmaking (3 credits) Students analyze garment designs and apply basic flat pattern techniques in accordance with industry standards. Prerequisite: FD370 Final Collection Concept FM102 Introduction to Fashion Marketing (3 credits) Students examine the basic principles of marketing. Corequisite: FD320 Design Studio: Women’s Wear FD250 Draping (3 credits) Students are exposed to the methods and principles of 3D pattern draping allowing for the expression of design concepts. Research develops skills in specifying. Students will be instructed in developing a design work board for a specific target market and selecting the most marketable ideas for the collections. Collections will be assessed by a panel to determine eligibility for the Fashion Show. Prerequisites: FD130 Textile Fundamentals. demographics. The final portfolio focuses on students’ individual strengths. creation. Advanced design skills are applied through hand rendering skills. FD224 Intermediate Construction. This course includes the production of concept boards for finished portfolio boards as well as construction of sample garments. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging FD224 Intermediate Construction (3 credits) This course further explores construction techniques in a laboratory setting. and manufacturing and budgetary issues are analyzed. integrating the concepts of consumer motivation with modern marketing strategies and planning. Students will construct a collection using industry standards. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of professionalism and an overall understanding of self-marketing in the field. Professional development tools are presented. Prototypes are developed. This course also shows you a variety of web sites and web design styles and how to critically evaluate a web site. Students use patterns and details to produce garments. Students will learn how to apply various combinations of the functions in PDS to get the desired results on the patterns being manipulated. including tailoring and advanced sewing techniques. students design and construct apparel and accessories for the women’s markets. students will also explore other forms of non-store retailing such as direct mail and multi-level marketing. Prerequisites: FD130 Textile Fundamentals and FD180 Product Development FD300 Professional Development and Portfolio (3 credits) This course focuses on the refinement of professional skills and the completion of the portfolio. and social issues that affect fashion and related industries. Prerequisite: FD224 Intermediate Construction FD340 Computer Patternmaking (3 credits) This course will be an introduction to the Gerber system management and will develop the basic knowledge skills regarding the software. FD104 Survey of the Fashion Industry. using sustainable materials. Students will be prepared for the business environment and the transition into an applied arts profession. interface design. Prerequisites: CC133 Digital Imaging. Prerequisite: FD124 Fundamentals of Construction FD241 Intermediate Patternmaking (3 credits) Students analyze garment designs and apply advanced flat pattern techniques in accordance with industry standards. Prerequisite: None FD210 Concept Development (3 credits) Specialty design areas are explored through research. and FD110 Fashion Illustration FD211 Digital Illustration for Fashion (3 credits) With a concentration on website and catalogue development. networking and interviewing skills. Students will also take an in-depth look at the manual pattern grading and learn how to grade basic blocks by hand on hard paper. All specialty areas are analyzed. This course will focus on the set up of tools and tables the system uses in order to give the student a basic understanding of how Gerber works. FD180 Product Development. grading and marker marking. Prerequisite: FD240 Fundamentals of Patternmaking FD341 Computer Patternmaking II (3 credits) This course will develop basic computer pattern drafting techniques using Gerber software. Prerequisite: FD211 Digital Illustration for Fashion The Art Institute of Vancouver . assembly and finishing. The work should reflect students’ uniqueness and ability to meet demanding industry standards Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director FD320 Design Studio: Women’s Wear (3 credits) In a laboratory setting. Prerequisites: CC133 Digital Imaging and FD104 Survey of the Fashion Industry FD280 Apparel Evaluation and Production (3 credits) Students analyze construction techniques and standards used in the ready-to-wear market. and FD240 Fundamentals of Patternmaking FD321 Advanced Sewing Techniques (3 credits) Further exploration of drafting and construction techniques.Academic Calendar . Students design and draft patterns and details to produce an outerwear garment that includes alternatives to fur or exotic skins. Corequisite: FD210 Concept Development. Students will learn to create effective web sites with maximum browser compatibility. interactivity and the competing theories on ‘good’ and ‘bad’ web design. Prerequisite: FD340 Computer Patternmaking FD370 Final Collection Concept (3 credits) This course provides students the opportunity to develop and implement their own thesis project from concept to completion. including resume and cover letter writing.

networking and interviewing skills. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. Prerequisite: None FD130 Textiles Fundamentals (3 credits) Students study natural and manufactured fibers. Students may satisfy the Fashion Design Elective by selecting a course from the Fashion Design program. merchandise management. fashion sketching. and turn to topics on e-commerce and Web marketing. their production. business ownership.6 quarters .Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC133 Digital Imaging 3 FD104 Survey of the Fashion Industry 3 FD130 Textile Fundamentals 3 FD190 History of Fashion 3 FD211 Digital Illustration for Fashion 3 FD260 Trends and Forecasting 3 FD300 Professional Development and Portfolio 3 FM101 Fundamentals of Marketing 3 FM102 Introduction to Fashion Marketing 3 FM110 Fundamentals of Advertising 3 FM120 Business Fundamentals 3 FM200 Consumer Behaviour 3 FM201 Brand Strategy 3 FM202 Brand Marketing 3 Course Number and Title Credits FM203 Principles of Market Research 3 FM210 Media Planning and Buying 3 FM220 Business Communications 3 FM231 Public Relations 3 FM240 Visual Merchandising 3 FM241 Sales and Event Promotion 3 FM242 Merchandise Management 3 FM250 Event and Fashion Show Production 3 FM260 Current Designers 3 FM270 Fashion Writing 3 FM290 Retail Mathematics 3 FM303 International Marketing 3 FM304 Website Development 3 FM320 E-Business and Marketing 3 Fashion Design Elective 3 media buying. textiles and fabrics.Academic Calendar . psychology. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. A variety of concepts. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. The final portfolio focuses on students’ individual strengths. human resources. securing an internship. Students examine the process of production from the development of textiles to the strategies of retailing.30 courses . including resume and cover letter writing. Prior to graduating. Prerequisite: None FD104 Survey of the Fashion Industry (3 credits) This course is an overview of the fashion industry. retail mathematics. Prerequisite: None Page 57 The Art Institute of Vancouver . 90 credits . Prerequisite: None FD211 Digital Illustration for Fashion (3 credits) With a concentration on website and catalogue development. national and cultural themes in costume and fashion from ancient to modern times. Prerequisites: CC133 Digital Imaging and FD104 Survey of the Fashion Industry FD300 Professional Development and Portfolio (3 credits) This course focuses on the refinement of professional skills and the completion of the portfolio. Professional development tools are presented. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. costume history. and design aspects of colour.Fashion Marketing Available at the Renfrew campus. including design. production. Students will be prepared for the business environment and the transition into an applied arts profession. and marketing. students concentrate on developing a portfolio. The work should reflect students’ uniqueness and ability to meet demanding industry standards. store planning and lease management. elements of retail operations and technology. advertising and marketing. uses and characteristics. Prerequisite: None FD190 History of Fashion (3 credits) Students analyze and research historic. They later move on to topics such as concepts and trends in apparel. Students are introduced to foundation skills such as colour theory. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging FD260 Trends and Forecasting (3 credits) This course is a comprehensive study of trend forecasting. Program Description The Fashion Marketing program blends individual creativity with a keen sales orientation.18 months . CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. students will also explore other forms of non-store retailing such as direct mail and multi-level marketing. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. demographics. accounting. digital imaging and introductory retail skills. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of professionalism and an overall understanding of self-marketing in the field. and social issues that affect fashion and related industries. consumer behaviour. manufacturing.

they will have generated numerous portfolio quality pieces. This course is an introduction to the essential concepts and skills of brand marketing. cost-effectiveness. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging FM110 Fundamentals of Advertising (3 credits) This course is a basic introduction to advertising. proper positioning of promotional material. Students will also get a real perspective on the businesses of styling and visual merchandising. We will examine various definitions of advertising and different methods of communication. and become more aware of the importance of visual merchandising. Prerequisites: FM102 Introduction to Fashion Marketing and FM120 Business Fundamentals FM201 Brand Strategy (3 credits) In this course. colour. questionnaire design. marketing people can rely less on the traditional tools of print and broadcast media. Students will investigate the importance that marketing plays in the fashion world by studying basic marketing strategies both inside and outside the fashion industry. Prerequisite: FM101 Fundamentals of Marketing FM202 Brand Marketing (3 credits) Branding became a buzz word in 1990s advertising and marketing. and analysis will be covered. Prerequisite: FM102 Introduction to Fashion Marketing FM241 Sales and Event Promotion (3 credits) In this course students will thoroughly explore the process of developing and preparing a marketing sales promotional package that is carefully targeted and positioned to reach the goal of generating sales. Learning about the major events. formulating promotional strategies. including Print. real world observations. development and composition of press kits. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging FM240 Visual Merchandising (3 credits) The objective of this course is to give students the tools necessary to be able to merchandise their own stores. Students examine basic business fundamentals. beauty. advertising objectives. Each student will develop a complete media plan and creative storyboard. Topics include defining and creating marketable promotions/event packages. integrating the concepts of consumer motivation with modern marketing strategies and planning. or fashion show. copywriting and production. Prerequisite: None FM200 Consumer Behaviour (3 credits) This course introduces the students to concepts of consumer behavior including both theory and measurement. Prerequisite: None FM102 Introduction to Fashion Marketing (3 credits) Students examine the basic principles of marketing. Prerequisite: None FM120 Business Fundamentals (3 credits) This course introduces the students to concepts of contemporary Canadian business including both theory and measurement. As the retail environment changes. The source of data. and influences on advertising will help the student place current events in context and help nourish the student’s understanding of the possibilities of various types of ads and advertising campaigns. artwork. letters. or the store of a fashion retailer. trends. and explore innovations that created some of the world’s most successful apparel. Students will design and prepare a sales and promotion package. students identify what a brand is. and lifestyle brands. Prerequisite: FM110 Fundamentals of Advertising FM220 Business Communications (3 credits) This course addresses the need to communicate in writing on the job.Academic Calendar . bios and fact sheets. The course will also help the student recognize emerging trends and capitalize on them. A variety of materials must be written for a business: memos. In addition. Prerequisites: FM101 Fundamentals of Marketing and FM200 Consumer Behaviour FM210 Media Planning and Buying (3 credits) This course will give students the basic planning and analytical tools to implement a creative media campaign for multiple delivery channels targeting specific fashion and apparel consumers. They will learn all the rules and guidelines practiced by the professionals. and federal regulations. we will look at how advertising has changed over the years and been affected by the culture that has produced it. The overview of marketing provided here will help students place their knowledge in a framework and understand how each component contributes to the strength and utility of a marketing plan. layout. and copy for advertising or marketing. sampling procedures. They will learn to identify the role of the Visual Merchandiser. and multimedia within the fashion industry. its history. New Media and Broadcast. The will learn how to dress a window display. and how to style a photo shoot. proposals. Prerequisite: None FM231 Public Relations (3 credits) Students will study traditional public relations tools and techniques and the use of public relations as an effective marketing strategy. as a facilitator and guide. advertising copy. presentations. developing methodologies for comprehensive marketing research. but this process has evolved into a powerful way to organize and utilize an understanding of consumer needs and motivations in a changing marketplace. and be able to have the tools to get started. potential and limitations. news releases. Students examine marketing research methods. Students will learn to identify the requirements of different types of writing and to prepare material to communicate clearly and effectively. Students will also learn how to identify the ways in which world events and cultural assumptions influence marketing. creating effective logos. as well as the advertising spiral. The instructor. accessories. while examining typography. Prerequisites: FM200 Consumer Behaviour and FM201 Brand Strategy Page 58 The Art Institute of Vancouver . and see what does and doesn’t work in a store environment. Instruction includes case studies. Prerequisites: FM200 Consumer Behaviour and FM201 Brand Strategy FM203 Principles of Market Research (3 credits) The use of the marketing research process as a tool for solving management problems is a focus of this course. will help students to fully explore the creative aspects of the assigned projects so that upon completion.FM101 Fundamentals of Marketing (3 credits) This course addresses the fundamental concepts and principles of marketing. examine core concepts and components integral to brand development. data collection. Marketing strategists need to learn how to create an identity for their products and services and how to use that identity to support sales.

Prerequisite: FM241 Sales and Event Promotion FM260 Current Designers (3 credits) In this course students analyze the dynamics of world-famous designers. organizational components. legal. They will explore the Private Label and Brand Name businesses. interface design. and the characteristics of various wholesale and retail markets. needed to produce a successful store event or fashion show. Prerequisite: FM290 Retail Mathematics FM250 Event and Fashion Show Production (3 credits) The student will be introduced to a range of skills. interactivity and the competing theories on ‘good’ and ‘bad’ web design. Prerequisites: FM202 Brand Marketing and FM203 Principles of Market Research FM304 Website Development (3 credits) This course introduces students to the theory and practice of web design. models and choreography. Prerequisites: FM202 Brand Marketing and FM203 Principles of Market Research The Art Institute of Vancouver . Marketing. and global issues are also covered.Academic Calendar Page 59 . analyze. and economic considerations and how these concepts relate to decision making in an international environment. develop customer profiles and look at franchising as a means of entering the retail world. Students will become familiar with merchandise accounting as it relates to the various retail formats. media techniques. political and legal influences. Prerequisites: FD260 Trends and Forecasting and FM220 Business Communications FM290 Retail Mathematics (3 credits) This course provides an understanding of the various financial tools used by retailers to evaluate performance. Prerequisite: FM120 Business Fundamentals FM303 International Marketing (3 credits) Students will gain an understanding of global marketing opportunities. cross-cultural sensitivities. During this course. Students calculate. Students will learn to create effective web sites with maximum browser compatibility. hair and make-up and video teams. music. special effects and lighting. ethical. online monetary transactions. including choosing domain names. Internet security and more. In-depth case study followed throughout the course. the student will gain insight into the role of creative and technical experts involved with the runway.FM242 Merchandise Management (3 credits) Students study the categorizations of stores. In addition. problems and strategies that impact the international environment. Prerequisite: FD260 Trends and Forecasting FM270 Fashion Writing (3 credits) This course introduces writing techniques in a wide range of areas within the fashion field. and interpret financial concepts associated with accounting from a merchandising perspective. students will become knowledgeable about international marketing concepts. social. backdrop. This course also shows you a variety of web sites and web design styles and how to critically evaluate a web site. Prerequisite: FD211 Digital Illustration for Fashion FM320 E-Business and Marketing (3 credits) Students develop an understanding of ebusiness.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director Page 60 The Art Institute of Vancouver . gameplay (interactivity) designer. A project or projects are then selected to move forward to Production Team. cohesive courses in which students accomplish specific.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC310 Preproduction and Project Management 3 CC401 Portfolio I 3 CC450 Production Team I 3 CC451 Production Team II 6 CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts 3 GAD100 History of Games 3 GAD102 Documentation for Design 3 GAD110 Game Design I 3 GAD120 Scripting I 3 GAD121 Mini Games and Prototyping 3 GAD122 Game Design II 3 GAD130 Level Design I 3 GAD131 Game QA and Prototyping 3 GAD140 Scripting II 3 Course Number and Title Credits GAD141 Creative Writing and Research 3 GAD200 Interactive Storytelling I 3 GAD210 Interactive Storytelling II 3 GAD230 Level Design II 3 GAD235 Online Game Scripting I 3 GAD240 Online Game Scripting II 3 GAD450 Game Design Workshop 3 GAD453 Portfolio II 3 GAD454 Mentor Studio 3 VGP100 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 VGP333 Programming for Game Engines 3 Media Arts Elective 1 3 Media Arts Elective 2 3 Media Arts Elective 3 3 Introduction Game designers are the people who give life to near flesh-andblood characters. Prerequisite: None CC310 Preproduction and Project Management (3 credits) Students work on a game prototype and learn to invent new game ideas. In sort. Graduates gain the training and skills necessary to compete for entry-level positions in the game industry: level designer. Students in the Game Art & Design Program at The Art Institute of Vancouver acquire a core skill set of written communication.6 quarters . 90 credits .Academic Calendar . and then providing students with hands on training in the application of these skills to video games. The student then learns to create professional documentation. and design aspects of colour. CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. psychology. and technology are introduced on a constant basis. This class is mainly a lab class where students are expected to work on their own personal projects. they create the user experience.29 courses . This course explores theories regarding physical perception.Game Art & Design Available at the Renfrew campus. and create and deliver a PowerPoint presentation of final portfolio goals. This is a field that demands constant evolution as new gameplay engines. Students should bring their work to class each week. and apply knowledge of video and computer games to create their own interactive experiences. The Game Art & Design Diploma Program is about learning the fundamental design skills necessary to enter into and maintain a career in the video game industry. This goal is achieved by building a foundation of core game design skills. articulate stories. game and level design. embroil them in fantastic plots. and design levels placing them in a compelling environment. Each three month term of the program is comprised of tightly integrated. game scripting and a foundation in art. The students are introduced to the theory of project management and how it applies to modern game development. research potential employers. industry-driven competencies and outcomes. Program Description The Game Art & Design Diploma Program is dedicated to providing graduates with the relevant skills necessary to enter into and maintain a career in the field of video game design. story writer. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. Prerequisite: GAD121 Mini-Games and Prototyping or permission of the Academic Director CC401 Portfolio I (3 credits) This course serves as a mid program checkpoint. A variety of concepts. and assistant producer. mission scripter.18 months . design game play. Media Arts Electives may be selected from courses in the 3D Modeling for Animation & Games and Animation Art & Design programs. tester. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. systems. and developing the technical aptitude necessary to demonstrate and present the acquired skills effectively. Students assemble and critique works from completed courses. design a production schedule for the duration of their studies. characters and their environments.

critical thinking. materials. Prerequisite: GAD140 Scripting II GAD240 Online Game Scripting II (3 credits) This students learn advanced object-oriented scripting techniques to create unique and compelling games. creating a final product and play testing. Prerequisite: GAD110 Game Design I GAD130 Level Design I (3 credits) This is an introductory course covering the level design process and the tools of level editing as they relate to building game environments using an existing commercial game engine. prototyping. Students will experience an entire game cycle: identifying the audience. Emphasis is on brainstorming techniques. organization structure. Prerequisite: GAD121 Mini Games & Prototyping GAD140 Scripting II (3 credits) This course builds on the previous scripting class and introduces students to advanced object-oriented programming and scripting concepts. In this class. drafting and the revision of a research based document of between 90 to 125 pages. created key-framed content. and animation. we explore a structured process of designing levels. They will also learn to tune games. Prerequisite: GAD120 Scripting I GAD141 Creative Writing and Research (3 credits) This course focuses on the research and writing process. script out. Emphasis is on research. The student is introduced to the basics of scripting an online game. pitching the game.Academic Calendar GAD200 Interactive Storytelling I (3 credits) Interactive Storytelling focuses on understanding storytelling. lighting. while understanding the audience and thematic elements. technological shifts. The focus is on generating levels with attention to efficiency and design aesthetics. Prerequisite: None GAD120 Scripting I (3 credits) Fundamentals of programming using a modern programming language. dialogue tree and script and implement it in a contemporary RPG game engine. Prerequisite: GAD141 Creative Writing & Research GAD210 Interactive Storytelling II (3 credits) This course continues the story development begun in Interactive Storytelling I. Prerequisite: GAD130 Level Design I GAD235 Online Game Scripting I (3 credits) Online Game Scripting provides students with an introduction to the online authoring environment. problem solving. including multi-threaded storytelling with fully realized characters and well developed plots. Prerequisite: CC310 Preproduction and Project Management or permision of the Academic Director CC451 Production Team II (6 credits) In this course. Students will learn modern tools for rapid prototyping of various electronic game genres. drafting and the revision of design documentation. Prerequisite: GAD120 Scripting I GAD122 Game Design II (3 credits) Game Design II focuses on providing students with practical application and instruction of game design as it relates to working inside a game development studio. brainstorming techniques. Prerequisite: None GAD100 History of Games (3 credits) This course introduces students to the timeline. Prerequisite: GAD235 Online Game Scripting I GAD450 Game Design Workshop (3 credits) This is a special topics workshop where an instructor and students explore a contemporary games design topic that has immediate relevance. students work as a team on the production of an electronic games project in a studio environment. Prerequisite: CC401 Portfolio I or Permission of the Academic Director Page 61 . Prerequisite: CC450 Production Team I CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts (3 credits) Students will be introduced to basic concepts of 3D space. We will cover advanced level construction techniques including effective lighting. scripted sequences and special effects. critical thinking. Prerequisite: None GAD102 Documentation for Design (3 credits) This course focuses on the writing process. Students work in teams to apply models and strategies for creating traditional games that are based in solid play mechanics. and exploring selected issues pertinent to the interactive entertainment industry. Using a discussion and workshop format. from high-level idea to implementation an industry standard level editor. modeling. manipulating graphics and creating simple games are explored. and key genres in the brief history of electronic video games. research. Prerequisite: GAD100 History of Games GAD110 Game Design I (3 credits) Students will be introduced to traditional game theory and design and how they relate to their modern electronic cousin. Prerequisite: None GAD121 Mini Games and Prototyping (3 credits) Students will design. Students take the story. students continue to work as a team on the production of an electronic games project in a studio environment. Prerequisite: GAD200 Interactive Storytelling I GAD230 Level Design II (3 credits) This course builds upon the previous foundational Level Design course. Prerequisite: GAD110 Game Design I GAD131 Game QA and Prototyping (3 credits) Students will learn the basics of quality assurance for games. Interface design. gameplay balancing. The student will develop a written and verbal vocabulary for analyzing games and their cultural significance. comparative game analysis and testing procedures that are necessary to polish and refine a game. writing design documentation. students will learn the tools of the trade and hone their storytelling skills by creating a design document that can later be implemented using a commercially available toolset.CC450 Production Team I (3 credits) In this course. and create small self-contained mini-games and subsequently balance and tune them. The goal of the course is to help students prepare themselves for employment with a game company and generate design materials. Prerequisite: GAD102 Documentation for Design The Art Institute of Vancouver . to use comparative analysis with respect to games and to critique games in a professional manner. The quality level in terms of form and content should be publishable. It includes discussion of current ideas regarding game design. the importance of developing a test plan. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by producing a project from inception to completion.

craftsmanship and other skills as they assemble and refine their portfolios pieces. build networking gameplay. use a modern 3rd party physics engine. Working individually with an instructor. File management and storage. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director GAD454 Mentor Studio (3 credits) Industry mentors guide students through the completion of team projects. They will learn a brand new pipeline and import game assets. spreadsheet. Prerequisite: GAD140 Scripting II The Art Institute of Vancouver . design. The use of peripherals and their interaction with the computer will be applied. basic word processing. Prerequisite: None VGP333 Programming for Game Engines (3 credits) Students will learn how to work in a pre-existing modern game engine framework. Students will demonstrate their conceptual. Corequisite: GAD453 Portfolio II Page 62 VGP100 Introduction to Computer Systems (3 credits) This course introduces students to the basic operation of a computer on multiple hardware platforms. and learn how integrate all major systems through advanced scripting.GAD453 Portfolio II (3 credits) This course will prepare students for job interviews by helping them compile a portfolio. personal portfolio pieces and assignments. students will select representative pieces.Academic Calendar . manipulate audio assets. showcasing work that reflects a unique style. The students will also be introduced to the Internet as a research and networking tool. and database techniques are explored. The components of a computer and general network infrastructure will be examined. prototype gameplay features.

Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . and take the challenging freelance assignments.Academic Calendar GD132 History and Analysis of Design (3 credits) Curriculum will encompass a study of the art movements that have structured the field of graphic design covering political. and Dreamweaver. works. Also students must receive a passing grade or credit for all required courses and submit a professional quality printed portfolio comprised of eight to 12 complete projects. Except for field trips. all instruction is conducted in a classroom/studio setting. advertising agencies. Students will be trained to design with the following software tools: Adobe Photoshop. brainstorming. Students will study the concepts. Students use creative problem solving and research techniques.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits ART102 History of Art in Early Civilization 3 GD121 Concept Development 3 GD131 Typography 3 GD132 History and Analysis of Design 3 GD211 Advanced Typography 3 GD212 Electronic Design 3 GD221 Production Procedures I 3 GD223 Photoshop for Prepress 3 GD230 Digital Illustration 3 GD231 Corporate Identity 3 GD310 Dimensional Design 3 GD311 Art Direction 3 Course Number and Title Credits GD312 Design and Technology 3 GD322 Foundation of Electronic Production 3 GD330 Portfolio II 6 GD412 Advertising Design 3 GD430 Portfolio I 3 GD432 Senior Project 3 IMD102 Digital Visual Composition 3 MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia 3 RS400 Professional Development 3 WS121 Fundamentals of the World Wide Web 3 WS130 Web Site Development I 3 WS230 Web Site Development II 3 Introduction Magazines. After gaining professional experience. demonstration. corporate communications departments.0 or higher and an incremental completion rate (ICR) of 66. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. publishing houses. Prerequisite: None GD121 Concept Development (3 credits) This course emphasizes the conceptualization processes of art and design in determining solutions to course assignments. Upon graduation. and periodic examinations. In addition the graduate portfolio must contain two to four professional quality packaging design projects. Students in this program will learn to apply the fundamentals of design.24 courses . and television studios. 75 credits . and styles of the periods through the use of images and projects. and creative problem solving solutions will also be Page 63 . The development of marketable.Graphic Design Available at the Renfrew campus. social and economic influences and the analysis of contemporary design and design trends. Prerequisite: None GD211 Advanced Typography (3 credits) This course is a continuation of the study of Typography. creative director.67%. specifically problem identification. Students must also develop a website to showcase an online version of their print portfolio and accompanying biographical and career development items. or production manager. Adobe InDesign. newspapers. packaging and web development companies all require the specialized skills of graphic designers. original. They will also produce material which will sup­ port portfolio quality projects throughout their study. Flash. analysis. artists. intention and personality of the written word. Prerequisite: Submission of portfolio GD131 Typography (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the history of the evolution and application of typography for the perception of meaning. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. studio manager.14 months . ART102 History of Art in Early Civilization (3 credits) This course is a history of art from the Prehistoric and Tribal periods through to the Baroque. engineering companies. Method of Instruction Instructional methods at The Art Institute of Vancouver include lecture. builders. publishing houses. web development companies. and idea refinement. students will learn how to meet the needs of clients quickly. many graduates are able to go on to advanced positions such as art director. Graduation Requirements To receive a Graphic Design Diploma. Some prerequisites are satisfied by submission of a portfolio. Some may establish design firms. illustration and production procedures in creative communication problems and projects. typography. design studios. tutorials. brand manager. The Graduate Portfolio Review by Industry is mandatory for graduation as it is a part of your final Portfolio II course. Adobe Illustrator. one-on-one instruction.5 quarters . In addition. Exercises and projects focus on the hierarchical qualities of typography. Graphic Design students will have acquired the training and the portfolio necessary to interview for entry-level positions in advertising agencies. students must complete a minimum of 75 credits with a cumulative GPA of 2. Students also explore the use of vector-based software as a design and typesetting tool. creatively and economically.

the student will demonstrate an understanding of electronic illustration. conceptual design process. design consistency and time management. Through critique. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing strong concepts appropriate to client needs. These applications will be part of a structured corporate image system. and put into practice through a series of project assignments designed to exercise both student understanding of techniques and design creativity. Industry-driven software will be used in the development of digital typography and hierarchal skills.Academic Calendar . design consistency and time management. Students learn to create complex effects. original concepts. Prerequisite: Submission of portfolio GD223 Photoshop for Prepress (3 credits) This course focuses on advanced computer techniques using digital input devices and imaging software to achieve design solutions appropriate to specific audiences. Using different software applications. GD131 Typography. The ability to effectively integrate photographs. deadlines. trapping procedures. Traditional reproduction techniques will be explored. A team environment is emphasized and will acquaint the students with the necessity of leadership ability. strategy and understanding the client vision. line camera & basic principles/ratios. processes and procedures of 3D design. bindery. students will execute and refine final pieces according to their own action plan to showcase work that reflects a unique style. and study the requirements necessary to scale and construct various dimensional pieces. including paste-up techniques. bindery. Exercises will train students in coordinating creative efforts from concept to finished product. logo development is also explored with other business communication solutions. colour and problem-solving skills and stress attention to detail. students will learn about and express their creative methods and cognitive processes. price. and six-colour presses. and traditional four-. image reproduction and manipulation. They will be familiarized with the materials.examined with an emphasis on creative techniques. Prerequisite: GD212 Electronic Design GD322 Foundation of Electronic Production (3 credits) This is a major portfolio course that will further develop students’ ability to prepare electronic and physical material for production. superior images. Key multi-page print and dimensional projects allow for advanced exploration of conceptual approaches. large format signage. and display and text type will be developed using page composition software. Prerequisites: GD121 Concept Development. In a mentored environment. Prerequisite: GD131 Typography GD212 Electronic Design (3 credits) This course will explore various means of indicating. Participants develop skills to analyze corporate objectives and apply practical applications. placing and manipulating visual elements in page design. and finishing techniques. The course also explores the business of advertising. While the course focuses on corporate identity and its function. students will learn about and express their creative methods and cognitive processes. The preparation of concepts will utilize the principles of design. illustration. communication and negotiating skills. Students demonstrate their conceptual design skills and craftsmanship as they assemble and refine specific portfolio pieces. and strategies for effectively selling a product and explore product concepts. colour approaches. and GD230 Digital Illustration GD310 Dimensional Design (3 credits) Students explore 3D designs and processes and how they relate to advertising design. methods. submission to newspapers or magazines. Students are expected to produce contemporary design solutions for corporate sectors. illustrations. Lectures include a review of the target audiences. Prerequisite: GD430 Portfolio I GD412 Advertising Design (3 credits) This course will explore the various aspects of advertising design communications with an emphasis on the development of creative. attention to detail. and how these relate to bitmap resampling and image/ file exporting. colour approaches. Prerequisite: GD212 Electronic Design GD330 Portfolio II (6 credits) This course prepares students for job interviews by helping them compile a portfolio. typography. Prerequisites: GD212 Electronic Design and GD221 Production Procedures I GD312 Design and Technology (3 credits) This is a major portfolio course that will introduce students to the electronic preparation of material for production. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing strong concepts appropriate to client needs. Prerequisite: Submission of portfolio GD221 Production Procedures I (3 credits) The course is designed to help students become proficient in designing and preparing various graphic materials for digital production via new printing technologies. Students will learn about the theories. This course also focuses on the refinement of previous works into a comprehensive collection representative of Graphic Design skills. budgets. systematically developing strong and creative layout solutions by means of a cumulative. illustration. and finishing techniques. including contracts. five-. billing along with business ethics. image reproduction and manipulation. and distribution as they relate to advertising. promotion. The course will explore vector-based graphic applications that are considered to be industry standard. line screens. Prerequisite: None GD231 Corporate Identity (3 credits) This course will explore the role of design in a corporate identity program. The instructor will act in a mentoring role and help guide students through various creative processes. Through critique. Focus is on developing and utilizing advanced techniques in raster and vector-based applications. typography. Prerequisite: Submission of portfolio GD230 Digital Illustration (3 credits) This course helps students communicate and design with the computer as a professional tool. Theory and techniques will be explored through lecture/tutorial series. attention to detail. and production ready files. typography. Prerequisites: GD212 Electronic Design and GD221 Production Procedures I GD311 Art Direction (3 credits) This course will exhibit the role of the Art Director in producing multi-faceted design projects. The instructor will act in a mentoring role and help guide students through various creative processes. professional presentation and attention to cultural diversity. trapping procedures. Prerequisite: None Page 64 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Key multi-page print and dimensional projects allow for exploration of conceptual approaches.

Students will learn to create resizable. the basic scripting language of all web documents. lighting. They will learn how to market themselves. small. Students will explore the procedures and techniques involved in delivering high-impact websites. They will do this by assessing their personal background. in addition to many of the other effects and extension scripts available for that medium. and many other brilliant special effects. including digital still camera as well as camcorder orientation. Students will select a major project in design or illustration and develop a “junior project” throughout the duration of the course. Typesetting. conceptual development and problem solving. The Art Institute of Vancouver . decision making. They will also develop their skills in problem solving. Emphasis will be placed upon effective layout and design for multi page document production. conflict resolution. game/ software interfaces.GD430 Portfolio I (3 credits) A primary emphasis of this course is the electronic and physical preparation of material for production. long-form animations. Research will culminate in a product or statement of philosophy. Prerequisite: None RS400 Professional Development (3 credits) This course is designed to prepare students for the process of gaining employment. animation for web and TV. Students will also create World Wide Web pages utilizing HTML. lighting. Prerequisite: WS130 Web Site Development I Page 65 . Prerequisite: None WS121 Fundamentals of the World Wide Web (3 credits) This course will focus on the origins of the World Wide Web. pagination. develop and execute a major design or illustration project. using such tools as effective cover letters. creative thinking and dealing with interpersonal situations found in a work environment. and other branded marketing materials. Prerequisite: GD430 Portfolio I IMD102 Digital Visual Composition (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamental terminology. Students will learn how to apply their skills to construct a commercial website with Web accessibility. schedule. and other techniques for overall thematic and visual effects of moving and static images. technical illustrations. an introduction to various web browsers and recent developments and applications concerning the Internet and World Wide Web. concepts. they will practice their listening and communication skills. trapping procedures. and identifying and pursuing career opportunities through the job search process. Students will also learn advanced HTML and CSS. By participating in interview activities. Prerequisites: GD221 Production Procedures I and GD231 Corporate Identity GD432 Senior Project (3 credits) Students will select. colour specifications. They will engage in individual research culminating in a statement of their philosophy of conceptual development and problem solving as it relates to the development of this junior project. binding and finishing techniques will be explored. resumes. This is a portfolio production course. Prerequisite: Submission of portfolio MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia (3 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the Flash authoring environment. and techniques of digital visual composition for both static and moving images.Academic Calendar self management. The course focuses on the principles of using colour. composition. set-up and operation. aesthetic and content considerations. Instruction is given on basic techniques of production. Prerequisite: None WS230 Web Site Development II (3 credits) Students will expand on the principals developed in previous courses and apply their skills to the development of a personal website accessible on the Web. image reproduction. Prerequisite: None WS130 Web Site Development I (3 credits) Students will learn to create effective websites with maximum browser compatibility utilizing authoring software. and compact navigation interfaces. as well as their ability to read the room by understanding non-verbal communication. including technical.

After gaining professional experience. form. The foundation quarter is designed to develop a student’s critical portfolio skills. corporate communications departments. proportion. In addition the graduate portfolio must contain two to four professional quality packaging design projects. Except for field trips. brand manager. framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination. 90 credits .0 or higher and an incremental completion rate (ICR) of 66. creatively and economically. students will learn how to meet the needs of clients quickly. publishing houses. many graduates are able to go on to advanced positions such as art director.Academic Calendar CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore. and television studios. design studios. Concept development processes and material manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions. newspapers. web development companies. and Dreamweaver. Some will establish design firms. engineering companies. publishing houses.6 quarters . Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. packaging.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits ART102 History of Art in Early Civilization 3 CC110 Drawing 3 CC112 Fundamentals of Design 3 CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC133 Digital Imaging 3 GD121 Concept Development 3 GD131 Typography 3 GD132 History and Analysis of Design 3 GD211 Advanced Typography 3 GD212 Electronic Design 3 GD221 Production Procedures 3 GD223 Photoshop for Prepress 3 GD230 Digital Illustration 3 GD231 Corporate Identity 3 GD310 Dimensional Design 3 Course Number and Title Credits GD311 Art Direction 3 GD312 Design and Technology 3 GD322 Foundation of Electronic Production 3 GD329 Portfolio I 3 GD330 Portfolio II 6 GD412 Advertising Design 3 GD432 Senior Project 3 IMD102 Digital Visual Composition 3 MMA121 Life Drawing I 3 MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia 3 RS400 Professional Development 3 WS121 Fundamentals of the World Wide Web 3 WS130 Web Site Development I 3 WS230 Web Site Development II 3 Introduction Magazines. studio manager. artists. and take the challenging freelance assignments. students must complete a minimum of 90 credits with a cumulative GPA of 2. advertising agencies. Also students must receive a passing grade or credit for all required courses and submit a professional quality printed portfolio comprised of eight to 12 complete projects. Upon graduation. Students will study the concepts. Method of Instruction Instructional methods at The Art Institute of Vancouver include lecture. Graphic Design students will have acquired the training and the portfolio necessary to interview for entry-level positions in advertising agencies. Adobe Illustrator. If a student wishes to challenge this quarter.67%. Graduation Requirements To receive a Graphic Design and Foundation for Design Diploma. Flash. identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. In addition. demonstration. one-on-one instruction.18 months . and styles of the periods through the use of images and projects Prerequisite: None Page 66 CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line. all instruction is conducted in a classroom/studio setting. shape.29 courses . It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. or production manager. and periodic examinations. Students will be trained to design with the following software tools: Adobe Photoshop. illustration and production procedures in creative communication problems and projects. and web development companies all require the specialized skills of graphic designers. builders. Prerequisite: None . ART102 History of Art in Early Civilization (3 credits) This course is a history of art from the Prehistoric and Tribal periods through to the Baroque. Students in this program will learn to apply the fundamentals of design. The Graduate Portfolio Review by Industry is mandatory for graduation as it is a part of your final portfolio II course. Adobe InDesign. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . they must submit a portfolio and have it accepted by the Admissions Committee before advanced standing is granted. creative director. tutorials. typography.Graphic Design and Foundation for Design Available at the Renfrew campus. Students must also develop a website to showcase an online version of their print portfolio and accompanying biographical and career development items. works. shading.

superior images. bindery. They will be familiarized with the materials. The development of marketable. the student will demonstrate an understanding of electronic illustration. and put into practice through a series of project assignments designed to exercise both student understanding of techniques and design creativity. Focus is on developing and utilizing advanced techniques in raster and vector-based applications. and GD230 Digital Illustration GD310 Dimensional Design (3 credits) Students explore 3D designs and processes and how they relate to advertising design. Students also explore the use of vector-based software as a design and typesetting tool. attention to detail. and finishing techniques. The instructor will act in a mentoring role and help guide students through various creative processes. and production ready files. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD223 Photoshop for Prepress (3 credits) This course focuses on advanced computer techniques using digital input devices and imaging software to achieve design solutions appropriate to specific audiences. Theory and techniques will be explored through lecture/tutorial series. design consistency and time management. psychology. original. and display and text type will be developed using page composition software. Exercises will train students in coordinating creative efforts from concept to finished product. Prerequisite: None GD121 Concept Development (3 credits) This course emphasizes the conceptualization processes of art and design in determining solutions to course assignments. The course will explore vector-based graphic applications that are considered to be industry standard.CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. Students use creative problem solving and research techniques. A variety of concepts. Prerequisites: GD212 Electronic Design and GD221 Production Procedures I GD312 Design and Technology (3 credits) This is a major portfolio course that will introduce students to the electronic preparation of material for production. social and economic influences and the analysis of contemporary design and design trends. and creative problem solving solutions will also be examined with an emphasis on creative techniques. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. analysis. Prerequisite: GD131 Typography GD212 Electronic Design (3 credits) This course will explore various means of indicating. Through critique. conceptual design process. systematically developing strong and creative layout solutions by means of a cumulative. submission to newspapers or magazines. Students learn to create complex effects. The ability to effectively integrate photographs. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. While the course focuses on corporate identity and its function.Academic Calendar Page 67 . and design aspects of colour. trapping procedures. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD221 Production Procedures I (3 credits) The course is designed to help students become proficient in designing and preparing various graphic materials for digital production via new printing technologies. placing and manipulating visual elements in page design. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD230 Digital Illustration (3 credits) This course helps students communicate and design with the computer as a professional tool. communication and negotiating skills. A team environment is emphasized and will acquaint the students with the necessity of leadership ability. Prerequisite: None GD132 History and Analysis of Design (3 credits) Curriculum will encompass a study of the art movements that have structured the field of graphic design covering political. and traditional four-. including paste-up techniques. Traditional reproduction techniques will be explored. Exercises and projects focus on the hierarchical qualities of typography. colour approaches. typography. line camera & basic principles/ratios. and how these relate to bitmap resampling and image/file exporting. Participants develop skills to analyze corporate objectives and apply practical applications. Prerequisite: None GD231 Corporate Identity (3 credits) This course will explore the role of design in a corporate identity program. logo development is also explored with other business communication solutions. These applications will be part of a structured corporate image system. and six-colour presses. image reproduction and manipulation. Industry-driven software will be used in the development of digital typography and hierarchal skills. Prerequisites: GD212 Electronic Design The Art Institute of Vancouver . They will also produce material which will sup­ port portfolio quality projects throughout their study. and idea refinement. processes and procedures of 3D design. line screens. five-. Using different software applications. Prerequisites: GD212 Electronic Design and GD221 Production Procedures I GD311 Art Direction (3 credits) This course will exhibit the role of the Art Director in producing multi-faceted design projects. illustration. large format signage. intention and personality of the written word. specifically problem identification. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD211 Advanced Typography (3 credits) This course is a continuation of the study of Typography. and study the requirements necessary to scale and construct various dimensional pieces. GD131 Typography. Prerequisites: CC110 Drawing and CC112 Fundamentals of Design GD131 Typography (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the history of the evolution and application of typography for the perception of meaning. brainstorming. Key multi-page print and dimensional projects allow for exploration of conceptual approaches. students will learn about and express their creative methods and cognitive processes. Prerequisites: GD121 Concept Development. illustrations. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing strong concepts appropriate to client needs.

student’s progress to sketching detailed long pose figure representations. game/ software interfaces. The course also explores the business of advertising. Students will learn to create resizable. using such tools as effective cover letters. Prerequisite: None GD432 Senior Project (3 credits) Students will select. the basic scripting language of all web documents. schedule. and compact navigation interfaces. muscular system. lighting. composition. long-form animations. By participating in interview activities. In a mentored environment. students will learn about and express their creative methods and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: None RS400 Professional Development (3 credits) This course is designed to prepare students for the process of gaining employment. set-up and operation. Emphasis will be placed upon effective layout and design for multi page document production. typography. students will execute and refine final pieces according to their own action plan to showcase work that reflects a unique style. including technical. Prerequisite: None WS121 Fundamentals of the World Wide Web (3 credits) This course will focus on the origins of the World Wide Web. and building the figure from the inside out. The course focuses on the principles of using colour. trapping procedures. Students will learn about the theories. concepts. and techniques of digital visual composition for both static and moving images. They will learn how to market themselves. Students demonstrate their conceptual design skills and craftsmanship as they assemble and refine specific portfolio pieces. Lectures include a review of the target audiences. Prerequisite: GD212 Electronic Design GD329 Portfolio I (3 credits) A primary emphasis of this course is the electronic and physical preparation of material for production. resumes. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging MAA121 Life Drawing I (3 credits) Students gain a technical and artistic understanding of how to draw the human form. They will do this by assessing their personal background. and finishing techniques. Key multi-page print and dimensional projects allow for advanced exploration of conceptual approaches. and other branded marketing materials. Prerequisite: GD430 Portfolio I IMD102 Digital Visual Composition (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamental terminology. Students will also create World Wide Web pages utilizing HTML. promotion. price. methods. including digital still camera as well as camcorder orientation. and distribution as they relate to advertising. and other techniques for overall thematic and visual effects of moving and static images. pagination. deadlines. Prerequisite: None MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia (3 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the Flash authoring environment. Prerequisite: None WS230 Web Site Development II (3 credits) Students will expand on the principals developed in previous courses and apply their skills to the development of a personal website accessible on the Web. and identifying and pursuing career opportunities through the job search process. conceptual development and problem solving. attention to detail. creative thinking and dealing with interpersonal situations found in a work environment. and many other brilliant special effects. Students will learn how to apply their skills to construct a commercial website with Web accessibility. and strategies for effectively selling a product and explore product concepts. The preparation of concepts will utilize the principles of design. they will practice their listening and communication skills. binding and finishing techniques will be explored. strategy and understanding the client vision. bindery. design consistency and time management. This is a portfolio production course. as well as their ability to read the room by understanding non-verbal communication. original concepts. This course also focuses on the refinement of previous works into a comprehensive collection representative of Graphic Design skills. lighting. illustration. budgets. aesthetic and content considerations. technical illustrations. Through critique. Typesetting. Students are expected to produce contemporary design solutions for corporate sectors. Prerequisite: GD430 Portfolio I GD412 Advertising Design (3 credits) This course will explore the various aspects of advertising design communications with an emphasis on the development of creative. The course emphasizes drawing the skeleton. develop and execute a major design or illustration project. trapping procedures. typography. Students will select a major project in design or illustration and develop a “junior project” throughout the duration of the course. billing along with business ethics. self management.GD322 Foundation of Electronic Production (3 credits) This is a major portfolio course that will further develop students’ ability to prepare electronic and physical material for production.Academic Calendar . Research will culminate in a product or statement of philosophy. Students will also learn advanced HTML and CSS. Beginning with basic gesture short pose drawings and anatomical studies. They will engage in individual research culminating in a statement of their philosophy of conceptual development and problem solving as it relates to the development of this junior project. professional presentation and attention to cultural diversity. image reproduction and manipulation. in addition to many of the other effects and extension scripts available for that medium. small. image reproduction. animation for web and TV. an introduction to various web browsers and recent developments and applications concerning the Internet and World Wide Web. Prerequisite: None WS130 Web Site Development I (3 credits) Students will learn to create effective websites with maximum browser compatibility utilizing authoring software. colour and problem-solving skills and stress attention to detail. The instructor will act in a mentoring role and help guide students through various creative processes. colour approaches. Prerequisite: WS130 Web Site Development I Page 68 The Art Institute of Vancouver . colour specifications. Students will explore the procedures and techniques involved in delivering high-impact websites. including contracts. Prerequisites: GD221 Production Procedures I and GD231 Corporate Identity GD330 Portfolio II (6 credits) This course prepares students for job interviews by helping them compile a portfolio. conflict resolution. decision making. Instruction is given on basic techniques of production. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing strong concepts appropriate to client needs. They will also develop their skills in problem solving.

Program Description The Art Institute of Vancouver offers a Certificate of Achievement upon successful completion of the Independent Recording Arts Program. video.Independent Recording Arts Available at the Renfrew campus. digital music technology. digital. Except for field trips. The Art Institute of Vancouver .12 months . Practice and integration are emphasized along with technical skills. demonstration. Graduation Requirements To receive a Certificate in Independent Recording Arts. one-on-one instruction. microphone techniques.4 quarters .20 courses . surround sound.0 or higher. and problem-solving and troubleshooting skills. and audio/acoustic principles. tutorials. all instruction is conducted in a classroom/studio setting. Instruction includes non-linear digital audio theory. Curriculum includes topics such as professional session engineering. system integration and synchronization (e. analogue. students receive practical business skills and knowledge in order to work as a freelance recording arts specialist. and satisfy all financial obligations with The Art Institute of Vancouver. production and project management. critical listening. Method of Instruction Instructional methods at The Art Institute of Vancouver include lecture. MIDI.Certificate Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio 3 PRA101 Digital Audio and Control Systems 3 PRA110 Audio Technology I 3 PRA111 Audio Recording I 3 PRA112 Audio Recording II 3 PRA120 Digital Music Technology I 3 PRA121 Digital Music Technology II 3 PRA130 Digital Audio I 3 PRA131 Digital Audio II 3 PRA140 Music Theory I 3 Course Number and Title Credits PRA141 Music Theory II 3 PRA200 Acoustics 3 PRA201 Psychoacoustics 3 PRA202 Audio Electronics 3 PRA210 Advanced Recording Techniques I 3 PRA212 Practical Audio Electronics 3 PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I 3 PRA230 Digital Audio III 3 PRA250 Live Sound Reinforcement 3 PRA260 Business Fundamentals 3 Introduction Students train in digital and analogue recording studios using nonlinear recording technologies. meet portfolio or other requirements outlined in the student handbook. 60 credits . signal flow. In addition. outboard equipment. students must complete a minimum of 60 quarter credits with a cumulative GPA of 2. The object of this program is to provide students with basic skills for working independently in the recording arts industry. and periodic examinations. automation) and advanced recording techniques. Students learn skills in recording engineering. Students must also receive a passing grade or credits for all required course work.g.Academic Calendar Page 69 . and audio editing..

