Daily Lesson Plan: Day 11 – Goals: ○ Break down the ideas of Multiple Genres; what’s helpful, what’s not

○ Review “Genre” handout – what can be useful for individual research projects ○ Class discussion of which modes are most appropriate for project ○ Review F=A+P (MAPS); how does form affect purpose? ○ Collect and review research update ○ Begin discussion on technology issues; how do we resolve this? Rationale: ○ At this stage in the research process, it’s necessary to return to the initial concepts of the project. Asking the students to reflect on their research, by having a solid grasp on form, audience and purpose, the students should be able to have an understanding of what genres are appropriate for their projects. Since the students are allowed to choose which genres they feel are appropriate for their research, I feel it is necessary to revisit form, audience and purpose. Finally, a technology discussion at the end of this class will lead into the beginning of the next day’s lesson: Technology Day. It will provide the students an opportunity to experience technology regardless if they are familiar with it or not. Assessments: ○ The students will be assessed on this particular day by:  Class discussion  Engagement with small group work  Participation  Written research update Objectives: SWBAT ○ Discuss how different multiple genres help/hinder their research ○ Write a written research update clarifying form, audience and purpose ○ Revisit and comprehend “Genre” handout ○ Engage in classroom and small group discussions on multiple genres and technology Tasks: ○ Understand Multiple Genres:  “Let’s review the handout from one of the first days of this unit… Has anyone chosen one piece from each column? … How does it make sense that John chose to create a recipe book and Kathy chose to create a Twitter account? What are the differences between their purpose, form and audience?” ○ Revisiting F=A+P  “Since we’re having some difficulty identifying Form, Audience and Purpose, let’s review which each concept means. Pull out your notes from a couple of weeks ago when we talked about these concepts. Can someone remind me what Form means? Let’s create a chart on the board. How are these concepts important with your research? Do not forget that F=A+P is one of the largest concepts

we’re learning throughout this research unit. Make sure that your notes are detailed because we will be revisiting these concepts again and again.” ○ Reviewing and Collecting Research Updates:  “By this point, you should have a research update ready to hand in. Can someone remind me what you are supposed to have in this update? How far along your research is, who is your audience, what’s the purpose of your research and what form it is going to take. Great. Let’s take 5-7 minutes to work on this update, since there was some confusion about F=A+P.” ○ Understanding Technology:  “Since we don’t have much time today, we will continue this discussion tomorrow. One of the components of the final assignment is to create a piece that is technology based. From the chart that I have provided for you, what are some of you choosing to do? Can you give a rationale for why you chose one form of technology over another? Tomorrow we will spend time in the computer lab reviewing the different forms of technology just in case there are some that are unfamiliar to you.” Materials: ○ Multi-Genre Sheet ○ Final Assessment Sheet ○ MAPS handout ○ Chalk board ○ Chalk To-Do List ○ Review with students the different genres on handout ○ Continue discussion and revisit F=A+P (Hand out worksheet when students show confusion) ○ Review, discuss and collect Research Update ○ Allow time for Think-Pair-Share for students to get their ideas sorted ○ Begin technology discussion References: ○ Wyse, Dominic, and Russell Jones. Teaching English, Language and Literacy. Abingdon: Routledge, 2001. ○ Rhetorical Structures Handout: Courtesy of Dawn Reed ○ Zemelman, Steve and Harvey Daniels. A Community of Writers. Portsmouth: Heinemann, 1988.

Rhetorical Structures
Definition of Rhetoric: All of the strategies used to help communicate a message to a given audience (genre; structure; length; punctuation; diction; literary devices; tone; sentence structure; text-to-text connections; capitalization; poetic literacy: structural style, line breaks, word economy; visual literacy: print conventions, design, color scheme, film techniques; dramatic literacy: body language, voice intonation, audience participation, blocking, etc.). Reading Rhetorically: “Readers actively trying to understand the author’s intent, the context, and how other readers might respond” (Haas and Flower 1988) Writing Rhetorically: Intentionally using strategies to communicate a purposeful message to a specific audience. Structure Explanation Mode, Audience, Purpose, Situation (MAPS) Mode: The type of writing. All of the elements of the text/genre that the writer intentionally uses to communicate his/her point (see definition of “rhetoric”).

Audience: To whom the writer is communicating. The intentional audience the writer intended to reach out to at the time of writing, as wel as any secondary audiences that have since developed. This includes literary lenses and exploring text through multiple perspectives.

