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Claremont

SMITH V. RAMOS: WATER FIGHT TAKES AN UNEXPECTED TURN/PAGE 3
Friday, June 14, 2013 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

Here come the graduates: Congratulations CHS Class of 2013
COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger Claremont High Schoolʼs 2013 graduating class try and stay cool as they wait outside the schoolʼs gymnasium to prepare for their entrance to the graduation ceremony on Thursday afternoon. Complete coverage will be online today at www.claremont-courier.com. Our coverage of the high schoolʼs Baccalaureate is in todayʼs edition on page 14.

Merrick Hummer took the Boot Camp Challenge to heart as he wrestled his way through the blow up obstacle course at El Robleʼs eighth grade party.

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El Roble students flip out over end of year party/ PAGE 28 Volunteers kick off the Summer to End Homelessness
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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 SUMMER OPPS/ PAGE 12

LETTERS/ PAGE 2 CALENDAR/ PAGE 20

More news and photo galleries every day at: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Parking problems? Great!
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

READERS’ COMMENTS

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
Tears remembering Fertilizing Claremont's soil Nurturing new growth
—Kathy Felton Zetterberg

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Sports Reporter Chris Oakley
sports@claremont-courier.com

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Back Page Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com

Dear Editor: Forty-two years ago, there were 7 eating places in the Village and, except for 2, they were not open after 6 p.m. No yogurt shops, no coffee bars, no juice bars, no bars, period! There are now over 40 such businesses in the Village. There were complaints about parking even in the 1970s. Thirty years ago I was part of a restaurant ownership group that signed a contract with the city of Claremont regarding our parking obligations at the corner of First Street and Harvard Avenue. The city was paid tens of thousands of dollars to help provide parking in the Village area. The money went into the Village Parking fund, designated to improve and provide parking in the Village, where appropriate, and for the general good of the business area. A number of newer food establishments in the Village have had these contracts in past years. The whole Village has benefited by contributions to the fund with additional parking provided in various projects. The parking fund was not expected to provide The First St. Bar & Grill with 10 or 12 specific spaces. We also did not expect that buildings would be demolished or modified to provide parking close to our business. The parking garage on the west side of Indian Hill Boulevard in the Village is an excellent example of the use of these funds, if indeed the Village Parking Funds were used in this project. It not only provides parking for public transportation users as designated by the terms of the Federal Transportation grant received by Claremont but it benefits the whole Vil-

lage. What would parking be like without the additional 250 or so spaces provided in this building? I say, “Parking challenges in the Village? Great!” That means that there is economic vitality and interest in goods and services being provided. I only hope that most of the spaces are being used by customers and not by employers and their employees.
Karen M. Rosenthal Claremont

Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

Train crossing safety
Dear Editor: Last year, I came out of a store and walked south across the tracks toward my car parked on First Street. The roadway is very broken and I was concentrating on my path, thinking of another errand, when I suddenly realized I heard a loud, clanging noise. I looked around, the rails were down, and I was in the middle of the tracks. The train was about a block away and I was able to retreat, but it was a close call. My heart goes out to Michael Rodriguez’s friends and family. The trains travel too fast, and it only takes a moment of inattentiveness to die. I do have a suggestion that might help. In Canada and England, they paint “Stop, look for trains” on the sidewalks approaching the pedestrian crossing areas. It might catch the walker’s attention. Also, walkers should re-consider wearing earpods while walking. You also need to hear those careless car drivers who are running stop signs all over Claremont.
Constance Condit Claremont READERSʼ COMMENTS/page 7

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Tuesday, June 18 Planning Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Thursday, June 20 CUSD Board of Education Kirkendall Center, 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 24 Tree Committee Council Chamber, 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 25 City Council Council Chamber, 6:30 pm Wednesday, June 26 Architectural Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m.

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Ad Design Jenelle Rensch Page Layout Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch

Advertising
Advertising Director Mary Rose
maryrose@claremont-courier.com

Classified Editor Jessica Gustin
classified@claremont-courier.com

Business Administration
Office Manager/ Legal Notices Vickie Rosenberg
legalads@claremont-courier.com

Billing/Accounting Manager Dee Proffitt Distribution/Publications Tom Smith
tomsmith@claremont-courier.com

Circulation/Subscriptions
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Interns Open

The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 30

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Stormwater treatment proves to be costly endeavor

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he proper treatment of stormwater, according to new regional requirements, is coming at a high cost to the city of Claremont and other local cities. Claremont officials estimate more than $400,000 will be needed to comply with a new set of stringent guidelines put into place by the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality board. And that’s only for starters.
The Claremont City Council Tuesday unanimously approved moving forward with plans to adhere to the water quality board’s new rules—not because of agreement with the stricter standards, but because they believed there was no other choice. “We either pay the fines and fees [imposed by the water quality board] or we pay the consultants,” said Councilmember Sam Pedroza. The newly adopted Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System Permit (MS4) further regulates the treatment of stormwater runoff that recedes into the waters of the San Gabriel Valley Watershed, providing for water conservation among many other benefits. In order to comply with the new unfunded mandates, cities must compile a report detailing their plans to comply with these stricter rules. Among many concerns, local officials have voiced frustration that all cities are being held to the same strict standards, regardless of their position along the watershed. Claremont—much more upstream, resulting in fewer pollutants—must comply in the same way as the beach cities, where most of the pollutants are found. Acting City Engineer Loretta Mustafa emphasized the financial burden that results. She also noted the financial demands of the preliminary consultant work to put the water quality board’s guidelines into place. A consultant was needed to advise as to which water management plan the city should adopt, yet more consultants are needed to draft the dif-

ferent water management plans—both for the San Gabriel Valley Watershed as well as the Santa Ana River Watershed—and a part-time consultant will be needed to manage all the plans. These consultant fees plus preliminary tasks associated with water management for 2013-2014 is estimated at almost $500,000. To combat the financial impact, the Claremont City Council CITY has directed staff to join COUNCIL forces with the cities of La Verne, Pomona and San Dimas to prepare a group water management plan. It is hoped this joint venture will help save money for all cities involved. While council members recognized that seeking out grants and other financial help might be worth exploring in the future, they momentarily conceded to the water board’s fees—directing staff to draft a notice of the city’s intent to comply—in order to avoid yet more costs. Despite the financial burdens, closer examination of the city’s runoff could provide the opportunity for potential environmental gains, noted Councilmember Joe Lyons. “We should turn this challenging opportunity into creative solutions,” Mr. Lyons said. “Especially with regards to water and our location, it does offer us opportunities to come up with some out-of-the-box thinking that might serve our long term sustainability needs.” Discussion on litigation continues The Claremont City Council discussed ongoing litigation between the city and longtime Village eatery Pizza ‘N Such in closed session prior to the council’s regularly-scheduled meeting. Mike and Sue Verbal, owners of Pizza ‘N Such, recently filed a complaint against the city of Claremont alleging city officials violated an agreement made in regard to more than $150,000 of in-lieu parking fees paid by the Verbals to the city. The Verbals believe the city misused the money, which they believed was intended to pay for development of parking for use by customers dining at their restaurant in the Village. Mr. Verbal says he later learned his money was used for the 4-story parking structure

just west of the Packing House on First Street in Village West. City officials, denying any wrongdoing in the case, remain tight-lipped over the lawsuit: “We have given our lawyer direction,” Mayor Opanyi Nasiali stated on behalf of the council after returning from closed session. No other comments were presented from the council, the city’s attorney or members of the audience.   Club islands still under review City officials postponed further review of the Claremont Club neighborhood hardscape, despite an expected city council discussion on Tuesday night.

The city council is being tasked with the final decision on whether or not to leave several Club islands on Davenport, Elmhurst and Stanislaus Circle intact. City Manager Tony Ramos announced the postponement, stating “information received from a law firm” prior to the council meeting required further review. It is unknown when the item will be back on the council’s agenda. “I’m not sure how long it’s going to take to get the information that I need in order to validate what [the lawyers] are suggesting,” Mr. Ramos said.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Sideshow ignites in the battle with Golden State

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he battle between Claremont and Golden State Water has trickled into unchartered territory as Claremont City Manager Tony Ramos and Rodney Smith, president of Stratecon Inc., campaign to discredit one another through ongoing correspondence.
It started on May 20 in a letter to Mr. Ramos where Mr. Smith, the author of an economic study that WATER sought to outline costs ISSUES associated with the city’s proposed purchase of the water company, requested that Mr. Ramos retract statements made in his April 25 mailer to residents. In the April 25 mailer, Mr. Ramos challenged the objectivity of Mr. Smith’s study, noting that the economic study “was commissioned and paid for by Golden State, and thus it says exactly what the forprofit company wants it to say.” Mr. Smith took offense to the suggestion and in a letter to Mr. Ramos asserted there was “no basis for your statement attacking the credibility of my work.” Mr. Smith went on to write, “Your statement claiming the study was controlled by Golden State provides a troubling insight into your own value system. The city, undoubtedly, has invested taxpayer dollars for consultants to provide reports on many different issues. Does the city really tell its consultants that their reports must say exactly what the city wants it to say? If so, that would be unethical.” He gave a May 24 deadline for the city to respond to his request for retraction of what Mr. Smith deemed as an “irresponsible and inflammatory statement.” On behalf of the city of Claremont, Kendall H. MacVey of Best, Best & Krieger, the city’s law firm, responded in writing to Mr. Smith on May 24. “The April 25 letter simply notes what you have acknowledged,” Mr. MacVey wrote, “that the report provided to the public by Golden State Water Company was a report paid for by Golden State Water Company. The letter does not accuse you of unethical behavior.” Mr. MacVey references an op-ed piece—authored by Mr. Smith and published in the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin—where Mr. Smith emphasizes what he sought to prove in his economic study: A city takeover of the water company “will have negative consequences for residents for generations to come.” The city stands by Mr. Ramos’ assessment, Mr. MacVey said, and does not feel that his remarks warrant a retraction. Mr. MacVey also notes that Mr. Smith seems “to be acting as an advocate for one side of the public discussion.” The volley continued on June 10 with the submittal of another letter from Mr. Smith, which proclaims that “Mr. MacVey’s meager attempts to change the subject are not at all satisfactory. His response is nonsense.” The letter includes a public records request asking for “all written work product of any and all city consultants you reviewed in reaching your conclusion that Stratecon’s study ‘says exactly what the for-profit company wants it to say.’” A total of 6 requests for documents are listed, each relating to meetings, correspondence, emails and letters, which might support Mr. Ramos’ suggestion that the study “says exactly what the forprofit company wants it to say.” Mr. Smith says he intends to take all necessary steps to protect his reputation. “Stratecon will pursue a resolution to its satisfaction, either by a written formal retraction by the city or by the legal mechanisms available to hold officials accountable for their actions,” Mr. Smith said. As far as the public records request, Mr. Ramos says the city will respond “appropriately and under the guidelines of the law.” —Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Final plans being made for city’s Fourth of July celebration
The 2013 Independence Day Committee invites all Claremont residents to enter the annual House Decorating Contest. Decorations must be outdoors and visible from the street. Judging will take place on June 23 and will be based on spirit, appearance, and creativity. The Grand Prize Winner will receive recognition at the pre-parade reception, a special place in the parade, fireworks tickets and an American Flag that flew over the Capitol. Entry forms are available at www.Claremont4th.org. The Fourth of July Celebration is a time-honored tradition in the city of Claremont. The celebration consists of a 5K run, pancake breakfast, flag raising, festival area with games, a parade and a Fireworks Sky Show. Four time slots remain open between 1:20 and 2:20 p.m. for the T. Willard Hunter Speakers’ Corner. Speakers are limited to 8 minutes of oration on any topic of interest. No foul language, no nudity and no promotion of commercial goods or services is allowed. To sign up, email Karen Rosenthal at karen.kmr@verizon.net.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Student embarks on world travel as Claremont ambassador

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his summer, Chaparral sixth-grader Faith Nishimura is putting her social studies homework and geography lessons into real-world application.

The straight-A student prepares to travel across the globe this month to represent her Claremont elementary school through the People to People Student Ambassadors program, a competitive educational travel course designed to provide students with global awareness. Faith will trade Claremont for Cambridge and County Cork as she goes solo to the United Kingdom and Ireland for a 3-week program abroad. Becoming a student ambassador is an accomplishment in and of itself—only a select amount of students are invited to participate in the program each year. Three letters of recommendation and an interview are part of that selection process. Faith was nominated for the distinction by Anne Dierken, one of the fifth grade teachers at Chaparral who has been a leader with the ambassador program for the last 4 years.
AMBASSADOR continues on the next page

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Chaparral sixth-grader Faith Nishimura is raising money to pay for a trip to the United Kingdom to be part of a global learning program called People to People Student Ambassadors. The Claremont Police Officersʼ Association donated $300 help with Faithʼs travel expenses.

Wednesday, June 7 A resident in the 3400 block of Grand Avenue dug up something unexpected when working in the garden Wednesday night. The resident was planting some bushes when she came across human bones buried about a foot deep in her flowerbed. The residents have lived in the home since 1988 and believe the bones might be part of a speculated Indian burial ground, according to Detective Rick Varney. The Los Angeles County Coroner is conducting a followup investigation of the remains.

POLICE BLOTTER

Police nab man connected to string of burglaries
A 26-year-old man identified as Anthony Hernandez was taken into custody last week after evidence connected him to last week’s string of smash-and-grab burglaries near the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park. The Chino resident is also connected to several other car burglaries throughout neighboring cities. Police served Mr. Hernandez a search warrant, suspecting him of involvement in a series of car burglaries at the Upland 24 Hour Fitness. The search revealed stolen property AbilityFirst. However, it did not show whether or not he was responsible for the break-in. Mr. Spotts gave up that part of the story himself. Questioned by police, Mr. Spotts said he had jumped into the patio area to smoke meth without detection, according to Det. Varney. He claimed he had leaned up against the window and it had broken. It was then that he spotted the radio. “I was like, ‘Oh, damn, there’s a radio,’” Mr. Spotts recalled to police. “I didn’t really want it, but I figured I could sell it.” Mr. Spotts, who is on parole for kidnapping, was arrested for the burglary. **** The saga of the black cow statue continues. In April, police took possession of the ceramic figurine, which had mysteriously appeared in the 200 block of Sixth Street. Just a couple weeks after the cow was returned home to the 400 block, it vanished once more. The heifer was reported missing once again on Sunday from a variety of other car burglaries in the area, including Claremont and Rancho Cucamonga, according to Det. Varney, who says Mr. Hernandez has been targeting vehicles parked near local trailheads. Police remind residents visiting the wilderness park and other local trails to be aware of their surroundings and never leave purses and other personal items in plain sight within their vehicle. Mr. Hernandez pled guilty to the car burglaries and is serving 28 months in county jail. evening. This time, however, the resident was able to obtain video footage of the attack. Four men were seen carting the cow off into the night. Police are reviewing the footage and will be conducting a follow-up investigation. Monday, June 10 Raymond Donahue, 34, of Alta Loma was caught red-handed vandalizing the Claremont Village’s newest eatery on Monday night. Mr. Donahue tried to enter Petiscos, the former location of Shrimps on First Street, but was prevented from entering the building, which is closed off to the public. Instead, he put his fist through a glass windowpane before taking off on his bike. Mr. Donahue was located down the street at City Hall, nursing a bleeding hand, which he said was the result of falling off his bike, according to Det. Varney. He was arrested for vandalism and public intoxication.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Thursday, June 6 An early morning, alcohol-induced argument quickly escalated at the Packing House parking garage on Thursday, leaving 2 with minor injuries. Police made their way to the structure down the street after a struggle was heard in the background of a 9-1-1 call. According to the report, 20-year-old Casey Farlow of Claremont punched another man on the side of the face before pulling out a knife and allegedly threatening to kill him. Two others tried to break up the fight and were cut by the blade in the process— one on the chin, the other on the hand. Police arrived to intervene. Mr. Farlow was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon and criminal threats. It is unknown what intensified Mr. Farlow’s anger, but it’s believed that booze was involved, according to Det. Varney. Saturday, June 8 A trio of Claremont College students

fought a losing battle with police early Saturday morning—the fact that they were trying to outrun a police vehicle in a golf cart should have been their first clue to their mission’s futility. The students were attempting to get away after being caught taking a joyride in one of the Pomona College golf carts without authorization. The police pursuit ended when the driver of the golf cart crashed the vehicle into a mailbox on Contra Costa Way. The students attempted to take off on foot, but did not succeed in getting away. Donald Okpaluga, the 23year-old driver, was arrested for the stolen vehicle, hit-and-run and for resisting arrest. Jung Cha, 22 was arrested for the stolen vehicle and resisting arrest. Jeremy Hilledwards, 22, was also arrested for resisting arrest. Sunday, June 9 If you believe 36-year-old Donald Spott, Claremont’s AbilityFirst has really thin windows. That or his story is short on credibility. Around 5:30 p.m., police made their way to AbilityFirst after the burglary alarm was activated. Officers arrived to find a tube sock and an empty beer can outside a broken window. A K9 unit from Chino was called in to search the building, but no one was found inside. Though it had appeared the crook had gotten away, he hadn’t gotten very far. Mr. Spotts was seen at a gas station down the street, carrying a radio and covered in blood. Video surveillance found at the scene positively identified Mr. Spotts jumping into a patio area at

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Property sale finalized at CUSD board meeting

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here was a special treat at the Thursday, June 6 gathering of the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education when the Pledge of Allegiance was followed by a rendition of “The Star Spangled Banner” as performed by district’s Elementary Strings Orchestra.