A practical eartraining component will train students to listen critically and to aurally identify various features of audio signals. Prerequisite: None PRA111 Audio Recording I (3 credits) An advanced foundation course in analog recording with an emphasis on practical. The course content includes audio signal flow and digital multitrack recorder operations. Working under the guidance of the instructor. PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio (3 credits) Students will be introduced to the foundational concepts in audio theory. They will learn to measure and evaluate acoustic spaces and develop an understanding of both the acoustical and electronic approaches to acoustic correction. analog recording course where students will continue to develop their professional skills. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio Page 70 The Art Institute of Vancouver . static and dynamic parameter and tempo automation. They will learn about the nature of audio waveforms. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA202 Audio Electronics (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the theoretical foundation of analog audio electronics with a complete overview of all basic components and main principles. The theory of control systems will be introduced through common music/audio based protocols leading to consideration of AV industry standards. Topics covered include: perception of pitch. digital audio transfer protocols. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes.Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. Prerequisite: None PRA101 Digital Audio and Control Systems (3 credits) Students will learn the fundamentals of digital audio theory through examination of current and historical systems. and Pro Tools software and hardware. A practical ear-training component will teach the ability to identify and distinguish acoustical properties of spaces. Music examples are used throughout and basic keyboarding skills are developed to apply to course material. auditory stream and source segregation and perceptual fusion and auditory perspective. Professional skills are taught in a MIDI production studio using industry standard software and hardware. Students will also be exposed to the work habits. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA201 Psychoacoustics (3 credits) This course builds on and expands the development of critical listening skills and the introduction of psychoacoustics and cognition. as well as becoming familiar with outboard microphone pre amps. students are ready to apply their skills to intermediate and advanced work in non-linear digital audio production effects and mixing. consonance. voice physics and neurology. Examples of studio and listening room acoustics will be examined. Through lectures and inclass projects. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA110 Audio Technology I (3 credits) Introduction to professional audio recording equipment with an emphasis on its practical use in a hands on environment. Both live and studio applications are covered. attitudes and expectations of the audio industry. loudness and timbre. students will undertake a variety of recording projects chosen to best exemplify the demands of the industry. instruction covers digital audio theory and developing non-linear audio workstation skills. Prerequisite: PRA140 Music Theory I PRA200 Acoustics (3 credits) Students are introduced to the theoretical concepts of acoustics and acoustic design. structure of the ear. Curriculum also covers sound design. software-based effects plugins. Prerequisite: None PRA121 Digital Music Technology II (3 credits) Students develop a detailed knowledge of the MIDI language. Topics include SMPTE time code and synchronization. Practical keyboard skills are fused with relevant theoretical concepts necessary for success in advanced music composition courses. and the basic recording of MIDI messages. This leads to more flexible and in-depth uses of sequencers involving graphical and list based editing. effects and signal processors. Prerequisite: PRA111 Audio Recording I PRA120 Digital Music Technology I (3 credits) Students develop a working theoretical and skills-based knowledge of the multi-timbral synthesizer and the sequencing environment within the context of the contemporary MIDI production studio.Academic Calendar . Prerequisite: PRA120 Digital Music Technology I PRA130 Digital Audio I (3 credits) Digital Audio I introduces students to the concepts. and real-time automation. Prerequisite: PRA110 Audio Technology I PRA112 Audio Recording II (3 credits) A project oriented. hands on use of the equipment to prepare students for careers as recording engineers. hearing damage. The protocols and procedures of the professional audio industry will be discussed and followed in class. Students will learn more advanced console signal flow. the design and use of typical microphone types as well as understand the history of the recorded medium and its transition from analog to digital. field recording. principles behind audio hardware and software signal processors. Prerequisite: PRA130 Digital Audio I PRA140 Music Theory I (3 credits) Students examine the fundamental concepts of music and its relationship to history and the technology used in composition and recording. In a practical component students will learn to distinguish between various frequency bands. including dynamic and static parameter automation. Prerequisite: None PRA141 Music Theory II (3 credits) Students develop keyboard and theoretical musical skills. Prerequisite: None PRA131 Digital Audio II (3 credits) Students move beyond the basics of Pro Tools and digital audio skills. songwriters. The course also includes instruction and practical experience using software samplers and synthesizers with Pro Tools and the integration of MIDI control surfaces. A review of the terminology used by musicians. By the end of the course. work habits and attitudes expected by the modern professional recording industry. dissonance and tuning systems. procedures and techniques of non-linear digital audio editing. Industry protocols and procedures will be followed with new concepts introduced in a three week recording session conducted by the instructor with assistance from students. multitrack recorder and patch bay operations. arrangers. producers and engineers to communicate with each other is included. computer based digital audio workstations.

analog-to-digital/ digital-to-analogue conversion. digital filtering. automating parameters in external MIDI devices. digital storage media. dithering. Corequisite: PRA202 Audio Electronics PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I (3 credits) Students learn MIDI and basic synthesis skills for music production and sound design. soldering techniques. developing a business plan. Topics include reading block diagrams of audio systems. Prerequisite: PRA121 Digital Music Technology II PRA230 Digital Audio III (3 credits) This course is designed to take the basics of DAW operations to an advanced level through hands on training and projects related to the post and music industries. and develop familiarity with sound design concepts using subtractive synthesis methods. software signal routing. interfacing issues. Students explore digital audio theory and interact with analog consoles. test equipment. Topics include linear digital audio. a hybrid digital/analog recording studio environment. a project using a short film where students will have to edit all the ADR and dialogue. error correction and concealment. create and edit sound effects. digital audio interface standards. Topics of learning include forms of business ownership. cabling and connectors. connecting powers. Topics include: basic audio circuitry components and their functions. Prerequisites: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio and PRA202 Audio Electronics PRA260 Business Fundamentals (3 credits) In this course. use of programmable or MIDI based hardware interfaces. wiring speakers. external DSP. project constructions.Academic Calendar PRA250 Live Sound Reinforcement (3 credits) In this course students learn to set up and operate various audio equipments for a typical live sound reinforcement. Prerequisite: PRA131 Digital Audio II The Art Institute of Vancouver . business management principles and strategies. and synchronizing digital audio streams. a remix of one song using software based samplers and synthesizers. Instructor and student feedback and evaluation of projects will be encouraged throughout all stages of project development. advanced sequencing concepts. testing and adjusting microphones. DAW interchange standards and synchronization methods. music and backgrounds and complete a mix all using proper post production techniques for organization and editing. system grounding issues. non-audio cables. following a systems approach which emphasizes the integration of various equipment and formats. interfacing equipment. The focus will be on increasing speed and efficiency using Pro Tools and the artistic side of editing and mixing. digital recorders. Topics covered include configuring and maintaining a complex MIDI studio through a multiport interface. The projects for the course will include three music mixes of different styles. troubleshooting sound systems. Prerequisite: None Page 71 . and engineer in. subtractive synthesis basics and audio recording in a sequencing environment. starting a business. audio mixer signal flow and circuitry. and fine-tune reinforcement effects. Prerequisite: PRA110 Audio Technology I. balanced lines. students are introduced to the fundamentals of business.PRA210 Advanced Recording Techniques I (3 credits) This course incorporates the skills needed to integrate the various technologies of. and marketing and promotion strategies for a business. Prerequisite: PRA112 Audio Recording II PRA212 Practical Audio Electronics (3 credits) This course examines the recording studio from an electronics perspective. encoding methods involving data compression. patch bays.

identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. Their work includes programming. students will draw three-dimensional forms. proportion. and welfare of the public. lighting. form. one-on-one instruction. Except for field trips. Students will have the opportunity to develop abilities in all aspects of the design of three-dimensional spaces. building codes. and design aspects of colour. Prerequisite: None CC118 Perspective (3 credits) In this course. They will learn to represent light. both residential and commercial.Academic Calendar psychological principles of design and colour.6 quarters . students will learn the principles of perspective. demonstration.Interior Design Available at the Renfrew campus. Using specialized knowledge of interior construction. Using observation and the application of perspective principles. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. They learn how to communicate design solutions through a variety of visual media and develop aesthetic and ethical sensitivities. Students learn how the profession interfaces with others in the industry and how to manage the business of Method of Instruction Instructional methods at The Art Institute of Vancouver include lecture. all instruction is conducted in a classroom/studio setting. by definition a person who identifies. interior designers prepare drawings and documents in order to protect the health. 90 credits . creative design solutions in diverse occupations within our current market realities. safety.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CC110 Drawing 3 CC112 Fundamentals of Design 3 CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC118 Perspective 3 CC120 Visual Indication 3 CC225 Human Factors & Psychology of Design 3 ID107 Technical Drafting 3 ID113 Introduction to Interior Design 3 ID115 History of Design 3 ID127 Computer-Aided Design 3 ID133 Space Planning 3 ID211 Lighting 3 ID212 Programming 3 ID235 Materials and Specifications 3 ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design 3 ID240 Corporate Design 3 Course Number and Title Credits ID303 Project Management 3 ID311 Codes/Barrier Free Design 3 ID313 Computer 3D Architectural Model Making 3 ID321 Residential Design 3 ID323 Professional Practices 3 ID324 Interior & Architectural Detailing 3 ID325 Digital Presentation Methods 3 ID330 Environmental Design 3 ID340 Building Systems and Materials 3 ID350 Commercial Design 3 ID351 Presentation Techniques 3 ID430 Portfolio Development 3 ID431 Senior Project 3 ID440 Construction Documents 3 Introduction Interior designers give form to the spaces in which we spend our lives. They will graduate prepared to enter the fields of commercial and residential design. Graduates of The Art Institute of Vancouver Interior Design Diploma Program will be eligible to write the NCIDQ exam upon completion of the required work experience. Program Description The Interior Design Diploma Program is rich in theory and practice. Prerequisite: None CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework.18 months . researches. CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line. shade and shadows through a variety of rendering and drawing techniques. Concept development processes and material Page 72 manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions. Prerequisite: None CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore. as well as specifying and designing all aspects of interior spaces. materials. and periodic examinations. shading. Prerequisite: CC110 Drawing . framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination. psychology. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. shape. The goal of the Interior Design Diploma Program is to graduate students that are prepared for their profession and able to conceive and execute viable.30 courses . materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and The Art Institute of Vancouver . design analysis. tutorials. A variety of concepts. their profession. and solves problems pertaining to the function and quality of interiors. An interior designer is. and furnishings.

students will conceptualize spaces that reflect the corporate culture and also analyze user needs from corporate philosophy to office structure and individual workstation. and explore the advantages and disadvantages of various materials including wood. ordering specification and environmental issues including LEED and Living Building Challenge. Students will be introduced to the most efficient commands for various tasks to enhance CAD productivity. textiles and metals. techniques. Students will increase their awareness of visual communication through exploration of editing. specialty production techniques. glass.e. textures and interior finishes. Prerequisite: ID127 Computer-Aided Design ID240 Corporate Design (3 credits) This course will allow students to study and apply the design process from programming through presentations to working drawings based upon client needs and applicable open and closed corporate environments. arrangement and planning of a process which will enhance the capacity of an individual or group to take effective action in a design project. Students will attend field trips and hear from industry professionals through various guest lectures. drawing and drafting principles. Utilizing their knowledge of colour theory as well as design. political. Students will debate and explore various application methods. They will also learn to evaluate and critique architectural drawings and drawing conventions. Students will learn strategies for analyzing clients’ needs and conveying effective solutions successfully. hatching and plotting techniques. social and economical conditions of time. safety and comfort for all end users. and fixture types and learn how to make appropriate specifications. The focus of the course will be two-pronged. Prerequisite: ID113 Introduction to Interior Design ID211 Lighting (3 credits) In this course. Prerequisite: None CC225 Human Factors and Psychology of Design (3 credits) This course will foster an awareness and understanding of the role and contribution that human factors and psychology of design play within a built environment. Universal design is examined as a method to provide functionality. Prerequisite: None ID113 Introduction to Interior Design (3 credits) This course merges theory with practice. Prerequisite: None ID212 Programming (3 credits) In this course. editing.CC120 Visual Indication (3 credits) Students will explore the use of innovative design solutions to graphic design problems. formats and finishes) of indicating materials as well as forms for presentation and design communication. They will build on their basic AutoCAD skills while increasing their speed and problem solving abilities. papers. They will also expand their understanding of traditional media. specifically the ability to effectively indicate materials. Prerequisite: None ID237 Advanced Computer-Aided Design (3 credits) In this course. students will develop the required skills for preparation of working drawings. construction. both natural and artificial has on a built environment. students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary for creating basic 2D drawing. Prerequisite: None ID133 Space Planning (3 credits) In this hands-on studio course. Student will survey the history of design from the ancient world to beginning of industrialization and to the present as the design relates to the cultural. view manipulation. fire/safety and accessibility that affect the interior design of private and public buildings. architecture and the decorative arts to the history of fine arts (painting and sculpture). Course material includes the history of the profession of interior design and contributions of individual designers to the development of the profession. In addition to reviewing current and future trends in office design. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . annotating. investigating the influence traffic flows and daily activities have upon spatial relations and space plans. installation and its impact on design. students will analyze and develop an understanding of the impact that light. Students will also learn how to source. They will apply theories of form and function to an interior environment. Students will investigate unique and creative means (i. Religious. exposing students to the steps for completing a design project. Prerequisite: None ID107 Technical Drafting (3 credits) Drafting is an important means of design communication among industry professionals. students will acquire and employ drafting terms and symbols to develop orthographic and paraline drawings. philosophical. text. Students will also explore lighting theories. Prerequisite: None ID127 Computer-Aided Design (3 credits) CAD training requires in-depth understanding of the commands and features of the AutoCAD software. including study of the development of the architecture and furniture of several major non-western cultures. and social beliefs and customs are emphasized. Prerequisite: None ID115 History of Design (3 credits) This course is a survey of the history of the design of interior environments. Prerequisite: ID127 Computer-Aided Design ID303 Project Management (3 credits) This course focuses on the creation. Students will examine the relationship between the history of design. Students will research and design a universal layout that best maximizes and utilizes space for a demographically diverse population. students will focus on the programming process by conducting adjacency studies and analyzing the needs and goals of the design project. The course continues with advanced techniques for drawing. dimensioning. They will apply their gained knowledge on real-world case studies by developing lighting plans for both residential and commercial built environments. students will employ conceptual thinking and analysis in planning spaces. students will investigate material properties. Students will analyze and gain an understanding and appreciation of interior elements designed for people considering the human form and culture. organizational abilities and presentation of gathered information. In this course. Students will trace the development of contemporary design thought from its roots in the nineteenth century reform movements through the Bauhaus to the impact of technology on designers in the twentieth century. Drawing details will be studies and applied as a communication tool with clients other industry members including contractors and trade professionals. Through this hands-on course. students will research and document solutions to several residential design problems. working with attributes and plotting. specify. This course will emphasize the importance of thorough programming necessary for the success of a project and take students through a variety of assignments to develop their analytical skills. Prerequisite: None ID311 Codes/Barrier Free Design (3 credits) This course is a comprehensive study and application of the codes and regulations for building construction. Prerequisite: None Page 73 .Academic Calendar ID235 Materials and Specifications (3 credits) In this course.

Prerequisite: None ID431 Senior Project (3 credits) Students will select their senior project in either residential or non-residential design. Emphasis will be on development. steel. analyzes and applied to various projects. Prerequisite: ID350 Commercial Design ID440 Construction Documents (3 credits) Using a design of their own creation students will learn how to develop a contract document package for that previously developed project. sections. Emphasis is on developing existing AutoCAD commands using 3D attributes. and retail planning. Prerequisite: ID127 Computer-Aided Design ID325 Digital Presentation Methods (3 credits) This course experiments with alternate methods of creating and producing interior design presentations. and issues of sustainability. developing and exploring new AutoCAD 3D commands. research. reflected ceiling plans. Prerequisite: None ID321 Residential Design (3 credits) This course explores the design of residential interiors as a problem solving process. They will learn how to design and detail the building construction and the typical interior components and finishes. with emphasis on universal design. 3D applications will also be reviewed. including formatting and crossreferencing drawings and how to represent details. programming and space planning. with applications to a variety of residential interiors.Academic Calendar apply them to design and presentation projects The students will learn how to manipulate images and create presentation packages. and alternate presentation methods. Students are responsible for engaging in individual research culminating in a statement of their philosophy of design. lighting applications. Electrical and heating systems. Students will develop a full set of contract documents for their design. conflict resolution. legal and financial aspects of a design practice. Methods of communicating interior details in construction drawings and contract documents will be reviewed. This studio course will simulate as closely as possible actual industry work conditions.ID313 Computer 3D Architectural Model Making (3 credits) In this course. and peer review. research and business communication as it relates to the profession of interior design. Prerequisite: None . human factors. ventilation. Individual projects cover the total design process. This course also examines the concepts and theories behind indoor air quality. practices. Students will learn basic tools and technique and The Art Institute of Vancouver . ID340 Building Systems and Materials (3 credits) This course is a study of the materials and principles utilized in basic construction. Prerequisite: ID127 Computer-Aided Design ID350 Commercial Design (3 credits) In this course. Students will investigate components that encompass a LEED certified project and implementation of the LEED project checklist. Students will also develop an understanding of the common building construction systems: wood frame. cohesiveness and presentation. craftsmanship. composition. building. air conditioning. The senior design project will allow students to utilize historical references and apply all skills and knowledge acquired over the previous quarters to fully express themselves both verbally and graphically. and typography. students will apply their specialized knowledge in AutoCAD to produce 3D furniture models and 3D interior renderings. students explore ways to manipulate and integrate images and text into a cohesive graphic package. In class discussions on the importance of environmental ethics and the role of sustainability with regard to the business practices of the interior design industry will also be reviewed. The course will include team projects emphasizing time management. The emphasis is on architectural finish plans. Prerequisite: None ID351 Presentation Techniques (3 credits) Students will explore the creative and technical aspects of various graphic presentations. and mechanical systems for residential and commercial interiors. Prerequisite: None Page 74 ID330 Environmental Design (3 credits) Exploration and integration of sustainable design principles. creating lighting effects and applying them to interior design studio projects. and legends. hospitality. reproduction methods. Students will prepare for a verbal presentation of their completed senior design project. design. and manual technology. acoustics. Areas of study include concept development. Combining a variety of software. Prerequisite: None ID324 Interior & Architectural Detailing (3 credits) Students will focus on the materials and fabrication techniques used to design and construct interior details and structures. Prerequisite: None ID430 Portfolio Development (3 credits) This course will focus on the refinement of previous works into a comprehensive collection representative of Interior Design skills. furniture and finish selection as well as concepts of universal design and sustainability. color. Other certification and rating systems will also be reviewed. and plumbing are surveyed. Prerequisite: ID133 Space Planning ID323 Professional Practices (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the principles of marketing Interior Design services. and custom architectural detail construction drawings. self-generated work schedules. materials and specifications throughout the design process. Students will also cover writing. concrete and masonry. Course includes issues of design. Students will review all business. students will investigate the physical requirements and code restrictions involved in a variety of specialty areas such as recreational.

the AV communications industry is thriving in every part of the world. The course content includes recording console signal flow. Prerequisite: None Page 75 .Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits DFV120 Introduction to Video Production 3 PAV100 Fundamentals of Audio 3 PAV101 Digital Audio and Control Systems 3 PAV102 Math for Audio Visual Applications 3 PAV110 Audio Technology I 3 PAV121 Fundamentals of Design for Audio Visual 3 PAV122 Introduction to Lighting 3 PAV130 Audio Electronics 3 PAV131 Structured Cabling and Networking 3 PAV132 HVAC and Security System Integration 3 Course Number and Title Credits PAV150 Live Sound Reinforcement I 3 PAV200 Acoustics 3 PAV201 Psychoacoustics 3 PAV221 Interface Design & Programming 3 PAV231 Advanced Networking 3 PAV232 Audio Visual System Calibration 3 PAV250 Live Sound Reinforcement II 3 PAV260 Professionalism. They will learn about the nature of audio waveforms. Prerequisite: None PAV101 Digital Audio and Control Systems (3 credits) In this course students will learn the fundamentals of digital audio theory including terminology. lighting technicians.4 quarters .Professional Audio Visual (ProAV) Available at the Renfrew campus. Corequisite: PAV130 Audio Electronics PAV110 Audio Technology I (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the professional multitrack recording studio with an emphasis on the practical use of the equipment in a hands-on environment. The theory of control systems will be introduced with a thorough investigation of the MIDI protocol in both musical and non-musical contexts. but also their integration into information communications and transmission of signals through digital networks. format variables and solid state vs tube analog audio components. trigonometry and geometry and apply that knowledge to the areas of data The Art Institute of Vancouver . Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. professional delivery and consumer formats. acoustics signals and digital signal processing (DSP). Program Description Program Mission The Professional Audio Visual (ProAV) Diploma Program is designed to prepare students for a variety of entry-level careers in the AV communications industry. In a practical component students will learn to distinguish between various frequency bands. Students will also be exposed to the work habits. AV programmers. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. 60 credits . The course emphasizes camera operation and the setup for electronic field production (EFP) and studio applications. The emphasis is on high-level competencies and outcomes to prepare each student for entry-level employment.19 courses . lecture and survey classes. The area of DSP will familiarize the student with both time and frequency domain concepts and introduce them to the Fourier transforms. DFV120 Introduction to Video Production (3 credits) This course introduces students to the video camera as a technical and creative tool for communication and art. A practical ear-training component will train students to distinguish frequencies. principles behind audio hardware and software signal processors. the design and use of typical microphone types as well as understand the history of the recorded medium and its transition from analog to digital. Camera movements and framing are applied using different camera mounts. video technicians. The Professional Audio Visual (ProAV) Diploma Program is designed to provide a variety of specialized education to students planning to pursue a career in the in AV communications field. AV systems have evolved to include not only audio and video systems. file and interface formats. basic control room and multitrack recorder operations. This preparation is accomplished through a combination of practical hands on training. Prerequisite: None PAV100 Fundamentals of Audio (3 credits) In this course students will be introduced to the foundational concepts in audio theory. Prerequisite: None PAV102 Math for Audio Visual Applications (3 credits) In this course students will learn the fundamentals of algebra. Students integrate the principles of lighting and gripping into video applications. The program emphasizes training and coursework in the two key areas of the AV field: fixed installations and staged events. attitudes and expectations of the recording industry. as well as a large-scale capstone graduating project. Sales and Client Service 3 PAV290 Senior Project 6 Introduction With the rapid growth of demand for audio and visual communication.12 months . staging professionals. and presentations professionals. audio technicians. convolution and filtering algorithms.Academic Calendar visualization. The protocols and procedures of the professional recording studio will be discussed and followed in class and lab sessions. Graduates of our program will be prepared to seek entry-level career opportunities such as AV installation technicians. AV systems designers.

Emphasis is on the students’ professional development including the ability to use common business communication software. integrate digital mixing consoles.). practical issues regarding installation practices and requirements will be considered. Prerequisite: PAV100 Fundamentals of Audio PAV201 Psychoacoustics (3 credits) This course builds on the bases laid in previous courses and continues the development of critical listening skills while providing a solid foundation in psychoacoustics and cognition. Prerequisite: PAV150 Live Sound Reinforcement I PAV260 Professionalism. research and apply for jobs. MC/DJ systems). Prerequisites: DFV120 Introduction to Video. make outstanding client presentations and understand the requirements for effective technical sales and rental business management practices. Examples of studio and listening room acoustics will be examined. dissonance and tuning systems. These designs will be implemented by learning the strategies and intricacies of interface programming within an AV context. set up live multitrack recording systems. Collaborating with sub-contractor responsible for such systems is crucial for a successful AV installation and therefore an understanding of their requirements is crucial for each job. Prerequisite: PAV121 Fundamentals of Design for Audio Visual PAV231 Advanced Networking (3 credits) In this course students will build on the foundation established in previous courses and expand into more advanced networking concepts and technologies. project budgeting & research. compositional theories and aspects of colour theory. commercial and staged event applications. configuration and maintenance. Prerequisite: None PAV122 Introduction to Lighting (3 credits) In this course students will learn the major concepts of lighting for residential. This is primarily a practical hands-on course with an emphasis on real-world situations and troubleshooting supplemented by the theoretical knowledge necessary to make informed decisions. PAV110 Audio Technology I. students acquire the theoretical and practical knowledge to design. Ethical practices and industry expectations for professionalism will be discussed throughout the course.Academic Calendar PAV232 Audio Visual System Calibration (3 credits) In this course students will learn the processes and technology required to calibrate installed audio and video systems. Students are exposed to the audio systems and acoustical environments encountered in live sound situaPage 76 tions (sound reinforcement for performances. Prerequisite: PAV131 Structured Cabling and Networking The Art Institute of Vancouver . Prerequisite: PAV130 Audio Electronics PAV150 Live Sound Reinforcement I (3 credits) In this course. consonance. security and surveillance system installation and their implications for the AV installation team. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director . PAV100 Fundamentals of Audio. assemble a job application package. Students will also develop basic abilities using design software to explore and develop their design ideas and projects. structure of the ear. and all relevant documentation practices. including staging. Prerequisite: PAV130 Audio Electronics PAV132 HVAC and Security System Integration (3 credits) In this course students will be introduced to the requirements of HVAC. Topics covered include: perception of pitch. Finally. corporate. Corequisite: PAV102 Math for Audio Visual Applications PAV131 Structured Cabling and Networking (3 credits) In this course students will understand the concept of structured cabling for all aspects of an AV installation in both residential and commercial environments and to be able to create all of the relevant documentation required by industry. loudness and timbre. Prerequisites: PAV100 Fundamentals of Audio and PAV110 Audio Technology I PAV200 Acoustics (3 credits) In this course students will be introduced to the theoretical concepts of acoustics and acoustic design. Students will learn to design and install line array systems. Both wired and wireless technologies will be addressed. sports etc. operate and troubleshoot small to medium-sized PA systems. Students will gain skills in project management. Prerequisite: PAV100 Fundamentals of Audio PAV221 Interface Design & Programming (3 credits) In this course students will apply principles learned in previous courses to design a variety of effective interfaces typically needed in AV installations. Students will also be introduced to the human and logistical factors in interior design. PAV101 Digital Audio & Control Systems. and understand the relationship of audio to all other aspects of large-scale event production. Students will study types of interfaces and implementation strategies and technologies for both off-the-shelf and proprietary systems and to create the necessary documentation both for the developer and the end-user. how to rig equipment safely in a variety of environments and gain familiarity with other business aspects of the industry. Prerequisite: None PAV290 Senior Project (6 credits) In this course students will work in teams to plan and implement either a commercial or residential AV installation. Practical aspects of installing and maintaining video conferencing systems and wireless networks will also be addressed. In completing their graduating project they will also learn relevant construction and electrical codes. interview effectively. speeches and lectures. and PAV130 Audio Electronics PAV250 Live Sound Reinforcement II (3 credits) This course builds on the foundation of sound reinforcement learned in previous courses by examining live sound practices in the context of large-scale events (concerts. and Client Service (3 credits) In this course students will learn the techniques of effective communication. Signal flow and troubleshooting skills are continually reinforced in the process of setting up and tearing down complete sound systems during classes. auditory stream and source segregation and perceptual fusion and auditory perspective. The controls and technologies of lighting in diverse contexts will be examined. voice physics and neurology. A practical ear-training component will teach the ability to identify and distinguish acoustical properties of spaces. and scene design. lighting. They will be introduced to general design elements and principles. Sales. Implications of lighting design on the end-user will be discussed. hearing damage. Students will become familiar with current Operating Systems and their installation. They will learn to measure and evaluate acoustic spaces and develop an understanding of both the acoustical and electronic approaches to acoustic correction. Corequisite: PAV121 Fundamentals of Design for Audio Visual PAV130 Audio Electronics (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the theoretical foundation of analog audio electronics with a complete overview of all basic components and main principles. rigging.PAV121 Fundamentals of Design for Audio Visual (3 credits) In this course students will be introduced to the foundational concepts of good design. and to overcome the problems inherent in difficult acoustical environments.

radio. usage. principles behind audio hardware and software signal processors. Students will also be exposed to the work habits. and design. Students may satisfy the Recording Arts Electives by selecting a program concentration in music. 90 credits . home studio. Today’s professional audio engineers and producers must constantly stay abreast of current developments in equipment technology and production methods. Prerequisite: None PRA101 Digital Audio and Control Systems (3 credits) Students will learn the fundamentals of digital audio theory through examination of current and historical systems. In a practical component students will learn to distinguish between various frequency bands. producers and business people. Graduates from the Diploma program may begin careers in music recording. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . and hands-on production techniques.18 months . live sound. The protocols and procedures of the professional audio industry will be discussed and followed in class. theory and industry practices. Program Mission The Art Institute of Vancouver’s Professional Recording Arts program is designed to prepare graduates for careers in the field of audio engineering and production. technical support.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio 3 PRA101 Digital Audio and Control Systems 3 PRA110 Audio Technology I 3 PRA111 Audio Recording I 3 PRA112 Audio Recording II 3 PRA120 Digital Music Technology I 3 PRA121 Digital Music Technology II 3 PRA130 Digital Audio I 3 PRA131 Digital Audio II 3 PRA140 Music Theory I 3 PRA141 Music Theory II 3 PRA200 Acoustics 3 PRA201 Psychoacoustics 3 PRA202 Audio Electronics 3 PRA210 Advanced Recording Techniques I 3 Course Number and Title Credits PRA211 Advanced Recording Techniques II 3 PRA212 Practical Audio Electronics 3 PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I 3 PRA221 Synthesis & Sound Design II 3 PRA230 Digital Audio III 3 PRA231 Digital Audio IV 3 PRA250 Live Sound Reinforcement 3 PRA260 Business Fundamentals 3 PRA390 Professional Development and Portfolio 3 PRA391 Senior Project 3 Recording Arts Elective 1 3 Recording Arts Elective 2 3 Recording Arts Elective 3 3 Recording Arts Elective 4 3 Recording Arts Elective 5 3 The Professional Recording Arts program will meet the needs of industry by offering a curriculum that provides students with a solid background in technology.6 quarters . industry practices. corporate AV. Practical hands-on experience with recording and live production equipment is essential to being prepared for the contemporary market place. attitudes and expectations of the audio industry. The Diploma in Professional Recording Arts is a six-quarter. game audio. they must have a solid foundation in the basic physics of sound and acoustics as well as skills in equipment operation. PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio (3 credits) Students will be introduced to the foundational concepts in audio theory. To do this. A practical eartraining component will train students to listen critically and to aurally identify various features of audio signals. film or game audio. They will learn about the nature of audio waveforms.Academic Calendar Page 77 . technicians. the design and use of typical microphone types as well as understand the history of the recorded medium and its transition from analog to digital. editing. studio management. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. The theory of control systems will be introduced through common music/audio based protocols leading to consideration of AV industry standards. The course content includes audio signal flow and digital multitrack recorder operations. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. and delivery of audio are evolving at a rapid pace.30 courses . Through rigorous study of theoretical concepts. students work to develop the technical skills and aesthetic sensibilities needed to become professional engineers.Professional Recording Arts Available at the Renfrew campus. television. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA110 Audio Technology I (3 credits) Introduction to professional audio recording equipment with an emphasis on its practical use in a hands on environment. full time course of study that prepares students with the essential skills and knowledge necessary to work in the field of audio. Program Description The tools for recording. and others.

interfacing issues. and engineer in. procedures and techniques of non-linear digital audio editing. static and dynamic parameter and tempo automation. error correction and concealment. Curriculum also covers sound design. Corequisite: PRA202 Audio Electronics Page 78 The Art Institute of Vancouver . and Pro Tools software and hardware. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA202 Audio Electronics (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the theoretical foundation of analog audio electronics with a complete overview of all basic components and main principles. Professional skills are taught in a MIDI production studio using industry standard software and hardware. analog recording course where students will continue to develop their professional skills. loudness and timbre. voice physics and neurology. Prerequisite: PRA111 Audio Recording I PRA120 Digital Music Technology I (3 credits) Students develop a working theoretical and skills-based knowledge of the multi-timbral synthesizer and the sequencing environment within the context of the contemporary MIDI production studio. arrangers. By the end of the course. They will learn to measure and evaluate acoustic spaces and develop an understanding of both the acoustical and electronic approaches to acoustic correction. they will continue to master the techniques and equipment used in the professional recording industry. Examples of studio and listening room acoustics will be examined. Practical keyboard skills are fused with relevant theoretical concepts necessary for success in advanced music composition courses. computer based digital audio workstations. and synchronizing digital audio streams. non-audio cables. digital audio interface standards. patch bays. Through lectures and inclass projects. Prerequisite: PRA130 Digital Audio I PRA140 Music Theory I (3 credits) Students examine the fundamental concepts of music and its relationship to history and the technology used in composition and recording. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA210 Advanced Recording Techniques I (3 credits) This course incorporates the skills needed to integrate the various technologies of. external DSP. songwriters. cabling and connectors. a hybrid digital/analog recording studio environment. encoding methods involving data compression. digital audio transfer protocols. Music examples are used throughout and basic keyboarding skills are developed to apply to course material. Prerequisite: PRA120 Digital Music Technology I PRA130 Digital Audio I (3 credits) Digital Audio I introduces students to the concepts. Working under the guidance of the instructor. work habits and attitudes expected by the modern professional recording industry. multitrack recorder and patch bay operations. Prerequisite: None PRA131 Digital Audio II (3 credits) Students move beyond the basics of Pro Tools and digital audio skills. system grounding issues. DAW interchange standards and synchronization methods. A review of the terminology used by musicians. auditory stream and source segregation and perceptual fusion and auditory perspective. They will also become familiar with various musical formats. analog-to-digital/ digital-to-analogue conversion. students are ready to apply their skills to intermediate and advanced work in non-linear digital audio production effects and mixing. following a systems approach which emphasizes the integration of various equipment and formats. including dynamic and static parameter automation. Prerequisite: None PRA141 Music Theory II (3 credits) Students develop keyboard and theoretical musical skills. and the aesthetic and acoustical issues specific to each genre and instrument. dissonance and tuning systems. Prerequisite: PRA110 Audio Technology I. audio mixer signal flow and circuitry. Prerequisite: PRA112 Audio Recording II PRA211 Advanced Recording Techniques II (3 credits) Students develop advanced engineering skills and knowledge. Topics include: basic audio circuitry components and their functions. Both live and studio applications are covered. The course also includes instruction and practical experience using software samplers and synthesizers with Pro Tools and the integration of MIDI control surfaces. effects and signal processors. structure of the ear. dithering. and real-time automation. Topics covered include: perception of pitch. hands on use of the equipment to prepare students for careers as recording engineers. field recording. Prerequisite: PRA110 Audio Technology I PRA112 Audio Recording II (3 credits) A project oriented. Building upon the knowledge gained in previous studio courses. Prerequisite: PRA210 Advanced Recording Techniques I PRA212 Practical Audio Electronics (3 credits) This course examines the recording studio from an electronics perspective. software-based effects plugins. Students explore digital audio theory and interact with analog consoles.Academic Calendar .PRA111 Audio Recording I (3 credits) An advanced foundation course in analog recording with an emphasis on practical. This leads to more flexible and in-depth uses of sequencers involving graphical and list based editing. interfacing equipment. students will undertake a variety of recording projects chosen to best exemplify the demands of the industry. Prerequisite: None PRA121 Digital Music Technology II (3 credits) Students develop a detailed knowledge of the MIDI language. Prerequisite: PRA140 Music Theory I PRA200 Acoustics (3 credits) Students are introduced to the theoretical concepts of acoustics and acoustic design. project constructions. Topics include SMPTE time code and synchronization. digital recorders. Students will learn more advanced console signal flow. digital filtering. and the basic recording of MIDI messages. balanced lines. consonance. test equipment. digital storage media. Industry protocols and procedures will be followed with new concepts introduced in a three week recording session conducted by the instructor with assistance from students. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA201 Psychoacoustics (3 credits) This course builds on and expands the development of critical listening skills and the introduction of psychoacoustics and cognition. as well as becoming familiar with outboard microphone pre amps. Topics include linear digital audio. soldering techniques. producers and engineers to communicate with each other is included. software signal routing. A practical ear-training component will teach the ability to identify and distinguish acoustical properties of spaces. instruction covers digital audio theory and developing non-linear audio workstation skills. hearing damage.

Prerequisite: None PRA390 Professional Development and Portfolio (3 credits) Built on the skills developed in previous courses. sync all elements of a production using SMPTE timecode. developing their music theory and technical expertise.Music Concentration PRA240 Songwriting (3 credits) Songwriting is a study of the elements that make a successful song. strategizing creative planning and producing creative through to final delivery and follow up. The analysis includes both music theory and investigations of the technology behind the production. subtractive synthesis basics and audio recording in a sequencing environment. voiceover casting and production for production and comedy campaigns. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I Page 79 The Art Institute of Vancouver . and to overcome the problems inherent in difficult acoustical environments. With a new found understanding of the demands of current production values. Prerequisites: PRA121 Digital Music Technology II and PRA141 Music Theory II PRA241 Music Arranging and Recording Technology (3 credits) Students study approaches to arranging as it relates to computer-based technology. automating parameters in external MIDI devices. covering practical considerations to get a career started. Prerequisites: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio and PRA110 Audio Technology I PRA260 Business Fundamentals (3 credits) Students gain valuable knowledge and skills to prepare them for being self-employed in the media entertainment industry. Students are exposed to the audio systems and acoustical environments encountered in live sound situations (sound reinforcement for performances. Students also write and record an original song as a final project. Students learn to conduct tracking sessions and both stereo and surround mix sessions using a control surface. remix techniques and arrangement planning and execution. The focus will be on increasing speed and efficiency using Pro Tools and the artistic side of editing and mixing. records. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA242 Music for Television and Film (3 credits) This course starts by analyzing contemporary musical and sound design trends in TV and film work. operate and troubleshoot small to medium-sized PA systems. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director Electives . Committee and/or faculty will approve the project content and type of the audio work. Each student is expected to verbally present the portfolio and address audience questions as a format of defense. Detailed study of subtractive. This course is valuable to both non-musicians (audio engineers and producers) and musicians (arrangers and composers). Students will employ their cumulative skills to pre-produce a significant. harmony. Course will cover all areas of creative including original music. sophisticated. assessing client needs. From getting the project. physical modeling and granular synthesis will culminate in original sound design projects. Prerequisite: PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA230 Digital Audio III (3 credits) This course is designed to take the basics of DAW operations to an advanced level through hands on training and projects related to the post and music industries. The projects for the course will include three music mixes of different styles. sound design. voicing. speeches and lectures. MC/ DJ systems). Freelancing. create and edit sound effects. vocal).PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I (3 credits) Students learn MIDI and basic synthesis skills for music production and sound design. invoices. Topics include traditional concepts relating to controlling arrangement flow for live musicians. beat creation. this course allows each student to determine and design the final organization and presentation of the graduation portfolio. Students will also survey the current market for hardware and software implementations of various synthesis methods. the course investigates the business aspects of creating music for the film and TV industries. Instructor and student feedback and evaluation of projects will be encouraged throughout all stages of project development. Analytical listening sessions will expose students to synthesis methods in various musical contexts. enabling them to be valuable in all areas of the industry. Signal flow and troubleshooting kills are continually reinforced in the process of setting up and tearing down complete sound systems during classes. melodic development. students go on to create their own music projects. communications. multi-track digital audio work. Prerequisite: PRA131 Digital Audio II PRA231 Digital Audio IV (3 credits) This course introduces students to the DAW in a studio environment. advanced sequencing concepts. FM. as MIDI files. and develop familiarity with sound design concepts using subtractive synthesis methods. computer-based performance techniques. marketing and taxes are practical topics that are addressed. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA243 Composition for Advertising (3 credits) Student gains knowledge encompassing all areas of audio for broadcast advertising. or audio files. and production techniques. arrangement. music and backgrounds and complete a mix all using proper post production techniques for organization and editing. There is also a theory component to the course. brass. a project using a short film where students will have to edit all the ADR and dialogue. Topics covered include configuring and maintaining a complex MIDI studio through a multiport interface. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director PRA391 Senior Project (3 credits) This course initiates a two quarter long comprehensive project which will be integral to students’ final portfolios. Students analyze the characteristics of all song genres with respect to form. Prerequisite: PRA230 Digital Audio III PRA250 Live Sound Reinforcement (3 credits) In this course students learn to design. chord extensions and substitutions. understand the pre-mastering process and be able to deliver final projects in current delivery formats. harmonization. Students submit weekly projects on paper. contracts. Projects will be carried out individually or in groups based on the needs of the class as determined by the instructor. Finally. a remix of one song using software based samplers and synthesizers. strings. Prerequisite: PRA121 Digital Music Technology II PRA221 Synthesis & Sound Design II (3 credits) This course will survey both commercially available synthesis methods and recent developments at audio research institutes. melody. use of programmable or MIDI based hardware interfaces.Academic Calendar . arranging for sections (rhythm. Course designed for the student to be capable in all areas of the process. which supports the practical application.

instruments and tools used in film scoring to convey theme. shot selection.Academic Calendar PRA171 Game Audio II (3 credits) This course develops students understanding of game audio through practical applications and real-world projects. Some of these programs model how content and control structures are used together to create interactive sound and music for video games. and audio postproduction tools and processes. Students will also learn and reinforce the fundamentals of professional shooting and set management. class critique. students pay particular attention to different textures. introduction to media management and managing long form projects.Game Audio Concentration PRA170 Game Audio I (3 credits) As an alternate employment possibility to the standard studio environment. With the instructor’s guidance. Understanding these environments helps the audio professional become more marketable and opens a wider variety of positions to explore in the software environment. and progressive lighting and shooting techniques will be reinforced.Film Concentration DFV110 Introduction to Digital Film Editing (3 credits) Students will develop the foundations of basic video editing using industry-standard nonlinear editing software. Prerequisite: None DFV121 Television and Film Production Techniques (3 credits) This course is designed to develop intermediate production skills and to acquaint students with the aspects of various production models found in the industry. wireless systems. students work as a team on the production of an electronic games project in a studio environment. Students are introduced to the processes and practicalities of writing for film. scene flow and continuity. Technical issues such as cinematography. hidden and exposed lavaliere techniques. Prerequisite: PRA170 Game Audio I PRA270 Game Audio III (3 credits) Students continue to develop the skills gained in previous courses by focusing on advanced solutions to real-world problems in game audio. Students integrate the principles of lighting and gripping into video applications. interactive software environments feature important differences concerning expectations of the audio professional. Prerequisite: PRA242 Music for Television and Film Electives . Prerequisite: None Electives . Prerequisite: None DFV111 Digital Film Editing (3 credits) Students will build on the foundations of basic video editing using industry-standard editing software. booming and shotgun microphone techniques. The students’ final projects involve working with Digital Film & Video students to score their student films. Emphasis will be on theory. Various technologies are examined to gain a strong theoretical basis for the use of proprietary computer audio programs typically used in video game studios. students further develop their compositional and technical skills through the production of several pieces to accompany sections of film. techniques. create and program acoustic environments within working game prototypes. mood and emotion to enhance the audience’s viewing experience. Prerequisite: PRA171 Game Audio II PRA271 Programming and Prototyping Interactivity (3 credits) Interactive audio programming techniques are introduced and expanded upon for the composition of acoustic spatial environments in interactive media and games. Camera movements and framing are applied using different camera mounts. Prerequisite: PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA370 Game Production Workshop (3 credits) In this course. television dramas and documentaries. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production DFV191 Location Audio (3 credits) This course introduces students to the equipment.PRA340 Scoring for Film and Television (3 credits) Using the technical and creative skills acquired in previous music composition courses. Emphasis is on production. Students learn the theory and practice of sound as it interacts with visible images and explore intermediate and advanced techniques for interactive audiovisual presentation. protocols and procedures used in on-site audio recording for film and television. Students will design. Prerequisite: PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I The Art Institute of Vancouver . Prerequisite: PRA270 Game Audio III . and the simulation of a working production company. The course emphasizes camera operation and the setup for electronic field production (EFP) and studio applications. Topics include set-up and operation of field mixers. with particular attenPage 80 tion to camera placement. Emphasis will be on making choices and editing for story. The course allows students to experiment musically and discover their strengths and individual styles. Prerequisite: DFV110 Introduction to Digital Film Editing DFV120 Introduction to Video Production (3 credits) This course introduces students to the video camera as a technical and creative tool for communication and art. This is achieved through group class projects utilizing a combination of hands on technical instruction. and providing library music.

2.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits GE100 Rhetoric and Composition 4 GE111 Academic Writing 4 PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio 3 PRA101 Digital Audio and Control Systems 3 PRA110 Audio Technology I 3 PRA111 Audio Recording I 3 PRA112 Audio Recording II 3 PRA120 Digital Music Technology I 3 PRA121 Digital Music Technology II 3 PRA130 Digital Audio I 3 PRA131 Digital Audio II 3 PRA140 Music Theory I 3 PRA141 Music Theory II 3 PRA200 Acoustics 3 PRA201 Psychoacoustics 3 PRA202 Audio Electronics 3 PRA210 Advanced Recording Techniques I 3 PRA211 Advanced Recording Techniques II 3 PRA212 Practical Audio Electronics 3 Course Number and Title Credits PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I 3 PRA221 Synthesis & Sound Design II 3 PRA230 Digital Audio III 3 PRA231 Digital Audio IV 3 PRA240 Songwriting 3 PRA241 Music Arranging and Recording Technology 3 PRA242 Music for Television and Film 3 PRA243 Composition for Advertising 3 PRA250 Live Sound Reinforcement 3 PRA260 Business Fundamentals 3 PRA280 Media Studies . Students must also receive a passing grade or credits for all required course work. interested students must fulfill the follow requirements.Professional Recording Arts (LIPA) Available at the Renfrew campus.6 quarters . and Directed Studies. radio. and others.Technology and Culture I 3 PRA281 Media Studies . full time course of study that prepares students with the essential skills and knowledge necessary to work in the field of audio. Each course within the program is worth three quarter credits and the program consists of 36 courses. corporate AV. students must complete a minimum of 108 quarter credits with a cumulative GPA of 2. Additional courses include Media Studies and Technology. In addition. In order to be considered into the Professional Recoding Arts – LIPA Program. home studio.Technology and Culture II 3 PRA340 Scoring for Film and Television 3 PRA380 Directed Studies I 3 PRA381 Directed Studies II 3 PRA390 Professional Development and Portfolio 3 PRA391 Senior Project 3 Introduction The Professional Recording Arts (LIPA) Program is a fully articulated block transfer program. Students aspiring to a higher level of academic work and/or are clear about their desire to transfer to the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA) may apply for the articulated program at the beginning of their studies at The Art Institute Vancouver. The program requires the completion of a variety of written papers through Directed Studies courses.4 or higher. Provide a 1000 word essay on career goals and how the Professional Recording Arts (LIPA) Program will help the student achieve his/her goals. live sound. UK. technical support. meet portfolio or other requirements outlined in the student handbook. students are required to fill out the Professional Recording Arts (LIPA) Preparatory Program Agreement form that will be considered as part of the enrolment agreement. Successful graduates of this program are guaranteed an interview for advanced standing in the LIPA BA (Honours) Sound Technology Degree Program in Liverpool.36 courses .Academic Calendar Page 81 . Graduates from the Diploma program may begin careers in music recording. The program includes all course work in the Professional Recording Arts Diploma Program with additional academic and project requirements and higher expectations regarding academic achievement. The Art Institute of Vancouver . and satisfy all financial obligations with The Art Institute of Vancouver. Upon acceptance into the program. Entrance Students must apply for the Professional Recording Arts (LIPA) program at the beginning of the regular Professional Recording Arts Program. To receive a Diploma in Professional Recording Arts (LIPA). studio management. The Diploma in Professional Recording Arts is a six-quarter. 1.4 or better throughout their program. 110 credits . television. Students must agree to maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2. This program lasts six academic quarters and contains 108 quarter credits.18 months . students are required to complete a major collaborative project. Graduation Requirements Program Description The Art Institute of Vancouver offers a Diploma of Achievement upon successful completion of the Professional Recording Arts (LIPA) Program.

The protocols and procedures of the professional audio industry will be discussed and followed in class. producers and engineers to communicate with each other is included. In a practical component students will learn to distinguish between various frequency bands. The theory of control systems will be introduced through common music/audio based protocols leading to consideration of AV industry standards. This leads to more flexible and in-depth uses of sequencers involving graphical and list based editing. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio Page 82 PRA110 Audio Technology I (3 credits) Introduction to professional audio recording equipment with an emphasis on its practical use in a hands on environment. Emphasis will be placed upon crafting the best form of expression for specific audiences and purposes. In this course students will consider their purpose for writing to state.Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. software-based effects plugins. analog recording course where students will continue to develop their professional skills. Prerequisite: None PRA101 Digital Audio and Control Systems (3 credits) Students will learn the fundamentals of digital audio theory through examination of current and historical systems. They will learn about the nature of audio waveforms. or create awareness. Prerequisite: None PRA111 Audio Recording I (3 credits) An advanced foundation course in analog recording with an emphasis on practical. call for action. A review of the terminology used by musicians. the more features of style and argument they will recognize and use. reflection. Examples of studio and listening room acoustics will be examined. Prerequisite: PRA130 Digital Audio I PRA140 Music Theory I (3 credits) Students examine the fundamental concepts of music and its relationship to history and the technology used in composition and recording. develop. instruction covers digital audio theory and developing non-linear audio workstation skills. composition and informal logic of the English Language. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio . Curriculum also covers sound design. Industry protocols and procedures will be followed with new concepts introduced in a three week recording session conducted by the instructor with assistance from students. Students will also be exposed to the work habits. students will undertake a variety of recording projects chosen to best exemplify the demands of the industry. The course content includes audio signal flow and digital multitrack recorder operations. As students gain confidence with the vocabulary of language analysis and rhetorical strategy. Professional skills are taught in a MIDI production studio using industry standard software and hardware. Prerequisite: PRA110 Audio Technology I PRA112 Audio Recording II (3 credits) A project oriented. Practical keyboard skills are fused with relevant theoretical concepts necessary for success in advanced music composition courses. and the basic recording of MIDI messages. songwriters. organize.Academic Calendar PRA130 Digital Audio I (3 credits) Digital Audio I introduces students to the concepts. A practical ear-training component will teach the ability to identify and distinguish acoustical properties of spaces. field recording. propose a solution. The course also includes instruction and practical experience using software samplers and synthesizers with Pro Tools and the integration of MIDI control surfaces. students are ready to apply their skills to intermediate and advanced work in non-linear digital audio production effects and mixing. Students will learn more advanced console signal flow. A practical eartraining component will train students to listen critically and to aurally identify various features of audio signals. This course emphasizes the critical arts of reading. Prerequisite: None PRA141 Music Theory II (3 credits) Students develop keyboard and theoretical musical skills. and discussion with an introduction to rhetoric. Prerequisite: None GE111 Academic Writing (4 credits) The key purposes of this course are to help students improve their academic writing capabilities and to help students prepare for writing in post secondary education and professional settings. attitudes and expectations of the audio industry. Prerequisite: PRA120 Digital Music Technology II The Art Institute of Vancouver . multitrack recorder and patch bay operations. the design and use of typical microphone types as well as understand the history of the recorded medium and its transition from analog to digital. effects and signal processors. procedures and techniques of non-linear digital audio editing. and support an argument or position. and real-time automation. Prerequisite: GE100 Rhetoric and Composition PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio (3 credits) Students will be introduced to the foundational concepts in audio theory. writing. digital audio transfer protocols. Prerequisite: PRA111 Audio Recording I PRA120 Digital Music Technology I (3 credits) Students develop a working theoretical and skills-based knowledge of the multi-timbral synthesizer and the sequencing environment within the context of the contemporary MIDI production studio. static and dynamic parameter and tempo automation. computer based digital audio workstations. By the end of the course. Prerequisite: PRA140 Music Theory I PRA200 Acoustics (3 credits) Students are introduced to the theoretical concepts of acoustics and acoustic design. Topics include SMPTE time code and synchronization. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. Both live and studio applications are covered. principles behind audio hardware and software signal processors. Prerequisite: None PRA131 Digital Audio II (3 credits) Students move beyond the basics of Pro Tools and digital audio skills. GE100 Rhetoric and Composition (4 credits) Writing is done for a purpose: to solve a problem. as well as becoming familiar with outboard microphone pre amps. Music examples are used throughout and basic keyboarding skills are developed to apply to course material. They will learn to measure and evaluate acoustic spaces and develop an understanding of both the acoustical and electronic approaches to acoustic correction. Working under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: None PRA121 Digital Music Technology II (3 credits) Students develop a detailed knowledge of the MIDI language. work habits and attitudes expected by the modern professional recording industry. The overall aim of this course is to enhance cognitive abilities and improve communication practices. hands on use of the equipment to prepare students for careers as recording engineers. arrangers. Through lectures and inclass projects. and Pro Tools software and hardware. including dynamic and static parameter automation.

