BY STACY TAFF

Staff Writer
staff@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — The board
of trustees of the Delphos
Public Library met for a short
June meeting Wednesday.
Director Kelly Rist told the
board that both summer read-
ing programs are off to a
good start.
“This year, we have 320
children signed up. Last
year’s report said we had 275,
so we’re ahead this year,”
she said. “We’ve started
the Adult Summer Reading
Program and I have some-
where between 50 and 75
adults. The program allows
them to look at the library
as a place that has more than
just books. If they’re tech
savvy, they can start tweet-
ing with us or check out our
Facebook page. We’re getting
them to use magazines and
newspapers and also explore
the book club we have here.”
Rist also announced that
patrons will have the oppor-
tunity to check whether or not
the library has a book they’re
browsing for on Amazon.
com.
“You go through Google
Chrome and type in libraryex-
tension.com and you can
download it from there,” Rist
said. “What it does is when
you’re browsing for a book
on Amazon.com, you can
check the availability of it at
your local library before you
buy it.”
Library Extension doesn’t
make users sign in; one
merely needs to install the
program and choose their
library.
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS—The closing
of ALCO has been quite a
shock to the community and
will have a financial impact
on city tax revenues.
Mayor Michael Gallmeier
said that from his under-
standing, there was a prob-
lem with the lease and there
seemed to be no other way
to get the problem resolved.
Unfortunately, it will greatly
affect the 15 full- and part-
time employees who worked
there and the people who
shopped there.
It will negatively impact
the community as a whole.
“I hate to see any busi-
ness close,” Gallmeier said.
“It is a tremendous loss for
the city.”
When asked about eco-
nomic development and
attracting a new business
to that site, Gallmeier said
that if there is trouble with
the landlord already, it’s
unlikely a business will
move in there unless repairs
are made. Those agreements
would be made between the
tenant (business) and the
landlord.
City Income Tax Manager
Doris Bockey said that she
could not give any specifics
on the financial impact the
store closing will have on
the city.
“Any type of business that
leaves Delphos will cause a
loss in revenue,” she said.
ALCO’s Senior Vice
President for Store Operations
Ricardo Clemente, in a press
release from ACLO Stores,
Inc., cited a different reason
for the store’s closure.
“The decision to close
the store in Delphos was a
difficult one. We have val-
ued the opportunity to be a
part of this community but
unfortunately the store’s
performance does not meet
our financial requirements,”
Clemente said. “The econo-
my has clearly had an impact
on store sales and we’ve
made the very difficult deci-
sion to close.”
Upfront
Sports
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Farm 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Classifieds 8
Television 9
World briefs 10
Index
Thursday, June 13, 2013 50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
US Open preview, p7 Purple corn, p4
www.delphosherald.com
St. Peter offers
Righteous
Returns! grants
St. Peter Lutheran
Church is excited to share
God’s blessings with the
community. Through
its In Reach OutReach
Team, the church will
give away three $100
Righteous Returns! grants.
The requirements
are very simple:
• The Righteous Returns!
grant must be used to
help someone else;
• The Righteous
Returns! event must take
place within six months
of receipt of grant; and
• A brief 5-10 min-
ute presentation must be
made in person to the
St. Peter congregation
during a Sunday morn-
ing worship service.
To apply, send a 300-
500-word essay describing
the proposed “Righteous
Returns!” project to Pastor
Angela Khabeb, 422 N.
Pierce St., Delphos OH
45833; or email pastor-
atstpeter@gmail.com.
Include a contact person
with contact information.
The deadline to enter
projects is June 25.
Grant recipients will be
announced on July 25
(Christmas in July).
The application pro-
cess is open to anyone
living in Delphos or sur-
rounding communities.
Mostly cloudy
today with
showers and
thunderstorms
likely this
morning.
Then mostly
sunny in the afternoon.
Highs in the mid 70s. Mostly
clear tonight with lows in
the upper 50s. See page 2.
New SJ VB coach
sets skill camp
Carolyn Dammeyer (new
St. John’s varsity coach) and
the St. John’s coaching staff
and players will host a volley-
ball skills camp for any inter-
ested girl (grade as of 2013-14
school year) wanting to learn
the fundamentals of volleyball
and engage in team play.
The purpose of the camp,
set for the All-Saints Building,
is to create a strong volleyball
tradition at St. John’s and
develop a love for the game.
Dates: Grades 3-6 - 4-6
p.m. June 17-20; Grades 7-8
- 6-8 p.m. June 17-20; Grades
9-12 - 4-8 p.m. June 24-27.
Cost is $50 (includes
instruction, T-shirts, prizes,
snacks and camp motiva-
tors). Campers should report
in shorts, tennis shoes,
T-shirt and knee pads if
desired, ready to play.
For more informa-
tion, contact Dammeyer
at (419) 305-5160. To
ensure a camp T-shirt,
please register by Saturday
by calling Dammeyer.
Insurance is the respon-
sibility of the parents.
See LIBRARY, page 10
TUMC serves up ‘berry’ nice June Jubliee
Trinity United Methodist Church Mission Committee held its annual June Jubilee
on Wednesday evening. Mission Committee Chairman Pete Hoffmann said that all
the food was homemade and donated by members of the congregation. Proceeds
from the dinner will benefit local community charitable organizations. Above: Nedra
Macwhinney, left, and Kay Best scoop servings of strawberries for take-out orders.
(Delphos Herald/Stephanie Groves)
Summer Reading Program has 320 children participating
City weighs in on
ALCO closure
See ALCO, page 10
Siblings Eliza and Ramon Nuñez put the computers to good use at the Delphos Public
Library Wednesday afternoon. They are the children of Tanya and Jeff Neal. (Delphos
Herald/Stacy Taff)
“We’ve started
the Adult Summer
Reading Program
and I have some-
where between 50
and 75 adults. The
program allows
them to look at
the library as a
place that has more
than just books. If
they’re tech savvy,
they can start
tweeting with us
or check out our
Facebook page.
We’re getting them
to use magazines
and newspapers
and also explore
the book club
we have here.”
— Kelly Rist,
library director
AEP, Council on Aging gives tips for storm aftermath
Information submitted
AEP Ohio, a unit of American
Electric Power, constantly has its eyes
on the weather. The company’s inter-
nal meteorologists were monitoring the
approaching storm that was expected to
hit Ohio Wednesday evening.
AEP meteorologists agreed there was
potential for the front to produce a
squall line that could affect much of the
AEP Ohio’s service territory, as well
as neighboring states. This squall line
was expected to produce severe weather
accompanied by high winds gusting
above 60 miles per hour, potentially
causing widespread power outages in
affected areas.
AEP Ohio crews were prepared to
respond throughout the company’s
service territory and the company is
identifying the availability of additional
resources.
What to do during a power outage:
• Unplug major appliances to protect
them from a power surge when power
comes back on.
• Leave a light turned on so you know
when power is restored.
• Refuel heaters, lamps and gen-
erators outside and stay away from any
flames or sparks. Wipe up fuel spills
immediately.
• Contact AEP if using a generator —
this protects the homeowner and AEP
line workers as they work to restore
power. Be safe with backup generators.
• Never operate lanterns, heaters, or
fuel-fired stoves without proper ventila-
tion.
• Never burn charcoal indoors. It
releases poisonous carbon monoxide.
• Avoid downed power lines or spark-
ing equipment.
• Never remove debris that’s within
10 feet of a power line.
• Prevent children from carrying can-
dles or oil lamps.
Helping the elderly after
severe weather conditions
From the
Ohio Department of Aging
As severe conditions approach and
after they have passed, please check
on your friends, family and neighbors
in your community to ensure they have
power, food, water, medicines and nec-
essary supplies to stay safe and healthy
until things return to normal. Also, stay-
ing cool will be a big concern, as older
adults can be more susceptible to heat-
related illnesses.
Older adults, people with disabilities
and their families can call 1-866-243-
5678 to be connected to their local
area agency on aging’s resources and
programs that can provide help in their
communities.
The Delphos
Herald went to
press before the
storm hit the area
late Wednesday
early today. Here
are some tips from
American Electric
Power and the Ohio
Council on Aging
to assist residents
after a storm. Look
for updates at
delphosherald.com.
See STORM, page 10
2 – The Herald Thursday, June 13, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERAL
BIRTHS
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
IT WAS NEWS THEN
POLICE
REPORT
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CORRECTIONS
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 255
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Lori Silette,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.48 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.

405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Mary J. (Heitz)
German
Mary J. (Heitz) German,
84, of Delphos, passed away
on Wednesday afternoon at the
Kindred Hospital in Lima.
Arrangements are incom-
plete at Strayer Funeral Home
of Delphos.
Times Bulletin Staff Report
kdougal@timesbulletin.com
VAN WERT - Sentences for four cases
highlighted an otherwise light session in
Van Wert County Common Pleas Court on
Wednesday.
Ruth Ann Napier-Caldwell, 21, of Van
Wert, was sentenced on a charge of attempt-
ed conveyance of illegal drugs onto the
grounds of a government facility, a felony of
the fourth degree. Judge Charles D. Steele
sentenced her to three years of commu-
nity control, 180 days in jail to be served
consecutively to the sentence she is cur-
rently serving, an additional 30 days jail, 100
hours of community service, completion of a
substance abuse assessment and treatment,
psychological assessment and treatment, to
take all medications as prescribed and two
years of intensive probation. In addition,
she was ordered to pay court costs and par-
tial appointed-counsel fees. As a result, 17
months in prison was deferred pending her
completion of community control.
Tyler Kast, 21, of Van Wert, was sentenced
on a charge of complicity to attempted con-
veyance of illegal drugs onto the grounds
of a government facility, a felony of the
fourth degree. Judge Steele sentenced Kast
to three years community control, 90 days
in jail, with an additional 30 days jail, 100
hours community service, a substance abuse
assessment and treatment, two years of inten-
sive probation, and was ordered to pay court
costs and partial appointed-counsel fees. A
nine-month prison sentence was deferred
pending completion of community control.
Stephanie Farmer, 32, of Van Wert, was
sentenced on a charge of possession of drugs,
a fifth-degree felony. Farmer was sentenced
to nine months in prison with credit for one
day served. The Court further found this
offense was committed while she was on
community control for a previous offense
and imposed the previous sentence of one
year on count one and two years on count
two, to be served concurrently with each
other but consecutively to the new charge.
She received credit for 273 days served on
the old charges. In addition, her driver’s
license was suspended for one year and she
was ordered to pay court costs.
Jonathan Maxwell, 26, of Oakwood, was
sentenced for possession of dangerous ord-
nance, a fifth degree felony. Maxwell was
sentenced to three years community control
and up to six months in the WORTH Center,
30 days in jail, 100 hours of community
service, a substance abuse assessment and
treatment, two years intensive probation,
and ordered to pay court costs and partial-
appointed counsel fees. Eleven months of
prison service was deferred pending comple-
tion of community control.
ARRAIGNMENTS
Robert Seibert, 26, Van Wert, pled not
guilty to a charges of possession of heroin,
felony four and possession of heroin, felony
five. He was released on a surety bond and
pre-trial set for 8 a.m. June 26.
Ricky Girod, 51, Grover Hill, pled not
guilty to illegal assembly or possession
of chemicals to manufacture drugs, felony
three. His bond was set at $80,000 cash and
pretrial was set for 8 a.m. June 26.
Lester Sulfridge Jr., 54, Van Wert, pled
not guilty to two counts of driving under
the influence, each a felony three. He was
released on a surety bond with a condition to
not operate any motor vehicle and pre-trial
set for 8 a.m. June 26.
CHANGE OF PLEA
Jerad Caldwell, 26, Van Wert, changed his
plea to guilty to possession of drugs, felony
of the fifth degree. The Court ordered a pre-
sentence investigation and set sentencing for
9 a.m. July 17.
SENTENCINGS:
PROBATION VIOLATION
Cyle Black, 27, Van Wert, appeared for
a probation violation for failing to report an
arrest to probation and for failing to report to
probation. He admitted the violations and was
re-sentenced to three years community control
under the same conditions as before plus 30
days jail. Nine months prison was deferred
pending completion of community control.
JUDICIAL RELEASE HEARING
Ryan Woodall, 39, Willshire, was granted
judicial release from prison having been
previously sentenced for robbery and driving
under the influence. He was placed on three
years community control, up to six months
in WORTH Center, 30 days jail, 100 hours
community service, substance abuse assess-
ment and treatment, three-year intensive
probation, ordered to pay court costs and
partial appointed counsel fees, three years
prison was deferred pending completion of
community control.
Twin boys, Brady Alan and
Blake Lee, were born April 21
to Mitch and Megan Koester.
They weighed 5 pounds, 3
ounces and 4 pounds, 6 ounces
respectively. They were both
18 inches long.
Grandparents are Dave and
Mary Koester, Debbie Collins
and Mike and Julie Collins.
Great-grandparents are Don
and Monica Miller and the late
H.H. Koester and Earl and
Helen Osting.
A boy, Bard Elliott, was
born 1:49 a.m. on May 8 to
April and Bryan Hickman of
Toledo.
He weighed 7 pounds, 11
ounces and was 22 inches long.
Grandparents are Jim and
Cindy Klima and Bard and
Vicki Hickman
Great-grandparents are
Ralph and Judy Averesch,
Ruth Klima and the late Lenny
Klima.
A boy, Keith Alexander
Bemis Sigler, was born at
1:51 a.m. on May 31 to Mary
Frances Bemis and Jonathon
Sigler of Portsmouth, Va.,
where they are stationed with
the Navy.
He weighed 8 pounds, 4
ounces and was 22 inches long.
He was welcomed by his
grandmother, Sue Bemis, and
Brandy Sloan of Delphos.
Grandparents also include
Tony (Sue) Bemis of Delphos,
Dennis (Carol) Sigler of San
Diego and Monica Sigler of
Colorado.
Great-grandparents are
Jack and Sue Reddy of Troy
and Don and Naomi Bemis of
Versailles.
Aunts include Allie
(Moon Nammour) Bemis
of Cleveland and Christy
Bemis of Malesworth AFB in
England.
Uncles include the late
Keith Bemis, Brandon Sigler
of San Diego and Ted Bemis
of Charleston, S.C.
Rosemary T.
Pohlman
Dec. 31, 1929-June 11, 2013
Rosemary T. Pohlman, 83,
of Delphos, died Tuesday at
her residence.
She was born Dec. 31,
1929, in Delphos to Jacob
and Veronica (Ricker) Burgei,
who preceded her in death.
On Oct. 6, 1951, she mar-
ried Arthur A. Pohlman, who
died on Dec. 23, 1959.
Survivors include a son,
Dennis L. (Rita) Pohlman
of Lima; four sisters, Alma
Minning and Ruth Pohlman,
of Delphos, Irene Miller
of Ottoville and Norma
Vonderembse of Delphos; a
brother, Orville (Ethel) Burgei
of Delphos; four grandchil-
dren, Lindsay (Andy) Snider,
Gwyne (Edwin) Sorenson,
Jessica (Joe) Hoersten and
Anthony Pohlman; and one
great-grandchild, Dylan
Snider.
She was also preceded
in death by a son, Karl J.
Pohlman; a sister, Gertrude
Rode; and two brothers, John
Burgei and Tom Burgei.
Mrs. Pohlman was a seam-
stress at Drapery Stitch for
30 years. She was a member
of St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church and volun-
teered at the nursing home
and Thrift Shop for many
years. She loved flowers,
working in the garden and
sewing for her family and
friends. She also enjoyed bus
day trips with her friends and
sisters.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday
at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, the Rev.
Chris Bohnsack officiating.
Burial will be in the church
cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. Friday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, where
a Parish Wake will begin at
7:30 p.m.
To leave condolences for
the family, visit harterand-
schier.com.
One Year Ago
Delphos children in grades
K-5 enjoyed “Lunar Rocket
Rovers” at the Delphos
Public Library Tuesday after-
noon as part of the Summer
Reading Program. Maria
Vega of Wapakoneta’s Neil
Armstrong Air and Space
Museum gave a presenta-
tion on space rockets. Vega
showed a model of “Saturn
V,” the rocket that took
Armstrong, a Wapakoneta
native, to the moon.
25 Years Ago – 1988
Alvin and Debbie
Langhals of Columbus
Grove were announced as
one of the six winners from
Ohio in the “Barn Again!”
historic rehabilitation con-
test. The Langhals were
merit award winners and
received $100 and a special
plaque for their preservation
of the rural heritage of the
United States.
Catholic Ladies of
Columbus held the last meet-
ing for the summer with a pot-
luck with 37 members attend-
ing. Attendance awards were
won by Agnes Sadler and
Stella Suever; 50-50 went to
Dorothy Osting, Mary Topp,
Valeria Altman and Martha
Ardner. Members attending
the convention June 13-15
at Columbus are Dorothy
Osting, Mary Topp, Bertha
Schmelzer and Gertie Patton.
The National Secondary
Educat i on Counci l
announced that Deb Sadler
has been named a Scholastic
All-American. Sadler, who
attended St. John’s High
School, was nominated for
the award by Dave Alt, coun-
selor. Sadler is the daughter
of Agnes Sadler and the late
Thomas Sadler.
50 Years Ago – 1963
Fifty members of the
Fraternal Order of Eagles
Auxiliary met in regular
session Monday evening at
the Eagles club rooms. The
new vice president, Ethel
Wrocklage, was installed
with past president, Jeanne
Stegeman in charge of the
ceremonies. The Auxiliary
door award went to Gloria
Bayman and her name was
also chosen in the hot seat
drawing.
Approximately 40 mem-
bers were present when the
Catholic Ladies of Columbia
at Fort Jennings met in
Memorial Hall recently to
honor four of their elder
members, Mrs. Edward
Schimmoeller, Mrs. John
Meier, Pauline Rellinger, and
Mrs. George Von Lehmden.
Each were presented with a
rosary.
John “Jack” Wiechart,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence
A. Wiechart, and a 1963
graduate of St. John’s High
School, has been notified
that he is the recipient of a
$300 scholarship grant from
the 37th Division Veterans
Association. Jack, who was
president of the school’s
student council during his
senior year and class saluta-
torian, was awarded a four-
year scholarship to General
Motors Institute in Michigan.
75 Years Ago – 1938
Two Delphos students,
Gerald Will of St. John’s
school, and Dale Van Meter
of Jefferson, will repre-
sent Commemorative Post,
American Legion, at the third
session of the 49th mythical
state of the Union, Buckeye
Boys State, sponsored by
the American Legion. A new
feature will be inaugurated
this year when a National
Broadcasting coast to coast
radio program will be broad-
cast June 25 from Boys State.
Miller’s Opticians had
no trouble in defeating the
Lima DeMolay kittenball
team Sunday afternoon at
Waterworks Park. The score
was 12 to 6. Ralston hit three
home runs during the game
and Stahl chalked up one.
VW Court News
WITTLER, Leroy N.,
69, of Fort Jennings, Mass of
Christian Burial will be 10 a.m.
today at St. Joseph Catholic
Church, Fort Jennings, the
Rev. Charles Obinwa officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in the
church cemetery. Visitation
will be held one hour prior to
the Mass at church. Memorial
contributions may be given to
St. Joseph Catholic Church or
to the Putnam County animal
shelter. Condolences may be
expressed at: www.lovefuner-
alhome.com.
