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OS-300

Optical Termination Unit
Models OS-304 and OS-306

User Manual

MRV Communications, Inc.

URL: http://www.mrv.com

OS-300 User Manual

Product Version 1.0

Standards Compliance
This equipment is designed to comply with the following standards: UL 1950; CSA 22.2 No 950; FCC Part 15 Class B; CE-89/336/EEC; CE-73/23/EEC.

FCC Notice
WARNING: This equipment has been designed to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to correct for the interference at the user’s own expense. The user is cautioned that changes and modifications made to the equipment without approval of the manufacturer could void the user’s authority to operate this equipment. It is suggested that the user use only shielded and grounded cables when appropriate to ensure compliance with FCC Rules.

Disclaimer
MRV® reserves the right to make changes to any technical specifications in order to improve reliability, function, or design. MRV reserves the right to modify the equipment at any time and in any way it sees fit in order to improve it. MRV provides this document without any warranty of any kind, whether expressed or implied, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. The user is advised to exercise due discretion in the use of the contents of this document since the user bears sole responsibility.

Trademarks
All trademarks are the property of their respective holders.

Copyright © 2006 by MRV
All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced without prior permission of MRV. This document and the information contained herein are proprietary to MRV and are furnished to the recipient solely for use in operating, maintaining and repairing MRV equipment. The information within may not be utilized for any purpose except as stated herein, and may not be disclosed to third parties without permission from MRV.
Document Number: ML49480 Document Revision: Rev. 01 Release Date: February 2007

Contact Information
For customer support, you can: • • • Contact your local MRV representative E-mail us at InternationalSupport@mrv.com Visit our MRV Web site at http://www.mrv.com

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ML49480, Rev. 01

Contents

Contents
About this Manual .............................................. 13
Audience ..................................................................................................................................13 Latest Revision ........................................................................................................................13 Related Documents.................................................................................................................13 Organization.............................................................................................................................13 Typographical Conventions ...................................................................................................15 Acronyms .................................................................................................................................15

Safety Requirements.......................................... 18
At all Times ..............................................................................................................................18 Before Installation/Maintenance ............................................................................................18 During Installation/Maintenance............................................................................................18 Before Powering On................................................................................................................18 During Operation.....................................................................................................................19 Servicing ..................................................................................................................................19

Chapter 1: Overview......................................... 20
General .....................................................................................................................................20 Application ...............................................................................................................................20 Typical ..................................................................................................................................20 IEEE 802.3ah IP-less Management .....................................................................................20 Highlights .................................................................................................................................21 Features....................................................................................................................................21 Physical Ports.......................................................................................................................21 Advanced Ethernet Features ...............................................................................................21 Device Management ............................................................................................................22 Fault Management & Monitoring on Network/User Ports.....................................................22 Optical Termination Service .................................................................................................22 Optical SFP Interfaces .........................................................................................................22 Traffic Management .............................................................................................................22 VLAN/VMAN Services..........................................................................................................23 Differentiated Services .........................................................................................................23 Remote Management & Fault Diagnostic ............................................................................23 Copper Cable Diagnostics ...................................................................................................23 Optical Performance Level Monitoring (Digital Diagnostics)................................................23 Telco Compatibility ...............................................................................................................23 Protection Schemes .............................................................................................................23 Denial of Service (DoS) Protection ......................................................................................24 February 2007 3

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...............30 Power .......................................................................................................................................28 Tools.................24 Link Aggregation (LACP IEEE802......................................................................................................28 Data Equipment.........32 Grounding...........................................................................................0 Loopbacks ...........................................................................................28 Essentials .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................25 General............................ 36 Startup ...36 Operation.........................................................................................................................................................................37 Chapter 4: CLI Management ......................................................................................................................................36 Setup..............................................................................................31 SFP Insertion.....34 Power Line Connection .......................28 Requirements...28 Options ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................28 Safety ...........................27 Power Supplies . 28 General ...........................................................................................................................27 Options ..............................................................................................27 Grounding..........................27 Chapter 2: Installation ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................28 Management Equipment ................................................................................33 Network Connection ...................................... 38 General ..........27 LEDs..................................................................................................................................................................... and Operation ..............31 Procedure........................................................com February 2007 ..30 Environmental ..........................................................................31 Mounting................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3ad) .............................................................................................36 Management.............................................................24 Models .............................................................30 Grounding.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................29 Mounting.................................................................................................................................................................OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.......................................................................... Setup........................................................................................................................................35 Chapter 3: Startup...................................................24 Layout ...............................................................................28 Package Contents ............................................................................................................mrv.....................25 Ports ...............................................38 Login .......................................38 4 URL: http://www....................................................................................................................................................................................................................36 Operation...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

.......................................................47 Definition .............................................................................................................................................................39 Help.............................45 CLI Password......50 Enabling/Disabling..............................................................................................................................................................47 Viewing................................46 Time ..50 February 2007 URL: http://www..........50 Definition ..........................................................................................................................................48 Enbling Learning .............................................49 Events Log ...........................................39 Functional Keys for CLI Commands .......................................................................................................................46 Date..........................................................38 Local.......................................................43 Procedure...............................................45 Removing the CLI Password....................................................................................................................................................................45 Setting a CLI Password.............................................44 Setting CLI Logout Timeout ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................50 Viewing.......................... 01 Contents First Time ...............................................................................................................................................47 Learn Table .......................43 Invoking a CLI Command ...39 Conventions for CLI Commands .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................40 Viewing .............................................................48 Disabling Learning...41 Configuration .......................................................................................................................................46 Restoration of the Factory Default Configuration...........................40 CLI Groups ............................. Rev..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................47 Aging ...........................................................................................50 Requirements ................................................................................40 CLI Commands ..................46 Rebooting.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................39 Remote..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................39 Logout ........................................50 SNMP Management ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................44 Quick Entry of a CLI Command ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................43 General........................................................................................48 Manually Logging Entries...................40 CLI Hierarchy ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................com 5 ............................49 Flushing.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................42 Command Arguments........................50 Clearing .....................................ML49480...........44 Setting the CLI Prompt ......................................................................................................mrv.................................................................................................................................

................55 Port Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) .....63 Clear ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................54 Port Enabling/Disabling ...............................................................................................................mrv...................................................................................................................................51 Trap Generation .................................................................................................................................................64 Benefits...........52 Viewing ...65 Procedure ..................................54 Port Status .................................................................................63 Viewing ...53 Disabling Local Management Login .......53 Chapter 5: Ports ..64 Copper Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) .....................................................................66 6 URL: http://www......................................... 66 Inband VLAN interfaces ..................................................................................65 Principles of Operation ...59 Near Loopback Mode .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................58 Port Loopback ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................54 Default ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................63 Statistics.........................................................................................................59 Topologies ...............................................................................................................................56 WAN Ports Link Protection (LOS).....OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1..........................................................54 Custom .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................55 Viewing ....................................................................................................................................................................................................51 Management Functions....59 Port Loopback Configuration.............................................63 Digital Diagnostics ........................................................................................................................................56 Definition....................55 Custom .............................. 54 General .........0 Commands ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................65 Example..............................................................................................64 General..................................................................com February 2007 .........54 Port Speed and Duplexity......................................57 Port Link Reflection (LIN) ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................65 Chapter 6: VLANs.................56 Port Flow Control ..........................................................................................................................................................51 Access Control ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................59 Far loopback Mode..........................55 Default ....................................................................................................................59 Loopback........

....................................................73 Enabling an In-band IP Interface.................................75 Viewing the in-band IP Interface ..............................69 Chapter 7: Port-based Access Control ...........................67 Tagged ...................................................69 Setting Default VID..................................................................74 TFTP Client Mode ........................................................................................... 73 General ..................................................................67 Hybrid .........................................................................................................................................76 Viewing .........................1x ............................................68 Q-in-Q (Service VLAN Access Mode) .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................com 7 .......................................................................................................74 Disabling Remote Management............................................................76 Configuration ...............................................................................73 In-band IP Interface ...............................ML49480....................75 Disabling the In-band IP Interface.................................................................................................67 Untagged...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................70 Configuration ............... 01 Contents General.73 General..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................mrv......................72 Chapter 8: Interfaces .......................................................................................................................................... Rev..............................................................................................66 Default Forwarding VLAN ........67 Port Outbound Tag Mode .................................................................................................................76 Disabling .................................................................................................... 70 IEEE802..........................................................................70 View.......................73 Out-of-band RS-232 Interface......................................................................................66 Adding Ports to an Existing VLAN............................................................................................... 76 Definition .......................................................................................................................................................66 Deleting .................................................................................................................................................................................................................73 Purpose ..............................................67 Deleting Ports from a VLAN .......................................................................................................................................................70 General...............................................................................................................................................................................................................75 Chapter 9: Rate Limiting of Flood Packets......66 Number...............................................................................................................................77 February 2007 URL: http://www...........................................................................................76 Applicability ......................................................................................................................71 Reauthenticate ........................69 Viewing.......................................................................................................76 Purpose ..................73 Enabling Remote Management or Protocols .....................................................................................................

....................................84 Principle of Operation .....85 Chapter 12: Port Mirroring .........82 Configuration ....................... 82 Definition ............................................................79 Viewing .........82 Rules .....................................................................................84 Viewing .....................................................................................................78 Configuration ..........78 Purpose ..........78 Principle of Operation ..............................79 Application Description..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................78 Number of Provider Bridges ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................87 Purpose ...................................80 Configuration ........................................................................................................0 Chapter 10: Provider Bridges................................................................................................................................................................................................................82 Purpose .........................82 Frame Transfer..............................................................83 Setting LAG Frames Distribution Mode ............................................83 Deleting............................................84 LACP ..................................................87 8 URL: http://www.......................... 87 Terminology ........................................................................................................OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.................................................................................................................78 Provider Bridge Ethertype .......87 Usage ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................87 Analyzer Port ..............................................................................................................................................80 Chapter 11: Link Aggregation............................................................................................................................................................................................................mrv.................................................................................................87 Definition ........................................................................78 Service VLAN Tag...............................................................................79 Example ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 78 General ....................................................................................................84 Configuration ..........................................................................................82 Viewing ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................87 Rules for Mirroring .........82 Principle of Operation ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................com February 2007 ......

........................................................................................................91 TagPrio Map.....................................95 Metering.......................................90 SL Class Maps .......................100 Setting the Scheduling Scheme ........ 99 Definition ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 01 Contents Analyzer Port..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................95 Setting Granularity of Policer.........................................92 DSCP to SL Class Map............87 Mirrored Ports........... Rev........................................99 Scheduling .................................................................................................................. 90 DiffServ Service Levels Classes.........................................102 Viewing ....................................................................99 Purpose ......................................................................................102 February 2007 URL: http://www............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................96 Port Policer Configuration............................................88 Chapter 13: Quality of Service (QoS) ......................97 Chapter 15: Egress-Queue Manager (EQM) ...................ML49480..............................................................95 Model............................................................................................................................................99 Congestion Avoidance ...............................101 Viewing..100 General............................................................ 95 Definition ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................91 Default User-priority Tag Map ..................101 Shaping ........102 Configuration ........................90 Selecting an SL Class Criterion ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................93 Chapter 14: Traffic Policer................................................................................99 Port Configuration...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................mrv........................................................99 Queue Configuration.....95 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................100 Configuration ..........................96 Policing Mode ...........................................................................................................................97 Viewing ................90 Assigning SL Classes to Ingress Packets...............................................................................................102 General.............................com 9 ..............................................................................................100 Scheduling Modes.............................

........................................................................................................................................................................111 General..........................................................................................111 Example........................................................................................................... 110 General ............................................................................................................................................111 Definition...........................................................................................................108 Upload.......................... 106 General .............................................. 108 General .......................................................................com February 2007 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................104 Viewing ......................................................106 Downloading a New or Backup Image ..........................................................................................................................................................................................111 Principle of Operation...........111 Address Resolution Protocol (ARP).........0 Chapter 16: Transparent Mode Media Cross Connect ..............................................111 TELNET.......................................................................107 Chapter 18: Configuration Files Upload/Download .................................104 Principle of Operation .......................................................................................................................................112 Definition..................................................................................................................................112 PING ....................................................108 Download ..............................................................................................................................................104 Setup..............................................................112 Purpose ..110 Appendix A: Utilities ............................................................................................mrv...............................................................................110 Usage .............................................................................................111 Usage ................................................111 Viewing the ARP Table ...................................................................111 Purpose ...................................................................................................................................................................................112 10 URL: http://www....................................................................................................................................OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.......109 Chapter 19: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 104 General ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 111 General ..105 Chapter 17: Firmware Upload/Download..............................................................................................................106 Uploading a New Image ............

......... Rev..........................................................113 Tools and Equipment.............................................................................................................. 113 General ..............................................112 Example ............................................................................................................................... 01 Contents Usage ....................................................... 118 February 2007 URL: http://www.............. 114 Appendix D: Cable Wiring................................... 115 Appendix E: Troubleshooting ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 116 Appendix F: Product Specification .113 Appendix C: Small Form-factor Pluggables (SFPs)..................................112 Appendix B: Cleaning Optical Connectors ......mrv............ML49480........................................................113 Procedure......com 11 .....

.......................................................................................................... 34 Figure 11: ASCII Craft Terminal/Emulator Connection to OS-300.................................................. 43 Default Map of Original VPT to SL ....................... 115 Tables Table 1: Table 2: Table 3: Table 4: Table 5: Table 6: Table 7: Table 8: Table 9: Models of the OS-300........ 60 Figure 16: Loopback at Far End of User Interface of CO............................ 62 Figure 21: Loopback at Near End of Network Interface of CPE.................................................................... 33 Figure 9: Fastening Bracket for Mounting an OS-300 on a Wall...................................................................................................................... 115 Figure 27: Ethernet Cross Cable Wiring........... 27 Figure 5: Fastening Brackets for Mounting an OS-300 in a 19-inch Rack ............................................................................. 33 Figure 10: Interconnecting an OS-300 Port and a DTE or DCE with a Fiberoptic Cable............... 39 Functional Keys for CLI Commands..... 33 Figure 8: Fastening Brackets for Mounting an OS-300 in a 23-inch Rack ... 34 Figure 12: TELNET or SNMP Station Connection to OS-300 .................................... 61 Figure 18: Loopback at Far End of Network Interface of CO .....0 Figures Figure 1: Typical Application .................................................................................................................. 96 Figure 24: Examples of Media Cross Connections in the OS-300... 62 Figure 23: Metering Operation....... 37 Conventions for CLI Commands .... 91 Default Map of Original DSCP to SL ........ 104 Figure 25: Null-Modem RS-232 Cable Wiring ..mrv................................. 35 Figure 13: Link Protection Data Path...................com February 2007 ...................................................................................................... 32 Figure 7: Fastening Brackets for Mounting an OS-300 + an LDP100 in a 19-inch Rack.......... 93 Startup and Operation Troubleshooting ..................... 61 Figure 20: Loopback at Far End of User Interface of CPE.... 58 Figure 15: Loopback at Near End of User Interface of CO ............ 32 Figure 6: Fastening Brackets for Mounting two OS-300s in a 19-inch Rack..... 25 ASCII Craft Terminal/Emulator Setup for CLI Management ............................................................. 20 Figure 2: IEEE 802... 60 Figure 17: Loopback at Near End of Network Interface of CO.................................................... 36 Front Panel LEDs ........................................................................................................................................................................... 116 12 URL: http://www...... 26 Figure 4: Rear End Layout of OS-300 Models ................... 39 Keywords/Arguments in CLI Commands ................................................................................. 115 Figure 26: Ethernet Straight Cable Wiring....................................................... 58 Figure 14: Link Reflection Data Path....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 61 Figure 19: Loopback at Near End of User Interface of CPE ......... 62 Figure 22: Loopback at Far End of Network Interface of CPE ...................................................................................OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1............................................................................. 20 Figure 3: Front End Layout of OS-300 Models...................3ah IP-less Management ..................................................................................................................................................................

• Organization This manual is organized into the following topics: Safety Requirements – specifies the safety requirements that must be met all times. Setup. Chapter 2: Installation – shows how to mount and network connect the OS-300. install. MegaVision User Manual: Describes how to manage the OS300 and other MRV SNMP-manageable products using MRV’s MegaVisionPro ® Web-Based Network Management application. and run the OS-300.mrv. models. February 2007 URL: http://www. operate. and troubleshoot the OS-300. Rev. setup. Outdoor Cabinets User Manual: Describes how to install equipment in an MRV Outdoor Cabinet for protecting them in hazardous environmental conditions. 01 About this Manual About this Manual Audience This manual is intended for the use of network administrators who wish to apply. capabilities.ML49480. Chapter 5: Ports – describes how to configure the physical ports of the OS-300. Chapter 3: Startup. Chapter 6: VLANs – describes how to configure VLANs in the OS-300. Chapter 4: CLI Management – describes how the CLI can be used to manage the OS-300. Chapter 7: Port-based Access Control – describes how to configure the OS-300 to provide IEEE802.international.mrv. The network administrator is expected to have working knowledge of: − Networking − Switches Latest Revision The latest revision of the user manual can be found at: ftp. manage. and options. Chapter 1: Overview – introduces the OS-300.1x access control. noting its key features.com 13 . and Operation – describes how to start. set up.com/support/tech_data Related Documents • • Release Notes for OS-300 (produced if warranted): Contains information not found in the User Manual and/or overriding information.

OS-300 User Manual Chapter 8: Interfaces – introduces the interface types of the OS-300.

Product Version 1.0

Chapter 9: Rate Limiting of Flood Packets – describes how to configure the OS-300 to limit the transmission and reception data rates for certain packet types at ports of a VLAN interface. Chapter 10: Provider Bridges – shows how to configure the OS-300 so that IEEE 802.1Q standard VLANs can be used to interconnect remote sites of an enterprise scattered across a service provider network. Chapter 11: Link Aggregation – describes how two or more ports of an OS-300 can be linked in parallel to form a single logical communication channel whose bandwidth is the aggregate of the bandwidths of the individual ports. Chapter 12: Port Mirroring – describes how to configure the OS-300 so that it can replicate traffic received on one physical port or VLAN at another physical port or VLAN for the purpose of analyses. Chapter 13: Quality of Service (QoS) – shows how the user can set the OS-300 to give preferential treatment to each ingress packet based on Layer 2 VPT or Layer 3 DSCP and, optionally, to change the VPT and DSCP values of outbound packets. Chapter 14: Traffic Policer – describes how to configure the OS-300 so that it can regulate the flow of ingress and egress traffic according to one or more packet attributes and/or conditions. Chapter 15: Egress-Queue Manager (EQM) – describes how to configure the OS-300 so that it can
manage inbound as well as outbound traffic queues.

Chapter 16: Transparent Mode Media Cross Connect – shows how to use the intelligent patchpanellike functionality of the OS-300. Chapter 17: Firmware Upload/Download – provides a detailed procedure for upgrading/downloading firmware to the OS-300. Chapter 18: Configuration Files Upload/Download – describes how to save an OS-300 configuration in a file and how to upload and download an OS-300 configuration using FTP. Chapter 19: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) – describes how the OS-300 can be configured to provide addresses to hosts on its network dynamically (automatically and for a pre-specified time duration). Appendix A: Utilities – describes and shows how to use the various network utilities of the OS-300. Appendix B: Cleaning Optical Connectors – describes a recommended procedure for cleaning optical connectors. Appendix C: Small Form-factor Pluggables (SFPs) – provides general information on SFPs that can be installed in the OS-300. Appendix D: Cable Wiring – shows the wiring for the null-modem RS-232, Ethernet straight, and Ethernet cross cables. Appendix E: Troubleshooting – is a guide for troubleshooting the OS-300 on the operative level.

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ML49480, Rev. 01 Appendix F: Product Specification – notes the general specifications of the OS-300.

About this Manual

Typographical Conventions
The typographical conventions used in this document are as follows: Convention Courier Bold Courier Plain Italics Enter Connotation This typeface represents information provided to the OS-300. This typeface represents information provided by the OS-300. This typeface is used for emphasis. This format represents the key name on the keyboard/keypad. This icon represents important information.

This icon represents risk of personal injury, system damage, or data loss.