Instructor and student feedback and evaluation of projects will be encouraged throughout all stages of project development. analog-to-digital/digital-toanalogue conversion. Students learn to conduct tracking sessions and both stereo and surround mix sessions using a control surface. DAW interchange standards and synchronization methods. Students submit weekly projects on paper. digital audio interface standards. and production techniques. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA242 Music for Television and Film (3 credits) This course starts by analyzing contemporary musical and sound design trends in TV and film work. Building upon the knowledge gained in previous studio courses. sound design. music and backgrounds and complete a mix all using proper post production techniques for organization and editing. harmony. students go on to create their own music projects. assessing client needs.Academic Calendar Page 83 . Prerequisite: PRA210 Advanced Recording Techniques I PRA212 Practical Audio Electronics (3 credits) This course examines the recording studio from an electronics perspective. dithering. voice physics and neurology. as MIDI files. create and edit sound effects. With a new found understanding of the demands of current production values. digital storage media. Students analyze the characteristics of all song genres with respect to form. Students also write and record an original song as a final project. melody. and synchronizing digital audio streams. arranging for sections (rhythm. dissonance and tuning systems. Course designed for the student to be capable in all areas of the process. cabling and connectors. enabling them to be valuable in all areas of the industry. balanced lines. Prerequisite: PRA110 Audio Technology I. The projects for the course will include three music mixes of different styles. interfacing equipment. remix techniques and arrangement planning and execution. and engineer in. Prerequisite: PRA131 Digital Audio II PRA231 Digital Audio IV (3 credits) This course introduces students to the DAW in a studio environment. external DSP. interfacing issues. covering practical considerations to get a career started. a remix of one song using software based samplers and synthesizers. system grounding issues. This course is valuable to both non-musicians (audio engineers and producers) and musicians (arrangers and composers). The focus will be on increasing speed and efficiency using Pro Tools and the artistic side of editing and mixing. Students explore digital audio theory and interact with analog consoles. physical modeling and granular synthesis will culminate in original sound design projects. auditory stream and source segregation and perceptual fusion and auditory perspective. following a systems approach which emphasizes the integration of various equipment and formats. loudness and timbre. structure of the ear. the course investigates the business aspects of creating music for the film and TV industries. chord extensions and substitutions. strategizing creative planning and producing creative through to final delivery and follow up. Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA202 Audio Electronics (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the theoretical foundation of analog audio electronics with a complete overview of all basic components and main principles. understand the pre-mastering process and be able to deliver final projects in current delivery formats. brass. vocal). Prerequisite: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio PRA210 Advanced Recording Techniques I (3 credits) This course incorporates the skills needed to integrate the various technologies of. they will continue to master the techniques and equipment used in the professional recording industry. test equipment.PRA201 Psychoacoustics (3 credits) This course builds on and expands the development of critical listening skills and the introduction of psychoacoustics and cognition. encoding methods involving data compression. Topics covered include configuring and maintaining a complex MIDI studio through a multiport interface. Prerequisite: PRA112 Audio Recording II PRA211 Advanced Recording Techniques II (3 credits) Students develop advanced engineering skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: PRA121 Digital Music Technology II PRA221 Synthesis & Sound Design II (3 credits) This course will survey both commercially available synthesis methods and recent developments at audio research institutes. Analytical listening sessions will expose students to synthesis methods in various musical contexts. or audio files. sync all elements of a production using SMPTE timecode. a project using a short film where students will have to edit all the ADR and dialogue. FM. error correction and concealment. soldering techniques. Topics include: basic audio circuitry components and their functions. software signal routing. consonance. arrangement. harmonization. Prerequisite: PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA230 Digital Audio III (3 credits) This course is designed to take the basics of DAW operations to an advanced level through hands on training and projects related to the post and music industries. The analysis includes both music theory and investigations of the technology behind the production. audio mixer signal flow and circuitry. Detailed study of subtractive. Finally. developing their music theory and technical expertise. computer-based performance techniques. Course will cover all areas of creative including original music. Topics include traditional concepts relating to controlling arrangement flow for live musicians. subtractive synthesis basics and audio recording in a sequencing environment. Topics include linear digital audio. automating parameters in external MIDI devices. They will also become familiar with various musical formats. strings. and develop familiarity with sound design concepts using subtractive synthesis methods. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I PRA243 Composition for Advertising (3 credits) Student gains knowledge encompassing all areas of audio for broadcast advertising. Prerequisite: PRA230 Digital Audio III PRA240 Songwriting (3 credits) Songwriting is a study of the elements that make a successful song. Students will also survey the current market for hardware and software implementations of various synthesis methods. use of programmable or MIDI based hardware interfaces. hearing damage. Topics covered include: perception of pitch. non-audio cables. beat creation. patch bays. digital recorders. a hybrid digital/analog recording studio environment. voicing. From getting the project. melodic development. Prerequisites: PRA141 Music Theory II and PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I The Art Institute of Vancouver . Corequisite: PRA202 Audio Electronics PRA220 Synthesis & Sound Design I (3 credits) Students learn MIDI and basic synthesis skills for music production and sound design. Prerequisites: PRA121 Digital Music Technology II and PRA141 Music Theory II PRA241 Music Arranging and Recording Technology (3 credits) Students study approaches to arranging as it relates to computer-based technology. advanced sequencing concepts. project constructions. digital filtering. voiceover casting and production for production and comedy campaigns. and the aesthetic and acoustical issues specific to each genre and instrument.

Agreements include the definition. Projects will be carried out individually or in groups based on the needs of the class as determined by the instructor. Prerequisite: PRA242 Music for Television and Film PRA380 Directed Studies I (3 credits) Students work independently on projects and papers as per agreements made with their LIPA mentor. With the instructor’s guidance. Committee and/or faculty will approve the project content and type of the audio work. There is also a theory component to the course. marketing and taxes are practical topics that are addressed. and providing library music.Technology and Culture I Page 84 PRA340 Scoring for Film and Television (3 credits) Using the technical and creative skills acquired in previous music composition courses.PRA250 Live Sound Reinforcement (3 credits) In this course students learn to design. Prerequisite: GE100 Rhetoric and Composition PRA381 Directed Studies II (3 credits) Students work independently on projects and papers as per agreements made with their LIPA mentor.Academic Calendar . and in related areas of the recording arts. communications. beliefs and impacts of technological change.Technology and Culture I (3 credits) This course explores the impact technology has on representing and shaping the way a culture thinks about itself and the world. speeches and lectures. Prerequisite: PRA380 Directed Studies I PRA390 Professional Development and Portfolio (3 credits) Built on the skills developed in previous courses. Agreements include the definition. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director PRA391 Senior Project (3 credits) This course initiates a two quarter long comprehensive project which will be integral to students’ final portfolios. MC/DJ systems). and in related areas of the recording arts. Students are introduced to the processes and practicalities of writing for film. the course examines other cultures with particular attention paid to comparing and contrasting attitudes. and timelines of the student’s projects and papers. assessment criteria. instruments and tools used in film scoring to convey theme. records. beliefs and impacts of technological change. and to overcome the problems inherent in difficult acoustical environments. sophisticated. The curriculum reviews various theoretical positions. television dramas and documentaries. Prerequisite: None PRA281 Media Studies . contracts. Prerequisite: PRA280 Media Studies . Prerequisites: PRA100 Fundamentals of Audio and PRA110 Audio Technology I PRA260 Business Fundamentals (3 credits) Students gain valuable knowledge and skills to prepare them for being self-employed in the media entertainment industry. and although contemporary North American culture is the central focus. The course allows students to experiment musically and discover their strengths and individual styles. The curriculum reviews various theoretical positions. The course requires that students write a number of papers focused on critical analysis of their work in other courses. who want perspective on the broader implications of technology and its role in cultural identity and development. and although contemporary North American culture is the central focus.Technology and Culture II (3 credits) This course continues to explore the impact technology has on representing and shaping the way a culture thinks about itself and the world. and timelines of the student’s projects and papers. Prerequisite: None PRA280 Media Studies . the course examines other cultures with particular attention paid to comparing and contrasting attitudes. Each student is expected to verbally present the portfolio and address audience questions as a format of defense. Signal flow and troubleshooting kills are continually reinforced in the process of setting up and tearing down complete sound systems during classes. operate and troubleshoot small to medium-sized PA systems. scope. assessment criteria. The course requires that students write a number of papers focused on critical analysis of their work in other courses. who want perspective on the broader implications of technology and its role in cultural identity and development. Students will employ their cumulative skills to pre-produce a significant. this course allows each student to determine and design the final organization and presentation of the graduation portfolio. invoices. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director The Art Institute of Vancouver . which supports the practical application. students pay particular attention to different textures. particularly in the entertainment industries. The students’ final projects involve working with Digital Film & Video students to score their student films. Freelancing. particularly in the entertainment industries. Media Studies Technology & Culture II is especially valuable to those who work with technology on a regular basis. Media Studies Technology & Culture I is especially valuable to those who work with technology on a regular basis. multi-track digital audio work. students further develop their compositional and technical skills through the production of several pieces to accompany sections of film. mood and emotion to enhance the audience’s viewing experience. scope. Students are exposed to the audio systems and acoustical environments encountered in live sound situations (sound reinforcement for performances.

Media Arts Electives may be satisfied by selecting courses from the 3D Modeling for Animation & Games. A variety of concepts. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. physics. students work as a team on the production of an electronic games project in a studio environment. Visual & Game Programming is an intense hands-on program with a focus on technical programming skills for video games. Each course within the program is worth three or six quarter credits for a total of 90 credits upon completion. Prerequisite: None CC310 Preproduction and Project Management (3 credits) Students work on a game prototype and learn to invent new game ideas.Visual & Game Programming Available at the Renfrew campus.18 months .Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CC115 Colour Theory 3 CC310 Preproduction and Project Management 3 CC450 Production Team I 3 CC451 Production Team II 6 GAD100 History of Games 3 GAD110 Game Design I 3 VGP100 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 VGP104 Software Development and Testing 3 VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I 3 VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I 3 VGP112 UML and Technical Documentation 3 VGP120 Procedural Programming in C II 3 VGP126 Applied Mathematics 3 VGP128 Geometry and Linear Algebra 3 Course Number and Title Credits VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II 3 VGP220 Algorithms and Data Patterns I 3 VGP230 2D Games Programming 3 VGP232 Game Tools & Pipelines 3 VGP240 3D Graphics and Applications 3 VGP244 Algorithms and Data Patterns II 3 VGP248 Physics of Motion. Program Description The Art Institute of Vancouver offers a Diploma upon successful completion of the Visual & Game Programming Program. The program’s objective is to provide students with the essential programming. The game programmer’s skill set includes the ability to create and customize game code. problem solving. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. Prerequisite: CC310 Preproduction and Project Management or permission of the Academic Director CC451 Production Team II (6 credits) In this course. In addition to core programming skills. A project or projects are then selected to move forward to Production Team. Students integrate all of the these skills during a final game project in which they create an original video game in a team setting. scripting. While the emphasis is on object oriented programming. mathematics. Javascript and OpenGL. The students are introduced to the theory of project management and how it applies to modern game development. Python. They must be able to create the core game engine subsystems. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. game design. Light and Sound 3 VGP333 Programming for Games Engines 3 VGP336 Gameplay Programming 3 VGP400 Portfolio I 3 VGP453 Portfolio II 3 Media Arts Elective 1 3 Media Arts Elective 2 3 Media Arts Elective 3 3 Media Arts Elective 4 3 Introduction Video game programmers must be well versed in the technical aspects of game creation. CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. 90 credits . and algorithm development. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. the curriculum introduces students to a number of programming topics including graphics. This program lasts one-and-a-half academic years (six quarters) and consists of 29 courses. integrate art assets. scripts and tools to best meet the needs of an individual game project. Animation Art & Design and Game Art & Design programs. students continue to work as a team on the production of an electronic games project in a studio environment.29 courses . students also study mathematics. and design aspects of colour. Graduates possess a blend of theoretical knowledge and practical experience that equips them for entry-level employment and career advancement. Prrequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I or permission of the Academic Director CC450 Production Team I (3 credits) In this course. Prerequisite: CC450 Production Team I Page 85 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Students learn C++.Academic Calendar . and translate the intent of the game designers into functional game software. and design skills required of a video game programmer. psychology.6 quarters . gameplay and tools development.

operator overloading. arrays. determinants.Academic Calendar VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II (3 credits) This course introduces more complex objectoriented programming techniques in C++. projection. Students work in teams to apply models and strategies for creating traditional games that are based in solid play mechanics. implementing. pitching the game. and basic collision detection. namespaces. tree traversal. The use of peripherals and their interaction with the computer will be applied. implementation and testing of a simple two-dimensional game. data driven design. user documentation. and database techniques are explored. motion. rotation. spreadsheet. data retrieval. maintenance. The course will cover productivity tools. queues. tree traversal. Students apply these concepts to problems in game programming. heaps. object-oriented design analysis. combinatorics. troubleshooting. time performance analysis and memory efficiency analysis. Students are introduced to common object-oriented concepts such as classes. Topics include coordinate systems. maintenance and testing are reinforced. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP220 Algorithms and Data Patterns I (3 credits) This course is an introduction to algorithms and design patterns. requirement gathering. vectors. Prerequisite: None VGP104 Software Development and Testing (3 credits) This course is an introduction to software engineering techniques used in modern application and game development. stacks. including variables. and complex numbers are introduced. Prerequisite: None VGP128 Geometry and Linear Algebra (3 credits) This course covers the essential analytic geometry and linear algebra tools and techniques used in 3D games and graphics programming. The components of a computer and general network infrastructure will be examined. trees. Prerequisites: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I and VGP126 Applied Mathematics VGP232 Game Tools & Pipelines (3 credits) The role and function of a tools programmer on a games team is introduced to the students. Students will simulate real world types of problems solving using C++ related to video games programming. prototyping. This includes templates. maintaining. lines. basic word processing. Additionally. Students will learn how to multiply team efficiency through building tools and pipelines to increase development productivity. technological shifts. quality assurance. inheritance. This course will introduce game engine architecture including 2D graphics. Vectors. The students will learn data patterns including various types of linked lists. Students will explore the standard template library. The student will develop a written and verbal vocabulary for analyzing games and their cultural significance. dynamic memory allocations. there will be introductions to software implementation. Prerequisites: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of programming using the C language. abstract data types. Prerequisite: None GAD110 Game Design I (3 credits) Students will be introduced to traditional game theory and design and how they relate to their modern electronic cousin. Students review the essentials of high school mathematics: algebra. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I . smart pointers. Prerequisite: None VGP120 Procedural Programming in C II (3 credits) This course introduces students advanced topics using the C language with a particular focus on pointers and dynamic memory access. pattern matching. The student will also learn about the different types of memory including heaps and stacks. and special effects. Prerequisite: VGP126 Applied Mathematics The Art Institute of Vancouver . branching. advanced data structures and dynamic memory. Students will be provided the 2D engine framework and will be shown how to use and extend the engine for their final game project. and testing. type casting. reference counting. and application troubleshooting. planning. implementation. C types. documentation. Students learn to recognize the importance of developing fast and efficient algorithms for solving common complex problems in a simple and elegant manner. pipeline solutions. matrices. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP230 2D Games Programming (3 credits) This class is a project focused course where the student is responsible for the design. and how to perform translation. Emphasis is placed on developing problem solving skills. automated build process and reusable tools. Prerequisite: VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I VGP126 Applied Mathematic (3 credits) This course covers the foundational mathematical tools required in any animation or physics based game. motion with constant acceleration. objectPage 86 oriented designs. Technical design documentation using UML and other technical writing techniques are emphasized. The students will also be introduced to the Internet as a research and networking tool. const-correctness. creating a final product and play testing. planes. user interface. exception handling. resource management. looping. scaling. and transformations. Emphasis is on replacing repetitive tasks in the development process with effective and functional tools. The course will cover topics relating to software development process such as requirement gathering. structures. The course will focus on utilizing the practical software engineering use-case approach to drive software specifications. virtual functions. designing. and learn to apply these tools to problems encountered in game development. hash tables and other advanced object-oriented data types in C++. They learn how to represent objects mathematically. and user-defined functions. Prerequisite: VGP110 Procedural Programming in C I VGP112 UML and Technical Documentation (3 credits) This course is an introduction to software documentation and planning techniques used in modern software development. collision detection. and functions. Prerequisite: None VGP100 Introduction to Computer Systems (3 credits) This course introduces students to the basic operation of a computer on multiple hardware platforms. vectors. logical and arithmetic operators. File management and storage. Students will experience an entire game cycle: identifying the audience. and software designs. and key genres in the brief history of electronic video games. dot & cross product. Prerequisite: None VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I (3 credits) This is an introduction to object-oriented programming in C++. The fundamentals of object-oriented programming in C++ through applied design.GAD100 History of Games (3 credits) This course introduces students to the timeline. polymorphism. trigonometry. mechanical energy. Students learn efficient sorting. basic artificial intelligence. and other advanced standard data types. physics. and standard template libraries.

tree traversal. Prerequisite: VGP220 Algorithms and Data Patterns I VGP248 Physics of Motion Light and Sound (3 credits) This course covers Newtonian mechanics. and learn how integrate all major systems through advanced scripting. expanding. The students will cover 3D geometry.VGP240 3D Graphics and Applications (3 credits) Students are introduced the fundamentals of 3D graphics and the underlying mathematics. rasterization. lighting.Academic Calendar Page 87 . and shading. manipulate audio assets. programming tests. A high level of emphasis will be working hands-on with numerous game subsystems including enemy behaviors. Prerequisites: VGP128 Geometry and Linear Algebra and VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP400 Portfolio I (3 credits) Students assemble and critique works from completed courses. graphs traversal. materials. and divide and conquer techniques are the main focus to this course. recursions. They will learn a brand new pipeline and import game assets. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director The Art Institute of Vancouver . Students research potential employers and learn about the different positions available for them. depth first search. technical interviews. use a modern 3rd party physics engine. rendering. compression. graphics pipelines. divide & conquer. and the basic physics of light and sound propagation in media. advance sorting. prototype gameplay features. Students are expected to present a plan that lead up to their Senior Portfolio which enables them to plan on a focused programming career objective. interpolations. Students learn how to apply these principles to problems encountered in physics based games. Problem solving. physics and networking. breath first search. build networking gameplay. Greedy method. and utilizing existing technologies to produce fun and interactive game mechanics. Students are introduced to games interview screening process. hashing. artificial intelligence. Emphasis is placed on formulating solutions in pseudocode. rigid body dynamics. matrix transformations. and randomization algorithms. algorithm analysis. simple harmonic motion. texturing. Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director VGP453 Portfolio II (3 credits) This course focuses on the completion of a studentʼs portfolio and enables the student to begin their career search. Prerequisite: VGP128 Geometry and Linear Algebra VGP333 Programming for Game Engines (3 credits) Students will learn how to work in a pre-existing modern game engine framework. player interactions. Prerequisites: VGP128 Geometry and Linear Algebra and VGP130 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ II VGP244 Algorithms and Data Patterns II (3 credits) This course introduces advanced algorithms including shortest path. Game play programming will focus on developing. clipping. Students will apply their knowledge of algorithmic efficiency analysis to devise more complex algorithms and data structures including both recursive and non-recursive algorithms. complex problem solving and verbal presentation of tough technical challenges. The class implements each of these concepts in an existing industry standard graphics framework. Prerequisite: VGP111 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ I VGP336 Gameplay Programming (3 credits) This course is an introduction to game play programming that is focused around building and working with modern game programming architectures to produce and prototype game mechanics. whiteboard questions. and discover the limits of their programming knowledge.

a solid knowledge base in film and VFX theories and principles. As technology and software are constantly evolving. and identifying and pursuing career opportuPage 88 nities through the job search process. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . 3D Generalist. they will practice their listening and communication skills. using such tools as effective cover letters. Finally. This course involves the observation and translation of three-dimensional form into two dimensional drawings. cohesive courses in which students accomplish specific.20 months . as well as how to work in a collaborative environment through a variety of team based projects. conflict resolution. and a host of related entry level VFX production positions. students will build skill levels in composition.VFX for Film & Television Available at the Renfrew campus. creative thinking and dealing with interpersonal situations found in a work environment. This goal is achieved by building a foundation of traditional artistic skill. Issues such as keyframing. and use of tone. decision making. 3D Match Mover. Prerequisite: None CC102 Professional Development (3 credits) This course is designed to prepare students for the process of gaining employment. 2D Compositor.7 quarters .Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title ANI151 2D Animation I CC102 Professional Development CCM101 Drawing and Perspective CCM111 Design and Colour Theory CCM121 Digital Imaging CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM141 Life Drawing I CCM171 Digital Imaging II CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM221 3D Animation I CCM231 Materials and Textures I CCM261 Portfolio I CCM271 Rigging CCM281 CG Lighting and Rendering I CCM291 Storyboarding CCM311 3D Effects CCM321 Preproduction Team Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Course Number and Title Credits CCM361 Production Team 6 CCM411 Portfolio II 3 CCM431 Mentor Studio 3 DFV110 Introduction to Digital Film Editing 3 DFV120 Introduction to Video Production 3 DFV121 Television and Film Production Techniques 3 DFV140 Introduction to Cinematography 3 MAG201 Character Modeling I 3 MAG301 3D Modeling II 3 MAG331 Materials and Textures II 3 MAG381 CG Lighting & Rendering II 3 MAG401 Brush Based Modeling 3 MAG441 Matte Painting 3 VFX191 Intro to VFX 3 VFX201 Compositing I 3 VFX251 Compositing II 3 VFX351 Compositing III 3 Program Description The VFX diploma program at The Art Institute of Vancouver is designed to provide graduates with the relevant skills necessary to enter into and maintain a career in the post-production industry for film and television as VFX artists and technicians.Academic Calendar CCM101 Drawing and Perspective (3 credits) This course is a fundamental drawing course where the students will explore various arts and media and learn to use a variety of drawing tools. 105 credits . Each 3 month term of the program is comprised of tightly integrated. Career opportunities for graduating students may include 3D Modeler. industry driven competencies and outcomes. line quality. Each course builds on the lessons of the ones before it and each term is a prerequisite for the following. students will learn how to communicate ideas effectively. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. as well as the game an animation industries. as well as their ability to read the room by understanding non-verbal communication. and other branded marketing materials.34 courses . resumes. By participating in interview activities. They will also develop their skills in problem solving. Matte Painter. Render Wrangler. The curriculum is structured to facilitate exceptional portfolio outcomes culminating in the development of a professional “demo reel” and other marketing pieces. They will do this by assessing their personal background. and by then providing students with hands on training in various modern applications and tools including compositing and digital film production techniques. They will learn how to market themselves. VFX Wrangler. Prerequisite: None . in-betweening. self management. and cycling will be addressed. ANI151 2D Animation I (3 credits) Students will study timing and weight through a series of projects designed to demonstrate the principles of animation. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. develop work ethic and standards in accordance with their professional practice. Texture Artist. Starting with simple shapes and progressing to more complex organic forms. to problem solve and above all. students are trained to be diagnostic in their study.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Academic Director CCM431 Mentor Studio (3 credits) Industry mentors guide students through the completion of team projects. Exercises in contrast. design a production schedule for the duration of their studies. and lighting strategies to add detail and realism to geometry without adding complexity. lighting. and animation. Students also explore rendering and camera effects to enhance their images. Students also have the option of creating and presenting a pitch package for consideration in the team production courses. and cycling will be addressed. textures.CCM111 Design and Colour Theory (3 credits) A presentation of the basic elements and principles of design and colour theory will be made in this course. Prerequisite: None CCM121 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment. proportion. Emphasis will be on making choices and editing for story. Prerequisites: CCM181 3D Modeling I and CCM221 3D Animation I CCM281 CG Lighting and Rendering I (3 credits) This course introduces students to lighting and camera strategies for computer generated images. each student will have created and tested a complete character set up and have the necessary skills to rig their own characters. performance. and live action production. The first component consists of a self-promotional package that includes business cards. volume. and apply the theories to the digital environment. maps. in-betweening. cinematic techniques. Students use 3D modeling software to simulate real world surfaces using reflection. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM261 Portfolio I (3 credits) This course serves as a mid program checkpoint. rigid and soft bodies. image manipulation. weight. Prerequisite: CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM221 3D Animation I (3 credits) Students will study timing and weight through a series of projects designed to demonstrate the principles of animation. personal portfolio pieces and assignments. Students assemble and critique works from completed courses. Camera usage will also be detailed more. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . materials. students focus on the production of a media arts project in a studio environment. Prerequisite: CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts CCM231 Materials and Textures I (3 credits) This course introduces students to materials. The student will develop a firm foundation to lay out and organize design elements. balance. Prerequisite: CCM121 Digital Imaging CCM181 3D Modeling I (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of 3D modeling software.Academic Calendar Page 89 . This class is the first complete team experience that exposes students to the collaborative efforts of a large production team. Students learn to construct and manipulate geometry. spatial perception. The character rig is broken down into its component parts and animation tested throughout the course. It provides students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and develop an original media arts concept. Prerequisite: CCM321 Preproduction Team CCM411 Portfolio II (3 credits) This course focuses on the completion of a student’s portfolio and enables the student to begin their career search. and create and deliver a Powerpoint presentation of final portfolio goals. and artistic concepts necessary to render clear and concise storyboards at a professional level. along with some stand alone projects. Prerequisite: None CCM131 Basic 3D Concepts (3 credits) Students will be introduced to basic concepts of 3D space. students will focus on the preproduction of a media arts project in a studio environment. Prerequisite: None CCM271 Rigging (3 credits) The purpose of this course is to demystify character setup. and organization. DVD packaging. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by producing a project from inception to completion. and light and render a scene. Corequisite: CCM411 Portfolio II DFV110 Introduction to Digital Film Editing (3 credits) Students will develop the foundations of basic video editing using industry-standard nonlinear editing software. and symbolism will be used to demonstrate the unique communication properties of colour. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I CCM291 Storyboarding (3 credits) This course focuses on the specifics of storyboarding as a storytelling medium and its place in the pipeline for animation. Students create and apply shaders and materials in support of lighting effects. and other effects. game. resume. Each assignment is evaluated based on functionality. create and edit materials and textures. harmony. modeling. Prerequisite: None CCM171 Digital Imaging II (3 credits) Students will further develop knowledge of digital imaging theory and application of digital imaging techniques. Upon completion. The student portfolio consists of two major components. channels. and force in human gesture drawing. Students will present work from their portfolio for review (critique) and obtain an assessment of the quality of their work in order to make necessary enhancements. Students learn the various terminologies. on-line propagation and web site. Students explore the tools and techniques of 3D modeling through a series of assignments. Prerequisite: CCM221 3D Animation I CCM321 Preproduction Team (3 credits) In this course. research potential employers. Students analyze real world lighting and cameras. This course also explores the theories regarding physical perception and design aspects of colour. with an emphasis on advanced skills in masking. Prerequisite: None CCM141 Life Drawing I (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course where students explore the concepts of structure. radiosity. The second component is the assembly and assessment of the student’s demo reel. Prerequisite: CCM101 Drawing and Perspective CCM311 3D Effects (3 credits) Students will be introduced to particles in further detail. Students will create a scene using what they have learned. Issues such as keyframing. Prerequisite: CCM261 Portfolio I CCM361 Production Team (6 credits) In this course. painting and compositing.

Every day compositing techniques will be reviewed. lights and lens shaders. Camera movements and framing are applied using different camera mounts. Students will be encouraged to assess and analyze various production roles. and create believable composites. Rendering software will be introduced with focus on rendering setup. incorporate photo referencing. projection masks. choices including camera movements and framing will be previewed and practiced. Students will explore techniques of character modeling to include various approaches to figure construction. Students will learn basic compositing techniques and processes as they relate to the acquisition of resources. basic lighting practices. Prerequisite: CCM281 CG Lighting and Rendering I MAG401 Brush Based Modeling (3 credits) The course covers the brush based software user fundamentals. Prerequisite: CCM231 Materials and Textures I MAG381 CG Lighting & Rendering II (3 credits) The students will build on the material learned in previous courses to create portfolio quality work. learn morph target generation. Students will also be introduced to rendering outside of the 3D modeling software package. Students will become well versed in the terminology of film. aesthetic and content considerations. Students revisit sculpting basics. They will also explore the changes in the television industry as a result of the digital revolution and the explosion in internet video portals. virtual sets and digital backgrounds.DFV120 Introduction to Video Production (3 credits) This course introduces students to the video camera as a technical and creative tool for communication and art. and materials. Evaluation will be structured to reflect industry practices and students will be responsible for providing visual progress reports to their instructor on a weekly basis or as determined by the faculty mentor. and will refine their ability to create believable composites. management and assembly of disparate elements. advanced keying. Students integrate the principles of lighting and gripping into video applications. television and video production. Prerequisites: CCM171 Digital Imaging II and CCM181 3D Modeling I VFX191 Introduction to VFX (3 credits) This course has both theoretical and practical elements. The course emphasizes camera operation and the setup for electronic field production (EFP) and studio applications. Students acquire the knowledge and practical skill sets for digital matte painting production. Through the creative process students will test and refine their assignments including all technical. create polymesh groups layers and levels. continuity and lighting treatments. scene flow. The course provides an overview of the history of visual effects with emphasis on various effects processes in their historical and modern contexts. Students model a character in a brush based 3D application using geometry from other software programs and learn to generate characters in the brush based package. Prerequisite: VFX191 Introduction to VFX VFX251 Compositing II (3 credits) In this course students will expand their theoretical and practical knowledge of layer based compositing. In addition. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production MAG201 Character Modeling I (3 credits) This course covers modeling techniques used for building three dimensional characters. pixols. Prerequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production DFV140 Introduction to Cinematography (3 credits) This course introduces students to the art and craft of cinematography. shot selection. tracking and particle techniques will be explored. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I MAG331 Materials and Textures II (3 credits) In this class students will further develop their knowledge of materials and shader systems. In addition. explore documents and tools. and tracking will be explored. including batch rendering and command line rendering.Academic Calendar . and stencils. students will learn advanced mapping systems and techniques including camera mapping. This course also provides an students with an opportunity to become familiar with compositing applications and fundamental compositing theories and principles. discover internet resources. Students will experience and better understand what it is like to start and complete a project in full cycle according to industry standards. roto. Emphasis is on production. basic keying. Prerequisite: None VFX201 Compositing I (3 credits) In this course students will be introduced to theoretical and practical knowledge of layer based compositing. create detailing masks. roto. Prerequisite: MAG301 3D Modeling II MAG441 Matte Painting (3 credits) This course explores and integrates design and technology to develop matte paintings. In addition. with particular attention to cameras placement. Prerequisite: VFX201 Compositing I VFX351 Compositing III (3 credits) In an instructed environment students will review compositing techniques in node based software program. Students will enhance their compositing techniques and processes as they relate to the acquisition of resources. Prerequisite: VFX251 Compositing II Page 90 The Art Institute of Vancouver . texture painting and lighting strategies to add detail and realism to objects without adding complexity to the model. management and assembly of disparate elements. and learn to output normal and displacement maps to a 3D application renderer. You will need to be able to keep to a schedule that you and I will create for your project. Prerequisite: None DFV121 Television and Film Production Techniques This course is designed to develop intermediate digital video production skills including camera operations and lighting. The navigation of camera technology. contrast texturing polys vs. Prerequisite: CCM181 3D Modeling I MAG301 3D Modeling II (3 credits) The main objective for this course is for students to take an idea from concept and develop their idea to completion.

Using different software applications. Focus is on developing and utilizing advanced techniques in raster and vector-based applications. entertainment. interactivity. as well as new media production for online content. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. education. Students learn to create complex effects. Students also explore the use of vector-based software as a design and typesetting tool. They will have broad skill sets suitable for employment in a host of entry-level positions. Camera movements and framing are applied using different camera mounts. and production ready files.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title DFV120 Introduction to Video Production GD131 Typography GD132 History and Analysis of Design GD223 Photoshop for Prepress GD230 Digital Illustration GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages IMD102 Digital Visual Composition IMD122 Design Layout IMD132 Project Management IMD300 Advanced Interactive Web Scripting IMD301 Introduction to User Centred Design IMD402 E-Learning Applications IMD410 Desktop Video Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Course Number and Title IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites IMD412 Designing for Server Side Technology IMD422 Intermediate Scripting Languages IMD431 Writing for Interactive Design IMD441 Senior Research IMD451 Senior Project IMD461 Portfolio MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia RS400 Professional Development WS130 Web Site Development I WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting WS230 Web Site Development II Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Program Description The Web Design & Interactive Media diploma is a “user-centred” design and development program. Prerequisite: None GD223 Photoshop for Prepress (3 credits) This course focuses on advanced computer techniques using digital input devices and imaging software to achieve design solutions appropriate to specific audiences.Web Design & Interactive Media Available at the Renfrew campus. The curriculum acknowledges the internet as an identified growth sector for business. The course emphasizes camera operation and the setup for electronic field production (EFP) and studio applications. In this program students will focus upon building fundamental competencies in interface and information design.15 months . intention and personality of the written word. graduates may become freelance contract specialists and work in collaboration with studios and agencies. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . superior images. DFV120 Introduction to Video Production (3 credits) This course introduces students to the video camera as a technical and creative tool for communication and art. This program provides students with comprehensive design and technical skill sets as well as business strategies necessary to produce interactive technology solutions. social and economic influences and the analysis of contemporary design and design trends. online communities and other sectors. the student will demonstrate an understanding of electronic illustration. Prerequisite: None GD132 History and Analysis of Design (3 credits) Curriculum will encompass a study of the art movements that have structured the field of graphic design covering political. Graduates will be prepared to seek employment within online divisions at major companies and as innovative entrepreneurs. The course will explore vector-based graphic applications that are considered to be industry standard. games.5 quarters . Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework.25 courses . Some prerequisites are satisfied by submission of a portfolio. Students integrate the principles of lighting and gripping into video applications. Furthermore. database and dynamic content development.Academic Calendar Page 91 . Prerequisite: None GD131 Typography (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the history of the evolution and application of typography for the perception of meaning. 75 credits . Prerequisite: Submission of portfolio GD230 Digital Illustration (3 credits) This course helps students communicate and design with the computer as a professional tool.

Students will produce short video projects for output to various storage formats. options for authoring systems. and revise instructional applications using industry standard authoring systems. The course focuses on theoretical foundations of e-learning. Prerequisite: IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites. In addition. including digital still camera as well as camcorder orientation. lighting. visual effects compositing software. students will physically create an interface prototype. Focus will be on incorporating server side solutions into user-centred web design in order to provide an exchange of information between client and server. concepts.Academic Calendar . to be submitted and defended during their final quarter. Prerequisite: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia IMD451 Senior Project (3 credits) Students select a major project major project in interactive media design. this course functions as a research course for major portfolio classes. database structures and server side scripting to create dynamic web sites. instructional analysis. and production of e-learning materials. students are introduced and gain experience in the design. Projects will focus on essential web development skills using PHP. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I IMD102 Digital Visual Composition (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamental terminology. They engage in individual research culminating in a statement of their philosophy of conceptual development and problem solving. as well as shooting and editing for digital compression and authoring. loops. and defining the audience. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I IMD410 Desktop Video (3 credits) This course deals with the processes involved with desktop editing of audio and video for digital output. and qualitative results. Instruction is given on basic techniques of production. project scheduling. lighting. Prerequisites: GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages and WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting. and budget. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I IMD300 Advanced Interactive Web Scripting (3 credits) Students will continue to build upon what they have learned to create and deliver fast-loading interactive animation. students will identify where user issues are raised and how they are answered. graphics and sound for the Web with exciting transparency and shape blending effects. Students will continue to develop and demonstrate through projects effective conceptual development processes. Particular attention will be paid to design issues relating to the display of dynamic content on the screen and how that dynamic content will be delivered. Students will apply user-centred design principles. Students will design and develop web content for server-based dynamic delivery. Students will communicate with databases using the SQL query language and apply server side scripting knowledge to create dynamic websites. During the course. playback on digital media and for streaming on the web. developing the treatment. Students design. such as establishing the premise. During this time students will conduct research sufficient for professional presentation as a graduate project. The course focuses on the principles of using colour. and other techniques for overall thematic and visual effects of moving and static images. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I. types of authoring software. buttons. Prerequisites: GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages and WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting IMD412 Designing for Server Side Technology (3 credits) Students will build on the skills taught in the previous courses. principles of effective design. By exploring the process step-bystep. Prerequisites: None IMD441 Senior Research (3 credits) The student will select a specific subject that can be effectively presented using interactive media or Web design. Prerequisite: None IMD132 Project Management (3 credits) Curriculum focuses on the project management process and development of the project team as they pertain to success in interactive media design. and techniques of digital visual composition for both static and moving images. time frame. manage and retrieve data. research techniques and data organization by programming. Emphasis will be placed upon translating original and innovative design concepts to the web. Topics include the operation of non-linear systems. MySQL. Prerequisite: Submission of portfolio IMD122 Design Layout (3 credits) This course will enable the student to utilize their design skills in collaboration with web development technology and technology considerations. students will use principles and techniques to develop small-to-medium scale applications that store. Emphasis during this research is to be on quantitative and qualitative components of the subject area. composition. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I IMD402 E-Learning Applications (3 credits) Through the course.GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages (3 credits) Students will learn to build database applications that are integrated with the Web. This course will teach advanced action scripting with classes to allow students to create sophisticated interactive projects. In addition. set-up and operation. Emphasis will be on writing opportunities in the communications industries. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I IMD431 Writing for Interactive Design (3 credits) This course examines the roles of copywriter and scriptwriter in interactive multimedia. Key areas of interactive design project teams serve to support the fundamental approach that every project team is tailored to achieve project results efficiently and effectively. and conditions. Students will present their project solutions and defend their decisions. as well as on the process of interactive writing. evaluate. Corequisite: IMD441 Senior Research The Art Institute of Vancouver . Corequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites (3 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the dynamic website authoring environment. and evaluation of effective e-learning programs. compression schemes. presentation methods. Corequisite: IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites IMD422 Intermediate Scripting Languages (3 credits) This course will enable expand upon concepts and techniques presented in previous courses. development. The course examines the main elements required in every proposal/plan. build. Emphasis will be placed on the process of design and web development from roughs to final projects optimized for screen delivery. Prerequisite: None Page 92 IMD301 Introduction to User Centred Design (3 credits) This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of developing interfaces which have as a primary goal addressing and solving user needs.

game/ software interfaces. Prerequisite: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia WS230 Web Site Development II (3 credits) Students will expand on the principals developed in previous courses and apply their skills to the development of a personal website accessible on the Web. creative thinking and dealing with interpersonal situations found in a work environment. resumes. and print material to support their interactive portfolios and to begin their industry networking process. Students will also learn advanced HTML and CSS. Students apply techniques and strategies to market themselves in their chosen fields. Prerequisite: WS130 Web Site Development I The Art Institute of Vancouver .IMD461 Portfolio (3 credits) This course guides students through the process of compiling their work into a final interactive portfolio. graphics and sound for the Web with exciting transparency and shape blending effects. In this course students will learn advanced action scripting. as well as their ability to read the room by understanding non-verbal communication. Students will learn to create resizable. and identifying and pursuing career opportunities through the job search process. they will practice their listening and communication skills. They will learn how to market themselves. They will do this by assessing their personal background. technical illustrations. small. long-form animations. Prerequisite: None WS130 Web Site Development I (3 credits) Students will learn to create effective websites with maximum browser compatibility utilizing authoring software. Corequisite: IMD441 Senior Research MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia (3 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the Flash authoring environment. They will also develop their skills in problem solving. By participating in interview activities. conflict resolution. Students will learn how to apply their skills to construct a commercial website with Web accessibility. animation for web and TV. and many other brilliant special effects. Students work on the packaging and presentation of various projects developed in other upper-level courses including resumes. and text elements. technical. buttons. and academic capabilities to create sophisticated interactive projects. and will develop the creative. using such tools as effective cover letters. and compact navigation interfaces. Students will explore the procedures and techniques involved in delivering high-impact websites. decision making. designing storyboards for their interactive video. Prerequisite: None RS400 Professional Development (3 credits) This course is designed to prepare students for the process of gaining employment.Academic Calendar Page 93 . Prerequisite: None WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting (3 credits) Students will learn to create and deliver fastloading interactive animation. Emphasis is on students assessing their most marketable skills. and other branded marketing materials. self management.

education. Prerequisite: None CC133 Digital Imaging (3 credits) Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a raster-based computer environment.Academic Calendar . and design aspects of colour. form. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. graduates may become freelance contract specialists and work in collaboration with studios and agencies.Web Design & Interactive Media and Foundation for Design Available at the Renfrew campus. interactivity. Camera movements and framing are applied using different camera mounts. They will have broad skill sets suitable for employment in a host of entry-level positions. Furthermore. Students also explore the use of vector-based software as a design and typesetting tool. identify and implement basic visual design principles and elements. online communities and other sectors. shape. Prerequisite: None GD131 Typography (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the history of the evolution and application of typography for the perception of meaning. Graduates will be prepared to seek employment within online divisions at major companies and as innovative entrepreneurs. The curriculum acknowledges the internet as an identi- fied growth sector for business. Prerequisite: None CC112 Fundamentals of Design (3 credits) Students will explore. materials and techniques is used in class to investigate the aesthetic and psychological principles of design and colour. intention and personality of the written word. This course explores theories regarding physical perception. Prerequisite: None CC115 Colour Theory (3 credits) The creative process is introduced using the visual elements of additive and subtractive colour and the basic principles of design. This program provides students with comprehensive design and technical skill sets as well as business strategies necessary to produce interactive technology solutions. Concept development processes and material manipulation will be used in combination with design principles to create effective and appropriate visual compositions.18 months . In this program students will focus upon building fundamental competencies in interface and information design. CC110 Drawing (3 credits) This is a fundamental drawing course in which students will explore various methods of applying line. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes.6 quarters . database and dynamic content development. Prerequisite: None Page 94 The Art Institute of Vancouver .Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title CC110 Drawing CC112 Fundamentals of Design CC115 Colour Theory CC133 Digital Imaging DFV120 Introduction to Video Production GD131 Typography GD132 History and Analysis of Design GD223 Photoshop for Prepress GD230 Digital Illustration GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages IMD102 Digital Visual Composition IMD122 Design Layout IMD132 Project Management IMD300 Advanced Interactive Web Scripting IMD301 Introduction to User Centred Design Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Course Number and Title IMD402 E-Learning Applications IMD410 Desktop Video IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites IMD412 Designing for Server Side Technology IMD422 Intermediate Scripting Languages IMD431 Writing for Interactive Design IMD441 Senior Research IMD451 Senior Project IMD461 Portfolio MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia RS400 Professional Development WS121 Fundamentals of the World Wide Web WS130 Web Site Development I WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting WS230 Web Site Development II Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Program Description The Web Design & Interactive Media and Foundation for Design diploma is a “user-centred” design and development program. games. A variety of concepts. Students integrate the principles of lighting and gripping into video applications. The course emphasizes camera operation and the setup for electronic field production (EFP) and studio applications. shading. 90 credits . entertainment. psychology. framing and perspective to develop drawings that communicate reality and imagination. as well as new media production for online content. proportion. Prerequisite: None DFV120 Introduction to Video Production (3 credits) This course introduces students to the video camera as a technical and creative tool for communication and art.29 courses .

Students will produce short video projects for output to various storage formats. In addition. time frame. Focus is on developing and utilizing advanced techniques in raster and vector-based applications. composition. Focus will be on incorporating server side solutions into user-centred web design in order to provide an exchange of information between client and server. evaluate. In addition. research techniques and data organization by programming. and production ready files. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I IMD300 Advanced Interactive Web Scripting (3 credits) Students will continue to build upon what they have learned to create and deliver fast-loading interactive animation. and other techniques for overall thematic and visual effects of moving and static images. MySQL. students are introduced and gain experience in the design. Students will communicate with databases using the SQL query language and apply server side scripting knowledge to create dynamic websites. and evaluation of effective e-learning programs. options for authoring systems. the student will demonstrate an understanding of electronic illustration. Prerequisites: CC133 Digital Imaging IMD122 Design Layout (3 credits) This course will enable the student to utilize their design skills in collaboration with web development technology and technology considerations. The course examines the main elements required in every proposal/plan. set-up and operation. and revise instructional applications using industry standard authoring systems. The course will explore vector-based graphic applications that are considered to be industry standard. Students will apply user-centred design principles. principles of effective design. Students will design and develop web content for server-based dynamic delivery. and production of e-learning materials. Students will present their project solutions and defend their decisions. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I IMD102 Digital Visual Composition (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamental terminology. students will physically create an interface prototype. Prerequisite: None GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages (3 credits) Students will learn to build database applications that are integrated with the Web. and techniques of digital visual composition for both static and moving images. Prerequisite: None IMD301 Introduction to User Centred Design (3 credits) This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of developing interfaces which have as a primary goal addressing and solving user needs. Students will continue to develop and demonstrate through projects effective conceptual development processes. Projects will focus on essential web development skills using PHP. concepts. build. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I IMD402 E-Learning Applications (3 credits) Through the course. Using different software applications. Students design. superior images. The course focuses on the principles of using colour. instructional analysis. Corequisite: IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites IMD422 Intermediate Scripting Languages (3 credits) This course will enable expand upon concepts and techniques presented in previous courses.GD132 History and Analysis of Design (3 credits) Curriculum will encompass a study of the art movements that have structured the field of graphic design covering political. Prerequisite: None GD223 Photoshop for Prepress (3 credits) This course focuses on advanced computer techniques using digital input devices and imaging software to achieve design solutions appropriate to specific audiences. Particular attention will be paid to design issues relating to the display of dynamic content on the screen and how that dynamic content will be delivered. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I. this course functions as a research course for major portfolio classes. social and economic influences and the analysis of contemporary design and design trends. lighting. types of authoring software. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I Page 95 . loops. Corequisite: DFV120 Introduction to Video Production IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites (3 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the dynamic website authoring environment. lighting. and conditions. manage and retrieve data. Prerequisite: CC133 Digital Imaging GD230 Digital Illustration (3 credits) This course helps students communicate and design with the computer as a professional tool. development. Prerequisites: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia and WS130 Web Site Development I The Art Institute of Vancouver . The course focuses on theoretical foundations of e-learning. Prerequisite: None IMD132 Project Management (3 credits) Curriculum focuses on the project management process and development of the project team as they pertain to success in interactive media design. Instruction is given on basic techniques of production. Emphasis will be placed upon translating original and innovative design concepts to the web. compression schemes. visual effects compositing software. By exploring the process step-bystep. buttons. graphics and sound for the Web with exciting transparency and shape blending effects.Academic Calendar IMD410 Desktop Video (3 credits) This course deals with the processes involved with desktop editing of audio and video for digital output. database structures and server side scripting to create dynamic web sites. students will use principles and techniques to develop small-to-medium scale applications that store. During the course. This course will teach advanced action scripting with classes to allow students to create sophisticated interactive projects. Students learn to create complex effects. playback on digital media and for streaming on the web. and budget. including digital still camera as well as camcorder orientation. Topics include the operation of non-linear systems. Emphasis will be placed on the process of design and web development from roughs to final projects optimized for screen delivery. as well as shooting and editing for digital compression and authoring. Prerequisites: GD414 Introduction to Scripting Languages and WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting IMD412 Designing for Server Side Technology (3 credits) Students will build on the skills taught in the previous courses. students will identify where user issues are raised and how they are answered. Key areas of interactive design project teams serve to support the fundamental approach that every project team is tailored to achieve project results efficiently and effectively.

