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ARIES MAINTENANCE MANUAL

ARIES MEGAMATIC

CANADIAN DRILLING TECHNOLOGY

SERVICE MANUAL (08/03/25)

II

Address:

Cubex Ltd. 1218 Redonda St., Box 13, Grp 524, RR5 Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada, R2C 2Z2

Phone:

(204) 694-5505

Website:

www.cubex.net

Main Fax:

(204) 633-0665

Parts Dept. Fax:

(204) 633-0678

Copyright 2010 Printed in Canada

SERVICE MANUAL (08/03/25)

III

Getting Familiar
There are 8 sections.

Sections have modules for serviceable components.

Safety & Important Notices

Service Info

SERVICE MANUAL (08/03/25)

IV

Planning your PM program

Read Section 1 and 2.

Read the first page of each module.

Look at each page for 3 to 5 seconds.

Review the sample PM Program Forms.

Plan your PM Program.

TABLE OF CONTENTS (08/03/25)

Finding the Information

Table of Contents (10084)


Page 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Introduction Operating/Maintenance Safety Safety Training Registration Warranty & Claim Form 1-01-001 1-02-001 1-03-001

2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

General Maintenance Drill Assembly Break-in Maintenance PM Program PM Schedules 2-01-001 2-02-001 2-03-001 2-04-001

3.0 3.1

Undercarriage Carrier Assembly 3-01-001

4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8

Feed Arrangement Slide Arrangement Rotary Actuator Mast Feed System Lower Mast Top Drive Top Drive Motor Breakout Wrench Carousel Assembly 4-01-001 4-02-001 4-03-001 4-04-001 4-05-001 4-06-001 4-07-001 4-08-001

TABLE OF CONTENTS (08/03/25)

II

5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5

Hydraulic System Hydraulic Symbols Hydraulic Circuits Hydraulic Pump Hydraulic Cylinders Control Valves Hydraulic Filtration Miscellaneous Controls Oil Cooler Proportional Valves Drill Air Circuit Drill Air Circuit Water Pump Grease Injection Fire Suppression Screw Booster Compressor 6-01-001 6-02-001 6-03-001 6-04-001 6-05-001 5-01-001 5-02-001 5-03-001 5-04-001 5-05-001 5-06-001 5-07-001 5-08-001 5-09-001

7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5

Electrical Electrical Circuits Electrical Components Testing of Valve Solenoid Alignment Laser Accra-Feed PLC System 7-01-001 7-02-001 7-03-001 7-04-001 7-05-001

8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4

Troubleshooting Guide Troubleshooting Mechanical Systems Troubleshooting Hydraulic Systems Troubleshooting Air Systems Troubleshooting Electrical Systems 8-01-001 8-02-001 8-03-001 8-04-001

TABLE OF CONTENTS (08/03/25)

III

Appendix Ansul Fire Suppression, A-101 Ansul Fire Suppression Owners Manual Ansul Fire Suppression, Checkfire SC-N Instruction Manual for Hydrodynamic Cable Reels Hydraulic Schematic Air Schematic Electrical General Arrangement Cubex Tool Catalogue A B C D E F G H

1.0 INTRODUCTION (08/03/25)

1.0 INTRODUCTION
This symbol warns of possible danger. Proceed with caution.
Module Date (Year/Month/Day) Page Number

Updating of Manual Updated modules will be issued for revisions and corrections as required. Please keep your manuals updated.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-001

1.1 Operating/Maintenance Safety


When operating this machine, the safety of the operating crew and other workers in the area must be the principal concern. All persons operating this machine must understand the necessary safety precautions to help minimize the risk of accidents and injury. The operator must ensure that all fire fighting equipment is in working order, inspect the condition of all walkways, handrails, ladders, and guards.

Personal Protection Equipment


All safety equipment such as hardhat, steel cap boots, safety goggles, hearing protection, gloves, etc., should be worn while operating this machine. Snug fitting clothing should be worn by the operator in and around the drill so as not to be caught up in any moving machinery.

Overhead and Buried Utilities


Special precautions must be taken by everyone when using a drill rig in the vicinity of electrical power lines and other utilities. Underground electricity is as dangerous as overhead electricity. Be aware and always suspect the existence of underground utilities such as electrical power, gas, petroleum, telephone, sewer, and water. Electricity can shock, burn, and cause death. Overhead and buried utilities should be located, noted, and emphasized on all holeboring location plans and hole-boring assignment sheets. When overhead electrical power lines exist at or near a drilling site or project, consider all wires to be live and dangerous. Watch for sagging power lines before entering a site. Do not lift power lines to gain entrance. Before raising the drill rig mast on a site in the vicinity of power lines, walk completely around the drill rig. Determine what the minimum distance from any point on the drill rig to the nearest power line will be when the mast is raised and/or being raised. Do not raise the mast or operate the drill rig within a minimum of three (3) meters of any electrical power line or other obstruction. Only move the drill rig with the mast down.

If there are any questions concerning the safety of drilling on sites in the vicinity of overhead power lines, call your supervisor.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-002

Ask for Assistance


If a sign warning of underground utilities is located on a site boundary, do not assume that underground utilities are located on or near the boundary or property line under the sign; call the foreman and check it out. The underground utilities may be a considerable distance away from the warning sign. Always contact the foreman before drilling. Determine jointly, with utility personnel, the precise location of underground utility lines. Mark and flag the location.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-003

1.1.1 Drill Operation and Maintenance Safety


Read all safety instructions provided here and those provided in the Operators Manual before operating and servicing the drill. General safety and accident prevention regulations laid down by local authorities must also be followed.

1.1.2 General Safety Instructions


1. Observe all safety procedures when operating and servicing the equipment. 2. Be completely familiar with the operating and maintenance procedures before inspecting, operating, or servicing the drill or booster. You must read and understand all procedures described in each manual. 3. Do not inspect or repair any components without properly shutting down the drill, water pump, and air supply. 4. Keep all non-essential personnel away from the operators controls and the maintenance area while service work is in progress. 5. Any modifications to controls or operating procedures must be noted clearly on equipment and all operators must be advised of changes. 6. Inspect hoses, hose connection safety devices, fittings, and supply lines at frequent intervals for indication of wear or damage. Repair or replace damaged components immediately. 7. Check all bolts, nuts, and adjustments frequently for proper tension. Check all fluids at recommended intervals. 8. Do not stand under the mast at any time. 9. Disconnect the electrical power supply to the drill and booster before washing. 10. Wear protective gear when operating, diagnosing, or servicing the equipment. 11. Do not weld or grind near electrical wiring or supply lines. 12. Keep hands, clothing, rags, and tools away from moving parts. 13. Keep shields and guards in place. Do not operate equipment with the electrical panel door open. 14. Keep safety and instruction decals clean. Replace them if they are not clearly legible.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-004

1.1.3 Safety Instructions for Driving and Operating


1. Do not move the drill if it is in potentially unstable conditions or if visibility is obscured in any way. 2. Check for overhead restrictions and ground clearances before moving drill. Do not drive over electrical cable or pressurized hoses or allow any vehicles to do so at any time. 3. Check that all controls on the drill are in off positions before connecting the electrical power, mine air, and water supply line. 4. Check for any damage that might have occurred to the drill. Repair any damaged components immediately, before starting the drill. 5. Check the water hose for damage or leakage before starting the pump. 6. Restrain the water hose to minimize vibration of the hoses. 7. Check that personnel are clear of the drill before starting system. High pressure leaks from hydraulic, pneumatic, and water systems could result in injuries.

1.1.4 Safety Instructions for Servicing


1. Follow all service procedures at recommended intervals. 2. Disconnect the electrical power source, mine air, and water supply before diagnosing or servicing the drill. Relieve pressures in the hydraulic, pneumatic, and water systems prior to servicing. 3. Before inspecting, disconnecting, or removing any hydraulic or mechanical components, secure the mast by placing it on solid ground or floor. Move the top drive assembly to the lowest position on the mast. Secure the mast with a hoist or restraining equipment. Follow proper shutdown procedures. 4. High voltage systems (380V, 575V, 460V, etc) are to be serviced and diagnosed by qualified electrical personnel only. 5. Do not reconnect or repair loose or damaged wiring with electrical power connected to the drill. 6. Make sure that the servicemen are in a dry and safe position when working with electrical circuits. 7. High-pressure leaks from hydraulic and pneumatic systems could result in injuries. Use protective gear when inspecting leaks.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-005

8. Secure all moving components with proper restraining devices before removing or loosening any hydraulic components. This is to prevent components from shifting when hydraulic components lose pressure. 9. Relieve pressure from track tensioning system before servicing. Unscrew relief plug slowly to allow the high pressure grease to escape. Use extreme caution when working on tracks. Keep fingers away from track shoes. 10. Tag the drill and pump to prevent accidental start-up. Signs must be clearly visible to alert of service in progress. 11. Tag or mark hoses, wires, or components to assist in reinstallation. 12. Cap or plug all hydraulic or pneumatic connections immediately after removal. 13. Cap fluid ports to keep foreign material from entering components during servicing. 14. Clean grease fittings with a clean cloth before greasing.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-006

1.1.5 Warning, Caution, and Danger Decals


Warning, Caution, and Danger decals are affixed to the applicable components or appropriate locations. Relevant safety instructions are written on the decals. Read these instructions carefully. Some of the main decals are illustrated below, along with safety instructions.

Observe the following safety instructions on the decals shown below BEFORE operating the drill:
Mast Function Keep personnel away from the mast when positioning. Decal is at control panel and valve controls. Keep personnel away when performing mast set-up functions.

Pinch Point Stay clear while operating. Decal is at slideover.

Rotating Drive Hazard Stay clear while operating. Decal is at rotating components. Decal is at compressor drive. Do not operate without guard.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-007

Observe the following safety instructions on the decals shown below BEFORE servicing the drill:

Danger! Compressed Air! Relieve pressure from receiver before servicing. Decal is at booster air receiver/drain valve.

Danger! High Voltage! Access by qualified personnel only. Decal is at electrical panel.

Danger! Keep flames and sparks away from battery.

Danger! High pressure leaks may cause injury.

Danger! Outriggers and mast stingers can cause serious crushing injury stand clear.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-008

1.1.6 Fluid and Filter Notices:

Fill with Hydraulic Fluid Only Decal is at hydraulic tank.

Fill with Rock Grease Only

Decal is at rock grease tank.

1.1.7 Safety Reminders:

Check that the drill is safe to work on.

Position mast on T-rest before moving drill.

Disengage torque hubs for towing. Engage torque hubs to apply brakes.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-009

Perform this Safety Check before welding:

Disconnect electrical panel before doing any welding.

Perform these Safety Checks when completing maintenance:

Check that all hose fittings are tight.

Check that all pressurized air hoses are secured with hose connection safety devices.

Check that all controls are in the off position before connecting the power supply.

Check that all valves are in the off position before connecting the air system and power supply to the drill unit.

1.1 OPERATING/MAINTENANCE SAFETY (08/03/25)

1-01-010

1.1.8 Extinguishing Fires


A Fire Suppression System is installed on the drill. In case of fire, do the following: 1. Shut down drill immediately. 2. Pull safety ring on actuator assembly mounted at drill control panel. 3. Push plunger at actuator assembly mounted at drill control panel. 4. Move away from drill and follow local fire safety procedures. 5. Do not restart the drill until drill and fire suppression system are checked.

Cubex's Safety Training Registration (95/09/14)


Cubex issues a Certificate to each person attending the Safety Program. Please photocopy this form, have each Student fill it out and return to Cubex.

Joe

Doe

Please print.

Name Company Address City State

Job Title

Zip

Be aware of the safety procedures when operating and servicing Drilling Equipment. 1. Safety symbols - Know the safety symbols. - Know the operating and maintenance procedures. 2. Compressed air system - Relieve the air pressure before servicing. - Check that all air hoses are secured with safety chains. - Keep away from hot compressor components. 3. Protective equipment - Wear safety glasses, ear protection, dust masks and proper clothing. - Check that all guards are in place. 4. Operating precautions - Keeps hands away from moving components. - Check that the path is clear before tramming. - Check that personnel is away from drill while tramming or positioning. - Check that the mine air supply hose and high voltage cable have free movement for tramming. - Engage the torque hubs to apply brakes and disengage them for towing. - Place the mast on T-rest before moving drill. 5. Fluid leakage - Wear protective gear when investigating hydraulic leaks. High pressure jet streams may cut skin and result in injuries. 6. Drilling - Use sufficient water to reduce inhaling of dust. - Be cautious when using the breakout wrench to avoid injury. 7. Equipment maintenance - Replace worn or damaged parts immediately. Well-maintained equipment is required for maximum personal safety. - Inspect the Ansul Fire Suppression System periodically if equipped with this option.

Safety . . . It takes only a few seconds.

I fully understand these safety procedures and I will practice them to my best knowledge and ability.

Signature

Date

Th is pa g e le ft bl an k in te nt i

on al

ly

WARRANTY CLAIM FORM - F102

CUBEX Ltd.
1. Distributor
Distributors Claim No. Owner Page of Date

Phone: (204) 694-5505

Fax: (204) 633-0665

Claim No.

1218 Redonda St., Box 13, Grp 524, RR5, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R2C 2Z2

W-

2. Model
Serial No. Hour Meter Reading

3. Failure

Repair Date

Cubex use only


Receiving Date Credit Memo No.

Failure Description

Failure Cause

Approved Comments

Rejected

Repair Procedures Followed

4. List
Qty.

of Parts used Part No. Description Net Cost

Cost Approval Qty. Part No. Approved Cost

Total Parts

5. Labour

Claimed Hours Rate Total Hours Rate

Description of Repair

6.

Parts Returned Comments

Total Labour Costs Total Parts Sub-Total Exchange Rate

I certify that the parts and labour claimed for repair were used as indicated and that failure did not appear to have resulted due to negligence, misuse, accident and that the equipment was not altered without written permission from Cubex.

Total Credit Date App'd. by

Signature

Date

Th is pa g e le ft bl an k in te nt i

on al

ly

2.0 GENERAL MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2.0 GENERAL MAINTENANCE

READ INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE SERVICING OR OPERATING!

2.1 DRILL ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

2-01-001

2.1 Drill Assembly


Refer to the Parts Manual for part numbers, descriptions, and part locations.

CAUTION! Be familiar with the operating procedures before operating the drill.

2.1 DRILL ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

2-01-002

2.2 BREAK-IN MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2-02-001

2.2 Break-in Maintenance


Preventative Maintenance Interval:
At the first 50 hours The break-in maintenance is necessary to re-adjust some of the components after the initial wear. It also includes the regular Preventative Maintenance (PM) checks as well as changing the fluids.

CAUTION! Familiarize yourself with the PM procedures before performing the break-in maintenance.

General Inspection 1. Clean and wash the drill. 2. Perform the general maintenance procedures as outlined in Fig 2.3.1 (see Section 2.3). 3. Change the pressure filter and the return filter. 4. Check for hydraulic leaks. 5. Check the entire drill for unusual indications. 6. Change the crankcase oil in the water pump. Use hydraulic fluid. 7. Check the bearing pre-load on the top drive (see Section 4). 8. Open the control panel and inspect the wires, terminals, and conduits. WARNING! By Qualified Electricians Only! 9. Refer to the engine and compressor service manuals for any required maintenance. 10. Inspect the carousel for proper operation. 11. Perform a 250 Hour Inspection (see the PM Schedules).

2.2 BREAK-IN MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2-02-002

2.3 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2-03-001

2.3 Preventative Maintenance Program


The PM program includes scheduled inspections and overhauling of drill components. Read this section carefully. PM Schedules are enclosed for photocopying. This section contains the following: General Maintenance Charts: Fastener Torque Table: Fluid Cross-over List: PM Schedules: Lubrication and inspection points Refer to this table when no specific rating is specified Refer to the list for approved fluid types Service forms for 250, 1000, and 2000 hours

2.3 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2-03-002

Fig 2.3.1 Lubrication Points Lubrication Points and Intervals


Key 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Component Water Pump Coupling Dump Cylinder Pins Pillow Block Bushing Air Swivel Top Drive Hinge Pins Rotary Actuator Bearings Water Pump Oil Level Grease Tank Grease Level Hydraulic Tank Oil Level Top Drive Oil Level Electric Motor Bearing Drill Pipe Carousel Air Compressor Oil Level
2 1

Type N/A Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Esso NUTO 46 Rock Drill Grease Esso NUTO 46 SAE 80W-90 low temp; SAE 140 high temp Lithium Grease Mobil SHC-1024
1

Interval/Hrs N/A 8 hours 8 hours 250 hours 250 hours 250 hours 8 hours 8 hours 8 hours 8 hours 250 hours 50 hours 50 hours

Service By N/A Operator Operator Operator Operator Maintenance Operator Operator Operator Operator Electrical Operator Operator

Extreme Pressure Grease


2

Inspection Points and Intervals


Key 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Inspection Point Drill Unit Drill Unit Drill Unit Drill Unit Cylinder Rods Top Drive Top Drive Mounting Plate Details Wash and Clean Inspection for loose bolts Inspection for leaks Check that air hoses are secured with safety devices. Wash and Clean Check bearing endplay Inspection slider adjustment Interval/Hrs 50 hours 50 hours 250 hours 50 hours 50 hours 50 hours 50 hours Service By Operator Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance

Note 1 : Do not over-grease. Excessive grease may cause overheating. Note 2 : Refer to Maclean Carrier Manual for recommended lubrication.

2.3 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2-03-003

2.3.1 Lubrication
Because of the severe operating conditions normally encountered in drilling operations, lubrication is very important. A scheduled lubrication program is required to extend the drills service life using high quality lubricants. Keep the lubricants in sealable containers marked with their contents and store these according to fire regulations. The lubrication points and intervals are shown in Fig 2.3.1. The recommended lubricants and system capacities are listed below. Substitute lubricants must meet these specifications. Mixing different types of gear lubrication should be avoided.

Lubrication Types/ System Capacities

Equipment Top Drive Compressor Rock Grease Tank Hydraulic Tank Water Pump

Lubrication Gear Oil SAE 80W-90 / SAE 140 Mobil SCH 1024 Esso AROX NM 000 Esso NUTO 46 Esso NUTO 46

Capacities 6.3 qts (6 ) 35 gal (132.5 ) 8.4 gal (32 ) 66 gal (250 ) 40 fl. oz. (1.2 )

2.3 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2-03-004

2.3.2 Lubrication Cross-over


Refer to this Cross-over Chart for alternate suppliers. If these brands are unavailable, your local supplier will be able to recommend alternatives using these specifications.

Lubrication Cross-over Chart


Fluid Type Shell Oil Esso (Mobil) Petro-Canada Mohawk

API Service CG-4 or CF-4 SAE 15W40 (for -15C to 50C) SAE 5W30 (for -30C to 30C) Engine Oil Spirax HD SAE 80W-90 Gear Oil Darina XLEP2 Grease Tellus T-37 NUTO 46 Harmony HVI-36 Mohawk HV132 UNIREX EP1 Precision EP2 N/A Mobil HD 80W-90 Gear Lube 80W-90 Gearlube GL5 80/90 HP

Hydraulic Oil Madrela S45 Mobil SCH 1024 N/A N/A

Compressor Oil

2.3 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2-03-005

2.3.3 Rock Drill Oils


The specifications on rock drill oils are essentially identical. Field experience has shown good performance may be obtained from most of the available rock drill oils.

Rock-drill Oils
Manufacturer Texaco Exxon Mobil Gulf Sinclair D Cities Services 75A D-A Lubricant Co. 500 Non-Fluid Oil Corp. E.F. Houghton & Co. 370 Southwestern Petroleum SAE 50 Kendall Refining Co. Shell Oil Co. 72 Lubrication Engineers 6305 Imperial Oil Co. Rock- 50 Champlin Purrol Co Chevron Oil Co. Molub-Alloy RockDrill Oil 381 Grade 10 Vistac 30X Molub-Alloy RockDrill Oil 297 Grade 30 Vistac 220X Molub-Alloy Drill Oil 297 Grade 50 Tonna R Oil 27 Monolec 6301 Swepco SAE 10 A #89/NR Grade 10 1541 EPL Arox EP 45 Almo #1 Grade 30 1542 EPM Arox EP 65 Almo#3 Rock-Drill 63 Air Drill Oil B Neptune 50A Rock-Drill Lubricant A #59/NR Rock-Drill Oil 340 Swepco SAE 30 Kenoil 065EP Tonna R Oil 41 Monolec 6303 Tonna R Oil Monolec Air Drill Oil Neptune Rock-Drill 5 A #79/NR Rock-Drill Swepco Grade 50 1543 EPM Ster-Mar 90 Almo #5

2.3 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE (08/03/25)

2-03-006

2.3.4 Rock Drill Grease


Rock drill grease is used in the grease injection system for lubricating the hammer. Please refer to Section 6.3 for information on the grease injection system.

2.3.5 Bolt Torque


Use these ratings when no specific torque rating is specified. Prevailing torque rating is the torque necessary to rotate a fastener after the mating components are in full contact. These torque ratings are for dry threads.

BOLT TORQUE TABLE Coarse and Fine Threads, Grade 8


Bolt Diameter 1/4 - 20 1/4 - 28 5/16 18 5/16 24 3/8 16 3/8 24 7/16 14 7/16 20 1/2 13 1/2 20 9/16 12 9/16 - 18 5/8 11 5/8 18 3/4 10 3/4 16 7/8 9 7/8 14 18 1 14 Torque (ft-lbs) 12 14 24 27 44 49 70 78 105 120 155 170 210 240 375 420 605 675 910 990 Torque (N-m) 16 19 33 37 60 66 95 106 142 163 210 230 285 325 508 570 820 915 1230 1340

250 Hour PM Schedule ARIES Drill


Main Assemblies / Actions: General: Carrier Assembly Tires Power Train Hydraulic brakes Transmission Axles Engine

Work Order # ______________________

Unit __________________________

Serial # _______________________

Hour Meter ________________________

Date __________________________

By ___________________________ Service Codes:

Service Codes: Clean, wash Grease Lubrication Hinge pins Dump cylinder pins Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease

Inspect

Rotary actuator pivot pins Rotary actuator bearings Feed extension pins

Inspect: Inspect: Inspect: Inspect:

Seals, oil, test Seals, oil Seals, oil Seals, oil, filters

Air swivel top drive

Fluid Changes Top drive Gear Lube SAE 140 high temp 80W90 low temp

Feed Arrangement Slideover Feed cylinder Sliders Wear guides Lower Mast Top drive Top drive motors Breakout wrench Breakout vise Hydraulic Circuit Hydraulic pump Cylinders Inspect: Inspect: Seals, hoses, fittings Seals, rods Hoses, fittings Inspect: Inspect: Adjust: Inspect: Inspect: Adjust: Inspect: Inspect: Inspect: Cylinders Cylinder, bushing @ Top drive mounting plate Under top drive mounting plate Cylinders, centralizer jaws, remove debris Bearing pre-load Seals & clean assembly & clean assembly

Engine Oil

Filter Changes Hydraulic pressure filter Hydraulic return filter Compressor oil filter Mine Air Filters Control Circuit Filter Engine Oil Filter Engine Fuel Filter Replace, check by-pass valve Replace Replace Replace Replace Replace replace

Miscellaneous Fire suppression Basic inspection

Electrical by Qualified Electrician Air Circuit Inspect: Air hoses, fittings, hose safety devices Compressor Daily Check Receiver/Sump oil level Moisture separator check and clean Air inlet filter check and clean Electric motor bearings Lubricate: lithium grease

Note: Optional equipment is not listed. See the Table of Contents for any equipment not listed above.

Add service code to boxes:

C Completed O Okay not required N See Note

Comments (Continue on reverse):

1000 Hour PM Schedule ARIES Drill


Main Assemblies / Actions: General: Carrier Assembly Tires Hydraulic brakes Transmission Axles Engine Inspect Inspect Inspect Inspect Inspect Change Feed Arrangement Slideover Rotary actuator

Work Order # ____________________

Unit ________________________

Serial # _______________________

Hour Meter ______________________

Date ________________________ Service Codes:

By ____________________________ Service Codes:

Clean, wash Air Circuit Inspect: Inspect: Seals, fluid, test Seals, oil Seals, oil Seals Oil and filter Grease Lubrication Hinge pins Dump cylinder pins Inspect: Inspect: Adjust: Torque Cylinders Counterbalance valves Gear rack Actuator bolts Trunnion mounts, cylinders Sliders and guide bars for wear @ Top drive mounting plate @ Mast connection plate Under top drive mounting plate Cylinders, centralizer jaws, slip plate flats, drill table, remove debris Top drive Bearings Mounting plate bolts Seals Motor bolts & clean assembly & clean assembly Filter Changes Hydraulic pressure filters Hydraulic return filters Compressor oil filter Air inlet filter Moisture separator element Replace, check bypass valve replace Replace Replace Replace Fluid Changes Top drive Hydraulic tank Water pump Compressor/sump tank Engine Oil Gear Lube SAE 140 high temp 80W90 low temp ESSO NUTO H46 or equal ESSO NUTO H46 or equal SCH 1024 Rotary actuator pivot pins Rotary actuator bearings Feed extension pins Air swivel top drive Air inlet valve Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Inspect and clean Air hoses, fittings, hose safety devices Grease pump seals Compressor daily check Air inlet filter check and clean Pressure regulator valves

Feed cylinder Sliders

Inspect: Inspect: Adjust: Adjust:

Wear guides Lower Mast

Inspect: Inspect:

Top drive assy

Inspect: Adjust: Torque:

Top drive motors Breakout wrench Breakout vise Hydraulic Circuit Hydraulic pump Cylinders Control valves Fill Pump

Inspect: Torque: Inspect: Inspect:

Inspect: Inspect: Inspect: Inspect:

Seals, hoses, fittings Seals, rods Seals Seals

Miscellaneous Control gauges Fire suppression (optional) Inspect: for proper operation Complete inspection

Electrical by Qualified Electrician Electrical panels: Electric motor bearings Note: Optional equipment is not listed. See the Table of Contents for any equipment not listed above. Add service code to boxes: Inspect wires, terminals, conduits, joysticks Lubricate with lithium grease C Completed O Okay not required N See Note Comments (Continue on reverse):

2000 Hour PM Schedule ARIES Drill


Main Assemblies / Actions: General: Carrier Tires Hydraulic brakes Transmission Axles Engine Inspect Inspect

Work Order # ____________________

Unit __________________________

Serial # ________________________

Hour Meter ______________________

Date __________________________

By _____________________________ Service Codes:

Service Codes: Clean, wash Air Circuit Inspect Water pump Seals Brake test Change oil and filter Change oil Oil and filters Intake filter Clean purifier To specs Grease Lubrication Hinge pins Dump cylinder pins Rotary actuator pivot pins Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Extreme Pressure Grease Compressor Air inlet filter Pressure regulator valves Grease pump Air hoses, fittings, hose safety devices Perform Perform Inspect Pressure test Clean strainer Pressure test Seals Daily check Check and clean Inspect and clean

Perform Perform Perform Perform Replace Perform Train bolts Feed Arrangement Slideover Inspect Replace Adjust Carrier Slideover Inspect Replace Torque Wear guides Rotary actuator Replace Inspect Adjust Torque Feed cylinder Replace Inspect Sliders Inspect Adjust Adjust Lower mast Replace Inspect Torque

Cylinders Pivot pin bushings, pins, keys, wear bushing Slideover Cylinder Slide bushings Bolts Under top drive plate Counterbalance valves Gear rack Actuator bolts Clevis pins Hydraulic by-pass, trunnion mounts, cylinders Guide bars for wear @ Top drive mounting plate @ Mast connection plate Clevises, pins Cylinders, centralizer jaws, slip plate flats, drill table, remove debris Top drive, adjust bearings Mounting plate bolts Seals Motor bolts & clean assembly

Rotary actuator bearings Feed extension pins Air swivel top drive Air inlet valve

Fluid Changes Top drive Hydraulic tank Water pump Compressor/sump tank Gear Lube SAE 140 high temp 80W90 low temp ESSO NUTO H46 or equal ESSO NUTO H46 or equal SCH 1024

Filter Changes Hydraulic pressure filters Hydraulic return filters Hydraulic oil fill filter Compressor oil filter Replace, check indicator Replace Replace Replace

Top drive Top drive motors Breakout wrench Hydraulic Circuit Hydraulic pump

Inspect Torque Inspect Torque Inspect

Air inlet filter Moisture separator element Bearing fluid filter Miscellaneous Control gauges Fire suppression

Replace Replace Replace

Inspect for proper operation Complete inspection

Inspect Inspect

Seals, hoses, fittings Operating pressure and standby pressure Seal, rods Seals For proper operation Seals Add service code to boxes: C Completed, O Okay not required, N See Note Electrical by Qualified Electrician Electrical panel Electric motor bearings Inspect wires, terminals, conduits Lubricate: lithium grease

Cylinders Control valve Fill pump

Inspect Inspect Check Inspect

Note 1 applies to drills with narrow frames only. Brakes and tram motors are mounted to angle drive assembly. Comments (Continue on reverse):

3.0 UNDERCARRIAGE (08/03/25)

3.0 UNDERCARRIAGE

USE PROPER LIFTING EQUIPMENT!