Acronyms
ARP BER BPDU BRAS BSD CBS CIR CIST CL CLI CoS CO CPE CTS CWDM dB DCD DHCP DiffServ DNS DoS DSCP DSR DTE DTR Address Resolution Protocol (For getting MAC address) Bit-Error Rate Bridge Protocol Data Unit Broadband Remote Access Server Berkley Software Distribution Committed Burst Size Committed Information Rate Common and Internal Spanning Tree Conformance Level Command Line Interpreter (Interface) Class of Service Central Office Customer Premises Equipment Clear To Send Coarse Wavelength-Division Multiplexing deciBel Data Carrier Detect Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Differentiated Services Domain Name Server/System Denial of Service Differentiated Services Code Point Data Set Ready Data Terminal Equipment Data Terminal Ready

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OS-300 User Manual

Product Version 1.0

EBS EFM EIA EPL ETSI FPGA FTP FTTX Gnd IFG IP ITU LAN LIN MDI

Excess Burst Size Ethernet in the First Mile Electronic Industries Alliance Ethernet Private Line European Telecommunications Standards Institute Field-Programmable Gate Array File Transfer Protocol Fiber To The X (Home/Business/etc.) Ground InterFrame Gap Internet Protocol International Telecommunications Union Local Area Network Link Integrity Notification Media Dependent Interface Pinout: 1 ! Tx+, 2 ! Tx-, 3 ! Rx+, 6 ! Rx-. Connected to DTE with a cross-wired cable. Media Dependent Interface X (with cross-wiring) Pinout: 1 ! Rx+, 2 ! Rx-, 3 ! Tx+, 6 ! Tx-. Connected to DCE with a cross-wired cable. Management Information Base Multi-Tenant Unit or Maximum Transmission Unit Network Access Server Network Equipment Building System Next-Hop Label Forwarding Entry Network Management Station Network-Network Interfaces Network Operation Center Optical Add-Drop Multiplexer Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (Tools/utilities for installing, monitoring, and troubleshooting a network.) Object IDentifier Optical Service Channel Operating Software System Peak Burst Size Packet Inter-Network Groper Peak Information Rate Point-of-Presence Quality of Service Random Early Discard Ring Ignore Remote LoopBack Remote MONitoring Receive Data

MDIX

MIB MTU NAS NEBS NHLFE NMS NNI NOC OADM OAM OID OSC OSS PBS PING PIR PoP QoS RED RI RLB RMON RxD

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01 About this Manual SCADA SDH SFP SL SLA SNMP SONET SP STM TCO TCP TDM TDR TELNET TFTP TTL TxD UDP UNI UP UPS URL UTC VC VCD VID VLAN VPN VPT WAN WDM WRR Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition Synchronous Digital Hierarchy Small Form-factor Pluggable (DiffServ) Service Level Service Level Agreement Simple Network-Management Protocol Synchronous Optical NETwork Strict Priority Synchronous Transfer Mode Total Cost of Operation Transmission Control Protocol Time-Division Multiplexer Time-Domain Reflectometry (dial-up) TELephone NETwork (connection protocol) Trivial-File Transfer Protocol Time-To-Live Transmit Data User Datagram Protocol User-Network Interface User Priority Uninterruptible Power Supply Universal Resource Location Coordinated Universal Time Virtual Circuit Virtual Cable Diagnostics VLAN ID Virtual LAN Virtual Private Network VLAN Priority Tag Wide Area Network Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Weighted Round Robin February 2007 URL: http://www.com 17 .ML49480.mrv. Rev.

(Less than 1.0 Safety Requirements CAUTION! To reduce risk of physical harm. Humidity Operate the OS-300 only at a location where the ambient humidity is noncondensing and between 10 and 95%. Leave the protective covers (e. In particular.) on the OS-300 components at all times until they are about to be connected. and difficult to detect and remove from the body! Do not look into the end of an optical fiber since it may be carrying harmful laser radiation that can cause permanent damage to the eye and loss of sight! Do not bend any part of an optical fiber/cable to a diameter that is smaller than the minimum permitted according to the manufacturer’s specification (usually about 65 mm or 2.mrv. In addition.com 18 . do not look into laser ports. ensure that no part of the OS-300 is damaged.5 in)! Before Installation/Maintenance Power Inspection Covers Ensure that all power to the OS-300 is cut off.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. equipment damage.000 particles per cubic foot is OK. dust caps on optical connectors. Input Voltage Ensure that the input voltage to the OS-300 from a power source is: AC: 90 to 240 Vac @ 60 to 50 Hz Temperature February 2007 URL: http://www. ensure that there is a clearance of at least 25 mm (1 inch) between the air vents and nearby objects. ensure that the OS-300 is electrically connected to ground at the butterfly nut on screw located on the rear (and shown on the right). disconnect all OS-300 power cords from the power sources (line/mains). Dust Ensure that the site for the OS-300 is dust-free. For personal protection against electrostatic discharge (ESD). wear an ESD-protective wrist strap that is connected to ground. and fire and to maintain proper operation. For personal and equipment protection against ESD.) Cooling Air Ensure that the air-flow around the OS-300 and through the air vents is not obstructed.000. By inspection.000 particles per cubic meter or 30.. ensure that the safety requirements stated hereunder are met! At all Times Do not let optical fibers come into physical contact with any bare part of the body since they are fragile.g. The wrist strap must have a resistance of at least one megohm in the path to ground. Ensure that each SFP port at which laser beams are (or will be) present is occupied by an SFP locked in position. Grounding Wrist Strap During Installation/Maintenance Avoid direct exposure to laser beams. Before Powering On Operate the OS-300 only at a location where the ambient temperature is in the range 0 to 45 oC (32 to 113 oF). Specifically. etc.

One end is terminated in an IEC 320 attachment plug. Do not connect or disconnect electrical cables and/or power cords during lightning strikes or thunderstorms. 230V AC Power Cord: The power cord to be used with a 230 Volt AC configuration must be a minimum type SJT (SVT) 18/3.5 meters (15 feet).5 meters (15 feet). negative. page 27. Before servicing.ML49480. the other in a NEMA 5-15P plug. One end is terminated in an IEC 320 attachment plug. 10 Amps with a maximum length of 4.mrv. Power Cord About this Manual AC: The AC power cord of the OS-300 must have either of the following specifications: 115V AC Power Cord: The power cord to be used with a 115 Volt AC configuration must be a minimum type SJT (SVT) 18/3. The other end is terminated as required by the rules of the country in which it will be installed. Rev. 10 Amps with a maximum length of 4. During Operation Ensure that each SFP port at which laser beams are present is occupied by an SFP locked in position. Wiring: 3-wire for connection to earth. rated 250 Volts AC. ensure that all power to the OS-300 is cut off! February 2007 URL: http://www.com 19 . and positive – see Figure 4. rated 250 Volts AC. DC: The DC power cord of the OS-300 must have the following specifications: Length (max): 4. Servicing All servicing must be carried out only by qualified service personnel. 01 DC: -36 to -72 Vdc.5 meters (15 feet). Power rating (min): 72 volts at 1 amp.

Rev. it allows the carrier to offer the simplest level of Ethernet services.g. Further.3ah Link OAM XML OSS HP-OV Fiber TL1 OSS OS9000 OS-304 Open Management Interfaces Figure 2: IEEE 802.mrv. including a fully managed native Optical Ethernet demarcation channel.. February 2007 URL: http://www.3ah management of a remote OAM device connected to one of its ports over an EFM1. illustrates a typical application for the OS-300. VLAN aware and unaware modes. OS-300 Figure 1: Typical Application IEEE 802. with controlled bandwidth. MRV OS-300 port) to a remote OAM device port (e. 01 Chapter 1: Overview General The OS-300 is a Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet small footprint Optical Termination Unit (OTU) that provides a simple and cost-effective solution for connecting optical fiber between the customer premises and a broadband service provider. protected network and customer ports. Figure 1.3ah IP-less Management The OS-300 provides for IEEE 802.com 20 .. below. 802.OS-300 User Manual ML49480. MRV OESD port). link without the need or use of the IP protocol.3ah OAM protocol over the link connecting a local OAM device port (e. Application Typical The OS-300 offers the service provider the capability to extend the Metro Ethernet Network service over fully managed optical 1000Base-X (GE) or 100Base-FX (FE) links. and cable diagnostics.g.3ah IP-less Management 1 Technology used to implement the IEEE 802.

mrv.com 21 .ML49480.3ad) or 1:1 LOS protection • • • • • • • • • February 2007 URL: http://www. ARP rate control and IEEE 802. single strand (bidirectional) and WDM pluggable optics supported per the INF-8074i standard 2/4 (for OS-304/OS-306) x RJ45 10/100/1000Base-T User ports − Auto MDI/MDIX − Auto-negotiation and forced full-duplex modes Network/User port identification EIA-232 out-of-band console port Environmental sensor for temperature alarms • • • • Advanced Ethernet Features • • Jumbo frames (9600 bytes) on user and network ports Non-blocking wire-speed operation on all Gigabit Ethernet ports: − Forwarding bandwidth 8 Gbps − Forwarding rate 6. and Broadcast frames Port Security. Rev. 01 Overview Chapter 1: Highlights • Local loop 100Base-FX. and fault diagnostics • • Features Physical Ports • 2 x SFP (100Base-FX/1000Base-X) Network ports − SFP can host 100Base-FX and 1000Base-X pluggable optics − Hot-swappable short/long haul.1Q VLAN support VLAN Stacking (Q-in-Q ) per user port for VLAN-aware transparent services Bandwidth control per user/network port − Policing of traffic entering from a LAN and shaping of traffic exiting to a WAN Rate limiting with 128 Kbps granularity Storm limit protection for Unicast. 1000Base-X Fiber extension to businesses with: − Optical versatility for various rates & distances Line extension Ethernet-centric services with: − Jumbo frames (9600 bytes). Multicast.5 Mpps Transparent cross-connect mode – port-based converter without MAC learning IEEE 802.1X CoS aware per DSCP and IEEE 802. including MAC DoS protection. control. Administration & Maintenance with: − Remote management. transparency − 50ms optical protection Operation.1p headers − QoS mapping to 4 hardware priority queues per port − Low-latency Strict Priority and WRR scheduling Network port protection with 1+1 Link Aggregation (IEEE 802.

Incremental scalable bandwidth is achieved by performing traffic policing on ingress traffic and shaping on the WAN optical interface and offers predictable network traffic loads into the provider’s broadband network. and Event − Complete set of raw alarms and traffic collection reports on a per-port basis Ping for connectivity verification Frame generator for Layer 2 connectivity testing Copper Cable diagnostics (copper TDR) on RJ45 User ports − Identifies and isolates location of a copper cable fault Optical level monitoring on SFP network ports − Complies with SFF-8472 for Rx/Tx optical level monitoring and other specifications Last gasp* to enable alarm indication at power loss Link fault reflection to enable of fault propagation from Network to User ports Port loopback to enable port analysis on traffic from the NOC • • • • • • • Optical Termination Service The OS-300 enables a clear optical termination point between the customer’s network and the service provider’s network.v2 DHCP client for automated IP address assignment Management VLAN – secure and invisible to the customer Configuration load/save via TFTP • • • • • • Fault Management & Monitoring on Network/User Ports • RMON – 4 groups: Ethernet statistics. The OS-300 incorporates two 10/100/1000Base-T RJ45 user ports. Traffic Management Customer services can be provided at physical interface rates. Optical SFP Interfaces FE and GE SFP interfaces provide unmatched deployment flexibility to enable versatile optical extensions from short to long haul single-mode.mrv. or CWDM/DWDM connections – simply by means of the use of the right SFP. History. and to connect Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet optical services via the same device. facilitating remote optical Ethernet services.com February 2007 . and two SFP network ports that can host 100Base-FX and 1000Base-X SFP pluggable transceivers.3ah OAM protocol TELNET or web-based SNMPv1. Alarm.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. 22 URL: http://www.0 Device Management • Out-of-band Serial-over-EIA-232 with the: − Option to disable this management mode and permit inband control via the network instead Remote IP or Remote IP-less Ethernet in the First Mile (EFM) based on IEEE 802. single-fiber (bidirectional). or can be provisioned remotely from the NOC at configurable rates of up to 1000 Mbps with 128 Kbps granularity.

temperature. The Link Protection (LOS) scheme provides trunk (uplink) port backup. as well as component information such as vendor code. History. perform software upgrades. it is often not possible with today’s Ethernet equipment to isolate the OSI layer at which a problem has occurred. voltage. It downs the link at the downlink ports (that are assigned to the uplink port) if the link at the uplink port fails. enables a network administrator to identify potential problems in optical transmission and take preemptive action before any service outage actually occurs. Telco Compatibility Compact in size and with a front-to-back cooling device. As a powerful OPM tool. February 2007 23 URL: http://www. This can be used to differentiate between packets that need fast and low delay processing. and wavelength. the OS-300 incorporates an advanced protection mechanism. The Link Protection Mechanism allows for a sub 50 milliseconds recovery time. Differentiated Services OS-300 used as a demarcation point for customer traffic can inspect various traffic flows and respect the marked traffic that can be queued according to service level. This dramatically increases operation costs and decreases the value proposition of Ethernet to service providers.ML49480. or interfaces. OS-300 offers remote network monitoring and statistical data collection with the aid of four RMON counters (Ethernet statistics. serial number. Rev. OS-300 supplies full remote access to the demarcation point. together with alarm and warning thresholds. This results in truck rolls to swap out equipment. two OS-300s can be installed side-by-side in a single rack frame in standard 19” and 23” Telco racks to enable OS-300 protection. The information provided by Digital Diagnostics.com . 01 Overview Chapter 1: VLAN/VMAN Services Provider’s Ethernet services can be differentiated and logically separated by means of the VLAN technology. it provides access to a number of real-time SFP operating parameters such as optical TX/RX power. The OS-300 incorporates copper TDR that can be used to identify faults (such as opens. shorts. Protection Schemes To enable increased service resiliency and reliability. Remote Management & Fault Diagnostic Network monitoring is an essential tool for debugging network faults. and easy accessibility. This capability offers visibility into the customer premises to eliminate the need for service technician visits to customer’s sites. Protection of 1:1 and 1+1 schemes are supported. The Link fault Reflection (LIN) scheme enables fault propagation from network to users ports. and between lower priority packets (usually for non-realtime applications) whose transmission may be delayed . Monitoring and SLA verification are done at wire speed. and impedance mismatch) in Category 5 copper cables at a customer’s site to avoid expensive time-consuming in-the-field truck rolls for isolating a fault. Copper Cable Diagnostics Because the L1/L2 aspects of Ethernet are closely coupled together. high port density. OS-300 offers VLAN stacking (Q-in-Q) that allows transparent LAN services by mapping the customer’s VLAN traffic into the provider’s service VLAN. and add new features to minimize operational expenses. and Event) for network performance analysis.mrv. This functionality provides Layer 2 transparency and obviates the need for VLAN configuration coordination between the provider and the customer. Optical Performance Level Monitoring (Digital Diagnostics) The OS-300 supports the SFP Digital Diagnostics per the SFF-8472 standard. Alarm. in an attempt to fix the problem without really knowing what/where it is. in order to remotely monitor the condition of a device. cables.

com February 2007 . IP/TCP/UDP packets).3ad) The IEEE802.3ad Link Aggregation Control Protocol provides a way to set up an aggregation trunk automatically between two peers. broadcast and multicast frames) and at Layer 3 (e.3ad Link Aggregation standard.g. Models The OS-300 is available in various models with flexibly selectable SFPs so that a model and SFPs that are most suitable to an application can be selected. 24 URL: http://www. Loopbacks The OS-300 offers extensive loopback functionality. Link Aggregation (LACP IEEE802. Implementation is compliant to IEEE 802... The models are described in Table 1. Two or more ports can be interconnected in parallel to form a single logical communication channel (called a link aggregation or port trunk) whose bandwidth is the sum total of the bandwidths of the individual ports. Multiple traffic types can be policed at Layer 2 (e. serves as an 2-Gbps full-duplex Ethernet trunk. Far end and near end loopbacks for all user or network ports allows for remote troubleshooting services.mrv. Loopback functionality is hardware controlled to provide performance monitoring and SLA verification at wire speed.0 Denial of Service (DoS) Protection The OS-300 incorporates multi-layer DoS protection at the hardware level on the CPU control plane and data-switching plane to protect service and device functionality from hostile traffic without causing degradation of service performance or affecting the forwarding database or CPU availability.g. the interconnection of two full-duplex Gigabit ports of one OS-300 unit to two full-duplex Gigabit ports of another OS-300 unit. from the NOC or any other manageable location without having to actually visit the customer premises. For example.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. Such a channel between two switches increases traffic throughput capacity among stations connected to the ports that are members of the trunk. below.

Rev. and 1 AC power supply (90-240 Vac). 2 100/1000Base-X WAN SFP ports. below.mrv. Side-by-side mountable in Telco 23-inch racks or on a wall. Operating temperature range: 0 oC to 65 oC. Side-by-side mountable in Telco 19-inch and 23-inch racks or on a wall. Side-by-side mountable in Telco 19-inch and 23-inch racks or on a wall. Can operate at high temperature extremes. and 1 AC power supply (90-240 Vac). 2 100/1000Base-X WAN SFP ports. Side-by-side mountable in Telco 19-inch and 23-inch racks or on a wall.ML49480. Operating temperature range: 0 to 45 °C Optical termination unit having 1 RJ45 10/100/1000Base-T LAN ports. February 2007 URL: http://www. and 1 DC power supply (-48 Vdc). Side-by-side mountable in Telco 19-inch and 23-inch racks or on a wall. and 1 AC power supply (90-240 Vac). Side-by-side mountable in Telco 19-inch and 23-inch racks or on a wall. and OS-306 are shown in Figure 3. Can operate at high and low temperature extremes. 01 Overview Table 1: Models of the OS-300 Model OS304 Description Chapter 1: Optical termination unit having 2 RJ45 10/100/1000Base-T LAN ports. 3 100/1000Base-X WAN SFP ports. and 1 AC power supply (90-240 Vac). Optical termination unit having 4 RJ45 10/100/1000Base-T LAN ports and 2 100/1000Base-X WAN SFP ports. Operating temperature range: 0 to 45 °C Optical termination unit having 1 RJ45 10/100/1000Base-T LAN ports. Operating temperature range: -40 oC to 65 oC.com 25 . OS-304-S. and 1 DC power supply (-48 Vdc). Operating temperature range: 0 to 45 °C Optical termination unit having 1 RJ45 10/100/1000Base-T LAN ports. Operating temperature range: 0 to 45 °C Optical termination unit having 2 RJ45 10/100/1000Base-T LAN ports. 3 100/1000Base-X WAN SFP ports. Operating temperature range: 0 to 45 °C Optical termination unit having 4 RJ45 10/100/1000Base-T LAN ports and 2 100/1000Base-X WAN SFP ports. 3 100/1000Base-X WAN SFP ports. Side-by-side mountable in Telco 19-inch and 23-inch racks or on a wall. and 1 + 1 redundancy dual AC power supplies (90-240 Vac). OS304/DC OS304-S OS304-S/DC* OS304-S/AC2* OS306-E OS306-EXT Layout General The layout of models OS-304.

OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.com February 2007 .0 OS-304 Model OS-304-S Model OS-306 Model Figure 3: Front End Layout of OS-300 Models AC Power Supply Model 26 URL: http://www.mrv.

control. Grounding Butterfly nut on screw for grounding the OS-300 chassis.mrv. The baud rate of the port is 38400 baud. control. page 37. Rev. The LEDs are described in Table 3. LEDs Global and per-port status-indicator LEDs. Out-of-band Management (CONSOLE EIA-232) Serial/RS-232 port for out-of-band local connection of a craft terminal. Options Up to two fiberoptic Fast Ethernet/Gigabit SFP transceivers can be fitted to the OS-300. and inband management traffic.ML49480. Power Supplies The standard OS-300 has one universal internal AC or DC power supply.com 27 . page 54. refer to Chapter 5: Ports. February 2007 URL: http://www. WAN (Network/Uplink) Two 100/1000Base-X Ethernet SFP WAN/Network/Uplink ports for data. For detailed information on configuration of ports. LAN (User/Downlink) Two/Four fixed 10/100/1000Base-T LAN/User/Downlink ports for data. 01 Overview Chapter 1: DC Power Supply Model Figure 4: Rear End Layout of OS-300 Models Ports Each port can be independently configured to operate in any of a wide range of modes. and inband management traffic.

Cabling 10/100/1000Base-T Ports Cable Type: Category 5.3z. Rev.3. 01 Installation Chapter 2: Chapter 2: Installation General This chapter provides a detailed step-by-step procedure for installing the OS-300. pre-installed) EIA-232 Cable (1 per OS-300) Power Cord (1 per power supply) CD containing the OS-300 User Manual (1) Options • • • Brackets for mounting the OS-300 in a 19-inch or 23-inch rack (2 per OS-300) MegaVisionPro ® Web-based server SNMP network management application (on CD) Outdoor Cabinet (1 for up to 4 OS-300s) Requirements Tools • • Philips screwdriver no. Cable Connector Type: RJ45 8-pin male Cable Length: Up to 100 m (330 ft) Cable Impedance: 100 Ω Cable Wiring: Straight (Figure 26. page 18. Safety Before installing the OS-300. page 115) February 2007 URL: http://www.mrv.ML49480. and/or IEEE 802. are met. IEEE 802. 1 Philips screwdriver no.com 28 . ensure that the requirements noted in the section Safety Requirements. page 115) or Cross (Figure 27.3u. Package Contents Essentials • • • • • OS-300s (as many as ordered by the customer) Power Supplies (1 per OS-300. 2 Data Equipment DTEs/DCEs Compliant to IEEE 802.

g. PC) since the OS-300 port automatically configures its interface to be Ethernet MDI or MDIX in order to communicate via the co-port.g.g.. CWDM. Rev.g.g. with RJ45 male 8-pin connector. The cable length can be up to: [Output power of SFP transmitter − Sensitivity of SFP receiver] . • • In-band Management using TELNET or SNMP Connection • TELNET station: For e. etc. refer to the MegaVision User Manual..g. up to 100 m (330 ft) long for connecting an OS-300 fixed copper port to the network via which the management station can access the OS300 or Fiberoptic cable for connecting an OS-300 optical fiber port to • • • February 2007 URL: http://www.. 100/1000Base-X Ports (Fiberoptic Ports) Per the SFP (Fast Ethernet. VT100 terminal or Craft terminal emulator: For e.. PC with asynchronous ASCII terminal emulation software application such as Microsoft Windows’ HyperTerminal or UNIX workstation or Linux workstation Operating System: For e. e. Interface to the Web: Optional.. and not longer than 15 m (50 ft) for connecting the OS-300 CONSOLE EIA-232 port to the local management station. plus a safety margin of 3 dB. Cable Fiber Marking For each cable fiber.Path losses (in dB) km Cable Attenuation (in dB/km) The path losses must include losses due to interposing devices. or DWDM). MRV’s MegaVisionPro® Web-based network management application running on a PC. Operating System: For e.ML49480. Microsoft Windows 95/98/2000/NT/XP.. 01 Installation Chapter 2: Note Each 10/100/1000Base-T port may be connected with a straight-wired or cross-wired cable irrespective of whether the co-port is that of a DCE (e. Management Equipment Out-of-band Management using Serial/RS-232 Connection • Craft terminal: Asynchronous ASCII terminal.com 29 . The cable wiring is shown in Figure 25 on page 115. PC with TELNET application or SNMP NMS: For e. required for Web-Based Management. For details.g. Gigabit Ethernet. Microsoft Windows 95/98/2000/NT/XP Cable (supplied by MRV): Null-modem RS-232. attach a label with the marking TX at one end and another label with the marking RX at the other end.g. Cable: Category 5. switch) or DTE (e. with RJ45 8pin male connector and DB9 9-pin female connector.mrv.... cable splices.