BLACKBURN, Jonah
James, stillborn, funeral servic-
es will begin at 4 p.m. Friday
at Harter and Schier Funeral
Home. Burial will be at a later
date. Friends may call from
3-4 p.m. Friday at the funeral
home. Preferred memorials are
to the family.
YOUNGPETER, Anthony
J., 86, of Lima, Mass of
Christian Burial will begin at
11 a.m. today at St. Gerard
Catholic Church, the Rev. Mike
Houston officiating. Interment
will be in Gethsemani
Cemetery, Lima, with the US
Army and VFW Post 1275
conducting military graveside
services. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions can be
made to St. Gerard’s Catholic
Church, 240 W. Robb, Lima
OH 45801. Condolences may
be expressed at www.chamber-
lainhuckeriede.com.
Corn $6.86
Wheat $6.48
Soybeans $15.59
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TODAY: Mostly cloudy
with showers and thunder-
storms likely in the morn-
ing. Then mostly sunny in
the afternoon. Highs in the
mid70s. Northwest winds 10
to 20 mph. Chance of precipi-
tation70 percent.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear.
Lows in the upper 50s. North
winds
5 to 15 mph.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the mid 70s. North
winds 5 to 15 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly
clear. Lows in the mid 50s.
Northeast winds around 5
mph shifting to the southeast
after midnight.
SATURDAY: Partly
cloudy. A 20 percent chance
of showers and thunderstorms
in the afternoon. Highs in the
upper 70s.
Rare Superman
comic book sells for
$175,000
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) —
A rare copy of the comic book
featuring Superman’s first
appearance that went undis-
covered for over 70 years in
the insulation of a Minnesota
house has sold for $175,000.
The high bidder for the
copy of Action Comics
No. 1 in the online auc-
tion was a “hard core, gold-
en age comic book collec-
tor,” Stephen Fishler, CEO
of ComicConnect.com, said
Tuesday. The buyer’s name
was not released. Fifty-one
offers were submitted before
bidding closed Monday night.
But Fishler said the buyer
had been looking for a sev-
eral months for a lower-grade,
unrestored copy of the Man
of Steel’s debut, rather than a
copy in better condition that
could have cost well over $1
million.
Fishler estimates there
are only around 100 known
copies of Action Comics No.
1, which was published in
1938. He said it’s prized not
only for its rarity, but because
Superman was the archetype
of all comic book superheroes
to come.
This copy was found by
David Gonzalez among old
newspapers in the ceiling
insulation of a house he was
restoring in the small western
Minnesota town of Hoffman.
Delphos woman
arrested on warrant
At 1:25 p.m. on Tuesday,
Delphos Police went to the
200 block of North Main
Street in reference to serving
an active arrest warrant on a
subject in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival, they
located Deborah Fisher, 52,
and took her into custody on a
warrant issued out of Hancock
County for a non-compliance
to a court order.
Fisher was later turned over
to deputies from the Hancock
County Sheriff’s Department.
Fisher
2
Prices good 8am Saturday, September 12 to midnight Sunday, September 13, 2009 at all Chief & Rays Supermarket locations.
Save up to $2.00 lb.
FreshMarket
Sandwich Spread
$
1
99
12 pk.
lb.
lb.
lb.
Double Coupons Every Day • www.ChiefSupermarkets.com
Product of the United States
Save up to $3.00 lb.
Kretschmar
Virginia Brand
Honey Ham
$
3
99
Save up to $1.81
Arps or Dean’s
Cottage Cheese
selected varieties
$
1
68
Save $3.42 on 2
Seyfert’s
Potato Chips
Save up to $1.00
Angelfood
Cake
Iced or Lemon
Angelfood Cake
Save $2.11; select varieties
Super Dip
Ice Cream
Great food. Good neighbor.
$
2
99
8.5-9 oz. ea. 4 qt.
In the Bakery
Sale starts Saturday!
24 oz.
Save up to $5.00 lb.
USDA Choice
Boneless Beef
Ribeye Steak
Regular or Thick Cut
$
6
99
Save $7.96 on 4
All Varieties
Super Chill Soda
2/$
3
16 oz.
Save $1.80 on 3
Flavorite
White Bread
79
¢
Limit 3 - Additionals $1.29
Limit 4 - Additionals 2/$5
95% Fat Free, No MSG, Filler or Gluten
In the Deli
$
1
28
$
3
29
S $2 11 l t i ti
In the Deli
1102 Elida Ave., Delphos • 419-692-5921
www.ChiefSupermarkets.com
www.Facebook.com/ChiefSupermarket
Open: 24 Hours Monday-Friday
Saturday & Sunday: 7am-midnight
One coupon per check. Must
have coupon. Not valid with
other offers or discounts.
Not valid on Father’s Day.
Exp. 6-24-13
$
1.
50
OFF
2 Regular
Lunch Buffets
One coupon per check. Must
have coupon. Not valid with
other offers or discounts.
Not valid on Father’s Day.
Exp. 6-24-13
$
2
OFF
2 Regular
Dinner Buffets
One coupon per check. Must
have coupon. Not valid with
other offers or discounts.
Not valid on Father’s Day.
Exp. 6-24-13
Sunday Buffet
Served all day
$
7.
99
Up to 6
people
One coupon per check. Must
have coupon. Not valid with
other offers or discounts.
Not valid on Father’s Day.
Exp. 6-24-13
Senior
Dinner Buffet
$
6.
99
Mon.-
Thurs.
All DAy Dinner
Sunday, June 16
10:30am-9:30pm
All DAy Dinner
Sunday, June 16
10:30am-9:30pm
$
9.
99 $
9.
99
• Crab legs
• Top round steak
• BBQ ribs • Mussels
• Crispy Frog Legs
• Salmon • Sushi
• Appetizers
• Fresh fruits
• Desserts
Kids under 3 eat FREE
Kids ages 3-9 half price
Take-out buffet available: $3.95/lb. lunch • $4.95/lb. dinner • Big selection of sushi boxes for take-out!
349 Towne Center Blvd.
Van Wert, OH
Tel. & FAx:
419.238.5888
ChineSe reSTAurAnT Dine in & TAke-OuT
BeST ChineSe FOOD in TOwn
All yOu CAn eAT BuFFeT • MOre ThAn 100 iTeMS!
GiFT CArDS AvAilABle
ChineSe reSTAurAnT Dine in & TAke-OuT
BeST ChineSe FOOD in TOwn
All yOu CAn eAT BuFFeT • MOre ThAn 100 iTeMS!
GiFT CArDS AvAilABle
GreAT FOOD AT GreAT PriCeS GreAT FOOD AT GreAT PriCeS
0
0
0
6
7
0
2
7
Happy
Father’s Day!
Happy
Father’s Day!
GOOD CARPET CLEANING
419-339-5471 419-233-5007
22 years experience
Dry Carpet
Cleaning
Miriam & Wilmer Good
NO DRYING TIME
• Deep Cleans - No Wickback
• Lifts & Fluffs Carpet
• Removes Dust Mites & Allergens
• Improve Indoor Air Quality
• Environmentally Friendly 1
What I learned from Dad
To run
Saturday, June 15
Deadline: June 13
Send us a photo with
a short write-up of
“What I learned
from Dad”.
(under 150 words)
Cost: $10.00
Send to:
The Delphos Herald
c/o “What I learned from Dad”
405 N. Main Street
Delphos, OH
or email nspencer@delphosherald.com
Thursday, June 13, 2013 The Herald – 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
E - The Environmental
Magazine
Dear EarthTalk: How far along are we
at developing algae-based and other higher
yield sources of biofuels?
— Jason McCabe, Tullahoma, TN
A few years ago biofuels were all the rage.
Environmental advocates to national security
hawks alike were extolling the virtues of etha-
nol and biodiesel as a carbon-neutral bridge to
our energy future. But the bubble burst when it
became apparent that there wasn’t enough agri-
cultural land in the U.S. or elsewhere to grow
sufficient amounts of corn, palm and other
crops to feed both people and their engines. To
boot, the process of extracting and distributing
biofuels has proven anything but carbon neu-
tral. And with ever cheaper natural gas widely
available now, paying a premium for ethanol or
biodiesel seemed frivolous.
But a new generation of biofuels based on
algae might just change all that. One of the
major problems with biofuels that algae could
solve is space, since algae can yield as much
as 100 times more fuel per unit area than other
so-called “second-generation” biofuel crops
(e.g. non-food crops or non-food waste parts
of food crops). Federal researchers from the
U.S. Department of Energy report that it would
take only 15,000 square miles — less than 1/7
the area now used to harvest all the corn across
the country — to produce enough algae fuel to
replace all of our petroleum fuel.
While burning algae-derived fuel in an
engine or factory generates carbon dioxide
(CO2) emissions just like fossil fuels do, the
algae itself requires CO2 to photosynthesize
— so overall no new CO2 is added to the atmo-
sphere. Furthermore, any CO2 created through
processing or refinement can be captured and
re-directed to the growing algae beds. And
unlike other biofuel feedstocks, algae produc-
tion has minimal impact on freshwater sup-
plies — especially when it can be undertaken
in ocean waters or even wastewater.
At least three well-funded ventures are
poised to ramp up production of commercially
viable quantities of algae-derived crude oil over
the next couple of years. California’s Solazyme
is building an algae fuel factory in Brazil in
partnership with food processing giant Bunge
and expects to manufacture 100,000 metric
tons of fuel there each year. Solazyme is also
retooling an Archer Daniels Midland factory
in Clinton, Iowa to produce another 100,000
metric tons of algae fuel per year domestically.
Another company ready to make the leap
into commercial scale production of algae fuel
is Sapphire Energy, which operates a 2,200
-acre algae farm in New Mexico where oil is
harvested across 70 open ponds and refined on
site. Sapphire — Bill Gates is a big investor
— expects the facility, which goes online next
year, to generate some 10,000 barrels of crude
oil a day by 2018.
Yet a third player in the emerging algae fuel
market is Synthetic Genomics, the brainchild
of genomics guru Craig Venter, who beat the
U.S. government in sequencing the human
genome and at a fraction of the cost. The com-
pany, which last year purchased an 81-acre site
in California’s Imperial Valley to scale up and
test its synthetic algae strains across 42 open
ponds, plans to genetically modify algae to
optimize its oil output. ExxonMobil signed a
$600 million development deal with the com-
pany to further the cutting edge research.
Federal researchers from the U.S.
Department of Energy report that it would
take only 15,000 square miles — less than
1/7 the area now used to harvest all of
the corn across the country — to produce
enough algae fuel to replace all of our petro-
leum fuel. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo)
Special Olympics
compete at track
Information submitted
Recently, 18 athletes from Van Wert County Special
Olympics competed at Bluffton University in track and field
events. The results are as follows:
100 meter dash: Gold Medal - Rhyan Gent, Miranda
Fleming and Meghan Bell; Silver Medal - Justin Wills,
Amber Young, Michelle Mollenkopf and Jeannie Miller
50 Meter assisted walk - Ronda Crosley - Gold Medal
100 Meter Walk - Patti Drake - Silver medal
Mini Jav: Gold Medal - Miranda Fleming
Silver Medal - Jason Etzler and Michelle Mollenkopf
Softball Throw — Gold Medal - Jason Benner, Rhyan
Gent, Justin Wills, Brandon Painter, Amber Young, Megan
Bell, Francis Smith, Jeannie Miller; Silver Medal - Kirk
Pontius, Patti Drake, and Sharon Mosier; Bronze Medal -
Ronda Crosley and Rachel Chivington
The 4x100 meter female relay team of Miller, Mollenkopf,
Fleming and Bell received a Silver Medal and a Gold Medal
went to the male team of Wills, Painter, Bradley Swann and
Gent.
Other athletes were Justin Kohorst and Meghan Dettrow.
Elks lodge donates to VW Council on Aging
Information submitted
VAN WERT — Van Wert Lodge No. 1197, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks
recently donated $100 to the Van Wert County Council on Aging. The monies will go
towards supporting their upcoming 3rd Annual Designer Purse Bingo Fundraiser sched-
uled at 6 p.m. Friday, June 14. The agency will use the donations to purchase designer
handbags which will be displayed and used as bingo prizes throughout the fundraiser.
The Council on Aging transports seniors every day to medical appointments, grocery
stores, pharmacies or social service appointments. Without these vital services, many of
the county’s seniors would be forced to enter long-term care facilities. The rising cost of
fuel has created a problem for the agency.
Red Power Round Up
2013 coming to the Allen
County Fairgrounds
Information submitted
LIMA — Attention
International Harvester
enthusiasts: the 24
th
annu-
al Red Power Round Up is
coming to the Allen County
Fairgrounds in Lima begin-
ning at noon on Wednesday,
June 19.
Over 20,000 people are
expected over the course of
the event featuring all things
International Harvester.
This annual summer show
brings together members of
the International Harvester
Collectors Club which has
chapters in Canada and New
Zealand, as well as 35 chap-
ters in the US.
Over 1,000 tractors, 175
Trucks-Scouts-Travelalls,
400 Cub Cadets, IH mem-
orabilia and other unique
products manufactured by
the International Harvester
Company will be featured.
The gates open to the pub-
lic on Thursday, Friday and
Saturday at 8 a.m. There will
be a variety of entertain-
ment featured each day of
the show, including a daily
tractor parade in front of the
grandstand.
Tickets prices are $10 at
the gate or $25 for a full show
pass. Attendees entering the
show after 5 p.m. will pay
$5 gate admission. Anyone
interested in displaying
International Harvester items
are invited to attend. There is
a $15 national membership
fee to display which covers
insurance for the event.
For more information,
visit our web page at www.
rpru2013.com.
Pictured are Kevin Matthews (right), COA director, and Gerard T. Mazur, exalt-
ed ruler. (Photo submitted)
Ohio House:
process veterans’
claims faster
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Ohio lawmakers want fed-
eral officials to reduce the
processing time for veterans’
disability claims.
The Ohio House on
Wednesday approved a res-
olution urging President
Obama, Congress and the
head of the Department
of Veterans Affairs to take
prompt action to help veter-
ans get needed treatment.
Speaker Wi l l i am
Batchelder, a Medina
Republican, said in a state-
ment it is “tragic” that many
veterans are unable to get the
treatment.
The statement says the U.S.
Government Accountability
Office reports the average
length of time for the VA to
complete a disability claim
increased from 161 days to
260 days between fiscal years
2009 and 2012.
The GAO also says the
number of backlogged claims
awaiting a decision for more
than 125 days has more than
tripled since September 2009.
Holiday at Home
activities announced
Information submitted
VAN WERT — The
Holiday at Home Committee
extends an invitation to the
Van Wert community to par-
ticipate in the events of its
30th celebration.
The VFW will be host-
ing its annual pancake and
sausage breakfast. The serv-
ing starts at 7 a.m. and runs
through 11 a.m. What a per-
fect way to start a busy day
with your choice of pan-
cakes & sausage or biscuits
& gravy.
The parade will start at 11
a.m. on July 4. The parade
route begins at the corner
of Cherry and Main Streets
(beside the YWCA) and con-
tinues on down Main Street
where it will turn north onto
Shannon Street and disband
by the YMCA.
All types of entries are
welcomed. Prizes will be
awarded for the best com-
mercial, best non-commer-
cial, best marching, most
patriotic and the judges’
award. A parade form may
be completed and returned to
the parade chair, Linda Stutz,
by mailing to 120 E. Main
Street, Van Wert. Any infor-
mation concerning the parade
may be had by contacting
Stutz at (419) 238-4192 from
8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. and at (419)
238-2901 after 4:30 p.m.
The Van Wert County
Historical Society will again
have lots of activities going
on at the museum grounds
on North Washington Street.
Their day will start with
the 20th annual bike ride
that starts at Jubilee Park
and winds through parts
of Van Wert County. After
the parade, you will want
to adjourn to the museum
grounds and enjoy food
sponsored by the Van Wert
Rotary Club and then wan-
der the grounds for all the
crafts and music.
Later in the afternoon,
the Van Wert Firemen’s
Association will be have its
chicken/pork chop meals at
Smiley Park. Come out and
pick up one of these delicious
meals and relax at the Park.
At dusk, the annual
Fireworks (sponsored by the
Van Wert County Foundation
and a group of local busi-
nessmen) will be displayed.
We need your help! The
Holiday at Home Committee
has sponsored the fireworks
held on the 4th of July for
30 years along with the sup-
port of the Van Wert County
Foundation and a number of
local businessmen (for which
we give a huge thank you).
As many of us do in our
personal life, this year we
find ourselves short on fund-
ing to put on the fireworks.
If you would like to be a part
of this celebration and have
your name added to the listing
of donors, please make your
financial support to “Holiday
at Home” and mail to Sue
Heppeard, Parks Department,
515 E. Main Street, Van Wert
OH 45891.
Bobcat sightings
in Ohio on the rise
Verifed sightings of threat-
ened species increase for
third straight year
Information submitted
COLUMBUS – The
number of verified bobcat
sightings in Ohio in 2012
increased to 169, according
to the Ohio Department of
Natural Resources (ODNR).
This marks the third con-
secutive year that more 100
verified bobcat sightings
were recognized in the state.
ODNR Division of
Wildlife biologists verified
136 and 106 sightings in
2011 and 2010, respectively.
Of the 169 verified sightings
in 2012, most occurred in
Noble County and the coun-
ties immediately adjacent.
Overall, observers in 31
counties reported a verified
bobcat sighting.
To report a bobcat sighting,
call 800-WILDLIFE (945-
3543) or email wildInfo@
dnr.state.oh.us. Sightings are
verified by ODNR Division
of Wildlife biologists and
have increased steadily dur-
ing the last decade. The bob-
cat is listed as a threatened
species in Ohio and is pro-
tected by state law.
Bobcats once roamed
across Ohio, but they were
extirpated around 1850 as
more people settled within
the state. A handful of unver-
ified bobcat sightings in the
1960s announced the return
of the species. Bobcat sight-
ings have been verified in
43 counties since 1970, with
unverified sightings in 84
counties.
A bobcat may be veri-
fied with photographs of the
animal or its tracks; road kill
recovery and sightings by
ODNR Division of Wildlife
personnel; and encounters
through incidental trappings,
which are followed by the
animal’s release. The num-
ber of bobcat sightings con-
firmed from trail cameras
has increased dramatically
since 2006, and most veri-
fied sightings in 2012 were
documented by these cam-
eras.
The ODNR Division of
Wildlife uses technology to
clarify estimated bobcat pop-
ulations because it is rare to
see them in the wild. To help
them with their research,
biologists use remote cam-
eras and scent stations. GPS
radio collars are used to track
the location of bobcats after
catching and releasing them.
Efforts to learn more
about the locations of bob-
cats are supported by the
Endangered Species and
Wildlife Diversity Fund.
Ohioans give donations to
this fund through the state
income tax check-off pro-
gram and by purchasing car-
dinal license plates. People
may also make donations at
wildohio.com.