3.1 CARRIER ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

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3.1 Carrier Assembly (MEM-944)


Carrier Parts and Maintenance manuals are supplied separately. Read these manuals and get familiar with the carrier before using or servicing the drill. General arrangement of the carrier is shown in Fig 3.1.1 (next page).

PM Tasks
The carrier requires periodic maintenance and visual inspections to detect worn or damaged components. 50 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: Check powertrain tanks and refill. Refer to attached manuals for lubrication and detailed service instructions. Clean thoroughly and check powertrain components for leaks or wear indications. Refer to the carrier manuals while servicing transmission, axle, brakes, engine, etc.

WARNING! Block the carrier tires if parked on an incline. Stop the engine, apply brakes, and disconnect electrical power before servicing.

Technical Specifications:

Engine Transmission Axle Brakes Power Steering

Mercedes 904 Dana Spicer 32000 New Holland D65 Hydraulic Hydraulic

3.1 CARRIER ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

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Fig 3.1.1 Carrier Arrangement

4.0 FEED ARRANGEMENT (08/03/25)

4.0 FEED ARRANGEMENT

DANGER! Keep personnel away from drill while operating!!

4.1 SLIDE ARRANGEMENT (08/03/25)

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4.1 Slide Arrangement


PM Tasks
Perform an inspection on all components of the slideover arrangement. Refer to Fig 4.1.1. See also the Parts Manuals. 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: 2000 Hour Intervals: Visual inspection Slideover inspection Tighten rotary actuator bolts Inspect slide bushings, replace cylinder pins and pin bushings

WARNING! Keep away from slideover arrangement while in operation. Support mast and slideover frame before removing any components or loosening hydraulic fittings.

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Fig 4.1.1 Slideover Arrangement

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4.1.1 Slideover Inspection


When performing this inspection, be aware of hydraulic leaks and wear indications. Refer to Fig 4.1.1 1. Inspect bushings. 2. Inspect slide shafts for wear or damage.

4.1.2 Slideover Assembly Overhaul


When overhauling the slideover, refer to Fig 4.1.1. 1. Drain hydraulic fluid from hoses connected to mast components; tag all hydraulic hoses; cap hoses and hydraulic fittings. WARNING! Support the full weight of the mast before removing any components or loosening hydraulic fittings. 2. Remove cap screws from mounting flange. Hoist mast assembly off the drill. 3. Remove bolts from pillow blocks and hoist top slideover off the drill. 4. Support frame. 5. Detach and rebuild cylinder, if required. 6. Remove slide tubes. Inspect slide tubes for wear indications and replace them as required. 7. Remove slide caps. Inspect slide bushings and wiper seal for wear indications and replace them as required. 8. Install components in reverse order.

4.1 SLIDE ARRANGEMENT (08/03/25)

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4.1.3 Rotary Actuator Bolts


Re-torque bolts on the rotary actuator, as they are exposed to extreme vibration. Refer to Fig 4.1.2 for torque ratings. When re-installing bolts, apply a medium strength thread fastener (Loctite or equivalent).

Fig 4.1.2 Torque Ratings

4.2 ROTARY ACTUATOR (08/03/25)

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4.2 Rotary Actuator


PM Tasks
The rotary actuator needs frequent greasing. Adjustment of the gear rack is required at moderate intervals. 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: Grease actuator bearings. Refer to Section 4.2.5 Adjust gear rack. Refer to Section 4.2.4 Re-torque actuator bolts. Refer to Section 4.2.7 Perform counterbalance valve inspection. Refer to Section 4.2.6

Overhauling the rotary actuator is required when excessive leaking of hydraulic fluid is noticed. It includes replacing seals, O-rings, bearings, pistons, shims, and counterbalance valves. To perform this maintenance, the mast assembly must be removed. If possible, all major components in Section 4 should be overhauled at the same time to reduce labour time.

WARNING! Support full weight of mast before removing any components or loosening hydraulic fittings.

4.2 ROTARY ACTUATOR (08/03/25)

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Fig 4.2.1 Rotary Actuator

4.2 ROTARY ACTUATOR (08/03/25)

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4.2.1 Actuator Removal


Refer to Fig 4.2.1 1. Place mast on T-rest and follow proper shutdown procedure. WARNING! Support mast before removing any components or loosening hydraulic fittings. 2. Drain hydraulic fluid from hoses connected to mast components. 3. Remove capscrews from mounting flange. Hoist mast assembly off the drill.

4.2.2 Dismantle Procedure


The actuator is a hydraulic unit; therefore, cleanliness is critical when rebuilding. Keep all similar parts separate or mark them to avoid mixing of parts later. Refer to Fig 4.2.1 1. Drain hydraulic fluid from cylinders. 2. Clean and wash exterior of actuator. 3. Remove mounting flange and bearing flanges. This allows removal of bearings and drive shaft gear. 4. Remove cylinder caps. Remove capscrews connecting cylinder tubes to main housing and lift each cylinder off pistons. 5. Remove rack assemblies from main housing. 6. Inspect all components for wear signs and replace them as necessary.

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Equal distance

Alignment Rods

Fig 4.2.2 Rack Alignment

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4.2.3 Assembly Procedure


Refer to Fig 4.2.1 and Fig 4.2.2 1. Begin by installing bearings on main drive shaft. CAUTION! Bearings are different sizes be sure to install them in correct location. 2. Install bearing cup on bearing cone then set flange in place. Flange should fit easily with no interference. Tighten bolts on flange to 45 ft-lbs (61.2 N-m). 3. Install second bearing cup on second bearing cone, then install shim and open flange. Install open flange without seal until bearing is properly loaded. Adjust preload on bearing by adding or removing shims until preload is approximately 600 in-lbs (67.8 N-m). 4. When bearings are adjusted and shim arrangement is determined, remove open flange and both bearing cups. 5. Place housing on its side and install racks. Using two 3/16 (4.8 mm) diameter rods, center racks in housing as shown in Fig 4.2.2. 6. Install o-rings on both bearing flanges. 7. Reinstall bearing flanges as in steps 2 and 3. 8. Install rack bearing and adjust rack bearing adjuster screw until racks are tight and evenly adjusted. 9. Install piston seal and wear ring on each piston. Install pistons onto racks and secure with pins. 10. Slide retainer flange and key over cylinder. Insert O-ring into end housing and position at end of cylinder. Pull retainer flange and key to end and bolt together with end housing. NOTE: The counter balance valve cavities should be facing away from each other. 11. Install mounting flange and flange retainer. 12. There are grease fittings on both open and closed bearing flanges. Grease each fitting with on half of standard grease tube. Insert breather plug at back of housing.

4.2 ROTARY ACTUATOR (08/03/25)

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4.2.4 Rack Gear Adjustment


Refer to Fig 4.2.1 1. Loosen lock nut on bearing adjusting screw. 2. Tighten each of the four screws the same number of turns. Even tightening is important to prevent misalignment of the racks. Use a reasonable tightening force, then back off each screw 1/4 in. (6 mm). 3. Retighten lock nuts.

4.2.5 Greasing Actuator Bearings


Grease nipples are located in the front and rear bearing plates. Pump equal amounts of grease into the nipples. Alternate this action until grease is discharged from the breather plug.

4.2.6 Counterbalance Valves


The counterbalance valves prevent cavitation at the inlet side of the actuators. They also assist the actuator to control the mast with minimum pump pressure. These valves are rated for 3000 psi working pressure. Refer to Fig 4.2.1 1. Inspect all four counterbalance valves for external leaks. 2. Rotate mast swing in clockwise and counter-clockwise direction. If erratic swing (irregular rotation) is noticed, the counterbalance valves have to be replaced. 3. To replace counterbalance valves, support the mast then replace each valve individually. Adjustment is made by turning adjustment cap in until fully seated, then back it off turn. All four units should be replaced at the same time.

4.2.7 Actuator Installation and Bolt Torquing


Refer to Section 4.1 Slideover Assembly to perform this procedure. Re-torque bolts on rotary actuator, as they are exposed to extreme vibration. When reinstalling bolts, apply a medium strength thread fastener (Loctite or equivalent).

4.3 MAST FEED SYSTEM (08/03/25)

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4.3 Mast Feed System


PM Tasks
Adjustment of the sliders on the top drive mounting plate and on the mast mounting plate is required to eliminate excessive play. The same adjustment is required on chain feed masts, which are equipped with a hose reel mounting plate. A visual inspection of the cylinder rods is necessary to locate pitting or damage to the surfaces. Damaged rod surfaces collect foreign matter that enters the hydraulic system. 50 Hour Intervals: 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: 2000 Hour Intervals: Inspect slider adjustment; zero clearance is required Adjust sliders at top drive mounting plate Inspect cylinder rods for wear indications Inspect feed cylinder bushing Inspect wear guides Adjust sliders on mast connection plate Torque top drive mounting bolts Replace feed cylinder bushing Check trunnion mounts Inspect guide bars and wear guides Check feed cylinder for by-pass Replace wear guide

The telescopic cylinder is exposed to heavy operating loads as well as shock loads. Rebuild the feed cylinder as outlined in Section 5 Hydraulic System.

WARNING! Secure or support mast before removing any components or loosening hydraulic fittings.

4.3 MAST FEED SYSTEM (08/03/25)


Top Drive Mounting Plate NC Setscrew NC Hex Capscrew Torque to 105 ft-lbs (142 N-m) Top Drive Inspect wear guide under mounting plate NC Hex Capscrew Torque to 375 ft-lbs (508 N-m) NC Setscrew

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Mast Connection Plate

Guide Bar Slip Plate

Fig 4.3.1 Slider Adjustment


NOTE: 4 equal gaps at left, right, top, and bottom.

See Note

NC Capscrew See Note Wear Guide Left Side Right Side

Fig 4.3.2 Section A A from Fig 4.3.1

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4.3.1 Slider Adjustment


Periodic adjustment of the sliders is required to keep the top drive mounting plate and mast connection plate parallel to the guide bars (see Fig 4.3.1). The adjustment procedure is the same for either plate assembly but with different PM intervals. Zero clearance is maintained between the sliders and the guide bars by adjusting the setscrews (see Fig 4.3.2). Refer to Fig 4.3.1 and Fig 4.3.2. 1. Rotate mast to vertical position. Move top drive mounting plate and mast connection plate to bottom of mast. Ensure that these are in lowest position. 2. Inspect gap settings as shown in Fig 4.3.2 at all four corners of plate assembly. 3. Turn all setscrews an equal amount until no clearance exists between sliders and guide bars. Ensure that mounting plate is parallel to guide bars. 4. Turn all setscrews turn to create a snug sliding fit. Tighten lock nuts. 5. Torque top drive mounting bolts to 375 ft-lbs (508 N-m). Refer to Fig 4.3.1 6. Move top drive mounting plate and mast connection plate up and down. Inspect sliders for zero clearance.

4.3.2 Wear Guide


Refer to Fig 4.3.3 At the specified intervals, inspect and replace the wear guides, which are located under the top drive mounting plate.

4.3.3 Feed Cylinder


Refer to Fig 4.3.3 Inspect the feed cylinder bushing and replace it as required.

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Fig 4.3.3 Mast Feed System

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4.3.4 Trunnion Mount Inspection


Refer to Fig 4.3.3 The feed cylinder is secured in trunnion mounts to allow the top drive to float when drill pipes are installed. This prevents damage to the top drive or drill pipes. The trunnion pins and wear inserts have to be replaced when worn. 1. Remove trunnion as shown in Fig 4.3.3. 2. Inspect trunnion pins and wear inserts. Replace them as required. 3. Reinstall trunnion.

4.3.5 Feed Cylinder Removal


It is assumed that the drill pipe and bit are already removed from the mast. Refer to Fig 4.3.3 1. Move top drive to midway position and rotate mast assembly into horizontal position. 2. To remove top drive, disconnect hydraulic hoses and remove 3/4 capscrews. Lift off top drive with a hoist. 3. Disconnect hydraulic hoses, and plug ports and hoses to feed cylinder. 4. Remove end flange guard and mast foot. 5. Disconnect end flange from feed cylinder and check it for wear. Replace bushing inside item 58. 6. Remove trunnions and trunnion pin caps on top drive mounting plate. 7. Remove sliders and support plates and remove top drive mounting plate. Remove capscrew from cylinder flange. 8. Lift feed cylinder from mast frame. Avoid nicking or scratching cylinder rods and center stage barrel.

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4.3.6 Feed Cylinder Installation


Extreme caution must be taken during installation, to prevent scratching or nicking of the feed cylinder surfaces. Refer to Fig 4.3.3 1. Place cylinder into the mast frame with upper rod port facing left (viewing from front of mast) and the upper barrel port facing forward. 2. Fit end flange with bushing onto the lower cylinder rod and install capscrews. 3. Install remaining components in reverse order. 4. To adjust top drive mounting plate and mast connection plate, see Slider Adjustment earlier in this section. 5. Tighten fasteners to specifications noted in Bolt Torque Table (refer to Section 2.3.5). 6. Start hydraulic system and check for proper operation.

4.4 LOWER MAST (08/03/25)

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4.4 Lower Mast


PM Tasks
The lower mast assembly requires minimal servicing but the cylinders and clevis pins need to be inspected. The slip plate flats (see Fig 4.4.1) are exposed to heavy loads and tend to wear. Build up these spots by welding when considerable metal has worn off. 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hours Intervals: 2000 Hours Intervals: Inspect cylinders and slip plate flats Remove debris from centralizer tube Inspect centralizer jaws Inspect cylinder clevises and pins Inspect centralizer jaws Inspect drill table Replace clevis pins

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4.4.1 Overhaul procedure


Servicing the mast feed is limited to checking and repairing the hydraulic cylinders and replacing the cylinder pins. Refer to Fig 4.4.1 1. Dismantle the assembly as illustrated in Fig 4.4.1. 2. Inspect centralizer jaws (66). Rebuild/replace as required. 3. Inspect all centralizer pins and bushings (items 68, 69, 70) and replace as required. 4. Inspect centralizer cylinders (65). Replace/rebuild as required. Inspect cylinder pins and bushings (items 32, 33, 106, 35, 34) and replace as required. 5. Inspect slip plate and replace or build up flats as required. Inspect slip plate pins and bushings (96, 97) and replace as required. 6. Inspect slip cylinders (36) and replace/rebuild as required.

Fig 4.4.1 Lower Mast

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

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4.5 Top Drive


PM Tasks
The top drive requires minimal maintenance; however, certain precautions must be taken to ensure long life of the unit. The top drive is exposed to severe vibration and shock loading. The frequency of rebuilding the top drive assembly depends on the drilling conditions as well as maintenance of the unit. It is essential to check the preload of the bearings after the first 50 hours of service as well as every 250 service hours, adjusting as required. This will prevent movement of the driveshaft when the bearings have excessive play. The movement will damage the oil seals and possibly damage the driveshaft wear sleeve and seal housings, causing loss of oil and eventual failure of the top drive. NOTE: A special tool is required to check the bearing pre-load. Order the tool from Cubex or manufacture it from an old drill pipe (see Fig 4.5.1.a). Daily: 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: 2000 Hour Intervals: Check oil level Check for oil leaks Bearing Pre-load Adjustment Change gear oil Torque bolts on rotation motors Torque bolts at mounting plate Inspect top drive and rebuild as required

WARNING! Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing. Support mast before removing or loosening hydraulic components or fittings.

Technical Specifications:

Lubricant:

Gear Lube SAE 140 - High temp. SAE 80W-90 - Low temp.

Capacity: Weight:

6.3 qts. (6.0 l) 780 lbs. (350 kg)

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

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Fig 4.5.1 Top Drive Assembly

Fig 4.5.1.a Pre-load Checking Tool

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4.5.1 Checking Bearing Pre-load


NOTE: This procedure is for Preventative Maintenance. A special tool is required to check the bearing pre-load. Order the tool from Cubex or manufacture it from an old drill pipe (see Fig 4.5.1.a). It is critical to maintain the correct pre-load on the drive shaft bearings. The test is to determine the force required to rotate the driveshaft. The pre-load is adjusted by removing shims, installed under the bearing cap. 1. Move top drive to a comfortable working position and drain oil. Rotate mast until top drive motors are facing down. WARNING! Secure full load of mast and top drive. Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply and relieve pressure in air receiver before proceeding. 2. Remove top drive motors and cap hydraulic lines. 3. Install Pre-load Checking Tool into drive shaft sub. Place torque wrench on nut, and measure torque required to rotate drive shaft. Torque must be between 6575 ft-lbs (88-102 N-m). NOTE: If pre-load is within limits, remove Pre-load Checking Tool and reassemble top drive. Otherwise proceed with Adjusting Bearing Pre-load.

4.5.1.1 Alternative Field Method for Checking Pre-load


1. Move the top drive to a comfortable working position and drain the oil. 2. Install the Preload Checking Tool into the driveshaft saver sub. Using a torque wrench rotate the driveshaft and read the torque required to turn it. Torque must be between 100-110 ft-lbs (136-150 N-m) rolling torque (torque must be read while turning the driveshaft). NOTE: If the preload is within limits, remove the Pre Load Checking Tool. Otherwise, proceed with Adjusting Bearing Preload.

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4.5.2 Adjusting Bearing Pre-load


Normal wear tends to reduce the pre-load. Shims, placed under the bearing cap, must be removed to compensate for wear. The shims are available in 2 sizes - 0.005 (0.127 mm) clear and 0.010 (0.254 mm) white, with both being found under the cap. NOTE: This procedure is continued from "Checking Bearing Pre-load"; therefore the air pressure is already relieved. 1. Remove bearing cap. Remove one shim, bolt bearing cap back in place and torque bolts (30) to 375 ft-lbs (508 N-m). Turn driveshaft two full revolutions. NOTE: When removing the bearing cap, care must be taken to insure that there are no burrs on the wear sleeve that might damage the seal as the cap is being removed. 2. Recheck bearing pre-load by measuring rotation torque. Repeat step 1 and recheck bearing pre-load until correct torque is achieved. 3. Remove Pre-load Checking Tool. Reassemble top drive and reconnect power. Rotate mast until air swivel is up, and check oil level in top drive.

4.5.3 Removing Top Drive


The top drive can be removed with the mast in the horizontal or vertical position. 1. Break saver sub before removing top drive from mast. To break and install saver sub, follow the instructions given in Section 4.5.10. WARNING! Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing. 2. Drain the oil into a suitable container. 3. Support weight of top drive using crane or suitable restraining device. 4. Disconnect air hoses and hydraulic hoses, capping all lines, 5. Remove 8 of the retaining bolts and lift off the top drive. 6. Clean and wash exterior of top drive. 7. Install the top drive on a suitable holding device. 8. Proceed with disassembly instructions.

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4.5.3.1 Using the Right Equipment


When working on a 6230 top drive, it is recommended that the correct stand is used to hold the unit while working on it. This stand must be capable of rotating the top drive 360 and securely holding it in the required position as shown in Fig 4.5.2 and Fig 4.5.3.

Top Drive

Stand

Fig 4.5.2 Stand

Fig 4.5.3 Stand

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4.5.4 Disassembly Procedure


NOTE: Use bearing warmer or press to remove and install bearings and sleeves. Refer to Fig 4.5.4 1. Remove the hydraulic motors. 2. Remove the splined piston. 3. Remove the upper seal housing bolts and then remove the housing by turning in the previously installed set screws. 4. Remove the oil seal from the housing and discard. 5. Remove the gear housing top plate. 6. Remove the driveshaft bearing cup and pinion bearings from the plate. 7. Remove the driveshaft assembly from the gear housing using a suitable lifting device. 8. Remove the bearing cones, sleeves, and bullgear from the driveshaft using a suitable press. Avoid damaging the driveshaft surfaces. 9. Remove both pinion gears and lower pinion bearings from the gear housing. It may be necessary to remove the four 1/8 pipe plugs from the bottom of the gear housing and use a pin punch to push the bearings out. 10. Remove the bottom bearing cap bolts and the bottom bearing cap. It may be necessary to use the two set screws previously installed in the cap. 11. Remove the bearing cup from the gear housing. 12. Clean and inspect all part, replacing any worn components.

Fig 4.5.4 Disassembly

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4.5.5 Installation of Pinion Gears and Bearings


1. Install bearing cup and upper pinion bearings into gear housing top plate (see Fig 4.5.5).

Top Plate Upper Pinion Bearings

Bearing Cup

Fig 4.5.5 Installation

2. Install lower pinion gear bearing into gear housing and install pinion gears (see Fig 4.5.6).

Pinion Gear

Pinion Bearing

Fig 4.5.6 Installation

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4.5.6 Driveshaft Assembly and Installation


Begin assembly of the driveshaft in the upright position. Refer to Fig 4.5.7 to Fig 4.5.22 1. Install the top spacer. Refer to Fig 4.5.7

Fig 4.5.7

2. Using a bearing warmer, heat one bearing cone to between 250-300F (120-150C) (refer to Fig 4.5.8).

Fig 4.5.8

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3. Install the heated bearing cone on the shaft (see Fig 4.5.9).

Fig 4.5.9

4. Install spacer on top of the bearing cone (see Fig 4.5.10).

Fig 4.5.10

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)


5. Heat the wear sleeve between 350-375F (180-190C). See Fig 4.5.11 6. Install the heated wear sleeve on the shaft (see Fig 4.5.12).

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NOTE: If the procedure for heating the bearings and wear sleeves is not followed they may freeze (seize) on the driveshaft. Care should be taken not to exceed a temperature of 375F (190C) when heating the wear sleeves.

Fig 4.5.11

Fig 4.5.12

7. After allowing the driveshaft to cool, invert it and install the bull gear (see Fig 4.5.13).

Fig 4.5.13

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8. Install the bottom spacer (see Fig 4.5.14).

Fig 4.5.14

9. Install the second bearing cone (see Fig 4.5.15).

Fig 4.5.15

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10. Install the second wear sleeve (see Fig 4.5.16).

Fig 4.5.16

11. Install splined piston insert (see Fig 4.5.17 and Fig 4.5.18) checking alignment of air ports. Secure the insert with a x 1 grade 8 bolt, using 262 Loctite on the threads. NOTE: The splined piston is available in different sizes depending on the application.

Splined Piston Insert

Align retaining hole to insure correct alignment of air ports. Install x1 grade 8 bolts and secure with blue Loctite 243.

Fig 4.5.17

Fig 4.5.18

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12. Lower the assembled driveshaft into the top drive housing to allow the bull gear to rest on the bottom. The use of a lifting device is necessary (see Fig 4.5.19, Fig 4.5.20, and Fig 4.5.21).

Fig 4.5.19

Fig 4.5.20

Fig 4.5.21

13. Install Gear housing gasket, coating both sides with Loctite High Tack (see Fig 4.5.22).

Fig 4.5.22

14. Position the gear housing top plate on the gear housing, insuring that it is fully seated before bolting. Tighten the 4 10UNC x 4 gr.8 bolts first in a crisscross manner, tightening in 3 steps to 375 ft-lbs (512 N-m). 15. Install the 6 of 13UNC x 4 gr.8 bolts tightening in three steps to 105 ft-lbs (143 N-m).

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4.5.7 Setting Bearing Preload


1. Rotate the top drive to the inverted position. Install the lower bearing cup onto the bottom bearing cone (see Fig 4.5.23), then install the bottom bearing cap.

Fig 4.5.23

2. Insert the bolts and slowly tighten to seat the bearing cup evenly; do not over tighten. Insert the splined piston into the splined piston insert and install a bolt in the piston (see Fig 4.5.24).

Fig 4.5.24

3. Rotate the top drive two full revolutions using the bolt installed on the splined piston; this will seat the bearing cup. Loosen the bolts on the bottom bearing cap and the retighten.

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4. Use the torque wrench on the bolt installed on the splined piston to check the rolling torque; this is the correct way to measure preload on the bearings, of the driveshaft (see Fig 4.5.25). The correct rolling torque is 75-85 ft-lbs (102-116 Nm). Tightening of the bottom bearing cap bolts will increase the bearing preload and the rolling torque. Once the correct rolling torque is achieved, use feeler gauges to check the clearance between the bearing cap and the gear housing in three places. Use an average of these readings and subtract 0.005 (0.127 mm).

Fig 4.5.25

5. Remove the bearing cap and insert the correct amount of shims under the cap (see Fig 4.5.26). Reinstall the cap and tighten the bolts to 375 ft-lbs (512 N-m) dry torque. Recheck the rolling torque and insure the proper torque value is obtained. NOTE: Shims in the kit are either 0.005 (0.127mm) clear or 0.010 (0.254mm) white. NOTE: Upon obtaining the correct preload, remove the retaining bolts and apply blue Loctite #243 to the threads. Reinstall and torque to 275 ft-lbs (375 N-m) wet torque.

Fig 4.5.26

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4.5.8 Installing Upper Seal and Housing


1. Remove the splined piston from the driveshaft. Install the bottom seal (see Fig 4.5.27). Lubricate the contact surface of the seal and wear sleeve of the driveshaft prior to installation.

Fig 4.5.27

2. Rotate the top drive to the vertical position. Install the 90 street elbow into the upper seal housing (see Fig 4.5.28). Coat the sealing surfaces of the top plate and upper seal housing gasket with Loctite High Track sealant.

Fig 4.5.28

3. Install the upper seal housing securing with 8 of 3/8-13UNC x 2 gr.8 UNC bolts and lock washers. Torque to 60 N-m dry torque.

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4. Fill the gearbox with 85W140 gear oil, to the top (leave the upper seal out until gearbox is full to insure all the air escapes). 5. Coat the sealing surface of the upper seal and driveshaft, and install the seal. Then install both fill plugs. 6. Install the splined piston o-ring on the piston and lubricate. Insert the splined piston spring into the driveshaft (see Fig 4.5.29). Check for free movement of the piston when fully inserted.

Fig 4.5.29

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4.5.9 Installing Air Swivel and Hydraulic Motors


1. Install swivel o-ring on the driveshaft and lubricate (see Fig 4.5.30).

Fig 4.5.30

2. Apply anti-seize to the threads of the swivel and install onto the driveshaft (see Fig 4.5.31), tightening by hand only. NOTE: Swivel in picture is left hand thread, RB30 is right hand thread. When top drive is installed, follow proper tightening instructions, given in Section 4.2.11.