They will also develop their skills in problem solving. Corequisites: IMD411 Designing for Dynamic Websites and IMD441 Senior Research IMD461 Portfolio (3 credits) This course guides students through the process of compiling their work into a final interactive portfolio. Prerequisite: None IMD441 Senior Research (3 credits) The student will select a specific subject that can be effectively presented using interactive media or Web design. Prerequisite: None Page 96 RS400 Professional Development (3 credits) This course is designed to prepare students for the process of gaining employment. Prerequisite: None WS130 Web Site Development I (3 credits) Students will learn to create effective websites with maximum browser compatibility utilizing authoring software. Emphasis is on students assessing their most marketable skills. Emphasis will be on writing opportunities in the communications industries. to be submitted and defended during their final quarter. as well as on the process of interactive writing. such as establishing the premise. They will do this by assessing their personal background. Students will also learn advanced HTML and CSS. developing the treatment. Corequisite: IMD441 Senior Research MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia (3 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the Flash authoring environment. buttons. Students will explore the procedures and techniques involved in delivering high-impact websites. Prerequisite: None WS221 Interactive Motion Scripting (3 credits) Students will learn to create and deliver fastloading interactive animation. and text elements. Prerequisite: WS130 Web Site Development I The Art Institute of Vancouver . and academic capabilities to create sophisticated interactive projects.IMD431 Writing for Interactive Design (3 credits) This course examines the roles of copywriter and scriptwriter in interactive multimedia. they will practice their listening and communication skills. decision making. During this time students will conduct research sufficient for professional presentation as a graduate project. the basic scripting language of all web documents. Emphasis during this research is to be on quantitative and qualitative components of the subject area. in addition to many of the other effects and extension scripts available for that medium. and qualitative results. and identifying and pursuing career opportunities through the job search process. Students will learn to create resizable. project scheduling. and print material to support their interactive portfolios and to begin their industry networking process. Students work on the packaging and presentation of various projects developed in other upper-level courses including resumes. as well as their ability to read the room by understanding non-verbal communication. and many other brilliant special effects. Students will also create World Wide Web pages utilizing HTML. Students apply techniques and strategies to market themselves in their chosen fields. small. and compact navigation interfaces. long-form animations. They engage in individual research culminating in a statement of their philosophy of conceptual development and problem solving. By participating in interview activities.Academic Calendar . and will develop the creative. self management. game/ software interfaces. using such tools as effective cover letters. and other branded marketing materials. technical illustrations. They will learn how to market themselves. animation for web and TV. Prerequisite: None WS121 Fundamentals of the World Wide Web (3 credits) This course will focus on the origins of the World Wide Web. Students will learn how to apply their skills to construct a commercial website with Web accessibility. Prerequisite: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia WS230 Web Site Development II (3 credits) Students will expand on the principals developed in previous courses and apply their skills to the development of a personal website accessible on the Web. In this course students will learn advanced action scripting. designing storyboards for their interactive video. presentation methods. an introduction to various web browsers and recent developments and applications concerning the Internet and World Wide Web. graphics and sound for the Web with exciting transparency and shape blending effects. creative thinking and dealing with interpersonal situations found in a work environment. Prerequisite: MM221 Computer Animation for Multimedia IMD451 Senior Project (3 credits) Students select a major project major project in interactive media design. conflict resolution. technical. and defining the audience. resumes.

Academic Calendar Page 97 .Baking & Pastry Arts Culinary Arts Culinary Arts & Restaurant Ownership Entrepreneurship & Restaurant Ownership Hospitality & Restaurant Business Management The Art Institute of Vancouver .

pastry arts is experiencing a renaissance that reflects the rapid growth of the food service industry. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. Prerequisite: None CUL122 Introduction to Pastry (6 credits) This course is a combination of theory. meat and poultry are covered.Baking and Pastry Arts . thickening agents. Students must successfully pass a practical cooking examination covering a variety of cooking techniques. Students learn a Page 98 . Topics such as cake and pastry preparation. and careers in the restaurant business give students a full spectrum of knowledge about the culinary industry as they develop their skills as pastry technicians. cooking theories. students discover the tools and techniques used by industry to achieve professional results. braising and frying. chocolate. The basics of vegetable cookery.6 months . poaching. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions.2 quarters . Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. cooking theories. co-ordination. The primary issues of concern to students are: career opportunities. and the preparation of stocks. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. Attention is focused on food borne illness and their origins. Prerequisite: None CUL103 Sanitation and Safety (3 credits) This course introduces food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. develop effective study habits. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. and cake decorating are specifically included in courses to prepare students for careers in baking and pastrymaking. skills and techniques of baking. CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques (3 credits) The fundamental concepts. Prerequisite: None CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary (3 credits) “Dimensions of Culinary” is a course that introduces students to a wide realm of topics in the culinary arts and culinary education. and soups. product identification and weights and measures as applied to baking. Our curriculum emphasizes speed. and teamwork when preparing pastry from scratch. creative expression that characterizes the baking and pastry arts is a respected and demanding facet of the culinary profession. roasting. braising and frying. broth. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces.Level I Available at the Granville campus. Studies in nutrition. tasting and testing.8 courses . The basics of stocks. demonstrations. vegetable cookery. and the advantages and disadvantages of working in specific areas of the hospitality industry. sauces. Lectures and demonstrations The Art Institute of Vancouver . starch cookery. and Work Safe BC. Students must pass a practical exam. the experience required to pursue particular opportunities. and knife skills. poaching. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. and on basic safety procedures followed in the food service industry. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course.Certificate Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques 3 CUL103 Sanitation and Safety 3 CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary 3 CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques 6 Course Number and Title CUL121 Introduction to Baking CUL122 Introduction to Pastry CUL132 Management by Menu CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification Credits 3 6 3 3 Program Description From cakes to custards and meringues to macaroons. work coordination. and the preparation of stocks. safety management. the role of culinary education. Students develop their communication skills. starch cookery. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. Provincial regulations are addressed in terms of Food Safe. Prerequisite: None CUL121 Introduction to Baking (3 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts. the exacting. soups. Students receive a solid foundation that enhances their knowledge and skills in the kitchen. A highly creative yet technical specialization. meat and poultry are covered. glazes. sanitation. 30 credits . production. thickening agents. quick dough. and prepares them to seek entry-level positions within the baking and pastry industry. make decisions. They learn to present and assimilate information logically. Lectures teach organization skills in the kitchen and work coordination. glazes. regional desserts. and increase their professional performance.Academic Calendar teach organization skills in the kitchen. Prerequisite: None CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques (6 credits) The fundamental concepts. WHMIS. soups. lecture. demonstration and hands-on production to provide an introduction to pastry techniques for use in a commercial kitchen. improve interpersonal relationships. use available resources. cookie dough. Through hands-on experimentation and in-class instruction. and product finishing techniques. roasting. Lectures. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. This course gives a profile of the hospitality industry and intends to provide a sense of its scope. pie dough. frozen desserts. broth. students learn yeast-raised dough mixing methods. The Baking & Pastry Arts – Level I Program is ideal for culinary students and professionals who want to explore the opportunities that exist in the colourful and creative world of pastry and desserts. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course.

as well as the design. Methods and procedures for producing high quality specialty decorated cakes. Emphasis will be placed upon learning to mix. skills and techniques of European Cakes and Tortes. and supplies. Prerequisite: None Baking and Pastry Arts . plus selection and proper use and handling of various chocolates used in baking and decorating are introduced. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions. shape. preparations of pastry cream and finishing techniques. and evaluation to facilities design and layout. bake and store hand crafted breads. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery as well as an exploration of a wide realm of topics in the culinary arts. and teamwork required in the baking and pastry industry. To provide students with a broad background and create a more versatile employee. Topics such as the preparation of cakes.Certificate Course Listing Course Number and Title CUL202 European Cakes and Tortes CUL204 Advanced Patisserie and Display Cakes CUL207 Artisan Breads & Baking Production CUL212 Externship Credits 3 6 6 3 Course Number and Title Credits CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs 3 CUL252 Food and Beverage Management 3 CUL260 Chocolate. Students will focus on traditional fermentation. assembly. Prerequisite: None Page 99 The Art Institute of Vancouver . and Centrepieces 6 Program Description Baking and pastry arts professionals have a distinct knack for distinguishing all the subtle nuances of a dessert’s flavour. create profit and loss statements. Prerequisite: None CUL132 Management by Menu (3 credits) This course prepares future food service managers by giving a clear picture of the important role menu planning plays within operations.2 quarters . Students must pass a practical exam. batters. roll-in dough. co-ordination.e. Prerequisite: None CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification (3 credits) This course is a collaborative exploration of basic principles of purchasing food. ferment. and aroma. This exploration includes the fundamental concepts. source of operational information and a merchandising method for reaching patrons. supplier selection. and the ordering. Students learn assembly speed and increased their proficiency in meeting production deadlines with quality products. storing and issuing process. competition or banquet functions. regional desserts as well as classical and artisan bread baking techniques are taught. fillings. Lectures and demonstrations teach cake mixing methods. frozen desserts. Confections. Instruction regarding the preparation of basic cakes and icings. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. Prerequisite: None CUL204 Advanced Patisserie and Display Cakes (6 credits) This course explores the techniques of plated desserts and the theory behind building edible art for A la Carte service.7 courses . and techniques on finishing classical tortes with various ingredients such as marzipan. ganache and glazes. and decorating of wedding cakes will be introduced. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions.. receiving. product identification and weights and measures as applied to pastry. 30 credits . cake decoration.Academic Calendar . as well as the science of the ingredients. pastries. CUL202 European Cakes and Tortes (3 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts. Baking and pastry instruction is delivered through lecture and hands-on kitchen instruction with students developing competencies in breads. a planning tool. equipment. students are introduced to more advanced tools and techniques used by professional bakers and pastry chefs. pricing. buffet centrepieces. and show pieces. including the advantages and disadvantages of working in specific areas of the hospitality industry. In the Baking & Pastry Arts – Level II Program. Prerequisite: None CUL207 Artisan Breads & Baking Production (6 credits) This course provides the information. Students will benefit because good menu development is crucial to the success of any foodservice operation. chocolate. Emphasis is on developing the skills. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. Instruction in planning and controlling costs familiarizes students with the tools required to budget effectively.variety of dough. It covers topics ranging from menu development. filling. and glazes with an emphasis on formulas. Primary focus is on product identification.6 months . product identification. and weights and measures as applied to confections. desserts. and maintain sales and cost histories. students explore the concepts and theories of culinary techniques.Level II Available at the Granville campus. tools and instruction to gain proficiency in the preparation of a variety of artisan breads. appearance. i.

Prerequisite: CUL132 Management by Menu CUL252 Food and Beverage Management (3 credits) This course will give students a basic understanding of the management process in food and beverage operations. and Centrepieces (6 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts. Students gain experience needed to seek entrylevel positions in their field upon graduation. menus. safety. skills and techniques of chocolates and confections. service. This course is a supervised entry-level work experience in the restaurant/hospitality field requiring a minimum of 99 hours for culinary programs or 90 hours for baking and pastry of practical work. and teach the techniques required to anticipate what is to come. finances. Prerequisite: None Page 100 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Individual conferences and class attendance is required. The student will learn about pricing support systems. the fundamentals of purchasing. storing. including food-cost breakdown.CUL212 Externship (3 credits) The course has been designed to acquaint the student with actual working conditions in an approved restaurant/hospitality establishment. and the menu’s effect on planning and control is covered. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. Forms and suggestions for implementing effective cost control procedures are given. wine style. All aspects of food and beverage operations are covered. production. Prerequisite: None CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs (3 credits) This course helps the student appreciate the planning and control process in the restaurant service industry. This course will introduce the tools required to maintain sales and cost histories. Students are responsible for securing an externship job and may seek assistance through The Institute. service of wine and. Confections. marketing. including organization. wine storing. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions. Lectures and demonstrations teach chocolate tempering. The importance of budgeting and an accurate profit and loss statement are emphasized. issuing and production are covered. receiving. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. product identification and weights and measures as applied to confections. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL260 Chocolate. candy production and the rules that apply when creating centrepieces. develop systems for monitoring current activities.Academic Calendar . food wine matching.

improve interpersonal relationships. custards. and centrepieces. and cakes. and banquet functions. use available resources. starch cookery. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. In the Externship portion of the program. vegetable cookery.Baking and Pastry Arts Available at the Granville campus. This includes the fundamental concepts. Attention is focused on food borne illness and their origins. thickening agents. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. European cakes. the role of culinary education. and the preparation of stocks. tarts. and the advantages and disadvantages of working in specific areas of the hospitality industry. WHMIS. To provide students with a broad background and create a more versatile employee. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. confections. CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques (3 credits) The fundamental concepts. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. temperatures. cooking theories. and Work Safe BC. chocolates. Lectures teach organization skills in the kitchen and work coordination. and on basic safety procedures followed in the food service industry. students begin to refine their skills and explore the techniques of plated desserts and the theory behind building edible art for a-la-carte service. They learn to present and assimilate information logically. Prerequisite: None CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary (3 credits) “Dimensions of Culinary” is a course that introduces students to a wide realm of topics in the culinary arts and culinary education. 60 credits -15 courses -12 months . Prerequisite: None CUL103 Sanitation and Safety (3 credits) This course introduces food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. and other fillings.4 quarters . braising and frying. Practical training covers the basics of fine dessert and pastry making. Students also study – through hands-on training – the creation of wedding cakes. hand-skills. Baking & Pastry Arts students receive instruction in the concepts and theories of culinary techniques. product identification. as well as methods for making mousses. and creative finishing techniques. Pastry curriculum introduces classic creams. make decisions. Provincial regulations are addressed in terms of Food Safe. glazes. This course gives a profile of the hospitality industry and intends to provide a sense of its scope. homebaked bread. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. Instruction in purchasing. skills. Students are also acquainted with creative decorating and plating techniques. and techniques involved in basic cookery. Students also learn to create hearth and artisan breads and to produce and deliver assorted bread products to the school’s various outlets on a daily basis – much like a true working bake shop. and Centrepieces 6 Program Description Whether it is an insatiable sweet tooth or a love of warm. develop effective study habits. as well as an exploration of a wide realm of topics in the culinary arts including the advantages and disadvantages of working in specific areas of the hospitality industry.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques 3 CUL103 Sanitation and Safety 3 CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary 3 CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques 6 CUL121 Introduction to Baking 3 CUL122 Introduction to Pastry 6 CUL132 Management by Menu 3 CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification 3 Course Number and Title Credits CUL202 European Cakes and Tortes 3 CUL204 Advanced Patisserie and Display Cakes 6 CUL207 Artisan Breads & Baking Production 6 CUL212 Externship 3 CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs 3 CUL252 Food and Beverage Management 3 CUL260 Chocolate. soups. broth. poaching. and soups.Academic Calendar . the experience required to pursue particular opportunities. meat and poultry are covered. all students in the Baking & Pastry Arts Program at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver share a passion for the pastry and desserts field. The primary issues of concern to students are: career opportunities. Baking curriculum explores methods for the preparation of yeast and sweet dough products and students learn the importance of weights and measures. Students develop their communication skills. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. and in the planning and control process of the restaurant service industry provides essential knowledge about the business side of a career in the culinary arts. competition. and increase their professional performance. students work in positions in commercial food service and hospitality establishments approved by The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver. The basics of stocks. Building on the basics learned in the first two quarters of the program. roasting. Confections. tortes. sauces. Prerequisite: None Page 101 The Art Institute of Vancouver .

poaching. Lectures and demonstrations teach chocolate tempering. source of operational information and a merchandising method for reaching patrons. wine storing. Emphasis will be placed upon learning to mix. and product finishing techniques. supplier selection. marketing. competition or banquet functions. service of wine and. roasting. equipment. and supplies. and the menu’s effect on planning and control is covered. and Centrepieces (6 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. The basics of vegetable cookery. Prerequisite: None CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs (3 credits) This course helps the student appreciate the planning and control process in the restaurant service industry. product identification and weights and measures as applied to pastry. fillings. production. pie dough. pricing. Students must pass a practical exam. work coordination. The student will learn about pricing support systems. cookie dough. issuing and production are covered. tools and instruction to gain proficiency in the preparation of a variety of artisan breads. plus selection and proper use and handling of various chocolates used in baking and decorating are introduced. Students learn a variety of dough.Academic Calendar . quick dough. starch cookery. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. Instruction regarding the preparation of basic cakes and icings.e. food wine matching. broth. and knife skills. shape. product identification and weights and measures as applied to baking. and techniques on finishing classical tortes with various ingredients such as marzipan. skills and techniques of European Cakes and Tortes. and decorating of wedding cakes will be introduced. Prerequisite: None CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification (3 credits) This course is a collaborative exploration of basic principles of purchasing food. the fundamentals of purchasing. assembly. ferment. Students will focus on traditional fermentation. This course will introduce the tools required to maintain sales and cost histories. It covers topics ranging from menu development.. including organization. production. Prerequisite: None CUL207 Artisan Breads & Baking Production ( 6 credits) This course provides the information. glazes. and teach the techniques required to anticipate what is to come. demonstration and hands-on production to provide an introduction to pastry techniques for use in a commercial kitchen. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions. meat and poultry are covered. Students must pass a practical exam. and the preparation of stocks. Methods and procedures for producing high quality specialty decorated cakes. Prerequisite: None Page 102 The Art Institute of Vancouver . storing and issuing process. Prerequisite: None CUL121 Introduction to Baking (3 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts. a planning tool. cooking theories. Prerequisite: None CUL202 European Cakes and Tortes (3 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts. candy production and the rules that apply when creating centrepieces. Forms and suggestions for implementing effective cost control procedures are given. safety. The importance of budgeting and an accurate profit and loss statement are emphasized. product identification and weights and measures as applied to confections. Prerequisite: None CUL204 Advanced Patisserie and Display Cakes (6 credits) This course explores the techniques of plated desserts and the theory behind building edible art for A la Carte service. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. as well as the design. as well as the science of the ingredients. Lectures and demonstrations teach organization skills in the kitchen. batters. lecture.CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques (6 credits) The fundamental concepts. This course is a supervised entry-level work experience in the restaurant/hospitality field requiring a minimum of 99 hours for culinary programs or 90 hours for baking and pastry of practical work. soups. menus. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL260 Chocolate. thickening agents. and evaluation to facilities design and layout. bake and store hand crafted breads. Primary focus is on product identification. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. Prerequisite: None CUL212 Externship (3 credits) The course has been designed to acquaint the student with actual working conditions in an approved restaurant/hospitality establishment. Students will benefit because good menu development is crucial to the success of any foodservice operation. Individual conferences and class attendance is required. tasting and testing. skills and techniques of chocolates and confections. Students must successfully pass a practical cooking examination covering a variety of cooking techniques. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. braising and frying. service. receiving. Lectures. receiving. Confections. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions. develop systems for monitoring current activities. Students gain experience needed to seek entrylevel positions in their field upon graduation. and glazes with an emphasis on formulas. wine style. and the ordering. filling. i. Students are responsible for securing an externship job and may seek assistance through The Institute. finances. Students learn assembly speed and increased their proficiency in meeting production deadlines with quality products. Lectures and demonstrations teach cake mixing methods. Prerequisite: CUL132 Management by Menu CUL252 Food and Beverage Management (3 credits) This course will give students a basic understanding of the management process in food and beverage operations. All aspects of food and beverage operations are covered. roll-in dough. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. Prerequisite: None CUL132 Management by Menu (3 credits) This course prepares future food service managers by giving a clear picture of the important role menu planning plays within operations. storing. ganache and glazes. demonstrations. students learn yeast-raised dough mixing methods. skills and techniques of baking. including food-cost breakdown. preparations of pastry cream and finishing techniques. Prerequisite: None CUL122 Introduction to Pastry (6 credits) This course is a combination of theory.

line cook. WHMIS. preparation. from kitchen operation and nutrition to knife skills and hygiene. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques Page 103 . skills. the experience required to pursue particular opportunities. starch cookery. sauces. plate presentation. regional. roasting. the role of culinary education. cooking theories. meat and poultry are covered. and presentation. taste. The basics of stocks.2 quarters . use available resources. roasting. Lectures teach organization skills in the kitchen and work coordination.6 months . Lectures and demonstrations The Art Institute of Vancouver .Level I Available at the Granville campus. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. poaching. soups. The concepts of mise en place. Successful completion of the program prepares graduates to seek entry-level jobs such as prep cook. none is required. They learn to present and assimilate information logically. Students must successfully pass a practical cooking examination covering a variety of cooking techniques. Attention is focused on food borne illness and their origins. roasting. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. cooking theories. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. work coordination. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. braising and frying.Certificate Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques 3 CUL103 Sanitation and Safety 3 CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary 3 CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques 6 Course Number and Title CUL111 North American Regional Cuisine CUL121 Introduction to Baking CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification CUL247 World Cuisine Credits 6 3 3 3 Program Description Poaching. Timing and organization skills are emphasized. and the preparation of stocks. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. make decisions. glazes. time-lines. Curriculum is broad and addresses the fundamental concepts. through lectures and practical use. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. meat and poultry are covered. braising. and the preparation of stocks. improve interpersonal relationships. Prerequisite: None CUL111 North American Regional Cuisine (6 credits) The course reinforces the knowledge and skill learned in the preceding classes and helps students build confidence in the techniques of basic cookery. and knife skills. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. thickening agents. students prepare. and the advantages and disadvantages of working in specific areas of the hospitality industry. or combined with Culinary Arts – Level II as a requirement of the Culinary Arts Diploma Program. and techniques involved in basic cookery. The basics of vegetable cookery. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. This course gives a profile of the hospitality industry and intends to provide a sense of its scope. soups. and evaluate a wide range of dishes to provide them with insight into the scope of the culinary world. 30 credits . CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques (3 credits) The fundamental concepts. Provincial regulations are addressed in terms of Food Safe.Culinary Arts . the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. The development of knife skills is accented. North American Regional cuisine explores the use of indigenous ingredients in the preparation of traditional and contemporary American specialties. Prerequisite: None CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary (3 credits) “Dimensions of Culinary” is a course that introduces students to a wide realm of topics in the culinary arts and culinary education.8 courses . Training covers a diverse range of topics. vegetable cookery. starch cookery. and soups.Academic Calendar teach organization skills in the kitchen. glazes. Over two quarters. they learn about modern. ingredients. thickening agents. and first cook. of how to build a career from the ground-up. and frying: Do these words stimulate more than just make your mouth water? Do they get you wondering how Chefs prepare delicious meals or balance the workload of a busy kitchen? The Culinary Arts – Level I Certificate Program at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver is ideal for anyone wishing to explore the career options available to them in the world of culinary arts. As students progress through the program. Prerequisite: None CUL103 Sanitation and Safety (3 credits) This course introduces food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. and increase their professional performance. broth. broth. Our Chef instructors combine classical principles and modern techniques and trends in both the classroom and the kitchen portions of the program. The primary issues of concern to students are: career opportunities. Students develop their communication skills. Rigorous hand-on kitchen work familiarizes students with cooking techniques. and Work Safe BC. poaching. Students are grounded in the basics and given a clear picture. and teamwork in a production setting are introduced and accentuated. develop effective study habits. Where no course prerequisite is provided. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. braising and frying. Culinary Arts – Level I can be taken independently as a Certificate program. serve. and on basic safety procedures followed in the food service industry. cooking theories. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. Prerequisite: None CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques (6 credits) The fundamental concepts. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. and classical cuisines and practice making their own culinary creations in our instructional kitchens.

CUL121 Introduction to Baking (3 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts, skills and techniques of baking. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions, product identification and weights and measures as applied to baking. Lectures, demonstrations, production, tasting and testing, students learn yeast-raised dough mixing methods, pie dough, quick dough, cookie dough, and product finishing techniques. Students must pass a practical exam. Prerequisite: None

CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification (3 credits) This course is a collaborative exploration of basic principles of purchasing food, equipment, and supplies. Primary focus is on product identification, supplier selection, and the ordering, receiving, storing and issuing process. Prerequisite: None

CUL247 World Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected world cuisines. Students prepare, taste, serve and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of Scandinavia, Russia, Switzerland, European and the Mediterranean as well as North Africa, Central and South America. Importance will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparation and techniques representative of these countries. Prerequisite: None

Culinary Arts - Level II
Available at the Granville campus. 30 credits - 7 courses - 6 months - 2 quarters - Certificate

Course Listing
Course Number and Title CUL122 Introduction to Pastry CUL132 Management by Menu CUL212 Externship CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs Credits 6 3 3 3 Course Number and Title CUL244 Asian Cuisine CUL252 Food and Beverage Management CUL261 A la Carte Kitchen Credits 3 3 9

Program Description

Few occupations offer the creativity, excitement, and growth found in the culinary arts. With dining out gaining popularity as a recreational activity, the food service industry is expanding at a rapid rate. The expectations of consumers are rising accordingly and demands are being placed upon the industry to respond to increasing needs for service, quality, nutrition, and diversity of product and flavour. Building upon the knowledge gained in the Culinary Arts – Level I Program, students acquire more advanced skills that will help them meet the challenges and demands of this dynamic industry. Our Chef instructors help students expand on their basic cookery skills by teaching the principles behind menu development, cost control, pricing, professional standards of performance, guest relations, and communication skills. As always, students continually return to the kitchen to practice new techniques. At this level of the program, students receive an introduction to the pastry arts, where they learn the basics of fine dessert and

pastrymaking. These skills are then complemented by instruction in creative decoration and plating skills. Specialized instruction is also given in Asian cuisine, where emphasis placed on India, the four regions of China, Japan, Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines, and Indonesia. As part of the practical training received in this program, students work in the student-run, 40-seat Culinaria Restaurant, where they learn to prepare modern and regional North American cuisine, and rotate working in the various positions (both front and back of house) found in any top-end restaurant. In the Externship portion of the program, students work in positions in commercial food service and hospitality establishments approved by The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Graduates of the Culinary Arts – Level II Program are prepared to seek employment in entry-level positions in the food service industry, such as prep cook, short-order cook, and line cook.

Course Descriptions

Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. CUL122 Introduction to Pastry (6 credits) This course is a combination of theory, lecture, demonstration and hands-on production to provide an introduction to pastry techniques for use in a commercial kitchen. Students learn a variety of dough, batters, fillings, and glazes with an emphasis on formulas. Instruction regarding the preparation of basic cakes and icings, roll-in dough, preparations of pastry cream and
Page 104

finishing techniques; plus selection and proper use and handling of various chocolates used in baking and decorating are introduced. Students must pass a practical exam. Prerequisite: None CUL132 Management by Menu (3 credits) This course prepares future food service managers by giving a clear picture of the important
The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

role menu planning plays within operations. It covers topics ranging from menu development, pricing, and evaluation to facilities design and layout. Students will benefit because good menu development is crucial to the success of any foodservice operation, i.e., a planning tool, source of operational information and a merchandising method for reaching patrons. Prerequisite: None

CUL212 Externship (3 credits) The course has been designed to acquaint the student with actual working conditions in an approved restaurant/hospitality establishment. This course is a supervised entry-level work experience in the restaurant/hospitality field requiring a minimum of 99 hours for culinary programs or 90 hours for baking and pastry of practical work. Individual conferences and class attendance is required. Students are responsible for securing an externship job and may seek assistance through The Institute. Students gain experience needed to seek entrylevel positions in their field upon graduation. Prerequisite: None CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs (3 credits) This course helps the student appreciate the planning and control process in the restaurant service industry. This course will introduce the tools required to maintain sales and cost histories, develop systems for monitoring current activities, and teach the techniques required to anticipate what is to come. The student will learn about pricing support systems, including food-cost breakdown, the fundamentals of purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing and production are covered. The importance of budgeting and an accurate profit and loss statement are emphasized. Forms and suggestions for implementing effective cost control procedures are given, and the menu’s effect on planning and control is covered. Prerequisite: CUL132 Management by Menu CUL244 Asian Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected Asian cuisines. Students prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of various countries. Importance will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques representative of these cuisines. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques, CUL103 Sanitation and Safety, and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL252 Food and Beverage Management (3 credits) This course will give students a basic understanding of the management process in food and beverage operations. All aspects of food and beverage operations are covered, including organization, marketing, menus, production, service, safety, finances, wine style, wine storing, service of wine and, food wine matching. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques, CUL103 Sanitation and Safety, and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL261 A la Carte Kitchen (9 credits) Introduces students to the A La Carte kitchen, emphasis is on “a la minute” method of food preparation, plus dining room service standards. Industry terminology, correct application of culinary skills, plate presentation, organization and timing in producing items off both a fixed-price menu and a la carte menu are stressed. The principles of dining room service are practiced and emphasized. The philosophy of food are further explored and examined in light of today’s understanding of food, nutrition and presentation. Prerequisite: None
The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar Page 105

Culinary Arts
Available at the Granville campus. 60 credits -15 courses -12 months - 4 quarters - Diploma

Course Listing
Course Number and Title Credits CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques 3 CUL103 Sanitation and Safety 3 CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary 3 CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques 6 CUL111 North American Regional Cuisine 6 CUL121 Introduction to Baking 3 CUL122 Introduction to Pastry 6 CUL132 Management by Menu 3 Course Number and Title CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification CUL212 Externship CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs CUL244 Asian Cuisine CUL247 World Cuisine CUL252 Food and Beverage Management CUL261 A la Carte Kitchen Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 9

Program Description

The mission of the Culinary Arts Diploma Program is to provide an environment for students to become learners possessing the skills, knowledge, creativity, and ethical values necessary to survive and flourish in the rapidly-changing culinary, restaurant and catering professions. Experienced industry professionals impart their knowledge and up-to-date technical acumen to their students, and curriculum relies heavily on actual participation in projects that are practical and technical in scope. Throughout this four-quarter program, students learn the business aspects of culinary arts along with intensive practical hands-on training. Instruction begins with an introduction to culinary skills, which outlines the fundamental concepts, skills and techniques involved in basic cookery. Students simultaneously learn the concepts and theories of culinary techniques, as well as food and environmental sanitation and safety. By the end of the first quarter students possess a well-rounded knowledge of the hospitality industry and an increased awareness of the various opportunities available in the culinary world.

As the course progresses, students continue to hone their skills in a production setting and build their confidence in the techniques explored in the first quarter. The development of knife skills is accented, and students begin to learn the specifics of ingredient functions, weights and measures, mise en place, timelines, plate presentation, and team work. An introduction to both baking and pastry is incorporated in the curriculum and students prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate International, Asian and North American regional cuisine. Instruction in food and beverage operations management culminates in the production of a complete dining room and bar operation manual. During the fourth and final quarter of the program, students combine all the critical skills they have acquired and apply it to the development of a complete business plan for a minimum 100-seat restaurant. They are then prepared to embark on an externship in the industry to gain real world experience.

Course Descriptions

Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques (3 credits) The fundamental concepts, skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients, cooking theories, and the preparation of stocks, broth, glazes, and soups, thickening agents, the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. Lectures teach organization skills in the kitchen and work coordination. The basics of stocks, soups, sauces, vegetable cookery, starch cookery, meat and poultry are covered. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing, roasting, poaching, braising and frying. Prerequisite: None CUL103 Sanitation and Safety (3 credits) This course introduces food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. Attention is focused on food borne illness and their origins, and on basic safety procedures followed in the food service industry. Provincial regulations are addressed in terms of Food Safe, WHMIS, and Work Safe BC. Prerequisite: None CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary (3 credits) “Dimensions of Culinary” is a course that introduces students to a wide realm of topics in the culinary arts and culinary education. Students develop their communication skills. They learn to present and assimilate information logically, make decisions, develop effective study habits, use available resources, improve interpersonal relationships, and increase their professional performance. This course gives a profile of the hospitality industry and intends to provide a sense of its scope. The primary issues of concern to students are: career opportunities, the role of culinary education, the experience required to pursue particular opportunities, and the advantages and disadvantages of working in specific areas of the hospitality industry. Prerequisite: None

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The Art Institute of Vancouver - Academic Calendar

skills and techniques of baking. pie dough. Central and South America. develop systems for monitoring current activities. correct application of culinary skills. service. Forms and suggestions for implementing effective cost control procedures are given. cooking theories. finances. regional dishes of various countries. taste. The student will learn about pricing support systems. and the ordering. Switzerland. Prerequisite: None CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification (3 credits) This course is a collaborative exploration of basic principles of purchasing food. Russia. the fundamentals of purchasing. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. a planning tool. Prerequisite: None CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs (3 credits) This course helps the student appreciate the planning and control process in the restaurant service industry. poaching. including food-cost breakdown. Prerequisite: None CUL122 Introduction to Pastry (6 credits) This course is a combination of theory. soups. thickening agents. Prerequisite: CUL132 Management by Menu CUL244 Asian Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected Asian cuisines. European and the Mediterranean as well as North Africa. Students prepare. and techniques representative of these cuisines.. Timing and organization skills are emphasized. demonstrations. Importance will be placed on ingredients. Primary focus is on product identification. glazes. Students must pass a practical exam. and glazes with an emphasis on formulas. menus. storing and issuing process. flavor profiles.CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques (6 credits) The fundamental concepts. regional dishes of Scandinavia. preparations of pastry cream and finishing techniques. The philosophy of food are further explored and examined in light of today’s understanding of food. quick dough. Importance will be placed on ingredients. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. organization and timing in producing items off both a fixed-price menu and a la carte menu are stressed. receiving. wine storing. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. Prerequisite: None The Art Institute of Vancouver . Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions. Students must pass a practical exam. plus dining room service standards. All aspects of food and beverage operations are covered. and evaluation to facilities design and layout. time-lines. The basics of vegetable cookery. Instruction regarding the preparation of basic cakes and icings. preparation and techniques representative of these countries.Academic Calendar Page 107 . Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. Industry terminology. Students will benefit because good menu development is crucial to the success of any foodservice operation. product identification and weights and measures as applied to baking. and knife skills. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. supplier selection. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. tasting and testing. plus selection and proper use and handling of various choco lates used in baking and decorating are introduced. production. safety. cookie dough. marketing. The concepts of mise en place. Prerequisite: None CUL212 Externship (3 credits) The course has been designed to acquaint the student with actual working conditions in an approved restaurant/hospitality establishment. nutrition and presentation. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL252 Food and Beverage Management (3 credits) This course will give students a basic understanding of the management process in food and beverage operations. taste. roll-in dough. food wine matching. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL121 Introduction to Baking (3 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts. broth. and product finishing techniques. Students gain experience needed to seek entrylevel positions in their field upon graduation. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL261 A la Carte Kitchen (9 credits) Introduces students to the A La Carte kitchen. flavor profiles. work coordination. and evaluate traditional. and teamwork in a production setting are introduced and accentuated. The principles of dining room service are practiced and emphasized. emphasis is on “a la minute” method of food preparation. students learn yeast-raised dough mixing methods. issuing and production are covered. source of operational information and a merchandising method for reaching patrons. fillings. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. The importance of budgeting and an accurate profit and loss statement are emphasized. serve and evaluate traditional. including organization. preparations.e. Students learn a variety of dough. batters. and the preparation of stocks. This course will introduce the tools required to maintain sales and cost histories. roasting. wine style. This course is a supervised entry-level work experience in the restaurant/hospitality field requiring a minimum of 99 hours for culinary programs or 90 hours for baking and pastry of practical work. pricing. lecture. and teach the techniques required to anticipate what is to come. Students prepare. serve. Individual conferences and class attendance is required. Lectures. plate presentation. The development of knife skills is accented. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL247 World Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected world cuisines. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. It covers topics ranging from menu development. and the menu’s effect on planning and control is covered. Prerequisite: None CUL111 North American Regional Cuisine (6 credits) The course reinforces the knowledge and skill learned in the preceding classes and helps students build confidence in the techniques of basic cookery. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. storing. plate presentation. service of wine and. receiving. meat and poultry are covered. braising and frying. Students must successfully pass a practical cooking examination covering a variety of cooking techniques. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. and supplies. Prerequisite: None CUL132 Management by Menu (3 credits) This course prepares future food service managers by giving a clear picture of the important role menu planning plays within operations. Students are responsible for securing an externship job and may seek assistance through The Institute. starch cookery. production. demonstration and hands-on production to provide an introduction to pastry techniques for use in a commercial kitchen. equipment. North American Regional cuisine explores the use of indigenous ingredients in the preparation of traditional and contemporary American specialties. i. Lectures and demonstrations teach organization skills in the kitchen.

As they hone their skills and gain a solid foundation in the culinary and baking and pastry arts. and catering and banquet operations are also covered and students learn to celebrate the culinary styles. cater special events. beverage management. 90 credits .Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques 3 CUL103 Sanitation and Safety 3 CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary 3 CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques 6 CUL111 North American Regional Cuisine 6 CUL121 Introduction to Baking 3 CUL122 Introduction to Pastry 6 CUL132 Management by Menu 3 CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification 3 CUL201 Garde Manger 6 CUL212 Externship 3 CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs 3 CUL244 Asian Cuisine 3 Course Number and Title CUL246 Classical European Cuisine CUL247 World Cuisine CUL252 Food and Beverage Management CUL261 A la Carte Kitchen CUL271 Art Culinaire CUL272 Capstone RCM241 Marketing for the Hospitality Industry RCM262 Catering and Banquet Operations RCM263 Hospitality and Human Resources Management RCM264 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry Credits 3 3 3 9 6 3 3 3 3 3 Program Description Top professionals in the culinary arts do more than just cook. and chefs who are currently in the industry spotlight. the ultimate goal is to own their own restaurant – to create a place that reflects their culinary passions and lets them share their style and personal panache with the world. customer service.Academic Calendar . They manage restaurants. The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver offers the Culinary Arts & Restaurant Ownership Advanced Diploma Program. The program begins with basic culinary skills and progresses to advanced food techniques. and more. technology.Culinary Arts & Restaurant Ownership Available at the Granville campus. Successful graduates leave with a solid understanding of how to establish effective communication between all restaurant staff. 40-seat Culinaria Restaurant. During the hands-on production. For many however. students combine all the critical skills they have acquired in the program to the development of a complete business plan for a minimum 100-seat restaurant. and rotate working in the various positions (both front and back of house) found in any top-end restaurant. and North American regional cuisine help round-out the student’s knowledge of the culinary world. as well as the skills and techniques of baking and pastry arts. As part of the practical training received in the program. They receive training in management. accounting and financial management. International. The Art Institute of Vancouver . Classical French. legal issues. and presentation. offer personal chef services. human resources. Management by menu.23 courses .18 months . restaurants. where they learn to prepare modern and regional North American cuisine. and have the necessary building blocks to start constructing a life-long career in the culinary arts. Asian. garnishing. During the sixth and final quarter of the program.6 quarters . For these individuals. students move on to develop managerial and leadership skills. business Page 108 communications. students are exposed to specialty products and produce. students work in the studentrun. marketing. garde manger. and global management and operations as they relate to the food service industry.

It covers topics ranging from menu development. Students are introduced to and prepare cold hors d’oeuvres. and evaluation to facilities design and layout. time-lines. and product finishing techniques. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL121 Introduction to Baking (3 credits) Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts. Students learn a variety of dough. fillings. glazes. Prerequisite: None CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary (3 credits) “Dimensions of Culinary” is a course that introduces students to a wide realm of topics in the culinary arts and culinary education..Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. and the ordering. starch cookery. Primary focus is on product identification. and the preparation of stocks. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. storing and issuing process. the role of culinary education. starch cookery. Attention is focused on food borne illness and their origins. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. tasting and testing. cooking theories. and teamwork in a production setting are introduced and accentuated. supplier selection. receiving. sauces. improve interpersonal relationships. demonstrations. batters. plate presentation. broth. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. thickening agents. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. Prerequisite: None CUL103 Sanitation and Safety (3 credits) This course introduces food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. a planning tool. Reception foods and buffet arrangements are introduced. WHMIS. cooking theories. equipment and responsibilities of the “cold kitchen”. They learn to present and assimilate information logically. and the preparation of stocks. Provincial regulations are addressed in terms of Food Safe. meat and poultry are covered. product identification and weights and measures as applied to baking. glazes. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. The development of knife skills is accented. and increase their professional performance. sandwiches. Prerequisites: CUL103 Sanitation and Safety and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques The Art Institute of Vancouver . CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques (3 credits) The fundamental concepts. students learn yeast-raised dough mixing methods. The basics of vegetable cookery.Academic Calendar Page 109 . use available resources. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. Lectures teach organization skills in the kitchen and work coordination. braising and frying. as well as basic charcuterie items while focusing on the total utilization of product. Prerequisite: None CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification (3 credits) This course is a collaborative exploration of basic principles of purchasing food. Prerequisite: None CUL132 Management by Menu (3 credits) This course prepares future food service managers by giving a clear picture of the important role menu planning plays within operations. Students must successfully pass a practical cooking examination covering a variety of cooking techniques. plus selection and proper use and handling of various chocolates used in baking and decorating are introduced. braising and frying.e. The primary issues of concern to students are: career opportunities. lecture. and soups. Students will benefit because good menu development is crucial to the success of any foodservice operation. and the advantages and disadvantages of working in specific areas of the hospitality industry. equipment. The concepts of mise en place. poaching. Prerequisite: None CUL111 North American Regional Cuisine (6 credits) The course reinforces the knowledge and skill learned in the preceding classes and helps students build confidence in the techniques of basic cookery. source of operational information and a merchandising method for reaching patrons. and Work Safe BC. Special significance is placed on the study of ingredient functions. North American Regional cuisine explores the use of indigenous ingredients in the preparation of traditional and contemporary American specialties. soups. Instruction regarding the preparation of basic cakes and icings. develop effective study habits. Lectures. cookie dough. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. roasting. The basics of stocks. Prerequisite: None CUL201 Garde Manger (6 credits) This course provides students with skills and knowledge of the organization. work coordination. and on basic safety procedures followed in the food service industry. Prerequisite: None CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques (6 credits) The fundamental concepts. vegetable cookery. Students must pass a practical exam. This course gives a profile of the hospitality industry and intends to provide a sense of its scope. roasting. pie dough. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. Lectures and demonstrations teach organization skills in the kitchen. and knife skills. Prerequisite: None CUL122 Introduction to Pastry (6 credits) This course is a combination of theory. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. roll-in dough. Students must pass a practical exam. quick dough. demonstration and hands-on production to provide an introduction to pastry techniques for use in a commercial kitchen. soups. i. and supplies. make decisions. salads. and glazes with an emphasis on formulas. the experience required to pursue particular opportunities. Students develop their communication skills. pricing. preparations of pastry cream and finishing techniques. thickening agents. poaching. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. skills and techniques of baking. meat and poultry are covered. broth. production. Timing and organization skills are emphasized. Students must pass a written and practical exam.

Students prepare. All aspects of food and beverage operations are covered. Switzerland. The course is designed to allow the student to prepare and present an original and organized business plan. marketing. Students also discuss topics such as contracts. consumer behavior. consumer orientation. regional dishes of Scandinavia. substance and quality will be discussed and examined. promotion planning. preparations. organization and timing in producing items off both a fixed-price menu and a la carte menu are stressed. Russia.CUL212 Externship (3 credits) The course has been designed to acquaint the student with actual working conditions in an approved restaurant/hospitality establishment. taste. Italy. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL272 Capstone (3 credits) Through the competencies developed in previous related studies. Prerequisite: None CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs (3 credits) This course helps the student appreciate the planning and control process in the restaurant service industry. The importance of budgeting and an accurate profit and loss statement are emphasized. taste. issuing and production are covered. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. Business related competencies are reviewed and tutored as necessary for completion of the project. flavor profiles. regional dishes of various countries. food wine matching. The course focuses on understanding the catering’s role within the hospitality industry and the various catering disciplines. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. serve. special events and sales in the hospitality industry. legal considerations. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL261 A la Carte Kitchen (9 credits) Introduces students to the A La Carte kitchen. Prerequisite: None CUL247 World Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected world cuisines. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL246 Classical European Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected Classical European Cuisines. Students prepare. employee safety. and Germany. the students develop a working knowledge of the current theories. safety. The philosophy of food are further explored and examined in light of today’s understanding of food. Forms and suggestions for implementing effective cost control procedures are given. This course is a supervised entry-level work experience in the restaurant/hospitality field requiring a minimum of 99 hours for culinary programs or 90 hours for baking and pastry of practical work. Topics include budgeting. investment analysis. Importance will be placed on ingredients. and competitor analysis. and evaluate traditional. issues and challenges involved with financial management. menus. plate presentation. and sanitation. market research. Students gain experience needed to seek entrylevel positions in their field upon graduation. Students prepare. Prerequisite: None RCM263 Hospitality and Human Resources Management (3 credits) This course introduces the principles and practices of human resources management relevant to hospitality organizations. Students are responsible for securing an externship job and may seek assistance through The Institute. plus dining room service standards. Their style. Prerequisite: CUL132 Management by Menu CUL244 Asian Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected Asian cuisines. and the menu’s effect on planning and control is covered. product planning. including food-cost breakdown. restaurants. regional dishes of British Isles. service. students will have the opportunity to be exposed to specialty produce and products. borrowing funds. European and the Mediterranean as well as North Africa. compensation and benefits administration. flavor profiles. Importance will be placed on ingredients. Students are introduced to the tools and skills that financial managers use in effective decision making. Design and delivery of marketing components for a hospitality business will be covered. France. and Scandinavia countries. Individual conferences and class attendance is required. The principles of dining room service are practiced and emphasized. This course will cover application of basic marketing concepts and research methods. Prerequisite: None RCM241 Marketing for the Hospitality Industry (3 credits) This course is an introduction to service marketing as applied to the Hospitality Industry. Switzerland. correct application of culinary skills. Topics included but not limited to: unique attributes of service marketing. including organization. diversity and ethics. checklists. The student will learn about pricing support systems. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. This course will introduce the tools required to maintain sales and cost histories. and teach the techniques required to anticipate what is to come. workforce management. cash management. and financial forecasting.Academic Calendar . storing. wine style. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL252 Food and Beverage Management (3 credits) This course will give students a basic understanding of the management process in food and beverage operations. students will develop a complete business plan for a one hundred seat restaurant. target marketing. production. taste. develop systems for monitoring current activities. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. and techniques representative of these cuisines. Prerequisite: None CUL271 Art Culinaire (6 credits) This course will celebrate the culinary styles. nutrition and presentation. Industry terminology. Prerequisite: None RCM264 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry (3 credits) In this course. Austria. Prerequisite: None RCM262 Catering and Banquet Operations (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of catering. Importance will be placed on ingredients. This course is project driven which requires significant creative and independent work. market segmentation principles. preparation and techniques representative of these countries. service of wine and. restaurateur and chefs who are in the current industry spotlight. wine storing. with emphasis on the entry-level manager’s role. serve. serve and evaluate traditional. and evaluate traditional. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. cost concepts and behavior. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. food production. and techniques representative of these cuisines. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. the fundamentals of purchasing. Topics covered will include employment laws. labor unions. Prerequisite: None Page 110 The Art Institute of Vancouver . preparations. Central and South America. receiving. emphasis is on “a la minute” method of food preparation. finances. flavor profiles. staffing and training. During the hands–on production aspect of the class. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety.

This course will cover application of basic marketing concepts and research methods. market research. France. a restaurant entrepreneur handles hundreds of varied yet critically important tasks every day. and foodservice industry knowledge. how to maximize value for owners and investors. During the second quarter of the program. Prerequisites: CUL103 Sanitation and Safety and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL246 Classical European Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected Classical European Cuisines. but want to understand the foodservice industry from the inside out. product planning. salads. Switzerland. Importance will be placed on ingredients. Topics included but not limited to: unique attributes of service marketing. and evaluate traditional. and sanitation. From overseeing food quality and to dealing with customers. serve. in the Entrepreneurship & Restaurant Ownership Program at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver. are ideal candidates for this program. and how to use analytical techniques to make informed business decisions. special events and sales in the hospitality industry. market segmentation principles. sandwiches. This course is project driven which requires significant creative and independent work. Students are introduced to and prepare cold hors d’oeuvres. Students also discuss topics such as contracts. students combine all the critical skills they have acquired in the program to the development of a complete business plan for a minimum 100-seat restaurant. Successful graduates demonstrate practical. technology. During the hands–on production aspect of the class. Curriculum focuses on financial management and understanding the various market segments and demands that affect a restaurant’s profit margins. consumer behavior. Either way. as well as basic charcuterie items while focusing on the total utilization of product. marketing. human resources. CUL201 Garde Manger (6 credits) This course provides students with skills and knowledge of the organization. restaurants. restaurateur and chefs who are in the current industry spotlight. checklists. substance and quality will be discussed and examined. Students learn to work with proven marketing strategies.Entrepreneurship & Restaurant Ownership Available at the Granville campus. accounting. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. students will have the opportunity to be exposed to specialty produce and products. you have the opportunity to become competent in the identified priorities of the foodservice industry: communication. The course is designed to allow the student to prepare and present an original and organized business plan. The ability to make decisions quickly often determines their ultimate success or failure. staffing and training. Design and delivery of marketing components for a hospitality business will be covered. taste. analytical. Business related competencies are reviewed and tutored as necessary for completion of the project. Students prepare. and competitor analysis. leadership. regional dishes of British Isles. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. Their style. and techniques representative of these cuisines. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL272 Capstone (3 credits) Through the competencies developed in previous related studies. management.8 courses . students will develop a complete business plan for a one hundred seat restaurant. and Germany. equipment and responsibilities of the “cold kitchen”.6 months . Prerequisite: None Page 111 The Art Institute of Vancouver .Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title CUL201 Garde Manger CUL246 Classical European Cuisine CUL271 Art Culinaire CUL272 Capstone RCM241 Marketing for the Hospitality Industry Credits 6 3 6 3 3 Course Number and Title RCM262 Catering and Banquet Operations RCM263 Hospitality and Human Resources Management RCM264 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry Credits 3 3 3 Program Description Maybe you think you have what it takes to manage a dining room operation or run a bustling kitchen. Prerequisite: None CUL271 Art Culinaire (6 credits) This course will celebrate the culinary styles. The course focuses on understanding the catering’s role within the hospitality industry and the various catering disciplines. Prerequisite: None RCM262 Catering and Banquet Operations (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of catering. which builds upon foundation culinary skills and techniques. and customer relations. consumer orientation. legal considerations. Austria. to making staffing decisions. flavor profiles. or those with equivalent training or industry experience. training. Students must pass a written and practical exam. Italy. Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. Reception foods and buffet arrangements are introduced.Academic Calendar . Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. Or perhaps you have always wanted to own a top restaurant. and Scandinavia countries. preparations. target marketing. and technical abilities to potential employers. but you want to get the right training before you make the leap. 30 credits . food production. promotion planning. Prerequisite: None RCM241 Marketing for the Hospitality Industry (3 credits) This course is an introduction to service marketing as applied to the Hospitality Industry.2 quarters . Graduates of the Culinary Arts Diploma Program at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver.