OS-300 User Manual the network via which the management station can access the OS-300. IP Address: If an IP address is to be assigned to the OS-300 for the first time, the interconnection shown in Figure 11, page 34 must be used.

Product Version 1.0

Mounting
If rack-mountable units are installed in a closed or multi-unit rack assembly, they may require further evaluation by certification agencies. Installation should be such that a hazardous instability condition is not developed due to uneven loading. Ensure that the OS-300 will be within reach of the necessary connections, namely, line/mains power outlet, Ethernet networks, and a craft terminal/emulator or a UNIX workstation if the OS-300 is to be managed via its CONSOLE EIA-232 port. For mounting an OS-300, any one of the following may be used: Rack, Wall, Outdoor Cabinet, or Desktop. Details are given below. Rack: − 19-inch rack: One OS-300: EM910-BR-1 bracket pair (for other types) + four philips screws (supplied by MRV) Two OS-300s: EM910-BR-D Tray + spacer D + 10 philips screws (supplied by MRV) One OS-300 and one LDP100: EM910-BR-E Tray + spacer E + 11 philips screws (supplied by MRV) − 23-inch rack: EM910-BR-2 bracket pair + four philips screws (supplied by MRV) − Space in rack: ~ 220 x 45 x 240 mm 3 [~ 8. 5 x 1U x 9.5 in 3] Wall: The wall area must be: ~ 220 x 240 mm 3 3 [~ 8. 5 x 9.5 in ] Outdoor Cabinet: For mounting up to four OS-300s indoors or outdoors (supplied by MRV). Desktop: Flat, stable, non-conductive static-free surface. The surface area must be at least: ~ 220 x 240 mm 3 [~ 8. 5 x 9.5 in 3]

Environmental
Temperature: Humidity: Cooling air: 0 to 45 oC (32 to 113 oF). Non-condensing, 10 to 95%. Able to flow around the OS-300 and through the air vents unobstructed. In particular, there must be a clearance of at least 25 mm (1 inch) between the air vents and nearby objects.

Power
The line (mains) should be able to supply power to the OS-300 as specified in the label on the unit.

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ML49480, Rev. 01 Installation

Chapter 2:

Check nameplate ratings on the OS-300 to assure there will be no overloading of supply circuits that could have an adverse effect on overcurrent protection and supply wiring. AC Source The AC power source (line/mains) should be able to supply power to the OS-300 according to the following specification: 100 to 120 Vac, 2 A, 60 Hz or 200 to 240 Vac, 1 A, 50 Hz The power cord for 115 Vac input from a power source must be a minimum-type SJT (SVT) 18/3, rated 250 Vac, 10 A with a maximum length of 4.5 m or 15 ft. One end must terminate in an IEC 320 attachment plug, the other end must terminate in a NEMA 5-15P plug. (The power cord supplied by MRV meets these requirements.) The power cord for 230 Vac input from a power source must be a minimum-type SJT (SVT) 18/3, rated 250 Vac, 10 A with a maximum length of 4.5 m or 15 ft. One end must terminate in an IEC 320 attachment plug, the other end must terminate as required by the recognized safety organization of the country in which it is installed. (The power cord supplied by MRV meets these requirements.) DC Source DC rated equipment must be installed in the following conditions: 1. The DC supply source to which the OS-300 is to be connected must be isolated from the alternating current source and reliably connected to earth or to a DC (SELV) source. 2. The OS-300 must be installed only in restricted access areas (Dedicated Equipment Rooms, Equipment Closets, or the like) in accordance with Articles 110-16, 110-17, and 110-18 of the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. 3. Input wiring to a terminal block must be routed and secured in such a manner that it is protected from damage and stress. Do not route wiring past sharp edges or moving parts. 4. A readily accessible disconnect device, with a 3 mm minimum contact gap shall be incorporated in the fixed wiring. 5. A listed circuit breaker suitable for protection of the branch circuit wiring and rated 60 Vdc minimum must be provided. Note To ensure continued operation even when the line (mains) power is cut off, it is recommended to connect the OS-300 through a UPS.

Grounding
Reliable grounding of the OS-300 must be maintained. Particular attention should be paid to supply connections when connecting to power strips, rather than to direct connections to the branch circuit.

Procedure
SFP Insertion
1. Choose the SFP receptacle into which the SFP is to be inserted. 2. Holding the SFP with the right side up, slide it about half-way into the SFP receptacle. 3. If the SFP has a latching mechanism, while holding the SFP with one hand gently release the latch with the other hand. Usually, the latch

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OS-300 User Manual

Product Version 1.0

handle is a wire frame around the SFP. To release the latch, swing down the wire frame. 4. With both thumbs pressed against the face edges of the SFP, gently slide it as far into the SFP receptacle as possible. Holding the SFP in this position, swing up the latch handle around the SFP in order to latch it.

Mounting
Rack 19-inch One OS-300 1. With four screws, fasten the two mounting brackets2 to the sides of the OS-300 as shown in Figure 5, below. 2. Mount the OS-300 in a 19-inch rack.

Figure 5: Fastening Brackets for Mounting an OS-300 in a 19-inch Rack Two OS-300s 1. With four screws, fasten one OS-300 on the left side of the tray as shown in Figure 6, below. 2. With two screws, fasten the spacer to the right side of the OS-300. 3. With four screws, fasten the second OS-300 on the right side of the tray as shown in Figure 6, below. 4. Mount the tray in a 19-inch rack.

Figure 6: Fastening Brackets for Mounting two OS-300s in a 19-inch Rack One OS-300 and One LDP100 1. With four screws, fasten the OS-300 on the left side of the tray as shown in Figure 7, below. 2. With two screws, fasten the spacer to the right side of the OS-300. With one screw, fasten the spacer to the tray. 3. With four screws, fasten the second OS-300 on the right side of the tray as shown in Figure 7, below. 4. Mount the tray in a 19-inch rack.

2

Either bracket may be mounted on either side.

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non-conductive static-free surface. Desktop Place the OS-300 on a flat. Mount the OS-300 in a 23-inch rack. Publication No. Rev. Figure 8: Fastening Brackets for Mounting an OS-300 in a 23-inch Rack Wall Fasten the wall bracket by inserting two flat-head philips screws (no longer than 3 mm) at two holes (having counter sinks) on the underside of the OS-300 as shown in Figure 9. Fix two wall screws 100 mm (4 inch) apart and hang the OS-300. stable. With four screws. below.mrv. fasten the two mounting brackets3 to the sides of the OS-300 as shown in Figure 8.ML49480. ML46852. Figure 9: Fastening Bracket for Mounting an OS-300 on a Wall Outdoor Cabinet For mounting the OS-300 in MRV’s outdoor cabinet. February 2007 URL: http://www. use the procedure described in the Outdoor Cabinets User Manual. connect the OS-300 to an grounding point at its butterfly-nut-on-screw located at the rear.com 33 . Grounding With an insulated copper wire of gage up to #18 AWG. 01 Installation Chapter 2: Figure 7: Fastening Brackets for Mounting an OS-300 + an LDP100 in a 19-inch Rack 23-inch 1. 3 Either bracket may be mounted on either side. 2.

UNIX station.mrv. Linux station. or SNMP NMS. Fiberoptic Ports Using fiberoptic cables connect each optical data port of the OS-300 to a DTE or DCE as shown in Figure 10. Craft Terminal/Emulator (For Out-of-band Management) With a null-modem RS-232 cable having an RJ45 8-pin male connector. 34 URL: http://www. below. connect the OS-300 to a TELNET or SNMP station in either of the following ways: − With a Category 5 cable (straight-wired or cross-wired) having an RJ45 8-pin male connector. connect the OS300’s RJ45 8-pin female connector marked EIA-232 to a craft terminal/emulator serial port as shown in Figure 11. page 28) to connect each OS-300 electrical data port to a DTE or DCE. Figure 11: ASCII Craft Terminal/Emulator Connection to OS-300 TELNET or SNMP Station As shown in Figure 12.0 Network Connection Data Equipment (DTE or DCE) Connect the LAN/WAN ports of the OS-300 to the data equipment with cables as follows: Electrical Ports Use a straight-wired or cross-wired cable (specified in the section 10/100/1000Base-T Ports. − With a fiberoptic cable.com February 2007 . TELNET station. below: Figure 10: Interconnecting an OS-300 Port and a DTE or DCE with a Fiberoptic Cable Management Station Connect at least one of the following to the OS-300: Craft terminal. at a 100/1000Base-X SFP port. as described below. at a 10/100/1000Base-T port.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. below.

com 35 . February 2007 URL: http://www. 01 Installation Chapter 2: Figure 12: TELNET or SNMP Station Connection to OS-300 Power Line Connection Connect the OS-300 Power Supplies to the line (mains) with the supplied power cords.ML49480.mrv. Rev.

Microsoft Window’s HyperTerminal or TeraTermPro). page 36. 01 Startup. Setup. If you are using a PC as a craft terminal emulator. connect it to the power source. page 46. Custom A setup can be changed using any of the management stations described in the section Management Equipment. run the emulation software application (e. the OS-300 becomes fully operational as a basic switch that can perform Layer 2 switching between its ports. At the end of the tests. The connection of management stations is described in the section Management Station. Rev.com 36 . Set up the craft terminal/emulator as shown in Table 2.mrv. page 34. Provider bridges. initially using a craft terminal. page 43. Use of the CLI is described in Chapter 4: CLI Management. which last a few seconds. and Operation Chapter 3: Chapter 3: Startup. The required setup of the craft terminal is described in the section Local Management (Craft Terminal).g. and Link aggregation. described in the relevant parts of the manual. page 29. Additional setup using its CLI is required to activate specific functions of the OS-300. Traffic policing. The section Invoking a CLI Command. shows how to invoke CLI commands. they can be restored as described in the section Restoration of the Factory Default Configuration. Make sure that a connection exists between them. Management Local Management (Craft Terminal) The interconnection between the management station and the OS-300 EIA-232 port is shown in the section Craft Terminal/Emulator (For Out-of-band Management). below. Setup. Examples of such functions are: VLANs. page 38. page 34. as follows February 2007 URL: http://www. Setup Operation Default The OS-300 is set up at the factory before it is shipped out. If the factory default settings are changed. This causes the OS-300 to undergo a sequence of operationality and initialization tests. Each default setting can be changed by invoking its associated CLI command. The available functions and their activation are described in their respective sections/chapters..ML49480. assign an IP address to the OS-300. Table 2: ASCII Craft Terminal/Emulator Setup for CLI Management Transmit/Receive Rate (Baud) 38400 Data Length (Bits) 8 Parity None Stop Bits 1 Flow Control None Remote Management (TELNET or SNMP) For remote management setup. and Operation Startup To start up the OS-300. The default setup is a collection of settings assumed by the OS-300 when settings are not assigned by the administrator.

and Operation Chapter 3: 1. 3.. or with a management station (e. Booting in progress ON-Green Upload in progress Per Port L (Link) ON-Green ON-Amber OFF ON-Green OFF A (Link) Port link integrity to network OK and port speed is 1000 Mbps. Port link integrity to network OK and port speed 10/100 Mbps. page 36. Port link integrity to network broken or faulty.255.57. Default: Subnet mask for address class. 2.255. Linux host. page 34.com 37 . 01 Startup. Press Enter to assign the IP address to the OS-300. TELNET or UNIX station. Type the command: IP Setup [<ipaddress>] [<ipmask>] [<ipgateway>] [<vid>] Where.38. Its operation can be monitored by interpreting the status of its LEDs with the aid of Table 3.0. Further. or SNMP NMS). Example >ip setup 192. [<ipgateway>]: Default IP gateway. Default: 0.mrv. Rev.0.ML49480. [<vid>]: VLAN ID. Port receiving or transmitting. February 2007 URL: http://www. craft terminal. Press Enter and.208 255. if required.38. [<ipmask>]: IP subnet mask.57. Ensure that the OS-300 is connected to the craft terminal as described in the section Craft Terminal/Emulator (For Out-of-band Management).0. [<ipaddress>]: IP address for the OS-300.96 47 IP Mode enabled > Operation The OS-300 becomes fully operational within a few seconds after being powered ON. type the password to get the CLI prompt ‘>’. No power at the entrance to the OS-300 system.0 192. 1-4094 Default: 1).g. ensure that the craft terminal is set up as described in Table 2. below. Port neither receiving nor transmitting. Setup. Table 3: Front Panel LEDs Level Global LED PWR (Power) STAT (Status) Status ON-Green OFF BLINKING ON-Amber Significance Power into the OS-300 system OK. Normal operation.

Password. Retype the password and press Enter . Additional basic settings and supplementary settings may be required for the OS-300. refer to their respective sections/chapters. Link aggregation. Ensure that an emulation software application (e. For security. Press Enter to enter a CLI session. Type Console and press Enter . Clock time. page 34. page 36. Type Password and press Enter . and OS-300 site location. you can set a password that will be required in order to access the OS-300 in the future.g. − Login First Time To access the OS-300 for the first time in order to manage it: 1. Examples of such settings are: Traffic policing. the setup is partial and allows only basic Layer 2 switching between the ports. 2. invoke CLI commands. Examples of such settings are: IP Address. 4. For other settings. c. login.) The OS-300 is shipped out of the factory already set up.) 5.ML49480.g. logout. 3. b. refer to the MegaVision® Network Management User Manual. − Perform basic custom settings of the OS-300 using CLI commands. Type a password consisting of a string of up to 16 characters and press Enter . Rev. However. To set a password: a. e.mrv.. etc.. Ensure that a craft terminal is connected to the OS-300 as described in the section Craft Terminal/Emulator (For Out-of-band Management).com 38 . The basic settings can be performed with the aid of this chapter. Microsoft Window’s HyperTerminal or TeraTermPro) is running. For SNMP management using a PC running MRV’s Web-Based Network Management application. d. 01 CLI Management Chapter 4: Chapter 4: CLI Management General This chapter shows how to: Use the OS-300 CLI. (Supplementary custom settings of the OS-300 using CLI commands are described in their respective sections/chapters. (Entry into a CLI session is indicated by the appearance of the prompt ‘>’ on the screen. use functional keys in processing CLI commands. Ensure that the craft terminal is setup as described in the section Local Management (Craft Terminal). Example >Console Console>Password Password: ****** February 2007 URL: http://www. and Port mirroring.

which by default. 01 CLI Management Re-enter Password: ****** Console> Chapter 4: Local Local management access is. Ensure that a TELNET or SNMP station is connected to the OS-300 as described in the section TELNET or SNMP Station. This typeface represents information provided by the system.) February 2007 URL: http://www. Part of a command. enter the password for the OS-300. Changes the current access level to the Top level. describes the conventions used for CLI commands as presented in the manual.mrv. Executes the command if complete. Conventions for CLI Commands Table 4. page 53. type exit and press Enter . Ensure that an IP address is assigned to the OS-300 as described in the section Remote Management (TELNET or SNMP). page 34. To access the OS-300 locally for management: 1.ML49480. Rev. If required. Ensure that management application (TELNET or SNMP) is running. Displays earlier invoked commands in the current CLI session. (Up to 20 of the most recently invoked commands can be displayed. 2. Enter the password for the OS-300 if required. Table 4: Conventions for CLI Commands Convention Courier Bold Courier Argument Description This typeface represents information provided to the system. below. page 38. 4.com 39 . Logout To logout. enabled. To access the OS-300 remotely for management: 1. is enabled. Follow steps 1 to 4 given in the section First Time. For security reasons. 3. Remote Remote Management access to the OS-300 can be gained via an OS-300 inband IP interface. 2. page 36. by default. it may be disabled as described in the section Disabling Local Management Login. Functional Keys for CLI Commands Table 5: Functional Keys for CLI Commands Key " ! Backspace Enter / or U P # Function Moves the cursor left across typed characters. Deletes characters in the left direction. Moves the cursor right across typed characters.

Enter the Top level. type a slash (/) and the group name. Example >? Commands at top level: System . refer to the section Viewing. page 41. The system prompt appears with the group name to signify entry into the group level. Example Console> /System System> Viewing CLI Groups To view the groups of commands available together with their description: 1.VLAN commands 40 URL: http://www. Example System>Up > To enter any Group level from any other Group level.Port commands MAC . Moves the cursor to the end of a command line (provided the craft terminal supports this function). To display the command groups. Type ?. To display the commands. invoke the command Up or /. At a Group level ? displays the CLI commands in the group. page 40.SNMP commands Port . type the group name and press Enter . CLI Hierarchy The CLI is hierarchical with the following levels: • Top level • Group levels At the Top level ? displays the CLI command groups. To enter a Group level from the Top level. (The Top level is indicated by the prompt ‘>’.) Moves the cursor to the beginning of a command string (provided the craft terminal supports this function). Example >System System> To return to the Top level from any Group level.com February 2007 . Help ? is used to display the available command groups and the commands in a group. 3. (Up to 20 of the most recently invoked commands can be displayed.MAC commands VLAN .) 2. Press Enter .0 $ Home End Displays later invoked commands in the current CLI session.Console commands SNMP .mrv.System commands Console .OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. refer to the section CLI Commands.

2. Press Enter . 2. 4. Type the name of the group containing the CLI command to be viewed. the commands in a group together with their description can be viewed as follows: List of Commands The list of commands available in any group can be displayed from the Top or Group level as follows: From the Top Level 1. From the Top Level 1. Type a space. Rev.Cross Connect commands QoS commands Mirror commands IP commands Dot1x commands Chapter 4: CLI Commands On accessing the CLI. Example Console>? Commands at Console level: Console Configuration Console Password [<password>] Console Timeout [<timeout>] Console Prompt [<prompt string>] Console State [enable|disable] Console Events [clear] -----Up. Type the name of the group containing the CLI command to be viewed. 3.mrv.com 41 . 01 CLI Management LAG LACP Cross Connect QoS Mirror IP Dot1x > Link Aggregation commands IEEE 802. Example >Console ? Commands at Console level: Console Configuration Console Password [<password>] Console Timeout [<timeout>] Console Prompt [<prompt string>] Console State [enable|disable] Console Events [clear] -----Up. q > From a Group Level 1. Type the command. Type ?. 2.ML49480. q Console> Details on a Specific Command Details on specific command can be displayed from the Top or Group level. 3. February 2007 URL: http://www. Type ?. Type a space.3ad Link Aggregation commands . Press Enter .

The value zero disables timeout. 2. Example Console>Configuration Console Configuration: Timeout: 0 42 URL: http://www. the group name. 5. Type ?. [<timeout>]: Timeout value in seconds.mrv. type the group name and press Enter . Type a space. The value zero disables timeout. and press Enter .com February 2007 . Press Enter . Example >/Console Configuration Console Configuration: Timeout: 0 Prompt: > State: Enable > From a Group Level To view the configuration of the OS-300 for any command from a Group level. Console> Configuration The configuration of the OS-300 for any command can be viewed as follows: From the Top Level To view the configuration of the OS-300 for any command from the Top level. Example Here. the command (without its arguments). > From a Group Level 1.60-10000. Type the command. type a slash (/). 4. Type ?.60-10000. [<timeout>]: Timeout value in seconds. 6. Example 2 Console>Timeout ? Syntax: Console Timeout [<timeout>] Description: Set or show the console inactivity timeout in seconds. Press Enter . 0.OS-300 User Manual 4. 3. Type a space. 0. he timeout command >console timeout ? Syntax: Console Timeout [<timeout>] Product Version 1.0 Description: Set or show the console inactivity timeout in seconds.

