research papers

Acta Crystallographica Section A

Foundations of Crystallography
ISSN 0108-7673

The global long-range order of quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture
Rima A. Al Ajlouni

Received 13 August 2011 Accepted 10 November 2011

College of Architecture, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2091, USA. Correspondence e-mail: rima.ajlouni@ttu.edu

# 2012 International Union of Crystallography Printed in Singapore – all rights reserved

Three decades after their discovery, the unique long-range structure of quasicrystals still poses a perplexing puzzle. The fact that some ancient Islamic patterns share similar quasi-periodic symmetries has prompted several scientists to investigate their underlying geometry and construction methods. However, available structural models depend heavily on local rules and hence they were unable to explain the global long-range order of Islamic quasi-periodic patterns. This paper shows that ancient designers, using simple consecutive geometry, have resolved the complicated long-range principles of quasi-periodic formations. Derived from these principles, a global multi-level structural model is presented that is able to describe the global long-range translational and orientational order of quasi-periodic formations. The proposed model suggests that the position of building units, locally and globally, is defined by one framework, and not tiled based on local rules (matching, overlapping or subdividing). In this way, quasi-periodic formations can grow rapidly ad infinitum without the need for any defects or mismatches. The proposed model, which presents a novel approach to the study of quasi-periodic symmetries, will hopefully provide a deeper understanding of the structure of quasicrystals at an atomic scale, allowing scientists to achieve improved control over their composition and structure. understanding the structure of quasi-periodic patterns, there is still significant information lacking concerning the determination of their long-range order. The discovery of ancient Islamic patterns with quasicrystalline structural properties has triggered significant discussion and a number of debates on the scientific relevance of Islamic geometry. To date, three types of Islamic quasiperiodic patterns were documented in Islamic historical ornaments. These include octagonal (Makovicky & Fenoll ´, 1996), decagonal (Makovicky, 1992, 2007, 2008; Hach-Alı Makovicky et al., 1998; Rigby, 2005; Lu & Steinhardt, 2007a; Saltzman, 2008) and dodecagonal (Makovicky & Makovicky, 2011). The striking similarities between these quasi-periodic Islamic patterns and the unique puzzling order of quasicrystals have triggered significant research into understanding the structural principles of Islamic formations. However, none of these investigations were able to describe the global longrange principles of quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture. This paper presents the first global structural model that is able to describe the long-range translational and orientational order of quasi-periodic formations in Islamic architecture. The method is used to construct infinite formations of perfect quasicrystalline patterns, including perfect Penrose tilings, without using confusing strategies or complicated mathematics.
doi:10.1107/S010876731104774X

1. Introduction
The unexpected discovery of quasicrystals in the early 1980s attracted significant scientific interest because of their unusual structural properties, exhibiting symmetries long thought forbidden in classical crystallography (Shechtman et al., 1984). The atoms in these unusual structures are neither arranged in neat rows at regularly spaced intervals, similar to crystals, nor scattered randomly, similar to glass. Instead, they exhibit a complicated long-range translational order that is not periodic and a long-range orientational order (Levine & Steinhardt, 1986; Yamamoto & Takakura, 2008). To understand the unusual structural properties of quasicrystals, scientists turned to alternative structural models. One early model for describing quasicrystals was based on a tiling discovered by mathematical physicist Roger Penrose in the 1970s (Penrose, 1974). These tiling patterns consist of two differently shaped tiles that join neatly, according to local matching rules, to cover a flat surface completely. Quasi-periodic patterns can also be generated mathematically using the inflation–deflation operation (De Bruijn, 1981a), the grid method (De Bruijn, 1981b), the strip projection method (Kramer, 1982), the cut projection method (Bak, 1986) and the generalized dual method (Socolar et al., 1985). Although these structural models provide important insights into
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1978. (b) Two different periodic patterns constructed by generating different star units within the same underlying decagon basic grid. Background Geometry is one of the chief characteristics that give the Islamic artistic tradition its distinct identity. suggested that Islamic decagonal quasi-periodic patterns were constructed by combining a localized tiling approach of a special set of decorated ‘girih tiles’ with self-similar transformations. This principle is represented by means of using the same proportional systems that nature embodies. (d) Quasi-periodic pattern found in the courtyard of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin (1323) in Fez. (c) Three different line variations for connecting the same star units.. El-Said. 2009). Most recently.1 Interestingly. philosophical and cosmological approach. 1992. Lu & Steinhardt. 2007). (a). 1e). Al Ajlouni. Al Ajlouni  Quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture . 2011. 1976. 2. A68 2 of 9 Rima A. In their attempts to resolve the structural order of Islamic quasi-periodic patterns. Chorbachi. Jones. 1(a) and 1(b) show two different patterns constructed by generating 1 Larger versions of all of the figures presented in this paper have been deposited in the IUCr electronic archives (Reference: DM5019). some Islamic patterns exhibit a more chaotic arrangement of elements with the presence of some local order but unclear long-range order (Makovicky. 1976. 1976. 2003). 2003). Bonner has investigated three styles of selfsimilarity in 14th and 15th century Islamic geometric ornament (Bonner. Iran. Mathematically these grids are known as tessellations. 1978). with colleagues. 2008. but rather aimed to honor matter and reveal the objective nature of its meaning (Kritchlow. 2007a. scientists investigated the relationship between these patterns and Penrose tiling patterns (Makovicky. which underlie the geometry of architectural spaces and geometric patterns (Kritchlow. Makovicky & Makovicky (2011) suggested that the dodecagonal quasi-periodic star pattern found in Fez is based on the Amman quasi-lattice grid. Islamic artists did not seek to express themselves. The vast variety of geometric formations and the strict rules of its generation reveal an important inner dimension of Islamic tradition: ‘unity in multiplicity and multiplicity in unity’ (Kritchlow. 1(c) shows three different line variations for connecting the same star units. Zaslavsky et al. El-Said.. Figs. Morocco. 1976. Rigby. 1998.. 2001).b. Although the body of literature provides important insights into understanding the local properties of Islamic quasiperiodic patterns. 1993). 1992. Jairazbhoy. 2000). (e) Quasi-periodic pattern found on the walls of the Darb-i Imam shrine (1453) in Isfahan. 1981). 2005. based on their investigation of the patterns on the Darb-i Imam shrine (1453) in Isfahan. Makovicky et al. 1992) and later. 2007a. different star units within the same underlying decagon basic grid. These complex geometric formations are elaborations of simple constructions of circles. Jones. Al-Bayati. 1d) and Darb-i Imam shrine (1453) in Isfahan. 1976. 1981. Morocco (Fig. Al-Bayati. 1993. Traditionally. 1998). (d). These star units are created by proportionally breaking down these polygons to form the different designs. 1989. Saltzman. Lu & Steinhardt. which embodied all aspects of life and manifested itself in every product (Kritchlow. These connecting formations can take different designs without affecting the symmetry of the overall pattern. 1976. which are often used to determine the underlying basic grids. 2008). in which polygons are repeated to fill the plane (Gonzalez. investigated the relations between Penrose-type tiling and traditional Islamic ornaments in Spain and Morocco (Makovicky et al. (e) Two examples of quasi-periodic patterns found in Islamic architecture. 2007. In 2007. Iran (Fig. 1998.c). This tradition was completely inspired by a deep religious. all proposed methods so far are based on localized rules (e.research papers Figure 1 The types of Islamic patterns. Iran. Makovicky et al. (2012). Makovicky & Makovicky.. Fig. The vast varieties of ornamental compositions are achieved by developing different star units within different variations of the basic grids (Kritchlow. The aperiodic order of these patterns is somewhat similar to the structural signature of quasicrystals. Services for accessing these data are described at the back of the journal. Islamic patterns were constructed by using a compass and a straightedge.g. subdividing. matching or overlapping) and were unable to describe the long-range Acta Cryst. Lu & Steinhardt (2007a. Ritchard. nevertheless. Iran (1197) (Makovicky. 2008. The final formations are then developed through intelligent extension of parallels forming a network of lines connecting the main unit. 1991. Examples of these patterns can be found on the Madrasa of al-’Attarin (1323) in Fez. Makovicky developed new variations of the Penrose tiles based on his analyses of the patterns on the external walls of the Gunbad-I Kabud tomb tower in Maragha. therefore the generating force of patterns lies in the center of the circle (Kritchlow. Bonner.

the star unit defines the internal variations of the patterns’ design. in which the generating force of patterns lies in the center of the circle. As a result. A68 Rima A. (d) The connecting formations are formed by overlapping the main units. the ratio between diminution sequence of the nested decagrams. In addition. The full sequence of constructing the quasi-periodic cartwheel pattern is demonstrated in Fig. (2012). evaluated both the processes and the outputs of their creativity. As an illustration of this model. consider the quasi-periodic cartwheel pattern in Fig. As we add more star ‘seed’ unit is proportional to the size of the framework and is strictly derived from the and more decagrams. (e) The final line configuration of the firstdenote the radius of the nth decagram level cartwheel of the global quasi-periodic empire. none of these methods could be generalized beyond their specific case studies. 2007. (h). which completely disagrees with the generating principles and philosophy of Islamic geometry (Kritchlow. Unfortunately. the radii of any two successive deca(c) The positions of star units are determined entirely by the network of the nested decagrams. Accordingly. If we black dots correspond to the center position of all instances of the star unit. (b) The main star unit and the connecting formations. (i) The process of constructing a new variation of the cartwheel pattern. ( f ) The final rendered pattern of the first-level by rn and the next larger radius by hierarchy of the global quasi-periodic empire. It is derived from the principle that Islamic patterns are based on a combination of an underlying basic grid and a star unit (Kritchlow. including infinite perfect Penrose tilings. Al Ajlouni. Lu & Steinhardt. serves as the underlying basic grid for the quasi-periodic pattern. I further demonstrate how this model can be used to construct and grow infinite formations of quasi-periodic patterns and more importantly demonstrate the universal applicability of this method to generate perfect quasicrystalline formations. A framework of nested decagrams (Fig. (a) A framework of the nested decagrams. 1993. El-Said. While the basic grid is used to define the type of symmetry by defining the positions of star units within the overall formation. accordingly. 2009. 2007c. many scientists have concluded that the Muslim designers constructed these patterns with localized tiling systems and without being aware of their global long-range order (Makovicky. The grams is equal to the golden ratio. had doubted the architectural ability of the ancient Muslim designers and. without affecting the overall symmetry. 1980) [e. the underlying basic grid is the key to resolving the order of Islamic quasi-periodic patterns. I present the first global multi-level hierarchical framework model (HFM) that is able to describe the longrange translational and orientational order of quasi-periodic formations in Islamic architecture. which grows based on the Fibonacci sequence. All Acta Cryst. then the ratio rn+1/rn is equal to which is constructed by extending the lines of the main star units to meet. Figure 2 2a) serves as the underlying basic grid.research papers order of quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture. Iran]. the suggested tiling approach. which was commonly used in Seljuk architecture (Schneider. Cromwell. The size of the central Fibonacci sequence. The sequence of constructing the cartwheel pattern of the first-level hierarchy of the global quasiThe framework grows based on the periodic empire. The proposed model conforms to the traditional Islamic method of using a compass and straightedge. 3. (g) A different possible connecting arrangement. the golden ratio ’ = (1 + 51/2)/2. 2009). 2. rn+1. The fact that Muslim designers were able to construct a wide variety of quasi-periodic patterns suggests that they have used a clear and consistent formal method to design and implement these complicated formations. Solving the puzzle Derived from the traditional principles of Islamic geometry and based on my examination of a large number of Islamic patterns.g. the Darb-i Imam shrine (1453) and the Friday Mosque in Isfahan. 2007). Bohannon. Al Ajlouni  Quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture 3 of 9 . 1976. 1976). 2( f ).

research papers Figure 4 A closer look at one axis of the final pattern of the second-level hierarchy of the global quasi-periodic empire reveals two main clusters repeating based on the Fibonacci sequence. It is also important to note that the connecting formations can take different internal designs without affecting the overall symmetry of the pattern. 4. Growing the quasi-periodic empire The construction of the global empire of the quasi-periodic cartwheel pattern requires building a progression of multilevel hierarchical formations. Following the same basic polygonal arrangements used in the first hierarchy. where the blue centers are located according to certain intersection points (Fig. The only difference is that the ‘seed’ unit in the second-level order is actually the final constructed cartwheel pattern of the first-level hierarchy (Fig. (b) The distribution of the main cartwheel units and their connecting formations are determined entirely by the network of the nested decagrams. (a) A new generation of the framework of the nested decagrams serves as the underlying basic grid for the second-level quasi-periodic pattern. 3(a) correspond to the center position of all instances of the cartwheel unit (Fig. 2c). The connecting formations between the main star units are determined by arrangements of overlapping star units (Fig. Fig. Often. the construction process of the second-level order is similar to the process of constructing the first-level order. 3(c) and 3(d). these patterns were never merely rendered as lines. 2a). create patterns of two basic polygons: a hexagon and a bowtie (shown as shaded in Fig. The positions of the overlapping decagons are determined by the framework of the nested decagram. These specific arrangements. 2001). 2(d). the internal arrangements of these Acta Cryst. 2( f ). 3a). which are used to fill in the gaps between the main cartwheel units. Al Ajlouni  Quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture . which is constructed by extending the lines of the main star units. the quasi-periodic empire is generated around one main ‘center of origin’. Fig. The sequences of constructing the two main connecting formations. the lines are thickened when incorporated into different material and sometimes broken up to suggest an interlacing pattern (Gonzalez. The black dots in Fig. 2b). (c). The size of the central star unit ‘seed’ unit is proportional to the size of the framework and is strictly derived from the diminution sequence of the nested decagrams (Fig. are shown in Figs. (d) The two connecting formations used to fill the gaps between the main star units. Figs. 2( f ) shows the final rendered pattern of the first-level hierarchy of the global quasi-periodic empire. 4 of 9 Rima A. (e) The final rendered pattern of the second-level hierarchy of the global quasiperiodic empire. In this infinite multi-generation order. The positions of star units are determined entirely by the network of the nested decagrams. The final line configuration of the cartwheel is shown in Fig. In this sequence. the geometric arrangement of the next higher-level order is governed by a new generation of the nested decagrams. the center of the global tenfold proportional system. Historically. 2(h) and 2(i) demonstrate the process of constructing the new variation of the cartwheel pattern. 2f ). 2a). 2(g) shows a different possible connecting arrangement. The same overlapping arrangement around the central seed unit is also used to determine the connecting formations around the ten peripheral star units. which is derived from the same proportional system. These cartwheels are distributed according to a new generation of nested decagrams (Fig. 2(a) correspond to the center position of all instances of the star unit (Fig. explained earlier. which are indicated by the gray decagons with the blue centers in Fig. According to the HFM model. 3b). 2(e). The black dots in Fig. The central star ‘seed’ unit is the same final cartwheel pattern in Fig. Figure 3 The sequence of constructing the pattern of the second-level hierarchy of the global quasi-periodic empire. 2b). A68 dimensions within this sequence are related to each other by the golden ratio proportional system. (2012).

(d) The overall quasi-periodic pattern on the interior walls of the courtyard of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin (1323). (c) The main cartwheel unit and the two connecting formations. is part of a larger quasiperiodic empire. Fez.] (b) A framework of the nested decagrams which serves as the underlying basic grid for the first-level quasi-periodic pattern. in which the new higher-generation order is built on the previous order. 3e) acts as the ‘seed’ unit for the third-level generation order. Courtesy of the Aga Khan Visual Archive. [Basel Kotob (1990). (a) A photograph of the quasi-periodic pattern on the interior walls of the courtyard of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin (1323). Further research into the different possible formations and their rules is still needed. 5a). 5d). The universal applicability of the HFM Figure 6 The sequence of constructing the second-level hierarchy of the quasiperiodic pattern on the interior walls of the courtyard of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin (1323). 4). Fig. Morocco. Acta Cryst. Al Ajlouni Quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture 5 of 9 . Fez. (a) A new generation of the framework of the nested decagrams serves as the underlying basic grid for the second-level quasi-periodic pattern. This process can grow indefinitely to build an infinite structure of quasi-periodic formations. Fez. A closer look at one axis of this empire reveals two main clusters repeating based on the Fibonacci sequence (Fig. 5 demonstrates the sequence of constructing the firstlevel cartwheel pattern of the global empire. This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 US Code). Two different main units and four connecting formations are used (Fig. The internal line formations of these units are flexible and can take a different design without affecting the overall symmetry. Building on the same sequence. (c) The two main star units and their different connecting formations. Morocco. According to this sequence. Fig. The size of the central ‘seed’ unit is proportional to the size of the framework and is strictly derived from the diminution sequence of the nested decagrams. the pattern on the interior walls of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin in Fez. (f) The overall quasi-periodic pattern on the interior walls of the courtyard of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin (1323). the positions of all units are guided by the line decoration of the two basic polygons (Figs. Fez. The sequence of constructing the secondlevel order of the quasi-periodic empire is shown in Fig. The black dots in Fig. The central star ‘seed’ unit is proportional to the size of the framework and is strictly derived from the diminution sequence of the nested decagrams. Morocco. 5c). (2012). As shown in Fig. The distribution of the main units and their connecting formations are determined entirely by the network of the nested decagrams. the generated cartwheel in Fig. Morocco (Fig. 5(d). Morocco. generating the next higher-level cluster also follows the same process. The first example is the quasi-periodic pattern on the interior walls of the courtyard of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin (1323). is part of the second-level global empire (Fig. MIT. The black dots correspond to the center position of all instances of the main cartwheel units.research papers connecting formations are determined by combining two basic polygons: a hexagon and a bowtie (Figs. (d) The final cartwheel pattern of the firstlevel hierarchy of the global quasi-periodic empire. Figure 5 The sequence of constructing the cartwheel pattern of the first-level hierarchy of the quasiperiodic pattern on the interior walls of the courtyard of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin (1323). The black and blue dots correspond to the center position of all instances of the star units. (e). a framework of nested decagrams (Fig. 6). 3c and 3d). Fez. 5(b) correspond to the center position of all instances of the red star unit and the blue dots correspond to the center position of all instances of the blue unit (Fig.  Rima A. 3c and 3d). The central ‘seed’ unit is the same final cartwheel pattern generated in Fig. A68 To demonstrate the universal applicability of the HFM method to construct a variety of quasi-periodic patterns in historical Islamic architecture. Although this pattern shows one specific arrangement. which is spread over two cartwheels. 5. (b) The distribution of the main cartwheel units according to the network of the nested decagrams. other internal formations are also possible. In this arrangement. 5(e). consider the following two examples. The red star unit has predominance over the blue main unit and the main two seed units have predominance over the connecting formations. 6. Morocco. 5b) serves as the underlying basic grid. The final generated pattern of the previous order (Fig. In this sequence. is part of the second-level global empire. Fez. 3(e) shows the final pattern of the second-level hierarchy of the global quasi-periodic empire.