ODNR ensures a bal-
ance between wise use and
protection of our natural
resources for the benefit of
all. Visit the ODNR website
at ohiodnr.gov.
PUTTING YOUR
WORLD IN
PERSPECTIVE
If you aren't already taking advantage
of our convenient home delivery service,
please call us at 419-695-0015.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
405 N. Main St. • Delphos
Ohio panel OKs new
statewide deer hunting rules
COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio hunters will see extended
hours and new limits on the number of deer they can kill
statewide during the upcoming hunting season under rules
approved Wednesday by a state legislative panel.
The regulations, approved by the state’s Joint Committee
on Agency Rule Review, reduce the statewide bag limit on
deer from 12 to nine. They also set per-county limits instead of
dividing the state into zones with different limits.
Hunting hours have been extended 30 minutes past sun-
set for all deer firearms seasons, making the hours the same
as archery season. The rules cleared the committee with no
opposition.
The president of the League of Ohio Sportsmen, Larry
Mitchell, said the new county limits will help maintain a more
balanced deer herd across the state.
AGRIBUSINESS
4 — The Herald Thursday, June 13, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
Does your business
need a website,
or does your website
need a new look?
The Delphos Herald
can help!
• We make all your content
• We do all the work
• Free ongoing changes & updates
• Your site will be SEO’d
• Plus LOTS more!
Call us today at 419-695-0015 ext. 138
email us at dhemple@delphosherald.com
dhi
DIGITAL
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
www.dhidigital.com
Powered by DHI Digital
2
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL
GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd.
Delphos
Fabrication & Welding In
c.
Quality
H.G. Violet Equipment
2103 North Main St
Delphos , OH 45833
Phone 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
H.G. Violet Equipment
2103 North Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
Phone 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are
tax-free, and distributions can be taken free of
penalties or taxes.* You may even beneft from
converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a
10% penalty if the account is less than fve years old and the owner is
under age 59½.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting
to know your goals so we can help you
reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit today.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are
tax-free, and distributions can be taken free of
penalties or taxes.* You may even beneft from
converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a
10% penalty if the account is less than fve years old and the owner is
under age 59½.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting
to know your goals so we can help you
reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit today.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are
tax-free, and distributions can be taken free of
penalties or taxes.* You may even beneft from
converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a
10% penalty if the account is less than fve years old and the owner is
under age 59½.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting
to know your goals so we can help you
reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit today.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
ASA announces
changes to Soybean
Marketing and
Production College
Information submitted

ST. LOUIS – The American
Soybean Association (ASA)
announced the format of
its Soybean Marketing and
Production College is being
updated to better serve soy-
bean growers.
A premier education event
originally planned as a two-
day conference, the Soybean
Marketing and Production
College is being condensed
so participating growers will
only have to commit to one
night away from their farms.
The conference will now be
one day: Tuesday, July 30 at
the Crowne Plaza Riverfront
Hotel in St. Paul, Minn.
“Every season has its own
unique challenges, and this
season is no different,” said
Bob Worth, ASA Membership
and Corporate Relations
Chairman. “The Soybean
Marketing and Production
College is designed to pro-
vide information on market-
ing and production practices
to enhance grower profit-
ability. Reducing the number
of days off-farm, while still
providing the same great con-
tent, will allow more growers
to take advantage of this key
educational opportunity.”
Attendees of ASA’s
Soybean Marketing and
Production College will par-
ticipate in learning sessions
on herbicide and weed resis-
tance sponsored by Bayer
CropScience; precision
agriculture, sponsored by
AGCO; and global sustain-
ability. Matt Roberts, Ph.D.,
of Ohio State University,will
deliver the keynote presen-
tation reviewing the current
supply and demand situation
for grains and how growers
can take advantage of trends
in their own marketing deci-
sions.
The registration fee for
the ASA Soybean Marketing
and Production College is
$199 for ASA members and
$279 for non-members. Fees
have been reduced to reflect
the change in format.
Don’t miss out on this
important educational pro-
gram that will help you
increase your on-farm profit.
Register by Tuesday, July 9!
For more information about
the ASA Soybean Marketing
and Production College, go
to www.SoyGrowers.com/
marketingproductioncollege.
Honey bee swarm;
do not panic
BY JIM LOPSHIRE
OSU-Extension
Ag Educator
Paulding County
A cluster of bees hanging on the branch of a tree or on the
side of a building is a sure cause for human excitement. This is
referred to as honey bee swarming.
A swarm is the way honey bees start a new colony. Honey
bee swarms can contain thousands of bees that have broken
away from the original colony, including workers, drones and
the original queen.
Swarms of bees sometimes frighten people, though they are
usually not aggressive at this stage of their life cycle. This is
principally due to the fact that swarming bees have no hive to
defend and are more interested in finding a new nesting point
for their queen. This does not mean that bee swarms will not
attack if they perceive a threat; however, most bees only attack
in response to intrusions against their hive and swarming bees
have no hive.
The queen is at the center of the swarm. Her pheromones
attract the other bees to her. A few scout bees will leave the
swarm to seek out a suitable location for a nest, such as a cav-
ity in a tree. When a location is found, the swarm will move to
the site.
Oftentimes, local beekeepers are willing to capture a swarm.
If you do not know one, give the Extension office a call. The
beekeeper will place an empty container, such as a bee hive, at
the base of the swarm, and shake or dislodge the bees from the
swarm into the entrance. The now-occupied hive can be moved
after dark, when the bees are done foraging and are less active.
Occasionally, honey bees will attempt to nest in house
walls. The OSU Extension Fact Sheet, “Honey Bees in House
Walls” (ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/pdf/2079.pdf) provides
detailed information on removing a honey bee colony from
structures.
BY JAMES J.
HOORMAN
OSU-Extension
Ag educator
Putnam County
Mississippi State
University offers the fol-
lowing explanation on pur-
ple corn. “Corn growth is
often stunted and lower corn
leaves turn purple as a result
of phosphorus (P) deficien-
cy. Phosphorus’s primary
role in a plant is to store and
transfer energy produced
by photosynthesis for use
in growth and reproductive
processes. Adequate P levels
encourage vigorous root and
shoot growth and promote
early maturity. These effects
often increase water use effi-
ciency and potential grain
yield. Thus, phosphorus
deficiency stunts plant veg-
etative growth and reduces
grain development.
Purple leaf tissue is
symptomatic of P deficien-
cy. Phosphorus deficiency
symptoms appear on lower
leaf tips and progress along
leaf margins until the entire
leaf shows purpling. Lower
leaves often die when P defi-
ciency is severe, especially
when hot, dry, windy con-
ditions persist. New leaves
emerging from the whorl are
usually green, because the
plant mobilizes available P
to the youngest leaves.
Phosphorus deficiency
symptoms often occur as
young plants are exposed
to growing conditions fol-
lowing cool and often wet
conditions. These conditions
result in a lag phase where
vegetative growth exceeds
the roots’ ability to supply
P. Young plants are espe-
cially vulnerable because
their root systems are small
and P is immobile in the
soil solution. Any cultural or
environmental factors which
limit root growth will aggra-
vate deficiency symptoms.
Examples of such conditions
include: cool temperatures,
too wet or dry soil, com-
pacted soil, herbicide dam-
age, insect damage, and root
pruning by side-dressing
knives or cultivators. Acidic
soil can also intensify P defi-
ciency symptoms. Low soil
pH severely limits P avail-
ability to plants, which may
cause deficiency symptoms
even where high soil test P
levels exist.
Leaves normally regain
green coloration when fur-
ther root exploration occurs,
especially when favorable
growing conditions prevail.
However, P deficiency will
reduce yield by delaying
maturity, stunting growth,
and restricting energy uti-
lization. Warmer tempera-
tures, sunlight, and rain help
plants obtain more P because
these conditions promote
both plant and root growth.
Good growing conditions
move sugars blocked in the
plant leaves, which is caus-
ing the purple leaf color.
Treatment options to rem-
edy P deficiency have mod-
est short-term effectiveness,
since P is immobile in the soil
solution. Thus, root explora-
tion into the amended area
is required for plant uptake.
Surface application of P fer-
tilizer will limit availabil-
ity to the top couple inches
of soil. Thus, plant uptake
would be more probable in
no-tillage cropping systems,
since these systems encour-
age root exploration near
the soil surface. Phosphorus
injected as a side-dress treat-
ment would increase avail-
ability to the root system;
however, be careful not to
prune roots” (Mississippi
State University). In most
cases, a good rain and warm-
er temperatures are the best
cure.
“Bagworms are starting
to hatch in southwest Ohio”,
says Joe Boggs, Ohio State
University horticulturalist,
“so people in Northwest
Ohio should start looking
for signs of bagworms on
their trees, especially pine
trees.” However, bagworms
eat not only evergreens but
also about 130 different spe-
cies of deciduous (plants that
grow and live more than one
year) trees and shrubs.
Bagworms use a pro-
cess called “ballooning” to
transport themselves to new
locations. Some of the first
caterpillars (first instar) that
hatch will produce a strand
of silk and if the wind catch-
es this strand, they can be
transported to a new loca-
tion. This is how bagworms
find new hosts to infect each
year. The first instar cater-
pillars make a bag like a
dunce cap while the second
batch (second instar) forms
a downward balloon like a
pine cone. The later-hatched
instars are highly destruc-
tive, especially to pine trees.
To control bagworms and
their damage, try to target
the early instar caterpil-
lars that are hatching. The
best product to use on early
instar hatching caterpillars is
a biological insecticide call
Bacillus thuringienis(Btk)
found in products like
Dipel®, Thuricide®, etc.
which kill the pest but not
the beneficial predators. Btk
is a stomach poison insec-
ticide that must be ingested
so the effect is short-lived
and two applications may
be required to control the
emerging bagworms. Once
the bagworms get more
than 0.75 inches long, the
Btk efficiency declines, so
spray early and often. A soil
drench application of dinote-
furan (e.g. Safari) or prod-
ucts containing clothianidin
are also effective against
early instar bagworms and
do not harm beneficial pred-
ators and parasitoids (Taken
from Buckeye horticultural
newsletter).
Corn growth is often
stunted and lower corn
leaves turn purple as a result
of phosphorus (P) deficiency.
(Mississippi State University
photo)
Phosphorus deficiency causes purple corn
Allen County
Courthouse
Thursday, June 13, 2013 The H erald — 5 www.delphosherald.com
COMMUNITY
Landmark
Calendar of
Events
Happy
Birthday
TODAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
8 p.m. — American Legion
Post 268, 415 N. State St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9-11:30 a.m.— Delphos
Project Recycle at Delphos
Fuel and Wash.
9 a.m. to noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. —
Delphos Postal Museum is
open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
8-11:30 a.m. — Knights
of Columbus benefit for St.
John’s School at the hall,
Elida Ave.
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — The Green
Thumb Garden Club will meet
at the Delphos Public Library
for luncheon and program.
Mealsite at Delphos Senior
Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff
Street.
6:30 p.m. — Shelter from
the Storm support group
meets in the Delphos Public
Library basement.
7 p.m. — Washington
Township Trustees meet at the
township house. Delphos City
Council meets at the Delphos
Municipal Building, 608 N.
Canal St.
7:30 p.m. — Jefferson
Athletic Boosters meet at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
Spencerville village coun-
cil meets at the mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015
if there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column
June 14
Anna Fitch
Jesse Schwiebert
Sam Elzay
Kris Paddubny
Kevin Watkins
Matt Siefker
Kristen Schweller
Dennis Schroeder
Seth Smith
Isaac Dickman
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
A light meal with
sugar snap peas and
chocolate for dessert.
Shrimp Stir-Fry
1/4 cup classic stir-
fry sauce (I use House of
Tsang)
1 teaspoon sesame-
seed oil
1/2 pound sugar snap
peas, strings removed
1 red and/or yellow bell
pepper, seeded and sliced
1 tablespoon sesame-
seed oil
1/2 pound large shrimp,
peeled and deveined
In small bowl, com-
bine stir-fry sauce and
1 tsp. sesame-seed oil;
set aside. In skillet over
medium-high heat, cook
peas and peppers in 1
Tbs. sesame-seed oil for 4
minutes or until softened,
stirring occasionally. Add
shrimp; cook 3 min. or
until shrimp are pink. Add
stir-fry sauce mixture;
cook 1 minute. Serves 6.

Cheese-Stuffed Pods
4 cups water
1/2 pound sugar snap
peas, strings removed
4 ounces cream cheese,
softened
2 tablespoons jalapeño-
pepper jelly
1 tablespoon chopped
parsley
1 tablespoon chopped
pecans (optional)
In saucepan, bring
water to a boil. Add peas.
Cook 3 minutes, drain.
Rinse under cold water;
dry. Using knife, make
incision along top seam
to create pocket. In bowl,
combine cream cheese
and jelly. Stir in parsley.
Spoon mixture into peas.
Sprinkle with pecans, if
using. Serves 6.

Philadelphia
Marble Brownies
1 pkg. (18.3 to 19.5
oz.) brownie mix (family
size)
1pkg. (8 oz.)
Philadelphia Cream
Cheese, softened
1/3cup sugar
1 egg
1/2tsp vanilla
Heat oven to 350
degrees. Prepare brownie
batter as directed on pack-
age; spread into greased
13x9-inch pan.
Beat cream cheese with
mixer until creamy. Add
sugar, egg and vanilla;
mix well. Drop by table-
spoonfuls over brownie
batter; swirl with knife.
Bake 35-40 minutes or
until cream cheese mix-
ture is lightly browned.
Cool completely before
cutting to serve. Keep
refrigerated.
*Top brownies with ice
cream, whipping cream,
chocolate syrup and a
cherry and you’re all set
for a great summer treat!
If you enjoyed these
recipes, made changes or
have one to share, email
kitchenpress@yahoo.com.
WEEK OF JUNE 17-21
MONDAY: Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, cauliflower,
bread, margarine, fruit, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: BBQ chicken, corn O’brien, cauliflower,
Heavenly Hash tarts, coffee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Meatloaf, mashed potatoes, California-blend
veggies, bread, margarine, peaches, coffee and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Baked spaghetti, broccoli, garlic toast, peach-
es, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Taco salad, fruit, coffee and 2% milk.
JUNE 13-15
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Mary Lee Miller, Lorene
Jettinghoff, Donna Holdgreve, Eloise Shumaker and Martha
Etzkorn.
FRIDAY: Lorene Jettinghoff, Mary Lou Krietemeyer,
Gwen Rohrbacher and Diane Mueller.
SATURDAY: Cindy Elwer, Helen Fischer, Theresa Gilden
and Marie Hirn.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m.
Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
Anyone who would like to volunteer should contact
Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-8440; Alice Heidenescher,
419-692-5362; Linda Bockey 419-692-7145; or Lorene
Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
Honor Roll
Franklin Elementary School
First grade
Citizenship Award
Jeffrey Kowalski, Mikel
Hale, Grant Dudgeon, Kianna
Mathison and Dawson
Stocklin.
Principal’s Award
Ghavin Bitters, Sam
Carmean, Lucy Castiglia,
Isis Cooper, Kaden Cross,
Wiley Dennard, Gavin
Joseph, Nolan Kunkleman,
Aiden Lanteigne, Malik
Mays, Kayden Slygh, Olivia
Taggi, D.J. Betz, Samantha
Brotherwood, Isabella Castro,
Lucas Clay, Xach Houx,
Alivia Joseph, Donavan Reed,
Annabelle Stepleton, Tyler
Wilkins, Emma Woodruff,
Alivia Arroyo, Ashton Briem,
Hailey Czerwinski, Cameron
Foust, Alise Frick, Vincent
Murray, Alijah Petty, Brooks
Sensibaugh, Maddisyn
Waltmire, Matthew Weitzel,
James Hasting and Abigail
Sterling.
Wildcat Honor Awards
Austin Coil, Emma Cooley,
Hannah Joseph, Kendall
Kill, Katelyn Knepper, Elijah
Mueller, Aaron Pohlman
Nautica Rader, Madison
Burris, Paige Cross, Rome
Olmeda, Ariel Wallace,
Cheyenne Weber, Gabriella
McClure, Kyrstin Moore and
Jislynn Thomas.
Second grade
Citizenship Award
Allisun Hackworth, Tanner
Jones, Abigail Morvay, Cody
Bailey, Libby Baker, Cole
Brooks, Rebecca Burk, Liberty
Hutchison, Paige Mericle,
Logan Murray, Damon
Gibson, Peyton Schmitt, Kayla
Smith and Madison Stocklin.
Principal’s Award
Natilie Altman, Logan
Cash, Morrison “M.J.”
Finkhousen, Hailey Kimmel,
Sarah Kohler, Lee Painter,
Abby Prine, Ahna Rowe, Eliza
Speakman, Elijah Spring, Ava
Armakovitch, Jaden Lucas,
Liberty Osenga, Aubriey
Reaman, Julian Calvelage,
Raiden Sams, Kylee Smith,
Tyler Springer, Julia Wallen,
Maxwell Zahorchak, Coby
Anspach, Emily Cline, Eli
Coil, Emma Dailey, Tyler
Dellinger, Brooke Hoyt,
Rylynn Marquiss, Matthew
Miller, Daniel Myers, Sonya
Roeder, Autum Springer, Mark
Stemen, Audrianna Taggi and
Leah Wood.
Wildcat Honor Awards
Samantha Braun, Aubriegh
Foust, Lilly Smith, Kylee
Dienstberger, Braxton Sherrick
and Rachel Ryan.
Third grade
Citizenship Award
Colin Bailey, Gwenth
Blevins, Connor Burris,
Alaina Cross, Dylan Heiing,
Logan Jones, Tyler Metzger,
Alexis Merschman, Garrett
Richardson, Aleigha
Schabbing, Paige Scott,
Dustin Sholler, Savanah
Smith, Emilee Stuteville,
Madeline Weitzel, Joslynn
James, Ramon Nunez, Haven
Bowen, Daniel Castro, Kaylei
Cavinder, Jared Chandler,
Myka Donathan, Kyra Foust
and Sabian Lawrence.
Principal’s Award
Anthony Bodine, Alexis
Gossett, Alyssa Harshman,
Xandra Houx, Joseph McClure,
Kaden Smith, Grace Bridges,
Elizabeth Chung, Audry Coil,
Makenna Cooley, Jessica
Dudgeon, Kaylee Grant, Kaleb
Jones and Ian Rex.
Fourth grade
Citizenship Award
Grace Bridges, Mallory
Bridges, Julian Grant, Alexis
Johnson, Tyrayna Olmeda,
Kailey Bodine, Madeline
Brantley, Madison Bremer,
Dalton Place, Seth Teman and
Megan Vogt.
Principal’s Award
Conner Braun, Danielle
Hohlbein, Emmalee Riddell,
Alexa Chung, Delaney Deuel,
Ethan Dunlap, Jacob Groch,
Sarah Metzner and Gregory
Rose.
Wildcat Honor Awards
Riley Smith, Karlie Ulm,
Emily Dienstberger and Emma
Mueller.