Fig 4.5.31

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3. Coat the hydraulic motor gaskets with Loctite High Tack sealer and place them on the gear housing. Install hydraulic motors and torque bolts -13 UNC x 2 flange 12 pt. gr.8 to 105 ft-lbs (143 N-m) (see Fig 4.5.32).

Fig 4.5.32

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4.5.10 Saver Sub


4.5.10.1 Removal
1. Lower the top drive to bottom of travel and support mast safely to remove the hydraulic motors. 2. Clean the top of the top drive to prevent debris from entering the top drive and cause premature wear. NOTE: Left is looking from the rear of the drill, toward the mast. 3. Remove both hydraulic motors from the top drive assembly; cap all hydraulic lines to prevent contamination of the hydraulic system. 4. Install the top drive locking tools and secure each with four bolts. Refer to Fig 4.5.33 and Fig 4.5.34. CAUTION! After installation of the top drive locking tools, do not engage the drills rotation either forward or reverse, as damage to the top drive may occur.

Pinion Locking Tool

Top Drive

Fig 4.5.33

Prevents the top drive driveshaft from turning during saver sub removal

Fig 4.5.34 5. Raise the top drive so the saver-sub is at the same height as the breakout cylinder.

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6. Install the saver-sub breakout wrench on the saver-sub, then install the appropriate wrench holding tool and connect to the breakout cylinder with the cylinder in the extended position. Refer to Fig 4.5.35

Hoses set up with quick couplers

Saver sub breakout wrench Breakout cylinder connected in extended position to allow movement for breaking saver sub

Fig 4.5.35

7. Retract (if cylinder is mounted on the left side of mast) or extend (if cylinder is mounted on right side of mast) the breakout cylinder until the joint is broken. WARNING! To prevent possible injury, do not stand in the path of the wrench while breaking the joint.

Breakout cylinder retracted; saver sub joint loosened

Fig 4.5.36

8. After the joint is broken, remove the saver-sub retainer and wrench, and remove the saver-sub by hand.

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-022

4.5.10.2 Installation
1. Thread saver sub onto driveshaft by hand. Ensure the threads have been coated with anti-seize. 2. Remove pinion-locking tools. 3. Reinstall top drive motors and all hydraulic lines. Torque motor bolts to 105 ftlbs. 4. Reduce forward rotation torque to minimum by turning the needle valve labeled Forward Rotation Torque counter-clockwise. 5. Install breakout wrench onto saver sub then install the appropriate wrench holding tool. 6. Rotate top drive forward until wrench contacts right edge of mast, keeping all personnel clear of area.

With wrench against the mast, apply 2500 psi forward rotation to tighten the saver sub to the shaft

Wrench Holding Tool

Fig 4.5.37

7. Push high rotation torque button; check gauge to ensure pressure of 2500 psi. 8. Release button to return to 1600 psi after making up saver sub; check pressure gauge to ensure pressure has reduced. 9. Relieve forward pressure with joystick to remove breakout wrench. 10. Remove breakout wench holding tool and breakout wrench.

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-023

4.5.11 Air Swivel


PM Tasks
50 Hour Intervals: 2000 Hour Intervals: Check for external leaks, lubricate grease nipple Remove and disassemble air swivel, inspect seals and O-rings

4.5.11.1 Removing Air Swivel


Refer to the beginning of the section if the top drive needs to be removed. WARNING! Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply, and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing. Support mast and top drive before loosening hydraulic components. 1. Lower the top drive to a comfortable working position to remove the air swivel, ensuring the saver sub is not engaging the breakout bars on the slip plate. 2. Clean the top of the top drive to prevent debris from entering the top drive and cause premature wear. WARNING! Ensure that the mine air supply is disconnected from the drill and that the air system does not contain any pressure, which could cause serious injury. 3. Remove the anti rotation bracket from the top drive mounting plate. 4. Remove the main air supply line and the splined piston airline from the air swivel.

Ensure the saver sub is not engaging the breakout bars

Fig 4.5.38

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-024

5. Install the air swivel wrench on the air swivel and connect the safety chain. NOTE: The air swivel has left hand thread.

Fig 4.5.39

Fig 4.5.40

6. Start the drill and slowly apply reverse rotation to breakout the air swivel. WARNING! To prevent possible injury, do not stand in the path of the wrench while breaking the joint. 7. After the joint is broken remove the air swivel wrench and remove the air swivel by hand. NOTE: If the air swivel is to remain off the top drive for any length of time, the driveshaft should be covered to prevent any debris from entering the top drive.

4.5.11.2 Installation of Air Swivel


1. Clean and examine the threads of both the saver sub and driveshaft for any damage, i.e. burrs, nicks, damage to the threads and replace the o-ring on the air swivel. 2. Apply a liberal amount of Anti-Seize compound to the thread of the air swivel and lubricate the o-ring. Start the air swivel by hand into the driveshaft and continue to screw in the air swivel until the shoulders meet. NOTE: The air swivel has left hand thread. 3. Install the air swivel wrench on the air swivel and connect the safety chain. 4. Adjust the rotation pressure to: 1000 lbs for underground unit, 1600 lbs for surface unit (QXR).

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-025

5. From the drilling panel, start the drill and with the rotation joystick slowly apply forward rotation to make up the air swivel. WARNING! To prevent possible injury, do not stand in the path of the wrench while making up the joint. 6. Remove the air swivel wrench. 7. Install the main air supply line and the splined piston airline from the air swivel. 8. Install the anti-rotation bracket from the top drive mounting plate. 9. Use breakout wrench and retainer to hold back saver sub while tightening air swivel. Slowly apply forward rotation until wrench contacts mast.

Fig 4.5.41

10. Apply full forward rotation. 11. Adjust forward rotation pressure to 1400 lbs for drilling.

Fig 4.5.42

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-026

4.5.11.3 Dismantling Air Swivel


Refer to Fig 4.5.43, Fig 4.5.44, and Fig 4.5.45 1. Remove the nut at top of the air swivel. 2. Remove bolts. 3. Remove air housing cap. 4. Remove shim set. 5. Insert punch through holes in bottom of housing and tap seal retainer and bearing assembly out. 6. Remove seal retainer and retaining ring. 7. Place wrench on flats and remove small tube. 8. Remove wear sleeve and bearings from large tube. Heat bearings and wear ring when removing to prevent scoring of the large tube.

Fig 4.5.43

Fig 4.5.44

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-027

9. Remove the seal plug from the swivel housing. NOTE: Seal plug has left hand thread. 10. Remove small rotary seal and inspect for wear. 11. Remove bearing and snap ring and inspect for wear.

Fig 4.5.45

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-028

4.5.11.4 Inspection of Parts


1. Inspect housing for wear, scoring, cracks, burrs, and thread condition. If any cracks are found, the housing must be replaced. 2. Inspect large tube for wear on the sealing area and the snap ring groove for damage. If wear is present or snap-ring groove is damaged, the large tube should be replaced. 3. Inspect small tube for wear on sealing area and thread damage. 4. Inspect wear sleeve for wear in the sealing area. 5. Inspect seal retainer for cracks and damage. Punch marks on the bottom from disassembly can be lightly buffed off. If any cracks are found, the retainer must be replaced. 6. Inspect housing cap for wear, and damage in the seal groove. NOTE: All seals and bearings should be replaced at time of rebuild.

Step 4

Step 6

Step 2 Step 5

Step 1

Step 3

Fig 4.5.46

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-029

4.5.11.5 Assembly Procedure


1. Clean and inspect housing for scoring, cracks, and thread condition. Ensure hole for grease fitting is free of burrs that could possibly cut seals on installation. Repair as necessary. Lubricate and install small rotary seal.

Grease Fitting Hole

Install small rotary seal

Fig 4.5.47

2. Install seal plug with a small amount of blue Loctite on the threads, into the housing, and torque to 150 ft-lbs (203 N-m). NOTE: The seal plug is left hand thread.

Seal Retainer Plug

Fig 4.5.48

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-030

3. Turn the housing over and install bearing with a light coat of anti-seize into the housing. Install snap-ring with a coating of anti-seize into the housing, be sure the snap-ring is properly inserted in the groove.

Fig 4.5.49

4. Place the large tube upside down on the bench. Using a suitable bearing warmer heat the wear sleeve to 200F (93C) and install on the large tube.

Fig 4.5.50

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-031

5. Heat the bearings to 200F (93C).

Fig 4.5.51

6. Install the first bearing with the numbers down, install the bearing spacer, then install the second bearing with the numbers up.

Install the spacer between the bearings

Fig 4.5.52 CAUTION! The orientation of the bearings is important. Position the bearings as shown in Fig 4.5.53 with the bearing numbers facing away from each other.

Bearing Numbers

Fig 4.5.53

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-032

7. Install snap-ring into the groove on the large tube. Allow the large tube to cool.

Fig 4.5.54

8. Lubricate and install the O-ring into the groove on the small tube.

Fig 4.5.55

9. Install the small tube inside the large tube and tighten firmly.

Fig 4.5.56

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-033

10. Install a 7/8 lock washer and 7/8 UNC nut onto the small tube.
Nut

Lockwasher

Fig 4.5.57

11. Torque to 150 ft-lbs (203 N-m).

Fig 4.5.58

12. Install the large rotary seal into the seal retainer. Remove the o-ring from the rotary seal and install into the groove; carefully bend the inner part of the seal in a U shape and install into the groove. NOTE: Only bend the seal as far as needed or it will be damaged.
Seal Retainer

Rotary Seal

O-ring Backup Ring

Fig 4.5.59

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-034

13. Install the back-up ring and CP16303-005 O-ring into the outer groove. Make sure that the back-up ring is closest to the bearing side of the retainer and that the concave side is facing the o-ring.
Backup Ring Rotary Seal O-ring

Fig 4.5.60

14. Lubricate the seals well and install the bearing retainer onto the large tube. Take care not to damage the seals. 15. Lubricate the inside of the housing and the seals on the seal carrier. Install the large tube assembly into the housing; make sure the seals are not cut during installation. Using a soft faced hammer, tap the large tube assembly into the housing keeping the bearings square to the housing until it comes to rest firmly at the bottom.

Large Tube Assembly

Seal Retainer

Housing

Fig 4.5.61 NOTE: Do not install the housing seal at this time, as it will result in an improper rolling torque adjustment.

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-035

16. Install the housing cap onto the housing. Do not put bolts in at this time. Using the shim kit, fit as many shims as will fit between the housing and the cap. Remove one (1) of the thinnest shims; this will be the starting point for setting the rolling torque. 17. Remove the housing cap and install the shims, reinstall the cap. Install four (4) equally spaced 3/8 x 1 UNC bolts and torque to 40 ft-lbs (54 N-m). Using a beam or dial style torque wrench, check the rolling torque. The rolling torque must be 10 to 15 ft-lbs (13.5 to 20 N-m). Add or remove shims as needed until the desired torque is reached.

Fig 4.5.62

18. Remove the housing cap and install the seal. Install the housing cap on the housing and install the two (2) seal retainers.

Fig 4.5.63

Fig 4.5.64

4.5 TOP DRIVE (08/03/25)

4-05-036

19. Install eight (8) grade 8 3/8 x 1 UNC bolts with 3/8 lock washers and torque to 40 ft-lbs (54 N-m).

Fig 4.5.65

20. Lube with extreme pressure grease until the housing is full.

Fig 4.5.66

Fig 4.5.67

4.6 TOP DRIVE MOTOR (08/03/25)

4-06-001

4.6 Top Drive Motor


PM Tasks
Replacing seals and O-rings is routine maintenance but a complete overhaul is time-consuming. Motor replacement is recommended. 250 Hour Intervals: Inspect seals

CAUTION! Rebuilding the hydraulic pumps is recommended for qualified maintenance technicians only.

Motor Specifications: Top Drive Motor CP17014-6 Displacement: Continuous Pressure: Continuous Flow: Speed: Weight: 12.1 in3/rev (198 cm3/rev.) 2800 psi (193.5 bar) 20 gpm (76 l/min.) 0 - 349 rpm 36 lbs. (16.3 kg.)

4.6 TOP DRIVE MOTOR (08/03/25)

4-06-002

Fig 4.6.1 Top Drive Motor

Fig 4.6.2 Rotor Clearance

4.6 TOP DRIVE MOTOR (08/03/25)

4-06-003

4.6.1 Dismantling Top Drive Motor


Remove the top drive motors from the top drive assembly, plug the hose fittings, and proceed as outlined below. Refer to Fig 4.6.1 1. Clean the outside of the motor and drain the fluid. Clean all parts, except seals, in petroleum-based solvent, then dry them with compressed air. Keep parts separate to avoid nicks and burrs. 2. Place motor in a vise with coupling shaft facing down and jaws gripping housing flange. 3. Draw an alignment mark down the outside of the motor from cover (2) to housing (18) to assist orientation when assembling the unit. 4. Remove bolts (1), end cover (2) and seal ring (4). Discard seal ring. Inspect end cover (2) for operating conditions. A polished pattern is normal wear created by commutator assembly. Discoloring indicates excessive fluid temperature, thermal shock or extreme speeds. If discoloring exists, inspect items 2, 5, and 8 for scoring or distortion. 5. Remove commutator ring (6) and inspect it for cracks or burrs. 6. Remove commutator (5). Remove seal from commutator, using an air hose blowing air into the ring groove until the seal (3) is lifted out. The seal (3) must be discarded after removal. NOTE: Item 5 and commutator ring (6) are sold as matched sets. 7. Remove manifold (7) and inspect it for cracks or surface scoring. Replace it if required. A polished pattern on the ground surfaces from commutator or rotor rotation is normal. Remove and discard seal rings (4) from both sides. NOTE: The manifold is constructed of bonded plates and cannot be dismantled any further. Compare configuration of both sides of the manifold to ensure that the same surface is reassembled against the rotor set. 8. Remove rotor set (8) and wear plate (9) together, keeping rotor set in its assembled form. Then, mark the position to allow installation in the same location. Keeping the original position increases the service life of the torque motor. Remove and discard seal ring between item 9 and item 8. NOTE: Some motors may have a rotor set with two stator halves with a seal ring (4) between them and two sets of vanes. Discard the seal ring if the stator halves become disassembled.

4.6 TOP DRIVE MOTOR (08/03/25)

4-06-004

9. Check rotor vane clearance as follows: Place the rotor set (8) and wear plate (9) on a flat surface then rotate the rotor as illustrated in Fig 4.6.2. Measure the clearance between the vane and rotor lobe. Replace the rotor set if the clearance is more than 0.005" (0.13 mm). If this motor is equipped with two sets of stators, repeat above procedure on other side. 10. Inspect drive link (10) for damaged splined. No noticeable lash should be apparent between mating spline parts. 11. Remove seal ring (4) from item 18. Remove thrust bearing (11) from coupling shaft (12) and inspect it for wear. 12. Remove coupling shaft (12) and check it for wear. Replace it if the two diameters show wear in excess of 0.020 (0.51 mm). 13. Remove inner thrust bearing (13) to inspect condition. Remove item 16 and item 17. Remove seal (20) using a seal puller. 14. Remove bearing (19) using a suitable bearing puller.

4.6.2 Assembly Procedure


1. Reassemble in reverse order including the additional steps below. 2. Pack bearing (19) with grease as it is not lubricated with hydraulic fluid. 3. Apply grease to all seal rings (4). Install two studs that are 0.50 (13 mm) longer than bolts (1) into item 18 to guide external parts during installation. 4. Install bolts (1) and torque to 24 ft-lbs (32 N-m).

4.7 BREAKOUT WRENCH (08/03/25)

4-07-001

4.7 Breakout Wrench


PM Tasks
Clean and replace components as required. The knurled inserts require replacement more frequently. 250 Hour Intervals: Visual inspection Cleaning assemblies

Fig 4.7.1 Breakout Wrench

4.7.1 Service Procedure


Servicing the wrench is limited to replacing chain components, pins, and springs. Consult the Parts Manual for replacement parts. 1. Dismantle the assemblies as illustrated in Fig 4.7.1. 2. Replace worn inserts and parts as required. Clean chains and replace them when necessary. 3. Assemble in reverse order.

4.7 BREAKOUT WRENCH (08/03/25)

4-07-002

4.8 CAROUSEL ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

4-08-001

4.8 Carousel Assembly


PM Tasks
The carousel requires frequent lubrication and inspection. 8 Hour Intervals: 50 Hour Intervals: 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: Lubrication of grease nipples, inspection of drill pipe alignment Visual inspection of bearings, pins, and pipe guides Visual inspection of bearings, pins, and pipe guides Replacement of bearings, pins, and pipe guides. Testing of hydraulic cylinders

WARNING! Secure or support mast before inspecting or servicing drill. Drill pipe may move if pipe clamping pressure is set incorrectly.

4.8 CAROUSEL ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

4-08-002

Fig 4.8.1

Fig 4.8.1 A

4.8 CAROUSEL ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

4-08-003

8 Hour Inspection (By Operator)


1. Inspect operation to ensure proper drill pipe alignment and pipe clamp pressure. 2. Pump grease fittings with Extreme Pressure Grease. Refer to Fig 2.3.1 3. Wash and clean drill.

50 and 250 Hour Inspection


1. Refer to Fig 4.8.1 to inspect bearings (1, 2) and pins (3, 4). Inspect washers (5, 6), cylinders, motor, wear liners (7, 8), and pipe guides (9, 10 if equipped). 2. Refer to Fig 4.8.1 A to inspect drive components (14, 15, 11). Inspect washers (12, 16). 3. Pump grease fittings with Extreme Pressure Grease. Refer to Fig 2.3.1 4. Adjust clamp arm and pipe clamp. Refer to Fig 4.8.2 and Fig 4.8.3.

1000 and 2000 Hour Inspection


Worn components must be replaced as required. 1. Replace bearings (1, 2), pins (3, 4), washers (5, 6, 12, 16), and wear liners (7, 8). Replace pipe guides (9, 10 if equipped). 2. Test cylinders and motor for leakage. 3. Pump grease fittings with Extreme Pressure Grease. Refer to Fig 2.3.1 Adjust clamp arm and pipe clamp. Refer to Fig 4.8.2 and Fig 4.8.3.

4.8 CAROUSEL ASSEMBLY (08/03/25) Carousel Adjustment

4-08-004

The carousel requires adjustment when the drill pipes do not align with the top drive or when the clamping force of the pipe clamp is insufficient.

2. Close pipe clamp to grip drill pipe.

1. Load drill pipe manually into drill table and tighten drill string

Pipe Clamp Cylinder

3. Release clamping pressure by turning upper and lower cylinder rods into clevises. You may have to open clamp for easy turning.

4. Adjust cylinder clevis until clamp grips drill pipe firmly. Open pipe clamp. Turn cylinder rods two complete revolutions out of clevises to adjust clamping pressure. Tighten lock nuts. Remove drill rod from drill table.

Fig 4.8.2 Pipe Clamp Adjustment You must also perform these adjustments when replacing carousel components. Tighten screws to torque values shown in Section 2.3.5 Torque Table.

4.8 CAROUSEL ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

4-08-005

Clamp Arm Adjustment


Adjust drill pipe with top drive location.
1. Move pipe arm to carousel. Load drill pipe into pipe arm and move it to top drive. 2. Lower top drive to inspect alignment between drill pipe and saver sub.

3. Adjust clevis to move drill pipe in Arc A.

5. Tighten lock nuts when alignment is correct.

4. Loosen lock nuts and turn adjusting screws until drill rod aligns with saver sub. Adjustment is in Arc B. 6. Tighten both adjusting screws and lock nuts at clamp arm cylinder. 7. Operate carousel to check alignment.

Fig 4.8.2 Pipe Clamp Adjustment

4.8 CAROUSEL ASSEMBLY (08/03/25)

4-08-006

5.0 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM (08/03/25)

5.0 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM

CAUTION! Wipe up spills immediately! WARNING!


Before servicing any hydraulic components or loosening hose fittings, secure the mast as follows: 1. Place the mast on solid ground or floor. 2. Move the top drive assembly to the lowest position on mast. 3. Support the mast with hoist or restraining equipment.

5.1 HYDRAULIC SYMBOLS (08/03/25)

5-01-001

5.1 Hydraulic Symbols


Symbols Description

Filter or strainer Variable Displacement Pump with One Direction Flow Fixed Displacement Pump Check Valve Ball Valve Pressure Relief Valve Shuttle Valve Internal Orifice Control Valve, 3-position, solenoid with spring return, manual lever control Flow Direction Reservoir Return Pilot Line Hydraulic Line
Fig 5.1.1 Hydraulic Symbols

5.1 HYDRAULIC SYMBOLS (08/03/25)

5-01-002

5.2 HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS (08/03/25)

5-02-001

5.2 Hydraulic Circuits


An open-loop, hydraulic system is used with a variable displacement, pressure compensating supply pump. The load sensing function strokes the pump up when flow is required, and destrokes when the system is idle.

PM Tasks
The hydraulic system requires limited maintenance. The filter elements and hydraulic fluid must be replaced at the recommended intervals. Keep all cylinders, motors and valves clean. The cylinder rods are the main source where contamination may enter into the hydraulic system. Replace damaged components immediately. Investigate all leaks, using extreme caution. Worn or damaged hoses must be replaced without delay. All maintenance should be performed in a clean, well-lit work area. Extreme cleanliness is required when servicing hydraulic components.

250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals:

See Section 5.6 Hydraulic Filtration. Inspect system for leaks. Change hydraulic fluid.

WARNING! High pressure oil leaks may cause injury. Use extreme caution and proper protective gear when investigating hydraulic leaks. After installing hydraulic components and hoses, check that hydraulic actuators are operating in direction as indicated on controls.

5.2 HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS (08/03/25)

5-02-002

Fig 5.2.1 Hydraulic Schematic See the Appendix for a full-size schematic

5.2 HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS (08/03/25)

5-02-003

5.2.1 Hydraulic Circuits


Operating Temperature: Fluid Type: System Capacity: Number of Valve Banks: 100 to 150F (38 to 65C) Esso NUTO 46 70 gal. (265 L) Four (4)

5.2.2 Pressure and Flow Settings


System (Operating) Pressure: Stand-by Pressure: Relief Valve: 2800 psi (193.5 bar) 400 psi (27.6 bar) 3200 psi (221.1 bar)

5.2.3 Adjustment Sequence


The hydraulic adjustments are preset and require setting only after servicing the pump or the control valve or when a change in performance is noticed. When overhauling the pump and valves at the same time, follow this adjustment sequence. 1. System (Operating) Pressure: 2. Standby Pressure: 3. Relief Valve: 4. Valve Pressure: 5. Valve Flow: Located on the pumps control valve. Located on the pumps control valve, this is the minimum pressure when the pump is running idle. Located on the inlet cover in each valve bank, except the drilling valve. Located in specified valve section, allowing independent settings for both valve ports. Located in each valve section, allows independent settings for both valve ports. See Section 5.5 Control Valves for individual pressure and flow settings.

5.2 HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS (08/03/25)

5-02-004

5.3 HYDRAULIC PUMP (08/03/25)

5-03-001

5.3 Hydraulic Pump


This model of pump is designed for open-loop, closed center, or load-sensing hydraulic systems. Flow is proportional to the drive speed and the displacement. By adjusting the position of the swashplate, it is possible to smoothly vary the flow. The Load Sense type of control registers the load at a point away from the pump. In the case of your Cubex drill, a pilot line from the hydraulic control valves sends the pressure signal back to the pump. The pump control then tries to keep the output pressure above the load requirements by the standby or differential pressure (pressure compensation). The differential pressure is generally in the area of 400 psi.

Principals of Operation
The displacement mechanism of this series of pumps operates via two stroking pistons (large and small) which adjust the position of the swashplate. The smaller of the two stroking pistons (1) works in conjunction with its spring (2) to always try to move the swashplate to maximum angle, and therefore the pump to maximum displacement. High pressure oil is continually routed from the outlet (pressure) port to the small stroking piston via the control oil drilling (3). Working in opposition to this on the opposite of the swashplate is the larger stroking piston (4). If pressurized fluid is routed to the larger stroking piston (4), it will exert a force to de-stroke the pump to a lower displacement value. Since piston (4) has a larger area than piston (1), the pump will de-stroke with pressure on both cylinders. It is therefore possible to control the pump displacement by changing the pressure applied to the larger of the two stroking pistons. All the pump controls work on the same principal of controlling the pressure on this large stroking piston (4) in order to vary the pumps displacement.

Fig 5.3.1 Hydraulic Pump

5.3 HYDRAULIC PUMP (08/03/25)

5-03-002

CAUTION! Rebuilding hydraulic pump is recommended for qualified maintenance technicians only. When reinstalling pump, ensure that pump housing is filled with hydraulic fluid before starting.

5.3.1 Installation
5.3.1.1 Pre Start-up
1. When you are installing a new pump because of a failure or gradual decrease in performance, it is important that you change the pressure and return elements in the system. The entire hydraulic system requires flushing and installation of new hydraulic oil. 2. Be sure the hydraulic oil level in the tank is sufficient. 3. Remove the case drain fitting and fill the case with clean hydraulic oil. Reconnect the line when full. 4. Loosen the suction line at the pump to allow air to bleed from the line. When oil starts to run out, reconnect the line. 5. Place a 4000 psi gauge at the pump outlet for testing.

5.3.1.2 Start-up
1. With a wrench, remove the protective nuts (see Fig 5.3.2) from the set screws for the differential pressure and compensator control adjusters. Loosen the jam nuts and unscrew both adjustments until you no longer feel any resistance from the control springs. Be sure not to screw them all the way out. This will allow the pump to start at minimum pressure. 2. If the pump is diesel driven, very slightly loosen off the outlet pressure hose or a downstream hose connection. Bump the starter for 2 to 3 second periods to allow air to escape from the line and pump cavity. When oil starts to leak at the connection you loosened, retighten the fittings. 3. If the pump is driven with an electric motor, jog the starter for the motor and follow the same procedure as described for a diesel motor. After you tighten the fitting you used to bleed out the air, run the electric motor. If the pump is noisy, crack the fitting again to bleed of the air. Air is probably still in the suction line or pump. 4. Once the pump runs quiet, adjust the differential (standby) pressure setscrew clockwise until the pressure on the outlet of the pump is at the required standby pressure. Once you have set the pressure, lock the jam nut and replace the protective nut on the differential pressure adjustment.

5.3 HYDRAULIC PUMP (08/03/25)

5-03-003

5. Next, set the compensator control adjustment to the recommended setting. To achieve this, you will have to bottom out a control at the valve bank where the load sense pilot line was connected. This is done to provide a signal back to the pump to determine a setting for the compensator. Once the compensator is set, tighten the jam nut and replace the protective nut.

Differential (standby) Pressure Adjustment

Jam Nut

Protective Nuts

Jam Nut Load Sensing Connection Case Drain

System (operating) Pressure Adjustment

Inlet and Outlet Ports

Fig 5.3.2 Hydraulic Pump

5.3 HYDRAULIC PUMP (08/03/25)

5-03-004

5.3.2 Adjustments
5.3.2.1 System (Operating) Pressure Adjustment
The system pressure is set at the pumps control valve, mounted at the rear of the pump. If the drill is not equipped with a system pressure gauge, connect a gauge on the inlet side of the pressure filter. Install a T-fitting and cap the line if the gauge is to be removed later. 1. Remove the protective cap and loosen the locknut on the system pressure adjustment. Check that personnel are away from the drill and start pump. 2. Set pressure to 4000 psi (278 bar) by turning the setscrew with a 4 mm allen key. Turn it counter-clockwise to reduce pressure. One turn creates a pressure change of approximately 725 psi (50 bar). 3. Reinstall the protective cap and torque to 15 ft-lbs (21 N-m).