The showcasing of student talent continued when, with a clinking of medals, a number of 4th through 6th graders stepped to the front of the board room to be honored for their success at the recent Los Angeles County Office of Education Math Field Day. Additionally receiving kudos was Jessica Jackman-Uy, a fifth grade teacher at Chaparral Elementary who coordinated the district’s participation in the event. Congratulations were also given to members of the Claremont High School debate program who have qualified to attend the National Championship Speech and Debate tournament to be held in Birmingham, Alabama next week, followed by a laudatory presentation by CHS theater director Krista Carson Elhai. Ms. Elhai took time to enumerate some of the achievements of her students such as the awards they took at the California State Thespian Festival held in Upland on March 22-24. A number of her students did so well in the festival they have now qualified for the International Thespian Festival, to be held at the University of Nebraska on June 24-29. With 5 productions, a move to a new theater and its associated opening gala plus their annual F.O.O.T. auction and a sing-along with the cast of Wicked, Ms. Elhai and her thespians are wrapping up a dizzyingly busy school year. “I don’t even remember what musical we did last week,” Ms. Elhai laughed. “We’re very excited to be celebrating our 50th year in our new building that we never leave.” The board next bid farewell to 2 high school students, Carolyn Bird of Claremont High School and Aimee Orcasitas of San Antonio High School, who had joined the school board at meetings in order to report on doings at schools throughout the district. “Please don’t think this has to be your last board meeting,” board member Steven Llanusa joked. “You’re welcome any time.” During the public comment period, Freeman Allen, co-chair of Sustainable Claremont, stepped up to the podium to appeal to the board to renew the position of
AMBASSADOR continued from the previous page

Community Garden Coordinator. Sustainable Claremont values the position so much it hopes to contribute $2000 to help finance the job, up from $1500 last year, he said. “I see these gardens as an outdoor laboratory that is absolutely crucial in giving students real-world lessons in what nature is like,” Mr. Allen, a reCUSD tired Pomona College chemistry profesNEWS sor, said. For the last year, the district has employed Dessa D’Aquila at 25 hours per week as the CUSD garden coordinator. Along with helping oversee gardens at various schools, including San Antonio’s Food Justice Program and the new biomes project at Oakmont School, which has staff, kids and volunteers cultivating the landscapes of 4 California native landscapes, including desert, grassland, shrub land and forest. Much of Ms. D’Aquila’s time, she explained prior to the meeting, is also spent connecting teachers hoping to embark on gardening projects with staff and students from local colleges as well as community members that hope to donate time or resources to Claremont schools. “As we go forward, we’re going to have a much more successful program if we have someone to coordinate it,” Mr. Allen said. Board approves Service Center sale, disagrees on sale process There were some moments of tension as the board prepared to vote on whether to approve the offer for the Service Center Property that D.R. Horton made at an auction held at the end of May. The homebuilder agreed to the district’s $7 million asking price, accompanied by a $10,000 deposit. While the board and district at large seemed pleased with the results of the auction, Mr. Llanusa expressed chagrin that the auction yielded no other conforming bids and no attendees other than D.R. Horton. It should be noted that there were 2 other bids submitted by company representatives before the auction, but one fell below the district’s price tag at $4.5 million and neither bid was accompanied by the required security deposit. Mr. Llanusa said he urged the board and the district to reach out to a number of real estate agencies prior to selling the Service Center Property, located at 700 Base Line Rd., in order to find the most motivated buyer. Instead, the district opted to use the services of Tierra Development, which helped CUSD promote and sell another property, 4.35 acres located at its former dis-

trict offices. D.R. Horton also purchased the property for $6.2 million. “I am hugely disappointed,” Mr. Llanusa said. “The district opted for expediency over efficacy. This is a Hobson’s choice—take it or leave it.” “I’m sure [Tierra Development] reached out to hundreds of companies,” Lisa Shoemaker, assistant superintendent of business services, said. “It’s very common that we’d get mostly nonconforming bids.” Board member Jeff Stark asserted that the bid received from D.R. Horton was twice what people told the board and that district the Service Center property would be worth in 2006, at the height of the real estate market. The district benefited from relying on experts, he emphasized, such as the Surplus Property committee who made recommendations as to the sale of the property and on a real estate company that had previously made good on its promise of netting the district the top-dollar amount for a property. If the district had set a lower price for the Service Center property, then it would perhaps have received many more bids. Mr. Stark stressed that the plan all along was to appeal to a big company with deep pockets. “I think it’s important for the board to understand what our role is in this,” Mr. Stark said. Bill Fox, former president of William Fox Homes Inc. in Ontario, is a member of the district’s Surplus Advisory Committee, also known as the 7-11 Committee. The committee is composed of volunteers with expertise in the real estate industry who donated many hours to helping the district sell its properties. Mr. Fox said he strongly objected to Mr. Llanusa’s assertion that work conducted by the 7-11 Committee and by the district utilized inferior methods this time around. “I’m proud of what the committee has done,” he said. “I’m proud to be a resident of Claremont and I’m proud to be a part of the process.” After the discussion, the board voted on whether or not to accept D.R. Horton’s offer for the Service Center property. Everyone on the 5-member board voted yes except for Mr. Llanusa, who cast a dissenting vote. Escrow on the former district office property, on which D.R. Horton plans to build a 50-plus unit condominium development, will close “in the very near future,” Ms. Shoemaker said. That happened more quickly than the district expected, and, given that D.R. Horton has already jumped over many of the hurdles that would apply to an adjacent housing project, the Service Center property should close even more quickly, she projected. —Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

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t takes a certain drive and tenacity to embark on the ambassador journey and travel alone at such a young age, Ms. Dierken recognized. Beyond the travel, students must complete 2 online courses and several orientations following their excursion. While the program can be grueling for some, Ms. Dierken felt it posed an exciting new opportunity for Faith. “Faith was one of the few I thought had that drive,” Ms. Dierken said. “Some kids are interested at first, but it takes a lot of hard work to stay in the program.” Faith’s teacher, Kimberly Walters, can attest to her student’s hard working spirit. “Faith is an extra-hard worker, always giving 110 percent,” Ms. Walters shared. “You couldn’t ask for a better student. She is always prepared and has a positive attitude.” With the help of Ms. Walters, Faith has spent a section of the past school year fa-

miliarizing herself with global geography and maps of the world, including the places she will visit. She has also taken the time to study world cultures. She looks forward to learning more firsthand. “I can’t wait to share my culture with other people and learn about their cultures as well,” Faith said. Putting her classwork into action is only part of the excitement surrounding her impending trip overseas. Traveling to Ireland and England is a dream-come-true for the avid reader—she gets giddy at the mere thought of traveling along the same routes as many of her favorite writers, Shakespeare included. Shakespeare’s home is among the top of her list of mustvisit destinations. Perhaps she’ll draw some inspiration. “I love writing and improving my writing,” she shared. While excited about the trip itself, Faith admits her nerves start flaring any time she has to climb aboard a plane, let alone the 12-hour flight she will be taking by

herself. However, she has a game plan. “I’m trying to stay calm and do other things,” she said. Her plan includes adding to her book knowledge with some of the classics, including Harper Lee’s iconic To Kill A Mockingbird. She will also throw in some math practice with her algebra book in tow. It’s an equally thrilling and nervewracking venture for the Nishimura family. Faith’s mother, Freya Nishimura is not only preparing to send her daughter off to the UK, she is also saying goodbye to her older son, Brent, who is traveling to Australia, also with the ambassadorship program. “I’m proud and broke,” Ms. Nishimura joked. Despite the expense, Ms. Nishimura has taken the opportunity to impart another valuable lesson to her children before they travel cross-country. Faith and her brother have been tasked with earning their way overseas by fundraising to help pay for their $7000 trips. Over the last 6

months, they have been hard at work helping to run yard sales and selling Valentine’s and Mother’s Day cards and other items. Faith took it upon herself, with the advice of her teacher Kimberly Walters, to also reach out to the Claremont Police Officers’ Association, which donates a certain percentage of club money to worthy causes in the community. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Detective Rick Varney said of Faith’s trip, and the association’s decision to donate $300 to her ambassadorship fund.   Ms. Nishimura is pleased to give her children the opportunity to see the world, while representing the family and her Chaparral community. She says her daughter’s drive and spirit, inspired by her older brothers, is something to be reckoned with. “Faith has no fear,” her mother said. “She is something else.”
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

6

The walls of Los Angeles
by Jan Wheatcroft

G

enaro Molina is my friend and an “almost son.” I met him many years ago when he worked as the photographer for the Claremont COURIER and I sold ads. He even lived with us for a while. He is a photographer for the Los Angeles Times now and lives in the Santa Monica area with his girlfriend, Patty. I am lucky. They treat me very well indeed.
On Mother’s Day, Genaro created a real treat that he knew I would love: A tour of Los Angeles to see the Public Art spaces created by artists and locals on walls, fences and spaces that could be reached by man. It took a lot of research on his part to locate these places and then find out the history behind as many as possible. The day was hot and we got caught in traffic. We jumped out at overpasses, underpasses, walls, mechanical coverings and bridges. We struggled to find parking places and even received a parking ticket as a non-gift. But it was an unforgettable day; one filled with art, color and soul. The first place we went to was the evening before at the Ballona Water Canal bike path in Santa Monica. This was part of the Peoples Art Project, which is comprised of different faces and exists all over the world. This one was way up on the plinth of the canal overpass but so high up that one wonders how anyone was able to get up there. There are 3 little faces, 2 babies and a woman in the center. The next morning we went for a breakfast on the Venice boardwalk, all foggy and cold. Who knew what heat would be waiting for us later on? Then we moved over to Abbot Kinney Boulevard at Palms to the Brig Building to see Brandellis Brig by Arthur Mortimer. This is a mural inside a mural; a painting of the bar’s owner and wife being painted by the painter. We could stand in the parking lot and photograph it. Then we went to see a large group of wall graffiti, which turned out to be one of my favorites. It was in Culver City on Washington Boulevard. It was at a former Hyundai Car Dealership and is soon to be torn down, which is really sad. The title is Branded Arts and the paintings are by a number of known artists with the only rule being “nothing negative.” Some of these were in a cartoon vein, others with outlined, fat letters. My favorites were the large pieces that covered an entire wall

and went into alley ways and central courtyards or parking areas. The area is now littered with glass and garbage, but people stop to see and photograph the art. It is really sad to think that soon they will all be gone. We drove up Robertson and Third Street. At a gas station, there is a very small Banksey of a boy peeing low down on the corner of the wall. A trail of pink dribbles up the street. The Banksey style is very obvious, stencil art that is sprayed on and is usually in black with red. I saw a lot of this work in Paris. We then drove into West Hollywood to the library where murals are painted on the parking structure. The largest and most dominant and exciting was the West Hollywood Peace Elephant—a black and white figure on a yellow and red background. This was painted by Shepard Fairey, who rose to artistic fame when he created the “Hope” poster of the then-presidential candidate, Barack Obama. The elephant is a very bold and powerful design and wonderful to look at. In the Fairfax District beginning at Melrose and Ogden, we discovered treasures on walls and buildings and fences by just driving around, in and out of alleys. My favorites were a Banksey of a boy on a rocket, a group of marching soldiers and a dog pulling a man on a skateboard painted on a metal fence. There were many more woven into parking lots and alleyways. A really fun—painted onto a backdoor and on the sidewalk— was a red pair of shoes at the end of candy striped legs. If one has the time, and enjoys the hunt, it is amazing what can be discovered. We drove down into Korea Town on Vermont at Wilshire, where there is a huge mural on 2 sloping walls called the Big Bowl of Rice Finished, Waiting for Giant Soy Sauce Packet. It was made from a digital photo into a painting. On Glendale Boulevard on the underpass of Sunset, are 2 sets of large and bold paintings on both sides. These are the Eyes Murals where the artist, Ruben Soto, has focused on the eyes area of the face. Here, we were

able to park and walk along both sides to get a great view and photos as well. We stopped in Silverlake on West Sunset Boulevard for a break at the Silver Lake Coffee bar (intelligentsia coffee). I had read about this place as having first sourced Ethiopian Coffee and wanted to try it. It was not, however, the right season so we had Kenyan Coffee instead, which was delicious. Their pastries were excellent, as well. After some people watching and gazing at the beautiful floral arrangements coming from the shop next door (it was Mother’s Day after all) we drove on down Sunset towards Echo Park, stopping to photograph the chickens and cats along the cement walls by Cache, which have become quite the landmark. Apparently Cache and 2 other painters climbed ladders and spray-painted while a small band of onlookers gathered to watch. He began painting his signature chickens in 2001. The next stop was at the Los Angeles Times parking lot to see the “Newlyweds” by Kent Twitchel and a tribute to the 1934 and the 1984 Olympics at the Victor Clothing Building. Our last lot of murals and wall art was in the Art District in Downtown LA. Here, we parked and walked around the various streets that had been brought to life with paintings and action. At one building there was a group filming a music video, using people who were just walking around holding cardboard signs. Hanging out of a window aboe them was a beautiful black and white husky dog. It made a great picture. There was a mural of 3 wolves on a pink backdrop, which I found very effective. There was a purple JFK under the words Beware Hipsters. Another of a woman standing in a polka-dotted bowl. The masculine faced Mona Lisa had be tagged, sadly. Then there was a whole wall of 3 black and white elephants. The whole area within a 3 block radius was alive with artwork. It was a super day filled with bold images that shouted out, “I am someone,”and “I was here.” This isn’t about gang tagging or words you can’t read or understand. This is street art. It is about looking at where you are and being there for a few moments yourself. It is bold expression, humor, a swash of color in an often drab place. It shouts “Look at me!” And I did. It is a part of the soul of the people of Los Angeles, different from what I saw in Paris or London, perhaps its brighter and more bold here. It was a terrific gift to me and a super way to explore Los Angeles.
Debbie Cariniʼs OUT OF MY MIND/page10

Happy Father’s Day.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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[Editor’s note: The following letter was sent to the Claremont City Council, with a copy forwarded for publication. —KD]

Conflict with city’s law firm
Dear City Council members: Your list of future council agenda items includes the contract with Best Best and Krieger for legal services. For many years, it has troubled me that the city attorney’s law firm may also represent the city in litigation. This creates a conflict of interest. Our city attorney should be advising you how to minimize litigation and also whether to accept the recommendations of its litigators. Litigators have a reputation for promoting further litigation instead of settlement, and mediation can be preferable to litigation despite being less lucrative for attorneys. In addition, by not having a contract with one law firm for legal services, you can engage the most expert law firm for the topic when you are required to litigate. A city attorney should give independent advice, which is at least awkward if his or her own firm is competing to be selected, and which is not possible at all if the firm has a monopoly. Any conflict of interest should be eliminated. I hope that you will do this when the legal services contract is up for renewal.

Meanwhile, I request that you publish a breakdown of our city’s expenses during the current legal services contract period before you calendar its renewal. We should know how much is paid to whom for what.
Bob Gerecke Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS

Invalidating what’s valid
Dear Editor: Are you kidding me? Is our legislature really that clueless? We want to give valid IDs to illegals and felons who are breaking our laws by being here to begin with. We want to thereby grant them immediate access to all sorts of social services that most of them don’t pay into (no taxes withheld from “under the table” workers). Let’s look at some of the drawbacks. (1) Birth certificates and proof of residency are required to obtain these documents. These can be created by hundreds of counterfeiters who are currently supplying them to anyone with the price to pay. (2) These documents can be obtained under any name the perpetrator of this crime chooses, thereby allowing for multiple IDs for criminals and terrorists who

wish to remain anonymous. (3) Once obtained, the holder of these documents can roam freely throughout our country and never fear that they will be jailed or deported. This will allow criminals and terrorists free rein to destroy any building, installation or group that they have targeted because, if stopped, they will have valid ID. (4) This law will make the term “valid ID” meaningless and once again this state will be the laughing stock of the country and the world.
Hayden Lening Claremont

Drop the personal attacks
Dear Editor: May I express my gratitude for Ellen Taylor’s unstinting and generous service to the community of Claremont. Without her diligent and yes, unbiased information, we would be hard-pressed to analyze, cogitate upon and resolve many political issues. As a registered Republican, I am grateful for people such as Ms. Taylor, who are devoted to the concept of community service. I do rely on her analysis and perspective as a community leader to provide information and balanced evaluation to the political conversation. I am so sorry to see a letter to the editor turn into a personal attack, and I must say that as a fellow property owner I absolutely agree with Ms. Taylor’s response to the Girl Scouts’ incident (and haven’t we heard enough ignorant opinions about this topic?). The Girl Scouts who wanted to sell cookies could have

benefited from a lesson in civics as they went to city hall and obtained a permit for their sales; instead the Girl Scouts were thrust into a situation where they learned nothing and probably felt bad. We are not all privileged enough to own property, but any property owner knows that liability starts whenever anyone sets foot upon their property If the Girl Scouts had been allowed to commence selling cookies upon private property, any one of their customers could hold the property owner liable for any small infraction, real or imagined. Ms. Taylor was right to defend her property. Unfortunately, most insurance companies require police reports or other official documents to back up property owners’ claims or information. Ms. Taylor was right to call the police to document the situation. This is the bizarre nature of the legal climate; most grown adults understand this. I used to be a Girl Scout in this community and I have raised 4 children in Claremont. I know personally that the atmosphere within this community strives to be forward-thinking and positive toward youth. Please drop this inane personal attack and stick to serious issues.
Carla Johnson Claremont READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Attorney at Law

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Splish, splash at city wading pools
Claremont parents and kids 5 and under have a bonus way to stay cool this summer. The community wading pools reopen for the summer season beginning this Monday, June 17. The pool at El Barrio Park is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays, the pool at Wheeler Park is open Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays while the Memorial Park pool is open Monday through Friday. Operating hours are 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. through Friday, August 23. For more information, including weekend rentals, call 399-5490.

OUR TOWN
the Hughes Center. Classes include an aerobics and Pilates combo on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday mornings at 8:30 a.m. and Wednesday evenings at 7:15 p.m. and “Super Fit” on Tuesday and Thursday mornings at 9 a.m. Additional drop-in classes include Stroller Strides, Jazzercise and Zumba. The drop-in fee is $10 to $12 per class. The Hughes Center is located at 1700 Danbury Rd. For more information, call 399-5490.

Claremonter graduates with honors
Lauren Heminger of Claremont just received her bachelor’s degree in liberal arts with department honors and summa cum laude from the University of La Verne. She will return to ULV in the fall to begin studies toward earning her master’s degree. Ms. Heminger attended Condit, El Roble and Claremont High schools. She has also traveled to Ireland and London and will be going to Budapest, Hungry with her sister and Revive Church on a mission trip this July.

Camp Claremont at Wheeler Park
Camp Claremont kicks off this Monday, June 17 at Wheeler Park, 626 Vista Dr., and continues through August 9. Camp Claremont is held at the local park on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants will engage in team-building exercises, arts and crafts and sports. The curriculum also includes escaping the summer heat with some water games.  The city-funded program requires a one-time registration fee of $10, in addition to the $15 cost per week/per child. The price includes a camp shirt and breakfast and lunch provided by the Claremont Unified School District. For more information, call 399-5490.

Self-defense class for Two Pilgrim Place teens and adult women residents honored for A course on self-defense for women achievements
will take place this Saturday, June 15 from noon to 2 p.m. at the Hughes Center, 1700 Danbury Rd. Hosted by the Community and Human Services Department, the program will provide a comprehensive course of practical self-defense tips geared towards teen and adult women. This class is based on the psychology of victim-avoidance combined with throwing, grappling, striking and other techniques typically found in Judo. Cost for the workshop is $25 per person. At its commencement on May 21, the Claremont School of Theology awarded an honorary doctorate to Dr. John Cobb Jr., PhD. Dr. Cobb is a renowned process theologian and United Methodist. Dr. Cobb has written, co-written, or edited more than 50 books, including Christ in a Pluralistic Age, God and the World, and For the Common Good (with Herman Daly), which was the co-winner of the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Dr. Cobb was the Ingraham professor of theology at CST, Avery professor at the Claremont Graduate School, Fullbright professor at the University of

Hey, teens: Get social, play games
The Claremont Library will host free teen game days every Tuesday from June 25 through July 30 from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Locals aged 12 to 18 are invited to socialize over new and classic board games. For more information, call 621-4902 or visit the library’s website at colapublib.org.

Mainz in Germany and visiting professor at Vanderbilt, Harvard and Chicago Divinity Schools. He pioneered a theology that is both Christocentric as well as accepting in its approach to other faiths, and includes ecological concerns as an essential and interrelated part of that theology, for the sake of future generations. Pilgrim Place resident Paul Minus, a retired educator and later involved in several nonprofits linking ethics and economics, received the Social Responsibility Award from LeadingAge California, the state’s leading advocate for quality, not-for-profit senior living and care. The most recent achievement of Mr. Minus involved raising funds for a remodeled resident activity center at Pilgrim Place called the Napier Center for Creative Change, in honor of deceased residents Davie and Joy Napier. Mr. Minus realized that the potential for the program extended further and spearheaded the effort to create the Napier Awards, a fellowship program that brings together students from the Claremont Colleges interested in projects reflecting various aspects of social responsibility, and matching them with mentors and elders at Pilgrim Place with experience in similar programs. Mr. Minus was recognized at the LeadingAge California Annual Conference, held earlier this month in Monterey, California.

Drop in and get fit at the Hughes Center
Claremont’s Community and Human Services Department is offering a variety of drop-in exercise classes in addition to the typical summer offerings at

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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The graduate
by Debbie Carini

S

eventeen years ago, I volunteered to help make the caps for my daughter’s preschool graduation class.  It seemed impossible, at the time, that she was already on her way to kindergarten— hadn’t she just mastered walking and talking and eating with the “big girl” spoon and fork?
As an inveterate crafter, I always have some yarn on hand, so I offered to put together the tassels that would dangle from the sides of the traditional mortarboards that other parents were gluing together from recycled file folders. The kids colored these and, voila!, a graduating class was on its way to the big time—real school, with ABCs, 123s and...drum roll...a permanent record! As I sat in the audience watching my 4-year-old march across the stage to the tune of Sir Edward Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance to receive her “diploma,” I couldn’t help but recall my own kindergarten graduation from Sacred Heart School in Lyndhurst, New Jersey.   In 1965, Vatican II was on its way to modernizing the Catholic Church, but I was still being taught by

nuns who were draped in layers of fabric, wimples covering all but their eyes, noses and mouths (I’m just going to admit it right here that I spent most of the 3 years that I attended Catholic school, from the ages of 5 to 7, wondering if my teachers had hair, and if they slept in their habits and, also, why did they all have men’s names?). At the Sacred Heart ceremony, we donned miniature caps and gowns that were rented from some Lilliputian professional costume company (my cap kept sliding off my unusually large head—still an issue with hats and headbands—so my mother stuck Bobby pins in it to hold it in place, an early form of acupuncture). Sister Frederick kept time to the classic piece by slapping her ruler against the palm of her hand as we marched, in procession, with the words Sister James

had taught us days earlier fixed in our brains: “Let’s do the slow walk, hands down by your side.” Now, think of the music—Pomp and Circumstance—and imagine repeating those words to yourself, over and over. So deeply ingrained in me was this mantra, that I found myself repeating it at my high school, and then college graduations. I am the one who is not waving to her parents in the home movies of these occasions because my hands are down at my side! Two weeks ago, Sir Elgar’s March No. 1 rang out again, this time as my darling daughter proceeded towards The Green at Tufts University to receive her bachelor of arts degree (with honors, proud mama moment!!). Of course, I thought of Sister Frederick and her round, wire-rimmed glasses, and her omnipresent ruler. As the music started, I sat, hands down at my side, and watched with mixed emotions. I felt immense pride and melancholy (are we all really this old?) and just a little bit of envy (gosh, to be 22 again!) as my daughter did the slow walk up to the podium, to a bright future, and a world filled with exciting opportunities.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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ʻPiratesʼ movie screening, dinner to benefit CHS students
The Claremont High School Class of 2016 is saluting the start of summer with a fundraiser, “Swashbuckling Summer Starter Dinner & Movie Night,” set for Saturday, June 29 from 5 to 10 p.m. For $10, guests can enjoy dinner, popcorn and a screening of the 2003 Disney film Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl starring Johnny Depp. Dinner is a hamburger or 2 hotdogs, chips and a drink. All proceeds will go to fund the CHS Class of 2016’s senior grad outing. “This is a great way for students and their families to kick off the summer and enjoy an evening with fellow classmates,” said Jesse Baltazar, 2016 class committee president. The event will take place at Taylor Hall, next to Claremont High School. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Jamie via text at (626) 278-5259 or by email at jayram2208@ yahoo.com or claremontclassof2016@ gmail.com.

OUR TOWN
Class, Ms. Couts is at technical training school, being trained in aerospace medical services. Ms. Couts was a 2005 graduate of Claremont High School and a 2011 graduate from Univeristy of California, Irvine. She plans on applying for the Officer’s Candidate Program. Her first assignment of duty will be at Langley Air Force Base in West Virginia. Ms. Couts is the daughter of Darrin and Yvette Walker of Rancho Cucamonga, and George and Christy Couts of Victorville.

Margaret F. Hinshaw
Margaret F. Hinshaw, a former Claremont resident, died on April 17, 2013. She was 92. A memorial service for Ms. Hinshaw will be held on Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 11 a.m. at Claremont United Methodist Church, 211 W. Foothill Blvd. Following the services, held at 2 and 3 p.m. Signups are required. On Wednesday, June 26, kids can learn about Treasures in the Tidepool. They will be able to examine ocean specimens and touch live tidepool animals. This program, held at 2 and 3 p.m., is recommended for kids in 2nd through 8th grades. On Wednesday, July 3, kids will be taken on a Historical Journey through America’s Music, just in time for the upcoming Fourth of July. This celebration of America’s music, from its roots to the present day, will be held at 2 p.m. and is recommended for children preschool aged through 8th grade. On Wednesday, July 10, the Lizard Wizard will stop by to take kids on a fascinating journey into the world of reptiles. Signups are required for this event, which takes place at 2 and 3 p.m. and is recommended for kids in grades K-8. attendees are invited to a no-host lunch in a reserved area of Walter’s Restaurant. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that donations be made to the Claremont United Methodist Church or to Planned Parenthood.

Library to host events aimed at summer fun for kids
The Claremont Library has an array of fun activities, may of them co-sponsored by the Friends of the Library, set for Wednesday afternoons throughout June and July. On Wednesday, June 19, the library will kick off its Summer Reading Program with a program showcasing John Abram’s Animal Magic Show. Kids in kindergarten through 8th grade will enjoy a lively mix of magic, music and live exotic pets. Performances will be

Claremonter completes basic military training
Natasha Couts completed basic military training from the Air Force out of Lackland, Texas. Now an Airman First

On Wednesday, July 17 at 2 p.m., youngsters are invited to savor Incredible Edible Science. How does popcorn pop and ice cream freeze? Children will learn these answers and more at this event, which is set for 2 p.m. and is aimed at kids in grades K-8. On Wednesday, July 24, kids can gather for a Musical Barnyard Extravaganza at 2 p.m. Kids can gather for a rootin’ tootin’ time with their favorite barnyard animals. The program is recommended for preschoolers through eight graders. And on Wednesday, July 31 at 2 p.m., kids can marvel at The Found Object Juggling Show. This fun and fast-paced show is recommended for grades K-8. The Claremont Library is located at 208 N. Harvard Ave. in Claremont. For information, call 621-4902.

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Members of the Class of 2013 laugh at the comments of fellow student Angel Ku on Sunday during Claremont High Schoolʼs Baccalaureate Service at Claremont United Church of Christ. The multi-disciplinary religious service featured readings from students, music and the Baccalaureate address from Reverend Edward Acosta.

Graduates ready to move forward after reflection on years past

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efore the pandemonium of commencement week— which culminated last night with graduation—Claremont and San Antonio high school seniors took a moment from gazing toward their futures for a quick look back.
Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young” and James Taylor’s “Lonesome Road” set the tone as students gathered together last Sunday for the annual Baccalaureate celebration, held at the Claremont United Church of Christ. Sponsored by the Claremont Interfaith Council in conjunction with the graduating seniors themselves, the event represented a hiatus from yearbook-signing, grad trip-planning and college preparation. “It is a reflective time on what these last 4 years has meant to them,” said Mary Jean Neault of the Claremont Interfaith Council. “It sets the tone for graduation.” Each student in Sunday’s ceremony provided their own personal response to that sentiment, whether through song, speech or spoken word. Seniors selected the lineup for the multi-disciplinary service after 3 days of auditions.   Among the performances and flashbacks chosen—about a dozen in all, played out in
BACCALAUREATE/continues on next page

Cantor Paul Buch of Temple Beth Israel plays guitar for 5 graduates as they sing Leonard Bernsteinʼs “Hashkiveinu” on Sunday during the CHS Baccalaureate.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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BACCALAUREATE continued from the previous page

Jahnavi Curlin delivers one of the sacred readings delivered by students on Sunday during the 2013 Claremont High Schoolʼs Baccalaureate. A total of 7 students gave similar addresses that reflected a wide range of religious backgrounds.

Members of the Class of 2013 begin the processional on Sunday during the CHS Baccalaureate service at Claremont United Church of Christ. Graduation was held yesterday, Thursday, June 13 at 4 p.m. on the CHS football field.

Members of the Class of 2013 applaud one of their classmates following a sacred reading on Sunday during Claremont High Schoolsʼ Baccalaureate. The service was held in the grand mid-century modern sanctuary at Claremont United Church of Christ. Visit www.claremont-courier.com for photos from yesterdayʼs commencement.

front of a packed audience—Alyssa Tepper lent her voice to Carrie Underwood’s “Temporary Home,” Ibrahim Gsibat presented a poised thank-you to those in the Claremont community who have provided him with a diverse upbringing, and Angel Ku provided a humorous yet sincere commentary on his high school experience. Zaina Goggins provided a moving tribute, drawing laughs and chills alike with her original spoken word, “Who Knew.” “Who knew that we’d change from who we were to who we are or that we possessed the power to get this far?” Zaina recited. “We envisioned caps, gowns, tissues and tears, a moment without regret and limits or fears, so while our hearts remind us, while our minds tell us that childhood is through, my heart tells me that these thoughts are still untrue...high school is just the start of our incomprehensible journey.” Soon, these seniors will be making their way to schools and careers across the country, leaving Claremont behind, if only physically. Eva Landsberg maintains her education at CHS is coming along for the ride as she travels to Yale University this fall. Eva will pursue a major in history and plans to pursue a career in law. “CHS has prepared me extremely well,” Eva shared. “As part of the International Baccalaureate program, I learned how to do research, debate and speak with adults. It’s helped me get ready for what’s next.” Friend Michaela Moss—who joined Eva and other pals in a sung rendition of the Jewish prayer “Hashkiveinu”—added that her education at CHS has gone beyond the classroom. Through an elective photography class, Michaela had the opportunity to display her artwork throughout the community, including an exhibit at Some Crust Bakery. While she has appreciated the ability to develop her hobby, Michaela says it’s the friendships she has forged at CHS through extracurricular activities that she will miss the most when she leaves Claremont for Berkeley this fall. “At Claremont, you can be a part of all different groups,” she said. “You aren’t limited to just your own social group. We are all close.” The collaboration displayed Sunday proved that to be true—in the stomp-andclap rhythm accompaniment classmates provided for classmate Kristiane Bizkarra’s a cappella performance, and in the tears and hugs shared by younger classmen and the graduating seniors after the Chamber Choir’s tribute to the Class of 2013. While Eva, Michaela and friend Jamie Borer admit the tears have been flowing leading up to graduation, they lovingly hold on to the past 4 years of fond memories as they take the next step forward. As classmate Jahnavi Curlin reminded them during her Baccalaureate speech, it’s not the destination but the joys of the journey. Visit www.claremont-courier.com for pictures of yesterday’s graduation ceremony, to be included in the Friday, June 21 edition of the COURIER.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

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COURIER photo/ Steven Felschundneff Karen Chapman Lenz, Paul Wood and Karl Hilgert act out a typical scene at a state welfare office on Saturday during a training session for volunteer homeless advocates at St. Ambrose Episcopal Church in Claremont. During the session Ms. Chapman Lenz played a homeless person, Mr. Hilgert was a state bureaucrat and Mr Wood was her advocate.

Volunteers begin work to assist homeless this summer

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ummer may be the season of relaxation and an occasional getaway from the usual workload, but members of the Claremont Homeless Advocacy Program (CHAP) are just getting started with their latest assignment.
Last month, the local nonprofit kicked off its Summer to End Homelessness project, geared at helping homeless individuals obtain permanent housing.  On Saturday, about 50 volunteers gathered for the first time at St. Ambrose Episcopal Church to train for the weeks of work ahead. Contributing to the workload is the fact that this project is a brand-new endeavor, built from the ground up by project directors Paul Wood and Mary Cooper and a handful of core members, including Karl Hilgert, the retired executive director of an organization back east that provides for the homeless, and Andrew Mohr of the Claremont Area Living Assistance Program. They are taking the effort in stride as they seek to reverse the numbers of those stuck on the streets. “Like any social problem, we to tend to close our eyes to it and pretend it doesn’t exist or at least minimize it.” Mr. Wood said. “We hand out the obligatory $3 or $4, which is well intended, but does not get to the root of the problem.” The advocacy campaign started in the fall of 2012 with the creation of a subcommittee of Claremonts Religious Society of Friends (Quaker). The committee was formed to more seriously address the issue of homelessness in the community after recent events in Claremont shed light on the extent of the city’s homeless situation. Los Angeles County holds the nation’s highest homeless population. A count conducted last February indicated that at least 30 homeless individuals reside in the streets of Claremont. Some speculate that number may be conservative. Given the breadth of what

defines homelessness, those numbers could vary, Mr. Wood acknowledged. “Certainly, there are the stereotypical cases people often think of...but we have also discovered a group of homeless individuals who are actually working but don’t make enough to pay for a sustainable place to live,” Mr. Wood explained. “Since the financial crash there are more people living in cars or motels and going from place to place.” Mr. Wood and CHAP volunteers want to provide the assistance for those who seek it. However, without enough money or the forces to properly aid their efforts, the group’s campaign had reached a crossroads. “We realized we were kind of powerless,” Mr. Wood said. “We needed more help.” The Friends turned to other community members interested in a project like the Summer to End Homelessness campaign. Dozens signed on, including Father George Silides, pastor at St. Ambrose Episcopal Church in Claremont. Before joining the St. Ambrose congregation in 2012, Fr. Silides was instrumental in running a relief center for the homeless in Juneau, Alaska, where he worked as the former pastor of another Episcopalian congregation. Other than his work with St. Ambrose, Fr. Silides admits he has had a difficult time rooting himself into his new hometown. Being a part of the advocacy group’s efforts, he says, has given him the renewed sense of purpose he was searching for. “This project has helped me find a way I can make a difference in this community,” the reverend shared. In Alaska, Fr. Silides worked collaboratively with a network of local churches to keep the relief shelter running. He believes the network of CHAP volunteers will be equally instrumental in creating change in Claremont, helping to highlight the need of the local homeless population for those in city government who make a difference.
SUMMER TO END HOMELESSNESS continues on the next page

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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff SUMMER TO END HOMELESSNESS continued from the next page

For now, they are taking matters into their own hands. Mr. Wood, who has helped a few homeless individuals find permanent housing in the past, has modeled the Summer to End Homelessness project after his own experience—taking into account his successes and steering away from the learned pitfalls. Such as establishing volunteers as “advocates.” “I found if I called myself ‘a friend,’

Paul Wood leads a workshop for potential homeless advocates on Saturday at St. Ambrose Episcopal Church in Claremont. The event was part of a larger effort called the Summer to End Homelessness.

I was told to go away,” he explained. “If I introduced myself as a person’s advocate, I was taken seriously.” There is also the challenge of navigating agencies in order to obtain sustainable housing and needed services.

There can be a lot of paperwork and procedure, Mr. Wood noted. And some cases can be more challenging than others, like when an individual does not have identification or even a birth certificate. “Every time I went through the process it was different,” Mr. Wood said. “You learn something new every time.” CHAP’s core team will be available to assist volunteers, who will be paired up in teams of 2, should they need the help. Within the next few weeks, Mr. Hilgert and Mr. Mohr will be stepping in to seek out homeless individuals looking for guidance. By the end of the

summer, volunteers hope to at least have begun taking a more active step towards helping those that need it. “We realize you can’t just wave a wand and end all homelessness, but we can certainly end it for certain individuals seeking the help,” Mr. Wood said. For more information on the Summer to End Homelessness campaign or for details on how to get involved, contact Paul Wood at paul_f_wood@yahoo.com or Mary Cooper at maryclaremont@aol.com.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

SPORTS

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COURIER photos/ Steven Felschundneff

Claremont resident Raquel Pedraza, 15, came out strong during her match against Elizabeth Lumpkin on Monday winning the first 2 games. She was not able to hold that momentum and eventually lost 6-3, 6-2.

Claremont players show flashes of brilliance, but go down in defeat

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he USTA Southern California Sectional Tournament provided the stage for 2 of Claremont’s young tennis stars to play against some of the strongest competition in the country. Raquel Pedraza and Toby Miclat, both teenagers, each played for the honor of getting one step closer to qualifying for the famed US Open.

At The Claremont Club on Monday, Pedraza fell to Elizabeth Lumpkin in the first round of the ladies singles bracket, 3-6, 2-6. The next day, Miclat and her

partner Alex Kitto were defeated 1-6, 6-2, 3-6 by Lumpkin and Konstantin Lazarov in mixed doubles. In the sixth installment of 13 sectional US Open qualifying tournaments this summer, hard-hitting 15year old Raquel Pedraza squared off against Naperville, Illinois golden girl Elizabeth Lumpkin. This year alone, Pedraza has won 2 tournaments and appeared in quarterfinals 6 times in both doubles and singles. Pedraza’s most recent win came in another USTA Regional Tournament in January 2013, where she defeated Albany’s Allison Chuang, 6-3, 6-4. This time, however, Pedraza would be competing against the 27-year old former UCLA athlete Lumpkin, a 3-time All Pac-10 scholar-athlete. Pedraza held serve during the opening game of the

first set. She then hit a running forehand passing shot in the second game, and broke Lumpkin’s serve to make it 2-0. It was clear Lumpkin’s calibration was off in the beginning of the match, but she would soon hit her stride. Pedraza served again, and lost a bit of momentum when she hit a shot down the line. The ball hit close to the line, and Lumpkin controversially called the ball out. This was to be the swing in momentum Lumpkin needed. The next 4 games went to Lumpkin. She hit a drop volley after a 20-plus shot rally, then hit a cross-court approach winner to take the lead, 3-2. Lumpkin added to the lead with a perfectly executed lob that had PeUS OPEN continues on the next page

SPORTS
US OPEN continued from the previous page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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draza sprinting, in vain, back toward her own baseline. Pedraza was able to temporarily turn it around when losing 2-4. Pedraza made a fantastic play at 15all when she chased down another angled approach shot by Lumpkin, and planted her forehand deep in the court for a winner. After another long rally at 4030, Pedraza hit a passing shot cross-court to get back into the match, 3-4. Lumpkin soon took charge and closed out the set. After a quick game, Lumpkin hit another volley winner to make it 5-3. She then closed out the first set in style. Pedraza pulled a slice short for a drop shot, and Lumpkin ran it down to cheekily flip the return crosscourt. The game went to deuce after a colossal overhead smash by Pedraza, but Lumpkin got her angles right on the next 2 points. Another topspin lob at set point sealed the first set for Lumpkin. In the 2nd set, it appeared Lumpkin had gained control. Pedraza displayed some powerful, yet inaccurate serving, hitting 3 double faults, but also grabbing 2 service aces. Pedraza’s athleticism was clearly impressive, but her mental resolve did not match her immense talent. Leading 4-2, Lumpkin took the final

Claremont resident Raquel Pedraza, 15, returns a shot from her opponent Elizabeth Lumpkin on Monday during the second round of the sectional qualifying for the Womenʼs US Open National Playoffs. Pedraza played well but was unable to hold of her older adversary losing in straight sets 6-3, 6-2.

2 games to seal a 2-set victory. Pedraza was candid on her performance and what the near future holds. “I can definitely improve on knowing when to go for the right ball, and not pulling the trigger too early. Keeping inside the point and being consistent, and playing more high percentage tennis will help me win. I will be playing in the girls 18’s sectionals coming up, and in some other tournaments on both clay and hard courts. I just came back from playing in a couple of pro tournaments in Mexico, and I got in last night, so it’s been a long day. I got to the quarterfinals there, and hope to keep gaining experience.” The tandem of Claremont High girls tennis captain Toby Miclat and male partner Alex Kitto from Jacksonville, Florida did not fare much better. Lumpkin was again the opponent, paired with Irvine native Konstantin Lazarov. Miclat and Kitto dropped the first set, then rallied to take the second set. Lumpkin and Lazarov closed out the final set to move on to the next round. Although this particular tournament did not produce any hometown victors, we can be sure that both women will be back in action soon.
—Chris Oakley sports@claremont-courier.com

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Friday, June 14 to Saturday, June 22

CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

Claremont After Hours
Charity event at Hotel Casa 425 raises funds for education.

Festival focus
Lindley to perform at Claremont Folk Festival.

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CLAREMONT FOLK FESTIVAL featuring live music, workshops, kidfriendly activities, garden tours, art vendors, craft booths and gourmet food and libations. The musical lineup includes David Lindley, Henry Rollins, Janet Klein and her Parlor Boys, Peter Harper, Moira Smiley and Voco, Leon Mobley with Da Lion and more. The festival opens at 10 a.m. Tickets are $25 for general admission, children 12 years and under may attend for free. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. For more information, visit www.folkmusiccenter.com, www.facebook.com/folkmusiccenter or call 624-2928.

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PLANES OF FAME Air Museum offers free admission for dads on Father’s Day today. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $11, $4 for children ages 5 to 11 years and free for children under 5 years old. 7000 Merrill Ave. #17, Chino. www.planesoffame.org. 597-3722.

June Friday

June Saturday

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FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Dine downtown, then stroll the Village to hear free live music performances from 6 to 9 p.m. This week’s performers include Sugar Mountain Mamas (Public Plaza), Tannin’s (Claremont Chamber) and Technopagan (City Hall).

CLAREMONT MODERN 2013 film series screens Eames: The Architect and the Painter. Co-sponsored by Claremont Heritage and the Arts Council of the Claremont School of Theology. A discussion will follow. 7 to 9 p.m. in the Claremont School of Theology’s Mudd Theater, 1325 N. College Ave. Suggested donation of $10. 621-0848. www.claremontheritage.org.

June Monday

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June Sunday

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LIVE JAZZ performance on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. 946-1398.

BEAT THE HEAT, BABY The community wading pools, available to children 5 and under, open today at Memorial Park (Monday through Friday) and Wheeler Park (Monday, Wednesday and Friday). The El Barrio Park wading pool opens tomorrow (Tuesday and Thursday). Pools will be open from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on their respective days. The wading pool season operates through Friday, August 23. For information, including weekend rentals, call 399-5490.
9-DAY CALENDAR continues on page 23

CLAREMONT AFTER HOURS

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Mi Casa Es Su Casa: charity event raises money for education

The bloggers behind the COURIERʼs Claremont After Hours visit Mi Casa Es Su Casa fundraiser and sample an array of delectibles.

The Claremont Educational Foundation (CEF) and Claremont Community Foundation (CCF) joined with Hotel Casa 425 to put on the 6th annual Mi Casa Es Su Casa charity event. We moseyed in to the Hotel Casa 425 courtyard in our summer clothes and greeted the new friends we’ve made over the past few months attending various Claremont events. We’ve come to expect quite a lot from our ventures, and Mi Casa Es Su Casa did not disappoint. The beautiful courtyard setting with strings of twinkling lights was classy and comfortable—a perfect place to stuff your face and enjoy conversation. There was also a flamenco/jazz band, the Vahagni Trio, playing some upbeat instrumental tunes that set the mood. We started our tasting tour at the 50-Fifty Asian fusion booth, sampling delicious stir-fry and tantalizing curry pockets. We then moved on to one of our favorite local businesses, Claremont Craft Ales, where we talked to the owner, Emily Moultrie. “These events are great. It’s always nice to meet people you have only heard about—people you’ve always wanted to meet,” she commented. Next on our culinary soirée was La Parolaccia Osteria, who served up a unique take on bruschetta paired with a cheesy pasta that was to die for. While enjoying

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i Casa Es Su Casa was a great excuse to sip and sample our way through a Sunday evening.

COURIER photos/Jenelle Rensch Flamenco/jazz band the Vahagni Trio play instrumental tunes during Mi Casa Es Su Casa at Hotel Casa 425 on Sunday, June 2. The event was a fundraiser for the Claremont Educational Foundation and Claremont Community Foundation.

Outgoing Claremont Educational Foundation president Ken Corhan makes announcements at Mi Casa Es Su Casa.

our pasta, we got the chance to talk to a 5-year participant of the event, Daniel Kentner. Mr. Kentner said the event has changed and grown over the years to include the addition of beer and liquor to the tasting options. His all-time-favorite food at the event was a slider made especially for the event by The Back Abbey. There were an array of wineries present from near and far including Franciscan Estates Winery, all the way from Napa Valley. We learned that the hotel was integral in getting all of the wineries to participate, graciously inviting and housing them for the event. [Editor’s note: Read the full story and see the slide show at www.claremont-courier.com. Click on “Claremont After Hours” on the lower left-hand side of the page.]
—Jessica Gustin and Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

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NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursday: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Friday through Sunday: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. to closing. —Sunday: Mariachi San Pedro. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open daily from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday June 20: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music featuring Mick Rhodes.

THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open Mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. —Saturday, August 17: Hobo Jazz plays a blend of roots music and pre-war soul with Dave Brown, a native of Riverside, who channels the spirit and style of Jimmie Rodgers, America’s Blue Yodeler, with songs of the 1930s. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —June 14 and 15: Tanyalee Davis stands under 4 feet tall but has a big sense of humor. She began her comedic career doing stand-up on a chair in 1990. Ms. Davis currently lives in Las Vegas and performs at comedy clubs around the world. —June 21 and 22: Tim Gaither began his comedic ca-

reer in church at the age of 5. One Sunday the preacher called all the kids at the Southern Baptist church to the front to ask some questions. When the preacher asked the young Mr. Gaither what he thought hell would be like, he calmly replied, “Preacher, hell will be hotter than the Wal-Mart parking lot on the Fourth of July, barefoot.” The church erupted with laughter, the little boy was hooked on the sound and a comic was born. Over 25 years later, Mr. Gaither has performed in most of the 40 states and abroad including some shows for United States Troops. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.foxpomona.com. —Saturday, October 26: The Naked and Famous. THE GLASS HOUSE: 200 W. Second St., Pomona. 865-3802. —Saturday, June 22: Father John Misty with special guest White Fence. $20. 7 p.m. —Sunday, June 23: Ben Kenney (of Incubus). $15. 7 p.m. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, June 14: Rumble King (rock n’ roll/rhythm n’ blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, June 15: Suzy Williams and her Solid Senders (jazz). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, June 16: Charged Particles (jazz). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, June 18: Ladies Night (female DJs). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, June 19: Open Jam Night with Sean Amato & Friends. 8 p.m. —Thursday, June 20: Barrett and Donohue (jazz/blues) at 7 p.m. and Beat Cinema (DJ) at 10 p.m. —Friday, June 21: Nutty (rock n’ roll/rhythm n’ blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, June 22: The Hula Girls (rockabilly/ swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont. Call 624-2272 or visit www.casa425.com. —Saturday, June 22: Lorenzo Grassi performs 7 to 10 p.m. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, June 14: Night Control (indie). 10 p.m. —Saturday, June 15: Strange Tides and Taller Than Trees. 10 p.m. —Sunday, June 16: Sunday night dinner music. 6 to 8 p.m. —Tuesday, June 18: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, June 19: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Thursday, June 20: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band (jazz). 8 p.m. D.J. at 11 p.m. —Friday, June 21: Jason Heath and The Greedy Souls (folk). 10 p.m. —Saturday, June 22: Pete Anderson. 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. 767-2255. —Friday, June 14: Salar Nader presents Qaamp Live featuring Qais Essar: Rubab, Manuel Guitierrez: Flamenco dance and Cajon, Pankaj Mishra: Sarangi, Antara Bhardwaj: Kathak and Alfredo Caceres: guitar. $75 includes dinner and show. Dinner begins at 7 p.m. and music begins at 8:45 p.m.

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9-DAY CALENDAR continued from page 20

June Monday

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June Thursday

SHAKESPEARE READERS of Pomona Valley will meet from 6 to 9 p.m. at Casa de Salsa to read the first half of Hamlet. Casa de Salsa, 415 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. For more information, call 625-4154.

June Tuesday

ARCHAEOLOGY Tom Helliwell of Harvey Mudd College will discuss how 2 scholars deciphered mysterious clay tablets found in 1900 on Crete. The decipherment, completed in 1952, is considered one of the great intellectual achievements of the 20th century. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont.

TODDLER TIME Kidspace Children’s Museum will give a sample of their early learner programs. Parents and caregivers are invited to bring their one-and 2-year-olds to take part in stories, songs and parachute fun. Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop, 1030 Bonita Ave., La Verne. BEER BREWING Andy and Curt Dale of Dale Bros. Brewery will discuss beer and the process of brewing. 1 to 3 p.m. Upland Public Library, 450 N. Euclid Ave., Upland. 931-4205.

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June Friday

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FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Dine downtown, then stroll the Village to hear free live music performances from 6 to 9 p.m. This week’s performers include Dynamite Dawson (Public Plaza), Baba Elefante Trio (Claremont Chamber) and Nobody’s Station (City Hall).

June Wednesday

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June Saturday

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COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Volunteer Linda Graber smiles as she greets a visitor recently during lunch at Joslyn center in Claremont. Ms. Graber makes a custom placemat for each senior featuring a cartoon with the guestʼs name.

SUMMER READING PROGRAM Celebrate the Claremont Library Summer Reading Program with an animal magic show by John Abrams encompassing comedy, magic, music and live exotic pets. Recommended for grades K-8. Sign-up is required. This program is co-sponsored by Friends of the Claremont Library. 2 and 3 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. 621-4902. LEVITT ON THE LAWN Scripps College presents The Adanfo Ensemble, a group of musicians and dancers from Ghana, who will perform a free outdoor concert at 6 p.m. on the Bowling Green at the center of Scripps College, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont.

CLAREMONT CLARINET FESTIVAL concludes today with a clarinet matinee. 2:30 p.m. Lyman Hall in Pomona College’s Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. 310-464-7653. For more information on the Claremont Clarinet Festival see the performaning arts listing on page 27. DALE BROS SUMMERFEST To celebrate its recently released Gold Medal-winning summer seasonal beer, Pacific Daylight. Dale Bros will host Summerfest from 2 to 10 p.m. at the Dale Bros.’ tap room, 2120 Porterfield Way, Upland. For more info, visit www.dalebrosbrewery.com or call 579-0032 ext. 204.

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RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

Dale Bros. to release award-winning beer at Summerfest
Dale Bros Brewery will host Summerfest from 2 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, June 22 at the Dale Bros’ tap room to celebrate its recently-released Gold Medalwinning summer seasonal beer Pacific Daylight. Summerfest is a festival of art, music and beer to benefit the dA Center for the Arts in Pomona, and will feature a variety of interactive art installations for festival-goers to engage in. “Both Dale Bros. and the dA share a passion for art and community,” explains dA Executive Director Margaret Aichele. “Both art and beer involve the connection of the imagination with raw materials to produce a work of art, right? So what better way to bring people together than through a festival celebrating both art and beer!” Musical acts include Better Daze, a reggae/ska band with hip hop influences, the Patrick Carrico Band, which delivers “California Country” music, and Analog, a funky rock band that boasts a saxophone and classic covers. Tribal Beats, a belly-dancing studio in Upland, will host a short set of belly dancing and live drumming, as well. Food will be available for purchase from the Border Grill Truck, Jogasaki Sushi Burrito, The Slummin' Gourmet and Brewcakes. In addition to featuring its Pacific Daylight summer beer, Dale Bros. will release a number of one-timeonly beer creations at the event including Badlands Baltic Porter, as well as barrel-conditioned beers Bl'Oak and Off With Her Head. “We will also be opening up some bourbon and rye casks that have never been tasted before, including a couple of sours,” said Brewmaster Curt Dale. Dale Bros. Brewery, owned and operated by brothers Curt and Andy Dale, focuses on brewing balanced, full-bodied beers. Tickets for the event are $30, which includes admission plus 6 four-ounce tasters and 2 pints of beer, and can be purchased at www.dbsummerfest.brownpapertickets.com, at the dA Center for the Arts, 252 D South Main Street, Pomona, or at Dale Bros Brewery, 2120 Porterfield Way, Upland. For more info, visit www.dalebrosbrewery.com or call 579-0032, ext. 204.

Library begins Reading Program
Read all summer for a chance to win a Kindle Fire and other prizes. The Claremont Library invites students in grades sixth through twelfth to participate in the program June 19 through August 17. There will be a “Game Day” every Tuesday from June 25 through July 30 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. featuring new and classic board games that teens can play with their peers. For more information on the Teen Summer Reading Program, call 621-4902. The Claremont Library is located at 208 N. Harvard Ave.

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #215

Across
1. Pub stock 5. Data transmitter 10. Blue 13. Buckle 14. Ta-ta 15. ___ Brockovich 17. Footnote abbr. 18. Martini on the ___ 19. Hokkaido residents 20. Beloved Claremont Park that reopened (goes with 22 across) 22. See 20 across 24. Skin art 25. Eye layers 26. Ages and ages 27. Makes a bundle 29. Swims ashore 32. Costco, for one 36. Jedi

37. "When hell freezes over!" 38. Theater duration 39. Became inflated 42. Flowed partner 44. Bad 45. Piece of history 46. Player in general 48. Center that has teamed up with AARP to offer defensive driving courses to seniors 52. College graduates 53. Spanish fortress 55. He's "Smarter than the average bear!" 56. Song words 58. A trickster god 59. 20-20, e.g. 60. Minimal 61. Mimics 62. Energy measurement

63. Eye sores 64. Destroy

Down
1. Workplace discriminator 2. OPEC land 3. Boot out 4. Calmed down 5. Strand 6. Quality 7. Chop up 8. Fox Series "___! The Cat" 9. Powerful 10. Lacking in richness 11. Indic language 12. Drunks 16. Order member 21. Sounds from Bossy 23. Birds 27. Angle 28. Like centenarians 29. Court ploy 30. Camel fabric 31. Zero 32. Restaurant handout 33. Sun, e.g. 34. Parisian way 35. Wrong __ of the stick 37. Basic 40. Breaking away 41. John Irving's "A Prayer for ___ Meany" 42. Arrow toter 43. Located at the bottom 45. Kicks out 46. Michael Jackson wore one 47. Icefishing tool 49. Amino acid in the brain 50. Expression of suprise 51. Babble 52. Sailor's affirmative 53. Beseech 54. Ascent 57. The end is not __

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #214

-Festival Focus-

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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Lindley will string audiences along at Claremont Folk Festival

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o one can coax a sliding symphony of sounds from strings like David Lindley. So it will be a treat for music lovers when Mr. Lindley, a longtime resident of Claremont, hits the stage at this weekend’s Claremont Folk Festival.

It’ll be a treat for Mr. Lindley, too. He’s developed a penchant for Canadian folk festivals over the years, because they “have a kind of understood rule that they have to get people from all over the world. You’ll have master musicians from Senegal and Hawaii and Madagascar and the Middle East and Ireland, all on the same bill.” He hasn’t participated in the local festival since the event, now in its 30th year, was in its infancy. Nonetheless, he has long admired how the Claremont Folk Festival follows that Canadian model. With the festival moving to the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gardens this time around, it will have something else in common with the gigs organized by our northerly neighbors. “It’ll be a Canadian festival, with beer, eh,” he said, doing his best imitation of comic SCTV canucks Bob and Doug McKenzie. Mr. Lindley shares another reason he’s interested in this year’s festival, aside from multicultural diversity and libations. “I can’t wait to see Henry Rollins!” Nabbing Mr. Lindley is a coup for festival organizers. He’s one of those people who are famous, but not so you’d know it. He has joined an array of legendary musicians in session and on tour, including Jackson Browne, Ry Cooder, Bob Dylan, Curtis Mayfield, Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Rod Stewart. And there’s something about Mr. Lindley that inspires superlatives. David Crosby has pronounced him to have “the best tone in the world.” Ben Harper has written that “the touch and feel Lindley has on the many instruments he plays is straight-up sorcery.” And Graham Nash waxed poetic while describing Mr. Lindley’s contribution to the Crosby, Stills & Nash song “Mutiny,” calling his part “like a sea serpent from the great depths. It comes screaming out of this dark ocean and bursts through.” But he can walk down the street and duck into favorite local haunts like Wolfe’s Market without attracting much notice. “I’m in my house in Claremont at an undisclosed location,” he said. “And even though I can only look myself, which is a cross between Hannibal Lecter and John Quincy Adams, I can go places and people don’t know. I kept it like that on purpose. It’s a good way to do things.” Mr. Lindley evinced an attraction to “anything with strings” before he started school. He eventually picked up his father’s ukulele, then switched to banjo and then added guitar to his repertoire. It was all about bluegrass for many years, with Mr. Lindley winning the Topanga Canyon Banjo Fiddle contest 5 years in a row before he finally “plugged in and became a rock and roller.” Mr. Lindley first rose to international prominence when, from 1967 and 1971, he lead the psychedelic group Kaleidoscope, which many consider the first world music rock band. From 1981 through 1983, Mr. Lindley served as founding bandleader for El Rayo-X, a group that integrated American roots music and world beat with a heavy reggae influence. While the El Rayo period yielded memorable

Photo courtesy of Philip Barlow David Lindley will perform this Saturday at Claremont Folk Festival at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden.

songs, including Mr. Lindley’s 1981 hit “Mercury Blues,” he is arguably best known for his partnership with Jackson Browne. Mr. Lindley joined forces with Browne in 1970 and became his most significant musical collaborator through 1981, with notable moments including his soaring steel guitar on Browne’s “Running on Empty.” After years of working together, Mr. Lindley and Mr. Browne meld together like warm honey and hot tea, a symbiosis evident in more recent endeavors, as when Mr. Lindley joined Mr. Browne and percussionist Tino di Geraldo in a tour of Spain. That tour led the Grammy-nominated 2010 double-live album “Love is Strange: En Vivo Con Tino.” Mr. Lindley’s career is so longstanding, he’s “starting to think in decades.” He’s not just going through the motions, though. He has traveled the globe, learning from the best players on an array of instruments and has accordingly shifted his instrumental preferences. Where traditional 6-string guitar once held primacy, Mr. Lindley now gravitates to Hawaiian lap steel guitars of various tunings, the Turkish saz and chumbus, the Middle Eastern oud and the Irish bouzouki. “That’s a thing I discovered a long time ago,” he said. “As long as you stay in student mode, and I’ve always been a student, that’s the key to learning more and actually getting better.” Closer to home, Mr. Lindley has a soft spot in his heart for the Folk Music Center. He’s purchased instruments there, talked shop with store founders, the late Charles and Dorothy Chase, and watched his daughter Roseanne grow up with the Chase’s grandchildren, Ben, Joel and Peter Harper. Ben, who has become an internationally noted musician himself, counts Mr. Lindley—who mentored him almost by osmosis—as one of his greatest influences. In a 2006 interview that he penned for The Fretboard Journal, Mr. Harper gave Mr. Lindley the following commendation: “To my grandparents, you were the flesh incarnation of the folk music center.” Mr. Lindley’s virtuoso ways have also trickled down to his daughter, who may or may not join him

on the Claremont Folk Festival stage, but who has performed with him all over the world. She’s a multi-instrumentalist too, currently specializing in the bouzouki and the divan saz, which is the largest Turkish saz. It is her pipes, though, that most impress her dad. “She’s this incredible singer, a terrifying singer,” he marveled. “It’s nature. She just had this gigantic voice come out of her when she was 15 years old.” Life isn’t all music making for Mr. Lindley. He’s gotten a touch more involved with business as, taking a cue from alternative folk rocker Ani Difranco and her Righteous Babe Records, he has started his own record label. “The old way of doing things…it’s like being a sharecropper,” Mr. Lindley said of working with the big record labels. “It’s a strange system, but it’s perpetuated because [musicians] are always told it’s the only way to do things, you can’t do it all yourself. “There is a great article called Courtney Does the Numbers, in which Courtney Love comes up with a scenario of a band that gets a million dollar advance and explains what happens to it and how it all disappears,” he continued. “And they all end up working day jobs at 7-11. She nailed it better than anyone. Younger musicians need to read that sort of thing.” He’s also an avid follower of politics, and enjoys a good rant. He will talk to anyone who will listen about his current cause, the potential dangers of genetically modified crops. “Food is being genetically modified in order to obtain a patent on it, not for feeding the poor or tending the crop,” he said. “It’s to collect the royalty on intellectual property—that’s the reality of it. I take the opportunity to talk about it on stage, and I make people uncomfortable, that’s part of what I do.” And while his bow has been gathering dust of late, Mr. Lindley enjoys unwinding with archery. He’ll head for an indoor range and benefit from an activity that is really an active form of meditation, and whose philosophy also applies perfectly to musicianship. “My friend Janet Dykman—she was on an Olympic team—one of her coaches told me ‘Go out there, unscrew the top of your head, pull out your brain and put it on a shelf. Then screw the top of your head back on with no brain in there and go out and shoot,’” he recalled. “It was the most productive thing anyone ever said to me.” Mr. Lindley’s music career continues, more productive than ever, and he doesn’t see himself stopping anytime soon. “I worked with the Blind Boys of Alabama and these guys are in their 70s, a couple are in their 80s, and they’re still touring as if they were 30 years old,” he said. “You’ve got people like Clifton Chenier who had diabetes and lost his legs. And they’d just strap him into the chair, hand him his accordion, adjust the microphone and there you go. “It’s that bop-till-you-drop type of thing,” Mr. Lindley continued. “And when I leave this particular dimension, I will most probably be on stage or driving to a concert.” Along with David Lindley, the Claremont Folk Festival will feature an array of performers, including Leon Mobley & Da Lion, Henry Rollins, Janet Klein and Her Parlor Boys, Peter Harper, Round Mountain and Moira Smiley & Voco. It will be held on Saturday, June 15 from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, visit www.folkmusiccen ter.com/folk-festival.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

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COURIER photo/Jenelle Rensch Art enthusiasts gather at the grand opening of Galeria de Pérolas in the Packing House during the Claremont Art Walk on Friday. The exhibit, called “Chiaroscuro: The Art of Light, The Art of Dark,” features pieces in black and white. Visit www.claremont-courier.com and click the “Claremont After Hours” link for the story.

GALLERIES
57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —June 29: “Juxtaposition” featuring Desiree Engel, Mervyn Seldon, Fay Colman and Mark Upson. Art Walk: Saturday, June 29 from 6 to 9 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www.amoca.org. 865-3146. —Through July 28: “The Clay Connection: Jim and Nan McKinnell,” celebrating their 5-decade careers. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. www.buddhamouse.com. 626-3322. —Through June 30: Native American art featuring Steve Rushingwind and his daughter Sienna with an exhibition titled “The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far.” CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 398-1060. —Through June 28: Lucien van Oosten’s “From a Point.” CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in The Packing House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. 6263066. —Through June 28: “The Art of Raul Pizarro,” featuring a collection of oil paintings. —June 14 through 16: “Buck-a-Book,” all books sold for $1 to benefit The Prison Library Project, sending quality books to inmates nationwide.

THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until 9 p.m. with live music sponsored by Live on Analog Records at 8 p.m. Visit www.loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com for information about purchasing monthly wall space for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of gallery space. Call Vicki at 626-224-7915 or 626-963-4238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior high and high school age students. —Through, June 29: Coastal watercolors by Barry Cisneros are featured this month at The Colony. Participants in The Colony this month include black and white photography by Diane Lynn, paintings by Brooke Morrison, stained glass/mosaic by Jenifer Hall, photography by Vicki, watercolors by Arwen Allen, limited edition prints by Melody Grace-Cave, “Dusty Roads” collection photography by Barbara Sammons, a boutique by Clare Miranda and oddities by Sarah Toribbio and friends. The boutique features one of a kind jewelry, scarfs, handmade greeting cards, small prints and other original art. Show your COURIER support—Claremont COURIER hoodies, mugs and recent editions of the newspaper are available exclusively at The Colony at Loft 204. —Tuesday, June 18: Beginning belly dance class with Adina Dane of Casablanca Bar & Grill. Learn basic upper and lower body isolations, footwork and important stretching techniques. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesday, June 19: Intermediate belly dance class. Time to get technical—work on isolation drills and movement combinations while diving deeper into belly dance technique. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Open Sundays from noon to 3 p.m.: Visitors welcome anytime, appointments appreciated. Featuring

California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. GALLERY SOHO: 300-A S. Thomas St., basement level, Pomona Arts Colony. Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. —Through July 5: “Nature’s Gifts” open exhibit, entry fees apply. LATINO ART MUSEUM: 281 S. Thomas St. Suite 105, Pomona. www.lamoa.net. 620-6009 or 484-2618. —June 30: Ivan Fernandez Da Vila, “Habitacion en Lima” in Grand Salon West. MAIN STREET GALLERY: 252C S. Main St., Pomona. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 868-2979. —Through July 27: “The Mad Art of Midnight Movies” featuring 23 artists and 25 vintage movie posters curated by film historian Stacy Davies. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 9800412, info@malooffoundation.org or www.maloof foundation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features drought-tolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. —Through October 27: “With Strings Attached: Art in the Craft of Sound.” There are nearly 40 musical instruments in the exhibition, representing a broad cross-section of cultures and traditions. The performances bring to life for audiences a number of the instruments, some of which are not often heard.
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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PERFORMING ARTS
BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Saturday, June 16: Faculty concert featuring Margaret Thornhill (clarinet), Twyla Meyer (piano) and guest Ray Tischer (viola). Claremont Clarinet Festival series. 2:30 p.m. —Friday, June 21: New Music for Clarinet Ensembles featuring SQWONK, avant-garde bass clarinet duo. Claremont Clarinet Festival series. 8 p.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through June 16: The Full Monty. Seeing how much their wives enjoy

watching male strippers during their girls’ night out, unemployed steelworkers in Buffalo, New York come up with a bold way to make some quick cash. In the process they find renewed selfesteem, the importance of friendship and the ability to have fun. As the guys work through their fears, self-consciousness, feelings of worthlessness and anxieties, they come to discover that not only are they stronger as a group, but that the strength they find in each other gives them the individual courage to face their demons and overcome them. Due to subject matter, recommended for mature audiences. LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Call 477-2752 or visit www.lewisfamilyplayhouse.com. —July 20 through 28: Seussical the Musical. LYMAN HALL: Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. —Thursday, June 20: Clarinet Masterworks. Claremont Clarinet Festival series. 8 p.m.

—Saturday, June 22: Clarinet Matinee. Claremont Clarinet Festival series. 2:30 p.m. RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3 and members. 6258767 or www.rsabg.org. —Saturday, June 15: The 30th Claremont Folk Festival. There will be 2 stages featuring live music as well as workshops, kid’s activities, garden tours, art vendors, craft booths and gourmet food and libations. The musical line-up includes David Lindley, Henry Rollins, Janet Klein and her Parlor Boys, Moira Smiley and Voco, Leon Mobley with Da Lion and more. The festival will open at 10 a.m. Tickets are $25, children 12 and under are free. For further information, visit www.folkmusiccenter.com or

www.facebook.com/folkmusiccenter. Contact the Folk Music Center at 624-2928 or by email at info@folkmusiccenter.com or folkfestival30@gmail.com.

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. General admission $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: Man of Steel [PG13], The Internship [PG13], Star Trek Into Darkness [PG13], Now You See Me [PG13], What Maisie Knew [R], Frances Ha [R]. —Premier: Man of Steel [PG13]. Friday, June 14 at 12:01 a.m.

Claremont Clarinet Festival returns to Pomona College
Now in its eighth year as a summer festival, the Claremont Clarinet Festival returns to the Pomona College campus from June 16 to 22, presenting 14 solo clarinetists in 5 public concerts. Admission to the festival is free. Featured guest soloists will be the San Francisco-based bass clarinet duo, SQWONK, a group which “pushes the envelope of what bass clarinet music can be,” says Clarinet Magazine. SQWONK’s music draws on a wide range of influences, from klezmer to heavy metal to blues to minimalism to free improvisation, creating a repertoire that is strikingly contemporary, yet broadly accessible to a wide audience. SQWONK will be performing on Friday, June 21 at 8 p.m. in the Mabel Bridges Hall of Music both in a set of their own repertoire and in the westcoast premiere of a new concerto by
GALLERIES continued from the previous page

Margaret Thornhill

Jonathan Russell in which the bass duo will be accompanied by a clarinet choir of festival participants. The opening concert of the festival is a faculty recital on Sunday, June 16 at 2:30 p.m. in Bridges Hall of Music. The festival's founders, clarinetist Margaret Thornhill, and Twyla Meyer, pianist, will perform works by Josef Horowitz and Takahaski Yoshimatsu, and will be joined by guest Ray Tischer, violist, in trios by Mozart and Bruch. “Clarinet Masterworks” takes place on Thursday, June 20, at 8 p.m. and a “Clarinet Matinee” on Saturday, June 22 at 2:30 p.m., feature festival participants, accompanied by pianists Twyla Meyer and Althea Waites. Both recitals are in Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Center. There will also be a noon recital in Lyman Hall on Friday, June 21, featuring works by Copland and Muczynski.

This year's participants are young artists, adult chamber musicians and music educators who are performance graduates of San Francisco Conservatory, California State University, Cal Arts, Cal Poly, UCLA, Stanford University, California Lutheran University and Louisiana State University. “This is a unique event in Southern California,” says Margaret Thornhill. “If you love great clarinet music, these concerts are for you.” Lyman Recital Hall in the Thatcher Music Center and Bridges Hall of Music are located near the south west corner of College Avenue and Fourth street in Claremont. There is ample parking in a campus structure at the end of Bonita, and disabled access at Fourth Street. For more festival information, visit www.claremontclarinetfestival.com or call 310-464-7653.

PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 B.C. to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. 399-5544. —Wednesday, July 10: Hawaiian quilt workshop led by Judy Manley who earned her MFA from the University of Hawaii, Honolulu. Participants will learn the history of Hawaiian-style quilting as well as how to design and execute their own unique Hawaiianstyle motifs. $5 for materials. 1 to 4 p.m. For ages 13 and up. Reservations must be made by July 7. Call Viki Battaglia, 399-5573. —Through August 25: “Celebrating the Arts of Polynesia and Micronesia.” RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave.,

Claremont. The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3 and members. 6258767 or www.rsabg.org. —Through July 28: RSABG’s Butterfly Pavilion lets visitors interact with real butterflies. The Lantz Outdoor Classroom features activities for families, including nature-based art and craft projects. Butterfly gardening enthusiasts can learn about creating the habitats that butterflies need to survive. $2 exhibition admission, plus standard garden admission. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every 6

COURIER photo/Jenelle Rensch Artist Barry Cisneros poses for photos at The Colony at Loft 204 in the Packing House during art walk on Friday. His costal watercolors are featured this month in the gallery.

weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through June 30: Jerry Owens’ collection of watercolors, “Landscape Savior-Faire.” Composition, line, color

and subject are the cornerstones of Mr. Owens’ work. Each piece has a limited but powerful palette crafted with museum-quality materials and mounted on hardwoods.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 14, 2013

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El Roble 8th graders say goodbye with star-studded party

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little bling and a lot of fun were the order of the evening when the matriculating class of El Roble Intermediate School celebrated their annual Eighth Grade Party on Wednesday night, June 12.
The party, which was organized by the school’s Parent Faculty Association, had a Hollywood theme. Students entered the auditorium via a red carpet and had opportunities throughout the event, which ran from 6 to 9:30 p.m., to don a costume and strike a pose for the camera. The theme was most evident in the darkened auditorium, where disco lighting and songs by hitmakers like Niki Minaj and Rhianna beckoned students to dance. The letters to the legendary Hollywood sign hung over the stage, fairy lights and tinsel shone and the darkened room was aglow with star lanterns. When the COURIER left the scene at 7:30 p.m., however, no students had opted to take advantage of the dance floor. That explains why El Roble now sees off its eighth graders, of which there are about 550 this year, with a full extravaganza. PFA president Julie Pedroza explained that when it was simply a dance, you had the awkward junior high phenomenon of the girls lined up on one side of the room and the boys lined up on the other. Only a few kids were prepared to cross the invisible demarcation line and ask a classmate to dance. Now, the dance floor is only the beginning. Once students went outside onto the El Roble grounds, they found a slew of other diversions, like an inflatable “Boot Camp” obstacle course, an inflatable “Human Foosball” court, a test-your-strength hammer game and a face-painting station. The PFA worked all year raising money and garnering donations in order to ensure a festive eighth grade send off. As any parent of a young teen knows, growing kids have nearly insatiable appetites. This was not a problem, because there was food a-plenty, starting with a Carl’s Junior Truck providing burger and Chicken Star combos. One boy’s exclamation said it all: “Dude, free food! This place is bomb.”

COURIER photos/Peter Weinberger El Roble Intermediate School definitely knows how to throw a party. And there was plenty of reason to celebrate as the eighth graders officially ended their tenure at the school. Following a Hollywood theme, over 300 students enjoyed everything from dancing, carnival games and, of course, plenty of food and treats. Here, students wait in front of the hamburger truck, clearly the most popular place at the event. But it was also a time for friends to stop and chat about their year as they prepare for their next challenge in high school.

Volunteers also dispensed popcorn, cupcakes, soda and candy of every ilk. The DoubleTree hotel notably sent some 350 cookies for the youths. “We’re going to sugar them up and send them home,” Ms. Pedroza laughed. There is a lot of mystery surrounding the Eighth Grade Party. The kids don’t know until 10 days before the event, when they receive an invitation at school, what the party’s theme is. “It’s all a surprise,” said one student, Amber Ayala. Of course, there are plenty of rumors about what the shindig is like.

“My brother said it was really fun when he was in 8th grade,” Ms. Pedroza’s son, Nick Pedroza, said. And the students know this is their last middle school hurrah. On Thursday, they received their yearbooks and enjoyed their last few hours at El Roble then were turned loose for the summer, now considered incoming freshmen. Most of the outgoing eighth graders said they were ready for the change. “It feels pretty great,” said Nick’s friend, TJ Carney. “I’m pretty happy about it,” added Amber. “I’ve had a pretty rough year.”
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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff The El Roble Intermediate School drummers perform for a crowd of fellow students during the Celebration of Excellence on Tuesday at El Roble. The students chose “There must be magic in you” as the theme for the event.

The best of the best at El Roble
El Roble Intermediate School took time out of studies and the end-of-the year hustle and bustle to honor the achievements of students at the Celebration of Excellence held Tuesday in the El Roble gym. Awards were given for academic achievement, citizenship and athletics and included the Joan Felsch Award in Science, which went to 5 seventh grade students who have shown aptitude, creativity and inquisitiveness in science. The event included a piano performance by Wilber Soetrisno, as well as performances by the school’s choir, orchestra, dance teams and the Wilbert Soetrisno performs on the piano, much to the delight of drama department.
his classmates during the Celebration of Excellence at El Roble. Max McDermott shows his strength to his friends with the hammer game. Both he and his friends had a tough time ringing the bell at the top. PANTHER PRIDE continued from the previous page

Parent volunteer Cynthia Cervantes McGuire, mother to outgoing eighth grader Max, feels a party is a great way to culminate a student’s El Roble career. “I think it’s nice that it isn’t a graduation or something where parents feel they have to rent limos and tuxes,” Ms. Cervantes McGuire said. “This is eighth grade.” There was plenty of jostling of boys vying against one another on the obstacle course and squeals as girls were reunited with their friends after a long 3-hour separation. But one boy knew how to chill out. He wore a shirt, in a nod to his fledgling facial hair, saying, “Keep calm and grow a moustache.” It’s always a relief to school staff and administrators when you can pull off a happening like the end-of-year party without a hitch. “It’s a great night for kids, with lots of activity,” said El Roble principal Scott Martinez. “It’s a great way for them to celebrate.”
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com A group of seventh grade students perform a dance they learned to assist in the understanding of how blood flows through the body as part of the Celebration of Excellence on Tuesday at El Roble.

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SCHOOL SPIRIT A student of an unnamed Claremont graduate school called the COURIER recently to say she had received a speeding ticket from the Claremont Police Department. She wasn’t concerned about her name appearing in our Police Blotter, but that printing the name of her college would bring undue shame. Talk about school spirit. Sammy notes that speeding ticket offenses aren’t typically listed in the crime reports. JOHN GETS A TONY Former Claremonter John Lee Beatty won a Tony Award for set design in the broadway play The Nance. Mr. Beatty’s father was the dean of students at Pomona College for many years. His mother, Carolyn, also worked at Pomona College and was reportedly very active in the League of Women Voters and Community Friends of International Students. MAKING THE GRADE California received an “F” when it comes to government spending transparency, according to an annual report by the CALPIRG Education Fund. The report describes California as a “failing state” because, even though it contains some checkbook-level data for contracts and grants, it lacks other important information to allow residents to monitor state spending, including checkbook-level data on non-contract

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spending and information about which companies benefit from economic development tax credits. California is also one of 2 states in the country without searchable vendorspecific spending information. California also fails to provide information on “off-budget” agencies as leading transparency states have begun to do. As a result of rising transparency grading standards, California’s “D-” grade from last year dropped to an “F” this year. In order for states to keep up with rising transparency standards, they must strive to keep their doings crystalclear. A SLICE OF KINDNESS Claremont’s Relay for Life had over 120 students signed up to run/walk for pledges for the American Cancer Society at the Claremont High School track. Organizers note that it was very difficult to secure donations and, at the 11th hour, the volunteers had yet to come up with vendors to donate food for the students. By Friday at 5 p.m., with the walk set to start the following morning, Round Table Pizza on Base Line came through with 10 extra-large assorted pizzas (120 slices) for the event.

FUN-DING Casa Colina raised about $450,000 at its 75th Anniversary Gala, which was attended by nearly 700 people, held Saturday, June 1 at the Sheraton Fairplex Conference Center in Pomona. The money raised will go to Casa Colina’s Free Care Fund and Wounded Warrior Fund. WOMAN TO WOMAN LA County Supervisor Gloria Molina will make a visit to Claremont next week as Scripps College launches its summer institute called “New Leadership” for undergraduate women in California who are interested in becoming political leaders. PECKING ORDER Several years ago, the COURIER ran a story about Metrolink riders being swooped down onand hit by a mother hawk’s wings as she was protecting her nest above the parking lot. Tony Krickl, the COURIER’s city reporter at the time, headed down toward the area near the Depot to check it out and was plucked on the head. A reader notified us that the mother hawk has returned. “Most mornings, I walk through College Park on my way to the train,” she wrote. “I was swooped and hit on the head by the hawk last year, and it happened to me again this morning around

7:15 a.m.!” The aggressive hawk was last seen near the trees between the Depot and Pooch Park. LLANUSA REACHES OUT The Los Angeles County School Trustees Association (LACSTA) recently selected CUSD Board Vice President Steven Llanusa to its executive board. The Los Angeles County School Trustees Association is an organization of school board members created in 1937 by the County Superintendent of Schools. Nearly all of the 93 school and community college districts in LA County, as well as the County Board of Education, are members of LACSTA. Under the auspices of the Los Angeles County Office of Education, LACSTA provides school board members with training, information and networking opportunities. LACSTA also cooperates with the California School Boards Association and other organizations for the betterment of education. WHAT YOU’RE SAYING ABOUT THE COURIER • Favorites: Cartoons, editorials, letters to the editor. Obituaries are wellwritten! Best little paper in the west.
Until next time, Sammy sammy@claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761
Friday 06-14-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

31

CLASSIFIEDS
REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE
Antiques
AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 212 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628. A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

BULLETINS
Business
SAVE on cable TV, internet, digital phone, satellite. You’ve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call today, 888-706-4301. (Cal-SCAN) MY computer works. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections. Fix it now! Professional, U.S. based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888-865-0271. (CalSCAN) DISH TV retailer. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1-888806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (CalSCAN) AT T E N T I O N : Computer work. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1500, parttime to $7500 monthly, fulltime. Training provided. www.WorkServices5.com. (Cal-SCAN) DIRECTV. Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call now! Triple savings! $636 in savings, free upgrade to Genie and 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free! Start saving today! 1-800-291-0350. (CalSCAN)

EMPLOYMENT

rentals..............31 legals...............32 services...........34 real estate.......37
RENTALS
Backhouse For Rent
QUAINT 2 bedroom back house in the heart of the Village. Commercially and residentially zoned. Perfect for a home based office or just a place to call home. acsclare mont@aol.com.

Townhome For Sale
CLAREMONT townhouse with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms. Open floor plan, cathedral ceilings, wood floors, fireplace. Open house June 15 and 16, 1:00 pm. to 4:00 p.m. at 737 Lander Cr. $385,000. Call Jim, 951-264-2898.

Police Aide $10.52 - $12.71 per hour (Part-time)
The City of Claremont Police Department is looking for a highly energetic, motivated self-starter who is of the highest moral character. Police Aides are utilized in a variety of areas within the Police Department, including records, investigations, overnight parking and traffic. Additional information about job duties and qualifications are available on the City website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us or from the Personnel Office at 909-399-5450. Completed application required and must be received by Wednesday, June 27, 2013, by 1:00 p.m. EOE.

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: Freight up and get more money. CDL Class A required. Call 877-258-8782. www.ad-drivers.com. (CalSCAN) DRIVERS: Training Class ACDL. Train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operators, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. 877-369-7091. centraltruckdrivingjobs.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Donations
DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE your car. Fast, free towing. 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
It's a Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale in Claremont (Claraboya area)
June 15-16, Saturday and Sunday 8:00 AM to 2:00 PM daily 729 Valparaiso Drive, Claremont, CA 91711 Beautiful estate in the prestigious community of Claraboya. The 4000 plus sq. ft. home is furnished in the Hacienda style of decor including furniture custom made from the studios of Fausto Polanco. Standing wrought iron candelabrums, wonderful oversized planters all in beautiful bloom, gardening potting table, lovely area rugs, vintage Cerveza Corona beer cooler (electric), patio furniture, lots of kitchen and home decor. To view pictures please visit: www.estatesales.net/estate-sales/450393.aspx.

Office Space For Rent
VILLAGE office. Exceptional building. Utilities, waiting room, parking. 419 Yale Ave. Weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Financial
GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (Cal-SCAN) EVER consider a reverse mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home and increase cash flow! Safe and effective! Call now for your free DVD! Call now 888-6983165. (Cal-SCAN)

House For Rent
NORTH Claremont: 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom, 1768 sq. ft. home. Delightful and pet friendly. $2600 monthly, includes trash and gardener. WSPM, 621-5941.

Student Ads
SENIOR or mother’s helper. CHS senior willing to do the running around for you and make those headaches go away! Call Emma, 234-1887.

Townhome For Rent
CLAREMONT Club: 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, 2-car attached garage. Available in July. $1800 monthly, for lease. Talat, 949-677-6736.

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
THE business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. Reach Californians with a classified in almost every county! Over 270 newspapers! Combo-California daily and weekly networks. Free brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or 916-2886019. (Cal-SCAN) “MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” —Mark Twain. Advertise your business card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million plus Californians. Free brochure. eliza beth@cnpa.com. 916-2886019. (Cal-SCAN) DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million plus Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth, 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

Garage Sales
SATURDAY, June 15, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Gift basket supplies/ inventory, furniture, sports and household items. 640 Bluefield Drive.

Vacation Rental
$399 CABO San Lucas all inclusive special. Stay 6 days in a luxury beachfront resort with unlimited meals and drinks for $399. www.luxurycabohotel.com. 888-481-9660. (Cal-SCAN)

For Sale
THE Tesla Shield. The #1 personal energy enhancement tool. Transformational technology for mind, body and soul. www.teslashield.com. (CalSCAN)

Education
BE an immigration or bankruptcy paralegal. $395 includes certificate, resume and 94 percent placement in all 58 CA counties. For more information visit www.mdsas sociates.com or call 626-5522885 and 626-918-3599. (Cal-SCAN) AIRLINE careers begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM, 877-804-5293. (CalSCAN)

BULLETINS
Health
CANADA Drug Center es tu mejor opcion para ordenar medicamentos seguros y economicos. Nuestros servicios de farmacia con licencia Canadiense e Internacional te proveeran con ahorros de hasta el 90 en todas las medicinas que necesites. Llama ahora al 1-800-3852192 y obten $10 de descuento con tu primer orden ademas de envio gratutio. (Cal-SCAN) CANADA Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today, 1-800-273-0209, for $10 off your first prescription and free shipping. (CalSCAN)

BULLETINS
Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800-945-3392. (Cal-SCAN) CHAT with local men. Local men are waiting for you! Call Livelinks now. 800-2913969. Women talk free! (CalSCAN)

Want To Rent
SINGLE mom, 11 year old son, looking for room with private bathroom or back house in Claremont. 568-6764.

Want To Buy
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime! 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

REAL ESTATE
Land For Sale
TWENTY acres free! Buy 40, get 60 acres. Zero down, $198 monthly. Money back guarantee, no credit checks. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El paso, Texas. Call 1800-843-7537. www.sunse tranches.com. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call Ready For My Quote now! Call 1-888-706-8325. (Cal-SCAN)

ANIMALS
Free Animal
FREE to good home, 6 week old male and female kittens. Female is gray, male is white with brown Tabby markings. Fully neutered. 957-5434.

Health
ATTENTION Sleep Apnea sufferers with Medicare. Get CPAP replacement supplies at little or no cost, plus free home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888699-7660. (Cal-SCAN)

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-12537343-JP Order No.: 120393727-CA-GTO YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/16/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): CARL L. WORRELL, MARRIED, AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Recorded: 10/30/2007 as Instrument No. 20072447586 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 7/8/2013 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: At the Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, in the Vineyard Ballroom Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $437,907.09 The purported property address is: 457 N MOUNTAIN AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8311-023-004 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-12-537343JP . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 800-280-2832 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-12-537343-JP IDSPub #0051157 6/7/2013 6/14/2013 6/21/2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 109511 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as MOONSHINE LAMP, PADUA FARMS, HANDMADE KITS, 175 N. Indian Hill Blvd., B101A, Claremont, CA 91711. HEIRLOOM CREATE CONSIGN INC., 324 Freedom Ave., Upland, CA 91786. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Robert Lewbel Title: CEO This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 05/28/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: June 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2013

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 109563 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Holistic Nature Bodywork, 630 South Indian Hill Blvd., Suite 7, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 690 W. San Jose Ave., Apt. 16, Claremont, CA 91711. Maria Elizabeth Marrufo, 690 W. San Jose Ave., Apt. 16, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Maria Elizabeth Marrufo This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 05/28/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: June 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013112665 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as MEDCUMEN IT CONSULTING, 3262 N. Garey Ave., Suite #206, Pomona, CA 91767. Cassie Lee Wright Jr., 3262 N. Garey Ave., Suite # 206, Pomona, CA 91767. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 05/30/2013. /s/ Cassie Lee Wright Jr. This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 05/31/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: June 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013114728 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as THE CECIL COMPANY, 734 Danville Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. The Cecil Company, 734 Danville Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Cecil B. Smith Title: Manager This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 06/04/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: June 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. 453790CA Loan No. 5891048846 Title Order No. 951557 ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY. PURSUANT TO CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE 2923.3 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 03-03-1988. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 06-28-2013 at 11:00 A.M., CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 03-091988, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 88-322482, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: R. BOBBY MARTINEZ AND HELEN M. MARTINEZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Trustor, WESTERN BANK, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. Legal Description: PARCEL NO. 1: UNIT NO. 101 CONSISTING OF CERTAIN AIRSPACE AND SURFACE ELEMENTS, AS SHOWN AND DESCRIBED IN THE CONDOMINIUM PLAN FOR LOT 4 OF TRACT NO. 43756 (LOT 4 PLAN) IN THE COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, WHICH PLAN WAS RECORDED DECEMBER 8, 1986, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 86-1694885, IN OFFICIAL RECORDS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. PARCEL NO. 2: AN UNDIVIDED ONE FORTIETH (1/40TH) FEE SIMPLE INTEREST AS A TENANT IN COMMON IN AND TO ALL OF THE REAL PROPERTY, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE COMMON AREAS DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT REFERRED TO BELOW, IN LOT 4 OF TRACT NO. 43756, IN THE COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN ON A SUBDIVISION MAP RECORDED OCTOBER 30, 1986, IN BOOK 1076 AT PAGES 61 TO 53, INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY RECORDER. EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL UNITS AS SHOWN ON THE PLAN. ALSO EXCEPT AND RESERVING THEREFROM ALL MINERALS, OIL, GAS, PETROLEUM, OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES AND ALL UNDERGROUND WATER IN OR UNDER OR WHICH MAY BE PRODUCED FROM SUCH LOT WHICH UNDERLIES A PLANE PARALLEL TO AND 500 FEET BELOW THE PRESENT SURFACE OF SUCH LOT FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROSPECTING FOR, THE EXPLORATION, DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION, EXTRACTION AND TAKING OF SAID MINERALS, OIL, GAS, PETROLEUM, OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES AND WATER FROM SUCH LOT BY MEANS OF MINES, WELLS DERRICKS OR OTHER EQUIPMENT FROM SURFACE LOCATIONS ON ADJOINING OR NEIGHBORING LAND OR LYING OUTSIDE OF THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED LOT, IT BEING UNDERSTOOD THAT THE OWNER OF SUCH MINERALS, OIL, GAS, PETROLEUM, OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES AND WATER AS SET FORTH ABOVE, SHALL HAVE NO RIGHT TO ENTER UPON THE SURFACE OR ANY PORTION THEREOF ABOVE SUCH PLANE PARALLEL TO AND 500 FEET BELOW THE PRESENT SURFACE OF SUCH LOT FOR ANY PURPOSE WHATSOEVER. RESERVING THEREFROM, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE GRANTOR, ITS SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND OTHERS, EASEMENTS FOR ACCESS, INGRESS, EGRESS, ENCROACHMENT, SUPPORT, MAINTENANCE, DRAINAGE, USE, ENJOYMENT, REPAIRS, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES, ALL AS DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS AND RESERVATION OF EASEMENTS FOR CIMARRON OAKS XI (DECLARATION), RECORDED ON DECEMBER 8, 1986, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 86-1694888, THE FIRST AMENDMENT TO THE DECLARATION (FIRST AMENDMENT) RECORDED ON FEBRUARY 10, 1987, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 87-198023, AND THE NOTICE OF ADDITION OF TERRITORY AND SUPPLEMENTAL DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS, RESTRICTIONS AND RESERVATION OF EASEMENTS FOR LOT 4 OF TRACT NO. 43756 (NOTICE), RECORDED ON DECEMBER 8, 1986, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 86-1694891, ALL IN OFFICIAL RECORDS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. FURTHER RESERVING THEREFROM, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE OWNERS OF CONDOMINIUMS LOCATED ON LOTS IN TRACT NO. 43756 OTHER THAN LOT 4, NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENTS ON AND OVER THE COMMON AREAS IN LOT 4 AS DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION, THE FIRST AMENDMENT AND THE LOT 4 PLAN REFERRED TO ABOVE, FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS, SUBJECT TO THE TERMS AS MORE PARTICULARLY SET FORTH IN THE DECLARATION, THE FIRST AMENDMENT AND THE NOTICE, EXCEPTING FROM THE COMMON AREAS ANY RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS THEREON. PARCEL NO. 3: NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENTS FOR ACCESS, INGRESS, EGRESS, USE, ENJOYMENT, DRAINAGE, ENCROACHMENT, SUPPORT, MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES, ALL AS SHOWN IN THE LOT 4 PLAN, AND AS DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARATION AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT. PARCEL NO. 4: A NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER THE COMMON AREAS LOCATED IN ANY PHASES OF DEVELOPMENT ANNEXED TO LOT 4. SUCH EASEMENT IS APPURTENANT TO PARCEL NOS. 1 AND 2 DESCRIBED ABOVE AND SHALL BECOME EFFECTIVE AS TO EACH OF SUCH PHASES UPON THE CLOSE OF ESCROW FOR THE SALE OF A CONDOMINIUM IN SUCH PHASE. THE COMMON AREAS REFERRED TO HEREIN AS TO EACH PHASE SHALL BE AS DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARATION AND IN THE NOTICE OF ADDITION OF TERRITORY AND CONDOMINIUM PLAN OR PLANS FOR EACH OF SUCH PHASES, EXCEPTING THEREFROM ANY RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS THEREON Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $61,093.17 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 24314- A EAST SYLVAN GLEN ROAD DIAMOND BAR (AREA), CA 91765 APN Number: 8704-056-108 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 06-03-2013 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee RIKKI JACOBS, ASSISTANT SECRETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the prop-

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, June 14, 2013
erty itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales and Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting and Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for "Advanced Search" to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1- 800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. A-4389429 06/07/2013, 06/14/2013, 06/21/2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: KS016919 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: GARRETT JAMES CRAIG Filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: a. GARRETT JAMES CRAIG to Proposed name: a. GARRETT RYAN FOX THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July17, 2013 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept.: EA-H Room: 312 Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 East District A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 /s/ R. BRUCE MINTO, Dated: May 14, 2013 Judge of the Superior Court Petitioner: Garrett James Craig, In Pro Per 915 Sweetland Street Claremont, CA 91711 Tel.: 909-374-6045 Publish: 05/31/13, 06/07/13, 06/14/13, 06/21/13 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BETTY JEAN SCRIVEN CASE NO. BP141554 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of BETTY JEAN SCRIVEN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by HOWARD ROY SCRIVEN JR. in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that HOWARD ROY SCRIVEN JR. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: June 26, 2013, at Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. 9 located at: Superior Court Of California, County of Los Angeles, 111 North Hill Street Los Angeles, CA 90012 Central District IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If

32

you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of the estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Howard Roy Scriven Jr., In Pro Per C/O 12606 Central Ave. Chino, CA 91710 Phone# 626-332-0555 Publish: May 31, June 7 and 14, 2013 CLAREMONT COURIER NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JACQUELINE MAC LYMAN Case No. BP141742 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JACQUELINE MAC LYMAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Laura A. MacLyman in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGE-LES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Laura A. MacLyman be appointed as personal representative to ad-minister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court ap-proval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representa-tive will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 24, 2013 at 8:30 AM in Dept. No. 9 located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written ob-jections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of let-ters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Re-quest for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of es-tate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: HOWARD R HAWKINS ESQ SBN 100875 2146 BONITA AVE LA VERNE CA 91750-4915 CN885442 Publish: May 31, June 7 and 14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 104548 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Mikeys Shop, 1175 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Michael Thompson, 1175 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Michael Thompson This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 05/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: May 24, 31, June 7 and 14, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013119422 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as THE SWEETER SIDE, 1688 Mural Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Catherine Ard, 1688 Mural Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Catherine Ard This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of LosAngeles County on 06/10/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: June 14, 21, 28 and July 5, 2013

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.: 99853438 TSG Order No.: 96123 A.P.N.: 8313-027-062 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED (The above statement is made pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(c)(1). The Summary will be provided to Trustor(s) and/or vested owner(s) only, pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(c)(2).) YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02/14/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NBS Default Services, LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded 03/01/2007 as Document No.: 20070443435, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: JON L RICHARDSON, A SINGLE PERSON, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date and Time: 06/24/2013 at 11:00 AM Sale Location: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 674 W FIRST ST, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $569,064.40 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call, (714)730-2727 for information regarding the trustee`s sale or visit this Internet Web site, https://www.lpsasap.com/, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9985-3438. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. NBS Default Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long Beach, CA 90802 800766-7751 For Trustee Sale Information Log On To: https://www.lpsasap.com/ or Call: (714)730-2727. NBS Default Services, LLC, Natalie Franklin "We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose." A-4388395 05/31/2013, 06/07/2013, 06/14/2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF OLIVIA LEOS Case No. BP141799 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of OLIVIA LEOS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Valerie Johnson in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGELES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Valerie Johnson be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-bate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 26, 2013 at 8:30 AM in Dept. No. 9 located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the pe-

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
tition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is avail-able from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: ARTHUR G NEWTON ESQ 1502 N BROADWAY SANTA ANA CA 92706-3907 CN885994 Publish: May 31, June 7 and 14, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MICHAEL JOHN BREHENY Case No. BP142070 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MICHAEL JOHN BREHENY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by James B. Pennino in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGE-LES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that James B. Pennino be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court ap-proval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representa-tive will be required to give notice to inter-ested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 8, 2013 at 8:30 AM in Dept. No. 9 located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contin-gent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is avail-able from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: R S VALENTINE ESQ LAW OFFICES OF R S VALENTINE 1334 PARK VIEW AVE STE 100 MANHATTAN BEACH CA 90266 CN886330 Publish: June 14, 21 and 28, 2013 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE AND OF INTENTION TO TRANSFER ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE(S) (UCC Sec. 6101 et seq. and B & P Sec. 24073 et seq.) Escrow No. 1002704-JY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale of assets and a transfer of alcoholic beverage license(s) is about to be made. The name(s) and business address of the seller(s)/licensee(s) are: ADEL ALSALAMY AND ZIAD SALAMI, 805 PHILADELPHIA ST, POMONA, CA 91766 Doing business as: DISCOUNT MARKET All other business names(s) and address(es) used by the seller(s)/licensee(s) within the past three years, as stated by the seller(s)/licensee(s), is/are: The name(s) and address of the buyer(s)/applicant(s) is/are: NISHANT PATEL AND RADHA PATEL, 805 PHILADELPHIA ST, POMONA, CA 91766 The assets being sold are generally described as: FURNITURE, FIXTURE, EQUIPMENT, GOODWILL, TRADENAME, LEASEHOLD INTEREST & IMPROVEMENT AND ABC LICENSE #379955 and are located at: 805 PHILADELPHIA ST, POMONA, CA 91766 The type and number of license to be transferred is/are: Type: OFF-SALE BEER AND WINE, License Number: 20-379955 now issued for the premises located at: SAME The bulk sale and transfer of alcoholic beverage license(s) is/are intended to be consummated at the office of: GLOBAL ESCROW SERVICES INC, 19267 COLIMA RD, STE L, ROWLAND HEIGHTS, CA 91748 and the anticipated sale date is JULY 10, 2013 The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform Commerical Code Section 6106.2 The purchase price or consideration in connection with the sale of the business and transfer of the license, is the sum of $450,000.00, including inventory estimated at $50,000.00, which consists of the following: DESCRIPTION, AMOUNT: CHECK $135,000.00, DEMAND NOTE $315,000.00, TOTAL $450,000.00 It has been agreed between the seller(s)/licensee(s) and the intended buyer(s)/transferee(s), as required by Sec. 24073 of the Business and Professions code, that the consideration for transfer of the business and license is to be paid only after the transfer has been approved by the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. ADEL ALSALAMY AND ZIAD SALAMI, Seller(s)/Licensee(s) NISHANT PATEL AND RADHA PATEL, Buyer(s)/Applicant(s) LA1310401 CLAREMONT COURIER 6/14/13 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 09-0124774 Doc ID #000223791072005N Title Order No. 09-8368218 Investor/Insurer No. 700215882 APN No. 8304-007-011 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/22/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by TONY B. BRANSON, A SINGLE MAN, dated 05/22/2006 and recorded 6/1/2006, as Instrument No. 06 1197745, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 07/18/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1116 CEDARVIEW DRIVE, CLAREMONT, CA, 91711. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $630,457.23. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 09-0124774. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 11/27/2009 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4392577 06/14/2013, 06/21/2013, 06/28/2013 T.S.#: 02013033 Loan#: GAA39-0650-C APN#: 8313003033 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED AS SHOWN BELOW. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under the pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges, and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the No-

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, June 14, 2013
tice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be as set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of the sale. Trustor: Jonathan D. Roman, a single man Duly Appointed Trustee: Guild Administration Corp., A California Corporation Trust Deed Date: April 26, 2005 Recording Date: May 03, 2005 Instrument No.: 05 0133404 Book: - Page - Recorded in County: Los Angeles, State of California Date and Time of Sale: July 09, 2013 at: 10:30 A.M. Place of Sale: near the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona California Estimated Sale Amount: $310,558.30 As More Fully Described On Said Deed Of Trust. Street Address of Property (or Other Common Designation, if any): 187 Marywood Ave, Claremont CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other Common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 480-5690 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.tacforeclosures.com/sales using the file number assigned to this case 02013033. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: June 05, 2013 Guild Administration Corporation As Said Trustee 5898 Copley Drive, San Diego, CA 92111 (858) 492-5890 By: Gail Windus, Assistant Secretary TAC: 963801 PUB: 6/14 6/21 6/28/13 T.S. No. 12-19022 APN: 8303-002-030 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/1/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: SERGIO BRIZUELA, A SINGLE MAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Law Offices of Les Zieve Deed of Trust recorded 9/10/2004 as Instrument No. 04 2325575 in book --, page -- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 7/8/2013 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA. Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $268,129.51 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1017 OCCIDENTAL DRIVE CLAREMONT, California 91711 Described as follows: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST A.P.N #.: 8303-002-030 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale

33

may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 12-19022. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 6/11/2013 Law Offices of Les Zieve, as Trustee 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale Information: (714) 573-1965 or www.priorityposting.com Christine O’Brien, Trustee Sale Officer THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE P1045291 6/14, 6/21, 06/28/2013 Trustee Sale No. 25679CA Title Order No. 1317813 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 1/24/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 7/9/2013 at 9:00 AM, MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 01/30/2007, Book , Page , Instrument 20070190798 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: SALIM MUSHARBASH AND KATHY MUSHARBASH HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS as Trustor, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without convenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesssion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notes (s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust The street address and other common designation of the real property purported as: 2104 NORTH INDIAN HILL BOULEVARD , CLAREMONT, CA 91711 APN Number: 8670007-001 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $592,422.67 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not the property itself. Placing the highest bid at trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www. Priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 25679CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. In addition, the borrower on the loan shall be sent a written notice if the sale has been postponed for at least ten (10) business days. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 6/11/2013 MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE 3 SAN JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR (702) 586-4500 JESSE J. FERNANDEZ, PUBLICATION LEAD MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFICIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1045254 6/14, 6/21, 06/28/2013

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 06-14-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

34

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning, 20 percent off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875.

Contractor
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!
MPGeneral Contractors. House remodels, kitchen cabinets, flooring, plumbing and landscaping. Call 909-749-2572. General Contractor Lic.856372.

Electrician
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Gardening

Handyman

Hayden’s Services Inc.

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Drywall

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

909-599-9530

House Cleaning
TRUSTWORTHY woman will clean your home. Excellent references. 15 years experience. Eva, 909-753-6517. CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda, 909-621-2162. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Babysitting offered, day or night. Call Lupe, 525-3273.

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

Girl Friday

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830 Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-251-2013. Lic.922000

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

FULL service errand business includes: grocery shopping, dry cleaning, postal center runs, FedEx, UPS, pharmacy pickup's and deliveries. Small pet and plant checks. Perfect for new mom's! 909-833-5522. 877-394-7600. Lic.24128. www.PriddyEliteErrands.com. I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience. ASA ELECTRIC
Residential and commercial. New installations, repairs and more!

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Garage Doors

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.
Claremont Handyman Service

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

951-283-9531
Claremont resident. Lic.860606
SERVICE * REPAIR * INSTALL Doors, Openers, Gates Same Day 24/7 Emergency Service 909-596-3300 accessdoorsco.com

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Contractor
WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

Serving Claremont Since 1995.
Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, trouble-shooting, landscaping lighting, pool and spa equipment replacement. Free estimates 24-hours. References. 909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED finish remodeler. Does kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting and more. Call Paul, 909919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

SERVICES
Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Friday 06-14-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

35

Landscaping

Painting

Plumbing
EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

Tile
MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray, 731-3511.

Weed Abatement
TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-922-8042. www.vjpaint.com.

Tree Care
MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909629-6960. Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call: 909-946-1123 951-522-0992

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

Power Washing
D&L Services FROM ROOFTOP TO SIDEWALK Hot or cold exterior washing. Owner operated for 25 years. Free estimates. 909-262-5790

Learn Japanese

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds. TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909-626-3066.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Pet Sitting
CLAREMONT Pet & House Sitting. Specializing in sabbatical coverage and long term pet care. Experienced, responsible and FREE. Lisa and Brenda, 909-518-0600. claremontpets@hotmail.com.

Roofing
Custom Construction Reroof specialist. Small repairs to large reroofs. Free estimates. 25 years experience. Lic.630203. Mark, 909-996-2981 GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

Pilates

BAUER TREE CARE 40 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning available for your perennials. 909-624-8238.

Tutoring
TUTOR available for summer. K-12 only. Literacy, test taking and study skills taught. All subjects. Call Kristen, 909-261-3099.

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

YOUR neigborhood classical Pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M., Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033.

Let us know when you move.
Call the COURIER at

Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Upholstery

621-4761
to update your mailing info.

909-615-4858
Lic.778506 D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604. CHARLES' Landscape & Sprinkler Service. 30 years experience. Claremont native. 909-217-9722.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

Plumbing
STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 * Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994. Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Weed Abatement
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Hayden’s Services Inc.

Tile

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275.

Don’t leave us in the dark!

Please call 909-989-9786.

Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

909.621.4761
Friday 06-14-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

36

SERVICES
ADVERTISE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

Selling, Buying or Renting?
Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

909-262-4633

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

SPECIALTY SERVICE

909-621-5626

10% OFF first-time customers & senior citizens!

Best rates for LEGALS. Call Vickie: 909-621-4761, Claremont COURIER.

Are you having a garage sale?
Place your ad in the Claremont COURIER Classifieds!

GE A R GALES SA

909-621-4761

909.621.4761
Friday 06-14-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

37

REAL ESTATE
Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

May
Number of Homes Sold Number Sold > $750,000 Number Sold < $750,000 Highest Sale Price Lowest Sale Price Average List Price Average Sold Price Average Days On Market

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
1-4 p.m. 737 Lander Cr., Claremont. For sale by owner, Jim Ahrberg.

2013 28 9 19 $2,116,000 $359,900 $754,961 $737,496 43

2012 42 5 37 $2,700,000 $150,000 $600,130 $568,260 76

Change From Previous Year -33 percent 80 percent

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, JUNE 15 AND 16

-49 percent -22 percent 140 percent 26 percent 30 percent -43 percent

May, again, is the strongest month for home prices, year to date. Inventory is still far below average for this time of year with 33 percent less sales than the year before—yet the average prices have risen significantly. The under $200,000 market has virtually disappeared from Claremont, and the under $300,000 is vanishing quickly. The $1,000,000+ market saw a surge of closings compared to previous months and while that market range is experiencing price increases, they are rising more modestly. Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty.
Contact Ryan at ryan.zimmerman@sothebysrealty.com.

REAL ESTATE
NEW LISTING

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com
818 SAN CARLOS CT., SAN DIMAS
Charming 2-story PUD in the community of La Cuesta Encantada, “the enchanted hill.” Located on one of the most desirable and private lots in the community. This 2 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom home has a spacious master suite with double door entry and separate vanity area in master bathroom. Living room with brick fireplace, half bathroom down stairs, eat-in kitchen area and indoor laundry. Community pool, club house, green belts and walking trails. $265,000. (S818)

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

NEW PRICE

2576 SAN ANDRES WAY, CLAREMONT
Outstanding Claraboya pool home. This single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home is perfect for entertaining. It features a large sunken living room and family room next to the kitchen with a breakfast nook. The spacious back yard is a private oasis with a pool, spa, patio, fountains, planters and views of the valley and city lights. Over-sized detached 2-car garage with storage. $849,000. (S2576)

604 LEHIGH DRIVE, CLAREMONT
Charming 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, 2story house on a shaded 8722 sq. ft. lot. Large living room with fireplace opens to formal dining room. Remodeled kitchen, den with fireplace and indoor laundry area. Downstairs office could be fourth bedroom. Recent improvements include: roof, copper plumbing, windows, freshly painted interior and exterior. $454,900. (L604) 1725 CHATTANOOGA CT., CLAREMONT

Located in the prestigious Claremont Club, this 2-story townhome is an end unit off a lush greenbelt. Three bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms on over 1900 sq. ft. Upgraded with dual-pane windows, custom cabinets and art tile counters, tile and laminate flooring. $439,000. (C1725)

SOLD IN 4 DAYS

649 MARYLIND AVE., CLAREMONT Unique one bedroom, custom built home on a spacious, wooded lot. Fireplace in living room, sky lights, newer water heater, concrete and brick driveway, automatic sprinklers, forced heat/air conditioning and brick patio with outdoor fireplace. Room to remodel or add on. $355,000. (M649)

Selling, Buying or Renting? Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Carol Curtis, Broker

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, June 14, 2013

38

Our experience with Mason selling our house could not have been better. He was so professional and prompt. I also attribute Mason and his knowledge to us getting almost our full asking price. Mason is the best! Thanks for everything.
—Kevin & Siara B.

To read more of what my clients are saying, please visit MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on Yelp.com.

Mason Prophet

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, June 14, 2013

39

D.R.E. #00997900

Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property.

GEOFF HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

Geoff is #1 in Claremont Sales & Listings since 1988

“Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time”
909.621.0500 Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

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We can publish your LA County legal.

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Call Vickie 621-4761
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 legalads@claremont-courier.com

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NEW LISTING! CONTEMPORARY CRAFTSMAN ESTATE INTHE FOOTHILLS - $1,250,000
Panoramic views in a picturesque setting on over an acre in Live Oak Canyon. Light wood and vaulted ceilings, great room setting with stone fireplace. Unique architectural details throughout. Gated driveway leads to motor court and 3-car garage. Zoned for horses. (L4825) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

UNDER THE CLARABOYA SKY - $978,000 798 VIA SAN SIMON, CLAREMONT
Prestigious hillside community of Claraboya. Open floor plan, formal living and dining room, master bedroom and family room overlook the courtyard and pool. Chef's kitchen, dine on the patio. Stunning city lights and serene valley views. Claremont schools, Claremont Colleges. (V798) Bernadette Kendall bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.1717

NEW LISTING! CLARABOYA HILLSIDE PANORAMIC VIEWS - $875,000
Contemporary Mid-Century custom built home. Perfectly situated on a quiet cul-de-sac offering picturesque valley, city lights and hillside vistas.Well designed 4 bedroom plus den floor plan boasts high ceilings, perfect for entertaining and family living. (V683) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

NORTH CLAREMONT - $675,000 436 ADRIAN CT., CLAREMONT
One story turnkey home on a desirable cul-de-sac. Open floor plan. Approximately 2529 sq. ft. Four spacious bedrooms, large living room, family room with fireplace, formal dining area, plantation shutters and a 3-car garage. Sizable backyard with heated pool. Lot size 12,043 sq. ft. (A436) BJ Nichka bj@bjnichka.com - 909-625-6754

MID-CENTURY NEAR VILLAGE AND COLLEGES - $619,500
Prime cul-de-sac locale on coveted street. Four to 5 bedroom home. High vaulted ceilings, walls of glass and open kitchen/dining/familyroom with fireplace. Private grounds with playhouse, covered patio, and view deck, plus a newly resurfaced pool. (B252) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

CUL-DE-SAC POOL HOME 1937 LOYOLA CT., CLAREMONT - $510,000
This sprawling single story home has 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, a separate formal living/dining room and a family room. Enjoy the refreshing pool this summer and family barbeques on the patio. (L1937) Jeannette Ewing jeannette.ewing@sothebysrealty.com - (909) 670-0322

Susan Emerson 909.447.7710

Jeannette Ewing 909.670.0322

Diane Fox 909.447.7709

Geoff Hamill 909.621.0500

Rose Ishman 909.624.1617

Bernadette Kendall 909.670.1717

Cheryl Knight 909.447.7715

Betty Leier 909.262.8630

Chris Macaulay 909.227.0162

B.J. Nichka 909.625.6754

Heather Petty 909.447.7716

Mason Prophet 909.447.7708

Madhu Sengupta 909.260.5560

Maria Silva 909.624.1617

Rob & Amy Titus 909.450.7415

Eurydice Turk 909.447.8258

Ryan Zimmerman 909.447.7707

Paul Steffen Broker/Owner

909.624.1617

500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont

wssir.com

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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