Topics include budgeting. Prerequisite: None Hospitality & Restaurant Business Management Available at the Granville campus.12 months . Prerequisite: None RCM264 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry (3 credits) In this course. and cost control knowledge informs students of the market requirements of running a food and beverage business. Topics covered will include employment laws. the students develop a working knowledge of the current theories. and human resources management expand on the student’s ability to foster effective communication with key staff. graduates are prepared to seek entry-level positions in the work force with a well-rounded portfolio that lays the foundation for a life-long career in the culinary arts. compensation and benefits administration. Upon successful completion of the program. Students then explore the various dimensions of culinary.RCM263 Hospitality and Human Resources Management (3 credits) This course introduces the principles and practices of human resources management relevant to hospitality organizations. Purchasing. employee safety. nutrition. issues and challenges involved with financial management. cash management. financial management. to gain real world experience. workforce management. with emphasis on the entry-level manager’s role. the program prepares you to seek a variety of employment opportunities. The Art Institute of Vancouver . Students are introduced to the tools and skills that financial managers use in effective decision making. At The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver. borrowing funds. and financial forecasting.18 courses . such as the role of culinary education and various career opportunities. cost concepts and behavior. budgeting. we understand that successful communication between all the players in the business – in the kitchen and in the front of the house – keeps things running smoothly and contributes to the overall success of any culinary venture.4 quarters . Front-end management issues such as dining room procedures. planning. students combine all the critical skills they have acquired in the program to the development of a complete business plan for a Page 112 minimum 100-seat restaurant. management by menu. They are then prepared to embark on an externship in industry. labor unions. During the fourth and final quarter of the program. and cafes. diversity and ethics. hotels. quality. 60 credits . The program also suits individuals currently employed in the service industry who are looking to challenge themselves and broaden their career options. The Hospitality & Restaurant Business Management Program is a prudent choice for those who possess a passion for the culinary and hospitality industries. investment analysis.Diploma Course Listing Course Number and Title Credits CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques 3 CUL103 Sanitation and Safety 3 CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary 3 CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques 6 CUL132 Management by Menu 3 CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification 3 CUL201 Garde Manger 6 CUL212 Externship 3 CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs 3 CUL247 World Cuisine 3 Course Number and Title CUL250 Career Development CUL252 Food and Beverage Management CUL272 Capstone CUL300 Nutrition RCM241 Marketing for the Hospitality Industry RCM262 Catering and Banquet Operations RCM263 Hospitality and Human Resources Management RCM264 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Program Description The world’s most illustrious restaurants build their reputations on being able to meet customer expectations and demands for service. before moving on to both practical and theoretical skills in the business arena. Curriculum for the Hospitality & Restaurant Business Management Program begins with an introduction to the fundamental culinary skills and techniques used in basic cookery. or if you are looking to work with catering companies. and kitchen management skills critical to operating a business in the hospitality and culinary industries. Whether your career goal is owning or managing a restaurant. and flavour. Students are also grounded in the marketing. diversity of product.Academic Calendar .

The student will learn about pricing support systems. roasting. Reception foods and buffet arrangements are introduced. The importance of budgeting and an accurate profit and loss statement are emphasized. equipment and responsibilities of the “cold kitchen”. Students must pass a written and practical exam. Students are responsible for securing an externship job and may seek assistance through The Institute. This course gives a profile of the hospitality industry and intends to provide a sense of its scope. This course will introduce the tools required to maintain sales and cost histories. poaching. taste. Students gain experience needed to seek entrylevel positions in their field upon graduation.. issuing and production are covered. braising and frying. preparation and techniques representative of these countries. flavor profiles. Russia. glazes. Importance will be placed on ingredients. Prerequisites: CUL103 Sanitation and Safety and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL212 Externship (3 credits) The course has been designed to acquaint the student with actual working conditions in an approved restaurant/hospitality establishment. develop effective study habits. broth. soups. starch cookery. and soups. improve interpersonal relationships. Provincial regulations are addressed in terms of Food Safe. Prerequisite: None CUL135 Purchasing and Product Identification (3 credits) This course is a collaborative exploration of basic principles of purchasing food. a planning tool. storing and issuing process. Lectures teach organization skills in the kitchen and work coordination. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. European and the Mediterranean as well as North Africa. make decisions. and evaluation to facilities design and layout. thickening agents. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients. receiving. Students develop their communication skills. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. cooking theories. Prerequisite: None CUL104 Dimensions of Culinary (3 credits) “Dimensions of Culinary” is a course that introduces students to a wide realm of topics in the culinary arts and culinary education. They learn to present and assimilate information logically. The basics of vegetable cookery. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients.e. regional dishes of Scandinavia. Students prepare. This course is a supervised entry-level work experience in the restaurant/hospitality field requiring a minimum of 99 hours for culinary programs or 90 hours for baking and pastry of practical work. sandwiches. Prerequisite: None CUL201 Garde Manger (6 credits) This course provides students with skills and knowledge of the organization. Lectures and demonstrations teach organization skills in the kitchen. Attention is focused on food borne illness and their origins. poaching. glazes. serve and evaluate traditional. including food-cost breakdown. sauces. braising and frying. work coordination. meat and poultry are covered. vegetable cookery. pricing. starch cookery. The primary issues of concern to students are: career opportunities. and supplies. Prerequisite: None CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques (6 credits) The fundamental concepts. broth. It covers topics ranging from menu development.Academic Calendar Page 113 . WHMIS. and Work Safe BC. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. Prerequisite: None CUL132 Management by Menu (3 credits) This course prepares future food service managers by giving a clear picture of the important role menu planning plays within operations. CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques (3 credits) The fundamental concepts. the grand sauces and emulsion sauces. Prerequisite: None CUL103 Sanitation and Safety (3 credits) This course introduces food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. Individual conferences and class attendance is required. the role of culinary education. receiving. equipment. and knife skills. and on basic safety procedures followed in the food service industry. source of operational information and a merchandising method for reaching patrons. thickening agents. i. and teach the techniques required to anticipate what is to come. storing. the experience required to pursue particular opportunities.Course Descriptions Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework. and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques The Art Institute of Vancouver . supplier selection. Students will benefit because good menu development is crucial to the success of any foodservice operation. develop systems for monitoring current activities. Prerequisite: CUL132 Management by Menu CUL247 World Cuisine (3 credits) This course emphasizes both the influences and ingredients that create the unique character of selected world cuisines. Prerequisite: None CUL242 Planning and Controlling Costs (3 credits) This course helps the student appreciate the planning and control process in the restaurant service industry. cooking theories. and the advantages and disadvantages of working in specific areas of the hospitality industry. Switzerland. Students must successfully pass a practical cooking examination covering a variety of cooking techniques. soups. skills and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. the fundamentals of purchasing. roasting. salads. Primary focus is on product identification. and increase their professional performance. and the menu’s effect on planning and control is covered. use available resources. Forms and suggestions for implementing effective cost control procedures are given. meat and poultry are covered. and the preparation of stocks. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing. and the preparation of stocks. It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning outcomes. as well as basic charcuterie items while focusing on the total utilization of product. and the ordering. Central and South America. The basics of stocks. Students are introduced to and prepare cold hors d’oeuvres.

food wine matching. This course will cover application of basic marketing concepts and research methods. Prerequisite: None RCM263 Hospitality and Human Resources Management (3 credits) This course introduces the principles and practices of human resources management relevant to hospitality organizations. closing and follow-up. what is realistic and what effort is required to do a successful job search. This course is project driven which requires significant creative and independent work. Prerequisite: None Page 114 The Art Institute of Vancouver . and sources of nutrients . Prerequisite: None RCM262 Catering and Banquet Operations (3 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of catering. Students will get instruction in self-confidence. fats. The course focuses on understanding the catering’s role within the hospitality industry and the various catering disciplines. borrowing funds. The course is designed to allow the student to prepare and present an original and organized business plan. flexibility. service. investment analysis. developing a network of contacts. Students also discuss topics such as contracts. Prerequisite: None RCM241 Marketing for the Hospitality Industry (3 credits) This course is an introduction to service marketing as applied to the Hospitality Industry. employee safety. labor unions. They will also learn what to expect in the first thirty days and how to keep that first position. with emphasis on the entry-level manager’s role. developing a professional appearance. legal considerations. Prerequisites: CUL102 Concepts and Theories of Culinary Techniques. promotion planning. consumer orientation. market research.are discussed. issues and challenges involved with financial management. preparing for their employment interview. cost concepts and behavior. energy balance. staffing and training. compensation and benefits administration. vitamin supplements. product planning. wine storing. Topics include budgeting. marketing. production. and financial forecasting. finances. Topics covered will include employment laws. and sanitation. The structure. Prerequisite: None CUL252 Food and Beverage Management (3 credits) This course will give students a basic understanding of the management process in food and beverage operations. carbohydrates. All aspects of food and beverage operations are covered. safety. service of wine and.CUL250 Career Development (3 credits) Students develop techniques and strategies for marketing themselves in their chosen fields.Academic Calendar . Current issues in nutrition are reviewed. Students are introduced to the tools and skills that financial managers use in effective decision making. food production. Business related competencies are reviewed and tutored as necessary for completion of the project. functions. cash management. minerals. checklists. and water . and CUL105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques CUL272 Capstone (3 credits) Through the competencies developed in previous related studies. generating interviews. Topics included but not limited to: unique attributes of service marketing. Prerequisite: None RCM264 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry (3 credits) In this course. special events and sales in the hospitality industry. Prerequisite: None CUL300 Nutrition (3 credits) This course centres on an explanation of the basic principles of nutrition and their relationship to health. workforce management. Design and delivery of marketing components for a hospitality business will be covered. CUL103 Sanitation and Safety. and food fads. writing cover letters and resumes.including proteins. Emphasis will be placed on student’s assessing their more marketable skills. diversity and ethics. and competitor analysis. target marketing. consumer behavior. wine style. students will develop a complete business plan for a one hundred seat restaurant. the students develop a working knowledge of the current theories. market segmentation principles. including dietary guidelines. vitamins. including organization. menus.

and more opportunity to work with instructors in developing your understanding of the wines and spirits industry. 5 weeks .Continuing Education Centre for Professional Development Sommelier and Wine Studies Program At The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver. • The ability to use a systematic approach to tasting and writing simple tasting notes. • The ability to describe the characteristics of the principle grape varieties of the world. major grape varieties and food & wine matching. This is highly interactive program that introduces the student to the many different aspects of the wine world including wine types & styles. legal and health aspects.Academic Calendar Page 115 . At the heart of our wine program is the internationally recognized Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) curriculum. considered to be the stepping stone to the ultimate Master of Wine designation. The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver is proud to be the sole provider of the WSET Diploma in western Canada.Certificate This entry level program is designed to provide the basic product knowledge & skills in wine service for those in a junior position in the hospitality sector. wine. The Art Institute of Vancouver . students must complete a food and wine matching exercise and pass a 30 question multiple choice exam.15 hours . widely-referred to as the gold standard in comprehensive training for the wine and spirits trade. This program is offered in conjunction with the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) and students will gain the WSET Level 1 Award in Wines upon successful course completion. students should be able to have: • An understanding of the fundamentals of food and wine pairing. • A basic understanding of the main types and wine styles available. To receive the WSET Level 1 Award in Wines. It will hold equal appeal to those non-trade wine lovers who wish to gain some formal wine education. Edmonton and Calgary. • Knowledge on the correct storage and service procedures for • Knowledge of the professional responsibilities regarding the Completion Requirements service of wine including the social. Upon successful completion. we offer a well-designed wine education program for those interested in the culinary and hospitality industry. This means increased focus on tasting. Level 1 – Foundation in Wine & Wine Service Available at Granville campus and other partner locations in Victoria. We have also build upon the core WSET syllabus by adding more instructional hours and content. wine tasting.

students must pass a 50 question multiple choice paper exam.Certificate This program is designed to build upon the fundamentals learned in the Intermediate program and comprises the first half of the WSET Level 3 Award in Wines & Spirits. required for advising customers in the hospitality and retail sectors. Page 116 The Art Institute of Vancouver .Academic Calendar .Level 2 – Intermediate Studies in Wines & Spirits Available at Granville campus and other partner locations in Victoria. quality and value. This program is offered in conjunction with the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) and students will gain the WSET Level 2 Award in Wines & Spirits upon successful course completion. students should be able to have: • The ability to describe the characteristics of the principal • The product knowledge required to underpin job skills wines and give information on the key factors influencing style. The service and storage wine is covered from both a professional and nonprofessional perspective.Certificate This program is designed to build upon the fundamentals learned in the Foundation course and features discussion on the classic grape varieties of the world. Each class is enhanced with a tasting that includes the benchmark wines discussed in the lecture. Each class is enhanced with a tasting that includes the benchmark wines discussed in the lecture.33 hours .33 hours . Completion Requirements This course is assessed in conjunction with Advanced Wines and Spirits Studies (II). • Ability to apply the principles of food and wine matching to • Ability to use the WSET Systematic Approach to Tasting • Knowledge to provide advice on the correct storage and service of wine. 11 weeks . • An understanding of the principles of food and wine match• Ability to use the WSET Systematic Approach to Tasting to gain an appreciation of wine style and quality. their production methods and region of origin. The service of wine is covered from both a professional and non-professional perspective. as are the principles of food and wine matching. • The ability to describe the characteristics of the principal wines and give information on the key factors influencing style. Completion Requirements To receive the WSET Level 2 Award in Wines & Spirits. quality and price band of wines. The factors that affect the character and quality of the wines are explored with specific classes on viticultural and vinification techniques. Upon successful completion. to produce tasting notes that will allow the identification of style. Level 3 (Section I) Advanced Wines & Spirits Studies (I) Available at Granville campus. students should be able to have: • A basic understanding of the major wines & spirits of the world. quality and value. 11 weeks . Edmonton and Calgary. Upon successful completion. the key styles of wine available. The course features detailed discussion about the classic wine regions of France and Italy. ing and how those principles are applied. • The in depth product knowledge required to underpin job skills required for product selection in the hospitality and retail sectors. The factors that affect the character and quality of wines are explored and this program takes a basic look at viticultural and vinification techniques. as are the principles of food and wine matching. • Knowledge on the correct storage and service of wines and • A thorough understanding of the principal wines of France and Italy and their commercial importance in the world’s market. spirits.

sparkling and fortified wines. 11 weeks . with a detailed statistical analysis. The assignment & case book study are on topics determined by WSET awards and will reflect the published learning outcomes of this Unit of the Diploma syllabus. tions for vines. including specific lectures on production and types of spirits. The course begins with an overview of the global markets in terms of both production and consumption and major companies. vinification. . • Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the factors that influence • Identify the choices available for maturation and treatment of Completion Requirements Unit 1 is assessed by means of one coursework assignment of between 2500 and 3000 words in length and one closed book case study to be completed under exam conditions in 75 minutes. and explain the activities involved in vineyard management. This paper is to be completed in 90 minutes. This program is offered in conjunction with the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) and students will gain the WSET Level 3 Award in Wines & Spirits upon successful course completion. Each class is enhanced with a tasting that includes the benchmark wines discussed in the lecture. • Apply knowledge of the dynamics of alcoholic beverages to commercial decision making. students must pass a 50 question multiple choice exam. • Outline the factors that influence vineyard selection and Completion Requirements To receive the WSET Level 3 Award in Wines & Spirits.Academic Calendar Page 117 . 11 weeks . establishment. importation and sales of alcoholic beverages in the local market. The key factors that affect the character and quality of the wines will be explored. The Art Institute of Vancouver . maturation and handling techniques. with particular reference to the local market in BC. the purchase. • Understand the influences on marketing decisions in global • Explain the factors that provide the necessary growing condi• List the characteristics and attributes of the main vine variet• Describe the issues involved in vine growing. The Unit 2 part of this course features detailed analysis of the Production of Wine. The Unit 1 part is wrapped up with a discussion of topical issues in the business of wine and spirits. The characteristics of the most commercially significant grape varieties are also studied. to produce tasting notes that will allow the identification of style. of the world and their commercial importance in the world’s market. Unit 2 is assessed by a multiple choice examination paper of 100 questions.33 hours This course consists of WSET Diploma Units 1 & 2 which is the mandatory starting point for the qualification.Certificate This course comprises the second half of the Advanced Wines and Spirits program and is a continuation of the Level 3 course. • Use knowledge of important industry companies and their influence on the production of wines and spirits when selecting products for consumers. quality and price band of wines and spirits.33 hours . • Ability to apply the principles of food and wine matching to • Ability to use the WSET Systematic Approach to Tasting • Knowledge to provide advice on the correct storage and service of wine and spirits. Upon successful completion.Level 3 (Section II) Advanced Wines & Spirits Studies (II) Available at Granville campus. This program features detailed discussion about the classic regions and wines of the world not covered in Level 3 Section 1. • The ability to describe the characteristics of the principal • Demonstrate detailed knowledge of the procedures used in wines and give information on the key factors influencing style. a short written answer paper and a blind tasting of two wines. quality and value. The dynamics of the industry are then examined. This is followed by an analysis of production issues relating to cost. ies. students should be able to have: Level 4 (Section I) Global Business of Wine & Wine Production Available at Granville campus. students should be able to: • A thorough understanding of the principal wines and spirits • The in depth product knowledge required to underpin job skills required for product selection in the hospitality and retail sectors. It is designed to build upon the fundamentals learned in the Intermediate Certificate program. The course includes a study of viticulture. wine. Upon successful completion. the key styles of wine available. and local markets. the production of wine.

During this course. makes up Unit 3 of the WSET Diploma. Gin. Workshop classes focus on giving students the necessary framework to study for the Unit 3 exam whereas lecture classes will feature industry specialists presenting on key winegrowing regions of the world. Liqueur & Sparkling Wine Studies Available at Granville campus. curate tasting notes. • Identify each type of spirit when tasted blind & write ac• Explain the production processes for all types of sparkling • Display in-depth product knowledge of sparkling & liqueur wines and apply that knowledge in a business context. 9 weeks . 5 & 6 assessment is by written examination. Each class involves practice of the WSET systematic approach to tasting at the Diploma level. the production of liqueur & sparkling wines and how these factors influence their style. students taste a wide range of spirits. • Show an understanding of the commercial and economic importance of sparkling & liqueur wines in world and local markets. Port. Madeira and other fortified wines. • Explain the production process for all the major spirit categories.Academic Calendar . production and maturation prac• Explain the trade structure. • Use the WSET Systematic Approach to Tasting to produce • Identify style. On completion of this course. Unit 6 covers the production of the main types of Fortified wines and features discussion on the regions. The course includes detailed information on regions of production. tasting notes on a range of relevant wines. the production methods and the commercial considerations of sparkling wines. Unit 4 covers the production of the main types of spirits including Vodka. • Understand the viticultural. Brandy and Tequila. quality and commercial value.Level 4 (Section II) Spirits. Upon successful completion. • Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the legal and commercial issues of the spirits industry. Rum. Completion Requirements This course is assessed in conjunction with Light Wines of the World (II). 9 weeks . methods of production.27 hours This course. Whisky. distribution methods and main markets for the region. 5 & 6. Unit 5 covers the production of the main types of sparkling wines and studies the regions involved. fortified & sparkling wines and will create a portfolio of tasting notes. tices of the region. wines. and legal and business issues.27 hours This course consists of WSET Diploma Units 4. students should be able to: Level 4 (Section III) Light Wines of the World (I) Available at Granville campus. • Display knowledge of the local rules and regulations govern• Display in-depth product knowledge of the region’s light wines and apply that knowledge in a business context. ing production. quality and commercial value of sparkling & liqueur wines using the information you have assembled in your tasting notes. together with Light Wines of the World Section IV. These two courses focus on the light wine regions of the world with the goal of preparing students for their final Unit 3 examination. tasting notes on a range of relevant wines. quality and commercial value of light wines. • Use the WSET Systematic Approach to Tasting to produce • Identify style. production methods and the commercial considerations of Sherry. using the information assembled from the tasting notes. a student will be able to: • Demonstrate knowledge of the location of a wine producing region and display a broad understanding of its history of production. • Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the factors affecting Completion Requirements For each Unit 4. This consists of a practical tasting paper of three blind wines or spirits followed by one question requiring written answer on product related knowledge Page 118 The Art Institute of Vancouver .

27 hours . production and maturation prac• Explain the trade structure. Explain the characteristics of French wines and give information on the key factors influencing style. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of terroir in relation to the style and quality of French wines. Display knowledge on the correct storage. makes up Unit 3 of the WSET Diploma. Workshop classes focus on giving students the necessary framework to study for the Unit 3 exam whereas lecture classes will feature industry specialists presenting on key winegrowing regions of the world. • Display knowledge of the local rules and regulations govern• Display in-depth product knowledge of the region’s light wines and apply that knowledge in a business context.Certificate Program Description This program offers a comprehensive study of the wines of France with a focus on historical development and terroir. Each class involves practice of the WSET systematic approach to tasting at the Diploma level. students must pass a 100 question multiple choice exam Course Prerequisites Students must be 19 years of age or older and have passed Level 2 Intermediate Wine Studies or possess relevant wine experience. ing production. a student will be able to • • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the major wine styles of France. 9 weeks . their appellations and production methods. Students gain an understanding of the importance of French wine in relation to food with reference to both classic and contemporary pairings. • Understand the viticultural.Level 4 (Section IV) Light Wines of the World (II) Available at Granville campus. Each class is enhanced with an extensive tasting of French wine styles and the course culminates in an optional end of course dinner paired with French wines This program is offered in conjunction with the French Wine Society. tasting notes on a range of relevant wines. a student will be able to: French Wine Scholar Available at the Granville campus. grape variety. quality and commercial value of light wines. distribution methods and main markets for the region. together with Light Wines of the World Section III. quality and value. • Use the WSET Systematic Approach to Tasting to produce • Identify style. This consists of two practical tasting papers. Show comprehension of the various classification systems used within the eight major French winegrowing regions studied. The correct service & storage of different French wines will also be discussed. A student who successfully passes the final exam may use the designation “French Wine Scholar” and post-nominal. each of six blind wines followed by one written answer paper of five essay questions on product related knowledge. soil. FWS. using the information assembled from the tasting notes. 9 weeks. tices of the region.27 hours . • Completion Requirements In order to gain the French Wine Scholar designation. • • Completion Requirements This course is assessed by written examination. • Demonstrate knowledge of the location of a wine producing region and display a broad understanding of its history of production. The appellations of eight major French winegrowing regions will be explored with reference to climate. The Art Institute of Vancouver .Academic Calendar Page 119 . These two courses focus on the light wine regions of the world with the goal of preparing students for their final Unit 3 examination. On completion of this course.WSET Diploma This course. viticultural and winemaking techniques. On completion of this course. service and appropriate food pairings for French wines.

Academic Calendar . quality and value. Each class is enhanced with a tasting that includes the benchmark spirits discussed in the lecture. This course is designed to give the student upon successful completion: • An understanding of the major spirit categories of the world. • • • • Completion Requirements The final examination consists of one 50 question multiple choice paper and one written tasting note. A basic understanding of the world & local markets for spirits & liqueurs. This program is offered in conjunction with the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) and students will gain the WSET Professional Certificate in Spirits upon successful course completion. The product knowledge required to underpin job skills required for advising customers in the hospitality and retail sectors. Page 120 The Art Institute of Vancouver . retail & agency sectors.Level 2 Available at the Granville campus. the importance of branding & the spirits marketplace . students will study production methods. Ability to use the WSET Systematic Approach to Tasting to gain an appreciation of the style & quality of spirits & liqueurs.21 hours .Certificate Program Description This program is designed to give a comprehensive level of focused product knowledge on spirits & liqueurs to those working in the hospitality.Professional Certificate in Spirits . The factors that affect the character and quality of spirits are explored and during this program. Knowledge on the correct storage and service of spirits & liqueurs. their production methods and significant brands. • The ability to describe the characteristics of the principal international spirits & liqueurs and give information on the key factors influencing style. 7 weeks.The service and storage of spirits is covered from both a professional and non-professional perspective as are the health issues relating to spirit consumption.

Mediterranean. Later you will learn the cookery of vegetables and starch through to proteins such as fish. Program Description This course emphasizes both the influences and the ingredients that create the unique character of selected Asian cuisines. braising. cooking theories and techniques. The focus is on the use of various ingredients. and creatively plating European.Letter of Achievement Instructional methods at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver include lecture and demonstration. The Art Institute of Vancouver . poultry and meat – all with a West Coast regional flavour. 5 weeks. and exploring techniques such as roasting. Course Prerequisites The Fundamental Skills for Aspiring Chefs course is recommended but not required. Method of Instruction International Cuisine for Aspiring Chefs Available at the Granville campus. regional dishes of China. and evaluate traditional.Continuing Education Aspiring Chefs Series Fundamental Skills for Aspiring Chefs Available at the Granville campus. 5 weeks. At the completion of the program. deep frying. poaching. Completion Requirements Program Description This program teaches fundamental culinary skills that are typical of European. and satisfy all financial obligations with The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Vancouver. In each class the emphasis will be preparing. Program Description The Fundamental Skills for Aspiring Chefs course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of knife skills and cookery of vegetables and starch as well as that of proteins such as fish. fresh ingredients to prepare Pacific West Coast cuisine. To receive a Certificate of Completion in Aspiring Chefs Series courses. South American cuisines. flavour profiles. Meditterranean and South American Dishes. Vietnam. The overall goal is to develop culinary skills and techniques therby allowing students to perform comfortably and creatively in the kitchen. All instruction is conducted in a classroom/studio setting.20 hours . 5 weeks. students should be able to use West Coast ingredients in the preparation and plating of a meal. You will be required to prepare. braising.20 hours .20 hours . preparations. Korea. steaming. and techniques representative of these cuisines. Japan.Letter of Achievement Asian Cuisine for Aspiring Chefs Available at the Granville campus. roasting. Students who wish to be successful in this course should have good knife skills and a basic understanding of the following cooking techniques: sautéing. and meat. Students must also receive a passing grade or credits for all required course work. meet portfolio or other requirements outlined in the student handbook. and sautéing. taste.Letter of Achievement Introduction Develop your culinary talents with us. frying. we will take you from basic fundamental culinary skills such as caring for your tools through to studying about ingredients and cooking theories. Importance will be placed on ingredients. students must complete a minimum of 20 hours of classroom time. Learn to use local. and Thailand. serve. In this introductory five Saturday (20 hour) course. and grilling.Academic Calendar Page 121 . poultry.

Page 122 Completion Requirements To receive a Flash Design and Development Certificate. This 11-week program consists of 24 hours of weekly instruction and introduces students to the writing. Completion Requirements To receive a Certificate of Completion in Photography students must complete a minimum of 30 hours of classroom time. and for creating the HTML necessary to display your graphics. Flash excels as a design tool. Other topics include pop-up menus. technical illustrations.Certificate Program Description The English for Academic Purposes (EAP) is a full-time program for students interested in improving their English prior to pursuing post-secondary education in Canada. 11 weeks. 11 weeks. 3 credit course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques of digital photography. animations. and compact navigation interfaces. buttons.Academic Calendar .Certificate Program Description This 5 week. graphics and sound for the Web with exciting transparency and shape blending effects. game/software interfaces and animation for web and TV. forms and variables. Interactive Web Scripting I (Flash Level II) Macromedia Flash and its tools allow designers to create and deliver fast-loading interactive animation.0 or higher.Levels I and II Available at the Renfrew campus.English for Academic Purposes Available at the Renfrew campus.Certificate Program Description This 11 week. Interactive Web Scripting II (Flash Level III) Interactive Web Animation (Flash Level I) This course will teach advanced action scripting with classes to allow students to create sophisticated interactive projects. long-form animations.30 hours . Students must also receive a passing grade or credits for all required course work. and satisfy all financial obligations with The Art Institute of Vancouver. Interactive Web Animation Available at the Renfrew campus. Students who successfully complete the EAP program may be able to transfer up to three academic credits towards a degree or diploma program at The Art Institute of Vancouver. This is a perfect course for anyone who wants to improve their photographic skills to capture better photographs.264 hours . students must complete a minimum of 9 credits with a cumulative GPA of 2. This course will teach advanced action scripting to allow students to create sophisticated interactive projects. because it includes all the pieces needed in one place to produce and deliver high-impact websites. and many other brilliant special effects. reading and communication skills necessary for successful academic study in an English-speaking institution.44 hours . In this class learn how to use Flash’s tools for creating graphics. The Art Institute of Vancouver . 5 weeks. and interface elements as a webpage. interactive movies. It combines basic photography principles of composition and lighting with digital concepts such as exposure evaluation. file formats and image manipulations. 30 hour (6 hours per week). As an additional benefit. Completion Requirements To receive a Certificate of Completion for the English for Academic Purposes program students must also receive a passing grade or credits for all required course work. It allows the creation of resizable. for animating those graphics. meet portfolio or other requirements outlined in the student handbook. creating interface elements with interactivity. Digital Photography . the EAP program features a foundationlevel academic course. Also students must receive passing grades in all 9 units of study. 3 credit certificate program in Animation for Multimedia provides students with an introduction to the Flash authoring environment. 44 hour. and satisfy all financial obligations with The Art Institute of Vancouver. and timeline control. small.

Even low-end productions now typically incorporate visually sophisticated digitally created graphics and effects. entertain. to an old room. film. or build brand value. Students in the Kitchen & Bath Design – Level 2 Program learn to go beyond the basics to bring new life To receive a Certificate of Completion in Kitchen & Bath Design – Level I. The Motion Graphics Certificate Program is designed to provide graduates with a variety of skills drawn from the fields of photography. Some previous experience with basic animation techniques is recommended.Kitchen & Bathroom Design . makes type. and lighting. Introduction Can’t wait for Extreme Makeover: Home Edition to come and make over your kitchen and bathroom? Become your own extreme makeover designer. and satisfy all financial obligations with The Art Institute of Vancouver. you can change your space from drab and dreary to bright and cheery. five week courses. 11 weeks.Levels I and II Available at the Renfrew location.Academic Calendar Page 123 . Audience awareness and expectations have fueled a growing demand for skilled artists and technicians in this field. Students earn a certificate of completion that may be redeemed for academic credit should the student enrol in a fulltime program. colours and images move. A motion graphic specialist Students should have a basic understanding of Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator.11 weeks .Certificate Introduction The field of motion graphics has in the last decade become an established area of specialization in the broader field of digital graphics. Various courses . promising impressive growth and a sustained presence in regionally diverse marketplaces. Culinary Programs Culinary Arts The Art Institute of Vancouver . students will be familiar with the kinds of materials that go best with their living spaces and be aware of how to accent rooms with fixtures. colour theory.44 hours . Program Description Course Prerequisites Motion graphics is graphic design for broadcast and film. educate.Certificate of Completion Design Programs The Cross-Disciplinary Studies program allows students to take individual courses within many of The Art Institute programs. and cabinetry. These individual courses are primarily aimed at providing continuing education for working professionals who wish to enhance their skills or students who wish to further their knowledge and/ or skill-base. In our six hour. to communicate. students must complete a minimum of 30 hours of classroom time. requiring additional skills in television technology.44 hours . animation and experimental graphics. At the completion of the program. students must complete a minimum of 30 hours of classrom time. audio. Program Description Completion Requirements The Kitchen & Bath Design – Level 1 course is designed to introduce the basic principles of kitchen and bathroom design. video. Motion Graphics Available at the Renfrew campus. To receive a Certificate of Completion in Kitchen & Bath Design – Level II. Cross-Disciplinary Studies Program Description Available at Renfrew campus and the Granville campus. Art & Design Professional Recording Arts Course Prerequisites Students are required to meet the prerequisites for each course or have the permission of the Academic Department Director responsible for the course to which they are applying. students explore a variey of do-it-yourself renovation possibilities. equipment. audio and animation. meet portfolio or other requirements outlined in the student handbook. Graphic Design Advanced Graphic Design Interior Design Media Programs 3D Modeling for Animation & Games Animation. Students must also receive a passing grade or credits for all required course work. compositing. video. providing them with the capabilities necessary to create broadcast-ready graphics and animations. From learning how to properly plan projects to construction basics and safety issues. graphic design.

The Art Institute of Vancouver may elect to waive these fees. The Art Institute of Vancouver does not discriminate on the grounds of race. The Art Institute of Vancouver reserves the right to request any additional information necessary to evaluate an applicant’s potential for academic success. Courses completed under the original program may not transfer into the new program. Academic status. Although a visit to The Art Institute of Vancouver is not a requirement for submitting an application form and enrolment agreement for acceptance. 6. Accepted academic grades and test scores are listed in the “Academic Placement” section. The Art Institute of Vancouver . activities. Under these circumstances. that they are currently able to handle college-level coursework. Essay. 7. (Please see the section.) The applicant must accurately represent their education. creed. The preadmission interview is designed to assist in assessing whether the prospective student possesses an ability to benefit from the programs they are considering at The Art Institute of Vancouver. •  Provide information related to curriculum offerings and support services available at The Art Institute. not to exceed one quarter. “Mature Students. The applicant must either have successfully completed secondary school (Grade 12 or GED 12) or qualify as a mature student of not less than 19 years of age as of the start date of the program. sexual orientation. but who otherwise meet all the entrance requirements (including all required documents) for another Art Institute program. applicants who are unable to submit required documentation and/or meet the requirements for the program for which they have applied. Foundation for Design. Applicants who are unable to submit all transcripts and/or other required documentation before classes start may be allowed to begin class conditionally. or with respect to admission and employment. Changes in program may also impact eligibility for student financial aid. Fees. Prospective students must independently conceive and write an essay of at least 150 words describing the applicant’s career goals and how The Art Institute of Vancouver can help the applicant achieve those goals. and stated or demonstrated interest in our program offerings. A $50 application fee and a $100 assessment fee. background. unless otherwise stated in the course description. Applicants must be at least 15 years of age at the time of enrolment.Academic Calendar . age. All degree-seeking students are required to submit official academic grades and/ or test scores to determine placement in college-level English and Math courses. prospective students are encouraged to schedule a visit with one of our admissions representatives to discuss special needs. 3. age. 9. 5. The minimum admissions requirements cannot be waived by either The Art Institute of Vancouver or the applicant. or disability in the administration of any of its educational programs. Demonstration of English language proficiency can be satisfied if the applicant submits a diploma from secondary school (or above) in a system in which English is the official language of instruction. may request to have their application changed to that program. Transfer credit may be accepted in place of test scores. sex. Forms. The purpose of the interview is to: •  Explore the prospective student’s background and interests as they relate to the programs offered at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Regardless of country of birth or citizenship. Admissions Interview (in person or over the phone) with an Assistant Director of Admissions. 2. colour. Test Scores for Degree programs. the applicant must submit a portfolio and have it accepted by the Admissions Committee before advanced standing can be granted. Admissions Requirements for Continuing Education Applicants who wish to enrol in continuing education certificate courses through the Centre for Professional Development (CPD) must meet the following general requirements: 1. 10.”) Applicants are required to submit official proof of secondary school graduation or equivalent. but must provide all required transcripts and documentation by a date established by the Director of Admissions. 8. •  Assist prospective students in identifying the appropriate area of study consistent with their previous education. If English is not the applicant’s first language. and other required information to determine that they meet the admission criteria for The Art Institute of Vancouver programs.Admissions Requirements Individuals seeking admission to The Art Institute of Vancouver are required to complete and submit the following: 1. ancestry. Applicants to the Game Programming degree must also submit Physics grades and/or scores. religion. Each applicant’s academic transcript and completed essay will be evaluated by the Admissions Committee. and that they have a reasonable capability of successfully completing the appropriate program of study. and lifelong career aspirations. as well as parent or guardian if the applicant is a minor. English Proficiency. temporary or permanent status. 4. the applicant will need to meet the minimum English Language Proficiency standard as outlined for international students. all applicants to The Art Institute of Vancouver whose first language is Page 124 not English must demonstrate competence in the English language. (Please see the section “Proof of Secondary School Graduation” for descriptions of acceptable forms of documentation for proof of graduation. long-term or short-term goals. If the applicant wishes to receive advanced standing in a program that has a foundation quarter. national origin. A separate Application Form and Enrolment Agreement must be completed and signed by the applicant. The Committee determines the compatibility of the applicant with the programs at The Art Institute of Vancouver and ultimately makes the final decision regarding acceptance into programs offered at The Art Institute of Vancouver.

Some programs. Unofficial transcripts are acceptable for scheduling and testing purposes (if official transcripts have not been received) and must be verified by either the Academic Director or Registrar. The Director of Admission has the discretion to extend this deadline. Foundation for Design Portfolio Requirements Applicants who wish to receive advanced standing in the Graphic Design and Web Design & Interactive Media programs must submit a portfolio that demonstrates proficiency in foundationlevel skills. Official Transcripts All students must provide official transcripts of high school and college attendance. If documentation of minimum requirements such as transcripts and/or portfolio cannot be provided at the time of application. such as the Sommelier & Wine Studies program. 2. not to exceed one quarter. evaluation by a credential evaluation agency may be required. For countries where it may not be possible to have official documentation sent directly from the institution. require students to be of legal drinking age at the time of enrolment. The applicant must be 19 years of age or older on his/her first day of classes. entering students in degree programs are required to take this diagnostic test. To ensure proper placement for college-level courses. and must provide proof of high school graduation on the official transcript. Applicants must provide documentation in the form of official school transcripts sent directly from the institution to The Art Institute that clearly indicate that the requirements for graduation have been met as well as the date of graduation. Applicants can petition for additional attempts if the candidate can provide evidence of some instructional intervention that would suggest that score improvement would be possible. A separate application form and enrolment agreement must be completed and signed by the applicant. permanent residents) to The Art Institute of Vancouver who do not have a high school diploma or hold a GED certificate may qualify for admission as a mature student if they meet the following criteria: 1. Exceptions will be granted to students who have the following academic grades and/or test scores: Page 125 Applicants must achieve minimum scores on all three sections of the Accuplacer test in order to pass.a. a high school completion certificate is not considered to be equivalent to graduation. Proof of Secondary School Graduation Prospective students who wish to attend The Art Institute of Vancouver and do not qualify as a mature student must have successfully completed the requirements for secondary school graduation or equivalent. If an applicant is unable to pass the test. Documentation from outside of Canada will be evaluated by The Art Institute of Vancouver prior to acceptance. Degree students who do not take the Accuplacer assessment before the start of their first quarter at The Art Institute of Vancouver and who are not granted exceptions per the following criteria. 3. as set by the recognized legal authority in the jurisdiction where secondary school was completed. Minimum passing scores are as follows: Test ACCUPLACER Reading Comprehension ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills ACCUPLACER Arithmetic Passing Score 55 60 34 Academic Placement The Art Institute of Vancouver is committed to academic success. they can make one re-attempt after 24 hours or more have elapsed. reserves the right to examine academic credentials on a case by case basis. applicants should consult with their Admissions representative to determine what forms of documentation are acceptable. not be required to provide official transcripts or may provide documentation other than transcripts deemed acceptable by the Dean of Academic Affairs. and to help us determine academic preparation. However. In some cases. b. The Art Institute of Vancouver The Art Institute of Vancouver . These requirements can be found in each CPD course description and/or course syllabus.Academic Calendar . applicants may be required to meet with the instructor and/or Academic Department Director to determine eligibility. We recognize that students come with various strengths and skill sets. Applicants must meet the minimum entrance requirements for each CPD course. associate’s degree or higher may submit proof of that credential as evidence of satisfying the secondary school graduation requirement. For current portfolio submission guidelines. with the approval of the Dean of Academic Affairs. will be automatically enrolled in Transitional Studies courses. Based on the results of the academic placement test. Applicants should refer to the course description for details. Students entering into programs under the “mature students” category may. In the absence of such legal authority. Mature Students Canadian applicants (citizens. For students in British Columbia. we have selected the Accuplacer test. The applicant must pass a placement test to demonstrate that the applicant has the ability to benefit from the course of study. Students who have applied and been accepted for admission in a degree program are encouraged to take the Accuplacer assessment at The Art Institute of Vancouver before classes begin. as well as parent or guardian (if the applicant is a minor). An applicant who holds a postsecondary diploma. Re-attempts must include all three sections of the test. the official transcript is required by 30 days after class start and will be verified by the Registrar and placed in the student file. Students who wish to enrol in Cross-Disciplinary Studies (CDS) courses must demonstrate English proficiency as described in the General Admissions Requirements section. a. Students must successfully complete such courses in order to progress in their program of study. Secondary school applicants who have not yet graduated should submit a partial transcript that indicates their expected graduation date in order to be evaluated for early conditional acceptance. such as the General Education Development (GED) certificate. please contact an Admissions representative. 2. students may be required to take Transitional Studies courses.

Not Accepted: The applicant has not met the admission requirements or information requested has not been received.5 • Internet-based TOEFL 80 • LPI Essay score 26 level 4 • IELTS (Academic module only). Demonstration that English is an applicant’s first language can be satisfied if the applicant has earned a diploma from secondary school (or above) in a system in which English is the official language of instruction. applicants to the Game Programming degree must meet minimum proficiency requirements in Physics.English • 68 percent in English Literature 12. if submitted. Please see the section “Proof of Secondary School Graduation” for more detailed information. grade of 3 or 68 percent • Transferable college credits in 100-level and above Mathematics courses (grades of 68 percent or higher) • 400 or above in the Mathematics portion of the SAT • Composite score of 17 or higher on the ACT • Score of 50 on the CLEP exam in Mathematics Applicants who do not meet the above exceptions will be required to take a transitional English and/or transitional Math course. which may require an additional application process. grade of 3 or 68 percent English Language Proficiency Policy All applicants to The Art Institute of Vancouver regardless of temporary or permanent status whose first language is not English must demonstrate competency in the English language before admission to or enrolment in any program of study. The Art Institute of Vancouver may amend this list from time to time. Proof of English language proficiency (see “English Language Proficiency Policy”). The Art Institute of Vancouver may elect to waive these fees. min. min. 6. A $50 application fee and $100 assessment fee. Communications 12 or Technical and Professional Communications 12 (each option must include the completion of the provincial exam) • Computer-based TOEFL 213 with Essay 4. if applicable. grade of 6 or 68 percent • Proof of undergraduate (bachelor) degree conferral from an English-speaking postsecondary institution • Transferable college credits in 100-level and above English courses (grades of 68 percent or higher) • 450 or higher in the verbal portion of the SAT • Score of 50 on the CLEP exam in English • Composite score of 17 or higher on the ACT Math • 68 percent in Math 11 (or equivalent) • Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB or Calculus BC. overall band test score 6. min. 3. university level academic records) and diplomas. • • • Accepted: A seat is reserved for the applicant pending completion of the registration procedure.Academic Calendar . grade of 3 or 68 percent • International Baccalaureate (IB) English Language A (Higher level). Acceptance Notification The Art Institute of Vancouver will notify the applicant. International Students Admissions Requirements for Persons Who are Neither a Canadian Citizen nor an Official Permanent Resident of Canada nor a Convention Refugee An international student seeking to enrol at The Art Institute of Vancouver in valid Study Permit status must submit each of the following items: 1. 5. A completed and signed Application for Admission form including the 150-word essay. will be refunded. the administrative fee. Page 126 The Art Institute of Vancouver . In the event the student is not accepted. of his or her acceptance. Physics proficiency can be demonstrated by submitting proof of any of the following grades/test scores: Physics • • • 68 percent in Physics 11(or equivalent) Transferable college credits in 100-level and above Physics courses (grades of 68 percent or higher) Advanced Placement (AP) Physics B or Physics C.5 • Advanced Placement (AP) English Language or Literature. A completed and signed Enrolment Agreement. in writing. These educational transcripts and diplomas must be prepared in English or include an official English translation. 2. the applicant must demonstrate sufficient command of the English language by providing evidence that he or she meets one of the English language proficiency standards listed below. Conditionally Accepted: A seat is reserved for the applicant pending receipt of specified requirements. Acceptance does not guarantee enrolment in a chosen program or course. English 12 First Peoples. 4. Original or official copies of all educational transcripts (secondary school and. If English is not the applicant’s native or first language. Game Programming Degree Requirements In addition to English and Math placement.5 • Paper-based TOEFL 550 with TWE 4. min. A photocopy of the student’s passport to provide proof of birth date and citizenship (applicants who have yet not yet acquired a passport will need to submit a copy of their birth certificate). min.

Individuals with student authorizations for six-months or longer must be covered under the province’s medical service plan. Successful completion is defined as passing all courses for which the student was registered during the two semesters. and in some cases. other electronic media. Satisfactory completion of English at the 100 level at an accredited English speaking college or university.cic.0 Completion of 5 42 420 Completion of level 4 Completion of Level 9 Completion of level 6 197 530 75 or higher 650 5. access to the materials and your rights and responsibilities related to Digital Bookshelf. In Victoria.5 Completion of 5 44 526 Completion of level 4 Completion of Level 11 Completion of level 6 213 550 80 700 6. High School Diploma from a country in which English is the official language. This mandatory fee is a flat rate per course and allows students access to an Electronic Library and HTML versions of textbook(s). as there is a three-month waiting period.gc. call 604-382-8406 or write to the following address: BC Medical Services Plan. BC V8W 2X9.bc. The fee for a Study Permit is currently $125. Victoria. students must obtain Study Permits prior to entering Canada. you will need to obtain a separate Work Permit. The Art Institute of Vancouver is obliged to provide notification to Citizenship and Immigration Canada. If you plan to work during your stay in Canada. Digital Bookshelf and eBooks The Art Institute of Vancouver is in the process of enhancing the learning experience by converting traditional textbooks to electronic media. PO Box 1600. To extend your study permit. Students are responsible for reading the Digital Bookshelf and eBook User’s Manual publication which describes the media. International students should not acquire private medical insurance for any longer than this time period as it will still be mandatory for them to be covered by MSP. contact the nearest Canadian Immigration Centre at least twomonths before the expiry of your Study Permit. Students should apply immediately upon acceptance.Academic Calendar . Applicants may also satisfy the minimum standard of English language proficiency by successfully completing the English for Academic Purposes course at The Art Institute of Vancouver or submitting official documentation of one of the following: • Successful completion of a minimum of two semesters or quarters of post-secondary course work at an accredited college or university in which English is the language of instruction. In Vancouver. or visit their Web site at www. Where an international student on a Study Permit has been dismissed or withdraws from the program for which the Study Permit is/has been issued. achieving a grade of “C” or higher. For more information contact Citizenship and Immigration Canada at 1-888-242-2100.gov. Thus eventually most courses will have a digital resource fee associated with them. call 604-683-7151. Medical International students must have a valid Study Permit upon entering Canada to be eligible for medical coverage under the BC Medical Services Plan (MSP).ca. For more information call 1-800-663-7100 (This number is intended for persons residing outside Victoria or Vancouver). You can also visit their Web site at http://www.Diploma Students: Columbia College EF International Language Schools ELS Canada iTEP Pacific Language Institute (PLI) Pearson Scholastic Aptitude Test Verbal Vanwest College Vancouver English Centre Language Studies Canada (LSC) TOEFL (computer-based) TOEFL (paper-based) TOEFL (Internet-based) TOEIC IELTS Degree Students: Columbia College EF International Language Schools ELS Canada iTEP Pacific Language Institute (PLI) Perason Scholastic Aptitude Test Verbal Vanwest College Vancouver English Centre Language Studies Canada (LSC) TOEFL (computer-based) TOEFL (paper-based) TOEFL (Internet-based) TOEIC IELTS Completion of English 097 or higher C1 Completion of Level 109 4. Study Permits In order to study at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Page 127 The Art Institute of Vancouver . which is integrated into the course. The cost at publication date is $54 per month.5 • • • GED administered in English.ca/healthservices/ Applicants should contact the Admissions Office to determine other examinations for which official scores are acceptable as an alternative.5 Completion of English 097 or higher C1 Completion of Level 108 4. Obtaining proper Study Permits is the student’s responsibility.