5.3.2.2 Stand-by Pressure Adjustment


The stand-by pressure is the minimum pressure maintained during zero pump load. It is set at the control valve mounted at the rear of the pump. 1. Install pressure gauge on inlet side of pressure filter. 2. Remove the protective cap and loosen the locknut on the stand-by pressure adjustment. Check that personnel are away from the drill and start pump. 3. Set pressure to 400 psi (27.6 bar) by turning the setscrew. 4. Reinstall the protective cap and torque to 6 ft-lbs (8.1 N-m).

5.3 HYDRAULIC PUMP (08/03/25)

5-03-005

5.3.3 Testing the Pump


The condition of a pump can be determined by checking the flow. Install a flow meter in series with a restrictor valve on the discharge line of the pump (make sure the restrictor valve is large enough to handle the flow from the pump). Run this line back to the tank. Make sure the load sense line is included in the circuit. While the pump is running, slowly restrict the flow with the valve you installed. As the flow is restricted, it should actually increase due to the load sense of the pump. The flow increase should continue until the pressure reaches 80 to 90 percent of the compensator pressure. At this point, the flow will drop off as the pressure reaches 100 percent of the compensator pressure, at which point the flow will be zero. See Table 5.3.A to determine the expected flow from your pump at 1750 rpm.

Restrictor Valve

Flow Meter

Return back to tank

Load Sense Line

Fig 5.3.3 Test Circuit

Pump Size 71 cc 100 cc

Acceptable Pump Flow 27.5 to 31 gpm 39 to 44 gpm Table 5.3.A

5.3 HYDRAULIC PUMP (08/03/25)

5-03-006

The approximate condition of a pump can also be determined by the flow produced from the case drain. No more than 10 to 12 percent of the pump output should be coming from the case drain. This means at a speed of 1750 rpm, the case drains contained in Table 5.3.B should apply. Pump Size 71 cc 100 cc Table 5.3.B Acceptable Pump Flow 27.5 to 31 gpm 39 to 44 gpm

NOTE: For a case drain leakage test, it is recommended that you DO NOT use a flow meter. This is because piston pumps are very sensitive to case drain pressure. Using a flow meter in most cases causes a certain back pressure that could damage the pump. Instead, use the manual method of directing the case drain into a pail of known volume while measuring the time and calculating the flow.

5.3 HYDRAULIC PUMP (08/03/25)

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5.3.4 Troubleshooting the Pump


Problem Hydraulic system is not performing as it should. For example the drill has lost performance. Cause Standby pressure is set too low. Explanation A low standby pressure setting will cause the pump to destroke too soon, preventing the required flow from reaching the hydraulic system. The pump has been contaminated, cavitated, aerated, or otherwise worn. The load sense line has become disconnected or obstructed and the signal is not getting back for the pump to compensate. If the pump is contaminated, its efficiency will deteriorate and manifest itself as a case drain leak. If a piston pump is being starved of oil or has air trapped in the oil (aeration), it will sound noisy when running. Corrective Action Check the differential pressure setting.

Pump is bypassing.

Check the pumps condition. If the pump does not pass standards, replace. Check the load sense line for leakage at fitting, breakage, or an obstruction.

Loss of load sense signal.

The case drain of the pump generates excessive heat.

Pump is worn.

Check the acceptable pump performance as outlined in Section 5. Change pump out as necessary. Shut the system down. Make certain the inlet to the pump is not restricted. Make certain there are no kinks, twists, or obstructions in the suction line.

Pump is noisy.

Pump is cavitating / aerating.

5.3 HYDRAULIC PUMP (08/03/25)

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5.3.5 Factors Affecting the Pumps Life


The weak link of swashplate piston pumps is the slipper pad arrangement and there are a number of conditions that may detrimentally affect the life of the pump by damage in this area. Essentially there are five possible conditions which may contribute to a failure in this area. These conditions are contaminated fluid, too high a vacuum at the pumps inlet, excessive case pressure, too low of an operating pressure, and aeration/cavitation.

5.3.5.1 Contaminated Fluid


Besides the obvious accelerated wear caused by contaminated fluid, in extreme cases contaminants can also plug the lubrication passages in the piston/slipper pad area. The principle of the slipper pad design is that the hydraulic force, which pushes the piston towards the swashplate is counteracted by a pressure force acting in the opposite direction. High-pressure oil in the piston chamber is routed via a drilling through the piston knuckle and slipper pad to a recess between the slipper and swashplate. This area is designed to have an effective area, which precisely balances the pressure forces caused by the piston.

1. If this passage becomes plugged with contamination

2. Lubrication and hydrostatic balancing are lost here 3. Which causes slipper pad failure.

Fig 5.3.4 Contamination

The relatively small drillings keep the leakage low and the volumetric efficiency in the pump high. If the system has a high level of contamination, it is possible that these drillings can become plugged. This would lead to an accelerated failure of the slipper pad since both lubrication and balancing forces would be lost.

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5.3.5.2 Too High of Vacuum Condition


The piston/slipper assemblies are connected together via a crimp connection. This type of connection is excellent under compression but cannot stand high tensile forces. During the suction process, the piston is drawn back out of the bore because of the retaining plate pulling on the slipper pad. If the vacuum at the pumps inlet is too high, it will oppose this motion and the tensile force will increase to a point where two modes of failure occur. 1. The retaining plate flexes and allows the slipper to lose contact with the swashplate. On the pressure side of the pumps rotation, the slipper is once again brought to contact as the high-pressure oil forces the piston back. At this point, the slipper is damaged due to rounding of the slipper corners from uneven re-seating contact. Repetition of this process will damage the slipper to a point where it can no longer retain its lubricating pool of oil and the pump will fail. 2. The high vacuum forces the slipper pad to simply be pulled off the piston knuckle if the tensile strength of the connection is overcome. CAUTION! Unfortunately, it is difficult to detect this failure by listening to the operation of the pump and the pump will keep running until it is destroyed.
1. Too much vacuum here

2. Or too high a case pressure here

3. Will cause slipper pad lift-off and slipper/piston serration.

Fig 5.3.5 Too High of Vacuum Condition

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5.3.5.3 Excessive Case Pressure


Excessive case pressure has the same effect on the piston/slipper assembly as the too high of vacuum condition. As can be seen in Fig 5.3.6, the two areas actually work together to force the piston to the left, causing a high tensile force in the piston/slipper connection. Because of this, a marginal suction condition and a marginal case pressure condition may work together to cause a failure of this type.

Fig 5.3.6 Excessive Case Pressure

In order to avoid damage by either of these two conditions, the suction line and drain line should be optimized. This means that the pump should always have a flooded suction (mounted below the oil reservoir oil level) and there should be limited resistance in the suction line itself. Therefore, the amount of bends should be minimized and only full area shut-off valves should be used if required. The case drain should be full sized and as short as possible back to the reservoir. It is not advisable to tee the case drain line in with any other return lines and each pump case should be routed individually back to the reservoir.

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5.3.5.4 Too Low an Operating Pressure


The running area between the slipper pad and the swashplate relies on high pressure oil for lubrication. If the pressure at the outlet of the pump is too low (i.e. the pump outlet is unloaded to tank), excessive wear will occur in this area causing premature pump failure.

5.3.5.5 Cavitation/Aeration
Cavitation results when air, which is typically entrained or dissolved in the hydraulic fluid, is allowed to expand because of a low-pressure situation. This occurs in pump inlets, which by nature have a low-pressure condition. The expanded gas bubbles at the inlet collapse with considerable force as the pumping chamber is exposed to system pressure. This collapsing action results in rapid energy losses in the form of heat and noise. This energy level is also high enough to cause serious damage to the lens plate and/or the cylinder barrel of the pump. Aeration is somewhat different than cavitation, however the resulting noise and damage to the pump is nearly identical. Aeration occurs when there are air bubbles present in the reservoir fluid at atmospheric pressure (typically caused by excessive foaming or vortexing at the pump inlet). These air bubbles are then drawn into the inlet line of the pump and ultimately cause of the same damage as described in cavitation.

Damage caused by cavitation and / or aeration

Fig 5.3.7 Cavitation / Aeration

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5.4 HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS (08/03/25)

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5.4 Hydraulic Cylinders


All cylinders are double acting, except the feed cylinder which is a telescopic, double acting type.

PM Tasks
The cylinder rods are the main source where contamination enters the hydraulic system. Any surface damage on the cylinder rods hold foreign matter that is absorbed into the hydraulic fluid. Keep the cylinders clean and in good condition. If premature cylinder failure is suspected, perform the cylinder inspection noted below. 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: Wash and inspect cylinder rods, rod wipers Wash and inspect cylinder rods, rod wipers Inspect cylinder operation

NOTE: Washing cylinder rods extends seal life. The following tools are recommended for servicing the telescopic feed cylinders: CT47907-008: CT47907-007: CM47807-T1: Large Gland Nut Tool Small Gland Nut Tool Seal Installation Tool

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Fig 5.4.1 Telescopic Feed Cylinder

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5.4.1 Telescopic Feed Cylinder


The telescopic feed cylinder moves the top drive up and down. It is exposed to vibration and heavy operating loads. Remove and install the telescopic cylinder as outlined in Section 4.3.5 and Section 4.3.6. Follow the cylinder inspection and seal installation outlined below. Tools shown in Fig 5.4.1 will assist in removing and installing seals. 1. Clean and wash exterior of cylinder and drain hydraulic fluid. Secure large cylinder barrel in chain vise. 2. Remove small glands (7) from center tube (2). Remove upper rod (3) and lower rod (4). 3. Remove large glands (8). Pull center tube from outer tube. Remove and dispose piston seals (21) and wear ring (22). 4. Unscrew lower rod (4) from upper rod (3); remove piston (6).

5.4.2 Telescopic Feed Cylinder Assembly


A complete overhaul requires re-plating of the cylinder components. Replace all seal parts and wear rings. 1. Inspect and clean all components. Remove sharp edges that may damage any seals. 2. Lubricate seals and all components and tools that contact seals during installation. 2. Lubricate seals and all components and tools that contact seals during installation. 4. Apply Anti-seize compound to small and large glands. Torque to 100 ft-lbs (136 N-m) using tool (25) and tool (24). 5. Pressure test cylinder. Cap cylinder ports, and wrap rods and center tube to guard against scratching during transit. Crate cylinder if required.

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5.4.3 Double Acting Cylinders


1. Inspect and clean all components. Remove sharp edges that may damage any seals. 2. Lubricate seals and all components and tools that contact seals during installation. 3. Install parts in reverse order but refer to Fig 5.4.1 for proper installation. 4. Apply Anti-seize compound to small and large glands. Torque to 100 ft-lbs (136 N-m) using tool (25) and tool (24). 5. Pressure test cylinder. Cap cylinder ports, wrap rods and center tube to guard against scratching during transit. Crate cylinder if required.

5.4.4 Cylinder Inspection


Perform a cylinder inspection if premature cylinder failure is suspected. 1. Improper installation of seals is apparent when cuts or nicks in seals are noticed. This is the most frequently occurring problem. 2. Break-down or softening of seals may indicate incompatible seal types. 3. Physical damage of seals may indicate fluid contamination. Most external contamination enters the system during rod retraction. Look for scratched rod and cylinder surfaces. 4. Hardening of seals may indicate hot running conditions.

5.4.5 Cylinder Overhaul


Seal types must be compatible with the fluid and temperature range. Refer to the Parts Manual for service kits. 1. Clean, inspect and replace all parts. Lubricate seals and all parts that contact seals. 2. Referring to Parts Manual, reassemble cylinder in reverse order.

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5.5 Control Valves


The control valves are load-sensing types. Valves, which control cylinders, are equipped with closed center spools. Valves, which operate motors, are fitted with open center spools. Proportional models are used where variable flow is required and On-Off types are installed in the remaining applications (see below). Depending on the drills options, the valves are manually or electrically operated. Refer to the Troubleshooting Section and Electrical Section when determining operating problems.

PM Tasks
Periodic maintenance is limited to external inspections. Overhauling the control valves includes replacing O-rings, seals and setting the pressure and flow. See Valve Specifications (next page) for these settings. If additional parts need servicing, it may be more economical to replace the individual valve sections. 1000 Hour Intervals: 2000 Hour Intervals: Visual inspection Visual inspection. Operate controls to check for proper operation

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Proportional Valve Specifications (with white/grey connectors)


Controls
Tram control Rotation control Feed control Mast swing control Dump control Steering

Flow Rating
17.2 gpm (65 l) 34.2 gpm (100 l) 26.4 gpm (100 l) 2.6 gpm (9.8 l) 2.6 gpm (9.8 l) 2.6 gpm (9.8 l)

Pressure Setting
Wide open (Note 1) Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open

Flow Setting
Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open

(Adjust stroke limiter to achieve pressure)

On/Off Valves Specifications (with black connectors)


Controls
Water pump control Breakout control Slip plate control Centralizer control Upper and lower stingers Jacks Slideover control Feed extension control Air control Cable Reel Arm unit Clamp Carousel rotation

Flow Rating
10.6 gpm (40 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 2.6 gpm (9.8 l) 1.3 gpm (4.9 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 6.6 gpm (25 l) 2.6 gpm (9.8 l)

Pressure Setting
Wide open Wide open Wide open (Note 3) Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open

Flow Setting
(Note 2) Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open

NOTES:
1. Forward Pressure: 1400 psi (82.9 bar). Reverse Pressure: 2800 psi (193.5 bar). 2. Set flow to run water pump motor at 225 rpm using a tachometer. 3. Set pressure for port A and B to 1500 psi (103.4 bar).

Relief Valve Setting: WARNING!

3200 psi (221.1 bar) in all circuits, except the drilling valve

After installing hydraulic components and hoses, check that hydraulic actuators are operating in direction as indicated on controls.

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5.5.1 Control Valves


The valve banks consist of five major components which are the valve section, lever assembly, end plate, inlet section and solenoid (see Fig 5.5.3). Malfunctioning of the control valves could be a mechanical, hydraulic or electrical problem. Therefore, each criterion needs to be checked. Refer to the Troubleshooting Section when determining operating problems.

5.5.2 Valve Pressure Adjustment


The valves do not require any periodic adjustment after the initial setting. After servicing the valves, set the pressure adjustment for both ports as shown in Fig 5.5.1 using the pressure setting listed in the Valve Specifications. NOTE: On rotation valve, reverse pressure is much higher than forward pressure to allow for breaking of tool joints. 1. Block movement of any small cylinder to build up pressure. CAUTION! Check that blocking does not move when force is applied. 2. Remove caps at valve section. Refer to pressure settings listed in Valve Specification at the beginning of Section 5.5. 3. Adjust both ports independently while observing pressure gauge at control panel. A 6 mm allen key is required. Each rotation of 360 creates a pressure change of 1400 psi (96.7 bar). 4. Reinstall caps and remove testing equipment.

Fig 5.5.1 Valve Adjustment

Fig 5.5.2 section C-C

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5.5.3 Relief Valve Adjustment


Each valve bank has its own internal relief valve that needs to be adjusted when the control valves are serviced. The relief valve is located in the inlet section (see Fig 5.5.3). NOTE: Operating pressure in hydraulic pump must be set correctly before performing this adjustment. 1. Remove protective cap on inlet section for relief valve. 2. Move cylinder to full stroke. Block movement of any small cylinder to build up pressure. CAUTION! Check that blocking does not move when force is applied. 3. Open control valve to blocked cylinder and observe hydraulic pressure gauge. Adjust relief valve setting to 3200 psi (221.1 bar). Reinstall cap and remove blocking. Reset pump pressure to specification (max pressure).

5.5.3 Relief Valve Adjustment

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5.5.4 Valve Flow Adjustment


The flow adjustment screws are located on the handle section, as illustrated in Fig 5.5.3. The upper setting screw controls port B and the lower setting screw controls port A. 1. Loosen lock nuts. Note flow setting listed in Valve Specifications at the beginning of Section 5.5. 2. Adjust both ports independently, using allen key. NOTE: Use tachometer when setting water pump motor. 3. Tighten lock nuts at flow adjustment and remove testing equipment.

5.5.5 Solenoid Adjustment


A solenoid adjustment may be required on the rotation and feed valves (proportional types with joysticks) if the joystick movements produce uneven speeds in both directions. The procedure is not included in this manual. Consult Cubex or a Danfoss Dealer for details.

5.5.6 Valve Overhaul


Overhauling any of the five valve components requires replacing of seals and O-rings. Work on each section separately to avoid mixing of parts with other valve sections. Wash the body and parts in solvent, and dry with compressed air. Inspect moving parts for wear and replace as required. Lubricate moving parts and O-rings with hydraulic fluid. When ordering replacement parts, specify the serial number and model of the drill.

5.5.7 Valve Sections


All O-rings must be replaced between each valve section (see Fig 5.5.4 next page). 1. Remove nuts (1) and studs (3) to disassemble valve sections. 2. Replace O-rings 4, 5, 6, and 7. Reassemble in reverse order and torque nuts (1) to 200 in-lbs (23 N-m).

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5.5.8 Valve Sections


All O-rings must be replaced between each valve section (see Fig 5.5.4). 1. Remove nuts (1) and studs (3) to disassemble valve sections. 2. Replace O-rings 4, 5, 6, and 7. Reassemble in reverse order and torque nuts (1) to 200 in-lbs (23 N-m).

5.5.9 Solenoid
The solenoid is not serviceable and must be replaced when malfunctioning. A special adjustment procedure may be required for the rotation and feed valves. Refer to Solenoid Adjustment in this section if the joystick movements produce uneven speeds in both directions. 1. Remove solenoid as shown in Fig 5.5.5. 2. Replace filter (7) and O-rings (8 and 9). 3. If electrical connector is damaged, replace it with connector of same color for ease of identification (see Valve Specifications). 4. Reassemble in reverse order and torque capscrew (2) to 70 in-lbs (8 N-m).

5.5.10 Lever Section


The handle section does not require frequent servicing (see Fig 5.5.6). 1. Replace damaged parts as well as O-rings (9 and 10) located between handle section and valve. 2. Reassemble and torque items 2, 4, 5, and 7 to 70 in-lbs (8 N-m). 3. Set Flow Adjustments, as outlined previously in this section.

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5.5.11 Valve Assembly


Fig 5.5.7 is a general assembly diagram and may show some additional parts. Therefore, it is critical to specify the model and serial number when ordering replacement parts. Work on one valve section at a time, to avoid mixing of parts. 1. Dismantle valve section as shown. 2. Install required parts, making sure that new parts are identical to existing ones. 3. Torque fasteners as follows: Item 17 and 19 Item 3 Item 15 360 in-lbs (40 N-m) 220 in-lbs (25 N-m) 70 in-lbs (8 N-m)

4. Set Pressure Adjustment, as outlined previously in this section.

5.5.12 Inlet Section


The inlet section contains the relief valve. Fig 5.5.8 is a general assembly diagram and may show some additional parts. Therefore, it is critical to specify the model and serial number when ordering replacement parts. 1. Dismantle inlet section as shown. Inspect, clean and replace parts as required. 2. Torque fasteners as follows: Item 3 Item 13 and 15 Item 6 and 23 360 in-lbs (40 N-m) 220 in-lbs (25 N-m) 70 in-lbs (8 N-m)

3. Assemble and install complete valve bank into drill. 4. Start hydraulic pump and adjust relief valve in inlet section, as outlined previously in this section.

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5.6 HYDRAULIC FILTRATION (08/03/25)

5-06-001

5.6 Hydraulic Filtration


A pressure filter, return filter, suction screen, and a breather cap is installed in the circuit to maintain the fluid quality. Change the hydraulic fluid at the recommended intervals to get maximum service life.

PM Tasks
The pressure filter and return filter are cartridge type with serviceable indicators. The manual fill pump fills through the return oil filter. The electric fill filter has a cartridge type filter. 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: 2000 Hour Intervals: Change pressure filter and return filter Change hydraulic fluid Change fill filter Clean filter indicator on pressure filter

Filter Types:

Pressure filter: Return filter: Hydraulic fill:

Cartridge In-tank Manual pump fills through return oil filter Electric pump has internal filter

WARNING! Disconnect power supply and mine air before servicing drill. High pressure jet leaks may cause injury.

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Fig 5.6.1 Hydraulic Filtration

5.6 HYDRAULIC FILTRATION (08/03/25)


WARNING!

5-06-003

Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing.

5.6.1 Replacing Hydraulic Fluid


1. Disconnect fill hose from hydraulic tank cover and return filter hose from return filter (see Fig 5.6.1). Remove tank cover with return filter and breather cap. 2. Remove drain plug from bottom of tank or use a pump to drain hydraulic fluid. Remove suction screen cartridge for inspection and cleaning. Clean inside of tank, tank cover with return filter, and breather cap. Remove tank cover seal and put new silicon bead around. 3. Reinstall components in reverse order and add hydraulic fluid to proper level.

5.6.2 Pressure Filter Element


Replacing the pressure filter element and servicing the filter indicator are performed at different intervals. 1. Remove drain plug from filter bowl to drain fluid. 2. Remove bowl and element, then clean inside of filter head and bowl. 3. Install new element with new O-ring which has been lubricated. Reinstall remaining filter parts. 4. Check fluid level then start system to check for leaks. If filter indicator is not performing properly, replace bypass valve inside filter head and service indicator. When replacing bypass valve, remove filter bowl and filter indicator. Remove outlet hose connection and unscrew bypass valve by inserting suitable tool into holes provided.

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Fig 5.6.2 Pressure Filter Assembly

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5.6.3 Fill Filters


The electric fill pump filter replacement procedure: 1. Use 1" socket wrench to remove end cap. Remove filter element and wipe inside of filter housing. Check that relief valve was not removed and end cap seal is not damaged. 2. Lubricate seal on new filter element. Install filter and tighten end cap. 3. Start system, check for leaks and proper operation of filter bypass indicator.

5.6.4 Return Filter


1. Use 1/2" wrench to remove end cap bolts. Remove filter element and wipe inside of filter housing. Check that bypass valve and cap seal are not damaged. 2. Lubricate seal on new filter element. Install filter and tighten end cap. 3. Start system, check for leaks and proper operation of filter bypass indicator.

5.6 HYDRAULIC FILTRATION (08/03/25)

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5.7 MISCELLANEOUS CONTROLS (08/03/25)

5-07-001

5.7 Miscellaneous Controls


5.7.1 Restriction Fittings
To gain better control, restriction fittings are installed in the hydraulic lines of the mast swing and the optional pipe arm.

5.7.2 Sequence Valve


The sequence valve does not require adjustment except when it is replaced or when the holdback function is malfunctioning. WARNING! Before servicing any hydraulic components or loosening hose fittings, secure mast as follows: 1. Place mast on solid ground or floor. 2. Move top drive assembly to lowest position on mast. 3. Support mast with hoist or restraining equipment.

5.7.3 Sequence Valve Adjustment


The holdback valve sets the relief pressure in the sequence valve which controls the pressure in the top portion of the telescopic feed cylinder. The sequence valve does not require adjustment, except when it is replaced or when the holdback valve is malfunctioning. 1. Remove adjustment cap on sequence valve and back off lock nut. Refer to Fig 5.7.1 (next page). 2. Turn adjustment screw all the way out, tighten lock nut, and reinstall adjustment cap. 3. Start drill to adjust holdback valve. Test equipment.

5.7 MISCELLANEOUS CONTROLS (08/03/25)

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Restriction Fittings Installed at both ports on the following valves: Optional Pipe Arm

Sequence Valve

Adjustment Cap Locknut

Fig 5.7.1 Miscellaneous Controls

5.8 OIL COOLER (08/03/25)

5-08-001

5.8 Oil Cooler


The oil cooler is a Shell and Tube type and requires periodic flushing.

PM Tasks
1000 Hour Intervals: Clean and flush 1. Check for leaks. 2. Use a mild concentrate of a suitable heat exchanger cleaner. 3. Flush with clean water from the water outlet port.

CAUTION! Drain the water when exposed to freezing conditions. Note: You must turn on the cooling water before drilling.

Fig 5.8.1 Oil Cooler

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5.9 PROPORTIONAL VALVES (08/03/25)

5-09-001

5.9 Proportional Valves


Proportional load-sensing type valves are used where variable flow is required. Refer to the Troubleshooting Section and Electrical Section when determining operating problems.

PM Tasks
Periodic maintenance is limited to external inspections. Overhauling the control valves includes replacing O-rings and seals, and setting the pressure and flow. See Section 5.9.1 Proportional Valve Settings for these specifications. If additional parts need servicing, it may be more economical to replace the individual valve sections. 1000 Hour Intervals: 2000 Hour Intervals: Visual inspection. Visual inspection. Operate controls to check for proper operation.

WARNING! After installing hydraulic components and hoses, check that hydraulic actuators are operating in direction as indicated on controls. CAUTION! Operating pressure in hydraulic pump must be set correctly before performing this adjustment. Improper Makeup & Breakout Speed may damage equipment or drill pipes.

All proportional valves are equipped with white/grey connectors. These instructions apply to proportional valves only.

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5.9.1 Proportional Valve Settings


Controls Tram, left Tram, right Rotation control Feed control Mast swing control Dump control Steering Valve Type Proportional Proportional Proportional Proportional Proportional Proportional Proportional Flow Rating 17.2 gpm (65 l) 17.2 gpm (65 l) 34.2 gpm (100 l) 26.4 gpm (100 l) 2.6 gpm (9.8 l) 2.6 gpm (9.8 l) 2.6 gpm (9.8 l) Pressure Setting Wide open Wide open (Note 1) Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Flow Setting Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open Wide open

Notes:

1. Forward pressure: 1400 psi (96.5 bar), Reverse pressure: 2800 psi (193.5 bar). Reverse pressure is much higher than forward pressure to allow for breaking of tool joints.

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5.9.2 Oil Flow Direction and Setting Max. Flow


Proportional valves are used in tram, rotation, and feed controls. Refer to Section 5.9.1 Proportional Valve Settings when adjusting flow in each valve section.

Fig 5.9.1 Flow Setting

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5.9.3 Pressure Setting


Refer to Fig 5.9.2 for pressure setting.

Fig 5.9.2 Pressure Setting

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5.9.4 Connections and Max. Tightening Torque


Refer to Fig 5.9.3 and the following table.

Fig 5.9.3

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6.0 DRILL AIR CIRCUIT (08/03/25)

6.0 DRILL AIR CIRCUIT

WARNING! Drain the Air System Before Servicing!

6.1 DRILL AIR CIRCUIT (08/03/25)

6-01-001

6.1 Drill Air Circuit


The drill air circuit mixes compressed air with water and rock oil or grease. Refer to the Parts Manual for compressor information.

PM Tasks
The air circuit requires limited maintenance but a schematic diagram is included for troubleshooting. 250 Hour Intervals: Inspect hose connection safety devices, all hoses

WARNING! Check that air hoses are in good condition and secured with hose connection safety devices. Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply, and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing.

6.1 DRILL AIR CIRCUIT (08/03/25)

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Fig 6.1.1 Air Schematic See the Appendix for a full-size schematic

6.2 WATER PUMP (08/03/25)

6-02-001

6.2 Water Pump


Driven by a hydraulic motor, the water pump is a positive displacement unit. It is equipped with a strainer/pressure regulator in the suction line and a relief valve mounted in the discharge line.

PM Tasks
Visual inspections and changing the crankcase oil are routine maintenance procedures. The hydraulic motor requires lubrication of the drive coupling but no periodic servicing is required. Service instructions are not included because replacing the motor is more economical than overhauling. 250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: 2000 Hour Intervals: WARNING! Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply, and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing. CAUTION! Keep parts separate or mark components to allow installation in original locations. Drain pump before exposing to freezing conditions. Technical Specifications: Volume: Discharge pressure: Speed: Crankcase Capacity: Lubricant Type: Weight: Pump Accessories: Relief Valve: Pressure Regulator: (Mine Water) 4 gpm (15 l/m) at 225 rpm 450 psi (31 bar) 225 rpm 40 fl. oz. (1.2 L) Esso NUTO 46 Hydraulic Oil 32 lbs. (14.5 kg.) 450 psi (31 bar) 50 psi (3.4 bar) Check pressure regulator/ strainer Change crankcase fluid Perform a pressure test

6.2 WATER PUMP (08/03/25)

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6.2.1 Pump Speed Adjustment


The pump has a direct drive propelled by a hydraulic motor. Using a tachometer, set the motor speed to 225 rpm by adjusting the hydraulic flow at the control valve. Follow the procedure outlined in Section 5 Valve Flow Adjustment.