Fifth grade
Citizenship Award
Collin Arroyo, Sam Bailey,
Gunnar Bodine, Johnathan
Brooks, Nate Dunning,
Madison Farler, Matthew
Horton, Addy Hubbard, Colby
Klaus, Haylee Kohler, Braden
Lintermoot, Kyla Louagie,
Shelby Maloney, Zoe Martin,
Ben McKee, John Radler,
IV, Logan Teman, Dylan
Anthony, Isaiah Antrican,
Alex East, Chloe Kunkleman,
Dakota Mathison, Hunter
Mericle, Kobe Smith, Katelyn
Stevenson, Sonya Thompson,
Taylor Thompson and Brady
Johnston.
Principal’s Award
Virginia Brotherwood,
Anna Cline, Donna Decker,
Zack Dudgeon, Sami Knepper,
Ashton Moore, Addy Stewart-
Phillips and Kent Brocka.
Wildcat Honor Awards
Shyan Shellenbarger, Kalie
Ulm and Megan Weitzel.
1
Honor or remember a loved one...
For a $2.00 donation to The Delphos
Herald Relay for Life team, you can
submit a loved one’s name to be a part of
the “In Honor and In Memory” page
published in The Delphos Herald.
Names will be published in
The Delphos Herald and displayed
in The Delphos Herald office.
To donate please fill in the form
(please print),
include your donation and
bring in or send to:
The Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
Please publish my loved one’s name
____in honor of ____in memory of
Name of loved one
Donated by
Please publish my loved one’s name
____in honor of ____in memory of
Name of loved one
Donated by
ONLY ONE LOVED ONE’S NAME PER FORM PLEASE!
ALL NAMES SUBMITTED WILL BE PUBLISHED IN
THE DELPHOS HERALD ON June 20, 2013.
DEADLINE IS JUNE 14, 2013.
Nothing feels beter than a white, bright, healthy
smile. Tat’s why we ofer a full line of
general and cosmetic dental services to
keep your teeth beautiful.
Brighten Every Day
with a Great Smile
Dr. Jacob Mohr
General Dentist
NEW PATIENTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME!
419.692.GRIN
(4746)
Open Mon-Wed-Thurs 8-5,
Fri 8-11
Call for appointment
www.mohrsmilesohio.com
00066410
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima
culpa!
There is always one thing that a
newspaper writer dreads.
That is making a factual mistake.
I did this weekend during the state
Track and Field Meet.
I wrote that Van Wert senior distance
man Jared Fleming came in third in the
boys 1,600-meter race in Division II.
The truth is, he came in second to
Sam Prakel of Versailles — who by the
way is heading to Oregon on an athletic
scholarship.
I sincerely apologize for my mess-
up. Believe me, that is the last thing I
ever intend when I write about a game
or a meet.
Speaking of State Track, the first-
ever Wheelchair Events went off this
year.
Everyone — that includes many in
the “hard-bitten” media — was clap-
ping and cheering for these athletes.
There weren’t many this year but
one hopes that there will be more and
more in the years to come.
I don’t wish for more and more ath-
letes to become paraplegics; I just hope
that more and more that already are will
give this a try.
It continues to amaze me about the
athletes we have in this state.
It’s not just the prowess on the track
or in the field.
It’s how you can have performers
go at it for four years — maybe longer
— tooth and nail and yet end up as best
friends.
Just like when a Putnam County
basketball team goes to State and the
entire county seems to be supportive,
the same is true of track.
There is a certain pride of represent-
ing your league and area of the state
that you want anyone that is in the same
boat to do well.
It’s not just that but it is the — to
borrow a phrase from my friend and
colleague, Dave Boninsegna — afore-
mentioned friendship.
While it is a source of pride — to
end your career at State — it is also a
source of sadness because it is the end
of a career.
For many of these boys and girls,
that was the last competitive event they
will participate in.
All the work, effort, camps, weight-
lifting, conditioning, etc., comes down
to that one last event and then “poof!”
It’s over.
As one who never played a sport
at the varsity level, I admit that I
really don’t know what that means,
how it feels, the emotions that were
going through everyone’s mind as they
crossed the tape, made/missed on their
final vault, tossed their last shot put.
I have also been doing this job —
covering sports — since August of
1990 and I appreciate what these kids
go through to get to that point.
Maybe this isn’t true at bigger news-
papers but I feel it is true for those at
smaller papers; we reporters do get to
know these kids and, try as we might,
we have something invested in their
success as well.
It’s how it is.
We like to see them do well, espe-
cially against the best of the best.
We take no credit — that would be
the ultimate of arrogance — because it
is what THEY do, not us. We just hope
to see it bear fruit.
I was perusing the Internet the
other day and found this item where
the fruit “matured” far sooner.
6 – The Herald Thursday, June 13, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Van Wert Youth Baseball Glance
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
Mea culpa! Ah, you
know what that means!
The Delphos Bass Club held its Jones Lake Tournament May 18. Winners are,
left to right, Travis Tenwalde, first place with five fish weighing 14.43 lbs. as well
as Big Bass with a largemouth weighing 5.04 lbs.; Bedford Miller, second place
with five fish weighing 12.03 lbs.; and Brian Davis and Dale Schleeter, tied for
third place. Both anglers had four fish that weighed 10.43 lbs. Davis had second
Big Bass with a largemouth weighing 4.87 lbs. (Photo submitted)
Jones Lake Tournament winners
Reds win record 12th straight at Wrigley, 2-1
By BRIAN SANDALOW
Associated Press
CHICAGO — Mike Leake pitched just
a little better than former teammate Travis
Wood and helped the Cincinnati Reds extend
their dominance of the Chicago Cubs at
Wrigley Field.
Leake combined with Aroldis Chapman
on a 3-hitter and Todd Frazier hit a tie-break-
ing home run against Wood in the seventh
inning, leading the Reds past the Cubs 2-1
Wednesday for their record 12th straight win
at Wrigley Field.
Leake (6-3) won for the fourth time in five
decisions, allowing only Nate Schierholtz’s
second-inning home run into the right-field
bleachers, his eighth of the season. The
Cincinnati starter gave up one run and three
hits while striking out six over eight innings.
Facing Wood, Leake said, is “fun, defi-
nitely, and frustrating at the same time.
“You want him to do well and you want
yourself to do well. Today we both did really
well, so you can’t complain.”
Wood (5-5) gave up two runs and four hits
in seven innings, his third loss in four deci-
sions. He fell to 0-3 with a 4.65 ERA in five
starts against the Reds, who traded him to
the Cubs on Dec. 23, 2011, for reliever Sean
Marshall.
“Felt good out there today, was locating
pretty well and keeping them off balance,”
Wood said. “Leake was doing the same; he
had an outstanding game today.”
The Reds usually do quite well against
the Cubs, especially at Wrigley Field.
Cincinnati is 10-2 overall against the
Cubs this season and 25-6 dating to Sept.
13, 2011. Leake improved to 6-2 with a 3.24
ERA in 13 career starts against Chicago.
The previous record for consecutive wins
by a visitor at Wrigley was 10, by the St.
Louis Cardinals (1943-44) and matched by
the New York Giants (1950-51) and Montreal
Expos (1982-83), according to STATS.
Cincinnati’s Dusty Baker, who managed
the Cubs from 2003-06, didn’t have an
explanation for the streak at Wrigley.
“I don’t know, man,” Baker said. “Just
feel fortunate that it happens when it hap-
pens.”
Cesar Izturis got the Reds’ first hit off
Wood with an infield single in the fifth
and Cincinnati tied the score in the sixth
when Shin-Soo Choo doubled and scored on
Brandon Phillips’ 2-out single.
Leake retired 12 consecutive batters
before Darwin Barney singled with one out
in the eighth. By then, Frazier had hit his
eighth homer, sending a 1-0 pitch through a
wind and into the left-field bleachers, giving
the Reds a 2-1 lead.
Frazier has homered in consecutive games
since Baker gave him the day off Monday to
“study and watch” what was happening.
Chapman struck out two in a perfect
ninth for his 17th save in 19 chances to give
Cincinnati its third straight win since losing
two out of three last weekend to first-place
St. Louis.
The Cubs have lost eight out of 10 since a
5-game winning streak and fell to a season-
worst 13 games below .500. In their last five
losses, they’ve scored a combined seven
runs.
“It’s a broken record,” Cubs manager
Dale Sveum said. “Woody’s just pitched
another great game and has nothing to show
for it.”
Unfortunately for the Cubs, that’s usu-
ally how it goes for them against the Reds
at Wrigley.
NOTES: Chicago’s Starlin Castro went
0-for-3 and is in a 4-for-48 slide (.083).
He hit in the No. 6 slot for only the sec-
ond time in his career. … Choo, normally
the Reds’ leadoff hitter, was second in the
batting order while Derrick Robinson was
first. Choo entered 0-for-6 with four strike-
outs against Wood. … The Cubs placed
RHP Zach Putnam on the 15-day DL and
recalled LHP Brooks Raley from Triple-A
Iowa. … When asked if LHP Tony Cingrani
would stay in the Cincinnati rotation, Baker
replied “Who’s spot is he going to take?”
Cingrani gave up two earned runs in seven
innings Tuesday but the Reds hope Johnny
Cueto will be able to return Sunday against
Milwaukee. … Alfonso Soriano pinch-
hit and had a game-ending groundout. …
Today’s pitching matchup is Cincinnati’s
Mat Latos (6-0, 2.87) against the Cubs’ Jeff
Samardzija (3-7, 3.18).
STANDINGS (as of June 11)
Van Wert Club Baseball
Team Record Win % GB Home Away
RF RA Last 10 Streak
Dons 12 9-7 .563 - 5-3 4-4 109 70 7-3
Lost 1
Dons 11 7-6 .538 0.5 6-5 1-1 84 98 5-5
Lost 1
Lee Kinstle 7th Grade 0-0 1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
Statewide 8th Grade 0-0 1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
Buckeye Boys Pony League
Team Record Win % GB Home Away
RF RA Last 10 Streak
VW Elks 1197 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
VW Alspach Gearhart 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
Willshire 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
Wren 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
Convoy 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
Middle Point 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
Antwerp 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
Payne 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0 0-0
VW Wallace Plumbers 0-0 - 0-0 0-0 0 0
0-0
Tri-County Little League
Team Record Win % GB Home Away
RF RA Last 10 Streak
K of C Indians 9-2 .818 - 5-1 4-1 71 36
8-2 Won 2
Delphos Pirates 6-4 .600 2.5 2-2 4-2 51 50
6-4 Won 1
VFW Cardinals 6-5 .545 3 3-3 3-2 61 60
5-5 Lost 1
Delpha Chevy Reds 5-4 .556 3 2-2 3-2 52
40 5-4 Won 1
Young’s Waste Service Yankees 6-6 .500
3.5 3-3 3-3 69 94 5-5 Lost 1
Delphos Braves 5-5 .500 3.5 2-3 3-2 71 51
5-5 Lost 3
Greif Rangers 5-5 .500 3.5 4-3 1-2 69 57
5-5 Lost 1
1st Federal Athletics 3-6 .333 5 1-4 2-2 49
56 3-6 Won 2
Ft. Jennings Musketeers 3-6 .333 5 3-0 0-6
41 64 3-6 Won 1
Treece Landscaping Rockhounds 4-9 .308
6 1-5 3-4 54 80 3-7 Lost 3
Inner County League
Team Record Win % GB Home Away
RF RA Last 10 Streak
Middle Point Gold 8-1 .889 - 5-0 3-1 90 9
8-1 Won 6
Middle Point Blue 8-1 .889 - 4-0 4-1 81
21 8-1 Won 1
Moose 1320 The Herd 6-3 .667 2 2-2 4-1
58 70 6-3 Won 1
VW Optimist Reds 3-5 .375 4.5 1-3 2-2 49
48 3-5 Lost 2
Lee Kinstle Pirates 3-5 .375 4.5 1-4 2-1 42
62 3-5 Won 2
VW Service Club Red Sox 2-7 .222 6 0-4
2-3 50 98 2-7 Lost 3
VW Federal Astros 1-9 .100 7.5 0-5 1-4 59
121 1-9 Lost 1
Delphos Minor League
Team Record Win % GB RF RA Last
10 Streak
Tigers 6-2 .750 - 83 58 6-2 L1
Pirates 5-3 .625 1 68 42 5-3 L1
Reds 5-3 .625 1 83 64 5-3 W2
Orioles 5-3 .625 1 65 51 5-3 W2
Cubs 3-5 .375 3 69 63 3-5 W1
Indians 3-5 .375 3 85 78 3-5 W1
Dodgers 3-5 .375 3 47 88 3-5 L2
Mets 2-6 .250 4 49 99 2-6 L3
——-
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Delphos Minor League
Indians 20, Dodgers 4
Cubs 12, Tigers 4
Orioles 10, Pirates 8
Reds 20, Mets 3
Inner County League
Middle Point Blue 12, VW Federal Astros
0
Moose 1320 The Herd 8, VW Service Club
Red Sox 7
Middle Point Gold vs. VW Optimist Reds
Tri-County Little League
K of C Indians 5, Delphos Braves 3
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Tri-County Little League
1st Federal Athletics at VFW Cardinals, 6
p.m. LL
Young’s Waste Service Yankees vs. K of C
Indians, 6 p.m. Jubilee Bank of Berne Field
Ft. Jennings Musketeers at Treece
Landscaping Rockhounds, 6 p.m. Smiley
Park-Field 4
Delphos Pirates at Delpha Chevy Reds,
7:45 p.m. LL
TODAY’S GAMES
Inner County League
VW Optimist Reds vs. Moose 1320 The
Herd, 6 p.m. Smiley Park-Field 2
VW Federal Astros at Middle Point Gold,
6 p.m.
Lee Kinstle Pirates vs. Middle Point Blue,
7:45 p.m. Smiley Park-Field 2
Delphos Minor League
Pirates at Reds, 6 p.m. LL
Orioles at Tigers, 6 p.m. 4
Cubs at Indians, 8 p.m. LL
Dodgers at Mets, 8 p.m. 4
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Buckeye Boys Pony League
VW Alspach Gearhart at Payne, 6 p.m.
Community Park
Wren at Willshire, 6 p.m.
VW Wallace Plumbers vs. VW Elks 1197,
8 p.m. Smiley Park-Field 3
Tri-County Little League
VFW Cardinals vs. Delphos Braves, 6
p.m. LL
Delpha Chevy Reds at 1st Federal
Athletics, 6 p.m. Jubilee Bank of Berne Field
SATURDAY’S GAME
Buckeye Boys Pony League
Convoy at Antwerp, noon
Associated Press
At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
Double Elimination
x-if necessary
Saturday’s Games
Game 1 — Mississippi State (48-18) vs.
Oregon State (50-11), 3 p.m.
Game 2 — Indiana (48-18) vs. Louisville
(51-12), 8 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Game 3 — North Carolina (57-10) vs.
N.C. State (49-14), 3 p.m.
Game 4 — UCLA (44-17) vs. LSU (57-9),
8 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Game 5 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser,
3 p.m.
Game 6 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2
winner, 8 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Game 7 — Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser,
3 p.m.
Game 8 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4
winner, 8 p.m.
Wednesday’s Game
Game 9 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 6
loser, 8 p.m.
Thursday, June 20
Game 10 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8
loser, 8 p.m.
See MUSINGS, page 7
NCAA College World Series Glance
See COLLEGE, page 7
Thursday, June 13, 2013 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
­
Description­ Last­Price­ Change
Dow­Jones­Industrial­Average­­ 14,995.23­­ -126.79­
S&P­500­­ 1,612.52­­ -13.61­
NASDAQ­Composite­­ 3,400.43­­ -36.52­
American­Electric­Power­Co.,­Inc.­­ 45.20­­ -0.16­
AutoZone,­Inc.­­ 416.00­­ 1.00­
Bunge­Limited­­ 70.60­­ 0.42­
BP­plc­­ 42.77­­ -0.32­
Citigroup,­Inc.­­ 49.44­­ -0.51­
CVS­Caremark­Corporation­­ 58.38­­ -0.29­
Dominion­Resources,­Inc.­­ 55.32­­ -0.01­
Eaton­Corporation­plc­­ 63.52­­ -1.04­
Ford­Motor­Co.­­ 15.37­­ -0.14­
First­Defiance­Financial­Corp.­­ 23.25­­ -0.02­
First­Financial­Bancorp.­­ 14.86­­ -0.21­
General­Dynamics­Corp.­­ 78.30­­ 0.13­
General­Motors­Company­­ 33.45­­ -0.48­
Goodyear­Tire­&­Rubber­Co.­­ 14.93­­ 0.33­
Huntington­Bancshares­Incorporated­­ 7.59­­ -0.09­
Health­Care­REIT,­Inc.­­ 65.50­­ -1.32­
The­Home­Depot,­Inc.­­ 76.40­­ -1.21­
Honda­Motor­Co.,­Ltd.­­ 36.42­­ -0.39­
Johnson­&­Johnson­­ 83.74­­ -0.95­
JPMorgan­Chase­&­Co.­­ 53.18­­ -0.31­
Kohl’s­Corp.­­ 51.20­­ -0.07­
Lowe’s­Companies­Inc.­­ 40.61­­ -0.28­
McDonald’s­Corp.­­ 98.24­­ 0.01­
Microsoft­Corporation­­ 35.00­­ 0.16­
Pepsico,­Inc.­­ 82.11­­ -0.42­
Procter­&­Gamble­Co.­­ 77.60­­ -0.52­
Rite­Aid­Corporation­­ 3.02­­ 0.02­
Sprint­Nextel­Corp.­­ 7.35­­ 0.00­
Time­Warner­Inc.­­ 56.16­­ -0.73­
United­Bancshares­Inc.­­ 12.04­­ 0.28­
U.S.­Bancorp­­ 35.40­­ -0.01­
Verizon­Communications­Inc.­­ 49.90­­ -0.28­
Wal-Mart­Stores­Inc.­­ 74.84­­ -0.41
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business June 12, 2013
NC State ready for shot at rival UNC in Omaha
Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. — North Carolina
State waited a long time to make it back
to the College World Series. It only
makes it sweeter that the first opponent
will be the Wolfpack’s hated rival.
N.C. State (49-14) left for Omaha
Wednesday, the program’s first trip to
the CWS since 1968 and just the sec-
ond overall. Its opener comes Sunday
against North Carolina, the No. 1 over-
all seed in the NCAA tournament.
The last time the teams met, the
Tar Heels won 2-1 in 18 innings over
Memorial Day weekend in the lon-
gest game in Atlantic Coast Conference
tournament history.
“It definitely is meaningful because
we owe them another game,” N.C.
State senior Tarran Senay said. “We
owe them our best. It’s going to be
tough but it’s going to be fun. It’s a big
one.”
The Wolfpack advanced to Omaha
with two 1-run wins against Rice in last
weekend’s super regionals here. In the
second game, N.C. State had to rally
from three down in the ninth before
finally winning 5-4 in 17 innings in the
longest super regional game ever.