As with any software.5 or Java 1. Online courses may use different textbooks and/or software than on ground courses. International students interested in enroling in online courses through The Art Institute should consult with the school’s international student advisor. Users wanting to move their material to their hard drive may need additional space.com/reader/) eCollege and VitalSource System and Hardware Specifications The Art Institute of Vancouver uses eCollege and Vital Source to deliver its digital resources. Java will be required.5 SP1 Latest version of Safari Browser. Preferred Hardware Specifications: • 2.4 • • Microsoft Windows XP SP2 or higher with Microsoft .5 or 10. Purchasing a low-price laptop or desktop computer that meets the system requirements outlined above is a much better solution for classwork. They are delivered in an asynchronous electronic mode.6 • • Windows 7 or Vista with Microsoft .html) If Window . the course registration will display whether there is a digital resource fee or whether paper textbooks are required for each particular course.com/java/index. Adobe Reader may be required to open and view those files. MozillaFirefox. or Internet Explorer Recommendation regarding “Netbooks” Students often see “Netbooks” (small laptop computers primarily designed for web browsing and emailing) as an affordable option when looking to purchase a computer for classwork. Online Courses Online Policy The Art Institute offers selected online courses through a consortium agreement with The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division. Mozilla Firefox 2. You can download these items at the time that they are deemed necessary. however.apple. Student participation in the course is required in addition to submitting formal assignments for the course.0. It is also important that users understand the process and benefits of maintaining their machines in top operating condition by keeping them current with the latest operating system updates. and other beneficial habits.0 GHz processor • • • 512 MB of RAM Graphics card capable of 1024x768 screen resolution Dial-up internet access is the minimum standard. students are expected to complete all work and submit assignments within the time periods given by the instructor as listed on the course syllabus. some older Netbooks may not be able to graphically handle these sites. correctly configuring virus control.com) Adobe Reader (http://get.5) (http:// developer.0 or higher.MacOS Classic Java (MRJ 2. Provided the digital resources for the retaken course still uses the same digital books. As in traditional on ground classes. students do not purchase additional textbook(s) for these courses. participate in discussions and post assignments. Online courses are 5½ weeks in length.Net 3.adobe. study questions. If your instructor uses Page 128 The Art Institute of Vancouver .Students retaking a course are charged only once for the digital resources fee associated with the same course because students have access to the digital resources materials for five years.Sun’s Java 2 SDK (Java 1. Students are able to access assignments. it is strongly recommended that students do not purchase a Netbook. Study Permits for international students are not available for distance education courses of study. The Art Institute charges the same tuition for online courses as it charges for on ground courses. and the larger hard drive space you provide. and maximize relevance to prior learning and experiences. Internet Explorer 6 or higher Minimum Hardware Specifications: • 1. On average the price of the digital resource fee is less than the retail price of the textbook(s) for each course.java. While newer Netbooks may meet resolution and screen-size requirements for reading your eBooks.5 SP1 Safari browser 3. • • • • Java If Mac . A $100 fee is charged in addition for each online course to cover administrative and technical support for students. Online courses have similar course and exit competencies as the on ground versions of the same course. Online courses are specifically designed to take advantage of technology. meaning that students can work on the course anytime. make the learning environment more efficient. If your instructor provides PDF files. a higher speed is recommended Recommended Plug-ins or Downloads: Course instructors may employee technology in the eCollege classroom that requires one of these recommended plug-ins or downloads in order to function properly. This means that reading e-texts and participating in the classroom could become difficult.6) (http://www.0 GHz Intel processor • • • • 1 GB of RAM Graphics card capable of 1024x768 resolution or larger Soundcard & speakers High speed internet access Minimum Software Specifications: • Apple Mac OSX 10. the ClassLive technology.Net 3. the more RAM. with the added benefits of no shipping charges and immediate access to the materials. It may be challenging to scroll through your readings and effectively and efficiently work through the material. One day is defined as the 24-hour period beginning at 5:01 AM and ending at 5:00 AM EST.2. When you register for a course. the faster the processor. the better the performance. Preferred Software Specifications: • Mac OSX 10. However. much like some older laptops. lectures.Academic Calendar .4 or higher. Students are required to log in to the course four out of each seven days in the class week (each of the four log-ins during a separate 24-hour period).

However. Students wishing to take an online course must complete an online orientation to familiarize themselves with the platform that will be used in the virtual classroom. at www. made available through The Art Institute. Students not completing the orientation prior to the quarterly deadline published by Academic Affairs will not be allowed to participate in the online course. www. Therefore. The Art Institute of Vancouver . these courses may be dropped up to four academic days after the start of the second session without financial penalty. as well as a reliable connection to the Internet. In addition. Students who choose to withdraw from a second session online course by 5 PM Friday of the ninth week will receive a “W” (withdrawal) grade for their course(s). they will receive a final letter grade in that course. aionline. virtual students who wish to withdraw must withdraw from both courses which will withdraw them from enrolment for the quarter. A student choosing to withdraw from a first session online course must do so by 5 PM Friday of the fourth week of the quarter and will receive a “W” (withdrawal) grade for the course(s). however. The second session begins the following day and runs for 5 ½ weeks and ends on the same day as the on-ground quarter ends. Online Orientation Registration for Online Courses Prior to registration each quarter. Students should ensure they have the correct course by referring to the online course code located on the quarterly published list located in the Online information packet available from Academic Affairs. edu. Every student is encouraged to take advantage of these support services. a student may receive permission from their Academic Advisor or Academic Department Director to withdraw from an online course. Advising and other student services are the same for all programs regardless of on ground or online delivery. registration for online courses ends prior to the start of a quarter (see Academic Affairs for deadlines). Please note no refunds will be given for any online course withdrawals initiated after the designated Schedule Adjustment Period. Doing this would cause the student to no longer be in attendance. Technical Support Online Course Schedules Students have access to 24-hour technical support via a toll-free number throughout the course to assist them should they have any problems. Online Course Textbooks Textbooks for online courses are listed in syllabi located at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division Web site.Requirements for Participation in Online Courses Students must have computer hardware and software equivalent to the specifications indicated by The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division.edu/online-education/tech-requirements. In addition. Students are advised of resources where they may purchase their own equipment through an outside vendor. A “WF” grade is calculated into the CGPA as an “F” grade. will have their enrolment terminated and should refer to the Refund Policy for more information. Students in this situation must apply for readmission into The Art Institute the subsequent quarter. Students also have access to email through The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division Web site. The first session begins on the same day as the on ground quarter begins and ends 5 ½ weeks later. Student Services for Students Taking Online Courses The Art Institute provides a wide variety of support services to students in order to assist them in completing their educational programs and reaching their career goals. aionline. Specific technology requirements are listed by program on The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division Website. all faculty members who teach online are required to successfully complete a six week online training course. The Art Institute provides students with a list of courses to be offered online. Virtual students who register for two online courses. Students who drop all of their courses. The second session courses have an extended Schedule Adjustment Period. Students are not. students may drop an online course without financial penalty. if a student withdraws after their first session online course ends. www.aionline. In many cases. are not permitted to withdraw from an individual course. Students should speak to the online facilitator or Academic Affairs for additional information or educational support. faculty members who teach online courses teach the same courses on ground in The Art Institute system. During this time. either online or on ground. Because The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division needs additional lead time to set up the courses. A student withdrawing from either session after these deadlines will receive a “WF” (withdraw failure) grade in their respective course(s). Student services are available on ground at The Art Institute for all students who reside locally or via email and telephone (at The Art Institute’s toll-free phone number) for students who do not reside in the immediate area or do not wish to meet in person. Students who are new to online are required to sign a consortium agreement and complete an online orientation. Faculty members who teach online courses possess equivalent academic credentials and experience as faculty who teach the same course on ground. Students who choose to take only online courses during a particular quarter are considered “virtual” students. Online courses are offered in two sessions within an academic quarter. Students withdrawing from school before the end of their online course will either receive a “W” or “WF” grade based upon the same deadlines stated above. Once the Schedule Adjustment Period ends.edu. one each session. educational support is offered through The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division for many online courses. required to purchase or lease any hardware or software through The Art Institute. Online Faculty Online Schedule Adjustment Policy The first seven academic days (including Saturday) of each quarter constitute the Schedule Adjustment Period. Online course codes are different from on-ground course codes.Academic Calendar Page 129 . Students register for online courses during the regular registration period for the upcoming academic quarter. to address any questions or concerns that arise.

fees. can make the final determination as to a student’s eligibility and the amount of student loan for which a student may qualify.g. Eligibility Requirements There are basic eligibility requirements (subject to change) that students normally must meet in order to qualify for assistance under the British Columbia Student Assistance Program (BCSAP). and to initiate loan renewal applications in advance of the upcoming quarters. or permanent resident of Canada with a valid IMM1000. These programs include loan and grant assistance for qualified applicants. Student Aid include: Student Financial Services At the time of initial enrolment. • Maintain enrolment and attendance in at least 60 per• Attain satisfactory scholastic standing in each period of post-secondary study by successfully completing at least 60 percent of a full course load. any student whose financial circumstances change or for whom a financial need arises should contact Student Financial Services for assistance. etc. B. only the student loan authority (e. or do apply and are determined to be ineligible for assistance. or any other status changes that might affect the student’s eligibility for financial assistance. • Not be incarcerated or have an outstanding warrant for • Be able to demonstrate financial need based on a moderate standard of living as determined by federal criteria. The satisfactory academic progress policies and related financial assistance eligibility policies are outlined herein. This department is responsible for processing student payments. a student must make satisfactory academic progress as defined in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy. Only government student assistance officials can make determination about a student’s eligibility. supplies. • Be pursuing full-time studies as their primary occupa• Not be in default of previous student loans or restricted from receiving assistance due to an audit. Students who receive financial assistance are cautioned to remember the various responsibilities they have under these programs: to maintain satisfactory academic progress as outlined elsewhere herein. the student meets with a Financial Planner to work on a plan so that he or she should be able to meet the expenses involved in the education process (tuition. Student Accounting works in conjunction with Student Financial Services when unforeseen circumstances affect a student’s ability to meet financial commitments. Student Assistance Program (BCSAP)). the BCSAP. cent of a full course load at all times. Details regarding these programs are available in Student Financial Services. or other reasons.C. Student Financial Assistance To be eligible for Student Financial Assistance. Student eligibility requirements (subject to change) for B.Academic Calendar . The school is very sensitive to the unforeseen circumstances that can affect a student’s ability to meet financial commitments. for each study period a student receives student financial assistance and/or interest-free status. Students must be eligible for Canada Student Loan funding in order to be eligible for provincial funding. this staff offers planning services to all students. as applicable. The Art Institute of Vancouver is eligible to offer its students the opportunity to apply for a variety of financial assistance programs.) for the length of the program. The continuing student should be aware that the federal and provincial eligibility criteria are periodically reviewed and modified. to inform Student Financial Services of address changes. • Have a valid Canadian Social Insurance Number. • Be a Canadian citizen. The Art Institute of Vancouver Student Financial Services staff can assist students in understanding the student financial assistance options that may be available to him/her. • Be a resident of British Columbia as defined by BCSAP. • Attend a provincially designated school as defined by The Art Institute of Vancouver . The Art Institute of Vancouver Student Financial Services staff may also be able to identify additional or alternate funding options for students from both public and private sources. Any student who has incurred or anticipates a financial problem is encouraged to meet with Student Accounting to discuss alternative payment options. Student Accounting bills students quarterly or monthly based on the financial plan developed in Student Financial Services. As noted. cost of living. Consequently. Page 130 • Graduated Grade 12 or GED 12. to inform Student Financial Services of address changes. the student who receives financial assistance must maintain satisfactory academic progress to remain eligible for such assistance on a continuing basis. However. Only BCSAP can make the determination about a student’s eligibility for student assistance. tion. as applicable. and to initiate loan renewal applications in advance of the upcoming quarters. Some students do not initially apply for financial assistance. or any other status changes that might affect the student’s eligibility for financial assistance. Therefore. Any student who has incurred or anticipates a financial problem is encouraged to meet with Student Financial Services and receive consulting assistance as needed to ensure his/her completion.C.Financial Information Administrative and Financial Services Student Accounting The Student Accounting Department assists students to satisfy their financial responsibility. arrest.

only the passing grade will be computed in the grade point average. Refunds will be made within thirty (30) calendar days after the applicant’s/student’s written request or within thirty (30) calendar days after his/her first scheduled class day. The student may voluntarily withdraw from school by notifying the Office of the Registrar in writing or in person. To calculate the amount earned. Every course for which a student receives an “F” or a “W” grade/code must be repeated and completed with a passing grade in order to graduate. it will reduce the term length and if the scheduled break is before the student’s last date of attendance (LDA). a student must notify the Office of the Registrar. The school will calculate the percentage and amount of awarded Federal student financial assistance that the student has earned if the student withdraws up through the 60 percent point of the term (or session if the student is only attending a session). the student may be eligible for a postwithdrawal disbursement. A complete listing of program tuition costs and fees is published and updated in the addendum to this Academic Calendar. which has financial implications as outlined in the PCTIA (Private Career Training Institution’s Agency of British Columbia. Withdrawals and failed courses can affect the student’s Incremental Completion Rate and ability to succeed. Funds will be returned to the aid source within forty-five (45) calendar days of the date that the school determines that the student has withdrawn. If the student received more than the amount of Federal student financial assistance earned. the school will determine the percentage by dividing the number of calendar days completed in the term up to and including the last date of attendance by the total number of calendar days in the term. SEOG. the student must return any loan funds that remain to be returned in accordance with the terms and conditions of the promissory note. If the student has completed more than 60 percent of the term. If there is a scheduled break of five or more days. No transcripts. the student earns 100 percent of the Federal student financial assistance. If Federal student financial assistance funds need to be returned. The school will notify the student as to the amount owed and how and where it should be returned. Direct PLUS Loan. The Art Institute of Vancouver . However. or • The entire amount of unearned funds. This can include ‘taking a break’ from your • The institutional charges multiplied by the percentage of the unearned Federal student financial assistance funds. The Art Institute of Vancouver may extend your credit during periods when financial aid application materials are in process and/or provide you with the convenience of paying your Balance of Costs through periodic payments. A student who withdraws from a program before the end of week 9 will be assigned a “W” code for each course within that quarter. Should you withdraw from the program for any reason prior to the disbursement of financial aid funds. when a course is successfully repeated. the student must return any amount of the overpayment that is more than half of the grant funds received.Payment of Tuition and Fees Tuition for each quarter is due within 30 days of the first day of class. the grade may not be changed without approval by the Academic Director or Chair and the Dean of Academic Affairs. the difference will be returned to the Federal student financial assistance programs from which funds were received in the following order: Unsubsidized Direct Loan. The amount earned will be based on the percentage of the term that was completed in days up to and including the last date of attendance. If there are remaining unearned Federal financial aid funds to be returned.F. you are responsible for any account balance remaining. Return of Federal Title IV Aid In compliance with Federal regulations. The refund policies outlined below shall apply in the event that a student withdraws from school. Non-payment of account to The Art Institute of Vancouver may result in additional collection costs to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law. The Art Institute of Vancouver reserves the right to withdraw extension of credit for any reason of non-payment or default of such payments. If you are making any change to your studies. the institution must return a portion or all of the unearned funds equal to the lesser of: Tuition Refund Policy The Art Institute tuition refund policy is no less generous than the PCTIA refund policy. When a final course grade has been established and recorded in the student record. it will also reduce the calendar days completed. studies. cheques. Perkins Loan. A student may not register for any academic quarter unless all tuition and fees due have been paid. certificates or diplomas will be given to any student until tuition fees (and any other monies owing to the Institute) are paid in full. or is suspended or terminated by the school. If more Federal student financial assistance has been earned than has been received. Tuition is charged for repeated courses. To withdraw from a program. If the remaining amount of funds to be returned includes grant funds. Subsidized Direct Loan. The Art Institute of Vancouver will charge a $15 service charge on all N.S. formerly PPSEC) directive within your Student Enrollment Agreement. The original grade/code and the subsequent passing grade(s) will remain on the record for reference purposes. The school will notify the student of any post-withdrawal disbursement for which the student may be eligible and what steps need to be taken for the Federal financial assistance funds to be received.Academic Calendar Page 131 . you need to contact your Academic Director to discuss the implications which could include refund or withdrawal penalties. the school will determine how much Federal student financial assistance the student has earned or not earned when a student withdraws from school. Pell Grant. or unless the student has made arrangements for an approved alternative payment plan. Withdrawing from a course may mean withdrawing from your program.

that is. the applicant/student will receive a refund of the starting kit fees paid provided the kit has not been received by the student or the kit is returned to The Art Institute unopened and within 20 days of the student’s last day of class attendance. including the cost of the starting kit.397. minus the $50 application fee and the $100 assessment fee. (b) If the applicant is approved and cancels the Enrollment Agreement in writing before the quarter or mid-quarter of the program/course start date. or any refund due a student.030. the Student Quarterly Fee is non-refundable. (e) In addition to the tuition fee refund prescribed within this section. The Art Institute will retain 30% of the total tuition due under the contract for that quarter or session of study. Before Quarter Start Refund Example: A student enrolls in a 105-credit diploma program. (g) Each academic quarter is 11 weeks in duration. $100 assessment fee.000 and purchases the starting kit for $220 prior to starting classes. The calculation of refunds is based upon the last day of attendance within the quarter. (c) Where the delivery of the program of study is through home study or distance education.Institutional Refund Policy Refund entitlement is calculated on the total fees due under the contract. 4 (b) of the PCTIA Bylaws. Refunds After the Quarter or Mid-Quarter Starts: (a) If written notice of withdrawal is received by The Art Institute or a student is dismissed by the school within 10% of the quarter or session of study’s duration. The calculation of refunds is based upon the last day of attendance within the term. (d) Where a student’s tuition has been paid in part or in whole by a recognized student aid program. (b) Tuition refunds owing to students shall be paid within thirty (30) days of The Art Institute receiving written notification of withdrawal. (f) A separate lease agreement and refund policy exists for students who lease housing accommodations arranged by The Art Institute. and the $177 student quarterly fee. The Art Institute of Vancouver . The Art Institute reserves the right to apply any student payment. if it is returned in good condition. the applicant will receive a refund of all tuition and other fees paid less the $50 application fee and the $100 assessment fee. $177 student quarterly fee. The Art Institute may modify the tuition refund policy as deemed appropriate to the circumstances. The Art Institute will retain 100% of the tuition due under the contract for the quarter or session of study. If the student cancels the Enrollment Agreement on the 8th day of the quarter. the applicant will receive a refund of all tuition and other fees paid. 2. refunds must be based on the percent of the program of study completed at the rates specified in Part IV. (e) In the event of a fully documented extreme illness or personal emergency that makes it impractical for the student to complete the program. The refund amount would be $1. (i) Examples of the calculations are available in the Student Accounting office. if the student fails to cancel/ withdraw their Enrollment Agreement by providing notice in writing to The Art Institute before the first day of class of the quarter. Please see your Financial Aid Officer before dropping or adding a course. or within thirty (30) days of The Art Institute’s written notice of dismissal. such as the Animation Art & Design Program.221. (c) If a student withdraws or is dismissed after 30% of the quarter or session of study’s duration. pays the $50 application fee. (d) The Student Quarterly Fee is non-refundable as of the first day of the quarter start. less the applicable non-refundable Application and Assessment Fees. minus the $50 application fee. Refunds Before the Quarter or Mid-Quarter Starts: (a) If the applicant is not approved for admission by The Art Institute of Vancouver. Information in the catalog or student handbook will apply except for the following changes specific to Session II courses: Add/Drop period is two days from the start of Session II courses and financial aid eligibility may change if the student drops or adds one or more courses. (b) Subject to subsection (2)(a). the student receives a full refund. The refund amount would be $4. The Art Institute is not responsible for refunding more than has been collected to date and a student may be required to pay for amounts due under the contract. and the student withdraws or is dismissed. The Art Institute will retain 50% of the total tuition due under the contract for that quarter or session of study. both of which are non-refundable.Academic Calendar . $100 assessment fee. The Art Institute tuition refund policy is as follows: 1. the student receives a refund of the first quarter tuition minus 30%. unless the student returns the equipment unopened or as issued within fourteen (14) calendar days. $177 student quarterly fee and the first quarter tuition of $6. if written notice of withdrawal is received by The Art Institute or a student is dismissed by the school after 10% and before 30% of the quarter or session of study’s duration. makes monthly early payment incentive of $1. without cost to the student. pays the $50 application fee and the $100 assessment fee. Other Refund Policy Requirements: (a) Where The Art Institute provides technical equipment to a student. to any student financial liability. Page 132 After the Quarter Start Refund Example: A student enrolls in a 75-credit diploma program. 3. The Art Institute may charge the student for the equipment or use of the equipment on a cost recovery basis. such as the Graphic Design program. (h) Session II academic terms are approximately five and one-half weeks in duration. Where total fees have not yet been collected. The Art Institute may be required to refund the funding party before any refund is payable to the student. If the student cancels the Enrollment Agreement with written notice before the first day of class.

Book Process (Specifically applicable to U.Academic Calendar Page 133 . the remaining amount due will be posted to the student’s account and the student will be responsible for making alternative payment arrangements. will be applied to the applicable session attended using the session start and end dates. books.S. Kits. Books. for the term in question. Students who do not authorize and who have excess Title IV funding due to receiving funds from a Pell Grant will receive the lesser amount of either the amount of their Pell Grant excess or their full credit balance amount. or Supplies Return Policy If kits. Appeal of Financial Assistance Students who are denied or suspended from financial assistance may file an appeal. Examples of the calculations are available in the Student Accounting office. or uniforms. Students) Students in need of purchasing books for their classes will need to sign an authorization form either approving or not approving the use of excess Title IV funds. Session II courses begin approximately the day after the Session I courses end. if applicable. supplies. completely unused condition within twenty (20) calendar days of the last date of attendance. and run approximately five and one-half weeks. Students who do not authorize and who are receiving excess Title IV funds but do not have a Pell Grant will receive a stipend within the later of the term begin date or 14 days of the date of their credit balance on their ledger card. within seven days of the start of the term. to cover the cost of books and supplies. Tuition Tax Receipts T2202A T2202A tax receipts will be mailed to each student’s home address. If the purchase of books and supplies should exceed the amount of the student’s credit balance after all aid pays in. The Art Institute of Vancouver . Components of the Kits. Refund Policy for Online Course Withdrawal Students who withdrawal from a Session I or Session II online course after the add/drop period are treated the same as if they withdrew from an on-ground course. components of the kit. the Return of Federal Title IV Aid calculation. a credit will be given. as described above. are returned to the Supply Store in resalable. See Student Financial Services department for additional information. under appropriate federal and provincial guidelines. The ending date of the second session may not coincide with ending date of the onground courses.Return of Title IV Aid Session I or Session II Only If students are only scheduled to attend Session I or Session II.

How to Enter Current students on full course loads are automatically entered.$3.$500 First Place September 23. See website.Academic Calendar . Varies Page 134 The Art Institute of Vancouver . $500 Third Place See website. See website. Cruel Competition Student Design Competition The Art Institutes Payment Plan Incentive Credit Eligible Students Current students on full course loads Quantity Awarded Amount Awarded Varies Varies. 2011 The program is ongoing. first-served basis.$1.000.edu/ postercompetition http://www. Complete details. Local . Unlimited for other Varies $5000-$2000 Maximum AiEPIC is $500 for each 3-month period.aspx Contact your Assistant Director of Admissions Contact your Assistant Director of Admissions Community College The Art Institutes Early Payment Incentive Credit Program Adults Prospective Students One $5000. aspx http://www. $750 Second Place. 2012 How to Enter Contact your Assistant Director of Admissions or visit AiScholarship.adobeaicontest. April 20. January 20. Current Students Award Name The Art Institute of Vancouver Merit Scholarship Humane Society Cool vs. http://www.edu/ competitions/cool-vs-cruel. Deadline for Entry Awards are granted quarterly based on previous term grade point average.000 to $20. 2012 The program is ongoing. 2012 February 3.com/ Vancouver artinstitutes.000 Second Place.000 First Place National . Local . Deadline for Entry Awards are granted on a first-come.One half tuition First Place.000 Third Place See website.edu/ passion4fashion Passion for Fashion Competition High School Seniors One in each category. The maximum incentive credit is $500 for each six consecutive monthly payments or two quarterly on-time payments made. November 28.Scholarship Information The following scholarships are available for prospective students. $4. edu/competitions/culinaryscholarship-competitionbest-teen-chef. com/ Contact your Student Accounting Representative.artinstitutes.500-$1. 2012 www. Prospective Students Scholarship Name The Art Institute of Vancouver Scholarship Eligible Students Prospective Students Quantity Awarded Amount Awarded Varies Individual awards range from $1. 2011 National .artinstitutes. terms and conditions for each scholarship can be found on the scholarship website or from an admissions representatve.artinstitutes. not to exceed $2000 total.000 First Place. $5. $4.000 other Poster Design Competition Best Teen Chef Competition High School Seniors Adults High School Seniors Adults See website. Three February 3. Current Fashion Design and Fashion Marketing students Current students Current students See website.000 First Place $1.

7 75-77% C+ 2. Advanced Standing Course credits. may request transfer credit by submitting a transcript along with the request. The Art Institute of Vancouver reserves the right not to accept any advanced course credit applications and the transfer of any credit based solely on its internal guidelines. It is not the policy of The Art Institute of Vancouver to impose redundant programs or requirements on any student. 2. All transfer credits must be reviewed prior to the student’s matriculation. Transfer credit must support the academic program. Administrative Position Responsible for Transfer Evaluation The Dean of Academic Affairs is the administrator ultimately responsible for the transfer evaluation. c. but have no letter or point value and are not computed in the grade point average. The review committee reserves the right to require examinations or other proof of competence regardless of transfer credits listed on the student’s records. Not all prior credit is applicable to academic programs at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Grades earned are C (2. and where the courses are comparable to those offered by The Art Institute of Vancouver program to which the student applies.0) or higher. Requests must be received prior to matriculation. though the Dean may delegate individual evaluations to faculty members or academic staff. Academic credit earned within 10 years prior to admission will be reviewed as to applicability to the present course of study. are applied to the total credits required for graduation.4 72-74% C 2.0 55-61% F 0 0-54% 1. or Mathematics and Sciences categories. accompanies the request. but did not complete an academic credential. which must be made prior to matriculation at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Academic Grading System A student’s cumulative grade point average is calculated by a) Multiplying credits for each course by grade points associated with the grade earned. Students who have earned credits at a postsecondary institution.4 82-84% B 3. Corporate or specialized training programs may be recognized as transfer credits as recommended by generally accepted educational standards. 3. Transfer of Credit Policy Credit for courses taken at an accredited postsecondary institution may be accepted at The Art Institute of Vancouver if the following conditions are met: The Art Institute of Vancouver . All exceptions must be approved by a designee of the Academic Affairs Department.0 or better. Credits will not be accepted after the student has matriculated at The Art Institute of Vancouver. a. Credit is applied for prior to matriculation. Credit may be granted on a course by course basis if: a.Academic Calendar Page 135 . A designee of the Academic Affairs Department will evaluate all transcripts and requests for credit to determine transfer credit acceptable to The Art Institute of Vancouver as meeting partial requirements for the program of study. Social and Behavioral Sciences.7 65-67% D+ 1. All credits requested have been completed prior to matriculation. 4. Academic Directors.7 85-87% B+ 3. Advanced Course Credit Credit will be given for college courses successfully completed with a grade point of 2. The Process for Evaluation of Transfer Credit Transfer credit must meet the expectations of the faculty. and c) Dividing total grade points earned by the total number of quality credits. quizzes. or prior learning assessment. and on a case-by-case basis.0 78-81% B- 2. There is no accommodation for concurrent enrolment. General Education courses fit into the Humanities. Students with credentials from international colleges and universities must submit a translation of the transcript along with the request to transfer credits. Credits may be granted on a course by course basis. b.4 62-64% D 1. The Process for Establishing Equivalency of Transfer Credit Transfer credit is accepted from postsecondary institutions authorized by appropriate legal authorities. GPA and letter equivalency: Letter Grade Grade Points Percentage A 4. Official grades must be on file. and must be appropriate to the credential sought. which may be awarded by advanced course credit. The credit must be from an accredited post-secondary institution authorized by appropriate legal authorities. b) Totaling the grade points earned for all the courses. An official transcript. proficiency examination. or transcripts.0 68-71% C- 1.0 88-100% A- 3. tests.Academic Policies and Procedures The Art Institute of Vancouver maintains academic policies to ensure a quality education and to provide meaningful measurements of student academic progress. The grading system incorporates numerical points to grade student work. and the Dean of Academic Affairs. b. The following scale shows the letter grades and their corresponding numerical. or exams. All advanced course credit must be applied for and approved before the first (1st) day of class of the initial quarter of study.

In the Canadian higher education system. studio work. f. A current resume. e. use of different instructional models. Copies of certificates or recognition for the completion of course work. Please include a description for all submitted work. internships. Submit their request prior to the start of their program. i. Prospective students seeking credit for non-traditional learning must demonstrate mastery of competencies acquired through their professional work or other learning experiences. For this reason. Programs offered by one school within The Art Institute system may be similar to. Course codes that are 100. it is your responsibility to determine whether that school will accept your Art Institute credits. b. 5. see the Dean of Academic Affairs or Academic Advisor for details. The value of programs like those offered by The Art Institute is their deliberate focus on marketable skills. d. 4. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work. or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time. Submit the following where applicable: a. and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours. grades. We encourage you to make this determination as early as possible. for example: • printed samples with a description of project purpose • CD or disk with files description of project purpose • URLs demonstrating description of project purpose Maximum Advanced Standing No more than 75 percent of the quarter credits required for graduation from The Art Institute of Vancouver may be satisfied through a combination of transfer credit. An earned transfer credit will be represented as “TR” on the student’s official transcript. not all of the credits you earn may be transferable. transferability of credit is determined by the receiving institution taking into account such factors as course content. and/or challenge exams. The Art Institute does not imply. but not identical to programs offered at another school within the system. accreditation and licensing. and are typically taken in the third and fourth years of academic study. 3. it is unlikely that the academic credits you earn at The Art Institute will transfer to another school. Appropriate portfolio/work examples for each course challenge. 2. The Art Institute of Vancouver . However. or 2. This is due to differences imposed by local law. demonstrating the competency or competencies. or the applicant may be required to complete an equivalent project. Photoshop workshop. applicants must: 1. These competencies will be demonstrated through submission of a portfolio to The Art Institute of Vancouver and will be reviewed by the respective program department.Transferability of Credits The Art Institute is accredited by the Private Career Training Institutions Agency of British Columbia (PCTIA) and participates in the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfers (BCCAT) system as a degree-granting institution. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of class student work each week for 10-12 weeks. Course codes that are 500-600 level codes are graduate courses.Academic Calendar . Course codes that are 0-level codes are non-credit Transitional Studies courses. Pay the non-refundable administrative fee. Quarter Credit Hour Definition A quarter credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than: 1. Complete one (1) PLAR form for each course challenge. Demonstrate the competencies for the courses to which they are applying. Copies of awards received for work. Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) is a process whereby students receive credit for learning that occurred in a non-standard or non-traditional environment. Credit is not granted based on experience alone. or guarantee transferability of its credits to any other institution. Letter(s) of recommendation.or 400-level codes are upper division courses. and are typically taken in the first two years of academic study. Course Code Numbering Course codes are numbered to delineate whether they are lower or upper division.e. To apply for PLAR. if you decide to transfer to another school within The Art Institute system. The mission of The Art Institute is to help you prepare for entrylevel employment in your chosen field of study. an exam may be arranged. If the applicant cannot provide examples Page 136 Quarter Credit Hour The following definition of a Quarter Credit Hour replaces all previous references to Quarter Credit Hour Definition or Quarter Credit Hour Requirements. an accrediting agency recognized by the United States Department of Education. and local employer needs. c. If you are considering transferring to either another Art Institute or an unaffiliated school. It is the responsibility of those seeking credit to follow these guidelines in order for evaluation to occur. The Art Institute is also accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. Therefore. Course codes that are 300. the fact that a school is accredited is not necessarily an indication that credits earned at that school will be accepted by another school. credit for prior learning assessment. promise.or 200-level codes are lower division courses. The credits earned are not intended as a stepping stone for transfer to another institution.

and completion of the program without attempting more than 150% of the credits in the program. Receiving D or lower grades and/or withdrawing from classes may put students at risk. 2012 I. Quarter Honors Designations (at the completion of a quarter) Any student who enrolls for and completes 12 credits or more is eligible for the following designations: Quarter GPA 4. It is very important that students attend all registered courses and complete them successfully. students must attain a minimum CGPA of 1. Should a compelling reason arise that requires a student to cease attendance. a student may appeal the Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. The Art Institute of Vancouver has the right to modify the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy at any time.S.0. The following criteria are used to determine whether or not a student is making satisfactory academic progress.Academic Calendar . In order for a student to graduate. students receiving Title IV funds. Administrative actions will be taken when a student fails to meet the minimum standards of any of the above criteria.5 or better are designated as Honor Graduates. Students who are only participating in Transitional Studies courses are considered to be maintaining satisfactory academic progress (SAP). Purpose/Scope The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy ensures that all students enrolled in certificate. Criteria for Honors Designations To promote academic excellence and to recognize exemplary academic achievement.7-3. The criteria and standards contained in this policy are set to recognize exemplary academic achievements or to detect problems for which actions of early intervention and/or remediation can be taken. Page 137 The Art Institute of Vancouver .0 3. Anything below these milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter.0 and an ICR of 33. the minimum requirements are a CGPA of 2. the student will remain dismissed and can no longer attend or receive Title IV aid at the Institute. and Complete the program within a maximum allowable timeframe (MTF). diploma. II. the following system is recommended for honor designations on a quarter basis and upon graduation. Milestones and Evaluation Points for Satisfactory Academic Progress Certificate and Diploma Programs that are less than 90 credits in length 1.99 3. The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy complies with requirements of accrediting commission(s) along with federal and provincial regulatory guidelines. A student must be able to: • • • Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA). If the appeal is denied. and Academic/Financial Aid Probation are used. If the resulting action results in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. Definitions • • • Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) Incremental Completion Rate (ICR) Maximum Allowable Timeframe (MTF) The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy contains the following information: • • Criteria for Honors Designations Milestones and Evaluation Points for Satisfactory Academic Progress • Academic/Financial Aid Warning • Procedure for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal • Procedure to Apply for Re-Entry after Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal • Academic/Financial Aid Probation and an Academic Plan • Explanations of Related Issues Failure to complete courses successfully for any reason may negatively affect Satisfactory Academic Progress. At the end of the first quarter. it is the student’s responsibility to immediately contact the Dean of Academic Affairs or Registrar’s Office.5-3. References to Financial Aid eligibility in this policy apply to U. Completing courses with C or better grades indicates academic progress. Students who fail to meet the minimum standards of any of the above criteria will be notified by letter by the Dean/Vice President of Academic Affairs or Campus Registrar within four (4) business days of determination.67% ICR. the status applies to all students whether receiving aid or not. Failing courses or withdrawing from courses could result in the loss of financial aid and academic dismissal. Policy Guidance A student must demonstrate Satisfactory Academic Progress by successfully completing courses attempted. Academic/ Financial Aid Dismissal. These references do not apply to the eligibility of Canadian students to receive Canadian federal and/or provincial student aid.Undergraduate Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy Effective for quarters beginning on or after April 1. Transitional studies courses are not considered when evaluating honors designations.33%.69 Honors Designation President’s Honor List Dean’s Honor List Honor Roll Honors Designation at Graduation Students who achieve a CGPA of 3. and undergraduate degree programs are maintaining satisfactory academic progress towards a successful completion of their academic programs. Achieve the minimum incremental completion rate (ICR). Poor academic performance may lead to Academic/ Financial Warning and/or Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. 66. While the terms Academic/Financial Aid Warning. III.

5 and/or 50. are available on the student portal for review.3%.00% End of Third Quarter and every quarter thereafter Anything in excess of 150% MTF <2. 9. If the student was on Academic/Financial Aid Warning in the previous quarter.0 and an ICR of 66. on Academic/Financial Aid Page 138 Probation.67%. While grades. Students should consult with their academic advisor concerning their exact requirements. At the end of the second academic year.0 and an ICR of 66. Anything below these milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. If the student was on Academic/Financial Aid Warning in the previous quarter. A student who starts or re-enters at a MID session will have that session count as an entire quarter for SAP purposes. failure to meet these standards will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.0 and/or 33.00 and an ICR of 33. 1. grade point average. students must attain a minimum CGPA of 1. anything in excess of 150% of the credits The Art Institute of Vancouver . failure to meet these standards will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. 2. Compliance with SAP is reviewed every quarter for Certificate and Diploma programs that are less than 90 credits in length.67% 2.33% Required Action Academic/Financial Aid Warning Academic/Financial Aid Warning (if 1st time)/ Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal (if on Academic/Financial Aid Warning) Academic/Financial Aid Warning (if 1st time)/ Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal (if on Warning) Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal End of Second Quarter <1. students are evaluated at the end of each quarter and must attain a minimum CGPA of 2. since the maximum time frame to complete is 45 credits (the 30 credits times 150%). they are informational only except at evaluation points. 4. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can happen at any time. and every quarter thereafter. or on Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. Certificate/Diploma Programs that are 90 credits or greater in length and Degree Programs Certificate/Diploma programs that are 90 credits or greater in length and Degree programs are evaluated after a student has attempted three quarters and sixth quarters (including portions of a quarter) during the first six quarters.Certificate/Diploma less than 90 credits Evaluation Point End of First Quarter Milestone (CGPA and ICR) <1. 4. There is also an indication if a student is on Academic/ Financial Aid Warning.67%. Students on Academic/Financial Aid Warning are considered to be making progress toward meeting Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress and. Starting the quarter after the sixth attempted quarter.0 and 66. it will be very difficult to meet the minimum requirements of the next evaluation point. Students should note that if they are on Academic/Financial Aid Warning. 7. Academic/Financial Aid Dismissals can be appealed. The grades.0 and an ICR of 66. Students may not attempt more than 150% of the credits in their programs. cumulative data for all courses a student attempted at the Institution. if otherwise eligible may receive financial aid. If the student was on Academic/Financial Aid Warning in the previous quarter.5 and an ICR of 50. Anything below these milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. Please note students may be alerted of their progress at any time and may be required to take specific action. Please see the Appeal Process below. 8. students must attain a minimum CGPA of 2. 6. At the end of the second quarter. Anything below these milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter unless the student was on Academic/ Financial Aid Warning in his or her previous quarter. 3. and Incremental Completion Rates are made available at the end of a student’s quarter. 3. students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.00%. the student is evaluated at the end of each quarter. anything in excess of 150% of the credits will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. Students may not attempt more than 150% of the credits in their programs. At the end of the third quarter. Please note that if you are in a 30 credit hour certificate or diploma program. At the end of the first academic year (an academic year is three (3) quarters in which courses are attempted in each quarter). Anything below these milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter unless the student was on Academic/Financial Aid Warning in his or her previous quarter. 5. students must attain a minimum CGPA of 2.67%. Unless otherwise noted. Failure to meet these standards will result in Academic/Financial Aid Warning unless the student was on Academic/Financial Aid Warning the previous quarter. as well as courses successfully transferred in from prior postsecondary education. After the sixth quarter. GPAs. failure to meet these standards will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.Academic Calendar . and every quarter thereafter. you may be dismissed if at the end of the 3rd quarter you attempted 45 credits and you did not complete the program.

students must successfully complete such courses in order to progress in the program. the student will be notified by the Dean of Academic Affairs both verbally and in writing. Please note that the student will be dismissed immediately if the student does not successfully complete the same Transitional Study upon a third attempt. earned credits. Like any course. 8. on Academic/Financial Aid Probation or on Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. For Certificate/Diploma programs that are 90 credits in length or greater as well as degree programs.67% Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal Academic/Financial Aid Warning (if 1st time)/ Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal (if on Academic/Financial Aid Warning) Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal <2. Transitional Studies courses do have credit hours assigned to them for enrollment and tuition charging purposes. The written appeal must be supported with appropriate documentation of the mitigating circumstances with an explanation on how the circumstances have been remedied or changed to ensure that he/ she will be able to meet satisfactory academic progress if readmitted. Transitional Studies course credits do not count towards the total number of credits for graduation nor do they count in the CGPA. a student must meet the Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements at the applicable measuring point. The grades. Please see the Appeal Process below. a student who attempts but does not pass or withdraws from the same Transitional Studies course three times is dismissed and there is no right to appeal the dismissal. Procedure for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal A student who is dismissed for violating Satisfactory Academic Progress must appeal in writing to the Dean of Academic Affairs for re-entry before the start of the quarter in which he/ she wishes to return. The written appeal must state the mitigating circumstances that contributed to the dismissal. 6. if successful.0 and/or 66. Placement into Transitional Studies courses are based on the result of the academic assessment tool. The Appeals Committee decision will be final. as well as courses successfully transferred in from prior postsecondary education. A student enrolled in Transitional Studies courses must be able to pass the same Transitional Studies course after three attempts or that student will be placed on Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. Academic/Financial Aid Dismissals may be appealed. compliance with SAP is reviewed every academic year during a student’s first two years and then quarterly thereafter. To be removed from Academic/Financial Aid Warning or Academic/Financial Aid Probation. cumulative data for all courses a student attempted at The Art Institute of Vancouver.Degree Programs Evaluation Point End of First Academic Year End of Second Academic Year End of Seventh Quarter and every quarter thereafter Anything in excess of 150% MTF Milestone (CGPA and ICR) <1. There is also an indication if a student is on Academic/Financial Aid Warning. Upon the Appeals Committee decision. Following is a comprehensive list of events that indicate there may be a mitigating circumstance which has negatively impacted academic progress: • • • • • Death of an immediate family member Student illness requiring hospitalization (this includes mental health issues) Illness of an immediate family member where the student is the primary caretaker Illness of an immediate family member where the family member is the primary financial support Abusive relationships Page 139 The Art Institute of Vancouver . The Dean of Academic Affairs or an Appeals Committee will review the student’s appeal and will determine within 14 business days of the date of the receipt of the appeal whether the circumstances and academic status warrant consideration for re-admission.Academic Calendar . the result will be Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal with no right to appeal the dismissal. Please note that if you do not pass the same Transitional Studies course after three attempts. Unless otherwise noted. grade point average.67% will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. A student who starts or re-enters at a MID session will have that session count as an entire quarter for SAP purposes.3% Required Action Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal <2.0 and/or 66. While Transitional Studies courses are not included in the CGPA. Additionally. the transitional study course(s) do not count in determining the maximum time frame allowable to earn the degree and do not count in the incremental completion rate as attempted credits and. are available on the student portal for review.00 and 33. The student may be asked to appear in person during the review process when deemed necessary by the Dean of Academic Affairs or the Appeals Committee. 7. 5. Dismissal for violating the maximum timeframe (MTF) can happen at any time.

The student may be asked to retake courses previously failed in order to raise both the CPGA and ICR. and the student’s ability to avoid the circumstance. A memorandum or letter on school or organizational letterhead indicating a counselor’s opinion that the student issues may be accommodated to ensure that the student will be able to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress will suffice as proof of mitigating circumstances as well as documentation that the student’s circumstances have been remedied or changed to ensure that the student will be able to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress with the accommodations from the institution. it must also be reviewed by The Art Institute Vice President of Academic Affairs. Page 140 Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal Appeals not Allowed A student who attempts but does not pass the same Transitional Studies course three times is dismissed and there is not a right to appeal the dismissal. the student is notified by the Dean of Academic Affairs both verbally and in writing. In addition to The Art Institute of Vancouver’s review of the appeal. Upon the Appeals Committee decision. Student life issues and making the transition to college are not considered mitigating circumstances under this policy since students have at least two quarters to adjust to college life.• • • • • • • • • • • Divorce proceedings Previously undocumented disability Work-related transfer during the period Change in work schedule during the period Natural disaster Family emergency Financial hardship such as foreclosure or eviction Loss of transportation where there are no alternative means of transportation Documentation from a Professional Counselor A doctor documented illness of the student for a significant period of time Military deployment A student denied an appeal must sit out one year before being eligible to apply for re-entry. the new mitigating circumstance occurred after the previous successful appeal. The Academic Plan must detail specific time frames and student success measures and cannot be greater than one (1) quarter for certificate or diploma programs less than 90 credits in length but for certificate or diploma programs 90 credits or greater in length as well as degree programs may be up to two (2) quarters. Also. The Academic Plan must be reviewed with the student to ensure that designated Academic Plan is being met and the student is on track to achieve the success measures within the approved timeframe. the student will be placed on Academic/Financial Aid Probation for one quarter. no additional appeals may be allowed and the student is permanently academically dismissed. Any student who is on Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal can no longer attend The Art Institute of Vancouver nor get Title IV at the Institution. The Art Institute of Vancouver and The Art Institute Vice President of Academic Affairs must review the appeal. The Art Institute of Vancouver . Additional Appeal Procedures While an appeal can be made for Maximum Time Frame. Any consideration of the conditions outside of the list provided should be discussed with The Art Institute Vice President of Academic Affairs. Academic Advisors. the student will be placed on Academic/Financial Aid Probation at the start of the academic quarter. the re-entering student will be placed on Academic/Financial Aid Probation at the start of his/her quarter of return. If a student’s appeal is successful. timing and duration of the mitigating circumstance. The student must demonstrate resolution to any mitigating circumstances and demonstrate that he/ she will be able to meet satisfactory academic progress if re-admitted. A student who is successful in his or her appeal is able to apply for re-entry and if otherwise eligible. If a student was initially denied a re-entry appeal and sat out for one year before attempting to reenter. If a student who has successfully appealed an Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal is later again dismissed. If the appeal is granted. any student who ceased attendance and whose grades in the last quarter of attendance caused him/her to not meet the minimum milestones of the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy must go through the same appeal process. and/or Academic Department Chairs/ Program Directors must document and maintain as part of the appeals process a concrete plan for how a student will complete his/ her remaining coursework by the next measurement point as well as how the student’s progression will be monitored. Documentation from a professional counselor should not breach the student/counselor relationship and should remain confidential. Registrars. Failure to meet the established goals approved in the appeal will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. receive financial aid. The Appeals Committee decision will be final. The appeal procedure described in the preceding section applies. the student must submit a second appeal for consideration for re-entry. the student can file one additional appeal as long as the appeal is based on different mitigating circumstances from any previous appeal. the student is showing significant satisfactory academic progress and mathematically the student can meet the next SAP evaluation points requirements. however. The student must meet the milestones of satisfactory academic progress by the end of his/her first quarter if in a certificate or diploma program less than 90 credits in length and up to the second quarter if in a certificate or diploma program 90 credits or greater in length or a degree program (but only if there is a documented Academic Plan between The Art Institute of Vancouver and the student) to continue in the program.Academic Calendar . If the second re-entry appeal is denied. A student on Academic/Financial Aid Probation may receive financial aid (if otherwise eligible). The Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for determining the appropriateness of the mitigating circumstance in regards to severity.

The criteria for determining a student’s grade shall be as follows (on a percentage of total point basis): The Metrics of SAP Academic Grading System The grading system incorporates letter grades. have the appeal granted based on mitigating circumstances before transferring to the new major. Students must successfully complete such courses in order to progress in the program.4 D 1.Academic Calendar Page 141 . The grade Incomplete (I) is calculated as if it is an F for CGPA and ICR purposes until it is changed to another grade and the course will be included as credits attempted but not credits earned until it is changed to another grade.4 B 3. Remediation of Academic Deficiencies It is strongly recommended that any student with withdrawn or failing grades enroll in the same course(s) in the subsequent quarter to improve academic performance. the student receives a report of his or her grade(s) for the course(s) just completed. 1. Under no circumstances can a request to change majors circumvent a dismissal of Satisfactory Academic Progress. In cases in which a student has graduated from one program in the Institution then subsequently begins work in a different program. which is updated each quarter. appeal the dismissal. All attempts are included in the credit hours attempted for the purposes of calculating the incremental completion rate (ICR). Grades for credits transferred from any other postsecondary institutions will be recorded as Transfer Credit (TR) and will not be calculated in the student’s CGPA.0 scale in assigning grade points.7 D+ 1. each individual Transitional Studies course may be attempted no more than three times. Transfers from another Art Institute A student must be maintaining Satisfactory Academic Progress in order to be allowed the opportunity of transferring from one program to another or from one school or campus to another. Withdrawn and failing grades are included in the maximum allowable timeframe and incremental completion rate as credit hours attempted but not earned. Courses that apply to the second major will be recorded as earned credit and will affect the student’ CGPA and will be included as credits attempted and credits earned. will be recorded with the letter grades and thus will be included in the Cumulative Grade Point Average and will be included in the Incremental Completion Rate as credits attempted and credits earned.0 C. Note: If a student is at the point of dismissal for Satisfactory Academic Progress in the first major.0 B. A student who is on Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal and wishes to transfer to another affiliated Art Institute must appeal his/her Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal at the originating school and receive reinstatement prior to the transfer. Failure to pass the courses within the attempts permitted will result in dismissal from the Institution and there is no right to appeal the dismissal.0 * *F does compute in GPA and CGPA and does count as credit attempted. b) Totaling the grade points earned for all the courses. and c) Dividing total grade points earned by the total number of quality credits. that student must be put on Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. 3.0 F 0.Explanations of Related Issues Calculation of CGPA A student’s cumulative grade point average is calculated by a) Multiplying credits for each course by grade points associated with the grade earned.0 A. Transitional Studies Courses Many Art Institutes require academic assessments. Transitional Studies course credits do not count towards the total number of credits for graduation nor do they count in the CGPA. Transfer Credits from another Postsecondary Institution Credits from transfer courses are calculated in the maximum allowable credits and incremental completion rate requirements as credits attempted and credits earned. While Transitional Studies course(s) are not included in the CGPA. Change of Program Students will be allowed one change of program. Repeated Courses and Grades As courses are retaken. Additionally. Please note that course credits and applicability of those credits at each Art Institute for a program can vary from location to location. The Institute uses a 4. Depending on assessment scores. equivalent numeric values and letter codes as follows: Letter Grade Quality Points A 4.7 C+ 2. Changing from a day program to an evening program of the same major is not considered a change of program. Grading System At the conclusion of each course in the program. if applicable to the new program. These grades are entered also in the student’s academic transcript.7 B+ 3. Students who change programs must sign a new program enrollment agreement which must be filed in the student’s academic file. Changing from an associate’s program to a bachelor’s program in the same major is not considered a change of program. grades earned in the first program. only the highest grade will count in the GPA/CGPA. students may be required to take Transitional Studies courses. Please carefully discuss any possible transfer with the Art Institute you wish to attend.4 C 2. The Art Institute of Vancouver . they do not count in determining the maximum timeframe and the incremental completion rate. 2.