The range is 1 to 4. one. The keyword ‘all’ can be used to specify all ports. sizes of interframe gap and preamble are not included in the rate. 2. The keyword ‘none’ can be used to specify no VLAN ID. Port) or two words (e. Format: ‘hh-hh-hh-hh-hh-hh’. 01 CLI Management Prompt: > State: Enable Console> Chapter 4: Command Arguments The following table describes the general arguments used in CLI command syntaxes. Note! For Stapleford™ and Heathrow-III™ bucket rate is linerate.4-6.1X switch authenticator. or several arguments. and 4 to 6.ML49480. The argument appears in brackets. February 2007 URL: http://www. Table 6: Keywords/Arguments in CLI Commands port portlist Port ID. ‘hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh. Example: To specify ports 1.) and/or dash (-) separators. Valid values are either displayed or can be determined from the description of the argument. A value must be typed instead of the argument. One or more VLAN IDs with comma (. The value may be just a number or a string consisting of letters. enter 1. It is a decimal number in the range 1-4095.e. Leaky bucket rate in Kbps [0-1000000k] or Mbps [0-1000m).) and/or dash (-) separators. The classes offered depend on the chip and the number of queues: 2 queues: low|high 4 queues: low|normal|medium|high One or more user groups with comma (. macaddress vid vidlist UDP port rate class grouplist shared secret Invoking a CLI Command General A CLI command consists of a name and none. One or more port IDs with comma (. Example: 00-00-24-F1-02-03 VLAN ID.mrv.’ or ‘hhhhhhhhhhhh’. The keyword ‘none’ can be used to specify no port. For OS-306 it can be any number in the range 1-6. Rev.g.. UDP Port for the external RADIUS server. An argument must be preceded by a blank space. Commands are not case sensitive. Internal class of service. Cross Connect). number digits. and other symbols.) and/or dash (-) separators. i. The keyword ‘all’ can be used to specify all VLAN IDs. A text string used by a RADIUS server to authenticate the request to access the OS-300 802.com 43 .2. whereas for Stanstead™ and Elstree™ bucket rate is payload-rate. For OS-304 it can be any number in the range 1-4.e. Example: To specify VLAN IDs 1 and 4 to 6.. enter 1.4-6. The name may be one word (e. hh represents a hexadecimal number in the range 0x00 to 0xFF... sizes of interframe gap and preamble are included in the rate.g. MAC Address. i.

Tarzan). the command (e. Restore Default).g. a command can be invoked that belongs to same group or to a different group. 2. the command System Name is invoked by entering just sys nam.g. Name). Same Group A command is to be invoked without the group name.. Example >/sys nam Tarzan > Setting the CLI Prompt To add a string to the CLI prompt: 1. To invoke a command from the Top level: 1. Example >System System>Name Tarzan System> Different Group A command is to be invoked with the group name. System) containing the command by typing the name of the group and pressing Enter . 2. Type a slash (/). To invoke a command belonging to the same group: 1. 44 URL: http://www. below.mrv. the name of the group (e. and the command (e.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.. From the Top Level From the Top level. System).. Type the command (e.com February 2007 .0 Procedure Any CLI command can be invoked from the Top level or a Group level. To invoke a command belonging to a different group: 1. 3. Press Enter . 2. Type the name of the group containing the command (e.... Press Enter . Press Enter .g. and its argument/s (e.g. System). Enter the level of the group (e. In the example..g. Example Console> /System Restore Default System> Quick Entry of a CLI Command For convenience.. Name) and its argument/s (e. to invoke a command it is sufficient to type only the first few letters of the command that are different from the other commands.g. Tarzan). Enter the Console group level.g. Example >System Name Tarzan > From a Group Level From a Group level.g. a command in any group is invoked by entering its group name together with the command.

To set a timeout time after which logout will be automatically executed: 1. Invoke the command Timeout [<timeout>] where.mrv. Enter the Console group 2. The password check may be disabled by setting the password to an empty string. Enter a password consisting of a string of up to 16 characters.com 45 . Enter the Console group 2. no timeout) Example >Console Console>Timeout 200 Console> CLI Password Access to the OS-300 can be restricted by setting a CLI password. in which case any password entered at login will be accepted. q Console>Password Password: ****** February 2007 URL: http://www.ML49480. 01 CLI Management Chapter 4: 2. Setting a CLI Password To set a CLI password: 1. and logout is not executed even when the OS300 is not being managed. [<prompt string>]: Prompt (string up to 10 characters long) Example >Console Console>Prompt Tiger> ConsoleTiger>Up Tiger> Setting CLI Logout Timeout By default. Range 60 to 10000. Default: 0 (i.. [<timeout>]: Timeout in seconds.e. The user will be required to enter this password at the next login. Reenter the password. Invoke the command: Prompt [<prompt string>] where. Example >Console Console>? Commands at Console level: Console Configuration Console Password [<password>] Console Timeout [<timeout>] Console Prompt [<prompt string>] Console State [enable|disable] Console Events [clear] -----Up. Rev. 4. the CLI session is preserved. Invoke the command password and press Enter . 3.

Press Enter twice. 0 is year 2000.com February 2007 . Range: 1-31. enter a empty string in place of the existing password as follows: 1. Press Enter . Enter the Console group. 3. [<Year>]: Year. 1. [<Hr>]: Current hour (0-24) [<Min>]: Current minute (0-59) [<Sec>]: Current second (0-59) 3. The OS-300 will now be accessible with any (even an empty string) password. Range: 1-12. Press Enter . the OS-300 will re-initialize with the new values. [Day]: Day of the week. 2. 2. Enter the system group. where. where. Range: 0-99. After restoring the factory default parameters. 3.mrv. Type date.0 Re-enter Password: ****** Console> Removing the CLI Password To remove password protection. [<Month>]: Month. 2. and the date in the format [<Date>] [<Month>] [<Year>] [Day]. 46 URL: http://www. Example System> time 13 47 00 13:47:00 System> Restoration of the Factory Default Configuration You can restore all the OS-300 parameters to their factory default values. Date To configure/change the date: 1. Example System> date 17 9 06 5 Thu Oct 17 2006 System> Time To configure/change the local time: 1. [<Date>]: Day of the month. Enter system group. Range: 1-7. Type time and the time in the format [<Hr>] [<Min>] [<Sec>]. Enter system group.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. Invoke the command password and press Enter . or you can restore all parameters but leave the current IP address unchanged.

e. Enter System group. up to 20 most recent MAC entries in the Learn Table can be viewed. To view Learn Table entries per a specific TAG: 1. Viewing To see the Learn Table parameters and summary information: 1. Enter MAC group. 2. Enter the MAC group. Invoke the command: Restore Default [keepIP] where. Learn Table Definition The Learn Table is a map of currently connected stations4 to ports. The OS-300 can maintain a MAC table per VLAN. *** Activating new configuration. Example >System System>Restore Default keepIP *** Restoring to default configuration. Invoke the command: Table <vidlist> where.... Invoke the command Reboot..mrv.com 47 . February 2007 URL: http://www... 1.ML49480. Invoke the command Configuration.. [keepIP]: Leave the OS-300 IP address unchanged. each entry includes the port number and the VID of the VLAN on which it was learned. 4 The stations are identified by their MAC address. System> Chapter 4: Rebooting Rebooting restarts the OS-300 with the new image (operative firmware) if one was uploaded. *** Restored to default configuration. <vidlist>: List of VLAN IDs To lookup a specific MAC address with a specific VLAN ID: 1. The Learn Table is dynamically updated and can maintain as many as 8K unicast entries (MAC addresses) for an OS-300. 2. i. Enter MAC group. Example >MAC MAC>configuration MAC Configuration: Entries in permanent table: NONE Agetime: 0 State: enabled MAC> Per VID. 2. 01 CLI Management 2. Rev.

Invoke the command: Lookup <macaddress> where. 010203ABCDEF. <macaddress>: MAC address to lookup. To lookup a specific MAC address without relating to a specific TAG: 1. To change the aging time: 1.. invoke the command: 48 URL: http://www. [<agetime>]: Aging time in seconds. invoke the command: Agetime 0 Disabling Learning Logging of entries in the Learn Table can be disabled with respect to pre-specified ports. String of 12 hex digits. [<vid>]: VLAN ID. The default aging time is 300 seconds. (e. or moved to another location.. Invoke the command: Agetime [<agetime>] where. Invoke the command: Lookup <macaddress> [<vid>] where.0 2. dashes or colons can be used for convenience as separators between digit pairs (e.g. 2. The aging time must be a number that is a multiple of 10. (e.g. Invoke the command: Learning State <portlist> disable where. 01-02-03-ABCD-EF or 01:02:03:AB:CD:EF). Default: 300 (seconds). <macaddress>: MAC address to lookup.com February 2007 . To enable MAC learning with respect to specific ports. String of 12 hex digits. <portlist>: List of ports. Default: all.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. Aging Aging is a mechanism that clears entries of stations that are idle. To disable aging enter 0. Example MAC> agetime 370 MAC> To disable aging.) Optionally. dashes or colons can be used for convenience as separators between digit pairs (e. Enter MAC group. 2.mrv.g. To disable learning MAC entries with respect to specific ports: 1.. Range: 10 to 65535. Enter MAC group. Range: 1-4094.. 2. 01-02-03-ABCD-EF or 01:02:03:AB:CD:EF). Enter MAC group. shutdown. Default: 1. 010203ABCDEF.g. Example MAC> learn state 2 disable MAC> Enbling Learning Logging of entries in the Learn Table can be enabled with respect to pre-specified ports.) Optionally.

. [<vid>]: VLAN ID. Enter MAC group.com 49 . 2.. 2. 01-0203-AB-CD-EF or 01:02:03:AB:CD:EF). dashes or colons can be used for convenience as separators between digit pairs (e. Enter MAC group. 01 CLI Management 1. Invoke the command: Learning State portlist enable where. 2. 2. 01-02-03-ABCD-EF or 01:02:03:AB:CD:EF). <macaddress>: MAC address to log. Default: all.) Optionally. <portlist>: List ports.) Optionally. Example MAC> lt Delete 7b:22:c9:3d:5e:ab 1 30 MAC> Flushing To delete all existing entries in the Learn Table: 1. <macaddress>: MAC address to remove from log. Invoke the command: Delete <macaddress> [vid] where. dashes or colons can be used for convenience as separators between digit pairs (e. String of 12 hex digits..g. Example MAC> learn state 2 enable MAC> Chapter 4: Manually Logging Entries Entries can be manually logged in the Learn Table as follows: 1. invoke the command: 1. Invoke the command: Flush Example MAC> Flush MAC> February 2007 URL: http://www. Default: all.ML49480. 010203ABCDEF.g. none for no ports. Invoke the command: Add <macaddress> <portlist> [<vid>] where. Default: 1.g.g. [<vid>]: VLAN ID. String of 12 hex digits. Range: 1-4094. Enter MAC group.. Example MAC> lt Add 7b:22:c9:3d:5e:ab 1 30 MAC> To remove a logged entry. Range: 1-4094. Enter MAC group. (e. <portlist>: List of ports. 010203ABCDEF. Rev.mrv. (e.

2.) Enabling/Disabling SNMP access is enabled by default. Invoke the command: Events Example Console>events Events Log Monday. Enter the Console group. Jan 22.g. They can be viewed with a management station or an SNMP browser. 2007 Type: informational Monday.com February 2007 . 50 URL: http://www. Invoke the command: Events clear SNMP Management Requirements For SNMP management of the OS-300.. 2.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. Viewing To view event log messages: 1. Default: Show SNMP mode. 2007 Type: informational Console> 12:51:10 Description: 12:51:10 Description: 12:51:09 Description: 12:51:09 Description: Link Down Link Down Link Down Link Down Port: 4 Port: 3 Port: 2 Port: 1 Clearing To clear the Event log: 1. Jan 22. Jan 22. Jan 22. SNMP NMS IP address.mrv. 2. Enter the SNMP group. 2007 Type: informational Monday. Enter the Console group. etc. Invoke the command State [enable|disable]. community names.0 Events Log Definition Severe system events such as link disruption or system restart are logged in the permanent memory. you need to: • Verify connectivity between the OS-300 and the SNMP manager • Enable SNMP management • Configure SNMP parameters (e. [enable|disable]: Enable/disable SNMP access. To enable/disable the SNMP access: 1. where. Up to 30 most recent events are logged. 2007 Type: informational Monday.

Example SNMP> Readcommunity Public SNMP> To configure the write access community string: 1. Example SNMP> Writecommunity private SNMP> To show the read access community: 1. 01 CLI Management Chapter 4: Commands All SNMP commands are accessible at the snmp group. Default: Show current read community string. Rev.com 51 . CLI commands can be invoked to perform the following SNMP management functions: − System Identification − Access Control − Trap Generation − Display Access Control The OS-300 can be used to perform access control with the following SNMP version 2c SNMP Version 1/2c General Access control in SNMPv1/2c is based both on Community String and on Source IP Address of the request. Management Functions In snmp group. Configuration To configure the read access community string: 1. Enter the SNMP group 2. Default: Show current write community string. They are used to authenticate SNMP requests to monitor and/or configure the OS-300.mrv. Enter the SNMP group 2. access is permitted. Invoke the command: February 2007 URL: http://www. Only if the string that is present in the packet matches the one in the OS-300 database. [<community string>]: New read community string. Community Strings Description Community strings (names) function like passwords. There is a community string for read access and another for write access.ML49480. [<community string>]: New write community string. Invoke the command: Readcommunity [<community string>] where. Enter the SNMP group 2. Each SNMP request packet that is received is checked for a community string. Invoke the command: Writecommunity [<community string>] where.

The OS-300 can be configured to send traps to a pre-specified IP destination address (trap host).mrv.90. <IP Address>: IP address to which traps are to be sent. Enter the SNMP group.136. 2. an SNMP authentication failure due to an incorrect community string. Default: Show current community string. Default: Show trap configuration.62 SNMP> Trap Community Settings To set the community string for traps: 1. Trap Host Display To display specification of the trap host: 1. detection of an interface link status change. 2. etc. A trap may be a cold or warm reset. Enter SNMP group. Invoke the command: Writecommunity Example SNMP> Writecommunity Writecommunity: private SNMP> Trap Generation General Traps are SNMP packets sent by the OS-300 agent to an SNMP manager when certain events external to the OS-300 are detected or when the condition of the OS-300 has changed significantly. Invoke the command: Trap [<IP Address>] where. [<community string>]: New community string. Trap Host Specification To specify the host that is to receive traps: 1. Invoke the command: Trapcommunity [<community string>] where. Enter the SNMP group 2. 2.OS-300 User Manual Readcommunity Example SNMP> Readcommunity Readcommunity: public SNMP> Product Version 1. Invoke the command: trap Example SNMP> trap IP: 194. 52 URL: http://www. Enter SNMP group.com February 2007 .0 To show the write access community: 1.

February 2007 URL: http://www. At the prompt ‘>’. make sure that the in-band IP interface exists and is enabled in the OS-300. management connectivity to the OS-300 will be lost! To disable local management login: 1. 2. 01 CLI Management Example SNMP> Trapommunity Public SNMP> Chapter 4: Viewing To view whether SNMP access is enabled or disabled: 1. page 38. 2007 Current Time: 14:48:21 Die Temperature: 66 C Ambient Temperature: 50 C MAC address: 00-0f-bd-00-29-e2 SNMP: enabled LOS Protection: Disable System> Disabling Local Management Login CAUTION! Prior to disabling local management login. (The procedure for creating and enabling this interface is given in the section Enabling an In-band IP Interface. Enter System group. type: Console State Disable.) If no such interface exists when local management login is disabled. 3. Invoke the command: Configuration Example System>configuration System Configuration: Name: S/W Version: OS910-4B 1. Log into the OS-300 as described in the section Login.ML49480.com 53 . Jan 22.03 Compile Date: Jan 15 2007 09:13:19 H/W Version: ?. Rev. 2. page 73.mrv.? Current Date: Monday. Press Enter to disable local management login.

Invoke the command: Configuration [<portlist>] February 2007 URL: http://www.ML49480. Enter Port group. Rev. each LAN/WAN port is enabled. 2. 01 Ports Chapter 5: Chapter 5: Ports General This chapter shows how to configure and monitor the physical ports of the OS-300 in respect to the following functions: − Enabling/Disabling − Display status − Speed − Duplexity − Flow Control − Maximum MTU size − Tagged/untagged mode − Link Protection (The commands for this function are under the System group) − Link Reflection − Statistics − Digital Diagnostics − Virtual Cable Diagnostics (VCD) Port Enabling/Disabling Default By default. Default: Show state. 2.com 54 . [enable|disable]: Enable or disable port(s). To enable/disable one or more ports: 1. Invoke the following command: State [<portlist>] [enable|disable] where. Default: all. Example >Port Port> state 1 disable Port> Port Status To view the configuration status of one or more ports: 1. [<portlist>]: List of ports.mrv. Custom Each port can be enabled or disabled independently of other ports. Enter Port group.

The options are: 10hdx: 10 Mbit/s. Note: SFP ports cannot be configured to 10 Mbit/s Example Port> Mode 1. [<portlist>]: List of ports [<mode>]: Port speed and duplexity. 100fdx: 100 Mbit/s.ML49480. Rev.2 Port 1: auto Down Port 2 auto 1000fdx Port> February 2007 URL: http://www. 01 Ports where. Default: Show current mode. page 26.) Custom The speed and duplexity of each port can be set independently of other ports. half duplex. full duplex. full duplex. full duplex. The description will show the speed/duplex configured for each port. as well as the actual speed/duplex set as a result of a negotiation with the link partner Port> Mode 1. invoke the command: Mode [<portlist>] [<mode>] where.2 100fdx Port> Viewing To view the speed and duplex configurations for ports. auto: Auto-negotiation. Default: all. 1000fdx: 1 Gbit/s. (Only for Copper ports) 10fdx: 10 Mbit/s. (Only for Copper ports) 100hdx: 100 Mbit/s.com 55 . [<portlist>]: List of ports. invoke the mode command for the ports.mrv. To set a speed and duplexity for one or more ports. (LAN/WAN ports are shown in Figure 3. Example >Port Port>Configuration 2-4 Port Configuration: Port State Mode 2: enabled auto 3: enabled auto 4: enabled auto Chapter 5: Flow control disabled disabled disabled Link Down Down Down MaxFrame 1518 1518 1518 Excessive Collisions Drop: disabled Port> Port Speed and Duplexity Default The default speed and duplexity of an electrical LAN/WAN port is according to autonegotiation. half duplex.

Invoke the command: Flow Control [<portlist>] [enable|disable] where.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. [<portlist>]: List of ports. Default: all. Example >Port Port>MaxFrame 2 3000 Port> To view the MTU of a group of ports: 1. Enter the Port group 2. Example Port>Configuration 2 Port Configuration: Port State Mode 2: enabled auto Flow control disabled Link Down MaxFrame 3000 Excessive Collisions Drop: disabled Port> Port Flow Control The OS-300 ports can be independently configured to handle congestion by either dropping packets or by flow control PAUSE frames signaling. Default: Show maximum frame size. Default: all. Default: all. [<framesize>|reset]: MTU (maximum frame size) in bytes or reset to 1518 bytes. Default: Show flow control mode. Enter the Port group 2.mrv. [<portlist>]: List of ports. The size can be selected from the range 64-9600 bytes. An MTU size can be set for each port independently. the OS-300 generates PAUSE frames when necessary to ensure that frames are never dropped. [<portlist>]: List of ports. Range: 1518-9600. [enable|disable]: Enable/disable flow control.0 Port Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) Definition Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) is the largest physical packet size (including jumbo packet sizes) that the OS-300 can forward. When enabled.com February 2007 . To set the MTU to a group of ports: 1. Invoke the command: MaxFrame [<portlist>] [<framesize>|reset] where. Example Port> flow control 1 enable Port> To view the flow control state of a group of ports: 56 URL: http://www. Enter the Port group 2. Invoke the command: MaxFrame [<portlist>] where. To set the Flow control to a group of ports: 1.