Fig. the generated cartwheel in Fig. 7a). (a) A new generation of the framework of the different designs without affecting the overall symmetry. 8c). connecting formations. The size of the ‘seed’ unit main star units and their different connecting formations. A68 . (b) The distribution of the main cartwheel the different possible formations and their rules is needed. Iran (1197). The two units can be interchanged without affecting the overall symmetry of the pattern. 7( f ) acts as the ‘seed’ unit for the second-level hierarchy (Figs. 6a). is part of the firstlevel cartwheel pattern of the global level cartwheel pattern. The connecting formations are flexible and can take different formations without affecting the overall symmetry (Fig.research papers 5(d) acts as the ‘seed’ unit for the second-level hierarchy (Fig. Iran (1197). Similar to the first-level hierarchy.c) have argued that this pattern is explicitly periodic. While Lu & Steinhardt (2007a. nested decagrams serves as the underlying basic grid for the second-level quasi-periodic pattern. Fig. on the other hand. 8a and 8b). Courtesy of the Aga Khan Visual Archive. questioned if it can be expanded indefinitely. (d). (d) The final pattern of the second-level hierarchy 8) confirms that the pattern. The second case is the pattern on the external walls of the Gunbad-I Kabud tomb tower in Maragha. 7( f ). (e) The distribution of the main units and their connecting formations are determined entirely by the network of the nested decagrams. The central ‘seed’ unit is the same final cartwheel However. spread over each of two adjusting panels on the walls of Figure 7 The sequence of constructing the cartwheel pattern of the first-level hierarchy of the quasi-periodic the Gunbad-I Kabud tomb tower. more research into understanding the different possible formations is still needed. These can be framework and is strictly derived from interchanged without affecting the overall symmetry. This the sequence of constructing the firstmaterial may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 US Code). A framework of nested decafor the first-level quasi-periodic pattern. Two different main units are used (Fig. this pattern can be expanded indefinitely. 7b). (b) A framework of the nested decagrams serves as the underlying basic grid empire. According to this sequence. (a) A part of a quasi-periodic cartwheel photograph of the external walls of the Gunbad-I Kabud tomb tower in Maragha. The final empire confirms that the pattern on the walls of the Madrasa of al-’Attarin is derived from the secondlevel hierarchy of the quasi-periodic empire. spread over each of two adjusting of the global quasi-periodic empire. is proportional to the size of the The black dots correspond to the center position of all instances of the two main units. as stated earlier. Makovicky (2007). The sequence of constructing the second-level order of the quasi-periodic empire is shown in Fig. 6 of 9 Rima A. Similar to the first-level periodic pattern on the external walls of the Gunbad-I Kabud tomb tower hierarchy. The central star ‘seed’ unit is proportional to the size of the grams (Fig. more research into understanding pattern generated in Fig. Iran (1197). ( f ) The final cartwheel pattern of the first-level the diminution sequence of the nested hierarchy of the global quasi-periodic empire. 7e). spread over each of two adjusting panels on the walls of the Gunbad-I Kabud tomb tower in Maragha. Al Ajlouni  Quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture Acta Cryst. The pattern. (2012). units according to the network of the nested decagrams. is pattern on the external walls of the Gunbad-I Kabud tomb tower in Maragha.] The pattern. The positions of all main units are determined entirely by the network of the nested decagrams (Fig. 7c). The internal arrangements of the two main connecting formations are Figure 8 determined by combining two basic polygonal units: a The sequence of constructing the second-level hierarchy of the quasihexagon and a bowtie (Fig. pattern (Fig. 7a). However. 7( f ) shows the final cartwheel pattern of the first-level hierarchy of the global quasi-periodic empire. Iran (1197) (Fig. these line formations are flexible and can take in Maragha. 7d). 7b) serves as the underlying framework and is strictly derived from the diminution sequence of the nested decagrams. 7 demonstrates [Sheila Blair & Jonathan Bloom (1984). (c) The two basic grid. decagrams (Fig. the connecting formations are flexible and can take different designs without affecting the overall symmetry. Building on the same process. MIT. (c) The different The construction sequence of the second-level hierarchy (Fig. 8.

it is possible from mapping the same inflation rules of the new pattern to Penrose tiles. Constructing the global empire of the new pattern follows the same process described in the previous examples (Fig. 9( f ). 9(i) shows the result from mapping the same inflation rules of the new pattern to Penrose tiles. (c) The different connecting formations. This is achieved by changing two parameters: the internal design of the ‘seed’ units and the distribution of these units by the framework. The result from applying the same inflation rules creates perfect Penrose formations (Fig. (b) The distribution the second-level inflation rules. 10(d).research papers panels on the walls of the Gunbad-I Kabud tomb tower in Maragha. 9g). The central ‘seed’ unit is the close-up detail of the generated empire in Fig. (a) A new generation of the and structures in the natural world. 11). the kite and dart with their new decoration. 9. 9b). The final generated pattern of the second-level hierarchy of the global quasicrystalline empire is shown in Fig. 9( f ). 6. which serves as the underlying basic grid for the first-level final designs (Fig. A detailed description of how to use the HFM to Acta Cryst. A framework of the nested decagrams serves as the underlying basic grid for the second-level quasicrystalline pattern. A68 Rima A. The black dots correspond to the center position of all instances of the main units. decagrams. Fig. (c) connecting formations between the main The three different connecting formations are fragments of the main seed unit. The new distribution quasicrystalline empire. (i) The result Derived from this process. consider the example shown in Fig. The connecting elements (Fig. is in fact part of a global quasi-periodic empire and can be expanded indefinitely. 9( f ). (h) The new pattern can be mapped level hierarchy is shown in Fig. The new pattern can be mapped perfectly to Penrose tiling systems. 10). (d) The final pattern of the second-level hierarchy of the global quasicrystalline empire. 9(i). (e) The distribution of the seed unit and are shown in Fig. The seed units are created by proportionally Figure 9 The sequence of constructing the first-level hierarchy of the new quasicrystalline pattern. ( f ) The final cartwheel pattern of the first-level hierarchy of the global quasicrystalline empire. (b) The main ‘seed’ unit is created by proportionally breaking down the decagon to form the final designs. ( j) Perfect Penrose to deduce the inflation rules for this pattern formations created by applying the inflation rules in Fig. The ‘seed’ unit of the second-level hierarchy is the same final generated pattern of the first-level order. An important characteristic of using this multi-level proportional system is that the same elements of the patterns recur at different scales. The central star ‘seed’ unit is proportional to the size of the framework of these units is shown in Fig. To illustrate this point. Fig. Fig. 10(d) reveals same final cartwheel pattern generated in Fig. 9(c) and main units and their connecting formations are determined entirely by the network of the nested their combinations are shown in Fig. 5. (Fig. 9(e). (d) The different units are actually fragments of the main combinations between the main units and the connecting formations. Mathematicians often describe this as Figure 10 the ‘self-similarity’ principle. 10c) are fragments of the new ‘seed’ unit. including quasicrystals. The same rules can be of the main cartwheel units according to the network of the nested deduced from the global empire of perfect Penrose tiling decagrams. 9j). Constructing new quasicrystalline formations One important characteristic of using the hierarchical proportional framework is that it allows for the construction of a wide variety of fivefold and tenfold quasicrystalline patterns. which is the key to underThe sequence of constructing the second-level hierarchy of the new standing the geometrical similarities between these formations quasicrystalline pattern generated in Fig. The and is strictly derived from the diminution sequence of the nested decagrams. The final reconstructed pattern of the first(g) The inflation rules for the new generated pattern. (a) A breaking down the decagon to form the framework of the nested decagrams. perfectly to Penrose tiling patterns. but with a different distribution of ‘seed’ units. (Fig. shown in Fig. Al Ajlouni  Quasi-periodic patterns in Islamic architecture 7 of 9 . 9(a) shows the same framework used in the previous example. 9(h) shows the kite and dart with the new decoration. (2012). 9(d).

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Digital Pattern Recognition in Heritage Recording: an Automated Tool for Documentation and Reconstruction of Visually Complicated Geometric Patterns. this novel method provides an easy tool for mathematicians. Acta Cryst. P. (2009). Future efforts should be directed toward investigating the application of similar hierarchical global methods to generate other perfect quasicrystalline formations of seven-. Esp. E. Intell. Soc. E. This quality is evident through the distribution of the main units within the global empire (Figs. Proc. Math. Al Ajlouni. subdividing or overlapping). Math. 144–175. (2007). London: Thames and Hudson Ltd. (2009). Rev. pp. philosophy and ‘conventional’ methods. Sarhangi & N. De Bruijn. 315. E. Makovicky. the findings of this paper suggest that ancient Muslim designers. 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