Does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA. Grade point values are multiplied by credit hours. Students with incomplete grades will receive an ‘F’ if a grade change is not submitted by the end of the second week of the following term. four-point scale and credit-hour values. SP or SA = Satisfactory/Pass This grade designation is utilized to indicate that a student acceptably completed a non credited course. The final grade is the one that counts in the calculation.94 = 1. It is rounded down to the nearest tenth of the last digit if the last digit is less than 5. Only if it is part of an Academic Plan may students retake courses in which they received a passing grade in order Page 142 to improve their CGPA but can retake a course passed only one additional time.Other Grade Codes worth Zero Quality Points CR = Credit through examination Credits Earned/TR grade. T = Termination from course Affects ICR/MTF/CGPA (Computes as an F) TR = External Transfer Credit Grade designation utilize for transfer credits. When a course is repeated after failure. though the failing grade will still appear on the transcript.Academic Calendar . This grade designation is utilized to indicate that a student did not acceptably complete a non credited course.6. NP = Not passing/Fail Does not affect ICR/CGPA. WV = Waiver Commonly used when waiving a transitional course and does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA WX = Course was registered for but never attended Self-explanatory and does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA Students receive grades at the end of each quarter including midquarter. This does not affect CGPA. The highest grade earned will be used in the CGPA calculations. In this example: A = 4 grade points x 4 credit hours = 16 grade points earned B = 3 grade points x 3 credit hours = 9 grade points earned To compute the GPA. They do impact ICR and MTF. the grade may not be changed without approval by both the Academic Department Director and the Dean/Vice President of Academic Affairs. 3. or ‘WF’. Example: 1.’W’. U = Unsatisfactory Indicates that a student unsuccessfully completed a noncredited course. divide the total number of grade points earned for the quarter by the total number of credit hours earned for the quarter.57. but not earned.90) Incremental completion rate is determined as follows (Transitional Study credits do not count in this calculation): (EARNED CREDITS at the institution + TRANSFER CREDITS Accepted) ______________________________________________________________ (ATTEMPTED CREDITS at the institution + TRANSFER CREDITS Accepted) The Art Institute of Vancouver . Here is an example of how GPA and CGPA are computed: Imagine that a student is taking a total of two courses during one quarter. One course has a four credit hours value and the student earns an A. S = Suspension Affects ICR/MTF/CGPA (Computes as an F).0. 1. They do impact ICR and MTF. or ‘WF’ are included in the maximum time frame (MTF) and incremental completion rate (ICR) requirements as credits attempted but not earned. using the letter grades. They do impact ICR and MTF. ‘W’. Remember. This does not affect CGPA. Credits from all repeated courses are included as credits attempted. In this example: 16 grade points + 9 grade points = 25 total grade points 25 grade points earned divided by 7 total hours earned = student’s GPA for the quarter. Changed Grade When a final course grade has been established and recorded in the student record. A student’s CGPA is computed in the same way by dividing the student’s total grade points earned from all quarters/semester at The Art Institute of Vancouver by the student’s total credit hours earned from all quarters at The Art Institute of Vancouver. The grade report contains both the grade point average for the quarter (GPA) and cumulative grade point average (CGPA) for the program. The grade ‘I’ indicates Incomplete and is calculated as if it is an ‘F’ until it is changed to another grade and the course will be included as course credits attempted. I = Incomplete Affects ICR/MTF/CGPA (Computes as an F). GPA is the average of grade points a student earns during one quarter.95 = 2. Does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA. Calculations The Art Institute of Vancouver measures and records academic performance by computing the Grade Point Average (GPA) and Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) for each student. PA = Pass This grade designation is utilized to indicate that a student acceptably completed a non credited course. which is rounded to 3. CGPA is the cumulative average of all grade points a student has earned over all quarters at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Does not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA. Repeating Courses Grades earned in repeated courses will replace grades of ‘F’. each letter grade carries a grade point value. The second course has a three credit hour value and the student earns a B. (The CGPA is calculated by rounding up to the nearest tenth if the last digit is 5 or greater. Only the final grade (not the original grade/code) will be computed in the grade point average. Transitional Study courses do not count in this calculation. P = Proficiency Credit by Exam or Portfolio This does not affect CGPA. the grade earned upon repeating the class replaces the original grade in determining the grade point average. Course credits with grades of ‘F’.

5 = TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS ALLOWED TO BE ATTEMPTED. Example: If a student transfers in 36 credits to a program consisting of 180 credits. students who retake previously completed coursework are considered eligible for additional Title IV assistance. Please refer to the school’s SAP Policy. Examples of these education benefits are State Grants. the 36 transfer credits would be considered attempted and earned so only 234 more credits could be attempted. Second Degree When a student has graduated from The Art Institute in one program. Students receiving Title IV Funds Effective July 1. only the grades transferred to that new program will apply to the second program. For standard term-based programs. 2011.The 150% Maximum Time Frame Only the attempted courses required in the program for which the student is currently enrolled are used in determining the number of MTF credits remaining. EDMC has implemented the following policy on retaking coursework for standard term and non-term based programs. Students wishing to transfer from one Art Institute to another may do so only if they are in good standing at the sending school. EDMC’s policy will allow financial aid to cover a single repetition of a previously Page 143 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Incremental completion rate is determined as follows (Transitional Studies credits do not count in this calculation): The 150% Maximum Time Frame Only the attempted courses required in the program for which the student is currently enrolled are used in determining the number of MTF credits remaining. Veterans’ Benefits. grades used in the CGPA of the previous program will be applied to the student’s new program CGPA calculation. For ICR and 150% purposes only. (EARNED CREDITS in the New Program + TRANSFER CREDIT ACCEPTED) minus CHANGE OF MAJOR ADJUSTMENT FACTOR FOR EARNED CREDITS __________________________________________________________________ (ATTEMPTED CREDITS in the New Program + TRANSFER CREDITS Accepted) minus CHANGE OF MAJOR ADJUSTMENT FACTOR FOR EARNED CREDITS Student Status Changes and SAP Transfer Students Transfer credits from other post-secondary institutions are calculated in the maximum time frame allowable credits and incremental completion rate requirements. Changes in Program Unless a second change is specifically approved for the specific student by the Dean of Academic Affairs. The 150% MTF is determined as follows: TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED in the PROGRAM TO GRADUATE times 1. If the student has taken a course more than once. the “CHANGE OF MAJOR” adjustment factor would be those credits from the previous major that we will NOT count in the student’s current major. All grades earned in the original program that apply to the new program will count towards the SAP CGPA (SGPA).S. In the formulas below. Department of Defense (TA) benefits or employee reimbursements. In a standard term-based program. Transitional Study courses do not count in this calculation. it may require a higher cumulative grade point average and/ or a higher incremental completion rate. students are allowed only one change of program and must be making satisfactory academic progress at the time a request is made to change programs. If the student is transferring to a different institution (as defined by the Department of Education). Although there is no limit on how many times students can repeat failed or withdrawn courses for FSA purposes. Please check with the Student Financial Service Office for details. To comply with this provision and to assist students with managing appropriate FSA loan balances. Therefore. Any student dismissed for violating satisfactory academic progress cannot transfer or be considered a New student (if they had a break in enrollment) at another Art Institute until he/ she has been granted an appeal at the original school and is deemed to be making satisfactory academic progress. even if the students will not receive credit for that coursework in addition to credits already received. The 150% MTF is determined as follows: TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED TO GRADUATE FROM THE PROGRAM x 1. Courses taken in one program that is applicable to the second program will be transferred with the applicable grade. Satisfactory Academic Progress for Educational Benefits which are not Title IV Funds Please note that in order to receive and/or retain certain education benefits from a source other than the U. the calculation would be 180 X 1. then subsequently begins work in a different program. Department of Education.Academic Calendar . the Department of Education amended the full-time enrollment status definition for programs at termbased institutions.5 = TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS ALLOWED TO BE ATTEMPTED. those courses transferred will apply to the second program will be considered. Retaking Coursework Policy For U. Grades for credits transferred in from any post-secondary institution (including an Art Institute) will be recorded as “TR” in the Student Information System and will not affect the student’s CGPA. then he/ she is treated as a student transferring in from an unaffiliated institution. some EDMC’s Educational Systems have limitations on how many times students can retake failed courses before they are dismissed from the institution. the maximum number of attempted credits for a student with transfer credit is still one and one-half times the number of credits required to complete a program for graduation.S.5 = 270 credits. Standard Term-based Programs Students enrolled in standard term-based programs will receive Title IV funds for unlimited retakes of failed courses and withdrawn courses with no credits earned as long as the student is meeting the satisfactory academic progress (SAP) standards. Therefore.

A student must successfully complete the credit hours and instructional weeks in a payment period. Students may only use FSA funds to cover such repeated courses to the extent excess funds are available in the academic year. as appropriate. lateness. If a student cannot make a class scheduled midterm or final exam. the student is not eligible for an additional retake because the student is considered to have completed the course. if the student failed the repeated course. lab. Art Institute policy denotes that the only valid reasons for excusable absence are: • • The student must have completed the course for it to be considered a repetition under this policy. where this is the case. The fee for re-scheduling an exam is $25.A. For Recording Arts students who have to re-schedule a PASE exam (one hour practical exam one-on-one with an instructor).P. The failure to adhere to attendance policies may put the student’s government student assistance funding in jeopardy. Therefore. Student Tardiness Any student arriving late will not be admitted to the lecture and should report to the Instructor at the break. or leaving class early. It is important that no class time be missed as The Art Institute programs are very intense and much of the work cannot be made up at a later date. Late Work Policy Late work may be accepted under exceptional circumstances in consultation with your Academic Director. an Academic Advisor or Academic Director must be notified prior to the examination date for approval to re-schedule. dent will not be withdrawn until a final decision on the appeal has been made by the school. An evaluation fee may be charged. to practice upon graduation. These records are available for review by government. Some programs may have additional attendance requirements due to the nature of the program.P. and attendance records are maintained for each student. or any others. Arriving late to class may result in the student being marked absent. Students that attend some. scheduled classes and assigned labs per day may be deemed to be absent for attendance purposes. A letter explaining your exceptional circumstances and why you think you should be given special consideration to submit a late project must be submitted with the form along with an application fee. • Personal sickness accompanied with a valid doctor’s note upon return. but not all. Students are expected to attend every class. Because only one repetition of a previously passed course may be included in the a student’s enrollment status for purposes of Title IV aid. • Death in the immediate family. Re-scheduling exams should be avoided. may not be allowed to join the class for the remainder of the day.A.successfully passed course subject to certain conditions. Students who earned credit(s) may receive Title IV funds for one retake of any previously passed course only if they meet one of the following conditions: • Specific State or Accreditation regulations require a student to retake a course which was previously successfully passed within a given time period of graduation. A student who is not in class following the break. Students are required to attend every class.. Exam make-up/re-scheduling is allowed only for family and medical emergencies. Evidence may be requested to substantiate the reason. these requirements will be explained and set out in the program or course syllabus. The Art Institute of Vancouver has strict policies in place with regards to attendance. For students who need a specific grade or G. lab and workshop that is scheduled for the full duration of the program in which they are enroled. the stuPage 144 Exam Policy The Art Institute of Vancouver has strict policies regarding the writing. in order to advance to the next payment period and academic year. In order to maintain fairness. The Art Institute of Vancouver . Non-term Based Programs Student’s coursework is divided into payment periods based the credit hours and weeks of instructional time in the program or the academic year.Academic Calendar . Late Projects at Term End Late Project Evaluation forms will be accepted by an Academic Advisor or Academic Director within a maximum of five (5) business days after the start of the following quarter. A student who is absent for four (4) or more cumulative classes in a course will be withdrawn from the course seven (7) calendar days after having missed the last class. If a student is not attending classes or assigned labs regularly they will be contacted to meet with his/her Academic Director or Academic Advisor and placed on probation or subject to dismissal. accreditation and student assistance officials. and workshop that is a scheduled or assigned for the full duration of the program in which they are enroled. whichever is less. the student must continue to attend classes pending the outcome of the appeal. The student may appeal the withdrawal by following the Appeal Process. Attendance Policy Attendance plays an important role in the success of a student. If an appeal is submitted as per the Appeal Process. or withdrawal. Students should note that records are kept of their attendance. Required as part of an academic plan if a student has successfully appealed a Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) termination. the course attempted and earned credits will not be included in the payment period and academic year credits requirement. Students who successfully completed a course (earned credits) and wish to repeat the course to earn a better grade or G. students are not allowed access to the campus and cannot attend classes until the exam has been written. canceling and rescheduling of exams. or after the lecture is finished. Students who fail or withdrawal from a course will not earn credits for the payment period and academic year. the fee is $100.

Failed Courses If a student fails a course. The Dean of Academic Affairs will not address the appeal unless the student has first attempted to address the issue with his instructor and if that was unsuccessful. A student who withdraws from a program after week nine will be assigned a “WF” code for the courses within that Quarter. including witnesses which provide evidence. Increased tuition rate. the student will follow these additional guidelines. The “W” does not compute in the grade point average. Withdrawal from The Art Institute of Vancouver may result in one or more of the following conditions: Requirements for Graduation The Art Institute of Vancouver awards Diploma or Certificates to successful graduates. The student must provide a complete explanation of the basis for the appeal and must attach appropriate documentation. On occasion a course may be discontinued or modified and in such a case and on the recommendation of the Dean of Academic Affairs. Revision of financial aid. students must fulfill all of the following requirements: • Satisfactory completion of all the course requirements of the given program.”W” or “WF” grade/code must be repeated and completed with a passing grade in order to graduate. Please contact your Academic Director for further details. A student who withdraws from a program before the end of week nine will be assigned a “W” code for the courses within that quarter. Every course for which a student receives an “F”. Also. Repeated courses will list both the original grade and the repeated grade on the grade transcript. when a course is successfully repeated. If. In making his/her appeal to the Dean of Academic Affairs. Students may appeal their final grade through the academic appeal process. they will be required to retake it in the following quarter if the failed course is available. To appeal. Page 145 • A delayed graduation date. Withdrawal Should a student choose to withdraw from any of The Art Institute of Vancouver programs prior to completion of his/her training. or reason for the student’s situation or actions. a student may take an equivalent course in substitution for the course failed. • Comply with attendance. When a final course grade has been established and recorded in the student record. • Unless specifically indicated otherwise in the program syllabus. they may appeal to the Dean of Academic Affairs. only the passing grade will be computed in the grade point average. The higher grade will be used in grade point calculation. SAP and student conduct policies. The original grade/code and the subsequent passing grade(s) will remain on the record for reference purposes. Students are required to repeat the course in the following quarter. please refer to the procedure for readmission. Unless the matter is referred to the Appeal Panel by the Dean of Academic Affairs or President. payment or failure to abide by The Art Institute of Vancouver withdrawal policies may result in financial penalties. after exhausting these options the student remains dissatisfied. As some courses are prerequisites. the student may submit his/her appeal in writing to the Dean of Academic Affairs within three business days of being informed of the action/decision of the Academic Director or the relevant instructor. In order to graduate and receive the applicable diploma or certificate. However. • Be in good standing with all offices at the time of gradu• Unless specifically indicated otherwise in the program syllabus. The “WF” does compute in the grade point average. justification. • Placement within revised curriculum (to include possible change of class session availability). • • • • Placement granted on space/course availability basis. The Dean of Academic Affairs Decision is final and without appeal. Retakes are charged at the regular course tuition rate. The Dean of Academic Affairs will review the matter and will make a determination and decision based on his/her review and judgment as to the merits of the appeal. a written notice stating the reason for withdrawal and date of withdrawal is to be submitted to the Registrar to be retained on file.Academic Calendar . the applicable Academic Director. The Art Institute of Vancouver . the grade may not be changed without approval by the Academic Director and the Dean of Academic Affairs. • Breach of Student Enrolment Agreement. please consult your Academic Director. • Satisfy all financial obligations to The Art Institute. Student Re-entry Process Any student who has left The Art Institute for any time period must go through the formal re-entry process and each student’s academic status must be reviewed before he/she can be considered for re-entry. • Earn at least 25% of the required credits at The Art Institute of Vancouver. all Art Institute of Vancouver programs also require the student to submit a portfolio. For details. the student must meet with the Academic Director of his/her program. Academic Appeals If a student is in disagreement on an academic/education matter and unable to resolve the issue first with their instructor and then with the Academic Director. participation in the Portfolio Show during the final quarter of study. a failed course may affect your program flow. Elimination of a specific program of study. Contact Student Financial Services to discuss any financial implications. ation. Tuition for the repeated course will be charged at the full rate. • Required repeat of failed or deficient grades upon return to the Institute. which must be submitted by the student no later than the end of the first week of classes the following quarter after the course was taken.

For additional protection electronic copies of students’ records are also kept off-site in a secure database located in Pittsburgh. students can request section changes to their schedules. For greater clarity. The actual program completion may be impacted by interruptions or schedule Page 146 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Student academic records are kept in the Registrar’s Office. If the student and instructor do not reach a resolution. The student is welcome to meet with his or her Academic Director regarding any course change. staff. The Academic Director. Students need to attend their regularly scheduled class until their request has been approved or they will be marked absent. titles. Class Scheduling The Art Institute of Vancouver reserves the right to reschedule students or modify the sequencing of program courses at any time necessary to accommodate the curriculum. Student records are confidential and protected by law. Reviews may result in changes in the curriculum. issuance of student transcript records. Attending Classes at other Art Institute of Vancouver Locations Student may be scheduled to attend classes at another Art Institute of Vancouver location other than their primary location of enrolment. The panel may request the appearance of the student. processing of student status changes. Contact Information and Name Changes Any student whose name or contact information (including address.Academic Calendar . The panel will follow a similar composition and procedure as set out in the student conduct policy appeal procedure. Some courses within a program are necessarily taught in sequential order and others may be taught in a varied sequence. equipment. courses. course curriculum content. telephone and email) changes while attending The Art Institute of Vancouver must notify the Registrar’s Office. and changes occurring at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Changes in Programs and Courses Courses are periodically reviewed for updating and relevance to changing industry. if still unhappy with the decision. or the sequencing of courses from time to time. Transcript Requests The Registrar’s Office is responsible for issuance of student transcripts. notices. The decision reached by this panel is the final position of The Art Institute of Vancouver. Program Completion Dates and Maximum Allowable Completion Timeframe The program completion is based on a calculation of a student continuously enroled as a full-time student to program completion. may appeal to the Dean of Academic Affairs.Where the matter involves the academic dismissal or suspension of a student the Dean of Academic Affairs may choose. classroom and facility usage needs. Section Changes to Schedule During the first week of each quarter. Section changes are only be possible where enrolment and class distribution allows. after consultation with the instructor and student. to clarify any statements or materials presented by the student. will make a determination. resource materials used or the sequencing / scheduling of courses. the start may be delayed. The first transcript is issued to graduates free of charge. there will be a $10 processing fee and please allow one week processing time. Only final grades may be appealed. or witnesses. to convene an Academic Appeal Panel to consider the student’s appeal. and records and then renders a final decision regarding the student’s status. the student may appeal to the Academic Director of their program. PA. The student. Forms for section changes may be obtained from the Registrar’s office or at a location designated by the Registrar’s office. Registrar’s Office The Registrar’s Office is responsible for the following services: maintenance of all permanent student records. Program Cancellation or Delay In the event The Art Institute of Vancouver determines a program or course does not achieve or maintain sufficient enrolment for the program or course to be or remain viable and productive. In the event the program is cancelled Art Institute of Vancouver tuition refund policies will apply. The Panel is responsible for reviewing all documentation presented by the student and available from The Art Institute of Vancouver faculty. taking a quarter off) students must notify The Art Institute of Vancouver so the program completion date can be amended. backed up on tape. This database is.e. in his/her absolute discretion. in writing. The Art Institute of Vancouver reserves the right to alter things like course titles. in turn. This will enable the school to keep students better informed of events. issuance of grade reports and/or attendance reports. Changes are effective when made. The Dean may apply and modify these procedures as he/she deems appropriate to the circumstances and will provide the student a summary of the process before the appeal is heard. the program or course may be cancelled. who will make a final determination and whose decision is final. technology or facility needs. Such changes are effective when made. supervision of quarterly student registration activities. students may be offered the opportunity to take a similar program or course as a substitute or permission to transfer to another program may be granted. Appeal of Grades Procedure Students who feel they have received an erroneous grade must appeal that grade to their instructor a maximum of five (5) business days after the start of the following quarter. In the event the student interrupts their studies (i. For all additional copies.

The Art Institute of Vancouver . These programs generally do not have occupational outcomes and may range from hobby courses to professional upgrading. Diploma programs are career-focused. or Degree of the academic program.changes. Event Management The Art Institute of Vancouver and the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC) have analyzed and compared the Event Management Diploma Program to the Occupational Knowledge component of the TCP. Certificate programs are non-CPD programming with career training outcomes. Program Types Continuing Education programs offered through the Centre for Professional Development (CPD) are short-duration training programs. Diploma. Articulation Agreements The Art Institute of Vancouver participates in the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) system. have entered into an articulation agreement. but do not access The Art Institute of Vancouver Career Services as part of their program.0 automatically qualify to receive credit towards the knowledge component of the TCP-EVC certification and designation. Due to the nature and design of CPD programs. In the event the student is selected by LIPA through the LIPA interview process. and generally of a more limited scope than Diploma programs. the two organizations as well as go2 who is the provincial partner of the CTHRC and delivery agent of emerit tourism training and certification in the province of British Columbia. Certificate programs do have occupational outcomes. AiV students may be required to complete two additional courses to complete the LIPA. the student shall be granted admission to the LIPA. the student must successfully complete all the program requirements within the maximum allowable timeframe which is 150% of the of the program length. Professional Recording Arts (LIPA) The Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts (LIPA) and The Art Institute of Vancouver (AiV) have entered into a block transfer agreement. Degree programs are career-focused. Completion date amendments shall not be deemed a breach of the enrolment agreement or any warrantee hereunder. To be awarded the designated Certificate.ca/ Additional updates to the list Articulation Agreements may be found in the Academic Calendar Addendum. Students in these programs do not access The Art Institute of Vancouver Career Services as part of their program. applied academic programs with a significant portion of the curriculum devoted to general education courses. unless otherwise stated. applied academic programs that are generally more advanced than Certificate programs. As a result. The maximum allowable timeframe is calculated as a period of time during which the student attempts 1. Current and future students that successfully complete the Event Management Diploma Program with an overall cumulative grade point average of 3. Students in Diploma programs have access to The Art Institute of Vancouver Career Services as part of their program. BA (Honours) Sound Technology Degree with advanced standing allowing them to proceed directly into the final year of that program. Students who successfully complete AiV’s Professional Recording Arts LIPA program are granted an interview for advanced standing at LIPA. A list of courses from other postsecondary institutions for which The Art Institute grants credit can be found at the BCCAT Transfer Guide website http://bctransferguide. CPD programs are offered as PCTIA registered programs and do not participate in the PCTIA training completion fund. Students in Degree programs have access to The Art Institute of Vancouver Career Services as part of their program. In addition to the block transfer of credits.5 times the number of credit hours required to complete the program.Event Coordinator certification program and found the programs to be equivalent.Academic Calendar Page 147 . BA (Honours) Sound Technology degree. Application fees apply.

To constitute original work.Independent Academic Effort or Creative Activity is defined as the inquiry. visiting scholars. (v) writings and other works of authorship. (d) Public Performance (any acoustic or visual representation of a work). sculptures and other works of art). URLs. C-42) for an original work of authorship fixed in any tangible form of expression. or involvement of the Institution. Copyright provides the owner with the sole right to produce or reproduce the work or any substantial part of thereof in any material form whatever. which supports this creative and scholarly work. translations. It covers all those who are a part of The Art Institute of Vancouver – faculty. investigation. or other participants enrolled. research. and sculpture works (including graphic designs. and compilations. brand names. whether subject to copyright protection or not. perform or publish any translation of the work. new ideas. and license any interest in the copyright). film and audio and video recordings). E. Intellectual Property . c. journal articles and other articles. improvements. (g) Rental (computer programs. visual. motion pictures and other audiovisual works (including films. the terms of that separate written agreement will govern. and new forms of creative and scholarly expression. dramatic works (including any accompanying music). and (h) Assign (the copyright. visiting artists. or a full-time or part-time staff member (as defined in the Staff Handbook). the work must be the product of an exercise of skill and judgment of an author. Institutional Employee . photographs. or creative activity that is carried out by faculty.A Commissioned Work is defined as a Work (as defined in paragraph K) that is produced or created pursuant to a written agreement with the Institution and for Institution purposes by (a) individuals not under the employ of the Institution or (b) Institutional Employees (as defined in paragraph D) acting outside the scope of their regular Institution employment. Independent Academic Effort or Creative Activity . (b) Reproduction (covers copying into any dimension. instructional and evaluation materials for classes. research. sound recordings. course or program proposals. labs or seminars. as determined by their existing Institution employment arrangement or contract. that advances knowledge or the development of the arts. novelizations. unless The Art Institute of Vancouver has modified it through a written agreement connected to a sponsored or commissioned work or as part of work under a grant or contract. D. integrity and association with the work. sciences. to publish the work or any substantial part of thereof. if the work is unpublished.Intellectual Property Policy Introduction As a creative community of teachers.C. audio and video recordings and multimedia projects). who is employed by the Institution or who is working under an Institution contract. reproduce. (g) Authorization (authorize or consent to any of the rights granted under the Copyright Act). musical works (including any accompanying words).S. Moral rights mean the author’s right to attribution. optical or other electromagnetic system). trade names. This Policy on Intellectual Property is provided to protect the interests of those who create as well as the interests of The Art Institute of Vancouver itself. scholarly articles. and content of the pursuit is determined by the faculty. slogans. either generally or subject to limitations. grade reports. B. logos and other indications of source. either wholly or partially. in any jurisdiction. patent applications and patent disclosures. radio. curricula. (iii) patents. The Copyright Act also grants “moral rights” to an author in respect of their work.Copyright is the intangible property right granted for a limited period of time by federal statute (Copyright Act. 1985. theses. staff and Students of the Institution working on their own. lecture and presentation materials). artist. Should there be any conflict between the provisions of this Policy and the terms of a separate written agreement between The Art Institute of Vancouver and any party. including but not limited to literary works (such as books. (iv) trade secrets and proprietary or confidential information. software. any part thereof. (f) Public Exhibition of Artistic Work other than for sale or hire. The exclusive rights possessed by a copyright owner are: (a) First Public Distribution (right to first distribute unpublished work). or fellow (as defined in the Faculty Handbook). (c) Subsidiary Rights (right to abridgments. data and databases. architectural works. staff member(s). know how. and includes the sole right to adapt. exams. scholar. in any jurisdiction. either expressed or implied. domain names. course syllabi. R. illustrations. or Student. C-42 II. dramatizations cinematographic adaptations. or Student(s) without the direct assignment. assumed names. unregistered or the subject of a pending application for registration). (e) Telecommunicate to the Public (transmission by wire. R. pantomimes and choreographic works.An Institutional Employee is a fulltime or part-time faculty member. paintings. staff. Commissioned Work . digests. size or medium. courses. methodology. visiting faculty. to perform the work or any substantial part of thereof in public or. trade dress. whether patentable or not. and this Policy governs in all circumstances. produce. student rosters and attendance forms. adjunct faculty. copyright registrations and applications for registration of copyrights I. study guides. (ii) inventions. pictorial. developments. c. humanities. This Policy is not intended to limit “fair dealing” as defined under the Canadian Copyright Act.C. graphic. Copyright . or technology where the specific direction. 1985. together with all associated goodwill (whether the foregoing are registered. The Art Institute of Vancouver is committed to encouraging the creation of new works. and either for the whole terms of the copyright or for Page 148 The Art Institute of Vancouver . students. discoveries. assessment of student work and projects.S. service marks. musical works). Terminology The following terms are used throughout the Policy and are defined as follows: A.Academic Calendar .Means: (i) trade-marks. sponsorship or affiliation. C. concepts and ideas. employed or affiliated with The Art Institute of Vancouver. artists and scholars. (vi) copyrights. condensations. supervision. Purpose and Scope This document expresses The Art Institute of Vancouver’s policy regarding ownership and usage rights with respect to Intellectual Property (as hereinafter defined).

The term “Work” as used in this Policy shall be defined to include all of the items identified in Sections (i). phrase. P-4. as a general rule. Student . logo.or parttime.A. General Rule.2(a) through (f) above.” This use does not include resources commonly provided to Institution faculty and staff. Substantial Institutional Resources . or adapted. and monetary expenditures that require a budget. constructing. or selling the claimed invention in Canada for a set period of time under the Canadian Patent Act. as a supplementary work. (f) The Intellectual Property is developed under a grant. L. (v). or in exchange programs or through special grants or fellowships. as a translation. Sponsored Work . program or agreement). as an instructional text. Consistent with the Copyright Act .g. The Rights of the Creator of Intellectual Property A.. (c) The Intellectual Property is developed using Substantial Institutional Resources. 2. a newspaper article written by a staff journalist for the newspaper that employs him/her. dramatization. the Pre-College or Saturday programs.Academic Calendar .” Resources not considered “commonly provided” include specially procured equipment or space. sound recording. 1985. such as offices. transformed. Continuing Education (CE). Staff and Student Works 1. as participants in Professional Institute for Educators (PIE). fictionalization. Work . such as a translation. and Students. staff. and use of Institution resources that are not “commonly provided”. F. as a compilation. using.Any substantial use of Institution equipment. Patent . and/or to exhibit forms of artistic expression on the part of faculty. or as an atlas. Similar rights are granted in other countries. or funds. Work Made for Hire . R. The authors of the Work shall agree and do hereby agree to waive all their moral rights to the Work. abridgment. elaborations.Sponsored Work is a Work (as defined in paragraph K) that is produced or created under an agreement between the Institution and a sponsor which provides the Institution with ownership and/or usage rights to the Work and Intellectual Property produced under the agreement. substantial time spent in the use of these latter resources may constitute the use of “Substantial Institutional Resources. directed or funded by The Art Institute of Vancouver to create the Intellectual Property. I.A. time.in any jurisdiction. Under the circumstances described in Section III. name. symbol. facilities. shall be a Derivative Work. Trade-mark and Service Mark . and computer network support. but the discussion of Patents in this Policy will focus specifically on Canadian patent rights. or other modifications which. (iv). musical arrangement. as answer material for a test. is considered a use of “Substantial Institutional Resources. (e) The Intellectual Property is developed by a creator who is assigned. However. c. The Art Institute of Vancouver does not claim ownership of Intellectual Property developed through Independent Academic Effort or Creative Activity and that is intended to disseminate the results of academic research and scholarship. H. III. G. in whole or in part. even when based on the findings of the sponsored project. Exceptions to the general rule set forth in III. utilization beyond normal work hours of Institution personnel. the Intellectual Property shall be owned by The Art Institute of Vancouver (or by The Art Institute of Vancouver and any other party as specified in any written grant. and everyday telephone. as a test. full. library facilities. basic artistic facilities.A “Work Made for Hire” is defined as a Work (as defined in paragraph K) prepared by an employee within the scope of his or her employment. motion picture version. The creator of any Intellectual Property that is or might be owned Page 149 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Faculty. undergraduate or graduate at the Institution. (ii). if the parties expressly agree in a written instrument signed by them that the work shall be considered a work made for hire. a Work Made for Hire under this Policy also includes a work specially ordered or commissioned for use as a contribution to a collective work. to the Intellectual Property.C. personnel.A trade-mark or service mark is any word. as amended. represent an original work of authorship. computer. J. staff.S. as a whole.1 above include Intellectual Property developed by faculty. Faculty may use the basic artistic facilities unless use infringes on student use of those facilities for coursework. condensation. art reproduction. (vi) and (vii) of the definition of Intellectual Property in paragraph E. additional staffing or personnel. (vii) Derivative Works which shall mean works based upon one or more pre-existing works. (b) The Intellectual Property is developed as a Commissioned Work. so long as an agreement does not state otherwise. and a musical arrangement or ditty written for a music company by a salaried arranger on its staff. as a part of a motion picture or other audiovisual work. Examples of works made for hire include software programs created within the scope of an employee’s duties by a staff programmer. or any other form in which a work may be recast. A work consisting of editorial revisions. including students attending the Institution as “special status students”: e. program or agreement which provides The Art Institute of Vancouver with ownership rights. annotations. or any combination thereof that is used in trade to identify and distinguish one party’s goods or services from those of others.A Student is a regularly registered. K. Exceptions to the General Rule.A Canadian patent is a grant which gives the owner of the patent the right to exclude all others from making. Subject to the exceptions noted in this Policy. device. (d) The Intellectual Property is developed by the creator within the scope of his or her employment with The Art Institute of Vancouver and constitutes a Work Made for Hire. Students and Institutional Employees under any of the following circumstances: (a) The Intellectual Property is developed as a Sponsored Work. slogan. Sponsored works do not include works created through independent academic effort or creative activity.

translate and otherwise use the copyrighted materials in any medium.2 (a) through (f) above is developed jointly with a non-Institution party. distribute. distribute. Either party has the right to initiate such agreement. and promotional purposes must be included in any agreement with a non. or The Art Institute of Vancouver has specially ordered or commissioned the work and such work is designated as a Work Made for Hire in a signed written agreement between the parties.1 and 2 above. (i) Students who wish to work collaboratively with Institutional Employees on projects which involve the creation of Works and Intellectual Property are required to sign and deliver an acceptable written agreement to The Art Institute of Vancouver outlining their rights before commencing work on such projects. courses of instruction and educational programs. The Art Institute of Vancouver shall have a permanent. staff or Institutional Employees retain ownership of Work and Intellectual Property according to this Policy. (h) Students hired to carry out specific tasks that contribute to Intellectual Property of The Art Institute of Vancouver retain no rights of ownership in whole or in part to that Intellectual Property or to the Student’s contribution to that work. which must be executed by the parties prior to use of the resources. including but not limited to its name. attendance forms. (j) The rights of The Art Institute of Vancouver to a perpetual. royalty free right and license to make educational use of such Work and Intellectual Property. all rights. presentations and scholarly papers prepared for seminars and conferences. (g) Students working on a project governed by an existing written agreement to which The Art Institute of Vancouver is a party are bound by all terms of that agreement.A. or a written agreement provides otherwise.A. insignia. interests and ownership to the Intellectual Property shall be vested with The Art Institute of Vancouver. Institution’s Marks Intellectual Property comprised of or associated with The Art Institute of Vancouver’s Trade-marks and Service Marks.2 (a) through (f). V. reproduce. B. it shall have a right or license to use any Work produced by the independent contractor in the course of performance of the contract. modify. ownership rights in the following types of Works are allocated as set forth below: (a) Curricular materials including course outlines. belong solely to The Art Institute of Vancouver. research. PowerPoint and other presentation materials (in all forms and media). Where practicable. Intellectual Property created by a Student working on his or her own. as The Art Institute of Vancouver deems necessary). publish. or developed in the context of a course. Likewise. is owned by the Student and The Art Institute of Vancouver will not use the Student’s Work without the Student’s permission to do so. non-exclusive.A. (e) Unless a Work is developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III. unless the parties agree otherwise in a written agreement. display.Ownership Rights in Specific Types of Works. Institution’s Usage Rights To the extent that faculty. (f) Unless the Work is developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III.by The Art Institute of Vancouver under this Policy is required to make reasonable prompt written disclosure of the Work to an officer designated by The Art Institute of Vancouver’s President. or a written agreement provides otherwise. lesson plans. 3. and personal lecture or teaching notes are typically not considered to be owned by The Art Institute of Vancouver as Works Made for Hire or otherwise. including all Intellectual Property associated therewith. For purposes of clarification and without limiting the general rule and exceptions set forth in Sections III. Independent Contractor Works. and to execute any document deemed necessary by The Art Institute of Vancouver to perfect legal rights in The Art Institute of Vancouver and enable The Art Institute of Vancouver to file applications for registration when desired. IV. and any related accreditation or promotion of The Art Institute of Vancouver. student rosters. and other symbols of identity (collectively the “Marks”) belongs exclu- Page 150 The Art Institute of Vancouver . reproduce.e. in accordance with the parties’ agreement. course handouts. scholarly articles and papers written for publication in journals. perform and modify (i. The Art Institute of Vancouver will own Intellectual Property created by an independent contractor if a written agreement signed by the parties so provides. The independent contractor shall agree and does hereby agree to waive all their moral rights to the Work. authorized representatives of The Art Institute of Vancouver will develop a written agreement with the user of those resources. all Intellectual Property created by faculty during sabbatical are owned by the faculty.2 (a) through (f). and assessments of student projects. curricula. If The Art Institute of Vancouver does not own the Intellectual Property created by an independent contractor. copy.A. (b) Unless developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III. to identify the nature and terms of the use. for educational. As a general rule. create derivative works) such Work and Intellectual Property in all forms and media now known or hereafter existing in connection with its curriculum. to adapt. interim grade reports. The Art Institute of Vancouver will use best efforts to cite the creator of the Work if The Art Institute of Vancouver exercises such usage rights. course content and syllabi are deemed to be Works Made for Hire and therefore all Intellectual Property associated therewith is owned by The Art Institute of Vancouver. display.2 (a) through (f). or a written agreement provides otherwise. worldwide. worldwide license (exclusive or non-exclusive. including the right to use. including possible reimbursements or other systems of compensation back to The Art Institute of Vancouver. slogans.Institution sponsor. (c) If any Intellectual Property to be owned by The Art Institute of Vancouver under Section III.Academic Calendar .A. (d) Where Intellectual Property is to be developed using Substantial Institutional Resources. logos.

VIII. however. and Students may identify their status or professional affiliation with The Art Institute of Vancouver as appropriate. it is acknowledged that such resources and their use may change over time. No Institution Mark may be used without the prior. The Art Institute of Vancouver agrees. Substantial Use of Institution Resources Although “Substantial Institutional Resources” is defined (see Section II. No products or services may be marked. faculty. staff. physical infrastructure of The Art Institute of Vancouver. X. insignias. Governing Law This Policy shall be governed by and interpreted under applicable laws of Canada pertaining to intellectual property and applicable provincial law.Academic Calendar Page 151 . However. promoted or distributed with or under The Art Institute of Vancouver’s Marks without The Art Institute of Vancouver’s prior written permission and compliance with the licensing policies of The Art Institute of Vancouver. etc. and images currently comprise The Art Institute of Vancouver’s Marks. this Policy allows the Academic Policy Advisory Committee to review the definition of “substantial use” from time to time and implement any changes or clarification to the definitions which The Art Institute of Vancouver deems necessary in order to establish an appropriate standard. misleading or false impression of affiliation with. names. with changes in technology. Review Scheme Questions concerning this Intellectual Property Policy should be addressed to the Dean of Academic Affairs. Therefore. All requests for use of Institution Marks must be submitted in writing to an officer designated by the President. and this Policy and other agreements that represent modifications to this Policy shall remain binding on such creators even after their relationship with The Art Institute of Vancouver changes or terminates.sively to The Art Institute of Vancouver and/or its affiliates. VI. VII. and to prevent the illegal or unapproved use of The Art Institute of Vancouver’s Marks. The Art Institute of Vancouver. This Policy will be binding on all parties who create Intellectual Property after the effective date. but any use of The Art Institute of Vancouver’s Marks in this regard must avoid any confusing. that it will endeavor to notify the entire Institution community through both print and electronic means of its intention to make modifications and/or changes to the Policy at least 30 working days prior to their enactment. Effective Date This Policy supersedes any preexisting Intellectual Property policy of The Art Institute of Vancouver and will remain in effect until modified or revoked by The Art Institute of Vancouver. Reservation of Rights The Art Institute of Vancouver reserves the right at any time in its sole discretion to modify and/or make changes to the Policy as advisable or appropriate. symbols. phrases. offered. The designated Institution officer retains information concerning what marks. or sponsorship or endorsement by. logos. sold. and related words. without regard to choice of law provisions. written authorization of the appropriate authorities of The Art Institute of Vancouver. The Art Institute of Vancouver . modes of employment. This Policy is designed to protect the reputation of The Art Institute of Vancouver and its affiliates. Terminology). IX.

Orientation helps new students with the transition to college. Depression. finding a doctor. Non-Discrimination Policy The Art Institute of Vancouver does not discriminate or harass on the basis of race. their specific requested accommodations. • • • • • • 4 sessions of short-term counseling per issue Confidential Services 24/7 access to telephone consultations Budget and debt consultations New Parents’ Partner telephone consultations Support during difficult times Contact the Student Assistance Program. students are encouraged to request accommodations as early as feasible with the Disability Services Coordinator to allow for time to gather necessary documentation. or any other characteristic protected by provincial. 2665 Renfrew Street.Academic Calendar . faculty and administration To support school clubs and work collaboratively with these organizations To provide leadership opportunities for students within the school To promote school spirit among the student body and create a sense of connectedness with the school that will result in student success Disability Services The Art Institute of Vancouver provides accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. and Anxiety and Addiction • Resources for services in the local area • Crisis management • Referrals to short-term counseling by the Student Assistance Program for students in need of emotional support or guidance Page 152 The Art Institute of Vancouver . but not limited to. 7 days a week. BC V5M 0A7. food banks. 778-373-8968. color. if known.edu. or counselor@aii.edu. ssvingenjones@aii. in our programs and activities. disability. Classroom accommodations are not retroactive. Student Affairs coordinates events and activities that will enrich your experience at the school. The Art Institute of Vancouver will promptly and equitably investigate the claim or complaint. All One Health Student Assistance Program This service is available at no charge to students and provides benefits such as: Orientation Students are required to attend Orientation prior to beginning their programs at The Art Institute of Vancouver. If you are interested in joining the Student Association. edu. If you have a concern or complaint in this regard. Therefore. and “Talk One2One” at: 888. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries and coordinate the school’s compliance efforts regarding the NonDiscrimination Policy: Shannon Svingen-Jones. There are a number of clubs to join and opportunities to suggest ideas for new clubs or become a club leader. It is designed to introduce students to the broad educational opportunities of the college and integrates new students into life at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Students will be asked to supply medical documentation of the need for accommodation. New members are welcome. gender. Student Volunteers and Clubs The Art Institute of Vancouver encourages students to get involved by contributing to the development of the school culture. national origin. but are effective only upon the student sharing approved accommodations with the instructor. programs and activities at The Art Institute of Vancouver. Students who seek reasonable accommodations should notify the Disabilities Services Coordinator at 778-373-8965.Student Affairs Community Resources Resources and/or referrals for stress management. The department also serves as a liaison to various departments so don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions. age. and much more. fitness facilities. When a complaint is reported under the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment that discrimination or harassment is believed to have occurred. please contact the Dean of Student Affairs at 778-373-8968. disability resources. Wellness Services The Student Support Coordinator provides assistance for the student population through: • Workshops and events around campus on a variety of topics such as.617. Vancouver. Dean of Student Affairs.3362. 24 hours a day. mental health. genetic marker. The Art Institute of Vancouver Student Association The Art Institute of Vancouver encourages and supports student leadership through the Student Association. Alcohol and Drug Awareness. anxiety and depression. please visit the Student Affairs office or email aivstudentaffairs@aii. religion. health clinics.edu. The Disability Services office assists qualified students with disabilities in acquiring reasonable and appropriate accommodations and in supporting equal access to services. sexual orientation.com or email aivstudentaffairs@aii. of their specific limitations and. The purpose of the SA is: • • • • • • To provide a forum to discuss student issues To facilitate the exchange of ideas and information among students To act as a liaison between students. sex. For more details visit MyAiCampus. Complaints will be handled in accordance with the school’s Internal Grievance Procedure for Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment. Stress Management. local or federal law.

In the event that the Institution has reasonable cause to believe that a student attempted. The Institution cannot provide the long-term psychological treatment that is necessary for students experiencing suicidal distress. the welfare of the school community. The Art Institute of Vancouver may work with homestay providers in the Greater Vancouver area for placement.artinstitutes. The Art Institute of Vancouver contracts with a local apartment complex located in Vancouver to provide housing to students who wish to live in an environment with fellow Art Institute of Vancouver students. the student’s parents or other support person(s) may be contacted by the school and informed of the student’s condition. support groups or any other resource that offer support around suicidality.” If circumstances indicate further harm may come to a student by contacting family members. If the student resides in School Sponsored Housing they may need to temporarily find alternative accommodations until the Institution feels that the student can safely return to housing. in finding entry-level jobs appropriate to their needs. whether in School-Sponsored Housing or a place independent of The Art Institute of Vancouver. Living with a Canadian family provides a great opportunity to further experience Canadian culture. The Art Institute of Vancouver does not endorse or screen any family or placement secured through a homestay Provider. Students with psychological impairments that affect the student’s ability to function in the school community (academically. news about fellow graduates. Many of the lasting connections and memories you’ll make at school will happen outside of the classroom. signing a safety contract. “if knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health and safety of the student or other individuals.Academic Calendar .alumniconnections. If you have any questions for your Career Services Advisors. Page 153 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Students complete an application and pay a fee to be matched with a family that has been carefully interviewed by the homestay Provider. Some of the benefits include: • • • • • Opportunities to meet and network with other Art Institute of Vancouver students Located approximately 25 minutes by public transportation from campus Costs can be included in the student financial plan Staff supervised environment with social and educational programs and events Whether you are a student moving away from home for the first time or you’re just trying to find a new apartment outside of School-Sponsored Housing. information on how to create an effective resume and cover letter. the campus may require the student to suspend their studies at the Institution until the student can demonstrate that they have sought help or assistance from others including family. Because of the serious nature of attempted suicide and/or suicidal ideation. will attempt. Students are responsible for coordinating all payments and fees for services with the homestay Provider. healthcare provider to present a threat to harm himself/herself or others. or has engaged in efforts to prepare to commit suicide.edu/vancouver/StudentLife/ student_housing. Where practicable. The Advisors can also provide job leads. make an appointment with a Career Services Advisor. Notwithstanding. If you would like a parttime job.edu.aspx Procedures following suicide threats and attempts The Institution is committed to the well-being and safety of its school community. other options may apply. please contact the Resident Life Coordinator or visit our website at www.School-Sponsored Housing School-Sponsored Housing is often a perfect compromise between students and parents as it provides an environment that is a step between living at home and living on your own. The Career Services office is located on the second floor at the Renfrew Campus. mental health professionals. We’re here to help you assess your needs and provide resources to get you started on the process of finding an appropriate place to live.com/ArtInstitutes for access to job leads. Student Employment Assistance The Career Services Advisors can also help you with your career-related needs during school. The Institution expects and encourages students to maintain a reasonable concern for their own self-welfare and in turn. the school at its discretion may set restrictions and/or conditions for the student to return to school including receiving outside counseling. the Residential Life Coordinator and housing staff at The Art Institute of Vancouver want to make sure that you have comfortable and convenient housing options. and announcements about Alumni events. For more information. Career Services The Career Services office is staffed with Career Services Advisors who assist students. while enroled and after graduation. socially or otherwise) may opt for a medical withdrawal or a medical leave of absence. School-Sponsored Housing gives you the opportunity to connect with your classmates on a daily basis. Alumni Services Art Institute alumni are encouraged to register for the Alumni website at www. School officials may contact parents without the student’s consent. or would like to discuss how you can get a head start on your career while you are still in school. We encourage you to meet with your Advisor early into your education as they have a wealth of information that can keep you focused on your career goals. Students who need to be hospitalized due to a suicide attempt and/or suicidal ideation may be asked to demonstrate that they are safe by providing appropriate documentation from a licensed mental healthcare provider stating that the student can safely return to school and is not believed by the Homestay Services International students or other students interested in living with a Canadian family may contact Student Affairs for homestay referral. and job search and interview strategies. or for general inquiries: careerservices@aii. Students will work directly with the homestay Provider on securing an accommodation. and restricting or denying Campus Sponsored Housing accommodations.

Librarian staff are available to help students find. Proofreading services are conducted at the library to assist students with their writing skills. four hours to increase availability. • Course reserve materials are assigned short loan periods of • Subscription based online databases. and use the large array of information resources and can be contacted by phone. and consist of textbooks and required or suggested curriculum readings or materials. The library also administers Accuplacer skill placement exams. • The online catalogue. video tutorials. 2500 DVD films.Library Services The Art Institute of Vancouver offers library services and diverse resource collections at both the Culinary and Renfrew campus locations. a scanner. five PC computers and four Macs for students and faculty to use. which can be used to search for library resources held at both library locations. the library website or by phone. The Renfrew library has a number of study tables. • To avoid overdue charges. by email. and borrow materials from either location. Students can renew items a maximum of two times. resources are distributed to students at the beginning of each quarter. and library resources for each program. business and industry information databases.campusguides. by email. Current students are welcome to use both campus libraries. Page 154 To contact a librarian. and can also be obtained by contacting or visiting the library. creative. sound recordings and effects. a colour printer and photocopier. and the effective use of library resources. and in person. students have 24 x 7 access to: The librarians also provide reference services and instructional training that promote research skills. exam proctoring. and the creation of course pack classroom materials. databases.edu. item can be renewed online via • Library program resource guides. including design fore- • Login information for the online subscription databases and The library’s resource collections will inspire creativity and help students achieve both professional and academic success. 200 games. In cultivating the collections and services. Librarians assist faculty with copyright information. access. email the library at aivlibrary@aii. and may return materials to. a current student ID card is required. and casting tools. and 100 periodical titles. and thousands of journals and electronic books. reading chairs. a collection of subject guides highlighting the most useful websites. The library website (http://aii. the library works closely with both faculty and students to ensure that its resources remain relevant to academic needs and that library instruction and research assistance is appropriate for classroom and program requirements.com/aivlibrary) provides information about the library and its services and connects students to the world of scholarly. encyclopedias. conduct research. General Policy & Library Information • To borrow from the library. Through the website. study. The Art Institute of Vancouver . wireless internet access. or by visiting the library during its hours of operation. and industry information.Academic Calendar . The libraries are the place to meet. information literacy. and explore the growing collections which include over 7500 books. digital film and photo media. or phone the Renfrew library at 778-373-8919. two group work rooms.