Invoke the command: LOS protection enable|disable Example >System System>LOS Protection enable To view the configuration. Ensure that the two trunk ports to be set in Link Protection mode (i. the traffic will go through the primary port. Enter the System group. primary port and backup port) are trunked.. traffic is switched back to the primary port.) 3. To set the Link protection primary port: 1. the traffic will resume on the primary port when its link state will become active.e. Default: all. invoke the command LOS protection. Invoke the command: LOS preemption enable|disable If the preemption mode is enabled. Enter the Port group 2. the backup (secondary) port takes over the tasks of the primary port. (The procedure for trunking ports is given in the section Configuration. Rev. Fail-over time is less than 50 millisec.ML49480. Example System>LOS Protection LOS Protection: Enable System> To configure OS Preemption mode: 1. Enter the System group. Depending on the preempt mode. 2.com 57 . [<portlist>]: List of ports. February 2007 URL: http://www. the Link Protection (dual-homing) function is used to set the two WAN ports to backup each other. Example Port> flow control 1. Invoke the command: LOS primary port On system initialization. To configure Link Protection: 1. Invoke the command: Flow Control [<portlist>] where.2 Port 1: Enabled Port 2: Disabled Chapter 5: WAN Ports Link Protection (LOS) Referring to Figure 13. when the link on the port is restored. 2. Enter the System group.mrv. page 82. 2. 01 Ports 1. When the primary port fails.

mrv. More than one downlink may be assigned to an uplink port. Figure 14 shows one downlink port assigned to each uplink port.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.com February 2007 . Figure 14: Link Reflection Data Path 58 URL: http://www.0 Figure 13: Link Protection Data Path Port Link Reflection (LIN) Referring to Figure 14. A downlink port can be assigned to only one uplink port. the Link Reflection (LIN) function downs the link at the downlink (user/LAN) ports (that are assigned to the uplink port) if the link at the uplink (network/WAN) port fails.

mrv. CO. CO. Near End 4. There are two possible modes: Near and Far.com 59 . CO. Far End February 2007 URL: http://www. User Interface. Near Loopback Mode In the near end loopback mode. 01 Ports To enable Link Reflection: 1. To allow reestablishment of connectivity. Note The frames are also sent to the MAC interface.ML49480. Rev. [<portlist>]: List of ports. Near End 2. User Interface. loopback mode can be limited by a timeout parameter in the loopback command (described in the section Port Loopback Configuration. Network Interface. page 63). Far End 3. the data transmitted by the OS-300 are looped back to the switch MAC interface. auto-negotiation must first be disabled on the port. Invoke the command: SFP LIN <sfp_port> [enable|disable] [<portlist>] where. Loopback Topologies In order to fully test the OS-300 in a CO-CPE connection. [enable|disable]: Enable/Disable LIN. Port>SFP LIN 3 enable 1 Port>SFP LIN 4 enable 2 Port> Port Loopback The OS-300 PHY interfaces can be tested in a loopback mode. the frames are looped back and sent out on the line. Example Chapter 5: The example below is a LIN configuration between uplink (WAN or network) port 3 and downlink (LAN or user) port 1 and another LIN configuration between uplink port 4 and downlink port 2. Enter the Port group. the link partner sends traffic to the OS-300 port (Copper or Fiber) in order to test the transmit and receive data path. Note To perform near loopback. 2. but are dropped. CO. Invocation of the loopback command from a remote management may result in loss of communication with the OS300. Performing a loopback on a port via a remote management interface may cause loss of connectivity to that management port. Before reaching the MAC interface. Network Interface. the following eight loopback topologies can be set up: 1. Far loopback Mode In the far loopback mode. <sfp_port>: Uplink SFP Port number.

com February 2007 . User Interface. Network Interface. Near End 8. Network Interface. Far End The topologies are described below. User Interface.mrv. CPE.0 Figure 15: Loopback at Near End of User Interface of CO Far End Figure 16: Loopback at Far End of User Interface of CO 60 URL: http://www. CPE. Far End 7. Near End 6. CPE. CPE. CO User Interface Near End Product Version 1.OS-300 User Manual 5.

mrv. 01 Ports Network Interface Near End Chapter 5: Figure 17: Loopback at Near End of Network Interface of CO Far End Figure 18: Loopback at Far End of Network Interface of CO CPE Near End Figure 19: Loopback at Near End of User Interface of CPE February 2007 URL: http://www.com 61 . Rev.ML49480.

mrv.0 Figure 20: Loopback at Far End of User Interface of CPE Network Interface Near End Figure 21: Loopback at Near End of Network Interface of CPE Far End Figure 22: Loopback at Far End of Network Interface of CPE 62 URL: http://www.OS-300 User Manual Far End Product Version 1.com February 2007 .

[<portlist>]: List of Ports. Example Port>statistics 2 Port 2: Receive Total ------------Rx Packets: Rx Octets: Rx Broad. Rev. [<timeout>]: Loopback test time in seconds. Invoke the command: Port Loopback [<portlist>] [none|near|far] [<timeout>] where.and Multicast Rx Error Packets Port> 0 0 0 0 Tx Tx Tx Tx Transmit Total -------------Packets: Octets: Broad. Example Port> loopback 1 far 90 Port> Statistics Viewing To view statistical information on one or more ports: 1. Default: all. none: Disable the loopback on the specified ports. Default: 0. far: Set a far-end loopback on the specified ports. Enter the Port group.e.ML49480. Enter Port group. 2. [none|near|far]: Loopback mode. Default: Show statistics.. Invoke the command: Statistics [<portlist>] [clear] where.and Multicast Error Packets 0 0 0 0 Clear To clear the statistical counters of one or more ports: 1. statistics [<portlist>] [clear] [<portlist>]: List of ports. near: Set a Near-end loopback on the specified ports. 2. Default: Show statistics. February 2007 URL: http://www. i. Default: all.mrv. [clear]: Clear port statistics. 01 Ports Chapter 5: Port Loopback Configuration To configure a loopback on a port for any of the topologies described in section Topologies. Enter the Port group. page 59: 1. [<clear>]: Clear port statistics. Invoke the command: where. 2. Default: Show loopback mode. no timeout.com 63 . [<portlist>]: List of ports. Default: all.

only one CLI command needs to be invoked. Some of the fault types detectable are: − − − − Opens Shorts Bad connectors Impedance mismatch 64 URL: http://www.004 ************************ Copper Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) General Copper TDR (or VCD) is a tool for testing an electrical data cable connected to a copper port for faults at the OSI Layer 1.com February 2007 . Serial encoding mechanism is 8B10B.0 Digital Diagnostics To view information on the parameters of SFPs in ports: 1. The tool identifies an electrical data cable fault type as well as its location accurate to 2 m (6. Connector code is LC.00 nm. SFP Digital Diagnostics: (Port 1) ************************************* Description Real-Time Value -------------------. 2. Transceiver subcode is 1000Base-SX.836 TX Power (dBm)/(mW): -5.5 ft).290 RX Power (dBm)/(mW): -23. Example Port> sfp-info 3 SFP ports internal EEPROM data =============================== SFP EEPROM Diagnostics: (Port 1) ************************************* Identifier is SFP. The nominal bit rate is 2100 Megabits/sec. It applies for cables that are longer than 10 meters (33 feet). Vendor PN is FTRJ8519P1BNL Vendor revision is A Nominal transmitter output wavelength at room temperature is 850. Invoke the command: SFP Info [<portlist>] where.OS-300 User Manual Example Port> statistics 1-4 clear Port> Product Version 1.--------------Temperature (C)/(F): 44/111 Voltage (V): 3.8/0. [<portlist>]: List of Ports. Default: all. Enter the Port group.mrv.2998 TX Bias (mA): 4. Vendor name is FINISAR CORP. To perform a Copper TDR test.4/0.

an energy pulse transmitted through the cable is partially distorted and reflected when it encounters a fault. anomaly: Full anomaly check. full: Full cable length and full anomaly check.mrv. Default: all. One end of the cable was connected to port 2 of the local OS-300. The far end of the cable was connected to another switch (in normal operation mode). Example Port>Copper 2 full Port Valid LenA LenB 2: yes 0 0 Port> LenC 0 LenD 0 StatA Open StatB Open StatC Open StatD Open February 2007 URL: http://www. It then translates this time into distance and the reflected distorted waveform into the associated fault type. termination: Anomaly check without check for coupling between pairs. The far end of the cable was disconnected and VCD was performed again. Invoke the command: Copper TDR [<portlist>] [full|anomaly|termination] where. In this method.com 65 . The TDR mechanism measures the time it takes for the signal to travel down the cable and analyzes its reflected waveform. The commands invoked and the test results are shown below. 2. VCD was performed. [<portlist>]: List of Ports. Example Following is a test case example of an 'open' on a 100 meter long cable. Rev.ML49480. Default: full. a method that works on the same principle as radar. Procedure To perform a copper TDR test: 1. Enter Port group. 01 Ports Chapter 5: − Polarity mismatch Benefits • • • • Quick & remote analysis of the attached copper cable Identification of fault location and type Less need for visits by technical support personnel to remote sites Reduced network downtime Principles of Operation Copper TDR uses Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR).

mrv. Enter the VLAN group. page 26). A VLAN is a user-configurable logical grouping of one or more ports to form an isolated communication domain.0 Chapter 6: VLANs Inband VLAN interfaces General Inband VLAN interfaces are user-creatable VLANs. Enter VLAN group. 2. Range: 1-4095. any of its (member) ports can be assigned to a user-defined VLAN (thereby removing the port from ‘Default Forwarding VLAN’). <vidlist>: List of VLAN IDs. <vidlist>: List of VLAN IDs. 2. Default: all.2 VLAN> Default Forwarding VLAN General The Default Forwarding VLAN is a broadcast domain for all ports not included in user-defined VLANs. In the factory default setting. However. VLAN interfaces are used for data communication but can concurrently be used also for inband management. any packet entering one such port is flooded to all other such ports. [<portlist>]: List of Ports. Invoke the command: Add <vidlist> [<portlist>] where. Invoke the command: Lookup <vidlist> where. The management station can be connected to any of the LAN or WAN ports (indicated in Figure 3. Adding Ports to an Existing VLAN To add ports to an existing VLAN: 1. only the default VLAN exists and all the physical data ports of the OS-300 are untagged members of it. Range: 1-4095. Communication between ports of the same VLAN occurs as if the ports are connected to the same physical LAN. The default tag (VID) is 1. one of which can be assigned an IP address.com 66 . Example VLAN> add 3 1. That is. Number The maximum number of VLAN interfaces that can be configured is 64. The default VLAN cannot be deleted. February 2007 URL: http://www.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. Viewing To view the default forwarding status and the default tag: 1.

Invoke the command: Delete <vidlist> [<portlist>] where. Default: all. A VLAN interface is enabled by default when it is added.4 VLAN> Chapter 6: Deleting An existing VLAN can be deleted for administrative reasons or in order to be able to modify several of its characteristics together. <vidlist>: The VLAN ID of an existing VLAN [<portlist>]: List of Ports. 3.2. 2.ML49480.3. 2. Enter the VLAN group. VID: The VLAN ID of an existing VLAN to be deleted.com 67 . Untagged This is the default mode for ports. Default: all.mrv. Invoke the command: Delete VID where. 01 VLANs Example VLAN>Lookup 1 VID Ports 1: 1. To set a port to handle only untagged ingress frames (and to forward them untagged): 1. To delete ports from an existing VLAN: 1. Invoke the command: February 2007 URL: http://www. Rev.1Q encapsulation in one of the following modes: − Tagged − Untagged − Hybrid − Q-in-Q Tagged To set a port to handle only tagged ingress frames (and to forward them with the tag): 1. To delete an existing VLAN: 1. Enter VLAN group. portlist: List of Ports. Deleting Ports from a VLAN Ports can be deleted from an existing VLAN. Default: all. Enter the VLAN mode. Invoke the command: Tagged portlist enable where. Enter VLAN group. Port Outbound Tag Mode One or more ports can be set to handle frames with IEEE 802. Invoke the command Frame Type portlist tagged where. 2. 2. portlist: List of Ports.

Example The following example shows how to configure a VLAN with tagged and untagged ports.com February 2007 . Product Version 1. In tagged mode.mrv.0 Hybrid This mode is similar to tagged mode except for the way it handles untagged frames.3 VLAN>pvid 1 10 VLAN> VLAN>configuration VLAN Configuration: Port 1: 2: 3: 4: Tagged Q-in-Q PVID 10 1 1 1 Ingress Filtering disabled disabled disabled disabled Frame Type All All All All disabled disabled disabled disabled enabled disabled disabled disabled Entries in permanent table: 1: 10: VLAN> 2. VLAN>Tagged 3 enable VLAN>Add 10 1. Default: show frame type.4 1. Port 3 (network port) is set as tagged and enabled to operate in tag mode. Egress packets having the default tag are sent untagged. 2. In hybrid mode. portlist: List of Ports.OS-300 User Manual Tagged portlist disable where. Default: all. Invoke the command: Tagged portlist enable where. ingress untagged frames are dropped. Port 1 (user port) is assigned a PVID that is the same as the VID of the VLAN of which it is a member5. Default: all. 68 URL: http://www. Invoke the command: Frame Type portlist all where. Default: all. ingress untagged frames are assigned the port’s default tag. all: Tagged and untagged. The VLAN configuration is displayed using the command configuration. 3. Enter the VLAN group. Tagged frames with this VLAN ID will be sent out of the port untagged. A VLAN is created having VID 10 and including ports 1 and 3. portlist: List of Ports. portlist: List of Ports.3 5 Untagged frames received on the untagged port will be tagged with this VLAN ID. To configure hybrid mode for a group of ports: 1.

Enter VLAN group. vid: The VID to assign to the port.4 VLAN> Ingress Filtering disabled disabled disabled disabled Frame Type All All All All February 2007 URL: http://www.com 69 . Rev. To disable Q-in-Q access mode for one or more ports: 1. All egress frames at tagged ports are decapsulated from Service VLAN tags. none: Can be used for trunk links Viewing To view the tags of one or more ports: 1. Enter VLAN group.ML49480. 2. Example >VLAN VLAN>Configuration VLAN Configuration: Port Tagged Q-in-Q PVID 1: disabled disabled 1 2: disabled disabled 1 3: disabled disabled 1 4: disabled disabled 1 Entries in permanent table: 1: 1.2. 2. portlist: List of Ports. portlist: List of Ports. Default: Show PVID. In this mode both tagged and untagged frames are allowed at ingress.3. 2. Default: all. Invoke the command: Q-in-Q portlist enable where. Enter VLAN group. Default: all. Invoke the command: Configuration [<portlist>] where. All ingress frames are encapsulated with an additional tag (Service VLAN tag). Range: 1-4094. Invoke the command: PVID portlist vid|none where. Enter VLAN group. Setting Default VID To set a default VID to one or more ports: 1. portlist: List of Ports. To enable Q-in-Q access mode for one or more ports: 1. Default: all. Default: all. 2. Invoke the command: Q-in-Q portlist disable where.mrv. [<portlist>]: List of Ports. 01 VLANs Chapter 6: Q-in-Q (Service VLAN Access Mode) This mode applies for access (LAN) ports.

1X state for the ports. Configuration In configuring a port as tagged or untagged.1x provides a framework to implement port-based authentication where only authenticated ports have access to the network. The OS-300 implements the port–based access control scheme. The authentication is done by an external RADIUS server.1x state. 2.1x General The port-based network access standard IEEE802. The authentication is initiated by Extensible Authentication Protocol over LAN (EAPOL) frames. the network services become enabled for the port. That is.1x standard.1x state: 1.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. and fully complies with the IEEE802.0 Chapter 7: Port-based Access Control IEEE802.com 70 . The user ports are initially in an un-authorized state where normal frame forwarding for the port is disabled. Default: Show mode. − Traffic entering tagged ports (network ports) are not authenticated. Upon authorization. Default: all. The port only accepts special authentication frames. and normal frame forwarding is possible. Enable 802. note the following: − Traffic entering an untagged port (user port) are authenticated.1x port-based access control: 1. 2. Enter Dot1x group. These frames are redirected to the OS-300 CPU.mrv. Invoke the command: State [<portlist>] [Auto|ForceAuthorized|ForceUnauthorized] where. frames entering such a port is dropped if their VID is different from the VID of the VLAN of which the port is a member.1x port-based access control by invoking the command: Mode enable Example Dot1x> mode enable Dot1x> Setting Port State To set the ports in the 802. [Auto|ForceAuthorized|ForceUnauthorized]: Set 802. which are identified by the unique bridge group address 01-80-C2-00-00-03 . Enter Dot1x group. Enabling To enable 802. Example Dot1x> State 1 Auto Dot1x> February 2007 URL: http://www. portlist: List of Ports to be set in the 802.

Default: Show current configuration.1X Disabled 802.ML49480.0. Enter Dot1x group. 01 Port-based Access Control Chapter 7: Setting the RADIUS Server address To set the Authenticating RADIUS server IP address invoke the command: 1.136.1X Disabled February 2007 URL: http://www. 2.1x configuration: 1. Default: Show current configuration.0. invoke the command: 1. Invoke the command: Server [<IP Address>] where. 2. Example Dot1x> Server 194.1X Disabled 802. Enter Dot1x group.0 UDP Port: 1812 Secret: Dot1x> Port State 802.com 71 . [<value>]: The UDP port the RADIUS server listens to. 2. [<IP Address>]: IP address of external RADIUS server.90. Invoke the command: Secret [<Shared Secret>] where. Invoke the command: UDP Port [<value>] where. Enter Dot1x group. Setting Dot1x Secret To set or show the secret shared with the RADIUS server invoke the command: 1. Default: Show current configuration.1X Disabled 802. 2. Enter Dot1x group. View To Show current 802. Invoke the command: Configuration Example >Dot1x Dot1x>Configuration Dot1x Configuration: Password: disabled Port Admin State 1: ForceAuthorized 2: ForceAuthorized 3: ForceAuthorized 4: ForceAuthorized RADIUS Configuration: Server: 0.59 Dot1x> Setting the RADIUS server UDP Port To set up UDP Port for the external RADIUS server. Rev. [<Shared Secret>]: Shared secret shared with external RADIUS server.mrv.

Enter Dot1x group. 72 URL: http://www.1X authentication process for the port: 1. Default: all.mrv.OS-300 User Manual To view the 802. Invoke the command: Statistics [<portlist>] where. 2. [now]: Force re-authentication immediately. Example >Dot1x Dot1x>Statistics 2 Port 2: --------------------------------------------------------authEntersConnecting: 27 authEapLogoffsWhileConnecting: 35 authEntersAuthenticating: 14 authAuthSuccessesWhileAuthenticating: 8 authAuthTimeoutsWhileAuthenticating: 4 authAuthFailWhileAuthenticating: 0 authAuthEapStartsWhileAuthenticating: 0 authAuthEapLogoffWhileAuthenticating: 0 authAuthReauthsWhileAuthenticated: 0 authAuthEapStartsWhileAuthenticated: 0 authAuthEapLogoffWhileAuthenticated: 0 backendResponses: backendAccessChallenges: backendOtherRequestsToSupplicant: backendAuthSuccesses: backendAuthFails: dot1xAuthEapolFramesRx: dot1xAuthEapolFramesTx: dot1xAuthEapolStartFramesRx: dot1xAuthEapolLogoffFramesRx: dot1xAuthEapolRespIdFramesRx: dot1xAuthEapolRespFramesRx: dot1xAuthEapolReqIdFramesTx: dot1xAuthEapolReqFramesTx: dot1xAuthInvalidEapolFramesRx: dot1xAuthEapLengthErrorFramesRx: dot1xAuthLastEapolFrameVersion: dot1xAuthLastEapolFrameSource: Last Supplicant identity: Dot1x> 22 0 0 0 0 67305 18902 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Product Version 1.1x statistics invoke the command: 1. [<portlist>]: List of Ports. [<portlist>]: List of Ports.com February 2007 . Invoke the command: Reauthenticate [<portlist>] [now] where. Enter Dot1x group. 2. Default: all.0 Reauthenticate To refresh (restart) 802.

February 2007 URL: http://www. 2.com 73 . management via the out-of-band Ethernet interface is. Rev. The out-of-bound RS-232 interface is enabled by default. invoke the command: Console State disable In-band IP Interface General The in-band IP interface is used for remote management and protocols. e. etc. and protocols of various OSI layers. page 34. Layer 2. by default. Unlike the RS-232 interface. Out-of-band RS-232 Interface The out-of-band RS-232 interface (CONSOLE EIA-232 Port – shown Figure 3. page 27.mrv. Enabling an In-band IP Interface To enable the in-band IP interface: 1. Default: Show IP configuration. They are: − Out-of-band RS-232 Interface − Inband IP interface Purpose Interfaces are needed for management. page 36. WARNING! If the out-of-bound RS-232 interface is disabled. The required setup of the craft terminal is described in the section Local Management (Craft Terminal).. Enter IP group. Enable the in-band IP interface by invoking the command: Mode enable 3. disabled for security reasons.ML49480. page 26) is used for local management only and is described in the section Out-of-band Management. The procedure for enabling management via the in-band IP interface is given just below. Assign an IP address to the in-band IP interface by invoking the command: Setup [<ipaddress> [<ipmask> [<ipgateway>]]] [<vid>] where. it will no longer be possible to access the OS-300 unless an IP address exists in the OS300! To disable the out-of-bound RS-232 interface. [<ipaddress>]: Interface IP address. the connection of a management station is described in the section TELNET or SNMP . Layer 3. The connection of a craft terminal to the RS-232 interface is described in the section Craft Terminal/Emulator (For Out-of-band Management).g. 01 Interfaces Chapter 8: Chapter 8: Interfaces General This chapter introduces the two types of interface of the OS-300. page 34.

1 IP> Enabling Remote Management or Protocols TFTP To enable management access by TFTP: 1. Invoke the command: State enable Note More than one of the management protocols (SNMP. Enter IP group.0. Invoke the command: Dhcp disable 74 URL: http://www. Enter SNMP group.0.255.0 193. [<vid>]: Interface VLAN ID.0 [<ipmask>]: IP subnet mask Default: Subnet mask for address class.07.222. 2.07. 1-4094 Default: 1. 2.com February 2007 . 2. Invoke the command: tftp enable Example IP>tftp enable IP> DHCP To enable management access by DHCP: 1. Enter IP group. and TFTP) may be selected with which the OS-300 will be accessible.mrv.2 255. Enter IP group. Invoke the command: tftp disable Example IP>tftp enable IP> DHCP To disable management access by DHCP: 1.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. DHCP.222. Default: 0. 2. Disabling Remote Management TFTP To disable management access by TFTP: 1. Example IP> mode enable IP> setup 193. Invoke the command: Dhcp enable SNMP To enable management access by SNMP: 1.255. [<ipgateway>]: IP address of Default IP gateway. Enter IP group.0. 2.