6.2.2 Inlet Pressure Regulator


The inlet pressure regulator/ strainer is mounted on the left side of the hydraulic tank. Perform the adjustment every 2000 hours. WARNING! Disconnect mine air and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing. 1. Disconnect water supply. Remove strainer screen, clean and reinstall it. 2. Install pressure gauge between pressure regulator and solenoid valve. Reconnect water supply and adjust pressure to 50 psi (3.4 bar). 3. Disconnect water supply.

Fig 6.2.1 Water Pump

6.2 WATER PUMP (08/03/25)

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6.2.3 Dismantling of Valves


For servicing the valve, refer to Fig 6.2.1 WARNING! Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply, and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing. 1. Remove fasteners (53, 55) securing discharge manifold (52) to crankcase (2). 2. Tap discharge manifold from backside with soft mallet to separate it from crankcase. Repeat action until it breaks free from cylinders. 3. Valve assemblies will remain in manifold. With reverse pliers, remove valve seats (43). Valve (44), spring (45), and retainer (46) will then fall out when manifold is inverted.

6.2.4 Assembling of Valves


1. Replace retainers (46) in manifold chambers. 2. Insert spring (45) into center of retainers (46). 3. Inspect valves (44) and valve seats (43) for wear, ridges, or pitting and replace as necessary. 4. Insert valve over spring with recessed (dish) towards discharge manifold. 5. Examine O-ring (42) and back-up ring (66); replace if worn. Lubricate O-rings to avoiding damaging them. NOTE: First install O-ring in groove on seat (towards seating surface), then on back-ring. 6. Insert valve seats into manifold chambers. 7. Install manifold on pump and lubricate O-rings on cylinders. Be cautious when slipping manifold over cylinders to avoid damaging cylinder O-rings. 8. Install fasteners and torque to 217 in-lbs (24.5 N-m). NOTE: Reinstall all original shims. When new manifold is used, re-shim pump.

CAUTION! When starting pump, check to see that there is no cylinder motion as this would cause premature failure of cylinder O-rings. Motion of center cylinder must be eliminated by adjustment described later.

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6.2.5 Dismantling the Pumping Section


1. Remove discharge manifold as previously described. 2. Grasp cylinders (41) by hand and with up and down motion, pull cylinders from inlet manifold (31). Mark each cylinder to allow installation in original location. 3. Remove cotter pin (39), nut (38) and washer (37) from piston rod (21). 4. Remove retainer (36), spacer (35) and piston/cup assembly (34, 34A). Remove inlet valve (33).

6.2.6 Pump Assembly


1. Examine surface of inlet valve (33) for pitting or scaling. Reverse valve then sand inlet side of valve, using 240 grit emery cloth. Surface must be clean. Replace it if excessive wear is apparent. Slip it onto rod (21). 2. Examine seating surfaces on piston (34) and sand clean on flat surface using 240 grit emery cloth. Replace piston if extreme pitting or sharp edges are present. 3. Examine cup (34A) for wearing, cracking or separating from piston and replace as required. Lubricate it before installing on piston. NOTE: See parts manual for Cup Insert Tool. Lubricate tool before using. Push cup (34A) over insert tool and square with all surfaces. Faulty cup installation causes premature cup failure. Lubricate piston (34) and slip on rod (21). 4. Replace piston spacer (35) and retainer (36) on rod (21). 5. Replace washer (37) and cotter pin (39). Install nut (38) and torque to 60 in-lbs (6.8 N-m). 6. Examine cylinder walls for scoring or etching which would cause premature wear of cups. Replace them if worn. 7. Lubricate cylinder and replace O-ring and/or back-up ring if worn or damaged. Carefully slip cylinder over rod end and push into inlet manifold. Make sure cylinders are installed in their original positions. 8. Position discharge manifold on pump, install fasteners and torque to 217 in-lbs (24.5 N-m). CAUTION! Cylinder motion will cause premature failure of O-ring and cylinder seals. Check for cylinder motion immediately after the pump is started. If there is any motion noted in the center cylinder, switch it with one of the end cylinders and start the pump again. If there is motion noted in one of the end cylinders, correct it by removing one manifold shim, install the lock washers and nuts. Torque to 10 ft-lbs (13.6 N-m).

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6.2.7 Removing Sleeves and Seals


1. Remove discharge manifold (52) and piston assemblies as described previously. 2. Remove inlet manifold (31) containing seals. 3. Grasp sleeves (27), with pulling and twisting motion and remove sleeves from piston rod (21). NOTE: Remove sleeve with pliers only if replacing worn sleeves, as this procedure would mark sleeves. 4. Remove seal retainer (29). 5. Remove O-rings (26) and back-up rings (28) on piston rod then check them for wear. Replace them as required.

6.2.8 Installing Sleeves and Seals


1. Lubricate new O-rings and slip them on piston rod. Install first O-ring in groove on piston rod. Position back-up ring against shoulder in front of first O-ring. Then install second O-ring. Exercise caution as you slip O-ring over threaded end of piston rod. 2. Examine sleeves (27) for scoring or etching and replace as required. Immerse sleeves in oil and carefully twist and push sleeve on rod (machined counter bore end first). 3. Install seal retainers (29). 4. Place inlet manifold (31) on pair of clearance blocks with crankcase side down and drive out old seals (30). 5. Invert inlet manifold with crankcase side up and install new seals. Lubricate circumference of seal and install Perm-A-Lube seal with Garder spring down. 6. Lubricate seal insert tool and slip it on piston rod end, position inlet manifold on pump and remove tool. NOTE: Install original quantity of washers (48) on studs before installing inlet manifold (31). 7. Reassemble piston and discharge manifold as described earlier.

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6.2.9 Servicing the Crankcase


1. While inlet manifold, sleeves and seal retainers are removed, examine crankcase seals for wear. 2. Check oil for water content. 3. Rotate crankshaft by hand. Rotation must be smooth. 4. Examine crankshaft oil seal (14) for cracking or leaking. 5. Consult your supplier if the crankcase requires servicing. 6. Reassemble in reverse order. 7. Add hydraulic fluid Esso Nuto H46 or equivalent to level indicated on sight glass.

6.2.10 Pump Installation


Install pump on drill and attach hoses. Check the crank case oil. Adjust pump speed and suction pressure regulator as outlined in beginning of this module.

6.3 GREASE INJECTION (08/03/25)

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6.3 Grease Injection


The grease pump injects grease into the drilling air stream (see Fig 6.3.1). It is a pneumatically-operated unit that develops a fluid pressure of twenty five times higher than its air supply pressure.

PM Tasks
Keep grease tank, pump, injector, and valves clean. The grease tank is the main source where contamination may enter into the grease system. Drain and lubricate air supply. Replace damaged components immediately. Investigate all leaks. All maintenance should be performed in a clean, well-lit work area. Extreme cleanliness is required when servicing injecting system components. Fill up grease tank (1) periodically in order to avoid air trapped in the lines. Add grease every time the grease level drops below middle window sight. Every shift: 250 Hour Intervals: Check grease level in the tank (1), drain air filter (3), and check oil in air lubricator (4). Inspect system for leaks

The grease injection system settings are: - air pressure in the grease pump (2) by regulator (7). - cycle time (from 20 sec to 24 hr) controlled by the ERIS Panel or manual timer. - amount of grease injected in a cycle by adjusting the injector (6) to suit the drill hole size (see specifications below).

Rock Grease Pump Specifications

Pressure Ratio: Max Output: Air consumption at 100 psi:

25:1 fixed setting 2.15 cu.in. (35.2 cc)/cycle 0.5 CFM per stroke

Grease Injector Specifications

Operating Pressure:

Min Max

1000 psi 3500 psi 0.05 cu.in. (0.82 cc) 0.50 cu.in. (8.2 cc)

Output:

Min Max

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1 1. Solenoid Valve 2 2. Grease Injector 3. Air Lubricator 4 4. Air Filter 5. Regulator 5 3 6. Fill Cap 7. Breather Cap 8. Grease Tank 9. Grease Pump

Fig 6.3.1 Grease Injection System

6.3 GREASE INJECTION (08/03/25)


WARNING!

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Disconnect electrical power, mine air, water supply, and relieve pressure in air receiver before servicing.

6.3.1 To Fill Reservoir


Remove fill cap, fill with grease until level reaches top window sight. NOTE: When filling the reservoir, caution should be used not to contaminate reservoir.

6.3.2 To Prime System


Supply Lines: After grease tank has been filled with recommended lubricant, turn vent plug counterclockwise one complete turn and operate pump until lubricant flows freely from opening in vent plug to expel air pockets trapped. Tighten vent plug. Feeder Lines: Fill each feed line with lubricant before connecting lines to outlets. Injectors: Check injector for proper operation. Injector stem moves when injector discharges grease. This may require cycling system several times. After checking adjust injector for the volume required.

6.3.3 Operation
The pre-determined lubrication cycle frequency is set by the operator using a manual timer. When a lubrication cycle is initiated, the air solenoid valve is energized and air is admitted to the pump. Lubricant is delivered to the injectors and the injectors discharge lubricant to the drill air line. When air sol valve is de-energized, air is admitted to the opposite side of the pump air cylinder. As pump plunger returns to its retracted position, the lubricant pressure in the system is relieved, permitting the injectors to recharge. System is now ready for the next lubrication cycle.

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Adjustment Screw

Lock Nut

Bleed

Injector Body

Grease Outlet Grease Inlet

Fig 6.3.2 Adjusting Flow Rate


1. Output ON/OFF indicator (when output is ON orange, when output is OFF green) 2. ON-time display window and setting dial 3. Lock for ON-time setting dial 4. ON-time display window and selector (this sets the time scale) 5. Lock for ON-time scale selector 6. OFF-time display window and setting dial 7. Lock for OFF-time setting dial 8. OFF-time display window and selector (this sets the time scale) 9. Lock for OFF-time scale selector

2 4 6 8

1 3 5 7 9

Fig 6.3.3 Manual Timer

Fig 6.3.4

Fig 6.3.5

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6.3.4 Adjusting Flow Rate


The maximum setting (flow of grease) is achieved with the adjustment screw backed all the way out (counter clockwise). NOTE: Be careful not to over torque the adjustment screw. It should take minimal force to turn the screw clockwise. This will be the minimum injection setting.

Setting for a 4" Hammer:


To set the flow of grease for a 4" hammer, which is approximately 0.3 quarts of grease per hour, you must set the adjustment screw to 30 percent of maximum adjustment. 1. Loosen locknut (see Fig 5.8.4). 2. Turn adjustment screw in clockwise with a wrench until it stops (approximately 12-1/2 turns if the adjustment screw is backed all the way out). 3. Turn the adjustment screw counter-clockwise 4 turns. 4. Lock in setting on adjustment screw with locknut.

Setting for a 6" Hammer:


To set the flow of grease for a 6" hammer, which is approximately 0.7 quarts of grease per hour, you must set the adjustment screw to 70 percent of maximum adjustment. 1. Loosen locknut (see Fig 5.8.4). 2. Turn adjustment screw in clockwise with a wrench until it stops (approximately 12-1/2 turns if the adjustment screw is backed all the way out). 3. Turn the adjustment screw counter-clockwise 9 turns. 4. Lock in setting on adjustment screw with locknut.

6.3.5 24VDC Manual Timer


Refer to Fig 6.3.3 I/O Function Inputs ON-start operation begins when inputs are turned ON. Outputs Outputs are turned ON/OFF according to the time set by the ON-time and OFF-time setting dial.

6.3 GREASE INJECTION (08/03/25) 6.3.5.1 Basic Operation


Selector Settings

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The selectors can be turned clockwise and counterclockwise to select the desired time scale or operating mode. Each selector has a snap mechanism that secures the selector at a given position. Set the selector at a position at which it is secured. Do not set it midway between two secure positions, or a malfunction could result from improper setting. Settings for ON-Start/OFF-Start If voltage is applied to terminal B1, or if terminals A1 and B1 are shorted, the operating mode is switched to ON-start mode. If these terminals are disconnected, the mode switches to OFF-start mode. The operating mode will not change if the state of the applied voltage changes during timer operation. Selection of Time Scale Refer to Fig 6.3.4 The time scale is selected by turning the ON-time scale selector and OFF-time scale selector. The time scales will appear in the following order in each time scale display window on the left of the selector: 0.1 s, 1 h, 0.1 h, 1 m, 1 s, 0.1 h, 0.1m, 1 s. Time Setting Use the ON-/OFF-time setting dials to set the ON-/OFF time. Locking/Unlocking Selectors and the Time Setting Dial Refer to Fig 6.3.5 The ON-/OFF-time setting dials and time scale selectors can be locked using the Y92S-38 Lock Key, a special pen-type tool that is sold separately. To lock the dials or selectors, insert the Lock Key in the keyhole to the lower right of the dial or selector and turn it clockwise until the dial or selector is completely covered with the red cover. To unlock, turn the Lock Key in the opposite direction. The timer settings for either grease or oil are as follows: Oil Grease 8 seconds on (ON-time set to 8, Time scale set to 1 s) 12 seconds on (ON-time set to 2, Time scale set to 0.1 m) 6 seconds off (OFF-time set to 6, Time scale set to 1 s) 24 seconds off (OFF-time set to 4, Time scale set to 0.1 m)

6.4 FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM (08/03/25)

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6.4 Fire Suppression System


The fire system described is a suppression system only and is not designed or intended to extinguish all fires. It is extremely important that alternative firefighting equipment be available in case the system does not totally extinguish a fire. When a fire is detected, the A-101 system is actuated either manually or automatically, operating the pneumatic actuator. The pneumatic actuator ruptures a seal disc in the expellant gas cartridge. This, in turn, pressurizes and fluidizes the dry chemical extinguishing agent in the tank, ruptures the burst disc when the required pressure is reached, and propels the dry chemical through the network of distribution hose. The dry chemical is discharged through fixed nozzles and into the protected areas, suppressing the fire.

In Case of Fire
1. Shut down the drill and set the brakes immediately. 2. Pull the ring pin on the manual actuator and strike the red plunger button (see Fig 6.4.1). 3. Evacuate the vehicle. 4. Stand by with a hand portable fire extinguisher. Fig 6.4.1 Pull pin. Strike plunger. NOTE: Do not restart drill until drill has been repaired and fire suppression system has been recharged.

What to Expect
When an A-101 system discharges, there is considerable noise accompanied by clouds of dry chemical. While breathing foreign particles is not pleasant, the agent FORAY is non-toxic and exposure during a fire will not harm you.

After the Fire is Out


Machinery should not be restarted until it has been serviced and cleaned (water may be used to remove the dry chemical). IMMEDIATELY recharge the fire suppression system. You needed it once; you may need it again. CAUTION! Heat remaining from the fire could cause re-ignition after the system has discharged. Because of this, it is important that someone stand by, at a safe distance, with a hand portable extinguisher. This standby should be maintained until all possibility of re-ignition is past.

6.4 FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM (08/03/25)


Dry Chemical Agent Storage Tanks

6-04-002
Checkfire SC-N Control Module

Manual Actuator Detection Wire

Expellant Gas Cartridges

Manual Actuator

Detection Wire

Fig 6.4.2 System Components

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6.4.1 System Description


Refer to Fig 6.4.2. The basic system consists of the following components: Dry Chemical Agent Storage Tank(s) The agent storage tanks consist of a welded steel tank, gas tube, brass or aluminum fill cap, agent outlet sealed bursting disc assembly, and instruction nameplate. Expellant Gas Cartridge The expellant gas cartridge is a spun high pressure cartridge containing either carbon dioxide for temperature ranges of +32F to +120F (0C to +49C), or nitrogen for extreme temperature ranges of -65F to +210F (-54C to +99C). Manual/Automatic Actuator The manual actuator consists of an actuator body, a nitrogen cartridge, and a mounting bracket. When the manual actuator is operated by hand, gas supplied from the nitrogen cartridge is released into actuation hose. The nitrogen pressure then operates the pneumatic actuator that punctures a larger expellant gas cartridge (either carbon dioxide or nitrogen) and this fluidizes and propels the dry chemical from the agent storage tank. Automatic actuators (a component of the automatic detection system) operate the same way, except they can be operated automatically by the detection system. Automatic Detection System The automatic detection system in use on your drill is the Checkfire SC-N. The Checkfire SC-N Electric Detection and Actuation System consists of the following components: Control Module Manual/Automatic Actuator Mounting Bracket Detection Wire Thermal Detectors Pneumatic/Linear Detection Squib LT-5-R Cartridge Check Valve Remote High Level Alarm Squib Circuit Test Module

Distribution Hose and Nozzles Accessories

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Sounder

Battery

Alarm Power Detection

Release

Delay

Reset

Fig 6.4.3 Checkfire SC-N Control Module

Manual Actuator on ERIS Panel

Fig 6.4.4 Switch on ERIS Panel

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6.4.2 Checkfire SC-N Control Module


Front Panel Indicators
Battery Trouble (Yellow) LED pulses once every 10 seconds when indicating battery trouble. The yellow battery trouble LED will pulse when a low power condition is detected. If a power source is once connected and recognized, a subsequent loss of that power source will be recognized as a Battery Trouble condition. If a power source is once connected, recognized, and then disconnected, the disconnected supply can be ignored by operating the RESET button. Power Normal (Green) LED pulses once every 3 seconds when indicating normal power. The green Power Normal LED pulses on once every 3 seconds indicating power is normal. If the power drops below an acceptable level, the green Power LED will be extinguished Alarm (Red) The alarm LED will flash if an alarm condition exists. An alarm condition is caused by operation of the detection circuit or operation of the manual pull/pressure switch input circuit. The alarm condition will continue until the source of the alarm is removed and the control module is reset. Detection Circuit Activation Mode Upon receipt of an input to the detection circuit, the Alarm LED and the sounder will pulse at a rate of 2 times per second and will continue at this rate until the first time delay period has expired. After the first time delay, a second time delay mode is initiated. This causes the LED and sounder to pulse at a rate of 4 times per second. After discharge, the LED and sounder will continue to pulse at a rate of 4 times per second for 30 seconds. After that, it will switch to the trouble mode and pulse once every 10 seconds. Electric Manual Release Mode The first time delay mode will be by-passed and the LED will pulse at a rate of 4 pulses per second. After the first time delay setting is reached, it will pulse another 30 seconds at the same rate. After that, the control module will go into the post-discharge mode, at which time the Alarm LED and Release LED will pulse at a rate of one pulse per 10 seconds.

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Pressure Switch Circuit (Feedback) Activated Mode When this mode is actuated, the Alarm LED will pulse a minimum of 30 seconds at 4 pulses per second. The control module will then go into the postdischarge mode and the Alarm and Release LED will pulse at a rate of one pulse per 10 seconds. Release Trouble (Yellow) The yellow Release LED and the audio will pulse at a rate of once every 10 seconds when a trouble condition is detected in the release circuit. The control module will return to normal when the trouble condition is cleared. The Release trouble will also pulse after the system has completed a discharge cycle or a pressure switch feedback signal has been received. The trouble signal in this condition is used to indicate a recharge of the fire suppression system is necessary. A Release trouble under either of these conditions can only be cleared by resetting the control module. Detection Trouble (Yellow) The yellow Detection trouble LED and the audio pulse once every 10 seconds when the control module detects a trouble in the detection circuit. The control module will automatically return to normal when the trouble is cleared. Sounder (Audio) The sounder gives the audio indication for all alarm and trouble outputs. The sounder will pulse at the same rate as the visual corresponding LED> The sounder gives the audio indications of the various outputs. The sounder is rated at 85 Db at 10 feet. The pulse rates are as follows: Alarm Time Delay 1 2 pulses per second Alarm Time Delay 2 4 pulses per second Trouble 1 pulse per 10 seconds Loss of Power 1 pulse per 10 seconds Release Circuit Fired 4 pulses per second for 30 seconds, then 1 pulse per 10 seconds Low Battery 1 pulse per 10 seconds

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Front Panel Buttons


Delay Pushing the Delay button during the first time delay cycle will restart the time delay cycle. If the second time delay cycle has already started, the Delay button will have no effect. The Delay button can also be used to check the diagnostics function. By depressing the Delay button when the system is in the trouble condition, the LEDs will flash a pattern code. Each pattern code indicates a certain type of trouble. The code pattern is prioritized. The first trouble must be addressed before addressing the next one. Once the first trouble is taken care of, depressing the Delay button will cause the LEDs to indicate the code for the next trouble, if there is one. When the Delay button is pressed, three short audio and visual indicators will acknowledge the switch has been depressed properly. In a post-discharge condition, pressing the Delay button will silence the alarm relay if the alarm relay has been programmed to silence. Reset The Reset button is used to re-initialize the control panel. When depressed, it provides an indication that all LEDs and the sounder are functional. It is used to upload the manual programming into the control module. If trouble(s) have not been cleared, the trouble indication will reappear after the Reset button is pressed. When the Reset button is pressed, three short audio and visual indications will acknowledge the switch has been depressed properly. Battery Replacement While in use, the battery requires replacement every year or when the yellow Battery LED and sounder are pulsing. The shelf life of the battery is 8 years. Control Module contains a label for recording battery replacement date. Make certain used battery is disposed of properly.

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Manual Actuator

Automatic Actuation

Manual Actuator

Pressure Switch

Pneumatic Actuator/ Cartridge Receiver Safety Relief Valve

Expellant Gas Cartridge

Union Assembly

Dry Chemical Tank

Nozzle

Fig 6.4.5 System Operation

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6.4.3 How the System Operates


Refer to Fig 6.4.5 1. A fire starts in the protected area. 2.1. Manual Actuation The equipment operator pulls the ring pin and strikes the plunger on the manual actuator. Depressing the actuator plunger punctures the seal on the cartridge. The released pressure is transmitted to the pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver The pressure through the line triggers a pressure switch set to shut down the drill. A safety relief valve at the pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver prevents too high an actuation pressure build-up. The pressure drives a puncture pin through the seal in the expellant gas cartridge. This releases the expellant gas which is then transmitted to the dry chemical tank where it fluidizes the dry chemical before carrying it to the fire hazard. A bursting disc in the union assembly prevents the flow of dry chemical until sufficient pressure is built up within the dry chemical tank. When the proper pressure is reached, the disc breaks, allowing the gas/dry chemical mixture to flow to the nozzle(s) and discharge onto the hazard. 2.2. Automatic Detection and Actuation - Linear or spot detectors signal the system control module indicating that a fire has started in the protected area. The control module actuates the fire suppression system. Upon receiving an input signal from either a shorted detection, the control module will react as follows: a. The Alarm LED will flash, the sounder will pulse 2 times per second, and the shutdown time delay begins. This delay is intended to give the operator time to shut down and exit the vehicle. (The operator can repeat the shutdown time delay if the Delay button is depressed before the shutdown time delay has expired.) b. After the shutdown time delay has expired, the Alarm LED pulse rate and the sounder pulse rate will change to four times per second. The equipment will shut down and the discharge time delay begins. c. After the discharge time delay has expired, the control module release circuit operates, resulting in system discharge (same as when manually actuated). After system discharge, the Alarm LED and sounder will continue to pulse at 4 times per second for 30 seconds. After that, it will switch to the trouble mode and pulse once every 10 seconds. It will continue to pulse until the system has been recharged.

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6.4.4 Recharge Procedures


Recharging the Checkfire Detection and Actuation System
For continued protection, the Checkfire SC-N Detection and Actuation System and the fire suppression system must be recharged immediately after operation. Before performing the recharge steps, determine the cause of the system discharge. 1. Remove the 4 screws holding the cover to the back box and remove the cover. 2. Remove the battery from the back box. NOTE: If the system contains optional vehicle power, also disconnect the wire leads at the vehicle battery. 3. Remove the empty LT-5-R cartridge from the manual/electric actuator. 4. If the system was manually actuated skip steps 5, 6, and proceed to step 7. 5. If the system was automatically actuated unscrew the squib lead connector. Remove the squib from the manual/electric actuator. 6. Clean and lubricate the manual/automatic actuator by completing the following steps. NOTE: If the system was actuated manually and the squib was not actuated, cleaning is not necessary. a. Remove jam nut and slide actuator out of mounting bracket. b. Unscrew upper portion of actuator body. c. Using a pencil eraser, apply pressure to the bottom of the puncture pin. This will force the puncture pin and spring out of the actuator body. d. Thoroughly clean carbon deposits from base of stem, puncture pin, spring, and inside surface of actuator body. e. After all components are clean and dry, liberally lubricate o-rings with a good grade of extreme temperature silicone grease. f. Reassemble actuator, re-install into bracket, and securely tighten jam nut. g. Pull ring pin and push strike button several times to spread grease and ensure free movement of puncture pin. h. With strike button in the up position, insert ring pin through actuator body into puncture pin shaft. Install visual inspection seal. NOTE: When puncture pin is fully reset, cutting point of pin will be located approx. 1/16 (1.6 mm) below threads in lower actuator body. 7. In the case of a fire, replace all linear detection wire and spot detector cable. See Section III in the Checkfire SC-N Installation, Recharge, Inspection, and Maintenance Manual, located in Appendix C. 8. Recharge the fire suppression system in accordance with the section Recharging the A-101 Fire Suppression System (following).

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9. Test the system and place into service by completing the steps listed under Functional Test pages 19 and 20 in the Checkfire SC-N Installation, Recharge, Inspection, and Maintenance Manual, located in Appendix C. 10. Record date of recharge on a tag or in permanent record file. Notify operating personnel that the system is back in place.

Recharging the A-101 Fire Suppression System


1. Pull the ring on the safety relief valve to relieve actuation pressure. 2. Disconnect the actuation system hose at the cartridge receiver/actuator assembly. 3. Open the bursting disc union assembly. 4. Remove the dry chemical tank from its bracket. 5. Replace the ruptured bursting disc with a new disc. NOTE: The flat side of the disc must face the tank. Verify that the proper disc is being used by referring to the manufacturers manual in the Appendix for the correct part number. 6. Fill the tank to the rated capacity with Ansul FORAY dry chemical as specified on the nameplate. 7. Clean the fill opening threads and gasket, and the fill cap threads. Coat the gasket lightly with a good grade of high heat resistant grease. 8. Secure the fill cap, hand tighten. 9. Return the tank to its bracket and secure it. 10. Loosen the U-bolts on the expellant gas cartridge bracket or remove the cartridge guard. 11. Unscrew and remove the empty nitrogen cartridge. 12. Make certain that the puncture pin on the pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver is fully retracted. 13. Obtain a new expellant gas cartridge and verify the proper part number as in step 5. Weigh the new cartridge. The weight must be within ounce of the weight stamped on the cartridge. 14. Screw the fully charged expellant gas cartridge into the pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver, hand tighten. 15. Secure the expellant gas cartridge assembly in its proper position in the bracket with the cartridge retaining bolt(s) or return the cartridge guard. 16. Check all hoses and fittings for mechanical damage. Replace any hose that has been exposed to fire. 17. Check the nozzles for mechanical damage. Clean them and install blow-off caps or silicone grease.