Student Assistance or authorized government officials as part of compliance or operational requirements. Student records may also be reviewed on a confidential basis by accreditation. Student Representative (see Campus Guide for more details). send your suggestion or concern to your While not every suggestion may be feasible. and/or verbal written statements The Art Institute of Vancouver (and to those whom it may authorize) may. • Email your suggestion to the Student Affairs Department or • Where applicable. • Schedule an appointment with your Academic Director and share your idea in person. ideas. This information has to be collected by PCTIA under section 26 of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. or documents disclosed or submitted by the student as part of his/her education program at The Art Institute of Vancouver are disclosed or submitted upon the understanding that the only obligation that the recipient has with respect to such information. the student may inspect and review only those records which relate to him/her personally. and institutional financial aid programs. the name of your program and the tuition paid may be forwarded to the Private Career Training Institutions Agency for the purposes of administering the Training Completion Fund.Academic Calendar . fill in a Suggestion Form and drop it in consult the Campus Guide for your local Student Affairs Office contact information. Publication of photograph. (with or without the student’s name). Use of information submitted by student All information. with student permission. withdrawal. the Registrar will make the needed arrangements for access within a reasonable period of time but in no case more than forty-five (45) days after the request was made. trade. or other purpose. The request should identify as precisely as possible the records s/he wishes to inspect. to identify the student by name and/or with school and employment information. confidentiality and retention of student records. This information may include. attendance and/or graduation from the program for which he/she was granted student assistance. and/or to quote or record statements made by the student for any editorial. but is not limited to. The Art Institute of Vancouver may also use student information for the purposes of employment assistance tracking. When a record contains personally identifiable information about more than one student. film. and will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.Student Information Student Input The Art Institute of Vancouver welcomes suggestions from our student body on ideas that might assist in carrying out the educational mission of the school.C. their artwork or photography. and/ or videotape students and or to use a photographic reproduction of students. Procedure to Inspect Educational Records The Art Institute of Vancouver generally will not permit disclosure of personally identifiable information to third parties from the records of a student without prior written consent of the student and consistent with the British Columbia “Personal Information Protection Act”. the student’s continued enrolment. The Art Institute of Vancouver regularly evaluates student suggestions and implements those that are in the best interest of all constituencies of The Art Institute of Vancouver. • Know the deadlines for submitting applications for each of the financial aid programs available. ideas or documents and any use of the same. Your name and personal identification information. The school may require the presence of a school official during the inspection and review of a student’s records. student satisfaction and follow-up research or recovery of debt the student may owe The Art Institute of Vancouver. There are a number of ways for students to share their ideas: Admissions Records: Admissions Department prior to matriculation / Registrar’s Office post-matriculation Attendance & Academic Records: Registrar’s Office Financial Aid Records: Student Financial Services Billing & Payment Records: Student Accounting Career Services Records: Office of Career Services The Art Institute of Vancouver abides by the PCTIA and the B. The Art Institute of Vancouver may be obliged to disclose student information and provide notice/confirmation to funding and sponsorship agencies of students receiving student assistance. promotional. the Suggestion Box. Page 155 Where Student Records are Located A list of the types and locations of records maintained by The Art Institute of Vancouver and the title of officials responsible for those records is as follows: The Art Institute of Vancouver . See the Campus Guide for location of Suggestion Box. • Know the cost of attending The Art Institute of Vancouver and the school’s refund policy. advertising. “Personal Information Protection Act” and regulations with respect to student information. film. is limited solely to claims for infringement of valid patents or failure to comply with copyright laws. If the requested records are subject to inspection and review by the student. photograph. videotape. Students who wish to inspect and review their education records should submit a written request to the Registrar. • Where applicable. provincial. Privacy Legislations The Art Institute of Vancouver respects the confidentiality of all student records and complies with the British Columbia Protection of Privacy Act and relevant Ministry of Advanced Education and PCTIA Directives on Record Keeping and Privacy. artwork. Students’ Rights & Responsibilities Students have the right to: • Know what financial assistance is available. including information on federal.

and/or new information requested by either Student Financial Services or the agency to which you submitted your application. A student. you have the right to know what the interest rate is. are considered in your budget. Errors can result in long delays in your receipt of financial aid. assumes responsibility for abiding by the standards that have been instituted pursuant to our mission. address or school status. the total amount that must be repaid. but not so as to limit generality of the foregoing. and in particular. other financial aid. • Know the policies and procedures as outlined in your Student Handbook. books and supplies. or developed during the program of study at The Art Institute of Vancouver. • Not copy any software that is in use. the length of time you have to repay the loan. responsible and business-like manner. notify the lender of changes in your name. the pay-back procedures. The student agrees that any unauthorized use by him/her of such software infringes Canadian. The Art Institute of Vancouver shall be permitted to use the student’s projects and related work for the purpose of advertising. • Know what portion of the financial aid you received must be repaid. • Know how much of your financial need. processes. • Know and comply with The Art Institute of Vancouver’s refund procedures. Student Conduct Policy The Art Institute of Vancouver recognizes its students as responsible and dedicated men and women who are preparing for career employment. If the aid is a loan. If you believe you have been treated unfairly. functions. students have responsibilities and duties commensurate with their rights and privileges. verification. learning methodologies and intellectual property. etc. has been met and may request from the Student Financial Services Department an explanation of the various programs in your student aid package. This process includes how costs for tuition and fees. and international patent laws. Page 156 The Art Institute of Vancouver . exhibition and promotion of The Art Institute of Vancouver. • Accurately complete your application for student financial aid. corrections. as determined by The Art Institute of Vancouver. travel. even where based upon use in combination with other software. An integral part of their career and professional development is the expectation that they conduct themselves during the education process in the same manner as will be expected in all employment situations. professional.Academic Calendar . and when repayment is to begin. As members of The Art Institute of Vancouver. U. copyright laws. • Complete all application forms accurately and submit them on time and to the appropriate office. • Accept responsibility for all agreements you sign. I. there is valid safety or academic reason for doing so or where a student is disrupting the educational environment of others. your assets. To function properly. The Art Institute of Vancouver community is composed of individuals with varied interests and diverse opinions. • Know and comply with the deadlines for application or reapplication for aid. you may request reconsideration of the award which was made to you. etc.. Student Conduct and Intellectual Property The Art Institute of Vancouver is a professional learning environment and expects students to act accordingly. by voluntarily joining The Art Institute of Vancouver community. with the student’s permission. Student Conduct Policies and Procedures Nothing in this Calendar or The Art Institute of Vancouver policies prevents The Art Institute of Vancouver from immediately dismissing or suspending a student where. The student further agrees to indemnify The Art Institute of Vancouver for any suit brought against The Art Institute of Vancouver based on a claim that such unauthorized use infringes such aforementioned laws. In this policy. The student further agrees to maintain complete confidentiality with respect to information about The Art Institute of Vancouver business. • Know how the school determines whether you are making satisfactory academic progress. The Art Institute of Vancouver provides guidance to students regarding those standards of student conduct and behavior that it considers essential to its educational mission. in the judgment of The Art Institute of Vancouver. and as expressed in this Handbook. • Read and understand all forms that you are asked to sign and keep copies of them. Students are bound by The Art Institute of Vancouver rules of conduct with respect to intellectual property which require that all students: • Act in a mature.) are considered in the calculation of your need. and do so without cost or obligation to the student. Disciplinary actions can range from a warning to suspension or termination from The Art Institute of Vancouver. However. with respect to the use of courseware.S. Student responsibilities are to: • Review and consider all information about The Art Institute of Vancouver program before you enrol. • If you have a loan. • Return all additional documentation. Students who violate these principles or the rights of others are subject to disciplinary action based on the Student Conduct Policy. personal and miscellaneous expenses. and what happens if you are not.• Know the criteria used by The Art Institute of Vancouver to select financial aid recipients. members must exhibit a respect for the individual and collective rights of all those within the community. and laws of industrial property rights of third parties. room and board. • Know what resources (such as parental contribution. and what portion is grant aid. goals. • Under certain circumstances a student may be able to claim some intellectual property rights to original intellectual property that s/he creates in the course of attending his/her program/ course. • Know how The Art Institute of Vancouver determines a student’s financial need. which the student may acquire during his/her program of study.

Being under the influence of illegal or controlled substances on school property. although not exhaustive. or any other form of physical abuse of a student or school employee 3. Theft. threats of physical abuse and threats to damage or destroy school property or the property of other students or school employees 6. upon request of school official acting in the performance of his/her duties 27.e. Disorderly. sale. rules and regulations and/or the school-sponsored housing student handbook (if applicable) 31. Harassment by any means of any individual. or use of. Any violation of the student housing contract. Any form of unwanted sexual attention or unwanted sexual contact 9. but not limited to. falsification. or that destroys or removes public or private property. including but not limited to cheating. Interference with the normal operations of the school (i. Persistent or gross acts of willful disobedience or defiance toward school personnel 2. or knowingly supplying false information or deceiving the school and/or its officials 16. school facilities 14. disciplinary procedures. Harassment includes but is not limited to. physical harm. This would include but is not limited to any type of clothing or materials worn or brought onto the premises by any student or guest • The theft or abuse of computer. including but not limited to setting fires. for the purpose of initiation. Violation of school safety regulations. turning in false fire alarms and bomb threats 19. dangerous chemicals. records or identification 15. Any in-school or off-campus act considered inappropriate or as an example of misconduct that adversely affects the interests of The Art Institute of Vancouver and/or its reputation 30. or personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm. this list provides examples of unacceptable student behaviors. or obscene conduct. indecent or obscene as determined by school officials 17. failure to exit during fire drill. Any student who is found to have violated the student conduct policy is subject to disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or permanent dismissal. Breach of peace on school property or at any school-sponsored or supervised program 20. or at any school function is also prohibited 21. 7.This policy also provides guidance regarding the types of conduct that infringe upon the fulfillment of The Art Institute of Vancouver mission. Assault. possession or distribution of alcoholic beverages on school property or at any function sponsored or supervised by the school. Failure to identify oneself when on school property or at a school-sponsored or supervised functions. Conveyance of threats by any means of communication including. Possession or use of firearms. Any conduct that threatens the health or safety of one’s own self or another individual. bodily danger. Unauthorized entry into. or defacing of school property or the property of another student. Failure to satisfy school financial obligations 25. “Hazing” includes any method of initiation or pre-initiation into a student club or any pastime or amusement engaged in with respect to such a club that causes. Any violation of the institutions policies on the responsible use of technology including but not limited to II. explosives. plagiarism. Violations by guest of a student on school property. or other weapons on school property or at school sponsored functions 23. Any form of “hazing” and any act that endangers the safety of a student. Extortion 18.Academic Calendar Page 157 . or is likely to cause. Use of cell phones and pagers during scheduled classroom times 13. Fighting 4. Use. Violation of federal. Elements/Violations The following is a list of behaviors that violate The Art Institute of Vancouver Student Conduct Policy. Verbal abuse of a student or school employee 5. Smoking in classrooms or other school buildings or areas unless designated as a smoking area 24. or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization. as further described below. tampering with fire safety and/or fire fighting equipment. Failure to comply with direction of school officials. disruption of teaching and administrative functions. admission into. including coercion and personal abuse. vandalism/damage. provincial or local laws and school rules and regulations on school property or at school sanctioned or school sponsored functions 28. indecent. Threats to commit self-harm and/ or actual incidents of self-harm by any student are a violation of this code. affiliation with. Use. staff or security officers who are acting in the performance of their duties 26. battery. Forgery. or other school activities) 12. deemed to be lewd. Internet or Intranet resources The Art Institute of Vancouver . sale. pedestrian or vehicular traffic. possession or distribution of illegal or controlled substances. 1. or at any function sponsored or supervised by the school. Students are responsible for the actions of their guests 10. faculty. Dishonesty. lewd. written or verbal acts or uses of technology. which have the effect of harassing or intimidating a person 8.. attempted theft. drug or drug paraphernalia on school property. to any student or other person attending the school 29. alteration or misuse of school documents. Being under the influence of alcohol on school property or at any school function is also prohibited 22. faculty or staff member 11. email.

or change the contents. and/or after the disciplinary proceeding student conduct policy • Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the • Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the disciplinary system 33. b. Page 158 • Hearings normally shall be conducted in private • Admission of any person to the hearing shall be at the discretion of the Dean of Student Affairs or his/her delegate.) Hearings shall be conducted by the Dean of Student Affairs or his/her delegate (herein referred to as the “Hearing Officer”) and may also include faculty. during. to identify violations of the student conduct policy. Complaints should be submitted as soon as possible after the alleged violation occurred. or school official sages tion. regulations or policies that the STUDENT is charged with violating. The complaint shall be prepared in writing and directed to the Dean of Student Affairs or his/her delegate.e.) If a good faith effort has been made to contact the STUDENT to discuss the alleged violation and the STUDENT fails to appear for the meeting. staff and students according to the following guidelines: • Verbal or physical harassment and/or intimidation of a member of a disciplinary body prior to. faculty member.) The Dean of Student Affairs or his/her delegate’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the STUDENT violated a rule. Disciplinary Procedures Complaint a. including but not limited to: • Failure to obey the summons of a disciplinary body or school official • Falsification. This decision shall be communicated to the STUDENT. the following procedures should apply unless the student elects to forego them. The Dean of Student Affairs or his/her delegate will render and communicate the decision to the STUDENT. This • Unauthorized downloading of copyrighted materials in viola. and to impose sanctions for such violations c. • In hearings involving more than one STUDENT. a. c. to use.) His/her delegate will notify the STUDENT of the complaint • Unauthorized transfer of a file and the alleged violation of the student conduct policy. religion. student. III. may permit the hearing concerning each student to be conducted separately Administration) and the STUDENT may present witnesses at the hearing. sexual orientation. national origin. read. b. age. or misrepresentation of information before a disciplinary body or school official disciplinary proceeding • Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a • Attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a disciplinary body prior to and/or during the course of the disciplinary proceeding Procedures Regarding Student Dismissals When the Administration proposes to dismiss/expel a student from The Art Institute of Vancouver. exhibits and written statements may be ac• All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of • After the hearing. the Hear• The complaining party (which may be a member of the ing Officer. The STUDENT will meet with the Dean of Student Affairs or his/her delegate to discuss the complaint and alleged violation. The The Art Institute of Vancouver . b.Academic Calendar . and impose sanctions for such violations. federal or local law. including the time. faculty. A time shall be set for a hearing not less than two nor more than fifteen calendar days after the STUDENT has been notified of the charges and his/her proposed dismissal from school. The Art Institute of Vancouver generally will not disclose the name of the person making the complaint to the accused student (“STUDENT”) unless it determines in its sole discretion that the circumstances warrant it.) Any member of The Art Institute of Vancouver i. staff. the Dean of Student Affairs or his/her delegate may make a determination of violations of The Art Institute of Vancouver policies on the basis of the information available. race. may file a complaint against any student for misconduct or for otherwise being in violation of The Art Institute of Vancouver policies. distortion. • Use of computing facilities to send obscene or abusive mes• Use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operation of the school’s computing system 32. in her or her discretion. disability or any other criteria protected by state.• Unauthorized entry into a file. colour. regulation or policy of The Art Institute of Vancouver. Harassment based on sex. Abuse of The Art Institute of Vancouver disciplinary system.notification may be in written form or through oral communication of law • Unauthorized use of another individual’s identification and/ or password • Use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student. Those witnesses may be questioned by the Hearing Officer cepted as evidence for consideration by the Hearing Officer at his/her discretion the Hearing Officer • Pertinent records.) Unless otherwise provided by law. of for any other purpose Notification and Adjudication a. place and nature of the alleged offense(s).) The Dean of Student Affairs or a delegate shall review and investigate the complaint to determine if the allegations have merit.) The charges against the student shall be presented to the STUDENT in written form. Maximum time limits for scheduling of hearings may be extended at the discretion of the Dean of Student Affairs or his/ her delegate. the Hearing Officer shall determine whether the STUDENT has violated the rules.

The student will not be permitted to continue his or her studies at the school and may not return to the school or to school-sponsored housing (if applicable) at any time or for any reason.e. Some sanctions not listed above may be used. to others. 4. participate in or attend school activities. simultaneously with. It must be delivered to the President or his/her delegate within seven calendar days following the student’s receipt of the decision. The student may not attend classes. It must detail all bases for the appeal. disciplinary action may be instituted and sanctions imposed against the student when the school has a reasonable belief that the health. • The Hearing Officer’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the STUDENT violated a rule. safety or welfare of The Art Institute of Vancouver community is threatened. • The Hearing Officer shall provide the STUDENT with a Interim Suspension The Art Institute of Vancouver may immediately remove or suspend a student from school and/or school-sponsored housing without applying or exhausting these procedures when. Appeal Procedures Students wishing to appeal a disciplinary decision may do so in the following manner: • The student must obey the terms of the decision pending the outcome of the appeal. in The Art Institute of Vancouver’s sole judgment. During the interim suspension. Proceedings under this policy may be carried out prior to. the President of The Art Institute of Vancouver or his/her delegate. The Dean of Student Affairs or his/her delegate defines the terms of probation. IV. visit school-sponsored housing. safety and welfare of students. or have restricted privileges.Academic Calendar . The Art Institute of Vancouver will cooperate fully with law enforcement and other agencies in the enforcement of criminal laws on school property. backpacks. labs. students of The Art Institute of Vancouver may participate in the adjudication of disciplinary proceedings including hearings and appeals. This may take the form of monetary or material replacement. use school facilities. V. to review appeals and make a recommendation regarding Search of Student’s Property The Art Institute of Vancouver reserves the right to search the contents of students’ personal property or belongings when there is reasonable suspicion on the part of The Art Institute of Vancouver staff that a serious risk to the health. attend counseling. regulation or policy of The Art Institute of Vancouver. Discretionary Sanctions: The student will be required to complete an educational service. If the Hearing Officer determines that a violation has occurred. The type of sanction imposed may vary depending upon the seriousness of the violation(s). Disciplinary procedures may be instituted against a student charged with violation of a law that is also a violation of the student conduct policy. This includes but is not limited to vehicles brought onto property leased. library) and/or all other school activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible. copy of the determination. Although not exhaustive. as the Dean of Student Affairs or designee may determine to be appropriate. owned or controlled by the school. i. or following civil or criminal proceedings off campus. The student may be able to return to school once specified conditions for readmission are met. students shall be denied access to school-sponsored housing and/or to the school (including classes. Dean of Student Affairs or his/ her delegate. • The student must write a letter of appeal. 3. This letter will give the student the opportunity to indicate his/her position on the decision. The above list is only a general guideline. or to property of The Art Institute of Vancouver or a member of The Art Institute of Vancouver. Warning: A notice in writing that a student has failed to meet some aspect of the school’s standards and expectations 2.. Violations of Law If a student is charged with a violation of federal. including information regarding the student’s right of appeal therefrom. The Art Institute of Vancouver reserves the right to immediately impose the most severe sanction if circumstances merit. a student who has been suspended from school may not be on school property. owned or controlled by the school.Hearing Officer will issue a written determination. addressed to • The President or his/her delegate shall appoint a committee Page 159 The Art Institute of Vancouver . a student dismissed from school-sponsored housing must leave in accordance with the directions indicated in the decision. Sanctions The Art Institute of Vancouver may impose sanctions for violations of the student conduct policy. provincial or local laws or regulations occurring away from the school. 5. Probation: Probation is used for repeated violations or a specific violation of a serious nature. portfolios and clothing. and/or the school community exists. 6. the Hearing Officer’s determination will also address whether dismissal from The Art Institute of Vancouver is an appropriate sanction for the offense(s) This policy also applies to student property in school-sponsored housing. Suspension: Separation of the student from the school for a pre-determined period of time. Restitution: Compensation for loss or damage to property leased. the student poses a threat of harm to himself. the following list represents the types of sanctions that may be imposed upon any student or student organization found to have violated the student conduct policy: 1. or be employed by the school during his/her suspension. Student Involvement in Conduct Proceedings At the discretion of the President. Expulsion: The student will be expelled from The Art Institute of Vancouver immediately.

Such conduct is unprofessional. familial status. such as tutoring 6. Providing referral to counseling services or providers 5. Consequently. coerced sexual acts. The Art Institute of Vancouver will use good faith efforts to protect the alleged victim from any hostile environment at the school and any subsequent harassment or retaliation. hostile. graphic commentary about an individual’s body. Other examples of sexual harassment include. Arranging for the victim to re-take a course or withdraw from a class without penalty. Other Forms of Harassment Verbal abuse. medical condition. and is therefore a form of sex discrimination. disability. color. sex. sex. for example. insulting or obscene Page 160 The Art Institute of Vancouver . The student may not be accompanied by an attorney. If The Art Institute of Vancouver determines that sexual violence may have occurred. ethnic origin. relevancy of evidence. Vancouver. genetic marker or disability. procedures. or in an academic decision. Complaints of sexual violence should be made to Dean of Student Affairs. and other harassing conduct are also forbidden under this policy when directed at an individual because of his or her race. sexual battery and sexual coercion. sexual assault. and generally considered bad for business. Reporting any subsequent harassment or retaliation to (insert title of appropriate school official) 2. assault. age. genetic marker or on any other basis protected by law. BC V5M 0A7. or sexual deficiencies. but are not limited to: unwanted sexual advances. or c. program or activity or in admission. Providing academic support services. The President or his/her delegate will render a written decision on the appeal within thirty calendar days from receipt of the appeal and communicate same promptly to the student. Such efforts may occur prior to the outcome of the investigation and may include: 1. gender. stalking. illegal. Sexual violence includes rape. Sexual violence is considered to be a form of sexual harassment and is defined as physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to the victim’s use of drugs or alcohol. Such action may include. friend. Policy Concerning Sexual Violence Sexual violence refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to the victim’s use of drugs or alcohol. duration of the hearing or any part thereof. age. Providing an escort to ensure the alleged victim can move safely between classes and activities 3. marital status. leering. demands for sexual favors in exchange for favorable treatment. videos. speaking with the alleged victim. color. requests for sexual favors. touching. prevent its recurrence. sexual prowess. The Art Institute of Vancouver will take immediate action to investigate or otherwise determine what happened. The Art Institute of Vancouver prohibits all conduct of this nature whether or not such conduct violates any applicable laws. suggestive. 2665 Renfrew Street. Upon learning of possible sexual violence involving a student. 778-3738968. regardless of whether it violates any law. Definition of Sexual Harassment Sexual harassment consists of unwelcome sexual advances. Submission to such conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of a person’s status in a course. • The committee will report back to the President or his/her delegate with its recommendation following its review of the appeal. comments or gestures. No Harassment The Art Institute of Vancouver is committed to providing workplaces and learning environments that are free from harassment on the basis of any protected classification including. phone records. This committee will be comprised of staff members not involved in making the initial disciplinary decision. Ensuring that the alleged victim and the alleged perpetrator do not attend the same classes 4. The committee may prohibit from attending or remove any person who disrupts the proceedings of the committee. Sexual violence is considered a form of sexual harassment. but not limited to race. ssvingenjones@aii. The Art Institute of Vancouver will take steps proactively designed to promptly and effectively end the sexual violence or the threat of sexual violence. all conduct of this nature is expressly prohibited. sexual harassment or sex discrimination are not tolerated by The Art Institute of Vancouver. religion. national origin. Acts involving sexual violence. sexual violence or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature where: a. and address its effects regardless of whether the alleged actions are subject to criminal investigation. unproductive. the alleged perpetrator and other potential witness as appropriate and reviewing other evidence such as calendars. whistling. The student may be accompanied by one person (family member. but is not limited to. sexual orientation. The student making the appeal and the person bringing the charges may be provided an opportunity to address the committee in person. b. or offensive work or educational environment. The committee shall determine all matters relating to the conduct of the hearing including. and displaying sexually suggestible objects or pictures. veteran status. Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for an academic decision. the weight to be given any evidence. verbal abuse of a sexual nature. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating.edu. religion. etc. It is the responsibility of each employee and each student to conduct himself or herself in a professional manner at all times and to refrain from such harassment.Academic Calendar .disposition of the appeal. sexual orientation. etc) as an observer. insulting comments and gestures. pinching.

The investigator may prohibit from attending or remove any person who disrupts the investigation in the investigator’s sole discretion. suspension or dismissal. a copy of which can be found in the Student Handbook or The Art Institute of Vancouver Academic Calendar. Both will be informed of the outcome of any campus disciplinary proceeding. Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment Students who believe they have been subjected to discrimination or harassment in violation of the Non Discrimination Policy should follow the procedure outlined below. Matters involving general student complaints will be addressed according to the Student Complaint Procedures. Both the accuser and the accused are entitled to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding. or other forcible or non-forcible sex offenses. The President. 778-373-8930. but shall not be informed of the details of the recommended disciplinary action without the consent of the accused. The student who made the complaint shall be informed if there were findings made that the policy was or was not violated and of actions taken to resolve the complaint. Department of Education or visit the website at http://www. In accordance with institutional policies protecting individuals’ privacy. acquaintance rape. promptly after learning of such alleged conduct. Regardless if a complaint is filed under the Student Grievance Procedure. 2. If an investigation confirms the allegations. unless otherwise required by local law. which may be imposed following a final determination of a disciplinary proceeding regarding rape. V5M0A7.S. please contact the Office for Civil Rights at the U. Students who initiate or participate in such investigations in good faith will be protected against subsequent harassment and school-related retaliation. etc. The complaint should be signed by the complainant. 5. ssvingenjones@ The Art Institute of Vancouver . Sanctions. the student who made the complaint may generally be notified that the matter has been referred for disciplinary action. 4. Vancouver. Students who have been subjected to sexual violence should also review the Policy Concerning Sexual Violence and Programs and Procedures Regarding Sexual Assault (available in the Student Affairs Office). probation. 2665 Renfrew Street.edu. The Art Institute of Vancouver will take prompt corrective action. For this purpose. if any. such as an order that the accused not contact the student who made the complaint. The Art Institute of Vancouver will investigate the allegations. the outcome of a disciplinary proceeding means only The Art Institute of Vancouver’s final determination with respect to the alleged sexual offense and any sanction that is imposed against the accused. which may include discipline.gov/ocr. BC. Students who have been subjected to sexual violence are encouraged to review the No Harassment Policy. The decision of the Investigator may be appealed by petitioning the President’s Office of The Art Institute of Vancouver. the Non-Discrimination Policy. The complaint should be presented in writing and it should describe the alleged incident(s) and any corrective action sought. V5M0A7.Disciplinary Actions and Sanctions On-campus disciplinary procedures against students will be in accordance with The Art Institute of Vancouver’s published Student Code of Conduct and the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment.ed. up to and including immediate dismissal. will render a written decision on the appeal within thirty calendar days from receipt of the appeal. Complaint Procedure Students who feel they have been harassed should follow the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Harassment and Discrimination (the “Student Grievance Procedure”). prompt and reliable determination about whether the The Art Institute of Vancouver Non Discrimination Policy has been violated.Academic Calendar Page 161 . mpetrovich@ aii. 6. no later than 45 calendar days from the date the complaint was filed. The President’s decision shall be final. Efforts will be made to ensure confidentiality to the extent consistent with the goal of conducting an appropriate investigation. Both the complainant and the accused will have the opportunity to meet and discuss the allegations with the investigator and may offer any witnesses in support of their position to the investigator during the course of the investigation. 3. 7. Vancouver. Any student who chooses to file a discrimination complaint should do so either with the Dean of Student Affairs. provide emotional support. 2665 Renfrew Street. aii. may include warning. that are directly related to him/her. Complainants are encouraged to file a complaint as soon as possible after an alleged incident of discrimination has occurred. 778-373-8968 or with the Dean of Academic Affairs. This complaint procedure is intended to provide a fair. friend. The written appeal must be made within twenty calendar days of receipt of the determination letter. For more information about your rights under the federal laws prohibiting discrimination.edu.) who can act as an observer. The Art Institute of Vancouver will conduct an investigation for the purpose of determining whether prohibited harassment has occurred. 1. The observer may not be an attorney. The Art Institute of Vancouver will not retaliate against persons bringing forward allegations of harassment or discrimination. the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment and the Programs and Procedures Regarding Sexual Assault (available in the Student Affairs Office). BC. or his or her designee. The student who made the complaint and the accused shall be informed promptly in writing when the investigation is completed. A student may be accompanied during investigation meetings and discussions by one person (family member. and/or assist the student in understanding and cooperating in the investigation.

55 shall govern this arbitration provision. investigate and make a determination of the merits of the complaint and/or recommend further investigation. The Art Institute will pay the filing fees charged by the arbitrator up to a maximum of $3. The Dean of Student Affairs may refer the complaint to an appropriate senior Art Institute of Vancouver Manager. however. and legal counsel. or after the student’s attendance and whether the dispute is based on contract. or otherwise to litigate the dispute or claim in any court (other than in small claims or similar court. if appropriate. to the extent such fees and expenses could be imposed by the British Columbia Commercial Arbitration Act and consistent with the civil procedures rules of the Province of British Columbia as applicable. c.S. The Art Institute will select one. Other rights that a student or The Art Institute would have in court also may not be available in arbitration. the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment or is not a matter relating to violation of student conduct policies have a number of ways to make their concerns known. except as provided in the applicable arbitration rules. at the student’s or The Art Page 162 Institute’s election. The arbitration shall follow the standards and rules of procedure as set out in the British Columbia Commercial Arbitration Act. neither party will have the right to a jury trial.Student Complaint Policy (Other) Students who feel that they have been dealt with unfairly but their complaint is not covered under the Student Academic Appeals Process.6780. or any of its officers. or if a student’s claim exceeds the relevant jurisdictional threshold. experts and witnesses. 1996. The student must make such a complaint within 10 days of the date of the events that gave rise to the complaint. Informal Resolution Procedures Unless specified to the contrary.B.202. trustees. If The Art Institute intends to initiate arbitration. If that claim is transferred or appealed to a different court. The arbitrator shall have no authority to arbitrate claims on a class action basis. The Art Institute reserves the right to elect arbitration and. The Dean of Student Affairs or the Manager to whom the matter has been referred shall review. during. the first step will be to seek an informal resolution with the person responsible for the action. employees or agents) arising out of or relating to a student’s enrollment or attendance at The Art Institute. If either a student or The Art Institute chooses arbitration. The determination of PCTIA on the matter shall be the full and final determination of the matter with no right of appeal or recourse to legal or other proceedings. the student may. Upon a student’s written request. expert and witness fees). Further. arbitrators’ fees. request that the President of The Art Institute of Vancouver review the matter. Any arbitration hearing shall take place in the city of Vancouver. directors.Academic Calendar . it will notify the student in writing by regular mail at the student’s latest address on file with The Art Institute and the student will have 20 days from the date of the letter to select a local arbitrator. unless applicable law gives a right to recover any of those fees from the other party.500 per claim. The Art Institute agrees that it will not elect to arbitrate any individual claim of less than the relevant jurisdictional threshold that a student may bring in small claims court (or in a similar court of limited jurisdiction subject to expedited procedures). submitted to and resolved by individual binding arbitration pursuant to the terms described herein. regardless of which party prevails. Formal Review Procedures If the matter is not resolved informally. shall be. This arbitration provision shall survive the termination of a student’s relationship with The Art Institute. If the arbitrator determines that any claim or defence is frivolous or wrongfully intended to oppress the other party. a student may make a formal complaint in writing to the Dean of Student Affairs. Washington. Suite 980. The arbitrator’s decision will be final and binding. The Commercial Arbitration Act. statute.336. Each party will bear the expense of its own legal counsel. B. tort. The President will normally provide a reply to the student within 10 days of the student’s request. the arbitrator may award sanctions in the form of fees and expenses reasonably incurred by the other party (including arbitration administration fees. to engage in discovery. The general procedures for dispute resolution are as follows: A. as set forth in the preceding paragraph. given the nature and subject matter of the complaint. If the student fails to select an arbitrator within that 20-day period. or otherwise. within three days of receipt of the formal reply and recommendation. and claims brought by or against a student may not be joined or consolidated with claims brought by or against any other person. Among other things. R. if it does so. The Art Institute of Vancouver . This request must be provided in writing. the student remains dissatisfied with the resolution of this complaint they may do any of the following: PCTIA PROCESS: the student may make a formal complaint to the Private Career Training Institutions Agency of British Columbia (PCTIA).C. DC 20002-4241 or contact at 1. ARBITRATION: Every student and The Art Institute agrees that any dispute or claim between the student and The Art Institute (or any company affiliated with The Art Institute. a student will not have the right to participate as a representative or member of any class of claimants pertaining to any claim subject to arbitration. If the student is not satisfied with the resolution recommended by the Dean of Student Affairs or Manager to whom the matter has been referred. ACICS: A student may also contact the Accrediting Council of Independent Colleges and Schools at 750 First Street NE. Should. mediation. whether such dispute arises before. and/or recommendation for resolution within 20 days of the student filing the formal complaint. or in an action to enforce the arbitrator’s award). each student agrees that the matter will be resolved by binding arbitration pursuant to the terms of this Section. after exhausting the above process. the President and the student may come to a mutually acceptable agreement on an alternative process for resolving the dispute including mediation or some alternative dispute resolution process.

Remember that part of your education is to learn how to present yourself well to others. there are a few basic rules that all of the students are expected to follow: 1. lab or library and may also result in the student not receiving credit for that day’s work. First Aid Kits are located at the reception desk of each campus and additional locations as noted in the Campus Guide. Both the individual and his/her clothes should be clean. Visitors and Phone Calls Firearm Policy Firearms. Students are also expected to clean up after themselves when using the microwaves and other facilities. is prohibited on The Art Institute of Vancouver property. rifles. on the physical premises of The Art Institute of Vancouver. Students must turn off cellular telephones. Individuals found soliciting should be reported to the Student Affairs Office. The possession of firearms (such as pistols. Solicitation Solicitation is forbidden (unless prior approval is granted) on the grounds of The Art Institute of Vancouver. whether said property is owned or leased by The Art Institute or provided to The Art Institute for its use. Use of Facilities The Art Institute of Vancouver expends considerable effort to maintain a clean and professional facility conducive to an educational environment. the student may request transportation to a local hospital emergency room or doctor for examination and treatment if necessary. knives or swords. Consequently. students are requested to make efficient use of receptacles provided for garbage. Policies. Shirt and shoes are required at all times. or any object or chemical specifically designed or made to inflict bodily harm to another person. and procedures Dress Code While it is not The Art Institute of Vancouver’s intention to dictate how to dress. the President or a member of management or a member of school staff. Children at The Art Institute of Vancouver Children are not allowed in the classrooms or labs of The Art Institute of Vancouver. Any person violating this policy may be required to leave The Art Institute premises. lab or library.Academic Calendar . Firearms are not permitted in any vehicle while the vehicle is parked on Art Institute property. shotguns. Health/Medical Insurance for International Students International Students are required to maintain appropriate and sufficient health insurance. Only in medical emergencies will a message be taken to a student. The Art Institute of Vancouver cannot operate a telephone message service for students. 3. including those that are concealed. except that sworn members of a law enforcement agency acting in performance of their duties and/or employees of a licensed armored car service providing contracted services to The Art Institute or to Art Institute vendors and contractors (where approved by The Art Institute) may carry weapons. If a recognized Art Institute of Vancouver organization wishes to raise funds as part of a service project. except where otherwise required by law. Failure to do so will result in the student being asked to leave the classroom.Other Services. so as not to offend others. The student should review personal and/or family insurance policies to determine whether appropriate coverage exists. Violation of this policy is considered a serious offense that endangers the safety of anyone on The Art Institute premises. commercial or handmade explosive charges (including fireworks). Cellular Telephones & Other Electronic Equipment Use Policy Active cellular phones are not allowed in the classroom. including concealed weapons. Students violating this policy are subject to suspension or dismissal from school. Page 163 The Art Institute of Vancouver . An adult must accompany children under the age of eighteen in the building at all times. Prohibited Weapons It is illegal for students to carry weapons. are not permitted on The Art Institute premises and/or at Art Institute events. pellet guns). Any employee or student who becomes aware of a violation of this policy should immediately notify Human Resources. permission must be obtained from the Student Affairs Office prior to any such activity. The student is responsible for any resulting expenses. Please visit Student Affairs for more information. recycling and ashtrays. Food & Drink Policy Consult your Campus Guide and Course Syllabus for specific details concerning the Food & Drink policy. Apparel should not be as revealing or questionable as to cause disruption of normal school and classroom operations. A main priority of The Art Institute of Vancouver is to provide an uninterrupted atmosphere for class and studies. There are a number of First Aid Kits available as well as qualified First Aid Attendants. walkman devices and any other electronic equipment when entering a classroom. Consequently. Health Services/First Aid In the event of illness or injury to a student on The Art Institute of Vancouver premises or at a sponsored function of The Art Institute of Vancouver. Visitors or family are not permitted in class without prior permission from the Instructor or Administration. 2.

Faculty members not only have appropriate academic credentials. The Art Institute of Vancouver is interested in providing a quality curriculum to help you attain your personal and professional goals. Page 164 The Art Institute of Vancouver . Telephones and Facilities Consult your Campus Guide for specific locations and availability of these amenities. Students come to The Art Institute of Vancouver to prepare for employment in the career field of their choice.Academic Calendar . The information will be at the top of the home page. com for updates. Daily updates will be posted by 6:30 am.Vending Machines. Academic Advisor. Academic Affairs Administration The Academic Affairs Department administrators and faculty members have been carefully recruited to assure the excellence of the educational processes. Inclement Weather There are a number of ways to determine closure status of each Art Institute of Vancouver location. the focus of the educational process is devoted to the development of employable skills and professional attitudes to prepare graduates to enter their career field.artschool. With this in mind. consequently. The Art Institute of Vancouver programs may be changed and updated as necessary. The student should consult with his/her Instructor. Check the Student Affairs Web site http://studentaffairs. and/or Academic Director any time there is need for additional support service. but many also have professional experience and backgrounds in the career-related areas they teach.

Assist people with disabilities. Never re-enter the building until notified by emergency personnel that it is safe to do so. earthquake. Vancouver. Flood. Do not use elevators. 7. Call 911 and report location of fire (see 911 Procedures). however in the event that the school must close. Calmly proceed to nearest exit -. Activate the fire alarm. other national emergencies When a fire alarm is activated: Page 165 The Art Institute of Vancouver . we will post the details of the closure on the main reception line or check the Student Affairs Website: http://studentaffairs. Follow instructions from emergency personnel. 2. terrorist attack (in any part of the country). 4. and Tsunami Environment/Wildlife Conflict Sexual Assault Centre Coastal/Airport Watch program Police non-emergency Fire non-emergency Ambulance non-emergency Fire Safety If you see a fire: 1. Use the correct fire extinguisher Fire extinguishers are specific to certain types of fires. a supervisor. British Columbia. fire. 2. Security phone numbers are listed below. Evacuating Disabled Persons: Individuals who are non-ambulatory. bomb threats and earthquakes. The need for evacuation in other situations will be determined by emergency personnel and you will be advised if evacuation is necessary. If evacuation is necessary: 1. alert others. but not limited to: • Bomb threat. 5. • • How do I know if it is an emergency? Err on the side of caution.watch for falling glass and other hazards. Use handrails in stairways. V5M 0A7 Culinary Campus Address: 300-609 Granville Street. the address. a faculty member. closing doors behind you. Dial 911 on a mobile or land line phone device and provide (a) nature of the emergency and (b) the location including the name of the building. Use a fire extinguisher on small fires (waste basket sized) only if it is safe to do so. Students and staff are advised not to talk to the media in a crisis situation. faculty and students to close the school for the following reasons. School closures are rare. Walk -. you may assume that all campuses will be open for regularly scheduled hours.in case of fire check doors for heat before opening. or visually impaired require special assistance during any evacuation. Class A B C D Type of Fire Ordinary combustibles Flammable liquids Electrically charged equipment Combustible metals School Closing Procedure The Art Institute of Vancouver may determine in the interests of staff. Tell someone: campus security. and move everyone away from the area of the fire.com/ If no information related to school closure is posted.don’t rush or crowd. British Columbia. violence. or call 911. Move away from the building quickly -. Renfrew Campus Address: 2665 Renfrew Street. Emergency Evacuation Procedures Situations requiring evacuation include fire. Move to your emergency meeting location and stay there so that all personnel may be accounted for. Fire alarms must be treated as real emergencies and building evacuation must occur.artschool. demonstrations (planned/unplanned). inclement weather. hazardous material release. 3. Contact Campus Security concerning all safety and safetyrelated issues as soon as possible. transportation strikes. 6.Academic Calendar . coworker and the Building Emergency Director of the help that they will require in the event of an emergency. Vancouver.Emergency Procedures 911 Procedures • • Do not hesitate to call 911 in matters of life and death or if you are uncertain about the severity of a situation. a peer. These persons should inform their supervisors. hearing impaired. Dangerous Goods Spills. V7Y 1G5 Campus Contact Information Security Reception Desks Renfrew 778-373-9000 Renfrew 604-683-9200 Culinary 778-373-8905 Emergency Phone Numbers • • • • • • • • • • • • Fire/Medical/Police Poison Control Centre Crisis Centre Gas Leaks & Odours 911 604-682-5050 604-872-3311 1-800-663-9911 1-888-769-3766 1-800-663-3456 1-800-663-9453 604-255-6344 1-888-855-6655 604-717-3321 604-665-6000 604-872-5151 Power Outages & Emergencies Earthquake. 3. a co-worker. phone number and room number.

open it slowly. It must be treated as a real emergency. well lit area. In heavy smoke you can crawl or crouch low with head 30”-36” from the floor (watching the base of the wall) and count out the number of doors you pass -. standing behind it to one side. proceed to the predetermined area so that a head count can be taken. Keep checking behind you so the person knows you cannot be surprised. Drop to your knees and crawl. If not hot. closing as many doors as possible between yourself and the fire. If you have concerns about your personal safety. Note: Know in advance exactly how many doors you will have to pass along your evacuation route before you reach the nearest exit. If this is not possible. 2. call Campus Security (numbers above). Get a good description of the suspect. 2. Use the stairway. or have someone accompany you. Walk with someone else whenever possible.if the door is hot. DROP to the floor. 4. well lit areas. Park your car or bicycle in a busy. well lit area. rug or coat and wrap them in it to smother the flames. Grab a blanket. • • If you witness a crime: • • • • Someone else’s: Personal Security • • • Know the location of the nearest phone. direction and mode of travel. Have your keys ready and check your backseat before getting in your car. Signal your location -. If caught in smoke: 1. 5. Be alert as you return to your vehicle.leave. Once outside. • • • Stay in busy. The Art Institute of Vancouver . 2. Retreat. clothing. do not open it. If you suspect you are being followed. be suspicious. Call 911 and then Campus Security (numbers above) Do not place yourself in danger by attempting to apprehend or interfere with a suspect. Block smoke from entering by placing damp cloth material around / under door. 3. Evacuate the building and proceed to your emergency meeting location. If trapped in a room by fire: 1. 3. never up.1. Note physical characteristics.Academic Calendar Safety on the go: • Page 166 . Never use elevators if fire is suspected. proceeding down to the ground floor. if this is not possible be prepared to signal from a window. Use a damp cloth over your mouth and nose to filter out smoke. Note the license plate number as well as the make and colour of any vehicle which may be involved. If someone is hanging around . Use caution when stopping to give strangers information or directions. holding your breath as long as possible. Do not take shortcuts through low-traffic areas.phone 911 and give the fire department your exact location.outside smoke may be drawn in. Find out the location of your predetermined area before a fire occurs. Lock your door and keep your windows rolled up. or if you are returning to your vehicle late at night. Never open a closed door without checking it first for heat . and be prepared to shut it quickly if fire is present. Report the incident to the police immediately. Stay calm.you will then know when you have reached the exit door (even if you can’t see that it is the exit). Have emergency numbers posted by the phone. ROLL around on the floor. cross the street and go to a busy. Do not open the window or break glass unless absolutely necessary -. especially at night. alarm and exits. Change directions. 3. call Campus Security. If clothing catches on fire: Yours: STOP where you are. Breathe shallowly through your nose.

in Fashion Design.A.A.A.A. Vancouver Community College George Gardiner Cookery for the Hotel and Catering Industry. Paris American Academy. Vancouver Community College BC Provincial Instructor Diploma. Martin’s B. City and Guilds of London Institute Paul Massincaud Certificate in Chocolate. Mount Saint Vincent University Foundation Studies Valerie Pugh B. Bournemouth University B. Ayr Catering College Scotland Certificate in Catering. L’Institut de Tourisme et d’Hôtellerie du Québec Certificate in Sugar Art. L’Institut de Tourisme et d’Hôtellerie du Québec Cours Entremets et dessets sur assiettes.A. TADMOR School of Hotel Professional Studies Daniel Riviere Executive Certificate in Food and Beverage.F.Sc.B. Mela Sekhon Red Seal in Baking and Pastry Arts Certificate in Baking and Pastry Arts.Culinary. in Marketing.D. in Visual Arts.A. Vancouver Community College. Vancouver Community College Digital Film and Video John Penhall Bachelor of Arts in Film and Television.A. in Art. in Fashion Design and Technology. Simon Fraser University Fashion Guy Babineau B. Simon Fraser University Associate Dipl. in Studio Practice. University of British Columbia Dipl.A. University of British Columbia The Art Institute of Vancouver . City and Guilds of London England 147 & 152 BC Provincial Instructor Diploma.F. in Hotel Administration.Sc. City and Guilds of London Institute Basic Cookery for the Catering Industry. British Columbia Institute of Technology/Vancouver Community College Certificate of Apprenticeship . in Hospitality and Tourism. University of Calgary Paul Winskell B. Kwantlen University Certificate in Fashion Draping.A. Central St. York University Anita Heiberg Post Graduate Certificate in Innovative Pattern Cutting. in Fashion Design and Technology.Academic Calendar Page 167 . Ryerson Polytechnical Institute Kevin Wall B. in Theatre.F.F.Fulltime Faculty by Program Culinary Tim Budd Culinary Red Seal Certificate in Commercial Baking.B. Kwantlen Polytechnic University Dipl. in Communications. Nova Southeastern University Dipl. Institut de Tourisme et d’Hôtellerie du Québec Azriel Paz M. in Fashion Design and Clothing Technology. in Catering.A. Kwantlen Polytechnic University Shainin Hudda B. Capilano College Rob Wenzek B. University of Calgary Janet Wang M. in Marketing/Management.D. in English. in Hospitality and Tourism. in Computer Science. Paris American Academy Sandra Scott B. University of Leeds B. American Hotel and Motel Association Dipl.

Queen’s University Taylor Potts Dipl.Game Art Design. RMIT University Dipl. in Recording Art Masters.Mus. Vancouver Community College Graphic Design Anne Ahmad M.Sc. The Art Institute of Vancouver Interior Design Bernadette Askey B. Universiteit van Amsterdam B. University of Wisconsin-Madison Media Arts Bert Dennison Management Certificate in Digital Animation. in Life Drawing.A. Kwantlen University College Management Dipl. Simon Fraser University BC Teacher Certification and Minor in English. in Classical Animation. Vancouver Film School Dipl.A in Psychology. Concordia University Jason Elliot Dipl.Academic Calendar . Vancouver Film School Dipl.A.A. Simon Fraser University Recording Arts Douglas Blackley B. in Interior Design. University of Alberta Ben Coulas Dipl. in Foundation Film. in Political Science and Communication Arts.F. in English Language and Culture.in Performance. in Graphic Design.A. Lakeland College Certificate in Interior Design. Alberta College of Art and Design Michael Whitney M. Simon Fraser University B. The Art Institute Online Dipl. Washington State University B. British Columbia Institute of Technology June Fong Associate Dipl. in Multimedia Masters.Des. In Interior Design. Centre for Digital Imaging and Sound BC Provincial Instructor Diploma. George Brown College of Applied Arts VFX for Film & Television Eric Belanger Web Design & Interactive Media Brad Eyers Dipl. in Fine Arts. Sheridan College John Wong Certificate in Maya Game. in English Literature and Sociology. Sheridan College Valerie Romain M. in Classical Animation. in Fine Arts. Alias|wavefront Dipl. in 3D Computer Graphics. in Interior Design. Sheridan College Dipl. in Communication Studies. Visual & Game Programming Marc Aubanel B. City University of New York Mark Den Boer Dipl. Vancouver Film School General Education Sajia Ebrahimi M. in Visual Communication. in Computer Animation. in Graphic Communication. British Columbia Institute of Technology National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) Page 168 The Art Institute of Vancouver . in Maya. Game Programming.A.Pub. British Columbia Institute of Technology Dipl.F. in Interior Design. Vancouver Film School Scott Swanson B..A.

2012 September 3. 2013 August 15. 2012 February 14. 2013 May 9. Day Labour Day Thanksgiving Day Remembrance Day Christmas Day January 1.Academic Dates Term Start Date Midsession Start End Date Winter 2012 Spring 2012 Summer 2012 Fall 2012 Winter 2013 Spring 2013 Summer 2013 Fall 2013 January 2. 2013 August 5. 2013 November 11. 2012 December 25. 2013 July 8.C. 2013 October 14. 2012 January 7. 2012 January 1. 2012 November 7. 2013 December 22. 2012 June 17. 2012 May 10. 2013 July 1. 2012 July 2. 2013 The Art Institute of Vancouver . 2012 September 16. 2013 December 25. 2013 May 20. 2012 December 23. 2012 October 1. Day Labour Day Thanksgiving Day Remembrance Day Christmas Day New Year’s Day Good Friday Victoria Day Canada Day B.Academic Calendar Page 169 . 2013 School Holidays New Year’s Day Good Friday Victoria Day Canada Day B.C. 2013 March 18. 2012 October 8. 2013 October 7. 2012 May 21. 2013 April 8. 2013 November 7. 2012 August 16. 2012 April 2. 2012 April 6. 2012 November 11. 2012 (Observed) August 6. 2012 July 2. 2013 March 29. 2012 March 24. 2013 June 23. 2013 February 16. 2013 September 22. 2013 September 2.

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