It was a breakthrough for a program
that has reached the NCAA tournament
in 10 out of 11 years and reached the
super regionals three times during that
span. N.C. State had lost at Miami in
2003, Georgia in 2008 and Florida last
year in what amounted to the same
frustrating roadblock.
N.C. State coach Elliott Avent said
he went right back to work preparing
for Omaha after the Rice win. But he
gave his players two days off to savor
the moment while he started sorting
through the congratulatory messages
from former players.
“It’s been a process,” Avent added
of the Wolfpack’s climb. “Every per-
son from Joey Devine to Aaron Bates
and every person that I’ve heard from
… the phone calls, the text messages,
the tweets, the e-mails, it’s just been
so special because everyone knows
they’ve been a part of this.”
Avent has 648 wins in his 17 seasons
and became the program’s winningest
coach in 2010, passing Sam Esposito
— the coach who led the 1968 team to
its only previous College World Series.
N.C. State had to wait two days to
find out who it would face in its CWS
opener. North Carolina’s 3-game super
regional series with South Carolina was
delayed two days due to weather before
the Tar Heels won Tuesday’s decisive
game 5-4.
It will be UNC’s sixth trip to the
College World Series in eight years,
though the first meeting between
the schools — separated by about a
30-minute drive along Interstate 40 —
in the NCAA tournament.
“I do think it certainly has brought
attention to college baseball in this area
especially,” UNC coach Mike Fox said
after Tuesday’s win. “I know how hard
Elliott has worked over there with his
program. It’s hard, it’s hard to get to
Omaha — I keep telling myself that.
We’re going six times in eight years
and I told the players (Monday) night,
it’s mind-blowing to me.”
The teams met three times this year,
twice in Raleigh during an April series.
The Tar Heels took the series opener
7-1 to end the Wolfpack’s 15-game
winning streak, the program’s longest
in a decade. N.C. State won the second
game 7-3 but the third game was rained
out.
Then came the ACC tournament
marathon in Durham, which drew the
biggest-ever crowd for a college base-
ball game (11,392) in the history of the
state.
N.C. State’s players are ready for
another shot at North Carolina — and
beyond.
“We’re not going there to play two
games, we’re going to play more,” soph-
omore Trea Turner said. “Hopefully we
can do that against Carolina and who-
ever we play after that. We definitely
think we can win it … and we’re going
to give it our all.”
Coach Cohen builds Mississippi
St. into a winner
STARKVILLE, Miss. — It’s taken
just five years for John Cohen to revi-
talize Mississippi State’s baseball pro-
gram and return the Bulldogs to cham-
pionship contention.
The journey hasn’t been easy but a
remade roster constructed with Cohen’s
ideals of hustle, intensity and just
enough talent have led the Bulldogs to
the CWS for the first time since 2007.
It’s only their second trip since 1998.
This group of blue-collar Bulldogs
also have a healthy sense of humor.
“We’re just 27 dumb guys,”
Mississippi State pitcher Luis Pollorena
said. “But once you put us all together,
you won’t beat us.”
Mississippi State (48-18) will face
No. 3 national seed Oregon State (50-
11) on Saturday in Omaha.
The Bulldogs do have one legiti-
mate superstar. Junior outfielder Hunter
Renfroe — who was the 13th overall
pick by the San Diego Padres last week
— leads the offense with a .360 batting
average, 15 homers and 61 RBIs.
But the rest of the roster has been
filled with interchangeable heroes. The
most recent is senior left-hander Chad
Girodo, who has struck out 24 batters in
13 innings during the postseason.
“Everybody kind of fits into this
thing and you’ve got a nice mix,”
Cohen said. “It’s like any recipe — it
involves a lot of different ingredients.”
Cohen was an outfielder for
Mississippi State during the program’s
glory years, when the Bulldogs went
to Omaha three times in 10 seasons,
including his senior season in 1990.
He was brought back to his alma mater
before the 2009 season, charged with
rebuilding a program that had turned
mediocre.
But he looked like a bad fit in
Starkville for the first two years, espe-
cially during the awful 2010 season
that included a 6-24 record in the
Southeastern Conference.
But a young group of players —
included Girodo — believed in Cohen’s
approach and helped the program grow.
The Bulldogs made a surprise run to
the NCAA tournament’s super regional
round in 2011 before losing to Florida
and then won the SEC tournament in
2012. A veteran team returned this
spring, started the season on a 17-game
winning streak and hasn’t slowed down
much since.
“If anyone watches what we do on a
daily basis, you would understand that
we’ve put in the work and the time,”
Girodo said. “We’ve worked so hard on
what we do and we’re finally getting
rewarded for it. It’s so awesome.”
Cohen said it’s gratifying watching
players like Girodo — who threw just
7 2/3 innings last season — mature into
quality players.
“There’s a bond that forms, there’s
no doubt about it,” Cohen said. “Those
bonds will last forever and ever and
ever.”
As Mississippi State’s roster has
changed, so has Cohen. The 42-year-
old is known for his aggressive person-
ality but there hasn’t been much yelling
lately.
The 48 wins have helped ease his
blood pressure but so has a group of
players that he recruited and now trusts.
Mississippi State first baseman Wes
Rea said Cohen’s fiery reputation is
well deserved but also a bit exagger-
ated; he gives the team’s captains a lot
of input on decisions and is open to
suggestions.
An example: Cohen relaxed the
team’s no facial hair rule after pitcher
Trevor Fitts put together a full Power
Point presentation that included suc-
cessful players who sported a scruffy
face.
Mississippi State might pride itself
on a loose attitude but they’ve been
quite efficient when the games come.
The Bulldogs have won 12 of their last
15, including an impressive 2-game
sweep over Virginia in the super region-
al round to advance to Omaha.
Now Mississippi State will try to
win its first national championship in
baseball. This is the Bulldogs’ ninth trip
to Omaha but they’ve never finished
higher than third.
The mystery of Merion starts to unfold at US Open
Associated Press
ARDMORE, Pa. — The affection was genuine. Even
better was beating Jack Nicklaus in a playoff. So when Lee
Trevino got his hands on that U.S. Open trophy in 1971, the
guy who never lacked for one-liners gushed, “I love Merion
and I don’t even know her last name.”
For this generation of stars, Merion is more like a blind
date.
No other course with four U.S. Opens had to wait such a
long time — 32 years — for another chance to test the world’s
best players. Even with Tiger Woods back to No. 1 and win-
ning at a ridiculous rate, so much of the talk at this major
championship has been about Merion.
For years, it was considered too small to handle such a big
tournament and the big hitters with their modern equipment.
And with soft greens from more than six inches of rain in the
last week, the question is whether the course will yield the
kind of scores rarely seen at the toughest test in golf.
Today, the mystery of Merion will start to unfold.
“It’s been how long, 32 years? And with all the technology
since then?” Steve Stricker asked as he headed to the first
tee Wednesday for one last practice round. “Someone asked
me the other day about someone shooting a 62. And what I
wanted to say was, ‘You’re crazy.’ But you just don’t know.
We don’t know what’s going to happen. And in a way, that’s
kind of cool.”
Not so cool was the weather expected for the opening
round.
Merion already took a beating last Friday when more than
three inches of rain sent water over the edges of some bunkers
and left small streams on fairways and greens. More rain on
Monday caused the course to be closed three times.
The forecast called for increasing clouds, gusts and show-
ers this morning, with stronger storms likely to arrive around
noon.
“Sure, we want it firm and fast,” USGA vice president
Thomas O’Toole said Wednesday. “We happen to play a sport
that’s played outdoors. We received significant rain over the
last week and some tell us that we’ll have even more sig-
nificant rain tomorrow. So it’s not a perfect world. It’s not a
perfect game but we take what we’re dealt with.”
Whether a golf course is big or small, soft greens typically
are a recipe for low scores. Then again, Merion is not a typical
golf course.
It measures 6,996 yards on the scorecard — the shortest of
any major championship in nine years — and has a stretch of
seven holes in the middle that are short even by yesterday’s
standards. Compare those holes with the scorecard from when
Ben Hogan won the 1950 U.S. Open at Merion and four of
those holes were actually longer by a few yards in Hogan’s
day.
Players typically reach for the wedge to chip out of the
rough around the greens at the U.S. Open. At Merion, they
could be hitting wedge into the green for their second shot on
at least six holes. That’s what has caused all the clamor about
low scores.
And with the rain, it’s reminiscent of how Congressional
was vulnerable two years ago, when Rory McIlroy shattered
U.S. Open scoring records at 16-under 268.
“I’ve been reading about how many scoring records are
going to be broken,” Nick Watney said. “I’ve been around
here once and I think that’s insane. It’s funny to me. People
look at the yardage and think it’s going to be easy. Even if it’s
soft, the greens are sloped. The rough is thick. OK, we’ll have
wedges into some of the greens but that doesn’t mean you
make birdie on all those holes. There’s enough tough holes to
counteract that.”
Even so, the winning score has gone down in each of
the four previous U.S. Opens at Merion, from Olin Dutra at
13-over par in 1934 to David Graham winning at 7-under in
1981, the last time this major championship was here.
“Where did David Graham shoot 7-under? From there?”
Watney asked as he pointed the end of his driver to a spot
some 30 yards from where he was standing. “Because he
didn’t do it from here.”
Watney was standing in the middle of the putting green.
He took three steps to his right and was standing on the 14th
tee. As an example of longer holes being made more difficult,
a new tee on the 464-yard hole is where members practice
putting.
The biggest fear with rain on the horizon is what will hap-
pen the rest of the week. The forecast is reasonable after today
but in soft conditions, balls start to pick up clumps of mud as
the sun starts to dry the course. And while players often are
allowed to lift, clean and place their golf balls in the fairway
in muddy conditions on the PGA Tour, they don’t do that at
the U.S. Open.
Remember, the USGA famously referred to the local rule
as “lift, clean and cheat.”
It all begins with Cliff Kresge hitting the opening shot of
the 113th U.S. Open at 6:45 a.m. today — weather permitting,
of course.
Woods, McIlroy and Masters champion Adam Scott play
this afternoon in the power grouping of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 in the
world. Sergio Garcia plays on the opposite side of the draw,
teeing off this morning. So does Phil Mickelson, who left
Philadelphia on Monday when the weather was bad to practice
in San Diego. He planned on being home, anyway, so he could
watch his oldest daughter graduate from the eighth grade.
Mickelson was scheduled to arrive about 4:15 a.m. today, just
three hours before his tee time.
Stricker called Merion the “longest short course I’ve ever
played.” Graeme McDowell is another guy who isn’t buying
into the fear over low scoring.
“Everyone is saying that it’s going to be 62s and 63s on
this golf course, which I kind of disagree with at the minute,”
McDowell added. “I think 10 or 11 of these golf holes are as
tough as any U.S. Open I’ve seen.”
The lowest score in major championship history is 63 and
it has happened only four times in the U.S. Open — Johnny
Miller at Oakmont in 1973 on a soggy course, Nicklaus and
Tom Weiskopf on the same day at Baltusrol in 1980 during
a wet week and Vijay Singh on a rain-softened course at
Olympia Fields in 2003.
(Continued from page 6)
Friday, June 21
Game 11 — Game 6 win-
ner vs. Game 9 winner, 3 p.m.
Game 12 — Game 8 win-
ner vs. Game 10 winner, 8
p.m.
Saturday, June 22
x-Game 13 — Game 6
winner vs. Game 9 winner,
3 p.m.
x-Game 14 — Game 8
winner vs. Game 10 winner,
8 p.m.
If only one game is nec-
essary, it will start at 8:30
p.m.
Championship Series
(Best-of-3)
Monday, June 24: Pairings
TBA, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 25: Pairings
TBA, 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 26:
Pairings TBA, 8 p.m.
College
(Continued from page 6)
It seems that Nathan Tilford, a wide receiver from Upland,
Calif., has been offered a scholarship — and verballed to it — by
the University of Southern California.
No big deal except for one simple fact — Tilford is an incom-
ing freshman in HIGH SCHOOL.
Oy vay.
Of course, this is nothing new for Lance Kiffin: he got a
commit from David Sills in 2010 when the quarterback was 13.
He is soon to start his junior year at Eastern Christian
Academy.
Then there is this item about one Cory Hahn.
He was the 34th-round pick of the Arizona Diamondbacks
this summer.
Nothing interesting about that, right?
Here’s where it does get intriguing.
You see, he wore number 34 for the Arizona State Sun Devils
but he will never play for the Diamondbacks.
You see, he is paralyzed after sliding head-first in a game
versus New Mexico in 2011.
The paradox is that he almost never slid head-first before but
he did this time.
In a classy move, the D’Backs are negotiating with Hahn
and his agent about a role in the scouting or baseball operations
department.
His dream was to play at the major-league level but instead,
he has adjusted his dream to work at that same level.
He was ecstatic about being drafted, so it’s a positive all
around.
He also has a dream of walking again some day.
Good for him; I hope he gets there!
Musings
1
Thursday, June 13, 2013 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
­
Description­ Last­Price­ Change
Dow­Jones­Industrial­Average­­ 14,995.23­­ -126.79­
S&P­500­­ 1,612.52­­ -13.61­
NASDAQ­Composite­­ 3,400.43­­ -36.52­
American­Electric­Power­Co.,­Inc.­­ 45.20­­ -0.16­
AutoZone,­Inc.­­ 416.00­­ 1.00­
Bunge­Limited­­ 70.60­­ 0.42­
BP­plc­­ 42.77­­ -0.32­
Citigroup,­Inc.­­ 49.44­­ -0.51­
CVS­Caremark­Corporation­­ 58.38­­ -0.29­
Dominion­Resources,­Inc.­­ 55.32­­ -0.01­
Eaton­Corporation­plc­­ 63.52­­ -1.04­
Ford­Motor­Co.­­ 15.37­­ -0.14­
First­Defiance­Financial­Corp.­­ 23.25­­ -0.02­
First­Financial­Bancorp.­­ 14.86­­ -0.21­
General­Dynamics­Corp.­­ 78.30­­ 0.13­
General­Motors­Company­­ 33.45­­ -0.48­
Goodyear­Tire­&­Rubber­Co.­­ 14.93­­ 0.33­
Huntington­Bancshares­Incorporated­­ 7.59­­ -0.09­
Health­Care­REIT,­Inc.­­ 65.50­­ -1.32­
The­Home­Depot,­Inc.­­ 76.40­­ -1.21­
Honda­Motor­Co.,­Ltd.­­ 36.42­­ -0.39­
Johnson­&­Johnson­­ 83.74­­ -0.95­
JPMorgan­Chase­&­Co.­­ 53.18­­ -0.31­
Kohl’s­Corp.­­ 51.20­­ -0.07­
Lowe’s­Companies­Inc.­­ 40.61­­ -0.28­
McDonald’s­Corp.­­ 98.24­­ 0.01­
Microsoft­Corporation­­ 35.00­­ 0.16­
Pepsico,­Inc.­­ 82.11­­ -0.42­
Procter­&­Gamble­Co.­­ 77.60­­ -0.52­
Rite­Aid­Corporation­­ 3.02­­ 0.02­
Sprint­Nextel­Corp.­­ 7.35­­ 0.00­
Time­Warner­Inc.­­ 56.16­­ -0.73­
United­Bancshares­Inc.­­ 12.04­­ 0.28­
U.S.­Bancorp­­ 35.40­­ -0.01­
Verizon­Communications­Inc.­­ 49.90­­ -0.28­
Wal-Mart­Stores­Inc.­­ 74.84­­ -0.41
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business June 12, 2013
NC State ready for shot at rival UNC in Omaha
Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. — North Carolina
State waited a long time to make it back
to the College World Series. It only
makes it sweeter that the first opponent
will be the Wolfpack’s hated rival.
N.C. State (49-14) left for Omaha
Wednesday, the program’s first trip to
the CWS since 1968 and just the sec-
ond overall. Its opener comes Sunday
against North Carolina, the No. 1 over-
all seed in the NCAA tournament.
The last time the teams met, the
Tar Heels won 2-1 in 18 innings over
Memorial Day weekend in the lon-
gest game in Atlantic Coast Conference
tournament history.
“It definitely is meaningful because
we owe them another game,” N.C.
State senior Tarran Senay said. “We
owe them our best. It’s going to be
tough but it’s going to be fun. It’s a big
one.”
The Wolfpack advanced to Omaha
with two 1-run wins against Rice in last
weekend’s super regionals here. In the
second game, N.C. State had to rally
from three down in the ninth before
finally winning 5-4 in 17 innings in the
longest super regional game ever.
It was a breakthrough for a program
that has reached the NCAA tournament
in 10 out of 11 years and reached the
super regionals three times during that
span. N.C. State had lost at Miami in
2003, Georgia in 2008 and Florida last
year in what amounted to the same
frustrating roadblock.
N.C. State coach Elliott Avent said
he went right back to work preparing
for Omaha after the Rice win. But he
gave his players two days off to savor
the moment while he started sorting
through the congratulatory messages
from former players.
“It’s been a process,” Avent added
of the Wolfpack’s climb. “Every per-
son from Joey Devine to Aaron Bates
and every person that I’ve heard from
… the phone calls, the text messages,
the tweets, the e-mails, it’s just been
so special because everyone knows
they’ve been a part of this.”
Avent has 648 wins in his 17 seasons
and became the program’s winningest
coach in 2010, passing Sam Esposito
— the coach who led the 1968 team to
its only previous College World Series.
N.C. State had to wait two days to
find out who it would face in its CWS
opener. North Carolina’s 3-game super
regional series with South Carolina was
delayed two days due to weather before
the Tar Heels won Tuesday’s decisive
game 5-4.
It will be UNC’s sixth trip to the
College World Series in eight years,
though the first meeting between
the schools — separated by about a
30-minute drive along Interstate 40 —
in the NCAA tournament.
“I do think it certainly has brought
attention to college baseball in this area
especially,” UNC coach Mike Fox said
after Tuesday’s win. “I know how hard
Elliott has worked over there with his
program. It’s hard, it’s hard to get to
Omaha — I keep telling myself that.
We’re going six times in eight years
and I told the players (Monday) night,
it’s mind-blowing to me.”
The teams met three times this year,
twice in Raleigh during an April series.
The Tar Heels took the series opener
7-1 to end the Wolfpack’s 15-game
winning streak, the program’s longest
in a decade. N.C. State won the second
game 7-3 but the third game was rained
out.
Then came the ACC tournament
marathon in Durham, which drew the
biggest-ever crowd for a college base-
ball game (11,392) in the history of the
state.
N.C. State’s players are ready for
another shot at North Carolina — and
beyond.
“We’re not going there to play two
games, we’re going to play more,” soph-
omore Trea Turner said. “Hopefully we
can do that against Carolina and who-
ever we play after that. We definitely
think we can win it … and we’re going
to give it our all.”
Coach Cohen builds Mississippi
St. into a winner
STARKVILLE, Miss. — It’s taken
just five years for John Cohen to revi-
talize Mississippi State’s baseball pro-
gram and return the Bulldogs to cham-
pionship contention.
The journey hasn’t been easy but a
remade roster constructed with Cohen’s
ideals of hustle, intensity and just
enough talent have led the Bulldogs to
the CWS for the first time since 2007.
