Turkey

SEB MERCHANT BANKI NG – COUNTRY RI SK ANALYSI S June 12, 2008

important your attention is drawn to the statement on the back cover of this report which affects your rights.
Analyst: Rolf Danielsen. Tel : +46 8 763 83 92. E‐mail : rolf.danielsen@seb.se
 
The political storm is on – this time not only over headscarves but more ominously: the future of 
the efficient AKP government, investors’ darling for the sixth consecutive year. Where do we go 
from here? A best guess is that investors will stomach also this political turmoil as long as the 
economy survives unscathed, which could be the bigger question, though.  
   
Country Risk Analysis 
Slowdown but growing 
deficits.  New data for 
2007 show the economy 
decelerated to only 4,3% 
expansion last year, 
sharply down from 6,7% 
the year before.  That was 
due to weakening private 
consumption and 
negative contributions 
from net exports mainly 
reflecting buoyant 
imports, but also drought which reduced agricultural output. As a result, the 
current account deficit widened $ 6 bill. further to $37 bill. although that 
represented a slight improvement in terms of GDP (from 6% to 5,7% 
according to recently revised national accounts methodology which all of a 
sudden has made Turkey’s economy some 30% larger in statistical terms).
1
  
According to the old methodology (before March 2008) the deficit to GDP 
ratios would have been around 8% in both years.  
GDP
0
2
4
6
8
10
2002 2004 2006 2008
p
e
r
c
e
n
t
GDP (change) Forecast
 
For 2008, these trends are set to continue as judged by numbers so far in the 
year. Consumer confidence and purchasing power are weakening while 
global turbulence is taking its toll on investors.  Exports growth held up quite 
well in the first quarter, despite a sharp slowing in March, but the external 
sector could once again become a drag on the economy.  If oil prices remain 
at present high levels the current account deficits could widen to as much as 
$50 bill. (7%/GDP).   That would act as a tax, reducing private consumption 
further and leaving GDP growth at below 4%, perhaps giving the final blow 
to the “Anatolian tiger”.  That is despite an ongoing fiscal easing that started 

1
This is because as the official statistical services have begun to include estimates for 
the assumedly large informal sector.  
SEB Merchant Banking Country Risk Analysis June 12, 2008
last year, as the government appeared to have abandoned its previous good 
intentions of fiscal 
stricture.  
 
Soaring inflation.  In 
early May, the central 
bank, which so far was 
believed to be not only 
operationally but also 
politically independent, 
surprised markets by 
renouncing its strict 
inflation target of 4% p.a. 
(+/‐ 2 p.p.), and instead 
opting for a much higher medium‐term inflation trajectory with the end goal 
of 4% inflation within reach only by 2012..  As recent data showed inflation 
already reaching into double digit levels (latest CPI‐number for May is 10,7% 
up from same period of 2007), the new targets are clearly much more 
realistic, but a the same time the timing of this announcement could probably 
not have been much worse.  Late 2007 it appeared that the central bank was 
about to win the battle against inflation, prompting an aggressive easing of 
interest rates.  At that time it could be excused for not foreseeing the later 
surge in international energy and commodity prices, including food stuff, 
which make up some 27% of the consumer basket. What it might have seen, 
though, was the ongoing rise in services prices, which were predominantly 
home‐made and reflected underlying price pressure in the economy.  
Current account deficit
Source: Reuters EcoWin
2000 2002 2004 2006 2008
$
B
i
l
l
.
/
q
u
a
r
t
e
r
-12,5
-10,0
-7,5
-5,0
-2,5
0,0
2,5
 
As a consequence, and as price acceleration became too evident during the 
early spring, the central 
bank was forced to 
change tack.  In March, it 
raised policy rates ‐‐ the 
expected response, but 
then also abandoned its 
inflation target to the 
disappointment of many 
observers and reportedly 
also to the IMF, with 
which the government 
had just concluded a 
stand‐by program from 
2005.  
Consumer Prices
ar 12 months
Source: Reuters EcoWin
2005 2006 2007 2008
%
-
c
h
a
n
g
e

y
e
a
r

o
n

y
e
a
r
6,0
7,0
8,0
9,0
10,0
11,0
12,0
 
Softer fiscal policy targets:  The recent easing of monetary policy targets was 
all the more astonishing as it came on the heels of a significant fiscal policy 
easing. Since the AKP government took office in 2002 following the deep 
financial and economic crisis of 2000/2001, fiscal stricture had been the 
linchpin of its economic policies, a stance that had been met with admiration 
and great respect from almost all quarters.  In early 2008, however, the 
government announced a long term fiscal program which set new targets for 
2

SEB Merchant Banking Country Risk Analysis June 12, 2008
the primary balance in coming years, despite the recommendation of the IMF 
report of late 2007 not to change the target at least for the coming year.  The 
government’s argument may nevertheless be reasonable seen in isolation. By 
persevering with tight fiscal policies since 2003, targeting a primary surplus 
in government finances (that is the budget balance stripped of net interest 
payments) of 6,5% of GDP government debt has come down from 90% of 
GDP in 2002 to 48% (gross) in 2007 (both according to unrevised GDP) 
thereby reducing the likelihood of a new fiscal crisis anytime soon.   At the 
same time the external environment was turning for the worse calling on the 
government to stimulate demand. But as with the monetary policy change, 
the timing seemed to be unfortunate against the background of the new and 
unpredictable state of international capital and money markets since the 
global financial turbulence erupted in 2007 and the still untamed inflation 
pressure in the economy. 
 
External vulnerability remains high.  For several years the large current 
account deficit has been willingly financed by professional investors eagerly 
buying the Turkish growth story, and others, including retail investors, 
happy to se their money earn a very decent double digit return in Turkish 
assets relative to yen, 
Swiss Franck an now 
also dollars.  FDI has 
flowed in and last 
year financed more 
than half of the deficit.  
However, not much of 
that has gone into 
export oriented green‐
field investments, but 
rather into merger 
and acquisition 
activities and 
government 
privatization schemes, 
particularly into banks, or into real estate developments, activities that do not 
immediately create dollar earnings to help pay dividend to its foreign 
investors.  That would not matter much if the money freed up in this manner 
to former domestic owners, had been used for other investments.  
Unfortunately, there is limited evidence of that.  Even though the investment 
to GDP ratio rose from 22% to 25% during the year of high FDI inflows, 2004‐
2007, the savings ratio stayed at a low 18‐19%/GDP. That is a level proved to 
be insufficient to keep up the high growth momentum in other emerging 
market countries.  – Apart from FDI, the other main current account 
financing item of the balance of payments has been short term capital 
inflows, including into the stock exchange or to private sector entities raising 
loans of shorter maturities from abroad.  
FDI inflows
0
5 000
10 000
15 000
20 000
25 000
2002 2004 2006 2008
$

m
i
l
l
.
FDI Forecast
 
Last year, as international interbank markets dried up, Turkish companies 
themselves increased their activity on global credit markets thereby raising 
their short FX position from $37 bill to $61 bill. ‐‐ a level that has begun to 
3

SEB Merchant Banking Country Risk Analysis June 12, 2008
raise concerns among observers.  All considered, that implies continued high 
external balance of payment vulnerability even though short term debt has 
not increased much.  Rapidly rising loan repayments this and next year and 
the rising current account deficit have lifted the total refinancing need in 2008 
to more than $100 bill. That could present a bigger challenge than last year.  
Recent developments in the domestic stock market have not been too 
encouraging and will probably attract less foreign money.  Like all emerging 
markets it experienced a sharp fall in late 2007, but unlike the others, did not 
see any rebound this spring.  In addition, delays in the government 
privatization program combined with possible flagging investor enthusiasm 
could reduce FDI inflows sharply.  
 
The reform 
program 
hangs in the 
balance.  In 
2007, the 
reform 
program 
suffered 
serious delays, 
not all of them 
to be blamed 
on the 
government as 
also trade 
unions tried to 
uphold several privatization deals by court actions.  Hopes have been that 
2008 would see a new push, in particular with regard to further 
disinvestment of government shares in banks, telecom, tobacco 
manufacturing, sugar refineries and the national lottery.  Last March, it 
eventually succeeded in passing the bill on reforming the social security 
system which is overly generous and has become a mill‐stone around the 
neck of the finance minister representing a deficit for the overall budget 
equal to 3,5% of GDP.  In January, it also made good on its promise to raise 
electricity tariffs more than 16% for end users to reduce the burden of utility 
subsidies on the budget, and also to prepare the power sector for eventual 
privatization.   
National 100-index
Istanbul Stock Exchange
Em e rg i n g Ma r ke t s ,M SCI , F r e e US D In d e x , Gr o s s T o ta l Re t u rn , US D T u rk e y , I SE ,N a ti on a l -1 0 0 In d e x , Clo s e , T RY
Source: Re uters EcoWin
2005 2006 2007 2008
I
n
d
e
x
750
1000
1250
1500
1750
2000
2250
20k
25k
30k
35k
40k
45k
50k
55k
60k
Emerging
Markets
Turkey
 
Markets are now waiting to see the government fulfil its commitment also to 
free administratively set electricity prices as promised beginning July 1, 
which eventually means 30‐60% price hikes over the next 1‐2 years.  That will 
not only help change the general sentiment that the government has begun to 
dither on its erstwhile reform vigour, but also bring forward a solution to the 
country’s pending power crisis as present supply is unable to keep up with 
demand with black‐outs hitting industries and consumers already in 2009 as 
a threatening consequence.  
 
The political battle is heating up between secularists and Islamists.  At the 
outset, the prospects for the government to take unpopular measures should 
4

SEB Merchant Banking Country Risk Analysis June 12, 2008
be the best against its strong 62% majority in Parliament after it won a 
landslide victory last summer in snap elections.  That rosy picture is again 
being challenged by the new battle heating up with the so‐called secularists, 
who represent the old political elite of urban westernizers, in contrast to the 
government, which has its roots in traditional Islam as presented by the 
impoverished country side in particular. The opposition has charged the 
government of having acted against the constitution secularist orientation on 
several instances, including when it proposed a law amendment to let 
women wear the headscarf, a symbol of religious piety for many people, at 
the state universities.  The opposition regarded that as an attack on the 
secularist values of the state.   
 
The case is now in the hands of the Constitutional Court, CC, and could end 
in the dissolution of the ruling party AKP and the banning of some 80 of its 
most prominent members, including the Prime Minister, Mr. Erdogan, from 
political life.  While most observers had first thought this was one of the 
many political brawls that in the end come to nothing, many were taken by 
surprise as the CC in early June actually ruled the law amendment over 
headscarf as unconstitutional.  That was clearly a shot above the bow to the 
government, and many see this as the first sign that the future of the 
government and the  present political order actually are hanging in a thin 
thread. Others point out that this may still just be a warning from the 
secularist establishment (some may say the “deep state”) to the government 
of toning down its Islamic credentials and focus on the economy.   
 
Much now depends on the response of the government.  If it complies, the 
CC may let it survive.  Few observers believe in the allegations that the PM 
himself is a fundamentalist masked as pragmatist, but his party is a large one 
and contain also extremist elements.  Some have pointed out that this may be 
a defining moment for the future of Turkish democracy and political stability, 
even though any threat of civil strife is still on only on the horizon. For the 
nearer term future, the danger is that the government will be hamstrung by 
these legal battles, unable to focus on the urgent needs of the economy and 
the reform program.   
 
 
Recent market reactions.  Markets have responded to the CC ruling on the 
headscarf issue with a mixed response.  The government securities market 
took an immediate hit sending the JP Morgan’ s EMBI index for Turkish 
sovereign bonds down several points, implying a higher risk premium.  The 
foreign exchange market, by contrast, has continued to stay quite impervious 
to political news. The domestic money market remains forex liquid, and such 
may be the case until a bunch of government foreign debt falls due in late 
August.  Many observers see that time as the real test of the resilience of the 
present exchange rate.  Since the beginning of the current year, it has 
regained strength vis‐à‐vis the euro, boosting the argument that is may be as 
much as 20‐30% overvalued, reflecting the higher Turkish inflation than of its 
most important export markets, the EU and the US.  Others point to still good 
export performance as a sign of continued competitiveness. Both arguments 
have their merits, but at the end of the day what matters is the current 
5

SEB Merchant Banking Country Risk Analysis June 12, 2008
account deficit and what a country can persuade markets to finance.  That 
has undoubtedly become more challenging this year, and investors should be 
braced for increased exchange rate volatility during the fall.  
 
‐*‐ 
 
Turkey seems like a country with a never‐ending ability to surprise.  Not long ago we 
thought the worst was over when the country weathered the sub‐prime crisis 
reasonably well, its military incursion into Northern Iraq (hunting down Kurdish 
separatist rebels) was handled in an excellent manner by its diplomacy, and the 
government had solved a political brawl with the secularist opposition last summer 
by winning snap elections.  But then, once again the political tensions are now 
coming close to the boiling point. One could be excused to ignore this development as 
a farce, if the issues at stake were not quite important.  After all this is a question of 
the judiciary closing down a democratically elected government which is doing 
nothing but implementing a political program on which it was elected into office.  
One may draw parallels to other countries, including in the region, where similar 
developments have ended in increased instability.  
 
This comes on top of flagging growth, rising inflation, a soaring current account 
deficit on the back of higher oil prices, and the threat of much less favourable 
international market conditions to refinance more debt than usual falling due 
through the rest of the year. So far, however, we do not want to sound the alarm bells, 
but simply note that over the last 12‐ months period two rating agencies have 
changed their rating outlook in negative direction: Fitch from BB‐ positive to stable 
in June 2007 and Standard and Poors from BB‐ stable to negative in last May.   
 
 
hÉó=ÑáÖìêÉë OMMT
IopuIalion (miIIions) 74,9
GDI/capila ($) 8854
GDI (clange) 4°
InfIalion 9°
Curr.Acc. baIance/GDI -6°
Reserves/imporls (monlls) 4
Budgel baIance/GDI -2°
Governmenl debl/GDI 43°
Graph: The pentagon shows Turkey's risk relatively
strong on resilience, but weak on macro balance and
liquidity. It is stronger than the Ukraine on resilience
but weaker on event risk.
bñíÉêå~ä=ê~íáåÖëW
Iilcl: BB-
S&I: BB-/neg
mÉÉêëW
UIraine
IaIislan
BraziI
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Resilience
Liquidity
Information
Absence of event
risk
Macro balance
Turkey Average EM
Ukraine
How to read the chart?
Moving out from the center
reduces risk.
 
 
6

SEB Merchant Banking Country Risk Analysis June 12, 2008
Key data: 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
GDP (mill. US$) 231556 307067 392374 483820 529201 662970 778537 813592
GDP/capita (US$) 3302 4320 5448 6630 7159 8854 10267 10597
GDP (change) 6,2% 5,3% 9,4% 8,4% 6,9% 4,5% 3,8% 4,5%
Investments/GDP 17% 19% 22% 24% 26% 25% 25% 26%
Budget balance/GDP -11,2% -8,8% -5,4% -1,5% -0,7% -1,7% -1,8% -1,1%
Govt debt/GDP 71% 67% 61% 54% 47% 43% 38% 35%
CPI inflation (%) 45,1% 25,3% 8,6% 8,2% 9,6% 8,8% 9,6% 7,2%
Money demand (%) -12,8% 5,9% 31,0% 24,4% 21,8% 9,6% 10,1% 5,2%
Stock prices 11008 12312 19903 29362 39861 48275
Interest rates 86,0% 34,3% 20,5% 14,4% 16,4% 17,0% 15,9% 14,9%
Exch. Rate ($) 1,50 1,50 1,42 1,34 1,43 1,30 1,25 1,34
Trade/GDP (%) 38% 39% 41% 39% 43% 42% 42% 45%
Oil price (Brent) $25 $29 $38 $54 $65 $73 $112 $106
Millions US $
Export of goods 40 719 52 394 68 535 78 365 93 611 115 304 136 588 157 152
Imports of goods 47 109 65 883 91 271 111 353 134 552 162 090 189 747 208 830
Other: 5 764 5 974 8 305 10 852 9 048 9 352 11 090 12 722
Current account -626 -7 515 -14 431 -22 136 -31 893 -37 434 -42 069 -38 956
(% of GDP) -0,3% -2,4% -3,7% -4,6% -6,0% -5,6% -5,4% -4,8%
FDI 958 1 253 2 006 8 962 18 988 19 856 16 404 13 712
Loan repayments -22 052 -21 546 -25 640 -32 837 -31 012 -38 314 -43 245 -44 496
Net other capital flows 27 228 35 131 41 392 54 300 60 036 67 258 74 168 74 201
Balance of payments 5 508 7 323 3 327 8 288 16 119 11 366 5 258 4 462
Reserves 23 615 30 938 34 265 42 553 58 672 70 038 75 296 79 758
Total debt 124 280 139 326 154 789 166 194 193 388 231 854 260 868 270 962
o/w short term debt 16 394 20 542 28 567 35 150 40 359 40 788 43 921 44 165
Sources: Oxford Economics and SEB estimates
Rating history
Fitch (eoy) B+ B+ B B BB- BB-
Moody's (eoy) B1 B1 B2 B1 Ba3 Ba3
S&P (eoy) B+ BB- B+ B+ BB- BB-
Type of government: Parliamentary Democracy
Next elections Legislative: 2012; Presidential: 2014 (provided courts do not overturn the latest)
Other:
Latest PC deal 1980/fully repaid
Latest IMF arrangements 2005 (SBA), Completed
E x t e r n a l tr a d e
Im p o rts
E xp o r t s
Im p o rts O IL
S o u rc e : R e u te r s E c o W i n
0 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 6 0 7
U
S
D

(
b
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
)
0
1 0
2 0
3 0
4 0
5 0 Rea l e f fe c ti v e a n d s p o t e u r/ T . L i r a
E xc h an ge ra t e s
Lo c al I nd i c es , CB RT CP I R ea l E f fec ti ve E xc ha n ge Ra te In d ex, A vera g e, TRY S p o t Ra tes , E U R/T RY , Cl ose
S o u rc e : R e u te rs E c o W in
2 004 2 0 05 200 6 2 007 2 008
E
U
R
/
T
R
Y
1 ,5
1 ,6
1 ,7
1 ,8
1 ,9
2 ,0
2 ,1
1 30
1 40
1 50
1 60
1 70
1 80
1 90
2 00
R E E R
T R Y/ E U R
Stripped Spr ead
Turkey C omp os i te
So u rce: R e uter s E coWi n
2006 2007 2008
B
a
s
i
s

P
o
i
n
t
s
150
200
250
300
350
400
Turkey
Emerging
M arket s
Interest r ates
Go ve rn me nt B e n ch ma rks , Bid , 5 Y ea r, Y ie ld , Clo s e , T
Inte rb a n k Rate s, T RL IBOR, 3 Mo n th , Fixin g, T RY
Po lic y Rate s , Ce n tra l Ba n k O/N L en d in g Rate
Sou rce: R euters E coWin
j an
20 06
ma j sep j an
2007
maj s ep j an
20 08
m aj
5
1 0
1 5
2 0
2 5

7

SEB Merchant Banking Country Risk Analysis June 12, 2008

Disclaimer

Confidentiality Notice

The information in this document is confidential and may not be reproduced or redistributed
to any person.

Important: This statement affects your rights

The information in this document has been compiled by SEB Merchant Banking, an entity
within Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken AB (publ) (“SEB”), for institutional investors only. It
is not intended for, and must not be passed to, Retail Clients. If you are not a client of ours,
you are not entitled to this report. This information is produced for the private information of
recipients, and SEB Merchant Banking is not soliciting any action based upon it.

Opinions contained in this report represent the bank’s present opinion only and are subject to
change without notice. All information contained in this report has been compiled in good
faith from sources believed to be reliable. However, no representation or warranty, expressed
or implied, is made with respect to the completeness or accuracy of its contents and the
information is not to be relied upon as authoritative. Recipients are urged to base their
investment decisions upon such investigations as they deem necessary. This document is
being provided for your information only, and no specific actions are being solicited as a
result of it; to the extent permitted by law, no liability whatsoever is accepted for any direct or
consequential loss arising from use of this document or its contents.

Your attention is drawn to the fact that a member of, or an entity associated with, the bank or
its affiliates, officers, directors, employees or shareholders of, such members may from time
to time (a) have a long or short position in, or otherwise participate in the markets for, the
currencies and securities of countries mentioned herein, (b) buy or sell, make a market (or
provide liquidity) in, or participate in an issue of such securities or options, for which SEB
may receive compensation

SEB is a public company incorporated in Stockholm, Sweden, with limited liability. It is a
member of the Stockholm Stock Exchange, the London Stock Exchange, the IPE, OM, EDX,
Euronext Liffe, Euronext Paris, Eurex, CME, and CBOT exchanges. SEB is authorized and
regulated by Finansinspektionen in Sweden, by the Financial Services Authority for the
conduct of designated investment business in the UK, and by relevant regulators in all other
jurisdictions where SEB operates its business.


SEB Merchant Banking. All rights reserved.

 
8