Purpose: Why the writer is writing. This is the writer’s intended purpose of the piece, but could also be a perceived purpose from an alternate lens Situation: Two parts: situation of the writing and situation of the writer. Situation of the writing: Everything the author needs to make the writing possible—task identification, researching, due dates, citations, format, timeline, materials

Situation of the writer: The writer’s awareness of him/herself as a writer in order to create the preferential writing environment/routines within given constraints—location, time, noise level, nourishment, method (typing vs. writing by hand), preparedness

Rhetorical Triangle: Persona

Purpose: The writer’s intended purpose of the piece, but could also be a perceived purpose from an alternate lens. Persona: The “mask” the writer is wearing when communicating the piece. Rather than encouraging students to think of literature as autobiographical, students can think of literature from a common, overarching perspective. The persona represents this perspective.

Purpose

Text: All of the elements of the text/genre that the writer intentionally us to communicate his/her point (genre, length, diction, literary devices, ton sentence structure, punctuation, body language, voice intonation, etc.) Audience

Text

Audience: The intentional audience the writer intended to reach out to, a well as any secondary audiences that have since developed. This include literary lenses and exploring text through multiple perspectives.

Form = Audience + Purpose (F= A+P)

Form: All of the elements of the text/genre that the writer intentionally uses to communicate his/her point (see definition of “rhetoric”).

Audience: The intentional audience the writer intended to reach out to at the time of writing, as well as any secondary audiences that have since developed. This includes literary lenses and exploring text through multiple perspectives.

Role, Audience, Form, Task (RAFT)

Purpose: The writer’s intended purpose of the piece, but could also be a perceived purpose from an alternate lens. Role: The “mask” the writer is wearing when communicating the piece. Rather than encouraging students to think of literature as autobiographic students can think of literature from a common, over-arching perspective The role represents this perspective.

Audience: To whom the writer is communicating. The intentional audience the writer intended to reach out to at the time of writing, as wel as any secondary audiences that have since developed. This includes literary lenses and exploring text through multiple perspectives. Form: The type of writing. All of the elements of the text/genre that the writer intentionally uses to communicate his/her point (see definition of “rhetoric”). Task: Why the writer is writing. This is the writer’s intended purpose of the piece, but could also be a perceived purpose from an alternate lens.
Haas, C., and Flower, L. (1988). Rhetorical reading strategies and the construction of meaning. College Composition and Communication, 39, 167-183.

Making your Research More Authentic
DESCRIPTION: For this project, you will choose to research someone throughout history (they can be dead, or alive) that has affected you or the world in a positive or negative fashion. In order to showcase the person you have chosen, and to utilize your research abilities, your collected information will be put to use in a creative way. Throughout the research process, you will be asked to complete at least one autobiography written by your person of choice. You will also need to utilize articles, journals, magazines, film, other books and technology to uncover all that you can about your person. Make sure that you compile your research in an organized fashion, allowing you to easily access all of your information. You will spend time learning about this person, their accomplishments, endeavors, trailsand tribulations and organize your research into a form that is suitable for your audience and research purposes (*remember F=A+P!). ASSIGNMENT: For this assignment you will need to choose one research product from each column. Your goal is to align your product with F=A+P. Please keep this in mind as you work through this project. If you have a suggestion that is not listed, please see me to discuss your idea. Written Newspaper Article Poem Song Letter Diary Resume Job Application Advice Column Play Visual Wanted poster Movie poster Life map Photo collage Comic strip Drawing Painting Sculpture CD Cover Technology Newscast Website Video Podcast Radio show iMovie Online Profile Twitter Account Blog

Each piece of research must include: – MLA citation whenever you are paraphrasing or taking direct quotes – Appropriate language, grammar, syntax, diction and punctuation – Classroom and school appropriate photos, comments, “friends,” and written material if you choose to join an online community – A work cited page attached to each product Your final products will be presented in a Reader’s Theatre Presentation setting. This will be discussed in more depth as we proceed.

Along with your three pieces of research, you will also write a reflection/rationale for why you chose what you did. This reflection should be 2-3 pages double-spaced, 12 pt. font. Your reflection should include the following: – Who your chosen person is/was – Why you chose this person – What research pieces you chose and a rationale for why you chose it (remember F=A+P) CLASS WORK: In order to gather more information on your chosen person, you will have to opportunity to utilize class time, and the library throughout the course of the next four weeks. I except that you will use these computer lab/media center days to not only start, but hopefully come close to finishing and finalizing your project. Time management is key. Use your time wisely. DUE DATES: Friday, April 7, 2009: Written proposal due Friday, April 14, 2009: Research Update #1 Friday, April 21, 2009: Research Update #2 (Last day of research) Wednesday, April 26, 2009: Readers’ Theatre Presentation Thursday, April 27, 2009: Readers’ Theatre Presentation Friday, April 28, 2009: Written Reflection Due Friday, April 28, 2009: Research Quiz