It’s only their second trip since 1998.
This group of blue-collar Bulldogs
also have a healthy sense of humor.
“We’re just 27 dumb guys,”
Mississippi State pitcher Luis Pollorena
said. “But once you put us all together,
you won’t beat us.”
Mississippi State (48-18) will face
No. 3 national seed Oregon State (50-
11) on Saturday in Omaha.
The Bulldogs do have one legiti-
mate superstar. Junior outfielder Hunter
Renfroe — who was the 13th overall
pick by the San Diego Padres last week
— leads the offense with a .360 batting
average, 15 homers and 61 RBIs.
But the rest of the roster has been
filled with interchangeable heroes. The
most recent is senior left-hander Chad
Girodo, who has struck out 24 batters in
13 innings during the postseason.
“Everybody kind of fits into this
thing and you’ve got a nice mix,”
Cohen said. “It’s like any recipe — it
involves a lot of different ingredients.”
Cohen was an outfielder for
Mississippi State during the program’s
glory years, when the Bulldogs went
to Omaha three times in 10 seasons,
including his senior season in 1990.
He was brought back to his alma mater
before the 2009 season, charged with
rebuilding a program that had turned
mediocre.
But he looked like a bad fit in
Starkville for the first two years, espe-
cially during the awful 2010 season
that included a 6-24 record in the
Southeastern Conference.
But a young group of players —
included Girodo — believed in Cohen’s
approach and helped the program grow.
The Bulldogs made a surprise run to
the NCAA tournament’s super regional
round in 2011 before losing to Florida
and then won the SEC tournament in
2012. A veteran team returned this
spring, started the season on a 17-game
winning streak and hasn’t slowed down
much since.
“If anyone watches what we do on a
daily basis, you would understand that
we’ve put in the work and the time,”
Girodo said. “We’ve worked so hard on
what we do and we’re finally getting
rewarded for it. It’s so awesome.”
Cohen said it’s gratifying watching
players like Girodo — who threw just
7 2/3 innings last season — mature into
quality players.
“There’s a bond that forms, there’s
no doubt about it,” Cohen said. “Those
bonds will last forever and ever and
ever.”
As Mississippi State’s roster has
changed, so has Cohen. The 42-year-
old is known for his aggressive person-
ality but there hasn’t been much yelling
lately.
The 48 wins have helped ease his
blood pressure but so has a group of
players that he recruited and now trusts.
Mississippi State first baseman Wes
Rea said Cohen’s fiery reputation is
well deserved but also a bit exagger-
ated; he gives the team’s captains a lot
of input on decisions and is open to
suggestions.
An example: Cohen relaxed the
team’s no facial hair rule after pitcher
Trevor Fitts put together a full Power
Point presentation that included suc-
cessful players who sported a scruffy
face.
Mississippi State might pride itself
on a loose attitude but they’ve been
quite efficient when the games come.
The Bulldogs have won 12 of their last
15, including an impressive 2-game
sweep over Virginia in the super region-
al round to advance to Omaha.
Now Mississippi State will try to
win its first national championship in
baseball. This is the Bulldogs’ ninth trip
to Omaha but they’ve never finished
higher than third.
The mystery of Merion starts to unfold at US Open
Associated Press
ARDMORE, Pa. — The affection was genuine. Even
better was beating Jack Nicklaus in a playoff. So when Lee
Trevino got his hands on that U.S. Open trophy in 1971, the
guy who never lacked for one-liners gushed, “I love Merion
and I don’t even know her last name.”
For this generation of stars, Merion is more like a blind
date.
No other course with four U.S. Opens had to wait such a
long time — 32 years — for another chance to test the world’s
best players. Even with Tiger Woods back to No. 1 and win-
ning at a ridiculous rate, so much of the talk at this major
championship has been about Merion.
For years, it was considered too small to handle such a big
tournament and the big hitters with their modern equipment.
And with soft greens from more than six inches of rain in the
last week, the question is whether the course will yield the
kind of scores rarely seen at the toughest test in golf.
Today, the mystery of Merion will start to unfold.
“It’s been how long, 32 years? And with all the technology
since then?” Steve Stricker asked as he headed to the first
tee Wednesday for one last practice round. “Someone asked
me the other day about someone shooting a 62. And what I
wanted to say was, ‘You’re crazy.’ But you just don’t know.
We don’t know what’s going to happen. And in a way, that’s
kind of cool.”
Not so cool was the weather expected for the opening
round.
Merion already took a beating last Friday when more than
three inches of rain sent water over the edges of some bunkers
and left small streams on fairways and greens. More rain on
Monday caused the course to be closed three times.
The forecast called for increasing clouds, gusts and show-
ers this morning, with stronger storms likely to arrive around
noon.
“Sure, we want it firm and fast,” USGA vice president
Thomas O’Toole said Wednesday. “We happen to play a sport
that’s played outdoors. We received significant rain over the
last week and some tell us that we’ll have even more sig-
nificant rain tomorrow. So it’s not a perfect world. It’s not a
perfect game but we take what we’re dealt with.”
Whether a golf course is big or small, soft greens typically
are a recipe for low scores. Then again, Merion is not a typical
golf course.
It measures 6,996 yards on the scorecard — the shortest of
any major championship in nine years — and has a stretch of
seven holes in the middle that are short even by yesterday’s
standards. Compare those holes with the scorecard from when
Ben Hogan won the 1950 U.S. Open at Merion and four of
those holes were actually longer by a few yards in Hogan’s
day.
Players typically reach for the wedge to chip out of the
rough around the greens at the U.S. Open. At Merion, they
could be hitting wedge into the green for their second shot on
at least six holes. That’s what has caused all the clamor about
low scores.
And with the rain, it’s reminiscent of how Congressional
was vulnerable two years ago, when Rory McIlroy shattered
U.S. Open scoring records at 16-under 268.
“I’ve been reading about how many scoring records are
going to be broken,” Nick Watney said. “I’ve been around
here once and I think that’s insane. It’s funny to me. People
look at the yardage and think it’s going to be easy. Even if it’s
soft, the greens are sloped. The rough is thick. OK, we’ll have
wedges into some of the greens but that doesn’t mean you
make birdie on all those holes. There’s enough tough holes to
counteract that.”
Even so, the winning score has gone down in each of
the four previous U.S. Opens at Merion, from Olin Dutra at
13-over par in 1934 to David Graham winning at 7-under in
1981, the last time this major championship was here.
“Where did David Graham shoot 7-under? From there?”
Watney asked as he pointed the end of his driver to a spot
some 30 yards from where he was standing. “Because he
didn’t do it from here.”
Watney was standing in the middle of the putting green.
He took three steps to his right and was standing on the 14th
tee. As an example of longer holes being made more difficult,
a new tee on the 464-yard hole is where members practice
putting.
The biggest fear with rain on the horizon is what will hap-
pen the rest of the week. The forecast is reasonable after today
but in soft conditions, balls start to pick up clumps of mud as
the sun starts to dry the course. And while players often are
allowed to lift, clean and place their golf balls in the fairway
in muddy conditions on the PGA Tour, they don’t do that at
the U.S. Open.
Remember, the USGA famously referred to the local rule
as “lift, clean and cheat.”
It all begins with Cliff Kresge hitting the opening shot of
the 113th U.S. Open at 6:45 a.m. today — weather permitting,
of course.
Woods, McIlroy and Masters champion Adam Scott play
this afternoon in the power grouping of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 in the
world. Sergio Garcia plays on the opposite side of the draw,
teeing off this morning. So does Phil Mickelson, who left
Philadelphia on Monday when the weather was bad to practice
in San Diego. He planned on being home, anyway, so he could
watch his oldest daughter graduate from the eighth grade.
Mickelson was scheduled to arrive about 4:15 a.m. today, just
three hours before his tee time.
Stricker called Merion the “longest short course I’ve ever
played.” Graeme McDowell is another guy who isn’t buying
into the fear over low scoring.
“Everyone is saying that it’s going to be 62s and 63s on
this golf course, which I kind of disagree with at the minute,”
McDowell added. “I think 10 or 11 of these golf holes are as
tough as any U.S. Open I’ve seen.”
The lowest score in major championship history is 63 and
it has happened only four times in the U.S. Open — Johnny
Miller at Oakmont in 1973 on a soggy course, Nicklaus and
Tom Weiskopf on the same day at Baltusrol in 1980 during
a wet week and Vijay Singh on a rain-softened course at
Olympia Fields in 2003.
(Continued from page 6)
Friday, June 21
Game 11 — Game 6 win-
ner vs. Game 9 winner, 3 p.m.
Game 12 — Game 8 win-
ner vs. Game 10 winner, 8
p.m.
Saturday, June 22
x-Game 13 — Game 6
winner vs. Game 9 winner,
3 p.m.
x-Game 14 — Game 8
winner vs. Game 10 winner,
8 p.m.
If only one game is nec-
essary, it will start at 8:30
p.m.
Championship Series
(Best-of-3)
Monday, June 24: Pairings
TBA, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 25: Pairings
TBA, 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 26:
Pairings TBA, 8 p.m.
College
(Continued from page 6)
It seems that Nathan Tilford, a wide receiver from Upland,
Calif., has been offered a scholarship — and verballed to it — by
the University of Southern California.
No big deal except for one simple fact — Tilford is an incom-
ing freshman in HIGH SCHOOL.
Oy vay.
Of course, this is nothing new for Lance Kiffin: he got a
commit from David Sills in 2010 when the quarterback was 13.
He is soon to start his junior year at Eastern Christian
Academy.
Then there is this item about one Cory Hahn.
He was the 34th-round pick of the Arizona Diamondbacks
this summer.
Nothing interesting about that, right?
Here’s where it does get intriguing.
You see, he wore number 34 for the Arizona State Sun Devils
but he will never play for the Diamondbacks.
You see, he is paralyzed after sliding head-first in a game
versus New Mexico in 2011.
The paradox is that he almost never slid head-first before but
he did this time.
In a classy move, the D’Backs are negotiating with Hahn
and his agent about a role in the scouting or baseball operations
department.
His dream was to play at the major-league level but instead,
he has adjusted his dream to work at that same level.
He was ecstatic about being drafted, so it’s a positive all
around.
He also has a dream of walking again some day.
Good for him; I hope he gets there!
Musings
1
8 – The Herald Thursday, June 13, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
Repairs
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney
Repair
419-204-4563
Tree Service
419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured
Mueller Tree
Service
Tree Trimming,
Topping
& Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
DAY’S PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
LLC
Brent Day
567-204-8488
• Mowing
• Landscaping
• Lawn Seeding
GESSNER’S
PRODUCE
PRODUCE
AVAILABLE NOW!
Tennessee Tomatoes
9557 St. Rt. 66, Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-5749 419-234-6626
Mention ad and receive
50
% OFF
ALL
FLOWERS
www.apluswithus.com
419-230-9096
PROVEN LOCAL,
AFFORDABLE, SUMMER
TUTORING BY LICENSED
EDUCATORS
Fitzgerald
Power Washing
& Painting
419-303-3020
Interior, Exterior, Residential,
Commercial, Decks, Fences,
Houses, Log Homes, Stripping,
Cleaning, Sealing, Staining,
Barn Painting, Barn Roofs
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured • References
A+ rating with the Better
Business Bureau
Concrete leveling of
floors, sidewalks,
patios, steps, driveways,
pool decks, etc.
Call Dave cell
419-236-1496
419-692-5143
home/office
Mike
419-235-1067
U
N
E
V
E
N
C
O
N
C
R
E
T
E
?
VONDERWELL
CONTRACTING
CONCRETE
LEVELING
WORK
WANTED
Any
• Carpentry • Framing
• Siding •Roofng
• Pole Barns
•Any repair work
FREE ESTIMATES
30 years experience!
419-733-6309
Home Improvement
Harrison
Floor Installation
Carpet, Vinyl, Wood,
Ceramic Tile
Reasonable rates
Free estimates
harrisonfoorinstallation.com
Phil 419-235-2262
Wes 567-644-9871
“You buy, we apply”
Lawn Care
SPEARS
LAWN CARE inc.
Total Lawncare
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Construction
AMISH
CARPENTERS
ALL TYPES OF
CONSTRUCTION
Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and
roofing needs contact us.
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
260-585-4368
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Is Your Ad Here?
Call Today
419 695-0015
Advertise Your
Business
DAILY
For a low, low
price!
AUCTION
FARMLAND & FARM HOME
SATURDAY, JUNE 22, 2013
10:00 A.M. PERSONAL PROPERTY
12:00 NOON REAL ESTATE
AUCTION LOCATION:
7525 Rt. 66, Delphos, OH
App. 3 miles North of Delphos on Rt. 66
40+/- ACRES FARMLAND &
FARM HOMES in 3 PARCELS
Section 1 * Washington Twp
* Van Wert County, OH
FRONTAGE on RT. 66 * GOOD FARM
WITH A GREAT LOCATION
“WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS”
PERSONAL PROPERTY
SELLS @ 10:00 A.M.
*See Web for pictures
FURNITURE HOUSEHOLD TOOLS
Art Glass, Good Selection of Modern Fenton Glass,
Delphos Advertisers, Steinle Bottles from Delphos,
Antique Dresser w/ Mirror, Dresser, Matching Dress-
er/ Chest of Drawers /Night Stand/ Bed Frame, Plank
Bottom Chair, Granite Top Table, Sharp 25” Color
T.V. Table & Chairs, Knives, Usual Kitchen Items,
VCR Tapes, Books, Pots & Pans, Bookcases, Side
Secretary Made into Gun Case, 4 Drawer File Cabi-
net, Frigidaire Refrigerator, Lava Lamp, Cast Iron
Pot, Beer Steins, Golf Clubs, Milk Cases, Card Table
& Chairs, Wash Tubs, Ash Bucket, New Milwaukee
Saws All, S-K Sockets, Craftsman Rollaway 3 Sec-
tion Tool Box, Lincoln 225 Welder, Welding Tools,
RH Grinder, S-K Metric Wrenches, Impact Sockets,
½ Impact Wrench, Impact Driver, Crescent Wrench-
es, Chanel Locks, Drills & Drill Bits, Dayton Battery
Charger, 2 New Yamaha 2000 Watt Gas Generators,
Old Vice, Air Tank, Small Air Compressor, Many New
Tools, New Nuts and Bolts, Shop Vac, Floor Jack,
Work Lights, Ext Cords, Air Hose, Lumber Nails,
Shop Cart, Jack Stands, Small Tool Boxes, Kero-
sene Heater, shovels, Rakes, Brooms, Post Hole Au-
ger, Werner Step & Ext Ladders, Wood Ext Ladders,
Other Good Tools & Misc.
GUNS @ 11:45 A.M.
Winchester #1300 20 Ga. Shotgun, S&W Mod. #BG-
380 Pistol, Ruger (mm Pistol, Ruger .22 Cal. Mark II
Target Pistol, Revelation 22 Cal. Rifle, Folico-Italian
22 Cal. Mad. TA-76 Pistol, Powerline 880 Pellet Gun.
VEHICLES TRACTOR LAWN MOWERS
YARD ITEMS @ App. 12:45 P.M.
2005 Chevy Trail Blazer ONLY 38K Mi 4x4 Clean,
03 Chevy Impala 170 K Miles 4WD 197? Honda 750
Motorcycle Not Running, Woods 6180 18 HP. 52”
Frt. Deck ZT Mower ONLY 260 Hrs. Very Nice, IH
C Tractor w/ Woods Belly Mower & Frt Blade, Cub
Cadet 1250 Hydro Riding Mower w/ Deck and Frt
Snow Blade Not Running, NEW in box “DR” Lane
Grader “As Seen On T.V.”, 48” Lawn Roller, Huskee
Yard Trailer, Huskee 35 Ton Trailer Log Splitter Like
New, Panther 5000 Snowmobile Not Running.
TERMS ON PERSONAL PROPERTY: Cash or
Good Check Day of Auction * Lunch by Big Dog
Diner
Owner: THOMAS KORTOKRAX ESTATE
Van Wert Probate Case # 20131072
Jan Michel Executrix * Steve Mansfield
Attorney for Estate
CONDUCTED BY:
SIEFKER REAL ESTATE &
AUCTION CO. * OTTAWA, OH
419-538-6184 Office or 419-235-0789 Cell
AARON SIEFKER, Broker/ Auctioneer
TOM ROBBINS & DARREL YODER,
DAN LIMBER, Assisting Auctioneers
Terms & Conditions at Open House
Contact: AARON SIEFKER for Further Details
419-235-0789
“WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS”
Parcel #1: 2 Story, 4 Bedroom, Frame Home w/
Basement, Eat-In Kitchen, Living Room, Full
Bath, Vinyl Siding, Asphalt Roof, Gas Heat/
C.A., 32’x 58’Pole Barn w/ Concrete Floor,
28’x 48’ Quonset Building w/ Cement Floor,
24’ x 62’ Coop w/ Cement Floor on 2 Acres,
Delphos Schools, App. 3 Miles North of Del-
phos
Parcel #2: 38 Acres +/- in SE ¼ Section 1 Wash-
ington Twp. Van Wert Co. Ohio, Frontage on
Rt. 66, Hoytville Soils, Very Good Farm w/
Great Location, Farm is Rented for 2013
Buyer to Receive 2013 Farm Income
Parcel #3: Combination of Parcels 1 & 2 as a
single unit
“COLLECTIVE BIDDING PROCEDURE USED”
For Full Terms, Maps, or Further
Information Call for Brochure or View
@ www.siefkerauctions.com
OPEN HOUSE:
Sunday
JUNE 16th
2:00 - 4:00 P.M.
Home at 7525 Rt.
66 Delphos, Ohio
Collision Repair Technician needed
Seeking self-motivated Auto Body
Technicians who take pride in their
Collision Repair and/or Painting skills.
Well established business offering Health
Insurance, 401k options and paid
vacations. Experience and Performance
based pay. Welding, Frame & Uni-body
straightening are required (Minimum 3
years’ experience) I-CAR certifcation is a
plus, must have valid driver’s license
& be drug free.
We are immediately accepting
applications and resumes at Raabe Ford
Lincoln. Stop by or E-mail us a Resume;
detailing your experience, job history,
references and your contact information.
bodyshop@raabeford.com or
419.692.0055
Raabe Ford Lincoln 11260 Elida Rd.
Delphos, Oh. 45833
Jeremy S. - Body Shop Manager
HELP WANTED
STORAGE ASSISTANT
High School diploma/GED. Courteous, friend-
ly, able to follow directions, and to multi-task.
Some lifting. Assist with custodial work when
needed. Flexible hours, 20-24 hours/week.
SHOP CUSTODIAN
High school diploma/GED. Some lifting.
Courteous, friendly and interpersonal skills
required. Ability to perform a wide variety of
custodial duties in order to provide a clean
and orderly environment and able to perform
related work as required. 35 hours/week.