Disable access for a TFTP client by invoking the command: Tftp disable Disabling the In-band IP Interface To disable the existing in-band IP interface: 1.com 75 .96 VID: 47 Mode: enabled dhcp: disabled tftp: disabled IP> February 2007 URL: http://www. 2. Enter SNMP group. Enabling To enable access via in-band IP interface for a TFTP client: 1.38. (Another way to back up IP configuration files is to first set the OS-300 as an TFTP client and then to invoke the command tftpget server-ip filename from the IP group level. 2. Enter the IP group. Enter IP group.208 Subnet Mask: 255. Rev. 2. Enter IP group.38.57.57.ML49480. 2.mrv. Enable access for a TFTP client by invoking the command: Tftp enable Disabling To disable access via the in-band IP interface for a TFTP client: 1. Disable the existing in-band IP interface by invoking the command: Mode disable Example IP> mode disable IP> Viewing the in-band IP Interface To view the existing in-band IP interface configuration: 1.255.0 Gateway: 192. Enter IP group.255. 2. The OS-300 in this case operates as a TFTP server. Invoke the command: configuration Example IP>up IP>Configuration IP Configuration: Address: 192. Invoke the command: State disable Chapter 9: TFTP Client Mode A TFTP server can be connected to an OS-300 interface in order to back up the configuration files stored in the OS-300. 01 Rate Limiting of Flood Packets SNMP To disable management access by SNMP: 1.

OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. Default: Show all. 8192k. Example QoS> storm control Broadcast enable 8k QoS> Viewing To view the storm control rate limit configured: 1. 4k. 8k. Enter QoS group. broadcasts. Flood packets that exceed the set rate limit are discarded. 512k. Applying Rate Limiting to flood packets in effect also prevents traffic storms. multicasts.mrv. [enable]: Enable specified storm controller (traffic type). 2. 2048k. (To limit the rate of egress packets. the traffic shaping function – described in the section Shaping on page 102 – can be used. 2k.com February 2007 . learn frames. Invoke the command: Storm Control Example QOS> storm control ICMP: Disabled 1K 76 URL: http://www. 64k. Applicability Rate Limiting can be applied to flood packets such as unknown-unicast. 16k. 32k. multicast. and unicasts. 256k. Allowed values are: 1k. broadcast. 32768k.) Purpose Rate Limiting is used to prevent excessively high packet rates at ports that are potentially hazardous to the operation of bridged networks. [<traffic type>]: ICMP|Learn|Broadcast|Multicast|Flood Unicast. 4096k. 1024k. 16384k.0 Chapter 9: Rate Limiting of Flood Packets Definition Rate Limiting of Flood Packets is a service for limiting the rate of ingress packets at ports that tend to flood the network. 2. 128k. Enter QoS group. [<rate>]: Frame rate in kiloframes/sec. and ICMP. Invoke the command: Storm Control [<traffic type>] [enable] [<rate>] where. Configuration To limit the rate of flood packets: 1. It can be set to a value in the range 1 Kbps to 1 Gbps. A central storm controller supervises the allowed frame rates for ICMP frames.

2. [<traffic type>]: ICMP|Learn|Broadcast|Multicast|Flood Unicast. Invoke the command: Storm Control [<traffic type>] [disable] where.mrv. Example QoS> storm control Broadcast disable QoS> February 2007 URL: http://www.ML49480.com 77 . 01 Rate Limiting of Flood Packets Learn: Broadcast: Multicast: Flood Unicast: Disabled Enabled Disabled Disabled 1K 8K 1K 1K Chapter 9: Disabling To disable the storm control: 1. [disable]: Disable specified storm controller (traffic type). Enter QoS group. Default: Show all. Rev.

Principle of Operation A packet (tagged or untagged) entering an access (user) port is directed to a core (provider network) port or to another access port. or Q-in-Q) is an IEEE 802. The interconnection is made possible using the same VLAN ID for the sites. Rev.com 78 . Purpose The purpose of Provider Bridges is twofold: 1) To isolate different types of traffic from one another (on the basis of service and/or customer) in a manner that is transparent to traffic of the same customer VLAN.1ad standard mechanism that uses an extra service provider tag as part of the Ethernet frame header in order to provide IEEE 802. All 4k VLAN range is supported. A Provider Bridge fulfills these purposes without interfering with the client VLAN structure while “hiding” the internal VLAN structure of the customer network from others. The carrier network is utilized as a completely transparent transport medium between the sites so that the sites appear to be directly interconnected.1ad standard refers to a Service VLAN Ethertype as TPID (Tag Protocol IDentification). At the core port.1Q standard VLAN tag and has a value in the decimal range 0 to 4095. the packet is pushed with another VLAN header which includes the Service VLAN Ethertype (pre-assigned by the user to the core port) and Service VLAN tag (VLAN interface tag assigned to the packet) and then forwarded on the provider network to the other access ports of the same customer. Provider Bridge Ethertype A Provider Bridge Ethertype (TPID6) is a value in the hex range 0 to FFFF. VMAN. 6 The IEEE 802. Stacked VLAN. Each instance is an interconnection of several sites of the same customer that are distributed across a carrier network. February 2007 URL: http://www. 2) To bridge customers or groups of customers scattered across the service provider network.1Q standard Ethertype 0x8100 for the port. Number of Provider Bridges A Provider Bridge can be defined per port.1Q standard VLAN interconnectivity between remote sites of a customer scattered across a service provider network. 01 Provider Bridges Chapter 10: Chapter 10: Provider Bridges General A Provider Bridge (Service VLAN. Provider Bridges provide separate instances of MAC services to multiple independent users of a carrier network (shared service provider network). The VLAN ID encapsulates the customer VLAN frames.ML49480. The OS-300 uses the IEEE 802. Service VLAN Tag A Service VLAN (provider) tag is a second (outer) IEEE 802.mrv.

Set each access (provider edge) port of the OS-300 that is to participate in the Service VLAN. Configuration To configure access and core ports to operate in Service VLAN mode: 1. Set each core (provider network) port of the OS-300 that is to participate in the Service VLAN. 2. Enter VLAN group.4 VLAN> Ingress Filtering disabled disabled disabled disabled Frame Type All All All All Example The purpose of the example here is to show how Service VLANs. Enter the VLAN group.mrv. The access port pops the Service VLAN header (Service VLAN Ethertype and Service VLAN tag) and forwards the packet on the access network. Two Service VLANs are configured. can be configured. 01 Provider Bridges Chapter 10: A packet entering a core port from the provider network is forwarded to the access port whose VLAN tag matches the Service VLAN tag of the packet. [enable]: Enable VLAN tagged mode. [enable]: Enable Q-in-Q. using the following command: q-in-q portlist enable where. 3.com 79 .4 enable VLAN> q-in-q 1.3. [portlist]: List of ports Default: all. This number should be sufficient to indicate the scope of Service VLAN configuration. Example VLAN> tagged 3.2 enable Viewing To view the provider bridges configuration 1. [<portlist>]: List of ports Default: all. using the following command: Tagged [<portlist>] [enable] where. 2.2. [portlist]: List of ports Default: all. Rev. Invoke the command: Configuration [portlist] where. February 2007 URL: http://www. Example VLAN>Configuration VLAN Configuration: Port Tagged Q-in-Q PVID 1: disabled enabled 1 2: disabled enabled 1 3: enabled disabled 1 4: enabled disabled 1 Entries in permanent table: 1: 1.ML49480. in general.

2 enable VLAN> add 91 1.1Q header that includes the default Service VLAN Ethertype 0x8100 and the Service VLAN tag. 3.3. the packet is forwarded as a tagged packet on Service VLAN 91. Otherwise.) − Setting the access Port 2 in tag mode.mrv.0 Application Description Ports 1 and 2 are access ports belonging to customers 1 and 2.) − Specifying tag 91 and member ports 1. 80 URL: http://www.4 VLAN> pvid 2 92 VLAN> frametype 1. the Service VLAN header (Ethertype and tag) is popped and the packet is forwarded to the network of customers 1 and 2.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.).) Customer 1 will be assigned to Service VLAN tag 91.4 VLAN> pvid 1 91 VLAN> add 92 2. respectively. The user inputs include: − Setting tagged mode for Ports 3 and 4 and enabling them.com February 2007 . − Setting the access Port 1 in tag mode.2 all VLAN> frametype 3. − Setting the frame type for access Ports 1 and 2. − Displaying the configuration. the packet is directed to access port 1.3. the packet is dropped.) If the Service VLAN tag is 92. Here. (Note that Port 2 is an access port and Ports 3 and 4 are core ports. Here. Packets entering core port 3 or 4 from the provider network are checked. Packet Data Path and Processing Packets from the access port 1 are assigned to Service VLAN 91 and forwarded to the core ports 3 and 4. Customer 2 will be assigned to Service VLAN tag 92. respectively. and 4 for a Service VLAN. (Actually. (Note that Port 1 is an access port and Ports 3 and 4 are core ports. − Specifying tag 92 and member ports 2. and 4 for a Service VLAN. Ports 3 and 4 are core ports.) − Setting Q-in-Q mode for Ports 1 and 2 and enabling them. Example VLAN> tagged 3. If the Service VLAN tag (outer tag) is 91. At ports 1 and 2. 3. each packet (whether tagged or untagged) is pushed with the Service VLAN tag 92 and forwarded on the provider network. (A Service VLAN is actually configured in the same way as any VLAN interface. the packet is directed to access port 2. Configuration Below is an example showing the user inputs (in bold) and OS-300 outputs on the CLI screen. Two Service VLANs are configured: 91 and 92.4 tagged VLAN> conf VLAN Configuration: Port Tagged Q-in-Q PVID Ingress Filtering Frame Type 7 Pushing the Service VLAN packet means adding another 802.4 enable VLAN> q-in-q 1. (Q-in-Q mode enables the ports to function as access ports. each packet (whether tagged or untagged) is pushed7 with the Service VLAN tag 91 and forwarded on the provider network. − Setting the frame type for core Ports 3 and 4. Packets from the access port 2 are assigned to Service VLAN 92 and forwarded to the core ports 3 and 4. (Tagged mode enables the ports to function as core ports.

4 92: 2.com 81 .mrv.4 disabled disabled disabled disabled All All Tagged Tagged Chapter 10: February 2007 URL: http://www.3.3. 01 Provider Bridges 1: disabled enabled 91 2: disabled enabled 92 3: enabled disabled 1 4: enabled disabled 1 Entries in permanent table: 91: 1.ML49480. Rev.

including BPDUs (which are multicast frames). Each Port Trunk must be formed with two or more ports. via one port only. For example. A trunk port may be connected only to a trunk port of another switch. 3. One trunk port on one OS-300 may be connected to any one (and only one) trunk port on another OS-300. link aggregation results in higher link availability.ML49480. 5. 7. 2. Rules The following rules must be used when configuring a Port Trunk: 1. Principle of Operation Frame Transfer Traffic is distributed among the ports of a trunk by an advanced frame distribution function. broadcast. Implementation is compliant to IEEE 802. Rev. and multicasts packets.3ad Link Aggregation standard. In addition to increased link capacity.mrv. can use the following information: • Source and destination MAC addresses • Source and destination IP addresses • TCP/UDP port numbers for IPv4 packets • Pseudo-randomization A Port Trunk transmits all unknown. A port that has been configured as an analyzer port cannot be a member of a Port Trunk. 6. A port may be a member of only one Port Trunk.com 82 . February 2007 URL: http://www. The OS-300 will automatically detect that a link has gone down and then re-assign packet distribution on the other links in the group. which. through configuration. LAG prevents the failure of any single link from leading to a disruption of the communication between the two peers. Enter LAG group. Purpose A Port Trunk between two switches increases traffic throughput capacity among stations connected to the ports that are members of the trunk. the interconnection of two full-duplex Gigabit ports of one OS-300 unit to two full-duplex Gigabit ports of another OS-300 unit. The two ends of a Port Trunk must be symmetric in regard to the number of ports at each end and the bandwidth of each port. serves as an 2-Gbps full-duplex Ethernet trunk. Configuration To configure a Port Trunk: 1. 4. A Port Trunk may consist of fixed ports and pluggable (SFP) ports. 01 Link Aggregation Chapter 11: Chapter 11: Link Aggregation Definition Port Trunking (Link Aggregation) is the parallel interconnection of two or more ports to form a single logical communication channel whose bandwidth is the sum total of the bandwidths of the individual ports.

Example LAG> Lookup 3 Groups: 3. Example LAG> delete 3 LAG> February 2007 URL: http://www.mrv. Invoke the following command: Lookup <portlist> where <portlist>: Ports of a trunk. Create a port trunk by invoking the command: Add <portlist> where.4 LACP status None Mode: dmac LAG> Deleting To delete a Port Trunk: 1. Enter LAG group 2. Invoke the command: configuration Example LAG> conf LAG Configuration: Groups: 3.com 83 .4 LAG> Viewing To view a configured Port Trunk: 1.ML49480. Example LAG> Add 3. Enter LAG group. Rev. Enter the LAG group 2. <portlist>: List of ports to be trunked.4 LACP status None LAG> To view all configured aggregation groups: 1. as shown in the example below. 01 Link Aggregation Chapter 11: 2. Invoke the command: Delete <portlist> where <portlist>: ports of a trunk – you can specify one of the trunk ports as shown in the example below. 2. Any number of ports may be selected.

The protocol controls bundling of several physical ports together to form a single logical channel. The ability of a port to aggregate with other ports is defined with the administrative key. When LACP is not able to aggregate all the ports that are compatible (for example. Invoke the command: Mode portlist enable|disable where. portlist: List of ports enable|disable: Enable/disable LACP. Enter LACP group. Enter LACP group. The OS-300 compares the information it receives from the peer with its own setup. Configuration To enable/disable LACP for a port: 1. and according to that decides which ports can be aggregated. the two LAG peers dynamically exchange configuration information among them in order to automatically configure and maintain the Link Aggregation groups.4 enable LACP> To set a key for a port: 1. 84 URL: http://www. A port is able to aggregate with others if all the ports share the same speed and duplex.3ad Link Aggregation Control Protocol provides a way to set up an aggregation trunk automatically between two peers.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. 2. smac: Source MAC address dmac: Destination MAC address xor: DMAC xor SMAC Example LAG> mode xor LAG> LACP The IEEE802. up to the maximum allowed by the hardware. the peer system allows a smaller number of ports in a trunk). Example LACP> Mode 3. Principle of Operation When LACP is enabled for a group of ports. Each port in the switch must be assigned an administrative key value that can be specified automatically or through the CLI.mrv. Enter LAG group. The protocol automatically detects the presence and capabilities of the group members. 2.0 Setting LAG Frames Distribution Mode To set the LAG frames distribution mode: 1. The LACP always tries to configure the maximum number of compatible ports in a channel. rather than the static configuration defined by LAG. then all the ports that are not actively included in the aggregation are put in a standby state and are used only if one of the channeled ports fails. Invoke the command: Mode [smac|dmac|xor] where.com February 2007 . LACP allows a switch to negotiate an automatic bundle by sending LACP packets to the peer.

Enter LACP group 2. 2. Example LACP> Conf LACP Configuration: System ID: 00-0f-bd-00-29-e2 System Priority: 32768 Port Enabled Key 1 no auto 2 no auto 3 yes 2 4 yes 2 LACP> To view the LACP status: 1. portlist: List of ports key: Number between 1 and 255 Example LACP> key 3. Rev. the configuration for all the ports is shown. Invoke the following command: status Example LACP> status LACP status: Group Partner-ID Ports Port Group Partner-Port 1 1 0 2 2 0 3 3 0 4 4 4 LACP> To view all the LACP statistics 1. Enter LACP group 2. portlist: List of ports to be trunked. If no ports are given. Enter LACP group. 01 Link Aggregation 2. Invoke the command: statistics Example LACP>statistics LACP Statistics: February 2007 URL: http://www.4 2 Port 3: Key: 2 Port 4: Key: 2 LACP> Chapter 11: Viewing To view the LACP configuration: 1. Any number of ports may be selected.mrv. View the configuration by entering the command: Configuration portlist where. Invoke the command: Key portlist key|auto where.com 85 .ML49480.

OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.mrv.0 Protocol Frame Statistics Received Port LACP Mark Resp 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 LACP> Transmitted LACP Mark Resp 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Received Illegal Unknown 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 86 URL: http://www.com February 2007 .

Analyzer Port Mirroring can be performed to one analyzer port.) 3. Only one port can be set as an analyzer port/VLAN. 2. only part of the data traffic may be made available for analysis.com 87 . the analyzer port may be over-subscribed if the aggregate bandwidth of the mirrored traffic exceeds the analyzer port link bandwidth. Mirrored port – A port whose traffic is replicated at another port/VLAN. The data thus obtained can be used for statistical analyses to determine how to improve network operation as well as for troubleshooting a network on a port-by-port basis.g. The speed of the analyzer port is independent of the ingress and egress mirrored port(s) speed. 4.. Purpose Port mirroring provides for the connection of a network protocol analyzer to an analyzer port to identify the types of traffic passing through particular ports. One port or several ports can be mirrored. 10 Mbps and 1000 Mbps) and/or different interface type (e. The mirrored port and analyzer port may be of different bandwidth (e. Enter the Mirror group.g.0 Chapter 12: Port Mirroring Terminology Ingress port – A port at which traffic enters the OS-300. Analyzer port – A port at which traffic (received at another port) is replicated. The analyzer port must not be a trunk port. (This means that if any other port is configured as an analyzer port. Egress port – A port at which traffic exits the OS-300. February 2007 URL: http://www. However. Usage Analyzer Port An analyzer port can be added.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. The analyzer port must be different from the mirrored port. 5. the previous port will cease to be an analyzer port. 100BaseTX and 100Base-FX). Adding/Replacing Analyzer Port To add an analyzer port or to replace it with a new one: 1.mrv. The congestion is handled in the same way as a regular transmit port congestion. Definition Port mirroring is the replication of traffic received on one or more physical ports (called mirrored ports) at another physical port (called analyzer or probe port). or viewed. if the bandwidth of the analyzer port is smaller than that of the mirrored port.. Rules for Mirroring 1. deleted. In some cases.

Invoke the command: Configuration Example Mirror>Configuration Mirror Configuration: Mirror Port: 3 Source: Port 1: disabled Port 2: disabled Port 3: disabled Port 4: disabled Mirror> Mirrored Ports One or more mirrored ports can be added. 1. 2. q Mirror>Port 3 Mirror> Product Version 1. [enable|disable]: Enable or disable mirroring from the ports Example Mirror> source 1 enable Mirror> Viewing Mirrored Ports To view the existing mirrored ports.0 Viewing Analyzer Port To view the existing analyzer port. Enter the Mirror group. or viewed. Invoke the command: Port port where.OS-300 User Manual 2. Adding/Replacing Mirrored Ingress Ports To add ports whose traffic is to be mirrored or to replace them with new ones: 1. [portlist]: List of ports whose traffic is to be mirrored.mrv. invoke the command: Configuration Example Mirror>Configuration Mirror Configuration: 88 URL: http://www. deleted. Enter the Mirror group. Example LACP>/mirror Mirror>? Commands at Mirror level: Mirror Configuration Mirror Port [<port>] Mirror Source [<portlist>] [enable|disable] -----Up. port: Number of port to be an analyzer port. Invoke the command: Source [<portlist>] [enable|disable] where.com February 2007 . 2.

invoke the command: Source [<portlist>] [disable] [portlist]: List of ports whose traffic is not to be mirrored.ML49480.com 89 . [disable]: Disable mirroring from the ports Example Mirror>Source 1 disable Mirror> February 2007 URL: http://www. Rev.mrv. 01 Port Mirroring Mirror Port: 3 Source: Port 1: enabled Port 2: disabled Port 3: disabled Port 4: disabled Mirror> Chapter 12: Disable Mirrored Ports To disable the existing mirrored ports.