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18. Pull up the button on the dashboard actuator and insert the ring pin. 19. Remove the spent cartridge. 20. Screw a fully charged cartridge into the remote actuator, hand tighten. Verify the part number as in step 5. 21. Connect the actuation system hose at the cartridge receiver/actuator assembly, wrench tighten. 22. Attach a lead and wire seal to the ring pin and actuation button or lever. 23. Notify operating personnel that the fire suppression system is back in service and record the date of recharge.

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6.4.5 Inspection and Maintenance


A-101 Fire Suppression Monthly
1. Note the general appearance of the system components for mechanical damage or corrosion. 2. Check the nameplate(s) for readability. 3. Remove the fill cap. 4. Make certain the tank is filled with free-flowing Ansul FORAY dry chemical to a level of not more than 3 inches from the bottom of the fill opening. 5. Secure the fill cap, hand tighten. 6. Remove the expellant gas cartridge and examine the disc the seal should be un-ruptured. 7. Return the cartridge to the pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver. Hand-tighten and secure in bracket. 8. Check hose, fittings, and nozzles for mechanical damage and cuts. 9. Check nozzle openings the slot on the F-1/2 nozzle should be closed (capped) with silicone grease or covered with a plastic blow-off cap. 10. Remove the cartridge from the manual actuator(s) and examine the disc the seal should be un-ruptured. 11. Return the cartridge to the manual actuator(s) assembly. Hand tighten. 12. Replace any broken or missing lead and wire seals and record the date of inspection.

Six Month Maintenance


1. Note the general appearance of the dry chemical tank for mechanical damage or corrosion. 2. Check the nameplate(s) for readability, corrosion, or looseness. 3. Remove the fill cap. 4. Examine the fill cap gaskets for elasticity clean and coat lightly with a good grade of high heat resistant grease. 5. Inspect the threads on the fill cap and in the fill opening for nicks, burrs, crossthreading, or rough or feathered edges. 6. Check the pressure relief vent in the fill opening threads for obstruction. 7. Make certain the tank is filled with free-flowing Ansul FORAY dry chemical to a level of not more than 3 inches from the bottom of the fill opening.

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8. Secure the fill cap, hand tighten. 9. Disengage the bursting disc union. 10. Examine the bursting disc. If necessary, move the tank slightly to view the disc. The bursting disc should be properly seated with the washer side facing out (smooth side in) and should be undamaged (smooth, not scored or ruptured). 11. Engage the bursting disc union (wrench tighten). 12. Be sure the dry chemical tank is firmly mounted in its bracket. 13. Loosen the bolts that restrain the cartridge or remove the extinguisher cartridge guard assembly. 14. Inspect the expellant gas cartridge assembly for evidence of mechanical damage or corrosion. 15. Unscrew the cartridge from the pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver and weigh it. Replace if its weight is not within ounce on A-101-10 models, ounce on the A-101-20/30 models of the weight stamped on the cartridge. 16. Inspect the threads on the cartridge and in the pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver for nicks, burrs, cross-threading, or rough or feathered edges. 17. Check the pressure vent in the pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver for obstruction. 18. Examine the cartridge receiver gasket for elasticity clean and coat lightly with a good grade of high heat resistant grease. 19. Return the cartridge pneumatic actuator/cartridge receiver. Hand tighten. 20. Check the hose, fittings, and nozzles for mechanical damage. 21. Check the nozzle openings - the slot should be closed (capped) with silicone grease or covered with a plastic blow-off cap. 22. Check the remote actuator - remove the cartridge and weigh it. Replace if its weight is not within ounce of the weight stamped on the cartridge. 23. Inspect the threads on the cartridge and in the actuator for nicks, burrs, crossthreading, or rough or feathered edges. 24. Check the pressure safety vent in the actuator body for obstruction. 25. Examine the actuator cartridge gasket for elasticity clean and coat lightly with a good grade of high heat resistant grease. 26. Pull the ring pin and operate the actuator button several times to check for free movement. 27. Seal the ring pin to the puncture lever with lead and wire seal. Return the cartridge to the remote actuator, hand tighten. 28. Record the date of maintenance.

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Checkfire SC-N Daily


The vehicle operator must check the system daily by visually verifying that the green Power LED is flashing and no other LED is illuminated. Also, no audio alarm should be sounding. If any other conditions exist, contact the local authorized Ansul distributor or whoever has been trained and authorized by Ansul to perform inspection and maintenance checks.

Six Month Maintenance


To give maximum assurance that the system will operate as intended, maintenance must be performed at 6 month intervals or sooner depending on the operating environment or maintenance schedule. Maintenance should be performed by an authorized Ansul distributor or someone who has been trained and authorized by Ansul to perform maintenance checks. See Inspection and Maintenance in the Checkfire SC-N Installation, Recharge, Inspection, and Maintenance Manual, located in Appendix C.

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6.5 SCREW BOOSTER COMPRESSOR (08/03/25)

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6.5 Screw Booster Compressor


Your new Cubex Booster is equipped with an on board, one stage, high pressure Sullair rotary screw compressor offering superior performance and reliability along with a minimal amount of maintenance requirements. Compared to other compressors, the Sullair is unique in mechanical reliability with virtually no wear or loss of performance. With Sullair compressors, no inspection is required of the working parts within the compressor unit. The package includes a compressor unit, cooling and lubricating system, air inlet system, compressor discharge system, capacity control system, and instruments.

PM Tasks
250 Hour Intervals: 1000 Hour Intervals: Complete 250 Hour Maintenance Schedule (Section 6.5.30) Complete 1000 Hour Maintenance Schedule (Section 6.5.30)

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Fig 6.5.1

Housing unit showing air cavities and rotor bearing

Fig 6.5.2

Fig 6.5.3 Rotors, Driving and Driven

Fig 6.5.4 End Housing

Fig 6.5.5 Housing with Rotors Installed

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6.5.1 Sullair Compressor Unit


Refer to Fig 6.5.1, Fig 6.5.2, Fig 6.5.3, Fig 6.5.4, and Fig 6.5.5

Functional Description
The compressor unit supplied with this booster is a one stage positive displacement, high pressure, flood lubricated type rotary screw air compressor, utilizing mine-supplied compressed air to act as a primary stage. The compressor unit utilizes two rotors to compress the incoming mine air. A driven male rotor drives a female rotor and, as they turn, compressed air is drawn into the unit through the inlet system where it is trapped in the grooves of the rotors and forced around to the discharge side of the case, recompressing it to obtain a higher pressure. The quantity of air can easily be controlled by regulating the amount of incoming air or by varying the speed at which the unit rotates. By changing gear sets we are able to use the same air end to give us different capacity units. NOTE: Each Sullair rotary screw compressor uses oil as a lubricant sealant and coolant medium (mineral or synthetic). Due to the many types of oil used in the marketplace, this manual will refer to oil as fluid. Fluid is injected into the compressor and mixes directly with the air as the rotors turn, compressing the air. The fluid has three main functions: 1. As a coolant, it controls the rise of air temperature normally associated with the heat of compression. 2. It seals the leakage paths between the rotors as well as between the rotors and stator. 3. It acts as a lubricating film between the rotors allowing the male rotor to directly drive the female rotor, which is an idler. After the air has been compressed, it is discharged in the form of an air/fluid mixture. This mixture is routed through the discharge system where the fluid is separated from the air. Then the air flows to the service line and the fluid is directed through the cooling and lubricating system in preparation for reinjection.

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Pressure Gauges and Shutdowns

Air Inlet Filter Assembly Air Inlet Valve

Control Circuits

Main Electrical Panel

Fig 6.5.6 Screw Booster Compressor Components (left side)

Running Blowdown Valve

Shutdown Blowdown Valve

See Fig 6.5.8 for details

Oil Fill Inlet for Receiver Tank Control Circuit Air Filter

Electric Motor Receiver Tank

Fig 6.5.7 Screw Booster Compressor Components (right side)

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6.5.2 Compressor Discharge System


Refer to Fig 6.5.6, Fig 6.5.7, Fig 6.5.8, and Fig 6.5.9

Functional Description
The Sullair compressor unit discharges a compressed air/fluid mixture into the sump. The discharge valve is located on the compressor unit at the end opposite the drive shaft. The discharge check valve prevents discharged air from returning from the compression chamber or sump on shutdown. From the discharge valve, the air/fluid mixture is directed to the sump. The sump has four basic functions: 1. It acts as a primary fluid separator. 2. It serves as the compressor fluid sump. 3. It houses the final fluid separator. 4. It serves as an air tank receiver. The compressed air/fluid mixture enters the sump and is directed against the end of the tank. By change of direction and reduction of velocity, larger droplets of fluid fall to the bottom of the sump. The fractional percentage of fluid remaining in the compressed air collects on the surface of the final separator element as the compressed air flows through the separator. As more and more fluid collects in the element surface, the fluid descends to the bottom of the separator. A return line (or scavenger tube) leads from the bottom of the separator element to the gear case of the compressor unit. Fluid collecting on the bottom of the separator unit is returned to the compressor gear case. An orifice (protected by a strainer) is included in this return line to assure proper flow. The sump is ASME code rated at 600 psi (2758 kPa) working pressure. A minimum pressure valve is located downstream from the separator to assure the required minimum receiver pressure during all conditions. This pressure is necessary for proper fluid circulation and air/fluid separation. The system is protected from excessively high sump pressures by a high-pressure shutdown switch (set at 440 psi), which will shut the compressor unit down. A second protection for high discharge pressure utilizes a 550 psi pressure relief valve, which is located on the wet side of the separator and is vented to atmosphere. Also, a High Compressor Discharge Temperature Shut Down (set at 240F) and High Receiver Temperature Shut Down (set at 220F) will shut the compressor unit down if the temperature exceeds the normal operating range.

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Fluid is added to the sump via a capped fluid filler opening placed low on the tank to prevent overfilling to the sump. A sight glass enables the operator to visually monitor the fluid sump level. The proper level is halfway of the sight glass when the unit is shut down. DO NOT OVERFILL. WARNING! DO NOT open the fluid filler cap when the compressor is pressurized. Shut down the compressor and bleed the sump to 0 psi before removing the cap. A hydraulically operated, 2-inch ball valve is used to open and close the discharge air when required.

Minimum Pressure Valve

High Receiver Temperature Switch

Separator Filter Restriction Indicator

Fig 6.5.8 Close up

Fig 6.5.9 Separator Element and Components

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6.5.3 Compressor Cooling and Lubrication System


Refer to Fig 6.5.10, Fig 6.5.11, and Fig 6.5.12 (next page)

Functional Description
The booster cooling and lubricating system is designed to provide adequate lubrication as well as maintain the proper operating temperature of the booster. In addition to a cooler and fan, the system consists of a main fluid filter, thermal valve, fluid stop valve, and pressure bypass valve. Fluid is used in the system as a coolant and a lubricant. The fluid is housed in a receiver/sump. Upon start-up, the temperature of the fluid is cool and routing to the fluid cooler is not necessary. The fluid, taking the path of least resistance, flows through the thermal valve to the compressor unit. The thermal valve has two entrance ports and two exit port. These ports are stamped on the thermal valve body indicating: A - From tank B - To cooler C - From cooler D - To compressor As previously stated, upon start-up the fluid temperature is cool and routing to the cooler is not required. The fluid first enters the thermal valve and then flows on to the compressor unit, bypassing the cooler. As the compressor continues to operate, the temperature of the fluid rises and Port A of the thermal valve begins to close. The closing of Port A forces a portion of the fluid through the fluid cooler. The cooler is a radiator type cooler that works in conjunction with the fan. The fan forces air through the cooler, removing the heat of compression from the fluid. From the cooler, the fluid is routed back to the thermal valve, entering at Port B. Before the temperature of the fluid becomes high enough that Port A is completely closed, cooled fluid at Port B is mixed with warmer fluid entering Port A. When the temperature of the fluid reaches 250F (121C), Port A is completely closed, causing all fluid to flow to the cooler. The pressure bypass valve insures a supply of fluid to the compressor during periods of excessive pressure drops across the cooler, which may occur in extremely cold weather. After the fluid passes through the thermal valve, it is then directed through the main fluid filter. There the fluid is filtered in preparation for injection into the compression chamber and bearings of the compressor unit.

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Fig 6.5.10 Fluid Stop Valve

Fig 6.5.11 Main Compressor Fluid Filter

Fig 6.5.12 Cooling and Lubrication

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The filter has a replaceable element and a built-in bypass valve, which allows the fluid to flow even when the element becomes plugged and requires changing, or when the viscosity of the fluid is too high for adequate flow. After the fluid is properly filtered, it lubricates, seals, and cools the compression chamber as well as lubricating the bearings and gears. The fluid stop valve is held open by a pressure signal from the compressor unit. At shutdown, the pressure signal is lost and the fluid stop valve closes, isolating the compressor unit from the cooling system. A Low Oil Pressure Shut-Off (set at 120 psi) will shut the compressor unit down in the event of low or no oil pressure. Another shutdown, the Oil Stop Signal Pressure Switch (set at 90 psi) will shut the compressor unit down in the event of a lost signal pressure to the oil stop valve.

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Fig 6.5.13 Gauges and Shutdowns

Ref. No. 1 2 3 4
2 3

Part No. N/A N/A CP18312-1 N/A

Description Fixing Kit Air Filter Housing Air Filter (inside housing) Auto Drain Fitting

2 3

Fig 6.5.14 Air Inlet Filter Assembly

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6.5.4 Air Inlet System


Refer to Fig 6.5.13 and Fig 6.5.14

Functional Description
The compressor inlet system consists of one mine air filter, a water separator, gauges to monitor filter condition and mine air, shutdown systems for low mine air and air filter restrictions, 3 ball valve, compressor air inlet valve, and interconnecting piping to the compressor. The air filters are dry element type filters capable of cleaning extremely dirty air and are equipped with an auto water discharge system plus an auto drain valve. Reading pressure\differential between incoming air and discharge air on the filter housing monitors air filter condition (differential should not exceed 5 psi). The compressor unit is protected from damage, caused by low mine air supply, with a low mine air shutdown switch. In the event of low mine air (60 psi) the compressor unit will shutdown after a twenty second delay. Also incorporated is a low compressor inlet shut off which will shut the compressor unit down after a twenty second delay. This shutdown will monitor restricted airflow through the air filters (20 psi differential). Shutdown on low mine air will require diagnosing and repair of mine air supply. Shutdown on low compressor inlet pressure will require the change of air filter elements. It would be advisable to verify the presence of the correct mine air pressure before assuming that the filters need replacement. This could happen in the event that the low mine air shutdown switch malfunctioned or was incorrectly set. NOTE: When checking mine air pressure, it is necessary to do so while the compressor is in operation. Static air pressure can significantly drop while making air.

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6.5.5 Compressor Lubrication Guide


The reliability of the unit is dependant upon the selection and maintenance of the lubricant. The ambient temperature, relative humidity, discharge pressure, and contamination levels must be considered in the lubrication selection. All lubrication oil(s) mentioned will be referred to as fluid.
Fluid Type Sullair AWF (I) D-A Torque Fluid SAE 10W SE, SF, SG, CD MIL-L-2104E 10W Change Period (hrs) 1200 300 300 300 Range F (C) -20 to 120 (-29 to 49) 10 to 110 (-12 to 43) 0 to 100 (-18 to 38) 0 to 100 (-18 to 38)

6.5.6 Application Guide


Water must be drained from the receiver periodically. In high ambient temperature and high humidity conditions, condensed moisture may emulsify with the oil forming a milky colour. ATF is especially prone to this condition. The fluid should be changed if this condition develops. WARNING! DO NOT mix different types of fluids. Combinations of different fluids may lead to operational problems such as foaming, filter plugging, and orifice or line plugging. When ambient conditions exceed those noted or if conditions warrant the use of other extended life lubricants, contact Cubex for recommendations. Cubex encourages the user to participate in a fluid analysis program. This could result in a fluid change interval differing from that stated in the manual.

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6.5.7 Purpose of Controls


Refer to Fig 6.5.15 next page

Control or Indicator Shutdown Blowdown Valve Running Blowdown Valve

Key # 27 26

Purpose Vents the receiver/sump pressure to the atmosphere at compressor shutdown. Vents excess receiver/sump pressure to the atmosphere when the receiver/sump exceeds the desired pressure during unload functions. N.C. (normally closed) valve that controls opening and closing of the running blowdown. Used to maintain the system in low pressure mode. Opens a pressure line between the receiver/sump tank, inlet control valve, and running blowdown allowing the inlet to regulate air delivery and opening the running blowdown to discharge excess air to the atmosphere. Set at 410 psi.

Low Air Pressure Solenoid Valve High Air Pressure Regulator

86

24B

Inlet Signal Pressure Regulator

24A

Opens a pressure line between the receiver/sump tank and inlet control valve, allowing the inlet control valve to regulate air delivery according to demand. Set at 400 psi.

Manual Unloader Valve

23

Used to change operational modes from high pressure to low pressure or vice-versa. The manual unloader valve is located with the compressor gauges and shutdown switches. N.C. valve that controls signal pressure to the Shutdown Blowdown Valve. During operation this valve is open, closing the shutdown blowdown valve allowing pressure to build.

Shutdown Blowdown Solenoid Valve

20

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Fig 6.5.15 Air Schematic

6.5 SCREW BOOSTER COMPRESSOR (08/03/25)


Signal Line Bleed Solenoid Signal Line Bleed Orifice 28B 21

6-05-015

Relieves air pressure from signal line circuit on shutdown. Used to relieve pressure when not required. It is also used to increase sensitivity of the circuit and bleed off any trapped moisture. Removes vaporized moisture, fluid, dirt, etc. in a filter medium where they are merged as droplets, which drop into the drain area. The drain is cleaned by opening a drain valve at the bottom of the canister. It is recommended that draining be done daily or even more frequently, under severe conditions. Indicator will read in the red zone indicating service of the separator element is required. Controls release of fluid during warm up. Cooler for removing heat from fluid generated by compression. Filters fluid prior to injection into the compressor. Cuts off flow of fluid to the compressor unit at compressor shutdown and allows flow of fluid to the compressor on start-up. Boosts the mine air. Used to close the inlet valve when the compressor unit is shut down and the mine air is left on. This prevents unwanted rollover of the compressor unit when not in use. Regulates the amount of air allowed to enter the unit. This regulation is determined by the amount of air being used at the service line. Cuts off the reverse flow of air/fluid mixture through the compressor discharge system at compressor shutdown. Contains a wire mesh filter to prevent contamination.

Control Line Moisture Separator

14

Separator Restriction Indicator Thermal Bypass Valve Oil Cooler Main Fluid Filter (Oil Filter) Oil Stop Valve

13 15 16 17 18

Air End Anti rollover Valve

6 28A

Intake Valve

Discharge Check Valve

Oil Return Strainer

33

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Fig 6.5.15 Air Schematic (repeated)

6.5 SCREW BOOSTER COMPRESSOR (08/03/25)


Scavenger Line Sight Glass 34

6-05-017

Used to indicate flow of fluid going back to the compressor unit from the fluid pickup in the receiver/sump tank. When the compressor is running at full load, fluid flow should be visible in this sight glass. There may be little or no flow when the compressor is running unloaded. A sluggish flow at full flow indicates a need to clean the fluid return line strainer and /or orifice. Maintains correct oil flow from scavenger line. Opens receiver/sump pressure to the atmosphere should pressure inside the receiver /sump tank exceed 575 psi. Located on wet side of tank. Acts as a fluid separator, sump, and air filter. Maintains required minimum pressure in the receiver/sump tank. This valve restricts the air discharge from the receiver/sump when the pressure falls below the minimum operating pressure. However, full flow is allowed at normal operating pressures. Monitors the fluid level in the receiver/sump. The sight glass is located on the side of the receiver/sump tank. The proper fluid level is halfway of the sight glass. DO NOT OVERFILL. Check the level when the compressor is shut down.

Scavenger Line Orifice Safety Valve

21 12

Receiver Tank Minimum Pressure Valve

11 31

Fluid Level Gauge

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Fig 6.5.16 Air Inlet Valve

Fig 6.5.17 Cross Section of Fig 6.5.16

Fig 6.5.18 Control Circuit

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6.5.8 Capacity Control System


Refer to Fig 6.5.16, Fig 6.5.17, and Fig 6.5.18

Functional Description
The purpose of the control system is to regulate the amount of air intake in accordance with the amount of air being used. The one stage hi pressure screw is designed to operate in one of two modes of operation, the lowpressure mode (approx. 200 psi) and the high-pressure mode (up to 410 psi). The Control System consists of an inlet control valve, running blow-down valve, shut down blow-down valve, shut down blow-down solenoid valve, low air pressure solenoid, manual selector, signal line bleed solenoid, orifice, signal line silencer and a blow-down silencer. Refer to Section 6.5.7 for a description of valves and functions. The position of the pressure selectors determines the pressure that the control system will respond to. The functional description of the control system is described in seven distinct phases of operation which (except for the start phase) apply to both high and low pressure modes. The inlet control valve is a normally closed valve. Signal pressure regulates the incoming air to control output flow of the compressor unit.

6.5 SCREW BOOSTER COMPRESSOR (08/03/25)


Running blowdown valve opens (normally closed)

6-05-020
Low air pressure solenoid valve opens (normally closed)

Shutdown blowdown valve closes (normally open)

Shutdown blowdown solenoid valve opens (normally closed)

Oil stop valve opens (normally closed) Signal line bleed solenoid closes (normally open)

Anti-rollover solenoid valve closes (normally open)

Fig 6.5.19 Compressor Start Up Mode / Running Mode Low Air Pressure

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6.5.9 Compressor Start Up Mode


Refer to Fig 6.5.19 The inlet system incorporates an N/C inlet valve, which opens when mine air pressure is applied to it. The opening and closing of the valve is controlled by a pilot signal from various valves in the system. To prevent the inlet from remaining open when the mine air is turned on and the compressor unit not running (causing the compressor to turn without lubrication) an N/C solenoid valve is installed between the mine airline and inlet valve signal line. This solenoid is protected from high air pressure by a one- way check valve. When the compressor unit is not running the valve is open allowing mine air to be applied to the piston side of the inlet valve, closing it. Upon start up the solenoid closes and turns off the signal to the valve, allowing the valve to open. NOTE: On shutdown, it is advisable to close the 3 inlet ball valve to prevent accidental compressor rollover. On start up, a series of events happens simultaneously to insure the correct start up of the compressor unit (with the manual unload valve in the load position). 1. The anti-rollover solenoid energizes, closing the N/O solenoid valve blocking mine air supply to the piston side of the inlet valve. This allows the inlet to open and the compressor begins to compress air. 2. The signal line bleed solenoid energizes, closing it to prevent the signal line from bleeding to atmosphere. An orifice is installed to relieve pressure when it is not required, also increasing sensitivity as well as bleed moisture from the system. 3. The shutdown blowdown solenoid valve opens, allowing signal pressure to both the oil stop valve and shutdown blowdown valve. The signal pressure opens the oil stop valve to allow oil to flow to the compressor unit (oil flow is accomplished because the air pressure in the receiver forces the oil into the oil system); also it closes the shutdown blowdown valve to stop air from exhausting from the receiver tank. 4. Receiver tank pressure builds and the minimum pressure valve located on the discharge of the receiver tank maintains a minimum pressure. This insures adequate oil flow. 5. The high - low solenoid valve opens (maintains open position for 2 mins.), applying a signal to the running blow down valve. The running blowdown valve opens and exhausts receiver pressure to the atmosphere; also a signal is sent to the inlet valve to partially close it. A modulating effect occurs at this time until the system balances, where the amount of air being exhausted is the same as the inlet is allowing into the compressor unit. This is the maintained low pressure (approx. 200 psi). 6. The 2 discharge valve is closed.

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6.5.10 Running Mode Low Air Pressure


Refer to Fig 6.5.20 After 2 minutes, the system is now fully functional. The running mode is the same as the start up mode except that the high - low selector now becomes operational. The drill air on/off switch controls this. Hole collaring is achieved by using the collar air function on the driller station. When operated, the 2 ball valve opens and the high - low solenoid remains energized, maintaining low pressure while collaring the hole. NOTE: Before switching the unit to high air pressure, the collar air function must be turned to the off position.

Running blowdown valve opens (normally closed)

Low air pressure solenoid valve opens (normally closed)

Shutdown blowdown valve closes (normally open)

Shutdown blowdown solenoid valve opens (normally closed)

Oil stop valve opens (normally closed)

Signal line bleed solenoid closes (normally open) Anti-rollover solenoid valve closes (normally open)

Fig 6.5.20 Compressor Start Up Mode / Running Mode Low Air Pressure

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6.5.11 Manual Unload Low Mode


Refer to Fig 6.5.21 The system can be manually unloaded to run in the low air pressure mode. When the manual unload valve is turned, a signal is sent to open the running blowdown valve and close the inlet control valve.

Running blowdown valve opens (normally closed)

Low air pressure solenoid valve closes

Manual unload valve opened

Intake control valve modulating

Fig 6.5.21 Manual Unload Low Mode

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6.5.12 Drilling Mode High Air Pressure


Refer to Fig 6.5.22 When drill air is selected, the high - low selector now de-energizes and closes, and the 2 ball valve opens, allowing air to the hammer. At this time, the pilot signal to the running blowdown valve and inlet valve is lost. The receiver tank is no longer vented to atmosphere and the inlet valve opens, allowing the compressor to work to maximum. Because the compressor is capable of producing more air than is required, the pressure builds in the system.

Low air pressure solenoid valve opens (normally closed)

Shutdown blowdown valve closes (normally open)

Shutdown blowdown solenoid valve opens (normally closed)

Oil stop valve opens (normally closed)

Anti-rollover solenoid valve closes (normally open)

Signal line bleed solenoid closes (normally open)

Fig 6.5.22 Drilling Mode High Air Pressure

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6.5.13 Drilling Mode High Air Pressure Unloaded Position


Refer to Fig 6.5.23 Once the pressure reaches 400 psi, the Inlet Signal Pressure Regulator opens, sending a pilot signal to the inlet to close it. The valve will modulate open and closed to maintain system pressure. If the pressure continues to build, the High Air Pressure Regulator set to 410 psi opens, sending a signal to both the inlet valve and running blowdown valve. This opens the running blowdown valve to allow excessive air to vent to atmosphere to aid in control of the system.

High air pressure regulator reaches 410 psi

Regulator opens when system pressure reaches 400 psi

Fig 6.5.23 Drilling Mode High Air Pressure Unloaded Position

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6.5.14 Shutdown Mode


Refer to Fig 6.5.24 On shutdown, the high - low solenoid is energized, opening the running blowdown valve and supplying a signal to close the inlet valve. The system is held in low mode for 2 minutes to allow the system to stabilize and the separator to clear itself of excessive oil.

Running blowdown valve opens (normally closed) Shutdown blowdown valve closes (normally open)

Low air pressure solenoid valve opens (normally closed)

Shutdown blowdown solenoid valve opens (normally closed)

Oil stop valve opens (normally closed)

Signal line bleed solenoid closes (normally open) Anti-rollover solenoid valve closes (normally open)

Fig 6.5.24 Shutdown Mode

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6.5.15 Shutdown Mode after 2 Minutes


Refer to Fig 6.5.25 After 2 minutes has elapsed, the compressor unit shuts down; at this time all the solenoids de-energize. The shutdown blowdown solenoid closes, removing the pilot signal from the shutdown blowdown valve allowing it to open and drain the receiver tank to atmosphere. The signal line bleed solenoid opens, draining any residual signal line pressure to atmosphere. The low air pressure solenoid closes, allowing the running blowdown to close and removing the signal from the inlet valve. Also the anti-rollover solenoid opens to allow mine air to close the inlet valve to prevent compressor rotation.

Shutdown blowdown valve opens and bleeds off the receiver tank.

Anti-rollover solenoid valve opens, sending a signal to the intake valve, closing it.

Fig 6.5.25 Shutdown Mode After 2 Minutes

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Fig 6.5.26 Main Electrical Panel

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6.5.16 Instrumentation and Protection


Refer to Fig 6.5.26 and Fig 6.5.27 There is a comprehensive instrumentation and protection group on this unit to protect both the operator and unit. This package includes visual aids, shutdown protection devices, visual alarms, and audio alarms. The instrumentation group is controlled by a PLC with a display to allow for visual verification of the operating pressures and temperatures of various systems incorporated into the compressor unit. These would include the following: Receiver and Discharge temperatures The Oil, Receiver, Separator Differential and Inlet/ Mine Differential Pressures The Blowdown Valve Status - This should show ON during the first minute of start-up and shutdown. The PLC Battery Status - This should show OK at all times. If it shows FLT, the PLC battery must be replaced.

The PLC battery part # LS14250 should be replaced regularly to avoid loss of data. Please see the following page for instructions on replacing the battery. There are shutdowns incorporated in order to protect the unit and personnel from damage and / or injury. These shutdowns will shut the compressor unit down in the event that any of the systems operate out of their designed parameters. Also, whenever a shutdown is activated, a visual beacon (an indicator light to identify the system) and an audio alarm will be set off to notify the operator that there is a system problem. Low inlet pressure shutdown set at 60 psi. Low oil pressure set at 120 psi. High receiver pressure set at 440 psi - immediate shutdown. High discharge temperature set at 240F - immediate shutdown. High receiver temperature set at 220 F - immediate shutdown. Motor overload (located in the electrical panel) Phase reversal (located in the electrical panel) Mine air filter pressure differential switch set to 20 psi Separator filter pressure differential switch set to 10 psi Oil stop signal pressure switch set to 90 psi

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When an alarm occurs, the horn will sound and a warning light on the indicator panel will light. The operator can push the Silence button to silence the horn. This action will also turn off the warning light if the alarm conditions have been cleared. If the warning light remains on after the silence button has been pushed, an error condition is still present. Investigate the error condition and correct any problems. Press the Lamp Test/Reset button. If the error condition has been cleared, the warning light will go off.

Fig 6.5.27 Indicator Panel

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Fig 6.5.28 Pressure Selector and Gauge Panel

Fig 6.5.29 Main Electrical Panel

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Air Inlet

Water Inlet

Fig 6.5.30 Mine Air Inlet and Water Inlet Valve

Fig 6.5.31 close up

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6.5.17 Start Up and Shutdown Procedures


Refer to Fig 6.5.28, Fig 6.5.29, and Fig 6.5.30

6.5.17.1 Start Up
1. Check that the pressure selector is in Load mode (see Fig 6.5.28). 2. Connect discharge to drill and install the hose connection safety device (adhere to site specific requirements) (see Fig 6.5.30). 3. Connect the mine air supply and install the hose connection safety device (adhere to site specific requirements). Then open the mine air valve (see Fig 6.5.30). 4. Ensure that discharge valve is closed. 5. Push start button. Unit will operate in low air mode for approximately 1 minute (see Fig 6.5.29). 6. Open discharge valve to drill. WARNING! When working on booster, ensure mine air connection is disconnected, the electrical power is disconnected, and the air receiver is completely drained.

6.5.17.2 Shutdown
1. Close discharge valve. 2. Push system stop button on main control panel (see Fig 6.5.29). CAUTION! Do not use emergency stop button for routine shutdown. 3. Unit will continue to run in low pressure mode for approximately 1 minute. 4. Close mine air supply once compressor has stopped. 5. Drain moisture from pre-filter.

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Fig 6.5.32 Pressure Regulator

Ref. No. 1 2 3

Part No. CX003172 CX003174 CX003175

Description Seal Kit 200-600 psi Spring Spring Buffer

Fig 6.5.33

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6.5.18 Adjustment Procedure


Refer to Fig 6.5.32 and Fig 6.5.33 This unit only requires the adjustment of 2 valves on setup. They are the High air pressure regulator (set at 410 psi) and the Inlet signal pressure regulator (set at 410 psi). The adjustment of these regulators is best done while drilling but can be preset in the shop. In order to check the operating pressures of the compressor unit while in the shop, it will be necessary disable the service valve, keeping it closed so that the compressor will build pressure (when the drill air switch is turned on, the unit switches to high mode and opens the service valve, allowing all the air out of the top drive). Start the unit and wait 2 minutes for the system to enter the running mode. Turn the manual unloader to low position and then move the drill air switch to the on position. Switch the manual unloader to high position and check the system pressure (should be 400 psi). In order to verify the opening pressure of the High air pressure regulator, the Inlet signal pressure regulator will have to be adjusted upwards by turning the screw in clockwise. Turn the screw in until the pressure quits rising. This is the set pressure of the High pressure regulator. If it is not correct, adjust it in the same manner as the inlet signal pressure regulator. Once completed, readjust the Inlet signal pressure regulator until the system maintains 410 psi.

Set pressures to: Inlet signal pressure High air pressure 410 psi 410 psi

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6.5.19 Main Fluid Filter (Oil Filter)


The main fluid filter is located schematically in the coolant line between the receiver/sump and the compressor unit. The full flow filter element is replaceable. For installation of filter element, follow the procedure explained below. 1. The compressor must be shut off and the compressor unit must be relieved of any pressure. 2. Rotate the filter bowl counter clockwise and remove. 3. Remove the element and discard it. These elements are not cleanable. 4. Clean the housing and filter head. 5. Apply a small amount of oil or grease to the new head seal and install it into the filter head, making sure it is seated. 6. Place the new element into the head, making sure it is properly seated. 7. Replace the bowl turning it clockwise and hand tightening.

Fig 6.5.34 Main Fluid Filter

Fig 6.5.35

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6.5.20 Thermal Bypass Valve Maintenance


When repairing the thermal bypass valve, use repair kit 250016-721 and follow the repair procedure explained below. 1. With the valve removed from the fluid system, remove the four cap screws, holding the lower body to the valve body. 2. Remove the o-ring sitting in the lower body and discard. 3. Remove the element and the quad ring inside the housing and discard. NOTE: there will be slight resistance from the quad/seal ring centered in the lower housing. 4. Turn the valve over and remove the hex plug. Remove this plug slowly as it is under spring pressure. 5. Remove the spring, sleeve, and bypass piston. 6. Clean the valve parts thoroughly before reassembly. 7. Install the bypass piston, new spring, and sleeve into the valve. 8. Install and tighten the new o-ring plug. 9. Coat the new quad ring with quality silicone grease. Install the new quad ring. 10. Install the new element into the housing. 11. Coat the new o-ring with quality silicone grease and install in the lower body. 12. Install the adaptor housing and tighten the four capscrews. 13. Install the four new o-rings on the hose flanges (o-ring P/N 826502-228 or flange kit P/N 250016-435). 14. Install the valve and check for leaks.

Fig 6.5.36 Thermal /Bypass Valve

Fig 6.5.37

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6.5.21 Separator Element Replacement


Refer to Fig 6.5.38, Fig 6.5.39, Fig 6.5.40, and Fig 6.5.41 (next page) When the need for a separator element replacement is indicated by the maintenance indicator (located on the air receiver/separator tank), use the following procedure. 1. Remove the air/receiver tank lid by removing the twelve hex head capscrews. NOTE: To assist with the removal of the tank lid, a 1x 8 nut has been welded to the lid so an eye bolt can be inserted. 2. Remove the x 10 jam nut and sealing hex nut from the separator hold down rod. 3. Remove the round separator cover plate from the top of the separator element. 4. Remove the upper grounding spring. A new one is supplied with the new filter element kit. 5. Remove the old separator element and discard. 6. Replace the lower grounding spring at the lower end of the retaining rod. A new one is supplied with the new filter element kit. 7. Remove the old gasket from the receiver tank lid and clean all sealing surfaces, taking care not to allow scrapings to fall into the tank. 8. Before installing the new separator element, make sure to lubricate both sides of the sealing O-ring on the element. 9. Install the new separator element and upper spring. 10. Install the cover plate, the new x 10 sealing hex nut and the x 10 jam nut. Torque the sealing nut to 85 90 ft-lbs (115 122 N-m). DO NOT over-tighten as damage to the separator can result. 11. Install the new tank flange gasket that is provided in the element kit. NOTE: Be sure not to remove the staples from the gasket as they provide a ground between the cap and the top of the tank. Before installing, lubricate both sides of the gasket. Re-install the tank lid. Install the capscrews finger tight, and then gradually tighten in a crisscross pattern in 4 5 steps. Always tighten the capscrews alternately at opposite sides of the cover. Torque capscrews to 500 ft-lbs (678 N-m). 12. Clean or replace the fluid return line strainer. 13. Clean the fluid line orifice installed in the side of the compressor unit air end. 14. After 24 hours of operation, re-torque the sump cover bolts to 500 ft-lbs (678 Nm).

6.5 SCREW BOOSTER COMPRESSOR (08/03/25)


Separator retaining bolt connected to receiver tank, creating a direct ground.

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Lower spring ensures a constant contact/ground between the element and the tank.

Retaining Plate Nut Grounding of separator is through center stud.

Fig 6.2.26 Fig 6.2.27


Separator Retaining Plate Upper spring ensures a constant contact/ground between the retaining plate and the strap.

Scavenger line to remove excess buildup between the separator and receiver tank.

The strap provides a direct connection to the separator element to carry the ground through the spring and retaining plate.

Fig 6.2.28

Fig 6.2.29

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6.5.22 Running Blowdown Valve Maintenance


Refer to Fig 6.5.42 When it is necessary to make repairs on the running blowdown valve, follow the instructions provided below: 1. Remove the hex nut from the bottom of the valve. The poppet guide which is secured by the hex nut is under slight spring tension. 2. Remove the poppet guide, poppet assembly and spring from the valve body. 3. Remove and discard the old o-ring and replace it with the new o-ring provided in the kit. Be sure to lubricate the o-ring with a silicone-based lubricant. 4. Place the new spring and poppet assembly in the valve body as shown. Then place the poppet guide (with the o-ring in position) over the poppet assembly. 5. Push the hex nut down over the poppet guide and compress the spring while turning the hex nut until tight. Tighten securely with a wrench. 6. Remove the pilot cap from the top of the valve body and pull the piston out of the cap. 7. Remove the U-cup from the piston and replace it with a new one. The U-cup should be lubricated with a silicone-based lubricant. 8. Remove the gland nut from the valve body and pull the poppet pin out to allow access to the small o-ring in the top of the body. 9. Remove the small o-ring and replace it with a new one. Lubricate with a siliconebased grease. 10. Replace the poppet pin and gland nut. 11. Place the piston with the new U-cup in position back in the pilot cap with the recessed centre showing at the valve body end of the cap. 12. Replace the pilot cap and tighten securely with a wrench. At this time the running blowdown valve is ready for operation.

Shutdown Blowdown Valve

Running Blowdown Valve

Fig 6.5.42 Running Blowdown Valve

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6.5.23 Minimum Pressure/Check Valve Maintenance


The minimum pressure/check valve should be periodically disassembled, inspected for excessive wear, and cleaned or reassembled. 1. Remove the six capscrews in the cover. 2. Remove the cover, taking care not to damage the gasket. 3. Remove the piston assembly. 4. Clean and inspect parts. Any excessively worn parts should be replaced. 5. Grease the piston and pack the grooves with a quality silicone grease. 6. Replace the piston assembly. 7. Replace the cover and gasket. 8. Apply locking compound to the capscrews. Replace and torque to 80 ft-lbs (108 Nm).

Minimum Pressure Valve

Fig 6.5.43 Minimum Pressure/Check Valve

Fig 6.5.44

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6.5.24 Discharge Check Valve Maintenance


When servicing of the valve is required follow this procedure: 1. Remove the six capscrews from the valve body cover and remove the cover/shaft assembly. 2. Remove the gasket and spring from the valve body. 3. Remove disc/bearing assembly from the valve body. 4. Clean cover and valve body gasket surfaces. 5. Install new disc/bearing assembly into the valve housing. 6. Place the spring into the disc/bearing assembly. 7. Place the gasket on the valve body. 8. Install the cover/shaft assembly centering the shaft into the spring. 9. Install the six cover capscrews and torque to 80 ft-lbs (108 N-m).

Fig 6.5.45 Discharge Check Valve

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6.5.25 Safety Valve


The safety valve is a non-serviceable item and must be replaced if it fails. If replacement is necessary, follow these instructions. 1. Remove the failed unit and replace with new. 2. Apply a small amount of pipe dope to the male threads only of new safety valve. 3. Tighten by hand, then tighten not more than one extra turn using a wrench on the inlet hex nut. During services, it is recommended that the safety valve be cracked open to ensure that it is still functional. If the witness wire has been broken, the safety valve must be replaced. Check the pressure ratings on the safety valve as both a 550 psi and a 575 psi valve are available. WARNING! Disconnect the mine air supply and drain the receiver tank before removing the safety valve.

Fig 6.5.46 Safety Valve

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6.5.26 Pressure Regulator (Control Inlet Signal Pressure/High Air Pressure Regulator)
Maintenance on the regulator valves comprises of replacing the diaphragm and spring units inside of the regulator. When replacement is necessary, insure that the regulator is in the direction of flow as indicated on the body of the unit.

Fig 6.5.47 Pressure Regulator (Control Inlet Signal Pressure/High Air Pressure Regulator)

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Fig 6.5.48

Fig 6.5.49

Fig 6.5.50

Fig 6.5.51

Fig 6.5.52

Fig 6.5.53

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6.5.27 Inlet Valve Maintenance


Refer to Fig 6.5.48, Fig 6.5.49, Fig 6.5.50, Fig 6.5.51, Fig 6.5.52, and Fig 6.5.53 When servicing the inlet valve it will be necessary to remove it from the compressor unit. After removal follow these procedures: 1. Remove the bolts from the threaded flange (mine air inlet) and remove the flange. The disc and spring can then be removed. 2. Remove bolts from the signal flange and remove flange. Push piston and rod assembly out of the unit and remove the spring. 3. Disassemble the rod and piston assembly by removing the locknut and pulling the piston off. Remove the seal from the piston and the o-ring from the shaft. 4. Remove both seals from the brass guide assembly in the main housing. If removal of the guide is necessary it will need to be pressed out. 5. Inspect the parts and clean before reassembly.

6.5.27.1 Reassembly of the inlet valve


1. Install rod seals (CP7022-2) into the brass guide (CM70024), with the seal lips facing out on both ends. Install retaining compound, Green Loctite, on the guide and install in the main body. 2. Install the o-ring (CP70022-3) on the shaft (CM70025) then install the piston on the shaft and secure with the locking nut, torque it to 70 ft-lbs. Place the seal on the piston with the lip facing out. 3. Lubricate all the seals and surface areas with a quality lubricant. Place the spring (CM70028) over the piston shaft and insert the shaft into the bore. 4. Install the signal flange using a small amount of sealant, such as Loctite 515, on the mating surfaces. Put Blue Loctite on the 3/8 bolts, quantity 4, and torque to 30 ft-lbs. 5. Install the second spring (CM70028) on the shaft in the air inlet side of the valve. Slide the disc (CM70023) over the shaft, with the chamfer facing out. Place a small amount of sealer, Loctite 515, on the mating surface of the threaded flange and install. Install 6 of the 3/8 bolts using Blue Loctite and torque to 30 ft-lbs. 6. Install breather and 1/8 pipe plug.

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6.5.28 Screw Booster Compressor

Fig 6.5.54 Screw Booster Compressor

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6.5.29 Operator Daily Checklist


Screw Booster Operator Daily Checklist
Cubex Serial Number: Operator Name: Foreman: Set Up location: Date: Hour meter reading start of shift: Hour meter reading end of shift:

NOTE: If any of the following checks are No, DO NOT RUN UNIT. Pre-start Inspection Has the first air inlet filter been flushed? Has the auto drain on the second air inlet filter been checked? Is oil visible in receiver/sump tank glass? Is the compressor free from oil leaks? Are the oil cooler and fan clean? Are safety slings in place? Are the bull hoses in good condition? Has the mine air been blown down before connecting bull hose? Has the signal filter been drained? Has the safety relief valve on the receiver/sump tank been checked? Are the fire extinguishers in place and accessible? Has the general condition of the compressor been checked? Operating Inspection Do all the following checks and readings under full load and air flow. Has the unit been checked for oil leaks? Has the unit been checked for air leaks? Air Discharge Pressure Comments: YES NO

YES

NO

psi

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6.5.30 Maintenance Schedules


250 Hour Maintenance Schedule
1. Complete Screw Booster Operator Daily Checklist. 2. Check Inlet Air Filters Check functioning of bottom ball valve. Clean if necessary. Check functioning of auto-drain. Clean if necessary. Check and clean filter elements. Replace elements if pressure differential across inlet filters is higher than 10 psi.

3. Replace oil filter element. 4. Check separator element. 5. Check and clean control line moisture separator element. 6. Check oil level. Top up if necessary and record amount added

1000 Hour Maintenance Schedule


1. Complete Screw Booster Operator Daily Checklist. 2. Check all solenoid valves for operation. 3. Check safety shutdown system, sensors, and switches. 4. Check electrical panel. 5. Grease electric motor (lithium based grease). 6. Inspect air inlet valve. Replace seals. Grease housing and shaft when re-. 7. Check air inlet filters Check functioning of bottom ball valve. Clean if necessary. Check functioning of auto-drain. Clean if necessary. Check and clean filter elements. Replace elements if pressure differential across inlet filters is higher than 10 psi.

8. Replace oil filter element. 9. Replace separator element. 10. Inspect and clean pressure regulator valves. 11. Replace control line moisture separator element. 12. Drain and clean receiver/sump tank. 13. Replace oil. Oil capacity of the receiver/sump tank is 35 US gallons (132 litres).

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7.0 ELECTRICAL (08/03/25)

7.0 ELECTRICAL

WARNING! Servicing the Control Panel is for Qualified Electrical Technicians ONLY!

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7.1 Electrical Circuits


Wiring Diagrams are located in Section 8 of the Parts Manual. The main Electrical General Arrangement is located in the back of this manual.

PM Tasks
Preventative maintenance includes cleaning and inspecting of the electrical components. Consult the Parts Manual for complete parts description. Label wires before dismantling any equipment. Service Intervals: See Section 8 Electrical Components in the Parts Manual

WARNING! Danger! The main control panel is high voltage. Confirm voltage before servicing. The maintenance procedures are for qualified electricians only.

Circuit Voltages:

Main Circuit: Motor Control: Valve Control:

See electrical drawings 120 volts, single phase 24 volts, DC

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Fig 7.1.1 ERIS Control Panel

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7.1.1 ERIS Control Panel


The ERIS Machine Operator Interface is a PC based system comprising of a unique custom designed enclosure, hardened mobile computer, joysticks, USB (Universal Serial Bus) interface, power supplies for the computer and necessary software. The computer is connected to the joysticks through a USB interface. There is also a data port located on the upper left hand side of the enclosure that is connected to the computer through a USB connection. The port can be used for downloading software or for uploading data as required. The data port is protected by a threaded plug and to access the port, this plug must be removed. The procedure for communicating with the computer through the external port is described later. The computer communicates to the main machine PLC over Ethernet. The connection is made at internal computer and passed through a plug at the back of the panel.

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Fig 7.1.2 Wiring Diagram

Fig 7.1.3 Parts (see Parts Manual for details)

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7.1.2 Communication with the ERIS Console


There will be instances where a technician will need to connect to the ERIS console. A few of these instances may be: To install a newer or different version of the ERIS software. To configure the Joysticks. To verify the console is communicating with the PLC. Verify computer settings.

To allow a technician to communicate with the ERIS console, there is a threaded plug in the top left corner of the panel. When this plug is removed, it reveals a USB connection. In order to communicate with the internal CPU in the ERIS panel without disassembling the console, what is needed is a USB keyboard. The keyboard can be plugged into the external USB port and the keyboard then can take over control of the computer. NOTE: It is recommended that a special keyboard and flashdrive should be used for this purpose that has been tested for compatibility to ensure reliable connectivity through the USB port. This is available through your local dealer under the following Cubex part numbers: CP000272 USB keyboard with pointing device and two USB ports. CP000271 512MB USB flashdrive.

7.1.2.1 Communication with the ERIS Console from the External USB Connection
The ERIS console must be powered up. 1. Plug the USB keyboard into the external USB port on the console. 2. If the console is in the control mode with the GUI (Graphical User Interface) showing on the monitor, hit Escape on the keyboard. This should bring the display to a Windows environment. At this point, the joysticks can be calibrated and/or new code (software) can be loaded.

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7.1.3 Checking the Joysticks


In general, the joysticks should not need calibrating, even when they come from the factory. However, optimum gain characteristics (the distance the joystick moves vs. the amount of output signal) may only be achievable through the process of making certain the joysticks are properly calibrated. The process of checking the joysticks is as follows: 1. Click on the Start button in Windows, then to Control Panel, then Game Controllers. The following screen will display:

Fig 7.1.4 This screen identifies that the A/D (analog to digital) Controller is communicating with the computer.

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2. Next click on Properties. The following screen will appear.

Fig 7.1.5 3. The buttons on the joysticks can then be checked for communication with the computer. Press each button in turn, one at a time. When pressing a button on the joystick, the corresponding button on the screen (see Fig 7.1.5) will light up. The light number 13 will show as being constantly on. This light represents the tilt switch that is built into the PCB (printed circuit board). If the ERIS panel is tilted, this light should go out. Fig 7.1.6 reflects the button numbering sequence the computer recognizes from the USB controller.

Fig 7.1.6

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4. The visual graphics for testing the X (right to left) and Y (back and forth) axis of the joysticks is slightly different between right and left joystick. As shown in Screen 2, the left joystick is represented by cross hairs in a square. When the left joystick is moved in its extreme pattern (move the joystick in a complete circle, pushing it as far to the outside edge as possible), the cross hairs should touch the sides of the box. If it does not, the left joystick should be calibrated. The right joystick is then confirmed through the slide bar graph as shown in Screen 2. While moving the right joystick in its extreme pattern, the slide bars should touch the top and bottom of the graph. If it does not, then the joystick should be re-calibrated.

7.1.3.1 Calibrating the joysticks:


1. Select Settings on the Properties window. The following screen will appear:

Fig 7.1.7 2. Click the Calibrate button (see Fig 7.1.7).

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A Calibration Wizard window will appear (see Fig 7.1.8) and lead you through a series of steps to calibrate the joysticks. All instructions can be found at the top of the screen (see Fig 7.1.9 through Fig 7.1.13).

Fig 7.1.8 3. Grasping the left joystick, move it around in a circle as far as it will go. Then press any button on the joystick. Refer to Fig 7.1.9

Fig 7.1.9

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3. Next, verify the center point of the left joystick by leaving it centered and clicking next. See Fig 7.1.10

Fig 7.1.10 4. Moving onto the right joystick, the screens will change. Even though the screen will indicate Y Rotation, this is actually calibrating the X Axis of the right joystick. See Fig 7.1.11

Fig 7.1.11

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5. Even though the screen will indicate Z Rotation, this is actually calibrating the Y Axis of the right joystick. See Fig 7.1.12

Fig 7.1.12 6. The calibration of both right and left joysticks should now be complete. See Fig 7.1.13

Fig 7.1.13

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7.1.4 Loading New Software


There may be instances where new software needs to be loaded onto the console computer. To operate the ERIS control system, there are two main programs that run. They are: 1. LLMC Low Level Machine Control This software runs in the background and is the communication link between the ERIS control console and the PLC. Even with the computer showing a Windows screen, the LLMC is still running in the background. 2. OCC Operating Control Console This software operates the GUI (Graphical User Interface). In order to load software without having to open the panel, it is necessary to have a keyboard and USB memory stick with the features as noted previously. NOTE: The possibility of the code (software programs) becoming corrupt and not operating is highly unlikely. In many instances during troubleshooting, it is historically tempting to blame the software program. However, history also reveals that a corrupted code in a computer or PLC is not very common. There are, however, times when the operating parameters of the Cubex machine change. For instance, the machine may have a carousel installed in the field and need the GUI to change accordingly, or a software revision may come available. In these instances, the technician will need to download code from the USB memory stick to the ERIS console. In the event of these software revisions, new code can be emailed to you as an attachment in an email. From the email, the code files can be copied to the special USB memory stick. Once the new code is written to your special low power memory stick and you are armed with your special USB keyboard, the following procedures (rest of Section 7.1.4) are followed for transferring that new code to the computer.

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7.1.4.1 Uninstall the Existing Program(s)


1. Power up the ERIS console. 2. If the monitor shows the GUI, hit Escape and bring up the Windows screen. Click on the Start button in Windows, then to the Eris Program Group as shown in Fig 7.1.14.

Fig 7.1.14 3. There are two program groups inside the ERIS program group. Both have to be uninstalled. We will start by first uninstalling the LLMC program group. Move the mouse over the LLMC folder to expose its contents as shown in Fig 7.1.15.

Fig 7.1.15

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4. First click on the killswitch program (see Fig 7.1.15) to stop all background processes for the ERIS from running. Next, go to the LLMC program group again and click on the uninstall icon. Follow the prompts (see Fig 7.1.16 and Fig 7.1.17).

Fig 7.1.16

Fig 7.1.17 5. Click on the Close button (see Fig 7.1.17) to complete the uninstallation process. You will now be returned to the desktop.

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6. We will now uninstall the OCC application. Navigate to the OCC program group as shown in Fig 7.1.18.

Fig 7.1.18 7. Click on the uninstall icon and follow the prompts as shown in Fig 7.1.19 and Fig 7.1.20.

Fig 7.1.19

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Fig 7.1.20 Click on the Close button (see Fig 7.1.20) to complete the uninstallation process. You will now be returned to the desktop. The ERIS software is now completely removed from the computer. NOTE: Reboot the ERIS panel before proceeding to the next step.

7.1.4.2 Installing the New Program(s)


1. Open Windows Explorer. (right click on Start, click Explore) Find the USB Memory stick and locate the necessary installer file. The icon should look something like this (Fig 7.1.21):

Fig 7.1.21 NOTE: The text on this icon will be specific to your drill type i.e. Aries, Orion. 2. Double click on this icon. This one install program will re-install the OCC and LLMC. Follow the prompts as shown in Fig 7.1.22 through to Fig 7.1.32.

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Fig 7.1.22

Fig 7.1.23

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Fig 7.1.24

Fig 7.1.25

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Fig 7.1.26

Fig 7.1.27

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Fig 7.1.28

Fig 7.1.29

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Fig 7.1.30

Fig 7.1.31

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Fig 7.1.32

3. The new ERIS program is now fully installed. Reboot the ERIS panel and the ERIS interface will load automatically.

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7.1.5 Ethernet Cable and Plug Configuration


There are different standards that Ethernet cables and cable ends are wired to. In general, when you purchase an Ethernet cable in the local computer shop and use it in an application where the plug remains on both ends, you never have to question the wiring orientation. As long as the same colour wire is connected to the same pin out on both ends of the cable, it does not matter what the colour orientation happens to be. However, the ERIS console has an Ethernet cable that has the standard RJ45 plug on one end, but the other end is wired to an industrial style of pin connector. Therefore, the colour of the wire and the pin out numbers become an important factor to the technician. The RJ45 Ethernet cable end that plugs into the computer follows the T-568B standard as shown in Fig 7.1.33. Please take note of the tab orientation on the plug.

Fig 7.1.33 Please refer to the electrical schematic for the corresponding wire orientation in the industrial plug in the rear of the ERIS console.

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7.1.6 Panel Layout and Component Replacement


All of these parts are available in a kit CP001096.

Fig 7.1.34

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7.1.6.1 Replacement of Power Supply


There is only one power supply in the panel. It converts 24 volts into 16 volts to power the laptop. To remove this, you must first disconnect the two connectors shown in Fig 7.1.35. The power supply is held in place with a silicone adhesive and is pried up for removal.

Fig 7.1.35 To test the output of the power supply, simply disconnect the 16 volt connector (black) and measure the voltage with a meter while the 24 volt is still connected. This will require the plug at the back of the panel to be hooked up to a 24 volt source.

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7.1.6.2 Replacement of USB Module


To remove the module, simply disconnect both plugs shown in Fig 7.1.36. This module is also held in place with a silicone adhesive and is pried up for removal.

Fig 7.1.36

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7.1.6.3 Removal of CPU (Laptop)


1. Remove the front bezel cover that is retained by 10 socket head capscrews. 2. Remove the trough cover that is retained by 3 countersunk screws. 3. The actuator locking set screw can be loosened and the connector disengaged from the start switch as shown in Fig 7.1.37. 4. Once all the electrical connections have been removed from the CPU, the 4 CPU retaining screws can be removed.

Fig 7.1.37 5. Remove the power, Ethernet, and USB cables from the CPU shown in Fig 7.1.38.

Fig 7.1.38 The computer can now be removed from the enclosure.

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7.1.6.4 Heat Sink Connector


Although there is a heat conductive plate built into the back of the ERIS console enclosure, the CPU must make contact with this plate for efficient heat transfer. This connection is made mechanically with aluminum foil due to the irregular shape of the back of the laptop. It is also important that the mechanical connection can wrap slightly around the edge of the CPU as shown in Fig 7.1.39. The CPU should come with the heat connection foil in place. However, if it is missing, it can be made up simply by folding several layers of aluminum foil to fit between the feet on the back of the CPU. Also ensure it is slightly wrapped around the edge as shown in Fig 7.1.39. The aluminum foil can be held in place by placing 2 or 3 small drops of silicon on the back of the computer.

Fig 7.1.39

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7.1.7 Troubleshooting
Symptom System will not start Possible Cause Power switch and linkage not installed correctly Power supply is not charging battery or supplying power to the system System becomes sluggish or hangs up repeatedly CPU may be overheating Section Reference 7.1.7.3 7.1.7.1 Action Correct installation of power switch Test power supply and 24v connections Check if heatsink connector is working properly. Send computer back to factory for analysis and re-installation of operating system Check all wiring harnesses

7.1.7.4

Operating system may be corrupt.

n/a

No response from joysticks

USB connection or joystick harnesses have a short, break in wiring or become disconnected Joystick has wiring disconnect or short

7.1.7 (Fig 7.1.2 & Fig 7.1.3) 7.1.3

Verify joystick functionality in windows control panel. Replace joystick if all connections are verified and it is still not working Verify wiring harnesses and connections. Verify settings in both windows network connections and RSLinx as per listed pages

No green live indication on screen.

Faulty Ethernet connection

7.1.6, 7.1.7 (Fig 7.1.2 & Fig 7.1.3) 7.1.4

Software settings issues regarding IP address.

7.1 ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS (08/03/25)

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7.1.8 500 Hour General Maintenance


1. Remove lower housing cover and inspect for moisture and corrosion on wiring connections. 2. Remove front bezel and trough guard and inspect for moisture. 3. Check condition of Gaskets and replace if required. 4. Test operation of Joysticks as described in Section 7.1.3. 5. Test output of 50 Watt power supply as described in Section 7.1.7.1. 6. Ensure all connections are tight and free of corrosion. 7. Ensure inside of enclosure is free of dirt and any moisture; replace trough guard, bezel, and lower housing cover as required. Ensure all fasteners are tight and in good condition. The interval of inspection may vary with operating conditions of the panel. It is recommended that you set up a regular inspection routine with your dealer tailored to suit your current operating conditions.

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7.2 Electrical Components


PM Tasks
Clean and inspect the electrical components at the specified intervals. Replace damaged parts immediately to avoid down time. 250 Hour Inspection: Clean and inspect electrical system Lubricate electric motor bearings Inspect dust boot on all joysticks Test instrumentation lamps Inspect seals on all panels

WARNING! Opening electrical panel exposes high voltage. Disconnect electrical power when servicing. Electrical circuits to be serviced by qualified electricians only. CAUTION! Disconnect electrical power and isolate ground before arc welding.

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Fig 7.2.1 Main Electrical Panel

Fig 7.2.2 Indicator Panel

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7.2.1 Electrical Panel


The following procedures are to be performed by qualified electricians only. 1. Push lamp test button at indicator panel (see Fig 7.2.2) to check for defective bulbs. Replace as required. 2. Clean and inspect electrical panel (see Fig 7.2.1). Check for loose connections. 3. Clean contacts with proper contact cleaner. 4. Replace any slightly damaged parts to avoid down-time. Inspect panel seals.

7.2.2 Overloads
When replacing overloads, adjust them to the correct current settings but do not set them to Automatic Reset. Do not use higher rated fuses then the factory installed units.

7.2.3 Replacement Parts


Check the Parts Manual for complete replacement components; if parts are not listed, contact the Cubex Parts Department.

7.2.4 Troubleshooting
Check the Troubleshooting Section to determine the problem source. The voltmeter and ammeter at the indicator panel (see Fig 7.2.2) are used to diagnose the system.

7.2 ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS (08/03/25)

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7.3 TESTING OF VALVE SOLENOIDS (08/03/25)

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7.3 Testing of Valve Solenoids


When troubleshooting control valves equipped with remote joysticks, the electrical circuit needs to be tested. There are no simple procedures to determine if the solenoids are defective. Use the elimination process to check related components before replacing the valve solenoids. Refer to the Troubleshooting Section before performing the following tests. NOTE: The On/Off valves have different testing method than the proportional valves.

CAUTION! Eliminate all possible problems before replacing valve solenoids.

7.3 TESTING OF VALVE SOLENOIDS (08/03/25)

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Fig 7.3.1 On/Off Valve

Fig 7.3.2 Hirschmann Connector

Fig 7.3.3 Proportional Valve

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7.3.1 Types of valves


The circuit voltage in the setup and drilling panel is approximately 24 volts DC. The On/Off valves are equipped with black Hirschmann connectors and have a smaller solenoid than the proportional valves (see Fig 7.3.1). On/Off valves are used on the following applications: Water pump control Breakout control Slip control Centralizer control Upper and lower stingers Slideover control Jacks Arm Unit Clamp Carousel Rotation Feed extension control Air control Dual stingers (if equipped)

Proportional valves with white/grey connectors are installed on the following applications: Tram control Rotation control Feed control Mast Swing Mast Dump

7.3.2 Testing On/Off Valves


When malfunctioning of the solenoid is suspected perform the following test: 1. Remove Hirschmann connector and check voltage between pin 1 and pin GR (Fig 7.3.2). Zero voltage reading indicates faulty circuit or joystick. Refer to electrical circuits to troubleshoot the problem. 2. If voltage reading is approximately 24 volts, inspect and clean pins in connector and solenoid. Reinstall connector and operate valve. Replace solenoid if valve is not operating. NOTE: Pin 3 is not used on the ON/Off valves.

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Fig 7.3.4 Joystick in Up position

Fig 7.3.5 Joystick in Neutral position

Fig 7.3.6 Joystick in Down position

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7.3.3 Proportional Valves


The joystick sends an electrical signal to the electronic module in the solenoid that responds to joysticks position. This signal (set-point) is converted into a hydraulic pressure which moves the main spool. Inside the transducer (C), the position of the main spool is converted to an electrical signal (feed-back). This signal is registered by the electronics. The variation between the set-point and feed-back signals activates the four miniature valves in the solenoid (see Fig 7.3.3). These miniature valves move the main spool to adjust to the changes set by the joystick.

7.3.4 Fault Monitoring System


The proportional valves are equipped with a fault monitoring system, located in the solenoid, to stop the hydraulic flow in the event of uncontrollable spool movements or positions. It produces a fast and operator-independent reaction to stop the current to the solenoid, causing the main spool to return to the neutral position. The indicator light on the solenoid near the connector changes from green to red when the fault monitoring system is activated. The fault monitoring system is activated by the following problems: 1. If the set-point voltage is less than 10% or more than 90% of the supply. A short circuit in the wiring harness to the joystick would create a lower set-point voltage. 2. If the feed-back signal from the position transducer corresponds to a main spool travel beyond the set-point signal of 15%. A stuck main spool would not move to neutral position when the operator slows the operation. NOTE: The monitoring system reacts only to faults of more than 500 ms durations. It continues to interrupt until the problem is repaired, even after restarting the drill.

7.3.5 Testing Proportional Valves


Remove the Hirschmann connector and check the voltage between the pins to pin GR (see Fig 7.3.2). NOTE: The joystick must be in full up, down or dead center position when checking voltage at pin 1 and 2. Supply voltage is 24 volts. Actual voltage may vary slightly. Joystick in up position (see Fig 7.3.4): pin 1: pin 2: Joystick in neutral (see Fig 7.3.5): pin 1: pin 2: 24 volts DC (100% of supply voltage). 6 volts DC (25% of supply voltage). 0 volts DC 0 volts DC

7.3 TESTING OF VALVE SOLENOIDS (08/03/25)

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Joystick in down position (see Fig 7.3.6):

pin 1: pin 2:

24 volts DC (100% of supply voltage). 18 volts DC (75% of supply voltage).

Conclusion:

If readings match above test, replace the solenoid. If readings do not match, check the following: Joystick not travelling to full position Faulty joystick Faulty wiring Improper voltage

7.4 ALIGNMENT LASER (08/03/25)

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7.4 Alignment Laser


7.4.1 Operation
The alignment laser is mounted on the slideover assembly, on both left and right sides (see Fig 7.4.1). To turn on the laser, access the set-up screen of the ERIS panel. Refer to Section 5.6 of the Operators Manual. The laser is a simple on/off system.

7.4.2 Troubleshooting
Should the laser not turn on, use the following procedure: 1. Ensure the output from the PLC is functioning (that the light is on). If the light is not on, your problem is the output from the PLC. 2. If the light is on and the laser is still not working, check the wiring. 3. If the wiring is good and the laser is still not working, you need to replace the laser unit.

Fig 7.4.1 Alignment Laser mounted on slideover

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7.5 ACCRA-FEED PLC SYSTEM (08/03/25)

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7.5 Accra-Feed PLC System (Optional)


7.5.1 Introduction
Cubex Limited, one of Canadas leading mining equipment manufacturers, introduces another innovation in drilling technology called the Accra-Feed system (AFS). It is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC) that provides significant productivity gains through improved hole accuracy and increased drill bit life. The Accra-Feed system can consistently deliver hole accuracy of less than one (1) percent deviation in holes over 30 meters long.

7.5.2 Accra-Feed Operation


During Accra-Feed operation, the forward rotation pressure and holdback relief circuit are combined together; if the drill bit binds in the hole, the rotation pressure will increase in turn, so will the holdback pressure. This will relieve the weight on bit as rotation pressure decreases, and the holdback and feed will return to the pre-set rate. If forward rotation pressure exceeds 1200 psi, the pressure switch will close, sending a signal to the PLC which signals the anti-jam circuit to retract the feed cylinder for two (2) seconds. How far the feed cylinder travels in two (2) seconds is controlled by the anti-jam potentiometer. If forward rotation drops below 1200 psi, feed will resume. If not, the PLC will again signal the anti-jam circuit. This is a continuous cycle of five (5) attempts. After that, the feed cylinder will retract and stop. Rotation will be maintained and a beacon or alarm will sound (optional).

7.5.3 Accra-Feed Components


Compact Logix PLC Rotation Pressure Switch Monitors forward rotation pressure (set 1200 psi) see hydraulic schematic

Hydraulic On/Off Valve This switches between manual operation of the holdback relief circuit and rotation pressure sensing holdback control circuit

When Accra-Feed is on, the Accra-Feed hydraulic valve connects ports 1 and 3 Holdback is now controlled by rotation pressure Manual operation of the holdback relief is not possible Pulldown control is still maintained

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7.5.4 Maintenance of PLC in Accra-Feed System


Periodically, inspect the tightness of the I/O terminal screws. They become loose over the period of time. Ensure that components are free of dust. Check periodically for corrosion of connecting terminals. Printed circuit board and connector may become corroded internally.

7.5.5 Troubleshooting Guide


Symptoms No response or movement from the top drive while moving the Feed joystick in manual mode Causes - The Feed joystick not all way up or down. - Loose wiring on terminals of control panel. - Loose wiring in pins and sockets - Loose wiring on the terminals of PLC - Power supply is OFF - PLC on error mode - PLC is OFF Corrective Action Call Electrician to troubleshoot the following causes: 1) Check the terminal voltage signal of Feed Joystick-voltage power should be 24 vdc and feed signal 6-18 vdc. If none of this condition-replace the joystick. 2) Check for any loose wiring from controller to the feed valve. 3) Check the voltage on Hirschmann Connector. For pin 1 =24 vdc, pin 2 = 6- 18 vdc. 4) If the PLC is on error mode, reset the power. 5) Check the terminals supplying the PLC or terminals I/4 and O/8. If the problem still persists, call Cubex Technical Support. Slow feed travel up or down in manual mode - The Feed joystick is not all way up or down See No. 1

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Symptoms No response or movement from the Top Drive during Accra-Feed on

Causes - No feed power - No feed signal - Loose wiring - No PLC power - PLC on error mode

Corrective Action 6) Check the Feed joystick if it is away from the center. 7) Check O/10 for feed signal pot -if theres no signal-replace the AntiJam and Speed Adjustment Box. 8) See No. 3 If the problem still persists, call Cubex Technical Support.

No response or rotation from the saver sub while moving the Rotation joystick in manual mode

- No rotational power - No rotational signal - Loose wiring - PLC on error mode - No power supply

9) Check the terminal voltage signal of rotational Joystick -voltage power should be 24 vdc and rotational signal 6-18 vdc. If none of this condition - replace the joystick. 10) Check for any loose wiring from controller to the rotational valve. 11) See No. 3 12) See No. 4 13) Check the terminals supplying the PLC or terminals I/5 and O/4. If the problem still persists, call Cubex Technical Support.

Slow rotational rpm in manual mode No response or rotation from the saver sub during Accra-Feed on.

- The Feed joystick is not all way up or down - No rotational power - No rotational signal - Loose wiring - No PLC power - PLC on error mode

See Prob. 9 14) Check the Rotation joystick if it is away from the center. 15) Check I/5 for rotational power; O/5 and O/6 for rotational signal pot-if theres no signal local or remote rotational pot. 16) See No. 3 If the problem still persists, call Cubex Technical Support.

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7-05-004

Symptoms Rotational pressure switch wont work.

Causes - Loose wiring - Defective pressure switch - Not set at 1,400 psi - PLC on error mode - No power supply

Corrective Action 17) Check the voltage supply on Hirschmann connector between pin 1 and 3. 18) Check the forward rotation torque adjustment pressure if it is below 1,400 psi (normal factory setting is at 1,600 psi). 19) Check the pressure switch, if it is defective replace with a new one. 20) Check I/2 for terminal connection. If the problem still persists, call Cubex Technical Support.

Anti-Jam is not working when Accra- Feed is on.

- Loose wiring - Defective anti-jam pot - PLC on error mode - No power supply - Fuse blown up

21) Check the voltage signal at O/9 varies from 12 to 18 vdc. 22) Check the Anti-Jam pot and rotate it, see if you can get voltage signal 12 to 18 vdc. If not replace with new Anti-Jam Speed adjustment box. 23) See No. 3 If the problem still persists, call Cubex Technical Support.

Beacon alarm is not working.

- Loose wiring - Defective light - PLC on error mode - No power supply

24) Check the voltage signal at O/3 for beacon alarm. 25) Check the power supply for beacon alarm. 26) If the beacon is defective - replace with the new one. 27) Check for the rotational pressure switch 28) Check the Anti-Jam and speed adjustment box. 29) Check the PLC if it on error mode. If the problem still persists, call Cubex Technical Support.

Accra-Feed System is not working properly.

See the previous causes

8.0 TROUBLESHOOTING (08/03/25)

8.0 TROUBLESHOOTING

Clean Tools and Equipment!

8.0 TROUBLESHOOTING (08/03/25)

8-00-001

8.0 Troubleshooting
The Troubleshooting is divided into four types of systems; Mechanical, Hydraulic, Pneumatic and Electrical. Use the elimination process to investigate each system separately because some of the problems may originate in any one of the four systems. Refer to the troubleshooting guide, schematic layouts and service modules to diagnose the system.

Encouragement:
Notice unusual things - ask yourself questions. Use the elimination process to find the problem. Refer to Maintenance Sections to help you understand the system. First Step - Perform the following preliminary inspection: Mechanical System: 1. Check for loose bolts. 2. Check for damaged components or misalignment. 3. Check for leaks and unusual sounds. Hydraulics System: 1. Check for proper type and level of fluid. 2. Check for proper fluid pressure. 3. Check for correct rotation of pump. 4. Check that all manual and remote controls are operating. 5. Check that cylinders and motors operate in correct direction. 6. Check that shut-off valves are open. Air System: 1. Check for leaks. 2. Check for proper air pressure. 2. Check that all manual and remote controls are operating. 3. Check that shut-off valves are open. Electrical System: 1. Check that the phase reversal indicator is not lit. 2. Check for proper electrical connections.

8.0 TROUBLESHOOTING (08/03/25)

8-00-002

8.1 TROUBLESHOOTING MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (08/03/25)

8-01-001

8.1 Troubleshooting Mechanical Systems


Tramming does not move or move straight
01. Locked brakes. Defective shuttle valve. Take pressure reading at bleed port in brake assemblies. Minimum pressure required is 250 psi. Defective seal in brake release piston. Replace as required. Defective bearings in brake assemblies. Replace as required. 02. Hydraulic system malfunction. 03. Defective tramming valve. 04. Defective solenoid lockout valve. Operate tram valves while manually overriding solenoid lockout. If tramming operates, check solenoid lockout.

Tramming is too slow or lacks power


01. Brakes not releasing fully. Defective seal in brake release piston. Replace as required. 02. Incorrect pressure or flow setting at control valve. 03. Incorrect system pressure. Set system pressure to 2800 psi. 04. Defective control valve. Replace defective valve section.

Tram Controls are insensitive


Applies to tramming from set-up panel and tram step. 01. Tram control adjustment needs setting. Correct tram control adjustment.

Brakes are slipping


01. Check for hydraulic oil leaks at both mounting faces of brakes. 02. Worn friction disc or damaged springs.

Excessive noise or vibration when tramming


01. Loose hardware in drive train. 02. Defective tram motors. Check for excessive motor leakage. Disconnect case drain hose at motor. Service motor if flow is excessive. 03. Defective brakes.

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8-01-002

Mast swing does not rotate


01. Internal leakage in rotary actuator. 02. Improper system relief, valve pressure, or flow setting at control valve. 03. Improper system or standby pressure setting at pump. 04. Defective control valve.

Mast rotates erratically or rotates after setting


01. Damaged counterbalance valves. Replace all four counterbalance valves at rotary actuator. 03. Improper pressure relief, valve pressure, or flow setting at control valve. 04. Improper system or standby pressure setting at pump. 05. Defective control valve.

Mast rocks back and forth


01. Loose bolts at mast connection plate. 02. Gear rack out of adjustment. 03. Worn spline at mast connection.

Oil Leakage from breather hole in rotary actuator


01. Damaged piston seals in rotary actuator.

Hydraulic cylinders not operating


01. Defective remote valve controls. Operate manual valve on drill deck. If cylinders operate, test electrical and hydraulic circuits. 02. Defective control valve. 03. Disconnected cylinder clevis. 04. Defective cylinder. Check cylinder for damaged seals.

Cylinder creep
01. Pin-hole leak in hydraulic hose. 02. Leaking load checks. 03. Internal cylinder leak. 04. Leaking control valve.

8.1 TROUBLESHOOTING MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (08/03/25)

8-01-003

Centralizer does not retract


01. Centralizer brackets plugged with debris. Remove debris. 02. Cylinder clevis disconnected. Repair as required. 03. Pressure at centralizer valve set too low. Adjust pressure setting.

Oil leakage at stinger cylinder


01. Defective cylinder seals or scored cylinder rod.

Pulldown control does not function correctly


01. Incorrect setting or malfunctioning of pulldown valve. 02. Leaking or by-passing seals in telescopic feed. 03. Improper relief valve setting at drilling control valve.

Holdback control does not function correctly


01. Incorrect setting or malfunctioning of holdback valve. 02. Improper relief valve setting at drilling control valve. 03. Sequence valve out of adjustment. Adjust as required. 04. Leaking or by-passing seals in telescopic feed cylinder.

Mast swing does not rotate or rotates incorrectly


01. Incorrect relief pressure, valve pressure or flow setting at control valve. 02. Improper operating or standby pressure setting at pump. 03. Defective counterbalance valves. Replace all four units. 04. Defective control valve or valve solenoid. 05. Damaged rotary actuator. Check for internal leaks and damaged gear racks. 06. Orifice in restriction fitting plugged or missing.

Top drive does not rotate, or rotation is slow or rough


01. One or both top drive motors defective. Inspect rotor set for leakage in top drive motors. Check for excessive heat in top drive motors. Heat source may be a flow restriction. Temperature over 200F (93C) may damage seals. 02. Misaligned or defective top drive assembly. Check bearing adjustment at top drive assembly. 03. Check for damaged gears or bearings in top drive assembly.

8.1 TROUBLESHOOTING MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (08/03/25)

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Splined piston in top drive does not retract


01. Damaged splined piston or weak spring in top drive. Dismantle unit and check splined piston for twist or burr that may interfere with springs action. Test string for proper compression force. 02. Check female splined in drill string. If damaged, repair it by filing or grinding.

Rotation and Feed joysticks produce uneven speeds in both directions


01. Solenoid Adjustment needs calibration. Refer to Solenoid Adjustment.

8.2 TROUBLESHOOTING HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS (08/03/25)

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8.2 Troubleshooting Hydraulic Systems


Fluid is hot
01. Open or leaking control valve. 02. Clogged aftercooler or insufficient cooling (if equipped with cooling option). 03. Incorrect pump or control valve settings. 04. Relief valve in control valve stuck open. 05. Excessive bypass in cylinders or hydraulic motors. 06. Defective components in hydraulic pump or excessive bypass.

System is noisy
01. Cavitation condition caused by leaking or clogged suction line or worn seals. 02. Leaking valve. 03. Standby pressure at pump set incorrectly. 04. Air entering hydraulic system. Check fittings and hoses on suction lines. 05. Damaged hydraulic pump.

Fluid quickly contaminates


01. Scratched cylinder rods. Check all cylinders and replace as required. 02. Damaged pump.

Fluid is foaming
01. Incorrect type or level of hydraulic fluid. Check for water contamination. 02. Air entering hydraulic system. Check fittings and hoses on suction lines.

Valve Solenoid Malfunction


01. Follow tests as outlined in Testing Valve Solenoids.

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Insufficient pressure or flow


01. Operating pressure or standby pressure at hydraulic pump of adjustment. 02. Pressure relief, valve pressure, or valve flow setting at control valve out of adjustment. 03. Check for load sense not operating. 04. Clogged suction strainer in hydraulic tank. 05. Defective pump. Check for internal leaks.

Pump is noisy or vibrates


01. Loose or defective pump coupling. 02. Defective hydraulic pump. 03. Defective pump control valve.

Pump does not run


01. Damaged pump coupling. Remove inspection plate on bell housing and inspect. 02. Poor electrical connection. 03. Defective pump motor. Test motor and controls.

Hydraulic motors or cylinders do not respond


NOTE: When troubleshooting the control valves, perform the following tasks in order: 01. Check problems listed in mechanical system. 02. Check problems listed in electrical system. 03. Perform checks listed in this section.

Rotation and Feed joysticks produce uneven speeds in both directions


01. Solenoid Adjustment needs calibration. Refer to Solenoid Adjustment.

8.3 TROUBLESHOOTING AIR SYSTEMS (08/03/25)

8-03-001

8.3 Troubleshooting Air Systems


Air pressure is zero or low
01. Check electrical circuit. Additional info is in Booster Parts Manual.

Water pump pressure is zero


01. Closed suction valve. 02. Defective water pump solenoid valve. 03. Defective water pump motor. Confirm that motor is turning. 04. Defective water pump or accessories - See Water Pump Pressure is Low. 05. Defective relief valve in water pump circuit.

Water pump pressure is low


01. Partially closed suction valve. 02. Defective or clogged regulator/strainer. Inspect and clean it. 03. Incorrect speed of water pump motor. Adjust hydraulic flow to correct speed. 04. Defective water pump solenoid valve. 05. Defective relief valve in water pump circuit. 06. Clogged needle valve (water metering valve). 07. Malfunctioning water pump. Worn seals in water pump. Worn piston assembly due to inadequate water supply. Check strainer to confirm source problem.

Water pump runs extremely rough


01. Restricted or leaking inlet line. 02. Stuck discharge valve or damaged cup in water pump. Clean pump and replace parts. 03. Worn inlet seals. Replace inlet manifold seals.

Water pump leaking


01. Replace leaking seals and o-rings. Check for water in crankcase and excessive play in crankshaft. Overhauling the pump is recommended.

8.3 TROUBLESHOOTING AIR SYSTEMS (08/03/25)

8-03-002

Rock oil pump delivery is incorrect


01. Check for proper air supply pressure. Adjust air pressure regulator to 80 - 100 psi (5.5 - 6.9 bar). 02. Check for clogged or defective check valve in discharge line. 03. Check for clogged or defective rock oil metering valve. 04. Air pressure regulator for rock oil pump is faulty. Check for worn O-rings, gaskets, valve stem and valve seat. Replace whole unit as required. Adjust air pressure regulator to 80 - 100 psi (5.5 - 6.9 bar). 05. Defective oil pump: Clean or replace trip shoe assembly. Clean piston seat and ball foot valve. If worn, replace piston, piston seat, and piston packing. Replace pump tube if worn.

Rock grease pump delivery is incorrect


01. Check for proper air supply pressure. Adjust air pressure regulator to 80 psi (5.5 bar). 02. Check for clogged or defective check valve in discharge line. 03. Check for clogged or defective grease injector, adjust volume. 04. Air pressure regulator for rock grease pump is faulty. Check for worn O-rings, gaskets, valve stem, and valve seat. Replace whole unit as required. Adjust air pressure regulator to 80 psi (5.5 bar). 05. Check for air trapped in grease pump. Fill grease tank and pump with grease and prime the grease injection system. 06. Defective grease pump should be replaced.

8.4 TROUBLESHOOTING ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS (08/03/25)

8-04-001

8.4 Troubleshooting Electrical Systems


WARNING! Servicing electrical circuits is for qualified electrical personnel only.

System does not start with Power Light off


01. Check main breaker. 02. Check high voltage line to control transformer. 03. Check breakers and fuses in electrical panel.

System does not start with Power Light on


01. Check if phase reversing indicator is on. 02. Check motor overload indicators. 03. Check stop/start switch. 04. Check control connection. 05. Check motor failure.

Tram speed from setup panel is incorrect


01. Tram joysticks at setup panel set incorrectly. Refer to Tram Control Adjustment.

Tram controls (joysticks only) are insensitive


01. Flow adjustment module set incorrectly. Refer to Tram Control Adjustment.

Hydraulic motors or cylinders not operating


01. Operate application manually using control valve lever. If working, test joystick, switch, and valve solenoid. Refer to electrical diagrams. 02. Test valve solenoid as outlined.

Rotation and Feed joysticks produce uneven speeds in both directions


01. Solenoid Adjustment needs calibration. Refer to Solenoid Adjustment.

Valve Solenoid Malfunction


01. Follow tests as outlined in Testing Valve Solenoids.

8.4 TROUBLESHOOTING ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS (08/03/25)

8-04-002