Send resume to P.O. Box 111, c/o The Delphos
Herald, 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833
255 Professional
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
The YWCA is looking for
an energetic, detailed
oriented person that
demonstrates a
commitment to women's
issues, a true advocate for
the goals and mission of
the YWCA. Bachelor’s
degree required w/min. 5
years of managerial
experience along with
grant writing. Duties
include long-range
organizational and
financial planning,
fundraising, personnel
administration and staff
development, working with
volunteers, and
establishing strong
community public
relations.
Send resumes with salary
requirements, posted
marked by Fri. June 21 to:
YWCA of Van Wert
County, OH
Attn. Search Committee
408 E. Main St.
Van Wert, OH 45891
320 House For Rent
COUNTRY HOME for
rent. 1744 sq. ft., 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, base-
ment. Fort Jennings.
419-286-2868.
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951
RENT OR Rent to Own.
2 bedroom, 1 bath mo-
bile home. 419-692-3951
425 Houses For Sale
HOUSE FOR Sale
-12660 Bloomlock Road.
Cape cod, 3 bedrooms,
2-1/2 baths on 1-1/2
acres. Open House Sun-
day, June 16 from 1 to 3.
For pri vate vi ewi ng
p l e a s e c a l l
614-989-7215
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
1108 MARSH Ave.
Friday June 14 9am-6pm
Infant-3T clothes, store
fixtures, glass desk, 2x4
various sizes, dresses,
Eddie Bauer high chair,
changing table, iPhones,
lawn mowers, TVs, too
much to list!
238 W. Clime St.
June 13th & 14th,
8am-?. Elliptical Kid’s
toys, bedspreads, TVs,
bird cages, disc changer,
Bowflex, bike pull be-
hind, trailer, clothes and
much more!
2 3 8 7 6 SR- 6 9 7 .
6/12-6/15, Wednesday
4pm-8pm, Thursday-Fri-
day 9am-6pm, Saturday
9am-1pm. Multi-family.
Clothes girls infants to
adult ladies/men’s, baby
i tems, home decor,
household items, kitch-
enware, washer/dryer,
f ur ni t ur e, l i ght s ,
pictures/frames, grill,
heaters, fans, sweeper,
sinks, bikes. So much
more.
MOVING SALE: 615 W.
Clime. Thursday 5-9pm,
Friday 5-9pm, Saturday
9am-2pm. Entertainment
center, couch, recliner,
dishes, power tools,
hand tools, Hammond
organ, 16” tires.
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
MULTI-FAMILY, 609 S.
Main. Friday 9am-7pm,
Saturday 8am-2pm. Lots
of furniture, Big Screen
TV, electronics, stove,
desk, shelving and cabi-
nets, Anime stuff, huge
selection of books, lots
of clothes: kids-adult,
lots of kids toys. Priced
to Sell!
ONE DAY Only- Friday,
June 14, 9am-6pm.
3-Family. Lots of every-
thing. 105-1/2 N. Frank-
lin Street, Delphos.
560
Home
Furnishings
FOR SALE: Old oak ta-
ble with chairs, redone,
$300. Love seat, good
shape, neutral colors,
$50. Call 419-204-7897
583
Pets and
Supplies
FREE: KITTEN to a
good home. Spayed &
d e c l a we d . Ca l l
419-863-9108
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders, Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
080 Help Wanted
3 OPEN Positions in
Delphos tire warehouse!
•2nd shift: Full-time, Sun
8am-finish, Mon-Thurs
3pm-finish.
•1st shi ft: Ful l -ti me
Mon-Fri 7am-finish. Must
have valid driver’s li-
cense with clean driving
record.
•Route Driver: Part-time,
Mon-Fri every other
week 7am-finish. Must
have valid driver’s li-
cense with clean driving
record. Retirees wel-
come!
Must be able to lift 100
lbs in all positions. Send
work experience to:
K&M Tire, PO Box 279,
Delphos, OH 45833
RachelM@kmtire.com
Fax: 419-695-7991
080 Help Wanted
CARRIER WANTED
DELPHOS ROUTE
AVAILABLE NOW
Route 42
Carolyn Drive area
No Collecting
Call the Delphos Herald
Circulation Department
at 419-695-0015 ext
126
EXERPIENCED AUTO
body repair technician.
Must have own tools.
Full-time. Apply in per-
son: Mark’s Auto Body,
24074 US224E, Ottoville
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+years OTR expe-
rience! Our drivers aver-
age 42cents per mile &
higher! Home every
weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annu-
ally. Benefits available.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with re-
spect! PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
HOME HEALTH AIDE
Par t - t i me, Put nam
County. Must be flexible,
work weekends, pick up
extra shifts. Prompt, reli-
able, dependable, good
work ethic. Application
online or pick-up at:
Community Health
Professionals
602 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
ComHealthPro.org
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k.
Home weekends, & most
nights. Call Ulm’s Inc.
419-692-3951
080 Help Wanted
PART-TIME, 1-9PM
Must be over age 18.
Must be fun and ener-
getic. Must pass drug
test. $7.85 to start. Pay
increase based on per-
formance. Apply at Pats
Donuts. No phone calls.
R&R EMPLOYMENT
is now Hiring!
•General Labor; •CDL A
with clean driving record;
•Forklift operators.
Apply online
www.rremployment.com
or call 419-232-2008
R&R MEDICAL
STAFFING now hiring!
•CNA; •RN; •LPN
Call Jamie
260-724-4810
303 Duplex For Rent
NEWER 1/2 Duplex. 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath, 1 car
attached garage. 707
Euclid. References & de-
posit required. $575/mo.
Call Cindy 419-234-7208
ELECTRIC RANGE in
good working condition.
$50. Call 419-692-6102
953
Free and Low
Priced Merchandise
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Auctions Caption: Real
Estate Auction, Sat. June
22nd-1PM Lakefront Log
Home w/Separate 2-Car
Garage/Apartment on Lake
Marion. 1251 Moultrie Drive,
Manning, SC. L. Meares,
SCAL 109 864-444-1321
www.MearesAuctions.com
Business Services REACH
2 MILLION NEWSPAPER
READERS with one ad
placement. ONLY $295.00.
Ohio’s best community
newspapers. Call Kathy at
AdOhio Statewide Classifed
Network, 614-486-6677, or
E-MAIL at: kmccutcheon@
adohio.net or check out our
website at: www.adohio.net.
Business Services REACH
OVER 1 MILLION OHIO
ADULTS with one ad
placement. Only $995.00.
Ask your local newspaper
about our 2X2 Display
Network or 2x4 Display
Network Only $1860. or Call
Kathy at 614-486-6677/E-mail
kmccutcheon@adohio.net. or
check out our website: www.
adohio.net
Employment $4,500 / Week
- Established frm seeks 5 top
sales people in Ohio area.
Car Bonus. Call (877)-206-
2552.
Help Wanted Class A CDL
Drivers. K-Limited Carrier
is offering competitive
compensation, full benefts,
fexible scheduling, company-
paid training, bonuses. True
family atmosphere. www.k-
ltd.com/employment

Help Wanted Drivers - Hiring
Experienced/Inexperienced
Tanker Drivers! Earn up
to $.51per mile! New Fleet
Volvo Tractors! 1 Year
OTR Exp. Req. - Tanker
Training Available. Call
Today: 877-882-6537 www.
OakleyTransport.com.
Help Wanted Knight
Refrigerated CDL-A Truck
Drivers Needed. Get Paid
Daily or Weekly, Consistent
Miles, Pay Incentive &
Benefts! Become a Knight
of the Road. EOE 855-876-
6079.
Help Wanted Gordon
Trucking - CDL-A Drivers
Needed! Up to $3,000 Sign
On Bonus! Starting Pay Up
to .46 cpm. Full Benefts,
Excellent Hometime. No.
East Coast! Call 7 days/
wk! TeamGTI.com. 866-954-
8836
Help Wanted Your New
Driving Job Is One Phone
Call Away! Experienced
CDL-A Drivers and Excellent
Benefts. Weekly Hometime.
888-362-8608/ 1 to 5 Weeks
Paid Training. Recent Grads
w/a CDL-A can apply online
at AverittCareers.com E.O.E.
Help Wanted Flatbed Owner
Operators and Company
Drivers Needed No East
Coast - One Yr. Experience
Needed Home Weekends
and Weekdays. Call Steel
Transport 330-331-7934 for
Info
Help Wanted WOOD
TRUCKING, Inc./MCT. Job
Guaranteed after FREE 3
week CDL-A Training. Live
within 100 mile radius of
Wauseon, Ohio 1-800-621-
4878. Also, Hiring Drivers!
Help Wanted Heavy Equipment
Operator Career! 3 Week Hands
On Training School Bulldozers,
Blackhoes, Excavators. National
Certifications. Lifetime Job
Placement assistance. VA
Benefts Eligible. 1-866-362-
6497.
Help Wanted Drivers - OTR
Positions. Earn 32c-45c per
mile. $1,000 Sign-On Bonus!
Assigned Equipment Pet
Policy. deBoer Transportation
800-825-8511 O/O’s Welcome
www.deboertrans.com
Help Wanted Drivers - CDL-A
Drivers Needed! Solos up
to .38c/mile. 50c/ mile for
Hazmat Teams. New Trucks
Arriving Daily! 800-942-
2104 Ext. 7308 or 7307 www.
TotalMS.com.
Help Wanted “‘Partners in
Excellence” OTR Drivers,
APU Equipped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass. Passenger policy.
2012 & Newer Equipment,
100% No Touch. Butler
Transport 1-800-528-7825.
Help Wanted Class A CDL
Flatbed Drivers Needed.
Excellent Pay & Benefts. 6
month exp. Min 23yrs of age.
877-261-2101
Help Wanted Class A CDL
Drivers Needed Midwest
Regional Home Weekends
38 CPM, Paid Orientation
Full Benefts - $1500 Signing
Bonus Online Transport
1-877-997-8999 www.
DriverForOnline.com
Misc. VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CANADA.
Fish for walleyes, perch,
northerns. Boats, motors,
gasoline included. Call
Hugh 1-800-426-2550 for
free brochure. website www.
bestfshing.com
Misc. WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Truck drivers are
IN DEMAND! Great Benefts,
stability & earning potential!
The avg. truck driver earns
$700+/wk. ! No. CDL? 16-Day
Training Available! Call Today!
1-866-221-3300 *DOL/BLS
2012
Misc ,Airlines Are Hiring -
Train for hands on Aviation
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if
qualifed - Job Placement
assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance.
1-877-676-3836.
Real Estate LAND & CABIN
PACKAGE Only $79,900!
Crossville, Tennessee. Pre-
Grand Opening Sale. 30
Acres and 1200 Sq. Ft. Cabin
Package. Minutes from 4
State Parks and TN River.
Limited Inventory. Call Now
877-243-2091
RV’s For Sale 2006 Gulf
Stream Cavalier Travel
Trailers 8’x32’, Queen bed
+ Bunks, Appliances w/
microwave, Furnace and A/C.
Incredible Buy! ONLY $3,995
1-800-686-1763 www.
williamsburgsquare.com
OHIO SCAN NETWORK
CLASSIFIEDS
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Putnam County
Troy Rampe
Construction Inc., Unit
A Phase VI, Silver Pines
Condo, Kalida, to Plum
Creek MJJG.
Roger W. Rosebrock
and Mindy Rosebrock,
1.0 acre Liberty Township,
to Troy E. Cunningham
and Jennifer Lynne
Cunningham.
Fannie Mae aka
Federal National
Mortgage Association,
Lot 117, Pandora, to
Nancy Jo Stratton and
Kris Shawn Stratton.
Thomas E. Hermiller
and Joyce A. Hermiller,
parcels Pleasant
Township, to Thomas E.
Hermiller and Joyce A.
Hermiller.
Joan R. Pfahler, Lot
190, Leipsic, to Raleigh
Hendricks and Julie
Evers.
Helping Hands
Housing 1 LLC, 2.50
acres Palmer Township,
to Jeremy Lunsford.
Jeremy Lundsford and
Chivon Lundsford, 2.50
acres Palmer Township,
to Brian D. Kettels.
Donald J. Ellerbrock
and Patricia M. Ellerbrock,
Lot 122 Glandorf, to John
M. Ellerbrock and Charles
R. Ellerbrock.
John M. Ellerbrock,
Charles R. Ellerbrock
and Lynn Ellerbrock, Lot
122, Glandorf, to Donald
J. Ellerbrock LE and
Patricia M. Ellerbrock LE.
Rose Marie Burke,
Lot 1, Lot 6 and Lot 7,
Continental, to Peggy
Sue Bragg, Michael A.
Burke and Jeffery R.
Burke.
Peggy Sue Bragg,
Earnest Timmy Bragg,
Michael A. Burke,
Rebecca L. Burke, Jeffery
R. Burke and Shirley M.
Burke, Lot 1, Lot 6 and
Lot 7, Continental, to
Rose Marie Burke LE.
Santiago Pedroza
and Martina Pedroza,
Lot 35, Lot 18 and Lot
53, Belmore, to Pedro
Pedroza Jr.
Pedro L. Pedrozer aka
Pedro L. Pedroza, Lot
53, Belmore, to Pedro
Pedroza Jr.
Donna Jean
Warnimont, 1.0 acre
Monterey Township to
Jason S. Wehri.
Sara E. Maag LE, 1.0
acre Pleasant Township
to W & S Maag LLC.
Sandra W. Spitnale,
Gregory D. Spitnale,
Sueann D. Bidlack,
Edwrd Bidlack, Kathy L.
Homier, Kevin Homier,
Ellen M. Perry, Stacy
M. Adams, Michael
Adams, Chad M. Shirey
and Jody Shirey, Lot 31,
Lakeland Estates Sub.,
Continental, to Matthew
Slattman and Lindsey
Slattman.
Howard L. Coleman
Jr., Marilyn Coleman,
Bobby D. Coleman,
Wanda Coleman, Ronald
S. Coleman, Rochelle
Coleman, Teresa L.
Jones, Larry Jones,
Brenda S. Thedford,
William Thedford,
Wanda J. Winkle and
Ronald Winkle, 1.00 acre
Greensburg Township to
Bryant S. Trenkamp.
Earl E. Siebeneck and
Nancy P. Siebeneck,
parcels Liberty Township
to Gail M. Creamer and
Michael D. Siebeneck.
Troy Rampe
Construction Inc., Bldg.
1, Unit B, Phase 6, Silver
Pines Condo, Kalida, to
Judith A. Birkemeier.
Fuerst Brothers LLC,
2.0 acres Pleasant
Township to Brent J.
Schroeder.
Mathew T. Lucke and
Tracy Lucke, 1.00 acre
Jennings Township to
Brad Karhoff and Emily
Karhoff.
Adam C. Donaldson,
Lot 374 and Lot 376
Columbus Grove,
to Federal National
Mortgage Association.
Ray Wayne Dunlap,
Gladys Helen Fern
Dunlap, Gary Dunlap,
Kristine Dunlap, Dennis
Dunlap, Sharon Dunlap,
Phyllis Simon and Harold
F. Simon, 2.003 acres
Jennings Township, to
Jeffrey W. Lohr.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday Evening June 13, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC J. Kimmel NBA 2013 NBA Finals Local Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Big Bang Two Men Person of Interest Elementary Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC Save Me Save Me Office Parks Hannibal Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX Hell's Kitchen Have to Go? Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds House House
Cable Channels
A & E Intervention Intervention Beyond Scared Straig Beyond Scared Straig Intervention
AMC The Breakfast Club Showville Town Town The Italian Job
ANIM Invasion Eating Giants: Hippo Eating Giants Eating Giants: Hippo Eating Giants
BET Video Girl Next Day Air Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Tabatha Takes Over Tabatha Takes Over Million Dollar
CMT Hell's Kitchen Hell's Kitchen Hell's Kitchen Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Dog and Beth
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Live Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Live
COMEDY Chappelle Chappelle Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Sunny Sunny Daily Colbert Tosh.0 Tosh.0
DISC Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property
DISN Jessie 16 Wishes Jessie Gravity Good Luck Jessie Good Luck Good Luck
E! Kardashian Rihanna 777 Fashion Fashion Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN U.S. Open Golf SportsCenter
ESPN2 SportCtr 30 for 30 Baseball Tonight SportsNation SportsCenter
FAM Alice Twilight The 700 Club Prince Prince
FOOD Chopped Chopped Giving Yo Giving Yo Food Network Star Chopped
FX The A-Team Anger Two Men Two Men Biased Biased Biased Max Payne
HGTV Rehab Rehab Renovation Raiders Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Renovation Raiders
HIST Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Swamp People Mountain Men Pawn Pawn
LIFE Wife Swap Wife Swap Wife Swap Pretty Wicked Moms Wife Swap
MTV Girl Code Girl Code Girl Code Girl Code The Show Zach Strangers Girl Code Girl Code Girl Code
NICK Big Time Wendell Full H'se Full H'se The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Big Foot Axe Giant Snow Beast
SPIKE Police Videos iMPACT Wrestling Universal Soldier
TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Sullivan Big Bang Conan Sullivan Conan
TCM Bathing Beauty Neptune's Daughter
TLC Say Yes Say Yes Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings
TNT The Hero 72 Hours The Hero 72 Hours CSI: NY
TOON Incredibl Regular King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy NTSF Face
TRAV Mysteries-Museum Monumental Mysteries Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Monumental Mysteries
TV LAND The Exes Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King The King of Queens
USA NCIS Burn Notice Graceland Necessary Roughness Burn Notice
VH1 Hit the Floor Hit the Floor Hit the Floor Couples Therapy Love, Hip Hop
WGN How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met News/Nine Videos Funniest Home Videos Rules Rules
Premium Channels
HBO Fast Five Game of Thrones Veep Real Sex
MAX Supermn 2 The Campaign Safe House Obsession
SHOW Rock-Exposed Drive Angry Gigolos The Borgias Gigolos
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Thursday, June 13, 2013 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
‘Back in High
School’ playing
with fre
Dear Annie: About a
year ago, I ran into a woman
I used to spend time with
in high school. We are both
married, although she is go-
ing through a divorce.
Since that day, she and
I have been talking quite a
bit. We discuss a lot of dif-
ferent things, all on a pla-
tonic level. The problem is,
I believe I am be-
coming infatuated
with her again. I
had a thing for her
throughout high
school but never
had the courage to
ask her out, prob-
ably because I was
too afraid to lose
our friendship.
I am now in a
situation where
I won’t be home
for a few months.
I know I will miss
her communication. I feel
I’m doing something wrong.
Is this normal? Do I need to
just keep my distance and
cease contact? —Back in
High School
Dear Back: You recog-
nize that you are “becom-
ing” infatuated (we think
you are already there) and
will miss this woman’s com-
munication. The fact that she
is going through a divorce
also puts you in an awkward
position, because she may
lean on you for comfort, and
when she becomes available,
you will fnd her hard to re-
sist.
Please back far, far away
before you fnd yourself en-
meshed in an affair, whether
emotional or physical. If
your marriage needs revital-
izing, work on it. Consider
how your wife would feel
if she found out how close
you are to this other woman.
How would you feel if she
did this to you? You are play-
ing with fre. Stop.
Dear Annie: This sum-
mer, I have my concert tick-
ets ordered and am excited
to see some of my favorite
performers on stage. How-
ever, I’m unsure of proper
etiquette after a problem I
encountered last year.