Layer 2 VPT.ML49480.. assigning port priority) is as follows: 1. The procedure for assigning a default SL class to an ingress port (i. Normal Example QoS> default 1. A packet can be forwarded to any one of 4 hardware egress packet queues of a port according to the packet SL class. The four classes are : High. Layer 2 VPT bits. Low. Normal. The user can set the class of each ingress packet based on the ingress port. Assigning SL Classes to Ingress Packets SL classes can be assigned to ingress packets on the basis of any of the following: Port priority. Low.com 90 . [diffserv]: Use Layer 3 DSCP bits to assign an SL to a packet. Invoke the following command: Default [<portlist>] [<class>] where. Enter the QoS group. Medium. 01 Quality of Service (QoS) Chapter 13: Chapter 13: Quality of Service (QoS) DiffServ Service Levels Classes Each ingress packet is assigned a DiffServ Service Level Class as part of the ingress traffic process. Enter QoS group. [portlist]: List of ports to which the SL class is to be assigned. or port priority) in order to map ingress packets to SL classes. 2. page 91 and DSCP to SL classes s according to Table 8. The user can assign SL classes according to port priority as described below.2 high QoS> Selecting an SL Class Criterion The Mode function is used to select a criterion (Layer 3 DSCP bits. [portlist]: List of ports. February 2007 URL: http://www. Invoke the command: Mode [<portlist>] [tag|port|diffserv] where. The user can also set the OS-300 to change the DSCP values to new ones for a packet transmitted out of the OS-300. To configure the SL class Mode: 1. [class]: Service level class: High. [tag]: Use Layer 2 VPT bits to assign an SL to a packet. VPT or DSCP. 2.mrv. The OS-300 maps VPT to SL classes s according to Table 7. Medium. or Layer 3 DSCP by mapping (assigning) an SL class to the packet. Rev. [port]: Use the default priority (SL Class) of the ingress port to assign an SL class to a packet. page 93.e.

Default If the user does not create a map of Original VPT to SL.2 1 normal QoS> View To view the VPT to SL class map for a port. 2. the OS-300 uses the default map in Table 7. Meduim. Invoke the following command: Tagprio [<portlist>] [<tagpriolist>] [<class>] where.2 QoS Configuration: Port Mode Default User 1: port high 0 2: port high 0 Tag Priorities: Port 0 1 2 3 1: low normal low normal 2: low normal low normal DiffServ: DSCP Class All high Granularity: 127k Shaper: 4 medium medium 5 medium medium 6 high high 7 high high February 2007 URL: http://www. Rev. in the range of 0-7. Normal.2 0 low QoS> tagprio 1. Low. [<portlist>]: List of ports. Table 7: Default Map of Original VPT to SL Original VPT 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 SL Class Normal Low Low Normal Meduim Meduim High High Custom The user can change the default map of Original VPT to SL class as follows: 1.mrv. invoke the command tagprio portlist Example QoS>Conf 1. below. [<class>]: SL class: High. 01 Quality of Service (QoS) Chapter 13: SL Class Maps TagPrio Map It is used to assign an SL class to an ingress packet according to its VPT. [<tagpriolist>]: VPT value of ingress packet. Enter QoS group. Default: all user priorities.com 91 . Example QoS> tagprio 1.ML49480.

25k 0. invoke the command: 1. [<portlist>]: List of ports. Custom The user can change the default map of user priorities as follows: 1. 2. Default: all. By default. Default: all.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.mrv. Invoke the command: Userprio [<portlist>] [<tagprio>] where.com February 2007 . [<portlist>]: List of ports. Example QoS>Userprio 1.0 Port 1: disabled 0k 2: disabled 0k Policer: Port 1: disabled 0k 2: disabled 0k Rate Count Method: Port 1: line 2: line Scheduling Scheme: Port 1: strict 2: strict Priority Weight: Port 0 1 2 1: 8 8 8 2: 8 8 8 Storm Control: ICMP: disabled Learn: disabled Broadcast: disabled Multicast: disabled Flood Unicast: disabled QoS> 0. Range: 07.25k 0.2 QoS Configuration: Port Mode Default User 92 URL: http://www.25k 0. [<tagprio>]: Default VLAN user priority for untagged frames. the user priority set to each port is 0. 2. Enter QoS group. Invoke the command: Userprio [<portlist>] where.25k 3 8 8 1k 1k 1k 1k 1k Default User-priority Tag Map It is used to assign a default VLAN user priority for untagged frames. Enter QoS group.2 1 QoS> View To view the Default user-priority Tag Map for a port. Example QoS> userprio 1.

23-25.mrv.25k 0.22 18 28. Default If the user does not create a map of DSCP to SL class.46 SL Low Low Normal Normal Medium Medium High High February 2007 URL: http://www.35.27.39-45.47-63 10 20.25k 0.11-17. below.38 34.25k DSCP to SL Class Map It is used to assign an SL Class to an ingress packet according to its DSCP.19.30 26 36. the OS-300 uses the map in Table 8. Rev.25k 0.ML49480.31-33.21. Table 8: Default Map of Original DSCP to SL Original DSCP 0-9.37.29. 01 Quality of Service (QoS) 1: port high 1 2: port high 1 Tag Priorities: Port 0 1 2 3 1: low normal low normal 2: low normal low normal DiffServ: DSCP Class All high Granularity: 127k Shaper: Port 1: disabled 0k 2: disabled 0k Policer: Port 1: disabled 0k 2: disabled 0k Rate Count Method: Port 1: line 2: line Scheduling Scheme: Port 1: strict 2: strict Priority Weight: Port 0 1 2 3 1: 8 8 8 8 2: 8 8 8 8 Storm Control: ICMP: disabled 1k Learn: disabled 1k Broadcast: disabled 1k Multicast: disabled 1k Flood Unicast: disabled 1k QoS> Chapter 13: 4 medium medium 5 medium medium 6 high high 7 high high 0.com 93 .

Low. [<dscpno>]: DSCP value of ingress packet. Medium. Normal. Default: all DSCP values. DSCP values 20 and 22 are transferred to the Normal class. invoke the command diffserv. 94 URL: http://www. Enter QoS group. Default: show class. [<class>]: Range of SL classes: High. Range: 0-63. Invoke the following command: DiffServ [<dscpno>] [<class>] where.25k Notice that as a result of the mapping.mrv.25k 0.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.com February 2007 . Example QoS>Config 2 QoS Configuration: Port Mode Default User 2: port high 1 Tag Priorities: Port 0 1 2 3 2: low normal low normal DiffServ: DSCP Class 22 normal All other high Granularity: 127k Shaper: Port 2: disabled 0k Policer: Port 2: disabled 0k Rate Count Method: Port 2: line Scheduling Scheme: Port 2: strict Priority Weight: Port 0 1 2 3 2: 8 8 8 8 Storm Control: ICMP: disabled 1k Learn: disabled 1k Broadcast: disabled 1k Multicast: disabled 1k Flood Unicast: disabled 1k QoS> 4 medium 5 medium 6 high 7 high 0. 2.0 Custom The user can change the default map of DSCP to SL Class as follows: 1. Example QoS> diffserv 20 Normal QoS> Diffserv 22 Normal QoS> View To view the DSCP to SL Class map.

The model assigns one of the following Conformance Levels (CLs) to each ingress packet: • Green – signifies conformance • Red – signifies non-conformance Traffic Metering is the process of measuring the time-involved properties (e. A packet is marked with the Conformance Level as follows: − Green if it does not exceed the CIR and CBS − Red otherwise Figure 23. By combining this service with egress traffic shaping. an Ethernet-to-the-Subscriber access box. they form a complete SLA enforcement set of tools for service providers. speed) of a traffic stream selected by a classifier. shows how the metering model handles a packet. This services is needed typically at access points. below.com 95 . such as.. Purpose A Traffic Policer limits the rate of ingress traffic and is used to provide SLA enforcement. The metering model meters a traffic flow and marks its packets on the basis of the parameters Committed Information Rate (CIR) and Committed Burst Size (CBS) to be either Green or Red. page 90 by adding the ability to control the rate of traffic in specific ports. Metering Model Packets entering the OS-300 can be metered according to the OS-300’s metering model (single-rate 2-color marking). February 2007 URL: http://www.g.mrv.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.0 Chapter 14: Traffic Policer Definition The Traffic Policer (rate limiter) complements the flow classification process described in Chapter 13: Quality of Service (QoS).

4M. [<granularity>]: 128k. The output of this function is a Yes/No decision regarding conformance of the packet to Leaky Bucket. [<portlist>]: List of ports.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.0 Figure 23: Metering Operation Traffic rate (CIR) and maximal burstsize (CBS) are two arguments of the ‘Leaky Bucket’ function. 512k. The metering model (which performs the ‘Leaky-Bucket’ operation) needs to know the policing mode since the bytes counted in a PDU depends on the layer. invoke the command: Granularity [<granularity>] where. The policing mode is global an affects all the port policers. relative to the granularity according to the following formula: Policer CIR = Granularity x Rate_level Setting Granularity of Policer The granularity sets the central granularity value which will be used to calculate the individual policers CIR. The policers CIR is measured in Kbits per second. 96 URL: http://www. invoke the following command in the QoS group: Rate Count [<portlist>] [line|packet] where. To set the granularity. This function can be likened to a water bucket with one hole. The packet buffer size (CBS) being analogous to the bucket capacity. including the 20 bytes for IFG and Preamble.mrv. The CIR is then set as one of 32 rate levels. More bytes are counted for a Layer 1 PDU than for a Layer 2 PDU. [packet]: Count only the packet data bytes. 16M. or 32M. 256k. 2M. 1M. [line]: Line rate – Count all frames bytes. 8M. Default: all. the traffic rate (CIR) being analogous to the rate of water leakage through the hole in the bucket. The OS-300 holds a central CIR granularity number. Example QoS> granularity 16M QoS> Policing Mode A policing mode is whether ingress traffic bytes counting is done of Layer 1 or 2.com February 2007 . To set the global policing mode.

Range: 0-31.25k QoS> Viewing To view the policers configuration: 1. [<rate-level>]: Rate level. Enter the QoS group. 16k Example QoS> Policer 1 enable 1 0. Example QoS>Config 1 QoS Configuration: Port Mode Default User 1: port high 1 Tag Priorities: Port 0 1 2 3 1: low normal low normal high DiffServ: DSCP Class 22 normal All other high Granularity: 127k Shaper: Port 1: disabled 0k Policer: Port 1: enabled 127k Rate Count Method: Port 1: line Scheduling Scheme: Port 1: strict Priority Weight: 4 medium 5 medium 6 high 7 0. Invoke the command: Policer [<portlist>] [enable|disable] [<rate-level>] [<burst>] where [<portlist>]: List of ports on which a policer will be configured.com 97 . Default: all. [<burst>]: Set the leacky bucket burst size (CBR) in Kbytes/Sec .ML49480. View the configuration by entering the command: Policer as shown in the example below. Possible values: 0. 01 Traffic Policer Example QoS> rate Count line QoS> Chapter 14: Port Policer Configuration To enable/disable a policer for a port: 1. Enter QoS group.mrv.25k February 2007 URL: http://www. Rev.25k 0. Rate level multiplied by the granularity parameter gives the policer rate limit. 1k. 4k. 2. [enable|disable]: Enable or disable policer. 2.25k.

OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.0 Port 0 1: 8 Storm Control: ICMP: Learn: Broadcast: Multicast: Flood Unicast: QoS> 1 8 disabled disabled disabled disabled disabled 2 8 3 8 1k 1k 1k 1k 1k 98 URL: http://www.mrv.com February 2007 .

for details. page 102. WRR) for the port’s queues – see the section Scheduling. A Gigabit port transmits at a high bandwidth to a Gigabit port configured to perform egress shaping (described in the section Shaping. Queue Configuration The EQM maintains the following configuration parameters per queue per egress port: • Queue scheduling mode • Weight for WRR scheduler (if the queue is scheduled according to WRR) Congestion Avoidance Congestion is a condition in which the OS-300 is unable to receive and process all packets arriving at its ports.mrv.com 99 . Several Gigabit ports transmit to one Gigabit port at a total rate that exceeds 1 Gbps. February 2007 URL: http://www. and shape individual queues − Schedule flows from multiple queues Port Configuration The EQM maintains the following per egress port: • Maximum egress rate set for the port for Token Bucket shaping (This is useful for limiting the egress bandwidth for each port. Purpose The purpose of the EQM is to perform the following functions at each physical port: − Prevent congestion in queues − Ensure that at least the minimum bandwidth allocated to each queue is provided − Limit rate to the allocated bandwidth. page 100. It can occur when: • The data speed on the transmission (outgoing traffic) link remains smaller than the data speed on the reception (incoming traffic) links over a period of time.) 3. • Flow Control is activated by a device at the other end of the transmission link This problem is resolved by the OS-300 using the congestion avoidance mechanism called Tail-Drop.) • Scheduling modes (SP. 01 Egress-Queue Manager (EQM) Chapter 15: Chapter 15: Egress-Queue Manager (EQM) Definition The Egress Queue Manager (EQM) is used to provide traffic control and monitoring services on outbound traffic queues. Examples of situations that may lead to such congestion are: 1. Rev.ML49480. 2. A Gigabit port transmits more than 100 Mbps to a Fast Ethernet port.

Scheduling Modes There are two scheduling modes for queues. The default weights for the four queues in WRR mode are as follows: Queue Weight 1 8 2 8 3 8 4 8 8 SL is DiffServ Service Level or Class of Service (CoS). Scheduling depends on the scheduling mode (described below) and QoS factors such as traffic shaping (described in the section Shaping. Scheduling queues in both SP and WRR modes enables handling of highly time-sensitive traffic (such as VoIP and mission critical protocols) as well as other traffic on the same link bandwidth.g. for e. etc.. queue 4 (SL4) is scheduled before queue 3 (SL3). Note Setting all queues in SP mode without traffic shaping or ingress rate limiting (policing) may prevent progress of lower SL queues.com February 2007 . 4. the IETF DiffServ standardized PHBs such as Assured Forwarding (AF). a queue in SP mode that has a higher SL8 is scheduled before queues in SP mode that have a lower SL. − If queue 4 is empty. queues in WRR mode share the available link bandwidth in proportion to the weights assigned to them.0 Scheduling General Scheduling is the process of selecting packets from egress queues for placement on a transmission link. the egress port serves queue 3 as long as packets are waiting in that queue. This means the following: − The egress port serves queue 4 as long as packets are waiting in that queue. Strict Priority (SP) At each port. and the capability to set a rate limit per port enables support for high level QoS applications (e. page 102). 2.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. The capability to set a queue in either one of the modes. The weights can have the values 1.. if. SL can have any value from 1 to 8. queues 3 to 4 are in SP mode. and lower queues are served only when queue 4 is empty. Weighted Round Robin (WRR) At each port. Best Effort. and 8 and designate the bandwidth ratio.). Configuration General This section shows how to configure scheduling for each queue by setting it into one of the two modes and assigning to the queue a weight.mrv.g. 100 URL: http://www. Expedited Forwarding (EF). and lower queues are served only when queue 3 is empty. Accordingly. They are: − Strict Priority (SP) − Weighted Round Robin (WRR) The user can set each queue at each port in either one of the scheduling modes.

25k 0. Default: show weight. or 4. Invoke the commands: Configuration [<portlist>] [<portlist>]: List of ports. Invoke the command: priority weight [<portlist>] [<priority>] [1|2|4|8] where. Example QoS>priority weight 3 0 4 QoS> Viewing To view the configuration for ports: 1. 2. Enter QoS group.25k February 2007 URL: http://www. [<priority>]: Priority queue number 0. 3. [<portlist>]: List of ports for which queue scheduling is to be set.mrv. 2. [strict|wrr]: Strict priority or WRR.com 101 .ML49480. [<portlist>]: List of ports for which the weight of a queue is to be set. Enter QoS group. Default: all. Rev. Enter QoS group. Example QoS>Conf 3 QoS Configuration: Port Mode Default User 3: port high 0 Tag Priorities: Port 0 1 2 3 3: normal low low normal DiffServ: DSCP Class 22 normal All other high Granularity: 127k Shaper: Port 3: disabled 0k Policer: Port 3: disabled 0k Rate Count Method: Port 3: line Scheduling Scheme: Port 3: strict Priority Weight: 4 medium 5 medium 6 high 7 high 0. Default: show all priority queues. Invoke the command: Scheduling [<portlist>] [strict|wrr] where. [1|2|4|8]: Weight. 2. 2. 01 Egress-Queue Manager (EQM) Chapter 15: Setting the Scheduling Scheme To set the scheduling scheme of the queues for a specific port: 1. 1. To set the priority weights for a specific port and queue: 1.

A token bucket shaper is available per port. (Rate level multiplied by the granularity parameter gives the policer rate limit. Configuration To configure egress traffic shaping & bandwidth limitation at one or more ports. 4k. Range 0-31. [enable|disable]: Enable or disable a policer.25k QoS> Viewing To view the shaper configuration: 1. Shaping can be used to limit and shape the traffic forwarding rate for specific egress queues or for the whole egress port. View the configuration by entering the command: Shaper Example QoS>Conf 1 QoS Configuration: Port Mode Default User 1: port high 1 Tag Priorities: Port 0 1 2 3 1: low normal low normal high 4 medium 5 medium 6 high 7 102 URL: http://www. Traffic that is in-profile with the Token Bucket parameters is transmitted on the link. Enter QoS group.e. the queuescheduling algorithm is considered non-work-conserving. Default: all. Traffic rate per queue is limited by the per-queue Token Bucket mechanism. When operating in this mode. but only when the packets match the Token Bucket profile. Out-of-profile traffic remains in the queue until it becomes in-profile.mrv.com February 2007 . invoke the command: Shaper [<portlist>] [enable|disable] [<rate-level>] [<burst>] where [<portlist>]: List of ports. 16k Example QoS> Shaper 1 enable 1 0. 1k. 2. Possible values: 0.0 Port 0 3: 4 Storm Control: ICMP: Learn: Broadcast: Multicast: Flood Unicast: QoS> 1 8 disabled disabled disabled disabled disabled 2 8 3 8 1k 1k 1k 1k 1k Shaping General Shaping is a mechanism for delaying traffic (usually egress traffic) in order to regulate/smoothen traffic flow..25k. queued packets are not transmitted at every opportunity. [<rate-level>]: Rate level. i.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.) [<burst>]: Set the leaky bucket burst size (CBR) in Kbytes/Sec .

com 103 .mrv.25k 3 8 1k 1k 1k 1k 1k February 2007 URL: http://www. 01 Egress-Queue Manager (EQM) DiffServ: DSCP Class 22 normal All other high Granularity: 127k Shaper: Port 1: enabled 127k Policer: Port 1: enabled 127k Rate Count Method: Port 1: line Scheduling Scheme: Port 1: strict Priority Weight: Port 0 1 2 1: 8 8 8 Storm Control: ICMP: disabled Learn: disabled Broadcast: disabled Multicast: disabled Flood Unicast: disabled QoS> Chapter 15: 0.ML49480.25k 0. Rev.

the forwarding is done in the same way as a repeater. In the OS-300.e. fully transparently.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. and reconnected to change the network configuration.0 Chapter 16: Transparent Mode Media Cross Connect General The Media Cross Connect application provides the OS-300 with intelligent patch-panel-like functionality. Enter Cross Connect group.. 2. Principle of Operation Media Cross Connect allows the administrator to program the OS-300 to forward traffic entering one user-specified port to another or to flood another user-specified port group – in transparent mode. February 2007 URL: http://www.com 104 . In this mode. Figure 24. moved. portlist: List of ports. illustrates Media Cross Connect.e. Invoke the command: Add <grouplist> [<portlist>] where. only logical connections are changed – purely by software control – to give the desired port-to-port interconnections. with no MAC address learning and no processing. Default: all.mrv. Figure 24: Examples of Media Cross Connections in the OS-300 Setup To setup a cross connect group: 1. below.. i. wires must be physically disconnected. i. <grouplist>: Group identifier for the new group. One application of Media Cross Connect is to forward data via a WDM-technology port. (and herein lies its great advantage) physical connections are left unchanged. In typical patch-panels.

01 Transparent Mode Media Cross Connect Example Cross Connect> Add 2 3. Enter the Cross Connect group. To delete a cross connect: 1.4 Cross Connect> February 2007 URL: http://www.ML49480. Enter Cross Connect group. Example Cross Connect> Delete 2 Cross Connect> Viewing To view details on a cross connect group: 1. Enter the Cross Connect group. Invoke the command: Delete <grouplist> where. all ports are members of Group 1. Note By default. Invoke the command: Lookup <grouplist> where.2. 2. 2.4 Cross Connect> Chapter 16: Note You may add ports to an existing group. Rev. <grouplist>: Group identifier for the new group.mrv. Invoke the command: Configuration Example Cross Connect> configuration Groups: 1: 1. <grouplist>: Group identifier for the new group.4 2: 3.4 Cross Connect> To view the full cross connect configuration: 1.3. 2.com 105 . Example Cross Connect> lookup 2 Groups: 2: 3.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. server-ip: IP address of the TFTP server. containing the executable code that runs on the OS-300. Load the new image onto an TFTP remote directory on your network. Ensure that the IP interface is enabled. due to an TFTP problem or illegal compressed file). page 47. ………………………. 4. you can: − Contact your local MRV representative. File transfer completed To run the loaded version – please reboot IP> February 2007 URL: http://www. Enter the IP group. If the upload process fails (for e. During uploading of a firmware image. To upload a new image: 1.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. Enable TFTP by invoking the command: TFTP enable 5. Powering the OS-300 off and on will also run the new image. The OS-300 storage device has two partitions for firmware images: current and backup.. 2. the backup partition is formatted and the new image is uploaded and opened in it. filename: Name of source file on TFTP-server. the OS-300 runs the previous image. The new image can be run at any time by rebooting as described in the section Rebooting. Example IP> ftpget 194. The image is uploaded using an upload procedure from a File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server on the network. Uploading a New Image The image.90.wrp TFTP transfer starting …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3.com.com 106 . is preinstalled at the factory in the OS-300 storage device in both partitions. The boot sector is then updated in such a way that at the next boot the backup partition becomes the current partition so that the new image is loaded as the current image.136.g.0 Chapter 17: Firmware Upload/Download General This chapter provides general information on the OS-300 image (operative firmware) and how to upload or download an OS-300 image. or − Visit our MRV Web site at http://www.mrv.mrv.com. For the latest image. The image should be uploaded as new versions are released. − E-mail us at InternationalSupport@mrv. Upload the new image to the OS-300 using the command: tftpget server-ip filename where.241 OS304-1-0-4.

Ensure that the IP interface is enabled. filename: Name of file for storing the runtime or backup image. 3.com 107 . Rev. Save the run-time image or backup image by invoking the command: tftpput image|backup server-ip filename where. 01 Firmware Upload/Download Chapter 17: Downloading a New or Backup Image To download/save a new image: 1. Enable TFTP by invoking the command: TFTP enable 4. server-ip: IP address of the TFTP server.mrv.ML49480. image|backup: Runtime or backup image. Enter the IP group. February 2007 URL: http://www. 2.

To copy the configuration file to a TFTP Server configuration file: 1.59 conf..136. Enable TFTP mode by invoking the command: tftp enable 4. You can then: • Save it as a backup for the configuration. Enter IP group.e. 3.com 108 . Default gateway) nor DHCP parameters of the OS-300. Ensure that the IP interface is enabled. server-ip: TFTP server IP address. • Send a copy of the configuration file to the MRV Technical Support Department for troubleshooting. Download the file by invoking the command: tftpput config server-ip filename where. 2. A downloaded configuration file will neither contain IP parameters (i. This chapter describes how to copy (upload or download) an OS-300 configuration file in one of the following ways: − Download (copy configuration file from the OS-300 to a TFTP Server) − Upload (copy configuration file from a TFTP Server to the OS300) Download The configuration file in the OS-300 can be downloaded to a TFTP server on your network. filename: Name to be given to the configuration file.dat TFTP transfer starting IP> February 2007 URL: http://www. Example IP> tftp enable IP> tftpput config 194. • Upload a copy of the file to the same OS-300 or to other OS300s. This allows a configuration file to be uploaded to any OS-300.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. the OS-300’s IP address.mrv.90.0 Chapter 18: Configuration Files Upload/Download General A configuration file consists of set of values to every one of the OS-300 parameters. Subnet mask.

File transfer completed *** Activating new configuration… IP> February 2007 URL: http://www.. Enter IP group. 01 Configuration Files Upload/Download Chapter 18: Upload To copy a configuration file from a TFTP server to the OS-300: 1. filename: Name to be given to the configuration file.59 conf. 2.com 109 . Invoke the command: tftpget server-ip filename where. server-ip: TFTP server IP address.ML49480. At the end of the upload process the copied configuration is activated automatically.mrv.dat TFTP transfer starting . Example IP> tftpget 194.90.136. Rev.

[<ipmask>]: Subnet mask.0 Chapter 19: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) General DHCP is an IP protocol that enables management of a network by automatically giving each host an IP address for a specific duration of time. Usage To enable DHCP operation: 1. Invoke the command: Setup [<ipaddress> [<ipmask> [<ipgateway>]]] [<vid>] where. The device that leases these IP addresses is called a DHCP server.mrv. When DHCP server mode is enabled. Using DHCP. To set the IP interface for operating with DHCP: 1. February 2007 URL: http://www. Default: 0. [<ipgateway>]: Default gateway. [<vid>]: Interface VLAN ID. Default: Show IP configuration. The lease time determines how long an IP address remains valid for a host in the network. the OS-300 sends DHCP requests directly to a DHCP server. called ‘lease time’. 2.0.0. Invoke the command: Dhcp enable When utilizing DHCP protocol.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. Enter IP group. the default being one day. Default: Subnet mask for address class. you must set the IP address and subnet of the OS-300. Range: 1-4094. network clients can be supplied dynamically with leased IP addresses for various lease times.0. Default: 1.com 110 . [<ipaddress>]: IP address. Enter IP group. 2.

Invoke the command: telnet IP-ADDRESS where. a list of command groups will be shown. Purpose TELNET is used to connect a host (client) to the OS-300 (server) on a network for management access. The help depends on the context:\r\n\ .At top level.mrv. If it finds the MAC address. it adjusts the packet to the right length and format and sends it to the host. e.g. PC: telnet 192. the OS-300 uses the ARP program to search for the MAC address that matches the IP address.ML49480. 01 Utilities Appendix A: Appendix A: Utilities General This chapter describes and shows how to use the various network utilities of the OS-300. PC). Example The example below shows how to invoke a TELNET connection. February 2007 URL: http://www. a list of the command syntaxes will be shown. Usage To make a TELNET connection: 1.At group level. Rev. > Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) General Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is a protocol for mapping an IP address (32-bit) to the MAC address (48-bit) of a host.23.158 44 Password: ***** Press ? or help to get help. TELNET Definition TELNET is a TCP/IP protocol terminal emulation software program that is run on a host (e. Run a TELNET client software on the station. IP-ADDRESS: IP address of the remote OS-300.g. PC..\r\n\ . the syntax and a description of the\r\n\ command will be shown.If given after a command.com 111 . 2. Principle of Operation When an incoming packet destined for a host arrives at the OS-300..\r\n\ . An ARP table maintains current maps of MAC addresses to IP addresses. In response. TELNET prompts you to enter the password before permitting access.76.

Viewing the ARP Table To view the ARP Table: 1.0 If it does not find the IP address.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. ARP broadcasts a request packet in a special format to all the hosts on the LAN to try to find a host with the specific IP address. Default: 1.90.136. Enter IP group. The OS-300 then updates its ARP table accordingly and sends the packet to the host with this MAC address.90. Enter IP group.mrv. Determine the Round-Trip-Time (RTT) in communication with a target device. Purpose • • • Check connectivity between the OS-300 an another device.com February 2007 . <ipaddress>: IP address of OS-300. Determine whether a target(destination) device is active. If a host machine recognizes the IP address as its own.136.59 00-00-1f-2e-33-44 Ports 1 PING Definition PING is an ICMP application protocol for monitoring network performance. it responds positively.62 Request timed out Request timed out IP> 112 URL: http://www. Usage To PING an OS-300: 1. Invoke the command: arp The examples below shows how to display the ARP Table. Invoke the command: Ping [-n <count>] [-w <timeout>] <ipaddress> where. resources and applications. Default: 2. 2. Example IP> arp IP-Address MAC-address 194. The PING command sends ICMP ECHO requests and interprets the ICMP ECHO replies. [-n <count>]: Number of ICMP echo requests to send. 2. [-w <timeout>]: Timeout in seconds to wait for each reply. Example IP>ping -n 2 -w 5 194. Example The example below shows how to perform PING in order to check for TELNET connectivity.

Tools and Equipment Following are tools and equipment required for cleaning connectors. cover it with a dust cap. 2. • Isopropyl alcohol Solvent for contaminants. in small circular motions. the exposed fiber surface and surrounding area in the connector to remove the stains. attenuate the signal through the fiber. Procedure The procedure for cleaning connectors is as follows: 1. etc.mrv. gently rub. Rev. avoid pressing it against the fiber ferula surface in the connector so as to prevent contamination.) at the interface of two optical fibers. such as at a pair of coupled connectors. A cap is usually made from flexible plastic.g. the exposed fiber surface and surrounding area in the connector to remove dust. in small circular motions. optical connectors must be clean before they are coupled with other connectors. in small circular motions. If no stains are present. • Tissues Soft multi-layered fabric made from non-recycled cellulose. dust. moisten a new clean dry tissue with isopropyl alcohol and gently rub. 4. 3. using a new clean dry tissue. When placing a cap over a connector.. February 2007 URL: http://www. grease. 01 Cleaning Optical Connectors Appendix B: Appendix B: Cleaning Optical Connectors General Intrusions (e. Using a new clean dry tissue. If stains are present. the exposed fiber surface and surrounding area in the connector to remove the dissolved stains and excess isopropyl alcohol.com 113 . Consequently. • Dust caps Caps for protecting the connector from intrusions. gently rub.ML49480. If a connector is not to be coupled with another immediately.

850 nm.g. with Digital Diagnostics.g. 0-2 km. SFP 1000Base-LX. 1550 nm. SFP 1000Base-ZX. ‘57’ is 1570 nm. cable media type (e. with Digital Diagnostics. SFP 1000Base-ZX. Extended MM. This endows the OS300 with flexible connectivity and minimizes cost of investment on upgrades and deviations since to change any one or more of the interface attributes.g. Description XX represents the two middle digits of the wavelength. ‘59’ is 1590 nm. 10 km. 10 km. 1310 nm. only the SFP needs to be replaced and not the entire OS-300. 0-550 m. 1310 nm or 1550 nm). fiber type (e. 80 km. ‘61’ is 1610 nm... MultiMode or SingleMode).. SFP 1000Base-XD.. SM. MM. 120 km. February 2007 URL: http://www. 1310 nm. 1310 nm. Ordering Code Gigabit Ethernet SFP-G-SX SFP-G-MMX SFP-G-LX SFP-GD-LX SFP-GD-ELX SFP-GD-XD SFP-GD-ZX SFP-GD-EZX CWDM Gigabit Ethernet SFP-GCWXD-XX SFP-GDCWXD-XX SFP-GDCWZX-XX SFP-GDCWEZX-XX SFP 1000Base-XD. An additional useful quality of SFPs is that they are pluggable and hot-swappable. e. SFP 1000Base-XD. carrier wavelength (e.g. SM CWDM (XX = Wavelength in the range 1470 to 1610 nm). with Digital Diagnostics. CWDM. and operating range to tailor suit the application and terminal equipment. with Digital Diagnostics. ‘51’ is 1510 nm.com 114 .. 80 km. with Digital Diagnostics. with Digital Diagnostics. SM CWDM (XX = Wavelength in the range 14710 to 1610 nm) 120 km with Digital Diagnostics. 1310 nm.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. ‘55’ is 1550 nm. SFP 1000Base-SX. fiber or copper). SM. SM. SM. SFP 1000Base-EZX. SFP 1000Base-LX. ‘53’ is 1530 nm. SFP 1000Base-EZX. SM CWDM (XX = Wavelength in the range 1470 to 1610 nm). 50 km. 50 km.g.mrv.0 Appendix C: Small Form-factor Pluggables (SFPs) The SFP transceiver option offers a very wide selection of interfaces in respect of protocol (e. SM 1550 nm. 1550 nm. SM CWDM (XX = Wavelength in the range 1470 to 1610 nm). ‘49’ is 1490 nm. SFP 1000Base-ELX. 10/100/1000Base-T or 1000Base-X). 50 km. 25 km. CWDM with Digital Diagnostics. ‘47’ is 1470 nm. SM. SFP 1000Base-SX.

ML49480, Rev. 01 Cable Wiring

Appendix D:

Appendix D:

Cable Wiring
RJ45 Connector Signal TxD 3 Pin DB-9 Connector Pin 2 Signal RxD

Gnd

4, 5

5

Gnd

RxD

6

3

TxD

Figure 25: Null-Modem RS-232 Cable Wiring

Figure 26: Ethernet Straight Cable Wiring

Figure 27: Ethernet Cross Cable Wiring

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OS-300 User Manual

Product Version 1.0

Appendix E:

Troubleshooting
The troubleshooting procedure given here is for the operative level and is detailed in Table 9, below. Read the entries in the column Problem until you reach the problem that applies to the OS-300. Then perform the corrective action(s) appearing in the same row. If the problem persists, note the status of all the LEDs and consult your MRV representative. Table 9: Startup and Operation Troubleshooting Row 1 Problem LED PWR OFF Probable Cause No power at the entrance to the OS300 system from a Power Supply. Corrective Action
1. Ensure that the power cord is securely connected to the power source output and to the Power Supply in the OS-300. Ensure that power is present at the power source output. Ensure that the power cord of Power Supply is not damaged. Verify that the cable connecting the OS-300 port to the network is securely connected at both ends and is undamaged. Enter Port mode and enable the port(s) using the following CLI command:

2. 3.

2

L LED OFF

No Ethernet link integrity signal being received.

Electrical Port (10/100/1000Base-TX Port):
1.

2.

state portlist enable where, portlist List of ports
3. If the port is connected to a DTE (e.g., PC, workstation, etc.), make sure the DTE is powered on and the NIC is OK. (The NIC can be checked by running a diagnostic test with the software supplied by the NIC vendor.) Temporarily attach the cable to another OS-300 port to determine whether the port is faulty.

4.

Fiberoptic Port (100/1000Base-FX Port: 1. For each cable fiber, ensure TX "! RX interconnection. 2. Verify that the cable connecting the OS-300 port to the network is securely connected at both ends and is undamaged. 3. Enter Port mode and enable the port(s) using
the following CLI command:

4.

5.

6.

state portlist enable where, portlist is List of ports Clean the fiberoptic connectors of the cable and OS-300 port as described in Appendix B: Cleaning Optical Connectors, page 113. Ensure that the cable type (singlemode or multimode) is right and the attenuation and length are such that the power budget is not exceeded. Temporarily attach the cable to another

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ML49480, Rev. 01 Troubleshooting Row Problem Probable Cause

Appendix E:

3

A LED OFF

DTE(s) not transmitting to/via port. Access is password restricted.

1. 2.

Corrective Action OS-300 port to determine whether the port is faulty. Ensure that L LED is on, possibly by performing the actions described in row 2. Make sure the DTE(s) are powered on.
Ensure connectivity between the OS-300 and management station. (Connectivity can be verified using the PING utility as described in the section PING, page 112.) Verify correctness of user name and password, including case of letters.

4

No manageme nt access

1.

2.

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Dedicated queues) Rate limit protection for Unicast/Multicast/Broadcast/TCP-SYN packets DHCP option 82 IEEE 802. transparent. DiffServ (IPv4 & IPv6 TC) 4 hardware queues per port & configurable adaptive buffer Layer 2 Tunneling Q-in-Q (Mapped mode or translation) IP Services PING. wire-speed on all ports Automatically managed 8K Up to 9600 bytes 220.1ad provider bridges: Media Cross Connect™ Service Protection 9 4K VLANs support.com 118 .3ad Link Aggregation Traffic Management Services (MEF Compliant) Inbound & Outbound traffic Classification CoS Per flow management By physical port.mrv.1Q and IEEE802.1x Management & Diagnostics Tools 9 An MRV patch-panel function technology February 2007 URL: http://www.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1. IEEE 802.733 hr @ 25 °C (77 °F) Switching Services IEEE 802. TFTP DHCP Server/Client Security CPU DoS protection (Frame rate control.1p VPT. 64 VLANs saved Q-in-Q stacking Software-controlled.0 Appendix F: Product Specification Operation Performance Packet Buffers MAC Addresses Supported (max) Jumbo Frame Lengths Supported (max) MTBF Non-blocking. no MAC address learning Automatic Optical switching on network interfaces (1+1) IEEE802.

Ports 10/100/1000Base-T: Interface Purpose Fixed Connection to Ethernet/Fast Ethernet/Gigabit Ethernet DTE or DCE Number OS-304 OS-306 Connector: 2 4 February 2007 URL: http://www.Optical signal level monitoring (SFP SFF-8472) Copper TDR on RJ45 ports Remote failure notification / reflection .3ah) Physical layer OAM .ML49480. SNMPv2.Cable Diagnostics . 50-60 Hz -36 to -72 Vdc 20 W or 68 Btu/hr Appendix F: 1 ac or dc power supply As specified in the section Power Cord. 01 Product Specification Industry Standard CLI Out-of-band Ethernet management – EIA-232 console Telnet.1x RADIUS authentication for user’s ports Configuration load/save via TFTP Events log OAM Service Assurance Tools Enhanced performance monitoring and SLA management Local and Remote hardware-based loop back functionality Link OAM (Auto-discovery compliant to IEEE802. RMON (4 groups) Port mirroring .ingress & egress traffic to analyzer port Ping Optional SNMP/CLI block IEEE802. Rev. page 19.mrv.Link Integrity Notification (LIN) Dying Gasp Power Power Supply Cord Input: AC DC Consumption (max): 90 to 240 Vac.com 119 .

g.. A – Link Activity Environmental 120 URL: http://www. 8-pin. 4!Gnd. male. VT100) connection 1 RJ45. male. LC (usually) Per the SFP Per the SFP Per the SFP Dual.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.. female.0 Type Pinout RJ45. female.com February 2007 . LC (usually) Craft terminal (ASCII. STAT – System Status L – Link integrity. each port can be connected to an Ethernet MDI or MDIX port with a straight or cross-over cable since the port automatically configures itself to suit the cable type and co-port interface. Cabling: Length (max) Type Connector 10/100/1000Base-FX: Interface Purpose Hot-swappable SFP Connection to uplink Fast Ethernet/Gigabit Ethernet DTE or DCE 2 100 m (~ 330 ft) Category 5 RJ45 male 8-pin shielded Number (max) Connector: Type Pinout Cabling: Length (max) Type Connector Management Console (Serial over RS232) – CONSOLE EIA-232: Purpose Number Connector: Type Pinout Cabling: Length Connector Dual. 2. 6!RxD (Pins 1. 7. and 8 not used) 15 m (~ 50 ft) RJ45. e. i. female. 8-pin 3!TxD.mrv. 8-pin LEDs Global Status Port Status PWR – System power. 5!Gnd.e. shielded Auto-MDI/MDIX.

2 mm) rack per the ETS 300-119 standard. corrosion. or 19-inch (482. CSA 22. etc.g. UV radiation. wall. Weight (max): Mounting Management Web-Based SNMP Using MegaVision ® management application or MIB Browser Using MegaVision ® management application or any other SNMP manager Using a TELNET station Using craft terminal (e. 950..ML49480.45 x 1U x 9.).6 mm) or 23-inch (584.65 x 240 mm 3 3 [8.mrv.. humidity. No clearances required between units. FCC Part 15. Two units per rack shelf.g. ETSI. NEBS. 73/23/EEC. CE-89/336/EEC. OS-300s can be housed in MRV’s weather-proof Outdoor Cabinets.6 x 43. VT100 Terminal or PC with ASCII terminal/emulator software) DHCP TELNET Serial/RS-232 IP Address Management Accessories Rack-Mount Two brackets for mounting in a 19-inch or 23-inch rack Compliance Safety Designed to comply with UL 1950. 10 February 2007 URL: http://www.000 particles/ft3) Physical Dimensions (W x H x D): 214. Class B.6 kg (~ 1. 01 Product Specification Temperature : Operating Storage Humidity (non-condensing) Dust 0 to 45 °C (32 to 113 °F) -25 to +70 °C (-13 to 158 °F) 10 to 95% 10 Appendix F: Less than 106 particles/m3 (~ 30.45 in ] 0. Rev.com 121 . rain. dust.3 lb) Desktop. RoHS 2002/95/EC and 2002/96/EC Operation IETF UDP – RFC 768 TFTP – RFC 783 IP – RFC 791 ICMP – RFC 792 TCP – RFC 793 ARP – RFC 826 Multi-session TELNET – RFC 854 Transmission of IP Datagrams over Ethernet Networks – RFC 894 Host Requirements – RFC 1122 Structure and Identification of Management Information for TCP/IP-based Internets – RFC 1155 In even more extreme weather conditions (e.2 No.

694.3u Fast Ethernet IEEE 802.0 SNMP v1 – RFC 1157 Concise MIB Definitions – RFC 1212 MIB II – RFC 1213 Trap Convention – RFC 1215 Etherlike MIB – RFC 1284 The MD5 Message-digest Algorithm – RFC 1321 Ethernet MIB – RFC 1643 per-port RMON IEEE 802. and Event (Group 9) – RFC 1757 Structure of Management Information for SNMPv2 – RFC 1902 SNMPv2 – RFC 1907 Network Ingress Filtering – RFC 2267 A Provider architecture for DiffServ and TE – RFC 2430 DiffServ of DS field in IPv4 & IPv6 headers – RFC 2475 Assured Forwarding DiffServ PHB Group – RFC 2597 Expedited Forwarding DiffServ PHB Group – RFC 2598 Definitions of Managed Objects for the Ethernet-like Interface Types – RFC 2665 ITU ITU-T Y. Alarm (Group 3).3ah Ethernet in the First Mile IEEE 802. History (Group 2).1D Bridging and Spanning Tree IEEE 802.1x Port-based Network Access Control IEEE 802.1307.1 – Ethernet Private Line Service ITU-T WDM grid – Optical Service ITU-T grid (G.com February 2007 .3ab Gigabit Ethernet Copper IEEE 802.OS-300 User Manual Product Version 1.1Q VLAN Tagging IEEE 802.1p Layer 2 priority QoS Support IEEE 802.2) – Wavelengths with 20 nm spacing for CWDM ITU-T grid (G.mrv.3ad Link Aggregation IEEE 802.3z Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-SX/LX) IEEE 802.1ad Provider bridges (partial draft) – Q-in-Q stacking per VLAN/port IEEE 122 URL: http://www.1: Ethernet statistics (Group 1).694.1) – Wavelengths with 100 GHz or 200 GHz spacing for DWDM IEEE 802.3 Ethernet IEEE 802.