I went to a country con-
cert, which meant plenty of
beer and dancing. The prob-
lem was, as soon as the au-
dience stood up, the people
directly behind me started
yelling at my friend and me
to sit down. We did, but we
couldn’t see a thing because
of the dozens of rows of
people standing in front of
us. We stood back up, only
to be yelled at again. I turned
around and explained that
everyone else was standing
and they should do the same.
They were angry and con-
tinued to yell throughout the
concert. After the concert,
they sarcastically thanked us
for ruining their night.
What is the right way
to handle people like this?
Should I sit and see nothing
because misery loves com-
pany? —Juliana
Dear Juliana: Concerts
have evolved into two basic
types: The formal concert,
where everyone sits, and
the informal concert, where
people often stand. Once the
people in the rows ahead of
you get up, you
need to do the same
in order to see.
We have advised
people who attend
such concerts to
try to get seats in
the front row or
frst-row balcony
if they want their
view unobstructed.
Those who are in
wheelchairs of-
ten fnd there is a
handicapped sec-
tion, although it
may be necessary to fnd an
usher and inquire.
It is unrealistic at infor-
mal events to expect hun-
dreds of other people to sit
down for your convenience.
If this happens again, apolo-
gize to the people behind
you and suggest that they,
too, stand up or move closer
to the aisle for a better view.
You are not obligated to sit
if the people in front of you
are standing.
Dear Annie: “An Anx-
ious Mom” was reluctant
to give money from her
late husband’s will to her
58-year-old unemployed son
who is living on his veterans
benefts. One of your sugges-
tions was to put the money in
a trust.
Please suggest she check
into creating a Special Needs
Trust for her son. If she
gives the money directly to
him, he will probably spend
it very quickly, but he could
also lose his VA benefts. She
will need to consult a lawyer
knowledgeable in these mat-
ters. —M.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 2013
In the coming months, it might
not be such a bad idea to clear out
any deadwood within your circle
of friends, especially if there is a
troublemaker among the group. It
can result in happier relationships.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- In matters of small consequence,
you’re not likely to pay much
attention to the details, but if
something is important, the opposite
will be true.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Don’t be surprised if you don’t grasp
the essence of an idea as quickly as
you usually do. It’s one of those days
when your head is likely to be off in
the clouds.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It
behooves you to be more careful
concerning your possessions. Pay
attention not only to how you handle
them, but where you leave them,
even for just a minute.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Your friends and family will take
you at your word, so think twice
before speaking. What you consider
to be merely a comment might be
taken as a promise.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Since what you do and what you say
are likely to be two different things,
you could confuse people. Try to be
consistent with both your words and
your deeds.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Don’t take well-meaning
friends’ financial tips as gospel.
Before making a major purchase or
investment, be sure you know what
you’re getting into.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Instead of giving input on a
topic that you know little about, just
be a good listener. There is a strong
chance that if you flap your gums,
you will be challenged.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Be wary of anybody, even a
trusted friend, trying to pry some
confidential information out of you.
This person’s motives might be
devious.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- It isn’t a great idea to participate in
an expensive pastime with a friend
who is always reluctant to pay his
or her fair share. Why would you
expect something to change?
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- If you are having trouble making
an important decision, seek advice
from more than one person. Each
counselor might have some good
ideas, but not the complete answer.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Fortunately, you’re prepared to work
hard, because advancing your career
might not be as easy as it usually is.
A strong, concerted effort will be
required.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Someone you know has been trying
to manipulate others into doing his
or her work. Don’t fall prey to such
machinations, and try to put a stop
to them.

COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
10 – The Herald Thursday, June 13, 2013
www.delphosherald.com
(Continued from page 1)
Clemente said employees of the Delphos store will have
the opportunity to be considered for positions at other ALCO
stores.
“This is never an easy decision to make and we know it will
have an impact on the Delphos community. We wish to express
our thanks to the many friends that we have served over the
past several years and also thank the employees who have
served our company faithfully during that time,” Clemente
added.
Plans are to hang a banner on the storefront on Monday
announcing a sale of 10 percent off on everything. The target
date for the store’s closure is Aug. 26.
ALCO
(Continued from page 1)
Rist also announced
the library will have a tent
at Canal Days, from 12-4
p.m. Sept. 21 in front of the
Delphos Post Office.
In other news, the board
voted to give Fiscal Officer
Janet Bonifas permission
to submit the county bud-
get to both Allen and Van
Wert counties and to the
Delphos City Schools Board
of Education for approval.
“The report consists of
2011 and 2012 actuals, 2013
numbers based on current
expenses and predictions for
2014,” Bonifas said. “We
will get a little increase in
support from local govern-
ment, so I added in $12,000
for that but other than that,
I kept it to what we’ve been
spending.”
Library
NSA director: Programs
disrupted dozens of attacks
DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
director of the National
Security Agency vigorously
defended once-secret surveil-
lance programs as an effec-
tive tool in keeping America
safe, telling Congress on
Wednesday that the informa-
tion collected disrupted doz-
ens of terrorist attacks without
offering details.
In his first congressional
testimony since revelations
about the top-secret opera-
tions, Army Gen. Keith
Alexander insisted that the
public needs to know more
about how the programs oper-
ate amid increasing unease
about rampant government
snooping and fears that
Americans’ civil liberties are
being trampled.
“I do think it’s important
that we get this right and I
want the American people to
know that we’re trying to be
transparent here, protect civil
liberties and privacy but also
the security of this country,”
Alexander told a Senate panel.
He described the steps the
government takes once it sus-
pects a terrorist organization is
about to act — all within the
laws approved by Congress and
under stringent oversight from
the courts. He said the programs
led to “disrupting or contribut-
ing to the disruption of terrorist
attacks,” but he did not give
details on the terror plots.
Half a world away, Edward
Snowden, the former contractor
who fled to Hong Kong and
leaked documents about the
programs, said he would fight
any U.S. attempts to extradite
him. American law enforce-
ment officials are building a case
against him but have yet to bring
charges.
“I am not here to hide from
justice; I am here to reveal
criminality,” Snowden said of
the surveillance programs in
an interview with the South
China Morning Post.
In plain-spoken, measured
tones, Alexander answered
senators’ questions in an open
session and promised to pro-
vide additional information
to the Senate Intelligence
Committee in closed session
today. The director of national
intelligence has declassified
information on two thwarted
attacks — one in New York,
the other in Chicago — and
Alexander said he was press-
ing for more disclosures.
But he also warned that
revelations about the secret
programs have eroded agency
capabilities and, as a result,
the U.S. and its allies won’t
be as safe as they were two
weeks ago.
House passes bill that would exempt foreign trades
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The House passed legislation
Wednesday that would exempt the
trading of derivatives from federal
oversight if it occurs outside the
United States.
A bipartisan group of lawmakers
supported the carve-out on a 301-
124 vote.
Supporters say the exemption is
necessary to allow U.S. firms to
remain competitive in foreign mar-
kets. But opponents say the regula-
tions outside the U.S. tend to be
weaker and the exemption would put
the broader financial system at risk.
Derivatives are investments
whose value is based on some other
investment, such as oil and cur-
rencies. The market was largely
unregulated around the globe before
the 2008 financial crisis and con-
tributed to the meltdown.
The legislation’s prospects in the
Senate are uncertain. The White
House has signaled it would veto
the legislation.
Still, opponents said just its pas-
sage by the House could pressure
regulators to take a more lenient
approach in writing rules for over-
sight of foreign derivatives trading.
The White House said in a state-
ment Tuesday that House passage
of the bill “would be premature and
disruptive” to the regulators’ ongo-
ing efforts to write the rules.
The legislation’s primary authors
were House Republicans, who
opposed the 2010 financial overhaul
legislation, but many Democrats
endorsed it. A key thrust of the 2010
overhaul was to put new regulatory
reins on derivatives, traded in a $700
trillion global market that has largely
escaped supervision until now.
Derivatives are often used to
protect an investor against future
price fluctuations of an underlying
commodity or security. But they
also are used by financial firms to
make speculative bets, and they
have grown increasingly complex
and risky.
Five of the biggest U.S. banks —
JPMorgan Chase & Co., Goldman
Sachs Group Inc., Bank of America
Corp., Citigroup Inc. and Morgan
Stanley — account for more than
90 percent of total derivatives con-
tracts. A large proportion of deriva-
tives are traded outside the U.S.,
estimated by regulators at around
40 percent to 45 percent of the total.
The Commodity Futures Trading
Commission has proposed putting
under its supervision all derivatives
trading, including trading overseas.
But the Securities and Exchange
Commission has taken a narrower
approach, allowing overseas deriva-
tives trades to escape U.S. regulation
if the country in which they occur
has a rules system that is roughly
equivalent to that of the U.S.
The House bill would require the
two agencies to issue a joint rule.
And trading in the nine biggest for-
eign markets for derivatives would
be exempt from U.S. regulation.
That would “drag that activ-
ity back into the shadows,” said
Rep. Maxine Waters of California,
the senior Democrat on the House
Financial Services Committee, in
debate before the vote.
“We’ll be put in the position
of bailing out failed institutions
all over again,” Waters said. “We
shouldn’t have to rely on foreign
regulators to protect us.”
Opponents pointed to the $182
billion federal bailout of American
International Group Inc. at the
height of the financial crisis — the
largest for any company. AIG near-
ly collapsed because of its massive
derivatives bets on the housing mar-
ket. It has since repaid the bailout.
The new legislation would under-
mine the 2010 financial overhaul
and “create a loophole big enough
to drive an AIG truck through,” said
Rep. Carolyn Maloney, a New York
Democrat.
But a supporter, Rep. Randy
Neugebauer, R-Texas, said the bill
would “bring some certainty to a
very uncertain process.”
Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas,
the Financial Services panel’s chair-
man, said the nine countries where
trading would be exempt from U.S.
regulation have systems of rules for
derivatives that are closely equiva-
lent to the U.S.
Having certainty in the rules
would help companies that use
derivatives to hedge against risks,
Hensarling said, naming Molson
Coors Brewing Co., Southwest
Airlines Co. and tractor maker
Deere & Co. as examples. That
would help economic growth and
jobs, he said.
Ariel Castro pleads not guilty in Ohio kidnap case
CLEVELAND (AP) — A man accused of holding three
women captive in his home for about a decade pleaded
not guilty Wednesday to hundreds of rape and kidnapping
charges, and the defense hinted at avoiding a trial with a
plea deal if the death penalty were ruled out.
The death penalty is in play because among the
accusations facing Ariel Castro, 52, is that he forced a
miscarriage by one of the women, which is considered a
killing under Ohio law. That charge doesn’t include a pos-
sible death penalty, but a prosecutor has said that’s under
review.
The women disappeared separately between 2002
and 2004, when they were 14, 16 and 20 years old. Each
said they had accepted a ride from Castro, who remained
friends with the family of one girl and even attended vigils
over the years marking her disappearance.
Castro, dressed Wednesday in an orange jail outfit with
his hands and ankles shackled and a full dark beard grown
in jail, kept his chin tucked on his chest through a brief
court appearance. He didn’t speak or glance at his two
attorneys standing by his side.
Attorney Craig Weintraub acknowledged afterward that
“certain charges in the indictment cannot be disputed” and
said the defense was working to avoid an “unnecessary
trial” with a possible death penalty sentence.
“Mr. Castro currently faces hundreds of years in prison
with the current charges,” Weintraub said. “It is our hope
that we can continue to work toward a resolution to avoid
having an unnecessary trial about aggravated murder and
the death penalty.”
The prosecutor’s office will look at the defense remarks
but had no immediate comment, said Joe Frolik, spokes-
man for Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty.
The 329-count indictment returned Friday covered only
the period from August 2002, when the first of the women
disappeared, to February 2007. More charges could be filed.
Castro was indicted on 139 counts of rape, 177 counts
of kidnapping, seven counts of gross sexual imposition,
three counts of felonious assault and one count of pos-
session of criminal tools. He was also charged with two
counts of aggravated murder related to one act, saying he
purposely caused the unlawful termination of one of the
pregnancies of one of the women.
Michelle Knight, now 32, has told investigators Castro
punched her in the abdomen and starved her to force five
miscarriages, according to police reports.
Ohio enacted a fetal homicide law in 1996, making it
illegal to kill or injure a viable fetus. That law and similar
ones in 37 other states have been used mainly to win con-
victions in car crashes in which pregnant women died or in
cases involving attacks on expectant mothers.
In 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death pen-
alty for child rapes in which no death occurred, spelling
out that a killing is the only crime eligible for the death
penalty outside of a crime against the state.
A death penalty case against Castro “would raise seri-
ous legal questions about whether a murder has occurred
and whether such a death sentence complies” with the
Supreme Court ruling, according to Richard Dieter, execu-
tive director of the Washington, D.C.-based Death Penalty
Information Center, which opposes capital punishment.
Weintraub, the defense attorney, said he expects a deci-
sion from prosecutors on the death penalty might hinge on
medical and forensic evidence, such as any fetal tissue that
may have been found at the home. Investigations haven’t
detailed what evidence was found.
The indictment alleges Castro repeatedly restrained the
women, sometimes chaining them to a pole in a basement,
to a bedroom heater or inside a van. It says one of the
women tried to escape and he assaulted her with a vacuum
cord around her neck.
A statement issued on behalf of the women said days
like the arraignment “are not easy” and added: “We are
hopeful for a just and prompt resolution. We have great
faith in the prosecutor’s office and the court.”
Castro has been held on $8 million bail.
He was arrested May 6, shortly after one of the women
broke through a door and yelled to neighbors for help.
She told a police dispatcher in a dramatic 911 call:
“Help me. I’m Amanda Berry. I’ve been kidnapped, and
I’ve been missing for 10 years, and I’m, I’m here, I’m
free now.”
Senate chief: Medicaid reform not part of budget
COLUMBUS (AP) — Changes to
the Medicaid health program won’t be
included in Ohio’s budget negotiations,
though a separate proposal aimed at
curbing the program’s costs is expected
to be introduced in the Legislature as
soon as today, the state Senate’s leader
said.
Senate President Keith Faber, a
Celina Republican, offered few details
to reporters on Wednesday, though
he said the Medicaid reform bill was
bipartisan and has been worked on
jointly by both chambers.
Republican Gov. John Kasich’s bud-
get proposal called for expanding the
Medicaid program to provide health
coverage to more low-income Ohioans.
But GOP leaders removed the idea from
the House version of the state spending
plan in April. It’s since remained out of
the $61.7 billion, two-year budget.
Medicaid expansion is one of the key
components of Democratic President
Barack Obama’s health care law.
Roughly 366,000 Ohioans would
be newly eligible for coverage begin-
ning in 2014 by expanding Medicaid,
the federal-state health program for the
poor that already provides care for one
of every five residents in the state.
The federal government would pay
the entire cost of the expansion for
the first three years, gradually phasing
down to 90 percent — still well above
Ohio’s current level of 64 percent.
But some Republicans in the Ohio
Legislature say they fear being stuck
with long-term costs and are leery of
expanding government programs.
A key lawmaker who helped draft
the Medicaid reform plan described the
proposal as a “starting point bill.”
State Rep. Ron Amstutz, a Wooster
Republican, said the goal is make the
program more cost-effective while not
dropping anyone from the rolls.
Lawmakers also want to help pro-
vide a pathway for Medicaid beneficia-
ries to get health coverage elsewhere,
perhaps through the federal law’s
new health insurance marketplaces or
through private coverage. And they
want to encourage individuals in the
program to access the state’s job train-
ing programs.
Amstutz, who is also the House
Finance Committee chairman, said if
lawmakers are successful in curbing
Medicaid’s costs, then they can weigh
whether to add people onto the pro-
gram.
“We’re trying to find that common
ground that will help us go forward,”
he said. “And we aren’t there yet, but
I think we’re making pretty good prog-
ress.”
The federal law expanded Medicaid
to cover low-income people making up
to 138 percent of the federal poverty
level, or about $15,400 a year for an
individual. The provision mainly ben-
efits low-income adults who do not
have children and can’t get Medicaid
in most states.
Amstutz said the proposal currently
makes no changes to Medicaid eligibil-
ity, and he could not yet say whether it
would require federal approval.
He said hearings on the legislation
could begin next week and move along-
side work on the budget, which must be
completed by June 30.
“We don’t have a lot of time, so it
would need to develop expeditiously,”
Amstutz said.
———
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
The traditional chef’s jacket is double-breasted
to hide stains. French chef Marie-Antoine Careme
designed it in the mid-1800s, making it white to empha-
size the cleanliness of the kitchen and double-breasted
so it could be buttoned either way to cover up stains.
Only two Star Wars performers appeared in all six
films in the popular sci-fi adventure series: the diminu-
tive Kenny Baker, who played R2-D2; and Anthony
Daniels, who played C-3P0.
Today’s questions:
What does the squirting cucumber plant squirt?
What Hollywood costars cofounded a nonprofit
humanitarian organization called Not On Our Watch
in 2007?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
Storm
(Continued from page 1)

When severe weather hits the community, please check
on older neighbors, friends and relatives to make sure they
have the resources they need to stay safe and healthy until
conditions return to normal.
Communicate effectively
—Always treat adults as adults. If someone isn’t making
sense, don’t assume it’s dementia. Dehydration, stress and
fatigue have similar symptoms.
— Use a natural tone of voice and conversational style
of communication. Be calm and reassuring, speak slowly
and distinctly and make eye contact. Use positive language:
Instead of “Don’t …” suggest what they should do.
— Ask open-ended questions. Instead of “Are you stay-
ing warm/cool?” ask “What are you doing to stay warm/
cool today?” “Where will you go if the power does not
come back on tomorrow?”
— Don’t ask “testing” or “challenging” questions.
Instead of “Do you know your name?” ask “What would
you like me to call you?” Instead of “Do you know where
you are?” say “I’m glad that I came to visit you at your
home today.”
— Don’t correct an adult who appears to be confused.
For example, if the person calls you by someone else’s
name, say “I haven’t seen ‘Joe’ lately but my name is …
and I’ll stay with you until your family comes by” or “I’ll
call someone so ‘Joe’ will know where you are.” Avoid
arguing but validate feelings.
Do a risk assessment
While visiting, observe his or her surroundings and ask
questions that will help you determine if this person is
healthy and safe, or if he or she may need some assistance.
— Does the person depend on oxygen?
— Does he or she need help walking?
— Does he or she need help getting to the bathroom?
— Does he or she have skin that is greyish? (If so, he or
she may require medical attention.)
Also, check if individuals have what they will need for
the next several days, including water, non-perishable food,
temperature control and medications. Refrigerated food
should be thrown out after two hours without electricity.
Also, some medications may need to be refrigerated or
stored on ice to remain safe and effective.
Make sure they can get help
Make sure the person is able to call for help if he or
she needs it. Don’t assume the person’s phone is working:
check the connection and battery charge. Some may not
realize that cordless phones need electricity to work and/
or charge. Instead of asking, “Do you have someone to
call if you need help?” say, “Show me how you would call
your daughter if you need her to come help,” will be more
effective.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful